Sample records for mice demonstrate features

  1. Nuclear Mice Demonstration: The Principles of Chain Reactions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Materials Science and Technology Teacher's Workshop (MAST) provides this activity to illustrate the principles of chain reactions. The demonstration uses ping pong balls and mouse traps to show the chain reaction process involved in fission. Each mouse trap is placed into a large container and given a ping pong ball placed on the trigger. Another ping pong ball is introduced into the system, demonstrating the activation energy.The lesson includes step by step directions for the experiment. Discussion questions, teacher notes and a video clip are also included.

  2. Oxytocin knockout mice demonstrate enhanced intake of sweet and nonsweet carbohydrate solutions.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Rinaman, Linda; Vollmer, Regis R; Amico, Janet A

    2007-05-01

    Oxytocin knockout (OT KO) mice display enhanced intake of nutritive and nonnutritive sweet solutions (i.e., sucrose and saccharin) compared with wild-type (WT) mice of the same C57BL/6 background strain. The present study further investigated the differential behavioral response of OT KO and WT mice to sucrose solutions and also examined intake preferences of OT KO and WT mice for palatable but nonsweet isocaloric solutions of carbohydrate and fat. A progressive ratio operant licking procedure demonstrated that OT KO and WT mice display a similar motivational drive to consume 10% sucrose. A series of two-bottle intake tests revealed that OT KO mice consume significantly larger amounts of both sweet and nonsweet carbohydrate solutions (i.e., sucrose, Polycose, and cornstarch) compared with WT cohorts. Intake pattern analyses revealed that OT KO mice overconsume carbohydrate solutions by initiating more drinking bouts compared with WT mice; bout sizes did not differ between the genotypes. In contrast, OT KO and WT mice did not differ in their intake of Intralipid, a palatable soybean oil emulsion. These findings indicate that the absence of OT in mice does not affect their appetitive drive to consume palatable sucrose solutions. Instead, the absence of OT may increase daily intake of palatable sweet and nonsweet solutions of carbohydrate (but not fat) by selectively blunting or masking processes that contribute to postingestive satiety. PMID:17272659

  3. ATF4 activity: a common feature shared by many kinds of slow-aging mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiquan; Li, Xinna; Miller, Richard A

    2014-12-01

    ATF4, a DNA-binding factor that modulates responses to amino acid availability and ribosomal function, has been shown to be altered in both liver and fibroblasts from two strains of long-lived mice, i.e. Snell dwarf and PAPP-A knockout mice. New data now show elevated ATF4 levels, and elevation of ATF4-dependent proteins and mRNAs, in liver of mice treated with acarbose or rapamycin, calorically restricted mice, methionine-restricted mice, and mice subjected to litter crowding. Elevation of ATF4, at least in liver, thus seems to be a shared feature of diets, drugs, genes, and developmental alterations that extend maximum lifespan in mice. PMID:25156122

  4. ATF4 activity: a common feature shared by many kinds of slow-aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiquan; Li, Xinna; Miller, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    ATF4, a DNA-binding factor that modulates responses to amino acid availability and ribosomal function, has been shown to be altered in both liver and fibroblasts from two strains of long-lived mice, i.e. Snell dwarf and PAPP-A knockout mice. New data now show elevated ATF4 levels, and elevation of ATF4-dependent proteins and mRNAs, in liver of mice treated with acarbose or rapamycin, calorically restricted mice, methionine-restricted mice, and mice subjected to litter crowding. Elevation of ATF4, at least in liver, thus seems to be a shared feature of diets, drugs, genes, and developmental alterations that extend maximum lifespan in mice. PMID:25156122

  5. Autism-associated gene Dlgap2 mutant mice demonstrate exacerbated aggressive behaviors and orbitofrontal cortex deficits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As elegant structures designed for neural communication, synapses are the building bricks of our mental functions. Recently, many studies have pointed out that synaptic protein-associated mutations may lead to dysfunctions of social cognition. Dlgap2, which encodes one of the main components of scaffold proteins in postsynaptic density (PSD), has been addressed as a candidate gene in autism spectrum disorders. To elucidate the disturbance of synaptic balance arising from Dlgap2 loss-of-function in vivo, we thus generated Dlgap2 ?/? mice to investigate their phenotypes of synaptic function and social behaviors. Methods The creation of Dlgap2 ?/? mice was facilitated by the recombineering-based method, Cre-loxP system and serial backcross. Reversal learning in a water T-maze was used to determine repetitive behaviors. The three-chamber approach task, resident–intruder test and tube task were performed to characterize the social behaviors of mutant mice. Cortical synaptosomal fraction, Golgi-Cox staining, whole-cell patch electrophysiology and transmission electron microscopy were all applied to investigate the function and structure of synapses in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) of Dlgap2 ?/? mice. Results Dlgap2 ?/? mice displayed exacerbated aggressive behaviors in the resident–intruder task, and elevated social dominance in the tube test. In addition, Dlgap2 ?/? mice exhibited a clear reduction of receptors and scaffold proteins in cortical synapses. Dlgap2 ?/? mice also demonstrated lower spine density, decreased peak amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic current and ultra-structural deficits of PSD in the OFC. Conclusions Our findings clearly demonstrate that Dlgap2 plays a vital role in social behaviors and proper synaptic functions of the OFC. Moreover, these results may provide valuable insights into the neuropathology of autism. PMID:25071926

  6. In vitro and in vivo demonstration of risperidone implants in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, C.; Liang, Y.; Ehrlichman, R.S.; Budhian, A.; Metzger, K. L.; Majewski-Tiedeken, C.; Winey, K. I.; Siegel, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Nonadherence with medication is a critical limitation in current long-term treatment of schizophrenia and a primary factor in poor quality-of-life outcomes. However, few treatments have addressed this shortcoming using an implantable drug delivery approach. The goal of this study was to provide in vitro and in vivo proof of concept for a long-term implantable risperidone delivery system in mice. Methods Implantable formulations of risperidone were created using the biodegradable polymer Poly Lactic co Glycolic Acid (PLGA) combined with various drug loads. Implant bioactivity was tested using in vitro release and stability studies, as well as in vivo pharmacokinetic and behavioral studies in mice. Results The pattern of risperidone release is influenced by various parameters, including polymer composition and drug load. In vitro measures demonstrate that risperidone is stable in implants under physiological conditions. Behavioral measures demonstrate the bioactivity of risperidone implants delivering 3mg/kg/day in mice, while pharmacokinetic analyses indicate that reversibility is maintained throughout the delivery interval. Conclusions The current report suggests that implantable formulations are a viable approach to providing long-term delivery of antipsychotic medications based on in vivo animal studies and pharmacokinetics. Implantable medications demonstrated here can last two months or longer while maintaining coherence and removability past full release, suggesting a potential paradigm shift in the long-term treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:17765477

  7. Aromatase Deficient Female Mice Demonstrate Altered Expression of Molecules Critical for Renal Calcium Reabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öz, Orhan K.; Hajibeigi, Asghar; Cummins, Carolyn; van Abel, Monique; Bindels, René J.; Kuro-o, Makoto; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2007-04-01

    The incidence of kidney stones increases in women after the menopause, suggesting a role for estrogen deficiency. In order to determine if estrogen may be exerting an effect on renal calcium reabsorption, we measured urinary calcium excretion in the aromatase-deficient female mouse (ArKO) before and following estrogen therapy. ArKO mice had hypercalciuria that corrected during estrogen administration. To evaluate the mechanism by which estrogen deficiency leads to hypercalciuria, we examined the expression of several proteins involved in distal tubule renal calcium reabsorption, both at the message and protein levels. Messenger RNA levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, calbindin-D28K, the Na+/Ca++ exchanger (NCX1), and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA1b) were significantly decreased in kidneys of ArKO mice. On the other hand, klotho mRNA levels were elevated in kidneys of ArKO mice. ArKO renal protein extracts had lower levels of calbindin-D28K but higher levels of the klotho protein. Immunochemistry demonstrated increased klotho expression in ArKO kidneys. Estradiol therapy normalized the expression of TRPV5, calbindin-D28K, PMCA1b and klotho. Taken together, these results demonstrate that estrogen deficiency produced by aromatase inactivation is sufficient to produce a renal leak of calcium and consequent hypercalciuria. This may represent one mechanism leading to the increased incidence of kidney stones following the menopause in women.

  8. Demonstration of Nondeclarative Sequence Learning in Mice: Development of an Animal Analog of the Human Serial Reaction Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Michael A.; Hersch, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate nondeclarative sequence learning in mice using an animal analog of the human serial reaction time task (SRT) that uses a within-group comparison of behavior in response to a repeating sequence versus a random sequence. Ten female B6CBA mice performed eleven 96-trial sessions containing 24 repetitions of a 4-trial…

  9. TRPV1 inhibition attenuates IL-13 mediated asthma features in mice by reducing airway epithelial injury.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Rakhshinda; Bhat, Younus Ahmad; Panda, Lipsa; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan

    2013-03-01

    Even though neurogenic axis is well known in asthma pathogenesis much attention had not been given on this aspect. Recent studies have reported the importance of TRP channels, calcium-permeable ion channels and key molecules in neurogenic axis, in asthma therapeutics. The role of TRPV1 channels has been underestimated in chronic respiratory diseases as TRPV1 knockout mice of C57BL/6 strains did not attenuate the features of these diseases. However, this could be due to strain differences in the distribution of airway capsaicin receptors. Here, we show that TRPV1 inhibition attenuates IL-13 induced asthma features by reducing airway epithelial injury in BALB/c mice. We found that IL-13 increased not only the lung TRPV1 levels but also TRPV1 expression in bronchial epithelia in BALB/c rather than in C57BL/6 mice. TRPV1 knockdown attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia and subepithelial fibrosis induced by IL-13 in BALB/c mice. Further, TRPV1 siRNA treatment reduced not only the cytosolic calpain and mitochondrial calpain 10 activities in the lung but also bronchial epithelial apoptosis indicating that TRPV1 siRNA might have corrected the intracellular and intramitochondrial calcium overload and its consequent apoptosis. Knockdown of IL-13 in allergen induced asthmatic mice reduced TRPV1, cytochrome c, and activities of calpain and caspase 3 in lung cytosol. Thus, these findings suggest that induction of TRPV1 with IL-13 in bronchial epithelia could lead to epithelial injury in in vivo condition. Since TRPV1 expression is correlated with human asthma severity, TRPV1 inhibition could be beneficial in attenuating airway epithelial injury and asthma features. PMID:23453702

  10. Premature Skin Aging Features Rescued by Inhibition of NADPH Oxidase Activity in XPC-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohsen; Mahfouf, Walid; Serrano-Sanchez, Martin; Raad, Houssam; Harfouche, Ghida; Bonneu, Marc; Claverol, Stephane; Mazurier, Frederic; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Taieb, Alain; Rezvani, Hamid Reza

    2015-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type C (XP-C) is characterized mostly by a predisposition to skin cancers and accelerated photoaging, but little is known about premature skin aging in this disease. By comparing young and old mice, we found that the level of progerin and p16(INK4a) expression, ?-galactosidase activity, and reactive oxygen species, which increase with age, were higher in young Xpc(-/-) mice than in young Xpc(+/+) ones. The expression level of mitochondrial complexes and mitochondrial functions in the skin of young Xpc(-/-) was as low as in control aged Xpc(+/+)animals. Furthermore, the metabolic profile in young Xpc(-/-) mice resembled that found in aged Xpc(+/+) mice. Furthermore, premature skin aging features in young Xpc(-/-) mice were mostly rescued by inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 (NOX1) activity by using a NOX1 peptide inhibitor, suggesting that the continuous oxidative stress due to overactivation of NOX1 has a causative role in the underlying pathophysiology. PMID:25437426

  11. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1)-deficient mice demonstrate abnormal antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Helen E; Willimott, Shaun; Beswick, Richard W; Dantzer, Françoise; de Murcia, Josiane Ménissier; Yelamos, José; Wagner, Simon D

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosylation) of acceptor proteins is an epigenetic modification involved in DNA strand break repair, recombination and transcription. Here we provide evidence for the involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1) in antibody responses. Parp-1?/? mice had increased numbers of T cells and normal numbers of total B cells. Marginal zone B cells were mildly reduced in number, and numbers of follicular B cells were preserved. There were abnormal levels of basal immunoglobulins, with reduced levels of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) and increased levels of IgA and IgG2b. Analysis of specific antibody responses showed that T cell-independent responses were normal but T cell-dependent responses were markedly reduced. Germinal centres were normal in size and number. In vitro purified B cells from Parp-1?/? mice proliferated normally and showed normal IgM secretion, decreased switching to IgG2a but increased IgA secretion. Collectively our results demonstrate that Parp-1 has essential roles in normal T cell-dependent antibody responses and the regulation of isotype expression. We speculate that Parp-1 forms a component of the protein complex involved in resolving the DNA double-strand breaks that occur during class switch recombination. PMID:18778284

  12. Ovariectomy and 17?-estradiol Replacement in Rats and Mice: A Visual Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Ström, Jakob O.; Theodorsson, Annette; Ingberg, Edvin; Isaksson, Ida-Maria; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens are a family of female sexual hormones with an exceptionally wide spectrum of effects. When rats and mice are used in estrogen research they are commonly ovariectomized in order to ablate the rapidly cycling hormone production, replacing the 17?-estradiol exogenously. There is, however, lack of consensus regarding how the hormone should be administered to obtain physiological serum concentrations. This is crucial since the 17?-estradiol level/administration method profoundly influences the experimental results1-3. We have in a series of studies characterized the different modes of 17?-estradiol administration, finding that subcutaneous silastic capsules and per-oral nut-cream Nutella are superior to commercially available slow-release pellets (produced by the company Innovative Research of America) and daily injections in terms of producing physiological serum concentrations of 17?-estradiol4-6. Amongst the advantages of the nut-cream method, that previously has been used for buprenorphine administration7, is that when used for estrogen administration it resembles peroral hormone replacement therapy and is non-invasive. The subcutaneous silastic capsules are convenient and produce the most stable serum concentrations. This video article contains step-by-step demonstrations of ovariectomy and 17?-estradiol hormone replacement by silastic capsules and peroral Nutella in rats and mice, followed by a discussion of important aspects of the administration procedures. PMID:22710371

  13. Intact memory in TGF-?1 transgenic mice featuring chronic cerebrovascular deficit: recovery with pioglitazone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nektaria Nicolakakis; Tahar Aboulkassim; Antonio Aliaga; Xin-Kang Tong; Pedro Rosa-Neto; Edith Hamel

    2011-01-01

    The roles of chronic brain hypoperfusion and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-?1) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are unresolved. We investigated the interplay between TGF-?1, cerebrovascular function, and cognition using transgenic TGF mice featuring astrocytic TGF-?1 overexpression. We further assessed the impact of short, late therapy in elderly animals with the antioxidant N-acetyl--cysteine (NAC) or the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? agonist pioglitazone.

  14. Behavioral Phenotyping of Parkin-Deficient Mice: Looking for Early Preclinical Features of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rial, Daniel; Castro, Adalberto A.; Machado, Nuno; Garçăo, Pedro; Gonçalves, Francisco Q.; Silva, Henrique B.; Tomé, Ângelo R.; Köfalvi, Attila; Corti, Olga; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Prediger, Rui D.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable evidence showing that the neurodegenerative processes that lead to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) begin many years before the appearance of the characteristic motor symptoms. Neuropsychiatric, sensorial and cognitive deficits are recognized as early non-motor manifestations of PD, and are not attenuated by the current anti-parkinsonian therapy. Although loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene cause early-onset familial PD, Parkin-deficient mice do not display spontaneous degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway or enhanced vulnerability to dopaminergic neurotoxins such as 6-OHDA and MPTP. Here, we employed adult homozygous C57BL/6 mice with parkin gene deletion on exon 3 (parkin?/?) to further investigate the relevance of Parkin in the regulation of non-motor features, namely olfactory, emotional, cognitive and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Parkin?/? mice displayed normal performance on behavioral tests evaluating olfaction (olfactory discrimination), anxiety (elevated plus-maze), depressive-like behavior (forced swimming and tail suspension) and motor function (rotarod, grasping strength and pole). However, parkin?/? mice displayed a poor performance in the open field habituation, object location and modified Y-maze tasks suggestive of procedural and short-term spatial memory deficits. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). These findings indicate that the genetic deletion of parkin causes deficiencies in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, resulting in memory deficits with no major olfactory, emotional or motor impairments. Therefore, parkin?/? mice may represent a promising animal model to study the early stages of PD and for testing new therapeutic strategies to restore learning and memory and synaptic plasticity impairments in PD. PMID:25486126

  15. The SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin ameliorates early features of diabetic nephropathy in BTBR ob/ob type 2 diabetic mice with and without hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gembardt, Florian; Bartaun, Christoph; Jarzebska, Natalia; Mayoux, Eric; Todorov, Vladimir T; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in humans in the Western world. The recent development of Na+-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offers a new antidiabetic therapy via enhanced glucose excretion. Whether this strategy exerts beneficial effects on the development of type 2 diabetic nephropathy is still largely unclear. We investigated the effects of the specific SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin in BTBR.Cg-Lep/WiscJ (BTBR ob/ob) mice, which spontaneously develop type 2 diabetic nephropathy. In the first experiment, BTBR ob/ob mice received either a diet containing 300 ppm empagliflozin or equicaloric placebo chow for 12 wk. In the second experiment, BTBR ob/ob mice received 1 ?g·kg body wt(-1)·day(-1) ANG II to induce arterial hypertension and were separated into the same two diet groups for 6 wk. In both experiments, empagliflozin treatment enhanced glucosuria, thereby lowering blood glucose. Independently of hypertension, empagliflozin reduced albuminuria in diabetic mice. However, empagliflozin treatment affected diabetes-related glomerular hypertrophy, markers of renal inflammation, and mesangial matrix expansion only in BTBR ob/ob mice without hypertension. In summary, empagliflozin demonstrated significant antihyperglycemic effects, differentially ameliorating early features of diabetic nephropathy in BTBR ob/ob mice with and without hypertension. PMID:24944269

  16. Senescence induced by RECQL4 dysfunction contributes to Rothmund–Thomson syndrome features in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H; Fang, E F; Sykora, P; Kulikowicz, T; Zhang, Y; Becker, K G; Croteau, D L; Bohr, V A

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence refers to irreversible growth arrest of primary eukaryotic cells, a process thought to contribute to aging-related degeneration and disease. Deficiency of RecQ helicase RECQL4 leads to Rothmund–Thomson syndrome (RTS), and we have investigated whether senescence is involved using cellular approaches and a mouse model. We first systematically investigated whether depletion of RECQL4 and the other four human RecQ helicases, BLM, WRN, RECQL1 and RECQL5, impacts the proliferative potential of human primary fibroblasts. BLM-, WRN- and RECQL4-depleted cells display increased staining of senescence-associated ?-galactosidase (SA-?-gal), higher expression of p16INK4a or/and p21WAF1 and accumulated persistent DNA damage foci. These features were less frequent in RECQL1- and RECQL5-depleted cells. We have mapped the region in RECQL4 that prevents cellular senescence to its N-terminal region and helicase domain. We further investigated senescence features in an RTS mouse model, Recql4-deficient mice (Recql4HD). Tail fibroblasts from Recql4HD showed increased SA-?-gal staining and increased DNA damage foci. We also identified sparser tail hair and fewer blood cells in Recql4HD mice accompanied with increased senescence in tail hair follicles and in bone marrow cells. In conclusion, dysfunction of RECQL4 increases DNA damage and triggers premature senescence in both human and mouse cells, which may contribute to symptoms in RTS patients. PMID:24832598

  17. Cfh Genotype Interacts With Dietary Glycemic Index to Modulate Age-Related Macular Degeneration-Like Features in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Sheldon; Weikel, Karen; Chang, Min-Lee; Nagel, Barbara A.; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; Carey, Amanda; Grant, Maria B.; Fliesler, Steven J.; Smith, Donald; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Genetics and diet contribute to the relative risk for developing AMD, but their interactions are poorly understood. Genetic variations in Complement Factor H (CFH), and dietary glycemic index (GI) are major risk factors for AMD. We explored the effects of GI on development of early AMD-like features and changes to central nervous system (CNS) inflammation in Cfh-null mice. Methods. Aged 11-week-old wild type (WT) C57Bl/6J or Cfh-null mice were group pair-fed high or low GI diets for 33 weeks. At 10 months of age, mice were evaluated for early AMD-like features in the neural retina and RPE by light and electron microscopy. Brains were analyzed for Iba1 macrophage/microglia immunostaining, an indicator of inflammation. Results. The 10-month-old WT mice showed no retinal abnormalities on either diet. The Cfh-null mice, however, showed distinct early AMD-like features in the RPE when fed a low GI diet, including vacuolation, disruption of basal infoldings, and increased basal laminar deposits. The Cfh-null mice also showed thinning of the RPE, hypopigmentation, and increased numbers of Iba1-expressing macrophages in the brain, irrespective of diet. Conclusions. The presence of early AMD-like features by 10 months of age in Cfh-null mice fed a low GI diet is surprising, given the apparent protection from the development of such features in aged WT mice or humans consuming lower GI diets. Our findings highlight the need to consider gene–diet interactions when developing animal models and therapeutic approaches to treat AMD. PMID:24370827

  18. Functional MRI demonstrates pain perception in hand osteoarthritis has features of central pain processing

    PubMed Central

    Sofat, Nidhi; Smee, Cori; Hermansson, Monika; Howard, Matthew; Baker, Emma H; Howe, Franklyn A; Barrick, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Background Hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is typified by pain and reduced function. We hypothesised that people with HOA have enhanced sensitivity and activation of peripheral nociceptors in the hand, thereby potentiating chronic pain. In our study we aimed to assess if central sensitisation mediates pain perception in osteoarthritis of the hand. Methods Participants with proximal and distal interphalangeal joint (PIP/DIP) HOA and non-OA controls were recruited. Clinical pain scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded before and after performing a painful hand task. Central pain processing was evaluated with functional brain neuroimaging (fMRI) using a finger flexion-extension (FFE) task performed over 3 minutes. Data was analysed with FMRIB software (www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/fsl). Group mean activation of functional MRI signal between hand osteoarthritis and control non-arthritic participants was compared. Results Our group of hand OA participants reported high pain levels compared with non-arthritic controls as demonstrated by the mean VAS in hand OA participants of 59.31± 8.19 mm compared to 4.00 ± 1.89 mm in controls (p < 0.0001), despite all participants reporting analgesic use. Functional MRI analysis showed increased activation in the thalamus, cingulate, frontal and somatosensory cortex in the hand OA group but not in controls (thresholded at p < 0.05). Regions of activation were mapped to Brodmann areas 3, 4, 6, 9, 13, 22, 24 and 44. Activated regions found in our study are recognised higher brain pain processing centres implicated in central sensitisation. Conclusions People with hand osteoarthritis demonstrated features of central sensitisation that was evident after a finger flexion-extension task using functional MRI. Functional MRI is a useful biomarker in detecting pain in hand osteoarthritis and could be used in future hand osteoarthritis pain studies to evaluate pain modulation strategies. PMID:24294351

  19. The Community Features and Factors Influencing Surface Runoff of Restoration Vegetation in Xinfeng National Demonstration Zone, SE China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dai-hua Qi; Zhi-yong Xia; Lin Huang

    2010-01-01

    Xinfeng, is the typical region of the vegetation restoration of serious soil and water loss zone and a typical national demonstration zone for biological measures to control soil erosion in Jiangxi Province, SE China, in which the relationship between surface runoff and environmental factors, soil features and community features of restoration vegetation were analyzed using Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and

  20. Clinical Features: CDKL5 mutations have been demonstrated in a broad spectrum of phenotypes [1-5], including

    E-print Network

    Ober, Carole

    6/11 Clinical Features: CDKL5 mutations have been demonstrated in a broad spectrum of phenotypes [1 feature found in patients reported to date with CDKL5 mutations is the early onset of seizures. 13/14 patients studied had seizures before 3 months of age [1]. Inheritance: CDKL5 mutations are X

  1. Clinical Features: CDKL5 mutations have been demonstrated in a broad spectrum of phenotypes [1-5], including

    E-print Network

    Ober, Carole

    1/13 Clinical Features: CDKL5 mutations have been demonstrated in a broad spectrum of phenotypes [1 feature found in patients reported to date with CDKL5 mutations is the early onset of seizures. 13/14 patients studied had seizures before 3 months of age [1]. Inheritance: CDKL5 mutations are X

  2. Clinical Features: CDKL5 mutations have been demonstrated in a broad spectrum of phenotypes [1-5], including

    E-print Network

    Das, Soma

    3/10 Clinical Features: CDKL5 mutations have been demonstrated in a broad spectrum of phenotypes [1 feature found in patients reported to date with CDKL5 mutations is the early onset of seizures. 13/14 patients studied had seizures before 3 months of age [1]. Inheritance: CDKL5 mutations are X

  3. An endocrinology laboratory exercise demonstrating the effect of confinement stress on the immune system of mice

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jacqueline Brehe (Carroll College Biology)

    2008-03-04

    This article describes a simple laboratory exercise for examining the effect of stress on the immune system in mice. Mice are subjected to confinement stress for 1 h, after which a sample of blood is collected via the caudal vein. Blood samples are smeared onto microscope slides, air dried, and stained with Wright's Giemsa stain. When differential white blood cell counts are performed, there are noticeable differences between the neutrophil and lymphocyte counts of stressed versus control mice. The protocol is simple enough for students to perform, and the entire experiment can be completed within 3 h. Examples of ways in which the basic protocol can be modified to accommodate a shorter laboratory class are provided. This hands-on laboratory experiment provides students with experience using the scientific method to investigate the interaction between the endocrine and immune systems in response to stress.

  4. Glycine decarboxylase deficiency causes neural tube defects and features of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yun Jin; Leung, Kit-Yi; Savery, Dawn; Hutchin, Tim; Prunty, Helen; Heales, Simon; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2015-01-01

    Glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) acts in the glycine cleavage system to decarboxylate glycine and transfer a one-carbon unit into folate one-carbon metabolism. GLDC mutations cause a rare recessive disease non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH). Mutations have also been identified in patients with neural tube defects (NTDs); however, the relationship between NKH and NTDs is unclear. We show that reduced expression of Gldc in mice suppresses glycine cleavage system activity and causes two distinct disease phenotypes. Mutant embryos develop partially penetrant NTDs while surviving mice exhibit post-natal features of NKH including glycine accumulation, early lethality and hydrocephalus. In addition to elevated glycine, Gldc disruption also results in abnormal tissue folate profiles, with depletion of one-carbon-carrying folates, as well as growth retardation and reduced cellular proliferation. Formate treatment normalizes the folate profile, restores embryonic growth and prevents NTDs, suggesting that Gldc deficiency causes NTDs through limiting supply of one-carbon units from mitochondrial folate metabolism. PMID:25736695

  5. Glycine decarboxylase deficiency causes neural tube defects and features of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun Jin; Leung, Kit-Yi; Savery, Dawn; Hutchin, Tim; Prunty, Helen; Heales, Simon; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Brosnan, John T.; Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) acts in the glycine cleavage system to decarboxylate glycine and transfer a one-carbon unit into folate one-carbon metabolism. GLDC mutations cause a rare recessive disease non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH). Mutations have also been identified in patients with neural tube defects (NTDs), but the relationship between NKH and NTDs is unclear. We show that reduced expression of Gldc in mice suppresses glycine cleavage system activity and causes two distinct disease phenotypes. Mutant embryos develop partially penetrant NTDs while surviving mice exhibit post-natal features of NKH including glycine accumulation, early lethality and hydrocephalus. In addition to elevated glycine, Gldc disruption also results in abnormal tissue folate profiles, with depletion of one-carbon carrying folates, as well as growth retardation and reduced cellular proliferation. Formate treatment normalises the folate profile, restores embryonic growth and prevents NTDs, suggesting that Gldc deficiency causes NTDs through limiting supply of one-carbon units from mitochondrial folate metabolism. PMID:25736695

  6. Epidermal-Specific Defect of GPI Anchor in Pig-a Null Mice Results in Harlequin Ichthyosis-Like Features

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariko Hara-Chikuma; Junji Takeda; Masahito Tarutani; Yoshikazu Uchida; Walter M. Holleran; Yoko Endo; Peter M. Elias; Shintaro Inoue

    2004-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the epidermal-specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor-deficient mice, generated by Pig-a gene disruption (Pig-a null mice), exhibited wrinkled and dry skin with hyperkeratosis and abnormal differentiation, and they died within a few days after birth. Here, we investigated the basis for the early demise of these animals, and the potential role of epidermal structural and biochemical abnormalities. The rapid

  7. Knock-in reporter mice demonstrate that DNA repair by non-homologous end joining declines with age.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Amita; Mao, Zhiyong; Tian, Xiao; Spencer, Brianna; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2014-07-01

    Accumulation of genome rearrangements is a characteristic of aged tissues. Since genome rearrangements result from faulty repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), we hypothesized that DNA DSB repair becomes less efficient with age. The Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) pathway repairs a majority of DSBs in vertebrates. To examine age-associated changes in NHEJ, we have generated an R26NHEJ mouse model in which a GFP-based NHEJ reporter cassette is knocked-in to the ROSA26 locus. In this model, NHEJ repair of DSBs generated by the site-specific endonuclease, I-SceI, reconstitutes a functional GFP gene. In this system NHEJ efficiency can be compared across tissues of the same mouse and in mice of different age. Using R26NHEJ mice, we found that NHEJ efficiency was higher in the skin, lung, and kidney fibroblasts, and lower in the heart fibroblasts and brain astrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that NHEJ efficiency declined with age. In the 24-month old animals compared to the 5-month old animals, NHEJ efficiency declined 1.8 to 3.8-fold, depending on the tissue, with the strongest decline observed in the skin fibroblasts. The sequence analysis of 300 independent NHEJ repair events showed that, regardless of age, mice utilize microhomology sequences at a significantly higher frequency than expected by chance. Furthermore, the frequency of microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) events increased in the heart and lung fibroblasts of old mice, suggesting that NHEJ becomes more mutagenic with age. In summary, our study provides a versatile mouse model for the analysis of NHEJ in a wide range of tissues and demonstrates that DNA repair by NHEJ declines with age in mice, which could provide a mechanism for age-related genomic instability and increased cancer incidence with age. PMID:25033455

  8. Knock-In Reporter Mice Demonstrate that DNA Repair by Non-homologous End Joining Declines with Age

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Amita; Mao, Zhiyong; Tian, Xiao; Spencer, Brianna; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of genome rearrangements is a characteristic of aged tissues. Since genome rearrangements result from faulty repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), we hypothesized that DNA DSB repair becomes less efficient with age. The Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) pathway repairs a majority of DSBs in vertebrates. To examine age-associated changes in NHEJ, we have generated an R26NHEJ mouse model in which a GFP-based NHEJ reporter cassette is knocked-in to the ROSA26 locus. In this model, NHEJ repair of DSBs generated by the site-specific endonuclease, I-SceI, reconstitutes a functional GFP gene. In this system NHEJ efficiency can be compared across tissues of the same mouse and in mice of different age. Using R26NHEJ mice, we found that NHEJ efficiency was higher in the skin, lung, and kidney fibroblasts, and lower in the heart fibroblasts and brain astrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that NHEJ efficiency declined with age. In the 24-month old animals compared to the 5-month old animals, NHEJ efficiency declined 1.8 to 3.8-fold, depending on the tissue, with the strongest decline observed in the skin fibroblasts. The sequence analysis of 300 independent NHEJ repair events showed that, regardless of age, mice utilize microhomology sequences at a significantly higher frequency than expected by chance. Furthermore, the frequency of microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) events increased in the heart and lung fibroblasts of old mice, suggesting that NHEJ becomes more mutagenic with age. In summary, our study provides a versatile mouse model for the analysis of NHEJ in a wide range of tissues and demonstrates that DNA repair by NHEJ declines with age in mice, which could provide a mechanism for age-related genomic instability and increased cancer incidence with age. PMID:25033455

  9. Reduced TET2 function leads to T-cell lymphoma with follicular helper T-cell-like features in mice

    PubMed Central

    Muto, H; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Nagae, G; Shiozawa, Y; Miyake, Y; Yoshida, K; Enami, T; Kamada, Y; Kato, T; Uchida, K; Nanmoku, T; Obara, N; Suzukawa, K; Sanada, M; Nakamura, N; Aburatani, H; Ogawa, S; Chiba, S

    2014-01-01

    TET2 (Ten Eleven Translocation 2) is a dioxygenase that converts methylcytosine (mC) to hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC). TET2 loss-of-function mutations are highly frequent in subtypes of T-cell lymphoma that harbor follicular helper T (Tfh)-cell-like features, such as angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (30–83%) or peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (10–49%), as well as myeloid malignancies. Here, we show that middle-aged Tet2 knockdown (Tet2gt/gt) mice exhibit Tfh-like cell overproduction in the spleen compared with control mice. The Tet2 knockdown mice eventually develop T-cell lymphoma with Tfh-like features after a long latency (median 67 weeks). Transcriptome analysis revealed that these lymphoma cells had Tfh-like gene expression patterns when compared with splenic CD4-positive cells of wild-type mice. The lymphoma cells showed lower hmC densities around the transcription start site (TSS) and higher mC densities at the regions of the TSS, gene body and CpG islands. These epigenetic changes, seen in Tet2 insufficiency-triggered lymphoma, possibly contributed to predated outgrowth of Tfh-like cells and subsequent lymphomagenesis. The mouse model described here suggests that TET2 mutations play a major role in the development of T-cell lymphoma with Tfh-like features in humans. PMID:25501021

  10. Clinical Features: CDKL5 mutations have been demonstrated in a broad spectrum of phenotypes [1-5], including

    E-print Network

    Gilad, Yoav

    3/10 Clinical Features: CDKL5 mutations have been demonstrated in a broad spectrum of phenotypes [1 in patients reported to date with CDKL5 mutations is the early onset of seizures. 13/14 patients studied had seizures before 3 months of age [1]. Inheritance: CDKL5 mutations are X-linked and appear to be less common

  11. Unusual Features in an Adult Pancreatic Hemangioma: CT and MRI Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Hemangiomas in the pancreas are very rare and only a few cases in adulthood have been reported in the literature. We describe a case of pancreatic hemangiomas in an adult with unique imaging findings. A 23-year-old woman visited the hospital for an incidentally detected pancreatic mass. CT and MRI revealed a multilocular cyst with fluid-fluid levels and no obvious enhancement. The patient underwent surgery and the mass was confirmed as a pancreatic hemangioma. The radiological features and differential diagnosis of this rare lesion are discussed. PMID:24043972

  12. Ultrastructural features of spongiform encephalopathy transmitted to mice from three species of bovidae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Jeffrey; J. R. Scott; A. Williams; H. Fraser

    1992-01-01

    The ultrastructural neuropathology of mice experimentally inoculated with brain tissue of nyala (Tragelaphus angasi; subfamily Bovinae), or kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros; subfamily Bovinae) affected with spongiform encephalopathy was compared with that of mice inoculated with brain tissue from cows (Bos taurus: subfamily Bovinae) with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). As fresh brain tissue was not available for nyala or kudu, formalin-fixed tissues

  13. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing APP and Transforming Growth Factor-?1 Feature Cognitive and Vascular Hallmarks of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ongali, Brice; Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Lecrux, Clotilde; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Tong, Xin-Kang; Hamel, Edith

    2010-01-01

    High brain levels of amyloid-? (A?) and transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) have been implicated in the cognitive and cerebrovascular alterations of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We sought to investigate the impact of combined increases in A? and TGF-?1 on cerebrovascular, neuronal, and mnemonic function using transgenic mice overproducing these peptides (A/T mice). In particular, we measured cerebrovascular reactivity, evoked cerebral blood flow and glucose uptake during brain activation, cholinergic status, and spatial memory, along with cerebrovascular fibrosis, amyloidosis, and astrogliosis, and their evolution with age. An assessment of perfusion and metabolic responses was considered timely, given ongoing efforts for their validation as AD biomarkers. Relative to wild-type littermates, A/T mice displayed an early progressive decline in cerebrovascular dilatory ability, preserved contractility, and reduction in constitutive nitric oxide synthesis that establishes resting vessel tone. Altered levels of vasodilator-synthesizing enzymes and fibrotic proteins, resistance to antioxidant treatment, and unchanged levels of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase-2, accompanied these impairments. A/T mice featured deficient neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling to whisker stimulation, cholinergic denervation, cerebral and cerebrovascular A? deposition, astrocyte activation, and impaired Morris water maze performance, which gained severity with age. The combined A?- and TGF-?1-driven pathology recapitulates salient cerebrovascular, neuronal, and cognitive AD landmarks and yields a versatile model toward highly anticipated diagnostic and therapeutic tools for patients featuring A? and TGF-?1 increments. PMID:21088218

  14. Transgenic mice overexpressing APP and transforming growth factor-beta1 feature cognitive and vascular hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ongali, Brice; Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Lecrux, Clotilde; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Tong, Xin-Kang; Hamel, Edith

    2010-12-01

    High brain levels of amyloid-? (A?) and transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) have been implicated in the cognitive and cerebrovascular alterations of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We sought to investigate the impact of combined increases in A? and TGF-?1 on cerebrovascular, neuronal, and mnemonic function using transgenic mice overproducing these peptides (A/T mice). In particular, we measured cerebrovascular reactivity, evoked cerebral blood flow and glucose uptake during brain activation, cholinergic status, and spatial memory, along with cerebrovascular fibrosis, amyloidosis, and astrogliosis, and their evolution with age. An assessment of perfusion and metabolic responses was considered timely, given ongoing efforts for their validation as AD biomarkers. Relative to wild-type littermates, A/T mice displayed an early progressive decline in cerebrovascular dilatory ability, preserved contractility, and reduction in constitutive nitric oxide synthesis that establishes resting vessel tone. Altered levels of vasodilator-synthesizing enzymes and fibrotic proteins, resistance to antioxidant treatment, and unchanged levels of the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase-2, accompanied these impairments. A/T mice featured deficient neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling to whisker stimulation, cholinergic denervation, cerebral and cerebrovascular A? deposition, astrocyte activation, and impaired Morris water maze performance, which gained severity with age. The combined A?- and TGF-?1-driven pathology recapitulates salient cerebrovascular, neuronal, and cognitive AD landmarks and yields a versatile model toward highly anticipated diagnostic and therapeutic tools for patients featuring A? and TGF-?1 increments. PMID:21088218

  15. Innovative Structural Design Features for a 10 m Solar Sail Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, G.; Moore, J.; Clayton, W.

    2004-01-01

    The successful development of sail architectures will require careful attention to a number of key issues including but not limited to material strength issues, stress conditions for the membrane, load interactions between membrane and structure, and membrane material planarity. Along with the inherent challenges of fabricating and handling very large membrane structures these issues will pose real challenges for the near-term development of practical sail technologies. SRS has developed innovative technologies that deal directly with the challenges of developing very large sail membranes. Some of these technologies include edge reinforcements and innovative reinforcement attachment techniques, production of flight durable sail materials of less than 2.5 micron thicknesses and large scale fabrication techniques. SRS has employed these technologies in several large 10 m demonstrators that have been delivered to LaRC for solar vacuum testing. Details of the design of this system will be discussed.

  16. Anatomic, Hematologic, and Biochemical Features of C57BL/6NCrl Mice Maintained on Chronic Oral Corticosterone

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Amy E; White, Julie R; Penraat, Kelley A; Wilson, Christopher D; Rasmussen, Skye; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a condition that typically includes central obesity, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Disruption of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, a regulator of corticosterone secretion, occurs in some cases of metabolic syndrome and obesity, and Cushing hypercortisolemia is associated with obesity and metabolic disorders. We therefore assessed anatomic and clinical pathology in C57BL/6NCrl mice to evaluate the effects of chronic corticosterone in the drinking water at doses of 25, 50, and 100 ?g/mL for 25 d. Treated mice developed obesity, glucose intolerance, electrolyte aberrations, and dyslipidemia that were dose-dependent and most severe in the 100-?g/mL treatment group. To evaluate return to normal function, additional C57BL/6NCrl mice received corticosterone-free water for 2 wk after the 25-d treatment period. According to results of gross examination, mice appeared to recover within days of exogenous corticosterone withdrawal; however, adrenal gland vacuolation and protein, lipid, and electrolyte abnormalities persisted. Together, these findings support chronic corticosterone exposure through the drinking water as a potentially useful, noninvasive method to induce some features of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23114038

  17. Targeted disruption of the Hexa gene results in mice with biochemical and pathologic features of Tay-Sachs disease

    SciTech Connect

    Proia, R.L.; Yamanaka, S.; Johnson, M.D. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease, the prototype of the G{sub M2} gangliosidoses, is a catastrophic neurodegenerative disorder of infancy. The disease is caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in an absence of the lysosomal enzyme, {beta}-hexosaminidase A. As consequence of the enzyme deficiency, G{sub M2} ganglioside accumulates progressively, beginning early in fetal life, to excessive amounts in the central nervous system (CNS). Rapid mental and motor deterioration starting in the first year of life leads to death by 2 to 4 years of age. Through the targeted disruption of the Hexa gene in embryonic stem cells, we have produced mice with biochemical and neuropathologic features of Tay-Sachs disease. The mutant mice exhibited less than 1% of normal {beta}-hexosaminidase A activity and accumulated G{sub M2} ganglioside in their CNS in an age-dependent manner. The accumulated ganglioside was stored in neurons as membranous cytoplasmic bodies characteristically found in the neurons of Tay-Sachs disease patients. At three to five months of age the mutant mice showed no apparent defects in motor or memory function. These {beta}-hexosaminidase A deficient mice should be useful for devising strategies to introduce functional enzymes and genes into the CNS. This model may also be valuable for studying the biochemical and pathologic changes occurring during the course of the disease.

  18. Overproduction of upper-layer neurons in the neocortex leads to autism-like features in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei-Qun; Chen, Wei-Wei; Jiang, Liwen; Liu, Kai; Yung, Wing-Ho; Fu, Amy K Y; Ip, Nancy Y

    2014-12-11

    The functional integrity of the neocortex depends upon proper numbers of excitatory and inhibitory neurons; however, the consequences of dysregulated neuronal production during the development of the neocortex are unclear. As excess cortical neurons are linked to the neurodevelopmental disorder autism, we investigated whether the overproduction of neurons leads to neocortical malformation and malfunction in mice. We experimentally increased the number of pyramidal neurons in the upper neocortical layers by using the small molecule XAV939 to expand the intermediate progenitor population. The resultant overpopulation of neurons perturbs development of dendrites and spines of excitatory neurons and alters the laminar distribution of interneurons. Furthermore, these phenotypic changes are accompanied by dysregulated excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connection and balance. Importantly, these mice exhibit behavioral abnormalities resembling those of human autism. Thus, our findings collectively suggest a causal relationship between neuronal overproduction and autism-like features, providing developmental insights into the etiology of autism. PMID:25466248

  19. A Comparative Study on the Structural Features of Muscle Fibers in Intrinsic Lingual Muscles of 21 Day Old and 9 Month Old Mice Using Light and Electron Microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aysel Temelli; Fatime Geyiko?lu

    2006-01-01

    Temelli, A. and Geyiko?lu, F. 2006. A comparative study on the structural features of muscle fibers in intrinsic lingual muscles of 21 day old and 9 month old mice using light and electron microscopy. J. Appl. Anim. Res., 30: 47–51.To compare structural features of muscle fibers in intrinsic lingual muscles of 21 day old and 9 month old mice, the

  20. Triple monoamine uptake inhibitors demonstrate a pharmacologic association between excessive drinking and impulsivity in high-alcohol-preferring (HAP) mice.

    PubMed

    O'Tousa, David S; Warnock, Kaitlin T; Matson, Liana M; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Linn, Michael Van; Tiruveedhula, Veera Venkata; Halcomb, Meredith E; Cook, James; Grahame, Nicholas J; June, Harry L

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 30% of current drinkers in the United States drink excessively, and are referred to as problem/hazardous drinkers. These individuals, who may not meet criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence, comprise binge, heavy drinkers, or both. Given their high prevalence, interventions that reduce the risk of binge and heavy drinking have important public health implications. Impulsivity has been repeatedly associated with excessive drinking in the clinical literature. As impulsivity is correlated with, and may play a critical role in, the initiation and maintenance of excessive drinking, this behavior may be an important target for therapeutic intervention. Hence, a better understanding of pharmacological treatments capable of attenuating excessive drinking and impulsivity may markedly improve clinical outcomes. The high-alcohol-preferring (HAP) mice represent a strong rodent model to study the relationship between impulsivity and excessive alcohol drinking, as recent evidence indicates they consume high levels of alcohol throughout their active cycle and are innately impulsive. Using this model, the present study demonstrates that the triple monoamine uptake inhibitors (TUIs) amitifadine and DOV 102, 677 effectively attenuate binge drinking, heavy drinking assessed via a 24-hour free-choice assay, and impulsivity measured by the delay discounting procedure. In contrast, 3-PBC, a GABA-A ?1 preferring ligand with mixed agonist-antagonist properties, attenuates excessive drinking without affecting impulsivity. These findings suggest that in HAP mice, monoamine pathways may predominate as a common mechanism underlying impulsivity and excessive drinking, while the GABAergic system may be more salient in regulating excessive drinking. We further propose that TUIs such as amitifadine and DOV 102, 677 may be used to treat the co-occurrence of impulsivity and excessive drinking. PMID:24118509

  1. Clinicopathologic features of young and old sphha/sphha mice. Mutants with congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Maggio-Price, L.; Russell, R.; Wolf, N. S.; Alpers, C. E.; Engel, D.

    1988-01-01

    A colony of mice with congenital hemolytic anemia, sphha/sphha, were evaluated over a 3-year period. Prominent findings included decreased survivability, reticulocytosis, increased peripheral blood leukocytes, extramedullary hematopoiesis in liver and spleen, lymphoid hyperplasia and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Older (12 to 21 months) anemic animals had elevated serum levels of IgG1 and IgA. There was deposition of C3, IgG, IgM, and IgA in renal glomeruli of both control and anemic mice, but deposition of IgM and IgA was more prominent and widely distributed in anemic animals and correlated with mesangial expansion and the presence of electron dense deposits in the mesangium and in glomerular capillary walls. Prominent renal tubular hemosiderosis was noted in young and old anemic mice. The relation between the hemolytic anemia and glomerular disease is unclear but these mice may be an animal model useful for exploration of changes attendant with chronic hemolysis and evaluation of renal disease that accompanies hemolytic anemia. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3414779

  2. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilkinson, J.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Geisler, J.G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (A{sup y}) or viable yellow (A{sup vy}) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant {open_quotes}obese yellow{close_quotes} a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Induced chromosome deletions cause hypersociability and other features of Williams–Beuren syndrome in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong Hua; Roy, Madhuri; Kuscuoglu, Unsal; Spencer, Corinne M; Halm, Birgit; Harrison, Katharine C; Bayle, Joseph H; Splendore, Alessandra; Ding, Feng; Meltzer, Leslie A; Wright, Elena; Paylor, Richard; Deisseroth, Karl; Francke, Uta

    2009-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Williams–Beuren syndrome is caused by spontaneous ?1.5 Mb deletions comprising 25 genes on human chromosome 7q11.23. To functionally dissect the deletion and identify dosage-sensitive genes, we created two half-deletions of the conserved syntenic region on mouse chromosome 5G2. Proximal deletion (PD) mice lack Gtf2i to Limk1, distal deletion (DD) mice lack Limk1 to Fkbp6, and the double heterozygotes (D/P) model the complete human deletion. Gene transcript levels in brain are generally consistent with gene dosage. Increased sociability and acoustic startle response are associated with PD, and cognitive defects with DD. Both PD and D/P males are growth-retarded, while skulls are shortened and brains are smaller in DD and D/P. Lateral ventricle (LV) volumes are reduced, and neuronal cell density in the somatosensory cortex is increased, in PD and D/P. Motor skills are most impaired in D/P. Together, these partial deletion mice replicate crucial aspects of the human disorder and serve to identify genes and gene networks contributing to the neural substrates of complex behaviours and behavioural disorders. PMID:20049703

  4. In vivo demonstration of T lymphocyte migration and amelioration of ileitis in intestinal mucosa of SAMP1/Yit mice by the inhibition of MAdCAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, K; Tsuzuki, Y; Matsunaga, H; Inoue, T; Miyazaki, J; Hokari, R; Okada, Y; Kawaguchi, A; Nagao, S; Itoh, K; Matsumoto, S; Miura, S

    2005-01-01

    The aetiology of Crohn's disease (CD) remains unknown. Since SAMP1/Yit mice have been reported to develop CD-like spontaneous enteric inflammation, such mice have been studied as an animal model of CD. In this study, using this model we examined T lymphocyte migration in microvessels of intestinal mucosa in vivo and the expression of adhesion molecules by immunohistochemistry. Fluorescence-labelled T lymphocytes isolated from AKR/J (control) mice were injected into the tail veins of recipient mice, and T lymphocyte migration in the postcapillary venules of Peyer's patches, submucosal microvessels, and villus capillaries of the terminal ileum was monitored using an intravital microscope. Adhesion of T lymphocytes was significantly increased in 35 week old SAMP1/Yit mice compared with that in AKR/J or 15 week old SAMP1/Yit mice. Immunohistochemical study showed increased infiltration of CD4, CD8 and ?7-integrin-positive cells and increased expression of MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the terminal ileum of SAMP1/Yit mice. Antibodies against MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 significantly inhibited adhesion of T lymphocytes to microvessels of the terminal ileum, and anti-MAdCAM-1 antibody showed stronger suppressive effect than the anti-VCAM-1 antibody. Periodical administration of anti-MAdCAM-1 antibody twice a week for 7 weeks significantly ameliorated ileitis of SAMP1/Yit mice, but submucosal hypertrophy was not significantly suppressed. Anti-VCAM-1 antibody treatment failed to show significant resolution of ileitis. In addition, anti-MAdCAM-1 antibody treatment also attenuated established ileitis. The results demonstrate that, although MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 play an important role in T lymphocyte–endothelial cell interactions in SAMP1/Yit mice, MAdCAM-1 may be a more appropriate target for therapeutic modulation of chronic ileitis. PMID:15762871

  5. A diet rich in OMEGA-6 polyunsaturated fat and sucrose reproduces key features of metabolic syndrome in C57BL/6 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether a diet enriched in v-6 fatty acids and sucrose will reproduce features of metabolic syndrome in C57BL/6 mice. 4- to 7-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were randomized to chow (13% kcal fat, lard and corn oil) or high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet (48% kcal fat, corn oil) for a period ...

  6. Haplosufficient genomic androgen receptor signaling is adequate to protect female mice from induction of polycystic ovary syndrome features by prenatal hyperandrogenization.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, A S L; Eid, S; Kay, C R; Jimenez, M; McMahon, A C; Desai, R; Allan, C M; Smith, J T; Handelsman, D J; Walters, Kirsty A

    2015-04-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with reproductive, endocrine, and metabolic abnormalities. Because hyperandrogenism is the most consistent PCOS feature, we used wild-type (WT) and androgen receptor (AR) knockout (ARKO) mice, together with a mouse model of PCOS, to investigate the contribution of genomic AR-mediated actions in the development of PCOS traits. PCOS features were induced by prenatal exposure to dihydrotestosterone (250 ?g) or oil vehicle (control) on days 16-18 of gestation in WT, heterozygote, and homozygote ARKO mice. DHT treatment of WT mice induced ovarian cysts (100% vs 0%), disrupted estrous cycles (42% vs 100% cycling), and led to fewer corpora lutea (5.0 ± 0.4 vs 9.8 ± 1.8). However, diestrus serum LH and FSH, and estradiol-induced-negative feedback as well as hypothalamic expression of kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin, were unaffected by DHT treatment in WT mice. DHT-treated WT mice exhibited a more than 48% increase in adipocyte area but without changes in body fat. In contrast, heterozygous and homozygous ARKO mice exposed to DHT maintained comparable ovarian (histo)morphology, estrous cycling, and corpora lutea numbers, without any increase in adipocyte size. These findings provide strong evidence that genomic AR signaling is an important mediator in the development of these PCOS traits with a dose dependency that allows even AR haplosufficiency to prevent induction by prenatal androgenization of PCOS features in adult life. PMID:25643156

  7. Morphological and electrophysiological features of motor neurons and putative interneurons in the dorsal vagal complex of rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong; Glatzer, Nicholas R.; Williams, Kevin W.; Derbenev, Andrei V.; Liu, Dan; Smith, Bret N.

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) contains preganglionic motor neurons that control viscera along the subdiaphragmatic digestive tract, but may also contain neurons that do not project to the viscera. Neurons that expressed EGFP 60-72 h subsequent to PRV-152 inoculation of vagal terminals in the stomach wall were targeted for whole-cell patch-clamp recording and biocytin filling in transverse brainstem slices from rats and their quantitative morphological and electrophysiological characteristics were compared with uninfected cells. Over 90% of PRV-152 labeled neurons were also labeled subsequent to intraperitoneal injection of FluoroGold, indicating most were preganglionic motor neurons. In reconstructed neurons with an identifiable axon trajectory, two cellular subtypes were distinguished. The axon projected ventrolaterally from the DMV in 44 of 49 cells and these were likely to be vagal motor neurons. Axons of other neurons ramified within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) or DMV. These cells were smaller and otherwise morphologically distinct from putative motor neurons. Transgenic mice with GFP-expressing inhibitory neurons (i.e., GIN mice) were used to identify a GABAergic subset vagal neurons. These neurons had locally-ramifying axons and formed a morphologically distinct subset of DMV cells, which were similar in size and axon trajectory to GABAergic neurons in the NTS. Most neurons in the DMV therefore possess morphological features of motor neurons, but locally projecting cells and inhibitory neurons with distinct morphological features are also found within the DMV. These cells likely contribute to regulation of vagal function. PMID:19619517

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy demonstrated in mice bearing EMT6 tumors following selective delivery of boron by rationally designed liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kueffer, Peter J.; Maitz, Charles A.; Khan, Aslam A.; Schuster, Seth A.; Shlyakhtina, Natalia I.; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Brockman, John D.; Nigg, David W.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2013-01-01

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) following liposomal delivery of a 10B-enriched polyhedral borane and a carborane against mouse mammary adenocarcinoma solid tumors was investigated. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 134 nm or less, composed of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and incorporating Na3[1-(2?-B10H9)-2-NH3B10H8] in the aqueous interior and K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer, were injected into the tail veins of female BALB/c mice bearing right flank EMT6 tumors. Biodistribution studies indicated that two identical injections given 24 h apart resulted in tumor boron levels exceeding 67 µg/g tumor at 54 h—with tumor/blood boron ratios being greatest at 96 h (5.68:1; 43 µg boron/g tumor)—following the initial injection. For BNCT experiments, tumor-bearing mice were irradiated 54 h after the initial injection for 30 min with thermal neutrons, resulting in a total fluence of 1.6 × 1012 neutrons per cm2 (±7%). Significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in mice given BNCT vs. control mice (only 424% increase in tumor volume at 14 d post irradiation vs. 1551% in untreated controls). In a separate experiment in which mice were given a second injection/irradiation treatment 7 d after the first, the tumor growth was vastly diminished (186% tumor volume increase at 14 d). A similar response was obtained for mice irradiated for 60 min (169% increase at 14 d), suggesting that neutron fluence was the limiting factor controlling BNCT efficacy in this study. PMID:23536304

  9. Of Mice, Birds, and Men: The Mouse Ultrasonic Song System Has Some Features Similar to Humans and Song-Learning Birds

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, Gustavo; Zhou, Eric P.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2012-01-01

    Humans and song-learning birds communicate acoustically using learned vocalizations. The characteristic features of this social communication behavior include vocal control by forebrain motor areas, a direct cortical projection to brainstem vocal motor neurons, and dependence on auditory feedback to develop and maintain learned vocalizations. These features have so far not been found in closely related primate and avian species that do not learn vocalizations. Male mice produce courtship ultrasonic vocalizations with acoustic features similar to songs of song-learning birds. However, it is assumed that mice lack a forebrain system for vocal modification and that their ultrasonic vocalizations are innate. Here we investigated the mouse song system and discovered that it includes a motor cortex region active during singing, that projects directly to brainstem vocal motor neurons and is necessary for keeping song more stereotyped and on pitch. We also discovered that male mice depend on auditory feedback to maintain some ultrasonic song features, and that sub-strains with differences in their songs can match each other's pitch when cross-housed under competitive social conditions. We conclude that male mice have some limited vocal modification abilities with at least some neuroanatomical features thought to be unique to humans and song-learning birds. To explain our findings, we propose a continuum hypothesis of vocal learning. PMID:23071596

  10. Motor neuron rescue in spinal muscular atrophy mice demonstrates that sensory-motor defects are a consequence, not a cause, of motor neuron dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gogliotti, Rocky G; Quinlan, Katharina A; Barlow, Courtenay B; Heier, Christopher R; Heckman, C J; Didonato, Christine J

    2012-03-14

    The loss of motor neurons (MNs) is a hallmark of the neuromuscular disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA); however, it is unclear whether this phenotype autonomously originates within the MN. To address this question, we developed an inducible mouse model of severe SMA that has perinatal lethality, decreased motor function, motor unit pathology, and hyperexcitable MNs. Using an Hb9-Cre allele, we increased Smn levels autonomously within MNs and demonstrate that MN rescue significantly improves all phenotypes and pathologies commonly described in SMA mice. MN rescue also corrects hyperexcitability in SMA motor neurons and prevents sensory-motor synaptic stripping. Survival in MN-rescued SMA mice is extended by only 5 d, due in part to failed autonomic innervation of the heart. Collectively, this work demonstrates that the SMA phenotype autonomously originates in MNs and that sensory-motor synapse loss is a consequence, not a cause, of MN dysfunction. PMID:22423102

  11. Transgenic mice expressing an intracellular fluorescent fusion of angiotensin II demonstrate renal thrombotic microangiopathy and elevated blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Redding, K M; Chen, B L; Singh, A; Re, R N; Navar, L G; Seth, D M; Sigmund, C D; Tang, W W; Cook, J L

    2010-06-01

    We have generated transgenic mice that express angiotensin II (ANG II) fused downstream of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, expression of which is regulated by the mouse metallothionein promoter. The fusion protein, which lacks a secretory signal, is retained intracellularly. In the present study, RT-PCR, immunoblot analyses, whole-animal fluorescent imaging, and fluorescent microscopy of murine embryonic fibroblasts confirm expression of the fusion protein in vivo and in vitro. The transgene is expressed in all tissues tested (including brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, and testes), and radioimmunoassay of plasma samples obtained from transgenic mice indicate no increase in circulating ANG II over wild-type levels, consistent with intracellular retention of the transgene product. Kidneys from transgenic and corresponding wild-type littermates were histologically evaluated, and abnormalities in transgenic mice consistent with thrombotic microangiopathy were observed; microthrombosis was frequently observed within the glomerular capillaries and small vessels. In addition, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, measured by telemetry (n = 8 for each group), were significantly higher in transgenic mice compared with wild-type littermates. Blood pressure of line A male transgenic mice was 125 + or - 1.7 over 97 + or - 1.6 compared with 109 + or - 1.7 over 83 + or - 1.4 mmHg in wild-type littermates (systolic over diastolic). In summary, overexpression of an intracellular fluorescent fusion protein of ANG II correlates with elevated blood pressure and kidney pathology. This transgenic model may be useful to further explore the intracellular renin-angiotensin system and its implication in abnormal kidney function and hypertension. PMID:20363893

  12. Amelioration of the premature ageing-like features of Fgf-23 knockout mice by genetically restoring the systemic actions of FGF-23

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, S; Sitara, D; Kang, K; Marsell, R; Jonsson, K; Taguchi, T; Erben, RG; Razzaque, MS; Lanske, B

    2009-01-01

    Genetic ablation of fibroblast growth factor 23 from mice (Fgf-23?/?) results in a short lifespan with numerous abnormal biochemical and morphological features. Such features include kyphosis, hypogonadism and associated infertility, osteopenia, pulmonary emphysema, severe vascular and soft tissue calcifications, and generalized atrophy of various tissues. To determine whether these widespread anomalies in Fgf-23?/? mice can be ameliorated by genetically restoring the systemic actions of FGF-23, we generated Fgf-23?/? mice expressing the human FGF-23 transgene in osteoblasts under the control of the 2.3 kb ?1(I) collagen promoter (Fgf-23?/?/hFGF-23-Tg double mutants). This novel mouse model is completely void of all endogenous Fgf-23 activity, but produces human FGF-23 in bone cells that is subsequently released into the circulation. Our results suggest that lack of Fgf-23 activities results in extensive premature ageing-like features and early mortality of Fgf-23?/? mice, while restoring the systemic effects of FGF-23 significantly ameliorates these phenotypes, with the resultant effect being improved growth, restored fertility, and significantly prolonged survival of double mutants. With regard to their serum biochemistry, double mutants reversed the severe hyperphosphataemia, hypercalcaemia, and hypervitaminosis D found in Fgf-23?/? littermates; rather, double mutants show hypophosphataemia and normal serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels similar to pure FGF-23 Tg mice. These changes were associated with reduced renal expression of NaPi2a and 1?-hydroxylase, compared to Fgf-23?/? mice. FGF-23 acts to prevent widespread abnormal features by acting systemically to regulate phosphate homeostasis and vitamin D metabolism. This novel mouse model provides us with an in vivo tool to study the systemic effects of FGF-23 in regulating mineral ion metabolism and preventing multiple abnormal phenotypes without the interference of native Fgf-23. PMID:18729070

  13. A Structural Feature of the Non-Peptide Ligand Interactions with Mice Mu-Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Noori, Hamid R; Mücksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2014-10-30

    By binding to and activating the G-protein coupled ?-, ?- and ?-opioid receptors in the central nervous system, opiates are known to induce analgesic and sedative effects. In particular, non-peptide opioid ligands are often used in clinical applications to induce these therapeutically beneficial effects, due to their superior pharmacokinetics and bioavailability in comparison to endogenous neuropeptides. However, since opioid alkaloids are highly addictive substances, it is necessary to understand the exact mechanisms of their actions, specifically the ligand-binding properties of the target receptors, in order to safely apply opiates for therapeutic purposes. Using an in silico molecular docking approach (AutoDock Vina) combined with two-step cluster analysis, we have computationally obtained the docking scores and the ligand-binding pockets of twelve representative non-peptide non-endogenous agonists and antagonists at the crystallographically identified ?-opioid receptor. Our study predicts the existence of two main binding sites that are congruently present in all opioid receptor types. Interestingly, in terms of the agonist or antagonist properties of the substances on the receptors, the clustering analysis suggests a relationship with the position of the ligand-binding pockets, particularly its depth within the receptor structure. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the substances is directly correlated to the proximity of the binding pockets to the extracellular space. In conclusion, the results provide further insights into the structural features of the functional pharmacology of opioid receptors, suggesting the importance of the binding position of non-peptide agonists and antagonists- specifically the distance and the level of exposure to the extracellular space- to their dissociation kinetics and subsequent potency. PMID:25360566

  14. Plasma Biomarkers of Liver Injury and Inflammation Demonstrate a Lack of Apoptosis during Obstructive Cholestasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Park, B. Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Cholestasis is a pathological common component of numerous liver diseases that results in hepatotoxicity, inflammation, and cirrhosis when untreated. While the predominant hypothesis in cholestatic liver injury remains hepatocyte apoptosis due to direct toxicity of hydrophobic bile acid exposure, recent work suggests the injury occurs through inflammatory necrosis. In order to resolve this controversy, we used novel plasma biomarkers to assess the mechanisms of cell death during early cholestatic liver injury. C57Bl/6 mice underwent bile duct ligation (BDL) for 6–72h, or sham operation. Another group of mice were given D-galactosamine and endotoxin as a positive control for apoptosis and inflammatory necrosis. Plasma levels of full length cytokeratin-18 (FL-K18), microRNA-122 (miR-122) and high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) increased progressively after BDL with peak levels observed after 48h. These results indicate extensive cell necrosis after BDL, which is supported by the time course of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and histology. In contrast, plasma caspase-3 activity, cleaved caspase-3 protein and caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 fragments (cK18) were not elevated at any time during BDL suggesting the absence of apoptosis. In contrast, all plasma biomarkers of necrosis and apoptosis were elevated 6h after Gal/End treatment. In addition, acetylated HMGB1, a marker for macrophage and monocyte activation, was increased as early as 12h but mainly at 48–72h. However, progressive neutrophil accumulation in the area of necrosis started at 6h after BDL. In conclusion, these data indicate that early cholestatic liver injury in mice is an inflammatory event, and occurs through necrosis with little evidence for apoptosis. PMID:24096036

  15. Plasma biomarkers of liver injury and inflammation demonstrate a lack of apoptosis during obstructive cholestasis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Jenkins, Rosalind E. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Bajt, Mary Lynn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Cholestasis is a pathological common component of numerous liver diseases that results in hepatotoxicity, inflammation, and cirrhosis when untreated. While the predominant hypothesis in cholestatic liver injury remains hepatocyte apoptosis due to direct toxicity of hydrophobic bile acid exposure, recent work suggests that the injury occurs through inflammatory necrosis. In order to resolve this controversy, we used novel plasma biomarkers to assess the mechanisms of cell death during early cholestatic liver injury. C57Bl/6 mice underwent bile duct ligation (BDL) for 6–72 h, or sham operation. Another group of mice were given D-galactosamine and endotoxin as a positive control for apoptosis and inflammatory necrosis. Plasma levels of full length cytokeratin-18 (FL-K18), microRNA-122 (miR-122) and high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) increased progressively after BDL with peak levels observed after 48 h. These results indicate extensive cell necrosis after BDL, which is supported by the time course of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and histology. In contrast, plasma caspase-3 activity, cleaved caspase-3 protein and caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 fragments (cK18) were not elevated at any time during BDL suggesting the absence of apoptosis. In contrast, all plasma biomarkers of necrosis and apoptosis were elevated 6 h after Gal/End treatment. In addition, acetylated HMGB1, a marker for macrophage and monocyte activation, was increased as early as 12 h but mainly at 48–72 h. However, progressive neutrophil accumulation in the area of necrosis started at 6 h after BDL. In conclusion, these data indicate that early cholestatic liver injury in mice is an inflammatory event, and occurs through necrosis with little evidence for apoptosis. - Highlights: • The mechanism of cell death during cholestasis remains a controversial topic. • Plasma biomarkers offer new insight into cell death after bile duct ligation. • Cytokeratin-18, microRNA-122 and HMGB1 levels implicate necrosis. • Acetylated HMGB1 levels rise late after BDL confirming inflammation. • BDL-induced liver injury involves mainly inflammation and necrosis but no apoptosis.

  16. Pituitary and ovarian abnormalities demonstrated by CT and ultrasound in children with features of the McCune-Albright syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Rieth, K.G.; Comite, F.; Shawker, T.H.; Cutler, G.B. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    In a random series of 97 children referred to the National Institutes of Health with a presumptive diagnosis of precocious puberty, eight girls were found to have features of the McCune-Albright syndrome, including fibrous dysplasia of bone and/or skin lesions resembling cafe au lait spots. Radiographic evaluation of these patients included computed tomography of the head and pelvic ultrasound. The pituitary glands were suspicious for abnormality in five of the eight girls. Seven girls underwent pelvic ultrasound, and in all of them the ovaries were considered to be abnormal for their chronological age; in addition, two had functional ovarian cysts. The role of diagnostic radiological studies in the diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed.

  17. Elevated Levels of Impulsivity and Reduced Place Conditioning With d-Amphetamine: Two Behavioral Features of Adolescence in Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter Adriani; Giovanni Laviola

    2003-01-01

    Human adolescents may have experience with easily available psychoactive drugs. Impulsivity and\\/or peculiarities in reward systems may play a role. These variables were studied in adolescent (Postnatal Day [PND] 30–49) and adult (PND > 60) CD-1 mice. In Experiment 1 (impulsivity), food-restricted mice were tested in operant chambers with 2 nose-poking holes that delivered 1 food pellet immediately or 5

  18. Design and operating features of the high-level waste vitrification system for the West Valley demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Beary, M.M.; Barnes, S.M.; Berger, D.N.; Brouns, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Jones, R.M.; Peters, R.D.; Peterson, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    A liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melter system is the reference process for immobilization of the high-level liquid waste in the US and several foreign countries. This system has been under development for over ten years at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other national laboratories operated for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributed to this research through its Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and used applicable data to design and test melters and related systems using remote handling of simulated radioactive wastes. This report describes the equipment designed in support of the high-level waste vitrification program at West Valley, New York. Pacific Northwest Laboratory worked closely with West Valley Nuclear Services Company to design a liquid-fed ceramic melter, a liquid waste preparation and feed tank and pump, an off-gas treatment scrubber, and an enclosed turntable for positioning the waste canisters. Details of these designs are presented including the rationale for the design features and the alternatives considered.

  19. Demonstration of 22nm SRAM features with patternable hafnium oxide-based resist material using electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrun, Xaver; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Freitag, Martin; Grenville, Andrew; Gutsch, Manuela; Hohle, Christoph; Stowers, Jason K.; Bartha, Johann W.

    2012-03-01

    To fulfill the requirements of future technology nodes new resists with high resolution, high sensitivity and low LWR and LER respectively are needed. A new inorganic non-chemically amplified resist (XE15IB, an experimental resist provided by Inpria Corp.) was investigated. The resist is spin-cast from aqueous solution and is based on hafnium oxide. Metal oxide based resist as XE15IB supersede other resist materials due to its high etch resistance.1, 2 This new material can be considered as a direct patternable spin on hard mask. XE15IB was processed in a 300mm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) manufacturing environment and exposed on a 50 kV VISTEC SB3050DW variable shaped electron beam direct writer at Fraunhofer Center Nanoelectronic Technologies (CNT). The resist was evaluated in terms of contrast, sensitivity and resolution. The process characteristics required for CMOS manufacturing such as delay stability were also examined. Furthermore, by printing a large static random access Memory (SRAM) pattern (design CD of 22 nm), the exposure of a real application pattern was demonstrated.

  20. Heterozygous deletion of the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical interval in mice recapitulates most features of the human disorder.

    PubMed

    Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Sahún, Ignasi; Velot, Emilie; Dubus, Pierre; Borralleras, Cristina; Rodrigues, Ana J; Valero, María C; Valverde, Olga; Sousa, Nuno; Herault, Yann; Dierssen, Mara; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Campuzano, Victoria

    2014-12-15

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a developmental multisystemic disorder caused by a recurrent 1.55-1.83 Mb heterozygous deletion on human chromosome band 7q11.23. Through chromosomal engineering with the cre-loxP system, we have generated mice with an almost complete deletion (CD) of the conserved syntenic region on chromosome 5G2. Heterozygous CD mice were viable, fertile and had a normal lifespan, while homozygotes were early embryonic lethal. Transcript levels of most deleted genes were reduced 50% in several tissues, consistent with gene dosage. Heterozygous mutant mice showed postnatal growth delay with reduced body weight and craniofacial abnormalities such as small mandible. The cardiovascular phenotype was only manifested with borderline hypertension, mildly increased arterial wall thickness and cardiac hypertrophy. The neurobehavioral phenotype revealed impairments in motor coordination, increased startle response to acoustic stimuli and hypersociability. Mutant mice showed a general reduction in brain weight. Cellular and histological abnormalities were present in the amygdala, cortex and hippocampus, including increased proportion of immature neurons. In summary, these mice recapitulate most crucial phenotypes of the human disorder, provide novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease such as the neural substrates of the behavioral manifestations, and will be valuable to evaluate novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25027326

  1. Bispecificity for myelin and neuronal self-antigens is a common feature of CD4 T cells in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Liliana E; Desbois, Sabine; Ramadan, Abdulraouf; Ben-Nun, Avraham; Eisenstein, Miriam; Carrié, Nadčge; Guéry, Jean-Charles; Sette, Alessandro; Nguyen, Phuong; Geiger, Terrence L; Mars, Lennart T; Liblau, Roland S

    2014-10-01

    The recognition of multiple ligands by a single TCR is an intrinsic feature of T cell biology, with important consequences for physiological and pathological processes. Polyspecific T cells targeting distinct self-antigens have been identified in healthy individuals as well as in the context of autoimmunity. We have previously shown that the 2D2 TCR recognizes the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein epitope (MOG)35-55 as well as an epitope within the axonal protein neurofilament medium (NF-M15-35) in H-2(b) mice. In this study, we assess whether this cross-reactivity is a common feature of the MOG35-55-specific T cell response. To this end, we analyzed the CD4 T cell response of MOG35-55-immunized C57BL/6 mice for cross-reactivity with NF-M15-35. Using Ag recall responses, we established that an important proportion of MOG35-55-specific CD4 T cells also responded to NF-M15-35 in all mice tested. To study the clonality of this response, we analyzed 22 MOG35-55-specific T cell hybridomas expressing distinct TCR. Seven hybridomas were found to cross-react with NF-M15-35. Using an alanine scan of NF-M18-30 and an in silico predictive model, we dissected the molecular basis of cross-reactivity between MOG35-55 and NF-M15-35. We established that NF-M F24, R26, and V27 proved important TCR contacts. Strikingly, the identified TCR contacts are conserved within MOG38-50. Our data indicate that due to linear sequence homology, part of the MOG35-55-specific T cell repertoire of all C57BL/6 mice also recognizes NF-M15-35, with potential implications for CNS autoimmunity. PMID:25135834

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  3. The effect of BSO-induced oxidative stress on histologic feature of testis: testosterone secretion and semen parameters in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadian, Fakhrosadat; Roshangar, Leila; Hemmati, Alireza; Nori, Mohammad; Soleimani-Rad, Sara; Soleimani-Rad, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) inhibits synthesis of glutathione as the main intracellular antioxidant. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of BSO-induced oxidative stress on histological structure of testis, testosterone secretion and semen parameters. Materials and Methods: Thirty male BALB/c mice were divided into 3 groups. In control group, the mice did not receive any chemical. In the experimental group, the mice received 2 mmol/kg BSO for 35 days. In the sham group, the mice received the solvent of BSO (0.9% saline). After the treatment, the mice were sacrificed. Their testes were fixed in Buein's fixative, embedded in paraffin and prepared for histological studies. To assess semen parameters, the sperms were collected from cauda epididymis. Blood samples were used for determination of super oxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT) and the serum testosterone level. The data analyzed using ANOVA and Dunnett's tests and SPSS software, version11.5. P- values at 0.05 level considered significant. Results: Data showed that in experimental group in comparison to control group; the concentration of CAT, GPX, SOD,GSH and the total level of testosterone is reduced while MDA level is increased significantly. The number of sperms with progressive motility were decreased (P<0.001) but sperms with abnormal morphology were increased (P<0.001). Histological studies revealed that the values for tubal differentiation index and spermatogenic index in experimental group were reduced (P<0.001). Conclusion: It is concluded that exposure to oxidative stress induced by BSO could affect testicular structure and semen parameters. PMID:25422755

  4. Persistent hyperactivity and distinctive strategy features in the Morris water maze in 3xTg-AD mice at advanced stages of disease.

    PubMed

    Baeta-Corral, Raquel; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2015-04-01

    Search strategies in the Morris water maze provide useful insights on cognitive function that may reveal genotype differences not reflected by escape latency or distance. Its analysis is pointed out as a complementary tool to better define the phenotype and the effect of treatments in animal models in which both cognitive impairment and behavioral symptoms reproduce the clinical complexity of the Alzheimer's disease patient. Here, we studied the performance of 13-month-old male 3xTg-AD mice in 3 different paradigms (cue learning, place task, and probe trial) and as compared with age-matched nontransgenic mice. The quantitative analysis (escape latency, distance, and speed) showed that in all tasks, the cognitive performance of 3xTg-AD mice was interfered with by a persistent hyperactive pattern. Their worse cognitive function was revealed by the qualitative features of nonsearch behaviors (floating and circling) and search strategies (single and /mixed, goal directed and nongoal directed). The search pattern was based on mixed and nongoal-directed strategies, in contrast to the single and goal-directed strategies used by controls. In the place task, poor cognitive flexibility of 3xTg-AD mice was also shown in persistence of search in the cue-trained position and the need to correct the strategy to find the new location. Trials involving a naďve situation (first trial of the cue task) or the difficulty of a new task (first trial of the place task and the probe trial) were the most suitable to show the deficits. This qualitative analysis may also be useful in the assessment of preventive or therapeutical treatments. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25730122

  5. Mineralizing Enthesopathy Is a Common Feature of Renal Phosphate-Wasting Disorders Attributed to FGF23 and Is Exacerbated by Standard Therapy in Hyp Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karaplis, Andrew C.; Bai, Xiuying; Falet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    We have previously confirmed a paradoxical mineralizing enthesopathy as a hallmark of X-linked hypophosphatemia. X-linked hypophosphatemia is the most common of the phosphate-wasting disorders mediated by elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) and occurs as a consequence of inactivating mutations of the PHEX gene product. Despite childhood management of the disease, these complications of tendon and ligament insertion sites account for a great deal of the disease's morbidity into adulthood. It is unclear whether the enthesopathy occurs in other forms of renal phosphate-wasting disorders attributable to high FGF23 levels. Here we describe two patients with autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets due to the Met1Val mutation in dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1 (DMP1). In addition to the biochemical and skeletal features of long-standing rickets with elevated FGF23 levels, these individuals exhibited severe, debilitating, generalized mineralized enthesopathy. These data suggest that enthesophytes are a feature common to FGF23-mediated phosphate-wasting disorders. To address this possibility, we examined a murine model of FGF23 overexpression using a transgene encoding the secreted form of human FGF23 (R176Q) cDNA (FGF23-TG mice). We report that FGF23-TG mice display a similar mineralizing enthesopathy of the Achilles and plantar facial insertions. In addition, we examined the impact of standard therapy for phosphate-wasting disorders on enthesophyte progression. We report that fibrochondrocyte hyperplasia persisted in Hyp mice treated with oral phosphate and calcitriol. In addition, treatment had the untoward effect of further exacerbating the mineralization of fibrochondrocytes that define the bone spur of the Achilles insertion. These studies support the need for newer interventions targeted at limiting the actions of FGF23 and minimizing both the toxicities and potential morbidities associated with standard therapy. PMID:23038738

  6. Development and functional evaluation of biomimetic silicone surfaces with hierarchical micro/nano-topographical features demonstrates favourable in vitro foreign body response of breast-derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Daniel J T; Oikonomou, Antonios; Hill, Ernie; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-06-01

    Reproducing extracellular matrix topographical cues, such as those present within acellular dermal matrix (ADM), in synthetic implant surfaces, may augment cellular responses, independent of surface chemistry. This could lead to enhanced implant integration and performance while reducing complications. In this work, the hierarchical micro and nanoscale features of ADM were accurately and reproducibly replicated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), using an innovative maskless 3D grayscale fabrication process not previously reported. Human breast derived fibroblasts (n = 5) were cultured on PDMS surfaces and compared to commercially available smooth and textured silicone implant surfaces, for up to one week. Cell attachment, proliferation and cytotoxicity, in addition to immunofluorescence staining, SEM imaging, qRT-PCR and cytokine array were performed. ADM PDMS surfaces promoted cell adhesion, proliferation and survival (p=<0.05), in addition to increased focal contact formation and spread fibroblast morphology when compared to commercially available implant surfaces. PCNA, vinculin and collagen 1 were up-regulated in fibroblasts on biomimetic surfaces while IL8, TNF?, TGF?1 and HSP60 were down-regulated (p=<0.05). A reduced inflammatory cytokine response was also observed (p=<0.05). This study represents a novel approach to the development of functionalised biomimetic prosthetic implant surfaces which were demonstrated to significantly attenuate the acute in vitro foreign body reaction to silicone. PMID:25818416

  7. Partial rescue of some features of Huntington Disease in the genetic absence of caspase-6 in YAC128 mice.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bibiana K Y; Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Graham, Rona K; Martin, Dale D O; Ladha, Safia; Uribe, Valeria; Stanek, Lisa M; Franciosi, Sonia; Qiu, Xiaofan; Deng, Yu; Kovalik, Vlad; Zhang, Weining; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Shihabuddin, Lamya S; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    Huntington Disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by an elongated CAG repeat in the huntingtin (HTT) gene that encodes a polyglutamine tract in the HTT protein. Proteolysis of the mutant HTT protein (mHTT) has been detected in human and murine HD brains and is implicated in the pathogenesis of HD. Of particular importance is the site at amino acid (aa) 586 that contains a caspase-6 (Casp6) recognition motif. Activation of Casp6 occurs presymptomatically in human HD patients and the inhibition of mHTT proteolysis at aa586 in the YAC128 mouse model results in the full rescue of HD-like phenotypes. Surprisingly, Casp6 ablation in two different HD mouse models did not completely prevent the generation of this fragment, and therapeutic benefits were limited, questioning the role of Casp6 in the disease. We have evaluated the impact of the loss of Casp6 in the YAC128 mouse model of HD. Levels of the mHTT-586 fragment are reduced but not absent in the absence of Casp6 and we identify caspase 8 as an alternate enzyme that can generate this fragment. In vivo, the ablation of Casp6 results in a partial rescue of body weight gain, normalized IGF-1 levels, a reversal of the depression-like phenotype and decreased HTT levels. In the YAC128/Casp6-/- striatum there is a concomitant reduction in p62 levels, a marker of autophagic activity, suggesting increased autophagic clearance. These results implicate the HTT-586 fragment as a key contributor to certain features of HD, irrespective of the enzyme involved in its generation. PMID:25583186

  8. One Percent Tenofovir Applied Topically to Humanized BLT Mice and Used According to the CAPRISA 004 Experimental Design Demonstrates Partial Protection from Vaginal HIV Infection, Validating the BLT Model for Evaluation of New Microbicide Candidates?

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Paul W.; Othieno, Florence; Martinez-Torres, Francisco; Zou, Wei; Krisko, John F.; Fleming, Elisa; Zein, Sima; Powell, Daniel A.; Wahl, Angela; Kwak, Youn Tae; Welch, Brett D.; Kay, Michael S.; Payne, Deborah A.; Gallay, Philippe; Appella, Ettore; Estes, Jacob D.; Lu, Min; Garcia, J. Victor

    2011-01-01

    Recent iPrEx clinical trial results provided evidence that systemic preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with emtricitabine (FTC) and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) can partially prevent rectal HIV transmission in humans. Similarly, we have previously demonstrated that systemic administration of the same FTC-TDF combination efficiently prevented rectal transmission in humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) mice. The CAPRISA 004 trial recently demonstrated that topical application of the tenofovir could partially prevent vaginal HIV-1 transmission in humans. To further validate the usefulness of the BLT mouse model for testing HIV prevention strategies, we evaluated the topical administration of tenofovir as used in CAPRISA 004 to prevent vaginal HIV transmission in BLT mice. Our results demonstrate that vaginally administered 1% tenofovir significantly reduced HIV transmission in BLT mice (P = 0.002). Together with the results obtained after systemic antiretroviral PrEP, these topical inhibitor data serve to validate the use of humanized BLT mice to evaluate both systemic and topical inhibitors of HIV transmission. Based on these observations, we tested six additional microbicide candidates for their ability to prevent vaginal HIV transmission: a C-peptide fusion inhibitor (C52L), a membrane-disrupting amphipathic peptide inhibitor (C5A), a trimeric d-peptide fusion inhibitor (PIE12-Trimer), a combination of reverse transcriptase inhibitors (FTC-TDF), a thioester zinc finger inhibitor (TC247), and a small-molecule Rac inhibitor (NSC23766). No protection was seen with the Rac inhibitor NSC23766. The thioester compound TC247 offered partial protection. Significant protection was afforded by FTC-TDF, and complete protection was offered by three different peptide inhibitors tested. Our results demonstrate that these effective topical inhibitors have excellent potential to prevent vaginal HIV transmission in humans. PMID:21593172

  9. Genetic Engineering of Carbohydrate Biosynthetic Pathways in Transgenic Mice Demonstrates Cell Cycle-Associated Regulation of Glycoconjugate Production in Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn Bry; Per G. Falk; Jeffrey I. Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Proliferation, migration-associated differentiation, and cell death occur continuously and in a spatially well-organized fashion along the crypt-villus axis of the mouse small intestine, making it an attractive system for studying how these processes are regulated and interrelated. A pathway for producing glycoconjugates was engineered in adult FVB\\/N transgenic mice by expressing a human alpha 1,3\\/4-fucosyltransferase (alpha 1,3\\/4-FT; EC 2.4.1.65) along

  10. Simulation of Mice Using G4MICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlett, L.; Rogers, C.

    2007-11-01

    The MICE experiment aims to demonstrate ionisation cooling for the first time experimentally. MICE is made up of a cooling channel, consisting of two RF linacs sandwiched between three absorbers, with instrumentation at either end. A detailed simulation of both the accelerator and detector elements of the experiment, called G4MICE, has been produced. This is required for both calibration of detectors and to provide a benchmark of whether the Monte Carlo is able to accurately reproduce cooling. This paper details the simulation of the components of the cooling channel and shows the cooling performance of MICE as simulated by G4MICE.

  11. A novel B-domain O-glycoPEGylated FVIII (N8-GP) demonstrates full efficacy and prolonged effect in hemophilic mice models

    PubMed Central

    Kjalke, Marianne; Karpf, Ditte M.; Balling, Kristoffer W.; Johansen, Peter B.; Elm, Torben; Řvlisen, Kristine; Möller, Flemming; Holmberg, Heidi L.; Gudme, Charlotte N.; Persson, Egon; Hilden, Ida; Pelzer, Hermann; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik; Jespersgaard, Christina; Bogsnes, Are; Pedersen, Anette A.; Kristensen, Anne K.; Peschke, Bernd; Kappers, Wendy; Rode, Frederik; Thim, Lars; Tranholm, Mikael; Ezban, Mirella; Olsen, Eva H. N.; Bjřrn, Sřren E.

    2013-01-01

    Frequent infusions of intravenous factor VIII (FVIII) are required to prevent bleeding associated with hemophilia A. To reduce the treatment burden, recombinant FVIII with a longer half-life was developed without changing the protein structure. FVIII–polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugates were prepared using an enzymatic process coupling PEG (ranging from 10 to 80 kDa) selectively to a unique O-linked glycan in the FVIII B-domain. Binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF) was maintained for all conjugates. Upon cleavage by thrombin, the B-domain and the associated PEG were released, generating activated FVIII (FVIIIa) with the same primary structure and specific activity as native FVIIIa. In both FVIII- and VWF-deficient mice, the half-life was found to increase with the size of PEG. In vivo potency and efficacy of FVIII conjugated with a 40-kDa PEG (N8-GP) and unmodified FVIII were not different. N8-GP had a longer duration of effect in FVIII-deficient mouse models, approximately a twofold prolonged half-life in mice, rabbits, and cynomolgus monkeys; however, the prolongation was less pronounced in rats. Binding capacity of N8-GP on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells was reduced compared with unmodified FVIII, resulting in several-fold reduced cellular uptake. In conclusion, N8-GP has the potential to offer efficacious prevention and treatment of bleeds in hemophilia A at reduced dosing frequency. PMID:23335368

  12. Genetic engineering of carbohydrate biosynthetic pathways in transgenic mice demonstrates cell cycle-associated regulation of glycoconjugate production in small intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bry, L; Falk, P G; Gordon, J L

    1996-01-01

    Proliferation, migration-associated differentiation, and cell death occur continuously and in a spatially well-organized fashion along the crypt-villus axis of the mouse small intestine, making it an attractive system for studying how these processes are regulated and interrelated. A pathway for producing glycoconjugates was engineered in adult FVB/N transgenic mice by expressing a human alpha 1,3/4-fucosyltransferase (alpha 1,3/4-FT; EC 2.4.1.65) along the length of this crypt-villus axis. The alpha 1,3/4-FT can use lacto-N-tetraose or lacto-neo-N-tetraose core chains to generate Lewis (Le) blood group antigens Le(a) or Le(x), respectively, and H type 1 or H type 2 core chains to produce Leb and Le(y). Single- and multilabel immunohistochemical studies revealed that expression of the alpha 1,3/4-FT results in production of Le(a) and Leb antigens in both undifferentiated proliferated crypt cells and in differentiated postmitotic villus-associated epithelial cells. In contrast, Le(x) antigens were restricted to crypt cells. Villus enterocytes can be induced to reenter the cell cycle by expression of simian virus 40 tumor antigen under the control of a promoter that only functions in differentiated members of this lineage. Bitransgenic animals, generated from a cross of FVB/N alpha 1,3/4-FT with FVB/N simian virus 40 tumor antigen mice, expand the range of Le(x) expression to include villus-associated enterocytes that have reentered the cell cycle. Thus, the fucosylations unveil a proliferation-dependent switch in oligosaccharide production, as defined by a monoclonal antibody specific for the Le(x) epitope. These findings show that genetic engineering of oligosaccharide biosynthetic pathways can be used to define markers for entry into, or progression through, the cell cycle and to identify changes in endogenous carbohydrate metabolism that occur when proliferative status is altered in a manner that is not deleterious to the system under study. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8577733

  13. First demonstration of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy-associated prion protein (PrPTSE) in extracellular vesicles from plasma of mice infected with mouse-adapted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by in vitro amplification.

    PubMed

    Saá, Paula; Yakovleva, Oksana; de Castro, Jorge; Vasilyeva, Irina; De Paoli, Silvia H; Simak, Jan; Cervenakova, Larisa

    2014-10-17

    The development of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in three recipients of non-leukoreduced red blood cells from asymptomatic donors who subsequently developed the disease has confirmed existing concerns about the possible spread of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) via blood products. In addition, the presence of disease-associated misfolded prion protein (PrP(TSE)), generally associated with infectivity, has been demonstrated in the blood of vCJD patients. However, its origin and distribution in this biological fluid are still unknown. Various studies have identified cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) among the protein cargo in human blood-circulating extracellular vesicles released from endothelial cells and platelets, and exosomes isolated from the conditioned media of TSE-infected cells have caused the disease when injected into experimental mice. In this study, we demonstrate the detection of PrP(TSE) in extracellular vesicles isolated from plasma samples collected during the preclinical and clinical phases of the disease from mice infected with mouse-adapted vCJD and confirm the presence of the exosomal marker Hsp70 in these preparations. PMID:25157106

  14. Intravenous injection of AAVrh10-GALC after the neonatal period in twitcher mice results in significant expression in the central and peripheral nervous systems and improvement of clinical features.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohammad A; Rao, Han Zhi; Luzi, Paola; Luddi, Alice; Curtis, Mark T; Wenger, David A

    2015-03-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) or Krabbe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from the defective lysosomal enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The lack of GALC enzyme leads to severe neurological symptoms. While most human patients are infants who do not survive beyond 2years of age, older patients are also diagnosed. In addition to human patients, several naturally occurring animal models, including dog, mouse, and monkey, have also been identified. The mouse model of Krabbe disease, twitcher (twi) mouse has been used for many treatment trials including gene therapy. Using the combination of intracerebroventricular, intracerebellar, and intravenous (iv) injection of the adeno-associated virus serotype rh10 (AAVrh10) expressing mouse GALC in neonate twi mice we previously have demonstrated a significantly extended normal life and exhibition of normal behavior in treated mice. In spite of the prolonged healthy life of these treated mice and improved myelination, it is unlikely that using multiple injection sites for viral administration will be approved for treatment of human patients. In this study, we have explored the outcome of the single iv injection of viral vector at post-natal day 10 (PND10). This has resulted in increased GALC activity in the central nervous system (CNS) and high GALC activity in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). As we have shown previously, an iv injection of AAVrh10 at PND2 results in a small extension of life beyond the typical lifespan of the untreated twi mice (~40days). In this study, we report that mice receiving a single iv injection at PND10 had no tremor and continued to gain weight until a few weeks before they died. On average, they lived 20-25days longer than untreated mice. We anticipate that this strategy in combination with other therapeutic options may be beneficial and applicable to treatment of human patients. PMID:25533112

  15. Humanized Mice Recapitulate Key Features of HIV-1 Infection: A Novel Concept Using Long-Acting Anti-Retroviral Drugs for Treating HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nischang, Marc; Sutmuller, Roger; Gers-Huber, Gustavo; Audigé, Annette; Li, Duo; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Baenziger, Stefan; Hofer, Ursula; Schlaepfer, Erika; Regenass, Stephan; Amssoms, Katie; Stoops, Bart; Van Cauwenberge, Anja; Boden, Daniel; Kraus, Guenter; Speck, Roberto F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Humanized mice generate a lymphoid system of human origin subsequent to transplantation of human CD34+ cells and thus are highly susceptible to HIV infection. Here we examined the efficacy of antiretroviral treatment (ART) when added to food pellets, and of long-acting (LA) antiretroviral compounds, either as monotherapy or in combination. These studies shall be inspiring for establishing a gold standard of ART, which is easy to administer and well supported by the mice, and for subsequent studies such as latency. Furthermore, they should disclose whether viral breakthrough and emergence of resistance occurs similar as in HIV-infected patients when ART is insufficient. Methods/Principal Findings NOD/shi-scid/?cnull (NOG) mice were used in all experimentations. We first performed pharmacokinetic studies of the drugs used, either added to food pellets (AZT, TDF, 3TC, RTV) or in a LA formulation that permitted once weekly subcutaneous administration (TMC278: non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, TMC181: protease inhibitor). A combination of 3TC, TDF and TMC278-LA or 3TC, TDF, TMC278-LA and TMC181-LA suppressed the viral load to undetectable levels in 15/19 (79%) and 14/14 (100%) mice, respectively. In successfully treated mice, subsequent monotherapy with TMC278-LA resulted in viral breakthrough; in contrast, the two LA compounds together prevented viral breakthrough. Resistance mutations matched the mutations most commonly observed in HIV patients failing therapy. Importantly, viral rebound after interruption of ART, presence of HIV DNA in successfully treated mice and in vitro reactivation of early HIV transcripts point to an existing latent HIV reservoir. Conclusions/Significance This report is a unique description of multiple aspects of HIV infection in humanized mice that comprised efficacy testing of various treatment regimens, including LA compounds, resistance mutation analysis as well as viral rebound after treatment interruption. Humanized mice will be highly valuable for exploring the antiviral potency of new compounds or compounds targeting the latent HIV reservoir. PMID:22719966

  16. A preclinical orthotopic model for glioblastoma recapitulates key features of human tumors and demonstrates sensitivity to a combination of MEK and PI3K pathway inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    El Meskini, Rajaa; Iacovelli, Anthony J.; Kulaga, Alan; Gumprecht, Michelle; Martin, Philip L.; Baran, Maureen; Householder, Deborah B.; Van Dyke, Terry; Weaver Ohler, Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest grade malignant brain tumor, are mostly ineffective, and better preclinical model systems are needed to increase the successful translation of drug discovery efforts into the clinic. Previous work describes a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model that contains perturbations in the most frequently dysregulated networks in GBM (driven by RB, KRAS and/or PI3K signaling and PTEN) that induce development of Grade IV astrocytoma with properties of the human disease. Here, we developed and characterized an orthotopic mouse model derived from the GEM that retains the features of the GEM model in an immunocompetent background; however, this model is also tractable and efficient for preclinical evaluation of candidate therapeutic regimens. Orthotopic brain tumors are highly proliferative, invasive and vascular, and express histology markers characteristic of human GBM. Primary tumor cells were examined for sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs. PI3K and MAPK pathway inhibitors, when used as single agents, inhibited cell proliferation but did not result in significant apoptosis. However, in combination, these inhibitors resulted in a substantial increase in cell death. Moreover, these findings translated into the in vivo orthotopic model: PI3K or MAPK inhibitor treatment regimens resulted in incomplete pathway suppression and feedback loops, whereas dual treatment delayed tumor growth through increased apoptosis and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Analysis of downstream pathway components revealed a cooperative effect on target downregulation. These concordant results, together with the morphologic similarities to the human GBM disease characteristics of the model, validate it as a new platform for the evaluation of GBM treatment. PMID:25431423

  17. A preclinical orthotopic model for glioblastoma recapitulates key features of human tumors and demonstrates sensitivity to a combination of MEK and PI3K pathway inhibitors.

    PubMed

    El Meskini, Rajaa; Iacovelli, Anthony J; Kulaga, Alan; Gumprecht, Michelle; Martin, Philip L; Baran, Maureen; Householder, Deborah B; Van Dyke, Terry; Weaver Ohler, Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest grade malignant brain tumor, are mostly ineffective, and better preclinical model systems are needed to increase the successful translation of drug discovery efforts into the clinic. Previous work describes a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model that contains perturbations in the most frequently dysregulated networks in GBM (driven by RB, KRAS and/or PI3K signaling and PTEN) that induce development of Grade IV astrocytoma with properties of the human disease. Here, we developed and characterized an orthotopic mouse model derived from the GEM that retains the features of the GEM model in an immunocompetent background; however, this model is also tractable and efficient for preclinical evaluation of candidate therapeutic regimens. Orthotopic brain tumors are highly proliferative, invasive and vascular, and express histology markers characteristic of human GBM. Primary tumor cells were examined for sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs. PI3K and MAPK pathway inhibitors, when used as single agents, inhibited cell proliferation but did not result in significant apoptosis. However, in combination, these inhibitors resulted in a substantial increase in cell death. Moreover, these findings translated into the in vivo orthotopic model: PI3K or MAPK inhibitor treatment regimens resulted in incomplete pathway suppression and feedback loops, whereas dual treatment delayed tumor growth through increased apoptosis and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Analysis of downstream pathway components revealed a cooperative effect on target downregulation. These concordant results, together with the morphologic similarities to the human GBM disease characteristics of the model, validate it as a new platform for the evaluation of GBM treatment. PMID:25431423

  18. Long-Term Characterization of Retinal Degeneration in rd1 and rd10 Mice Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Michaels, Keith V.; Magee, Sienna S.; Maricle, Anastasiya; Davin, Sean P.; Garg, Anupam K.; Gale, Michael J.; Tu, Daniel C.; Wen, Yuquan; Erker, Laura R.; Francis, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We characterize the in vivo changes over time in the retinal structure of wild-type mice alongside two lines of mice deficient in the ?-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. SD-OCT images were obtained using the Bioptigen spectral domain ophthalmic imaging system (SDOIS). Wild-type C57BL/6J, rd1 and rd10 mice ranging in age from P14 to P206 were sedated with 1% isoflurane. Horizontal and vertical linear scans through the optic nerve, and annular scans around the optic nerve were obtained. Results. SD-OCT imaging of wild-type mice demonstrated visibility of the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction, external limiting membrane (ELM), outer nuclear layer (ONL), and outer plexiform layer (OPL). At P14, most rd10 mice exhibited normal SD-OCT profiles, but some displayed changes in the IS/OS junction. At the same time point, rd1 mice had severe outer retinal degeneration. In rd10 mice, imaging revealed loss of the IS/OS junction by P18, hyperreflective changes in the ONL at P20, hyperreflective vitreous opacities, and shallow separation of the neural retina from the RPE. Retinal separations were not observed in rd1 mice. Segmentation analysis in wild-type mice demonstrated relatively little variability between animals, while in rd10 and rd1 mice there was a steady decline in outer retinal thickness. Histologic studies demonstrated correlation of retinal features with those seen on SD-OCT scans. Segmentation analysis provides a quantitative and reproducible method for measuring in vivo retinal changes in mice. Conclusions. SD-OCT provides a non-invasive method of following long-term retinal changes in mice in vivo. Although rd10 and rd1 mice have mutations in the same gene, they demonstrate significantly different features on SD-OCT. PMID:22562504

  19. Specific suppression of insulin sensitivity in growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted (GHR-KO) mice attenuates phenotypic features of slow aging.

    PubMed

    Arum, Oge; Boparai, Ravneet K; Saleh, Jamal K; Wang, Feiya; Dirks, Angela L; Turner, Jeremy G; Kopchick, John J; Liu, Jun-Li; Khardori, Romesh K; Bartke, Andrzej

    2014-12-01

    In addition to their extended lifespans, slow-aging growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene-disrupted (knockout) (GHR-KO) mice are hypoinsulinemic and highly sensitive to the action of insulin. It has been proposed that this insulin sensitivity is important for their longevity and increased healthspan. We tested whether this insulin sensitivity of the GHR-KO mouse is necessary for its retarded aging by abrogating that sensitivity with a transgenic alteration that improves development and secretory function of pancreatic ?-cells by expressing Igf-1 under the rat insulin promoter 1 (RIP::IGF-1). The RIP::IGF-1 transgene increased circulating insulin content in GHR-KO mice, and thusly fully normalized their insulin sensitivity, without affecting the proliferation of any non-?-cell cell types. Multiple (nonsurvivorship) longevity-associated physiological and endocrinological characteristics of these mice (namely beneficial blood glucose regulatory control, altered metabolism, and preservation of memory capabilities) were partially or completely normalized, thus supporting the causal role of insulin sensitivity for the decelerated senescence of GHR-KO mice. We conclude that a delayed onset and/or decreased pace of aging can be hormonally regulated. PMID:25244225

  20. H9c2 and HL-1 cells demonstrate distinct features of energy metabolism, mitochondrial function and sensitivity to hypoxia-reoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Javadov, Sabzali; Sickinger, Stephan; Frotschnig, Sandra; Grimm, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of cardiac energy metabolism plays a critical role in many cardiac diseases, including heart failure, myocardial infarction and ischemia–reperfusion injury and organ transplantation. The characteristics of these diseases can be elucidated in vivo, though animal-free in vitro experiments, with primary adult or neonatal cardiomyocytes, the rat ventricular H9c2 cell line or the mouse atrial HL-1 cells, providing intriguing experimental alternatives. Currently, it is not clear how H9c2 and HL-1 cells mimic the responses of primary cardiomyocytes to hypoxia and oxidative stress. In the present study, we show that H9c2 cells are more similar to primary cardiomyocytes than HL-1 cells with regard to energy metabolism patterns, such as cellular ATP levels, bioenergetics, metabolism, function and morphology of mitochondria. In contrast to HL-1, H9c2 cells possess beta-tubulin II, a mitochondrial isoform of tubulin that plays an important role in mitochondrial function and regulation. We demonstrate that H9c2 cells are significantly more sensitive to hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in terms of loss of cell viability and mitochondrial respiration, whereas HL-1 cells were more resistant to hypoxia as evidenced by their relative stability. In comparison to HL-1 cells, H9c2 cells exhibit a higher phosphorylation (activation) state of AMP-activated protein kinase, but lower peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha levels, suggesting that each cell type is characterized by distinct regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results provide evidence that H9c2 cardiomyoblasts are more energetically similar to primary cardiomyocytes than are atrial HL-1 cells. H9c2 cells can be successfully used as an in vitro model to simulate cardiac ischemia–reperfusion injury. PMID:25450968

  1. [Features of behavioral reactions of chronically irradiated mice in the raised crosswise labyrinth with various genetically determined radiosensitivity and possibilities of their modification by the fungal biopolymer complex].

    PubMed

    Seniuk, O F; Gorovo?, L F; Kovalev, V A; Palamar, L A; Krul', N I; Zhidkov, A V; Chemerski?, G F; Kireev, S I; Khatuntseva, I V

    2013-01-01

    Structural elements of the central nervous system--neurons, along with the higher neuroendocrine structures and the hypothalamus centres, show high sensitivity to a chronic action of low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) in view of their extreme enrichment by phospholipids and intensive supply by oxygen, creating favorable conditions for the development of oxidizing stress. Stressful influences cause negative emotions in the behaviour of animals manifested as fear or uneasiness. The study represents the results of comparative research into the behavioral reactions characterized by uneasiness in the Balb/c and C57bl/6 mice exposed to a chronic irradiation at low doses. The chitin-melanin-glucan complex from fungi Fomes fomentarius (ChMG) was approved as an adaptive agent. It has been shown that under identical conditions, deposition levels of radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr are raised in mice with IR hypersensitivity--line Balb/c, in comparison with less radio sensitive mice--line C57bl/6. Simultaneously, Balb/c mice were observed to exhibit the signs of a more anxious behaviour in the new environment. Chronic external and internal radiation exposure to rare ionizing radiation at low doses promotes strengthening of anxiety and phobic reactions in mice with IR hypersensitivity. The use of ChMG in animals neutralized the increase in anxiety and phobic reactions after a prolonged irradiation, thus indicating the presence in ChMG of the anxiolitic activity along with the above mentioned powerful radiosorbent, antioxidant, gene protective and immunomodulatory properties. PMID:23786031

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  3. Novel NG2-CreERT2 knock-in mice demonstrate heterogeneous differentiation potential of NG2 glia during development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhui; Zhao, Na; Bai, Xianshu; Karram, Khalad; Trotter, Jacqueline; Goebbels, Sandra; Scheller, Anja; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2014-06-01

    NG2 (nerve/glia antigen-2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and also known as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4. In the parenchyma of the central nervous system, NG2-expressing (NG2(+) ) cells have been identified as a novel type of glia with a strong potential to generate oligodendrocytes (OLs) in the developing white matter. However, the differentiation potential of NG2 glia remained controversial, largely attributable to shortcomings of transgenic mouse models used for fate mapping. To minimize these restrictions and to more faithfully mimic the endogenous NG2 expression in vivo, we generated a mouse line in which the open reading frame of the tamoxifen-inducible form of the Cre DNA recombinase (CreERT2) was inserted into the NG2 locus by homologous recombination. Results from this novel mouse line demonstrate that at different developmental stages of the brain, NG2(+) cells either stayed as NG2 glia or differentiated into OLs during the whole life span. Interestingly, when Cre activity was induced at embryonic stages, a significant number of reporter(+) astrocytes could be detected in the gray matter after birth. However, in other brain regions, such as olfactory bulb, brain stem, and cerebellum, all of the NG2 glia was restricted to the OL lineage. In addition, tamoxifen-sensitive and NG2 gene locus-dependent gene recombination could be detected in a small, but persistent population of cortical NeuN(+) neurons starting from the second postnatal week. PMID:24578301

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student demonstrations. (CW)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  8. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article details two demonstrations involving color changes. Included are "Manganese Color Reactions" and "Flame Colors Demonstration." Include a list of materials needed, procedures, cautions, and results. (CW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for college level chemistry courses including: "Electrochemical Cells Using Sodium Silicate" and "A Simple, Vivid Demonstration of Selective Precipitation." Lists materials, preparation, procedures, and precautions. (CW)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  17. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  3. Physics Demonstrations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A collection of in-depth physics demonstrations with instructions for doing it yourself, videos that let you see how it's done, and suggestions for developing some of the demos into experiments. The demonstrations were developed and tested by The Science House, the mathematics and science learning outreach project of North Carolina State University.

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the photochromic behavior of mercury(II) bis(dithizonate) in providing a colorful demonstration of the effect that visible light can have on the conformation and bonding of molecules in solution. Provides a description of the demonstration itself, along with the preparation needed to complete it. (TW)

  6. Complete Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are demonstrations designed to reveal the important "nonsolvent" properties of water through its interaction with a toy called "Magic Sand" and other synthetic silica derivatives, especially those bonded with organic moities. The procedures for seven demonstrations along with a discussion of the effects are presented. (CW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations suitable for chemistry instruction. One involves fractal structures obtained by electrodeposition of silver at an air-water interface and the other deals with molecular weights and music. (TW)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  18. Kinetic Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgardt, Erik D.; Ryan, Hank

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on chemical reaction kinetics that consists of a predemonstration activity, the demonstration, and a set of postdemonstration activities that help students transfer the concepts to actual chemical reactions. Simulates various aspects of chemical reaction kinetics. (JRH)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  1. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  2. Hyperalgesic activity of kisspeptin in mice

    E-print Network

    Spampinato, Simona; Trabucco, Angela; Biasiotta, Antonella; Biagioni, Francesca; Cruccu, Giorgio; Copani, Agata; Colledge, William H; Sortino, Maria Angela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Chiechio, Santina

    2011-11-23

    ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the ipsilateral dorsal horn as compared to naive mice and mice treated with formalin alone. Conclusion These data demonstrate for the first time that kisspeptin regulates pain sensitivity in rodents and suggest that peripheral...

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three broad classes of magnetic behavior: diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic. Presents a simple lecture demonstration using an overhead projector to synthesize triiron tetraoxide and to show its interaction with a magnetic field and comparing it to a paramagnetic material. (MVL)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  9. Online feature selection with streaming features.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xindong; Yu, Kui; Ding, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Xingquan

    2013-05-01

    We propose a new online feature selection framework for applications with streaming features where the knowledge of the full feature space is unknown in advance. We define streaming features as features that flow in one by one over time whereas the number of training examples remains fixed. This is in contrast with traditional online learning methods that only deal with sequentially added observations, with little attention being paid to streaming features. The critical challenges for Online Streaming Feature Selection (OSFS) include 1) the continuous growth of feature volumes over time, 2) a large feature space, possibly of unknown or infinite size, and 3) the unavailability of the entire feature set before learning starts. In the paper, we present a novel Online Streaming Feature Selection method to select strongly relevant and nonredundant features on the fly. An efficient Fast-OSFS algorithm is proposed to improve feature selection performance. The proposed algorithms are evaluated extensively on high-dimensional datasets and also with a real-world case study on impact crater detection. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithms achieve better compactness and higher prediction accuracy than existing streaming feature selection algorithms. PMID:23520258

  10. Passive transfer of antibodies to the linear epitope 60?kD Ro 273-289 induces features of Sjögren's syndrome in naive mice.

    PubMed

    Maier-Moore, J S; Kurien, B T; D'Souza, A; Bockus, L; Asfa, S; Dorri, Y; Hubbell, S; Yeliosof, O; Obeso, D; Schoeb, T R; Jonsson, R; Scofield, R H

    2015-04-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that primarily affects the lacrimal and salivary glands causing dry eyes and mouth. Antibodies to Ro60 are observed frequently in patients with SS; however, the role of these antibodies in SS initiation and progression remains unclear. The sequence Ro60 273-289 (Ro274) is a known B cell epitope of Ro60 and antibodies to this epitope have been observed in a subset of SS patients and in animals immunized with Ro60 protein. Animals immunized with Ro274 linear peptide develop a Sjögren's-like illness. We hypothesized that passive transfer of anti-Ro274-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G would induce a Sjögren's-like phenotype. To evaluate this hypothesis, we adoptively transferred affinity-purified Ro274 antibodies into naive BALB/c animals, then evaluated salivary gland histology, function and IgG localization 4?days post-transfer. At this time-point, there was no demonstrable mononuclear cell infiltration and salivary glands were histologically normal, but we observed a functional deficit in stimulated salivary flow of animals receiving Ro274 antibodies compared to animals receiving control IgG. Cellular fractionation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed Ro274-specific antibodies in the nucleus and cytoplasmic fractions of isolated parotid salivary gland cells that was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These data support the hypothesis that antibodies to Ro274 deposit in salivary glands can enter intact salivary gland cells and are involved in the dysregulation of salivary flow in SS. PMID:25370295

  11. Partial Return Yoke for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.; Plate, S; ,

    2013-05-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a large scale experiment which is presently assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, UK. The purpose of MICE is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling experimentally. Ionization cooling is an important accelerator concept which will be essential for future HEP experiments such as a potential Muon Collider or a Neutrino Factory. The MICE experiment will house up to 18 superconducting solenoids, all of which produce a substantial amount of magnetic flux. Recently it was realized that this magnetic flux leads to a considerable stray magnetic field in the MICE hall. This is a concern as technical equipment in the MICE hall may may be compromised by this. In July 2012 a concept called partial return yoke was presented to the MICE community, which reduces the stray field in the MICE hall to a safe level. This report summarizes the general concept, engineering considerations and the expected shielding performance.

  12. Immunopathogenesis of environmentally induced lupus in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, V M; Satoh, M; Richards, H B; Yoshida, H; Shaw, M; Jennette, J C; Reeves, W H

    1999-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune syndrome defined by clinical and serologic features, including arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and certain autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear ribonucleoprotein (nRNP)/Smith antigen (Sm), DNA, and ribosomal P. Although lupus is considered primarily a genetic disorder, we recently demonstrated the induction of a syndrome strikingly similar to spontaneous lupus in many nonautoimmune strains of mice exposed to the isoprenoid alkane pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane), a component of mineral oil. Intraperitoneal injection of pristane leads to the formation of lipogranulomas consisting of phagocytic cells that have engulfed the oil and collections of lymphocytes. Subsequently, pristane-treated BALB/c and SJL mice develop autoantibodies characteristic of SLE, including anti-nRNP/Sm, antiribosomal P, anti-Su, antichromatin, anti-single-stranded DNA, and anti-double-stranded DNA. This is accompanied by a severe glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition, mesangial or mesangiocapillary proliferation, and proteinuria. All inbred mice examined appear to be susceptible to this novel form of chemically induced lupus. Pristane-induced lupus is the only inducible model of autoimmunity associated with the clinical syndrome as well as with the characteristic serologic abnormalities of SLE. Defining the immunopathogenesis of pristane-induced lupus in mice may provide insight into the causes of spontaneous (idiopathic) lupus and also may lead to information concerning possible risks associated with the ingestion or inhalation of mineral oil and exposure to hydrocarbons in the environment. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10502537

  13. System Demonstration

    E-print Network

    Multilingual Weather Forecast; Tianfang Yao; Dongmo Zhang; Qian Wang

    The MLWFA (Multilingual Weather Forecasts Assistant) system will be demonstrated. It is developed to generate the multilingual text of the weather forecasts automatically. The raw data from the weather observation can be used to generate the weather element chart. According to the weather change trend, the forecasters can directly modify the value Of the element on the chart, such as the center .point value, the isoline and the isocircle. After 'that, the modified data are stored as the input for the system. The system can select a schema depending on the input or the requirement from the users. The schema library can be conveniently maintained, such as the schema modification 'or extension. Through optimizing and mapping the schema .tree, the microplanner constructs the brief and coherent internal text structure for the surface generator. After the processing Of the generator, the multilingual 'weather forecasts used for the broadcast program are generated.

  14. Volcanic Features

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-12-17

    This interactive resource adapted from the National Park Service illustrates the variety of landforms and features created by volcanoes. Featured are calderas, craters, fumaroles and other geothermal features, igneous rocks, lava flows, lava tubes, and maars.

  15. [Effect of intranasal administration of dopamine on anxiety and locomotor activity of two lines of mice].

    PubMed

    Kholodar', A V; Amikishieva, A V; Anisimov, M P

    2011-07-01

    Intranasal administration of dopamine (0.3; 3 and 30 microg/kg) on anxious behaviour of mice was studied using elevated plus-maze and open fields tests and the pinch-induced catalepsy on parallel bars test. Dopamine was introduced as nose drops or inhalation of nanoparticles of the compound solution in C57B1/6J and CBA/Lac mice with differences of dopaminergic function features. In our experiment, dopamine had anxiolytic and elevated motor activity effects in C57B1/6J, but not in the CBA/Lac mice. Nose drops were more effective than inhalation; perhaps, it was a more stressful manipulation. Apparently dopamine increased the number of CBA/Lac mice who demonstrated catalepsy and the reflex duration. Indeed, the neurotransmitter is active in different psycho-emotional phenomena. PMID:21961293

  16. Deletion of IL-12p35 induces liver fibrosis in dominant negative transforming growth factor ? receptor type II mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Masanobu; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guo-Xiang; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Ando, Yugo; Kawata, Kazuhito; Park, Ogyi; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Coppel, Ross L.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Ridgway, William M.; Gao, Bin; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Flavell, Richard; He, Xiao-Song; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that mice with a dominant negative transforming growth factor ? receptor restricted to T cells (dnTGF?RII mice) develop an inflammatory biliary ductular disease that strongly resembles human primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Furthermore, deletion of the gene encoding interleukin (IL)-12p40 resulted in a strain (IL-12p40?/?dnTGF?RII) with dramatically reduced autoimmune cholangitis. To further investigate the role of the IL-12 cytokine family in dnTGF?RII autoimmune biliary disease, we deleted the gene encoding the IL-12p35 subunit from dnTGF?RII mice, resulting in an IL-12p35?/? dnTGF?RII strain which is deficient in two members of the IL-12 family, IL-12 and IL-35. In contrast to IL-12p40?/? mice, the IL-12p35?/? mice developed liver inflammation and bile duct damage with similar severity but delayed onset as the parental dnTGF?RII mice. The p35?/? mice also demonstrated a distinct cytokine profile characterized by a shift from a Th1 to a Th17 response. Strikingly, liver fibrosis was frequently observed in IL-12p35?/? mice. In conclusion, IL-12p35?/? dnTGF?RII mice, histologically and immunologically, reflect key features of PBC, providing a useful generic model to understand the immunopathology of human PBC. PMID:22576253

  17. Islet-infiltrating lymphocytes from prediabetic NOD mice rapidly transfer diabetes to NOD-scid\\/scid mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. W. Rohane; A. Shimada; D. T. Kim; C. T. Edwards; B. Charlton; L. D. Shultz; C. G. Fathman

    1995-01-01

    In an effort to study the development of diabetes in NOD mice, our laboratory developed a novel adoptive transfer model using NOD-scid\\/scid (NOD-scid) mice as recipients of islet-infiltrating lymphocytes from donor prediabetic female NOD mice. We first confirmed previous results that demonstrated that splenocytes of diabetic and prediabetic female NOD mice could transfer diabetes to NOD-scid mice. We demonstrated that

  18. Mice Rule! (or Not)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Engineering K-PhD Program,

    Students explore the relationships between genetics, biodiversity and evolution through a simple activity involving hypothetical wild mouse populations. First, students toss coins to determine what traits a set of mouse parents possesses, such as fur color, body size, heat tolerance and running speed. Next, they use coin tossing to determine the traits a mouse pup born to these parents possesses. These physical features are then compared to features that would be most adaptive in several different environmental conditions. Finally, students consider what would happen to the mouse offspring if those environmental conditions were to change. Which mice would be most likely to survive and produce the next generation?

  19. Improved Establishment of Embryonic Stem (ES) Cell Lines from the Chinese Kunming Mice by Hybridization with 129 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shumin; Yan, Xingrong; Liu, Huanhuan; Cai, Xin; Cao, Suizhong; Shen, Liuhong; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Ma, Xiaoping; Wang, Ya; Ren, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    Chinese Kunming mice (Mus musculus Km), widely used as laboratory animals throughout China, remain very refractory for embryonic stem (ES) cell isolation. The present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of hybridization with 129/Sv mice, and culture media containing fetal bovine serum (FBS) or Knockout serum replacement (KSR) on ES cell isolation from Kunming mice. The results demonstrated that ES cells had been effectively isolated from the hybrid embryos of Kunming and 129/Sv mice using all three media containing 15% FBS, 15% KSR and their mixture of 14% KSR and 1% FBS, individually. These isolated ES cells had maintained in vitro undifferentiated for a long time, exhibiting all features specific for mouse ES cells. In addition, the rates of ES cell isolation in the medium containing 14% KSR and 1% FBS, was 46.67% and significantly higher than those in another two media containing only FBS or KSR (p < 0.05). Contrarily, no ES cell line had been established from Kunming mouse inbred embryos using the same protocols. These results suggested that ES cells with long-term self-renewal ability could be efficiently generated from hybrid embryos of Kunming and 129/Sv mice, and a small volume of FBS was necessary to isolate ES cells in the KSR medium when embryos and early ES cells cultured. PMID:24573251

  20. Combined exposure to cigarette smoke and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae drives development of a COPD phenotype in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoke (CS) is the major etiologic factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). CS-exposed mice develop emphysema and mild pulmonary inflammation but no airway obstruction, which is also a prominent feature of COPD. Therefore, CS may interact with other factors, particularly respiratory infections, in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in COPD. Methods C57BL/6 mice were exposed to CS for 2 h a day, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. Mice were also exposed to heat-killed non-typeable H. influenzae (HK-NTHi) on days 7 and 21. One day after the last exposure to CS, mice were sacrificed and lung inflammation and mechanics, emphysematous changes, and goblet cell metaplasia were assessed. Mice exposed to CS or HK-NTHi alone or room air served as controls. To determine the susceptibility to viral infections, we also challenged these mice with rhinovirus (RV). Results Unlike mice exposed to CS or HK-NTHi alone, animals exposed to CS/HK-NTHi developed emphysema, lung inflammation and goblet cell metaplasia in both large and small airways. CS/HK-NTHi-exposed mice also expressed increased levels of mucin genes and cytokines compared to mice in other groups. CS/HK-NTHi-exposed mice infected with RV demonstrated increased viral persistence, sustained neutrophilia, and further increments in mucin gene and chemokine expression compared to other groups. Conclusions These findings indicate that in addition to CS, bacteria may also contribute to development of COPD, particularly changes in airways. Mice exposed to CS/HK-NTHi are also more susceptible to subsequent viral infection than mice exposed to either CS or HK-NTHi alone. PMID:24495712

  1. Self-tracking Energy Transfer for Neural Stimulation in Untethered Mice

    E-print Network

    Ho, John S; Iyer, Shrivats Mohan; Christensen, Amelia J; Grosenick, Logan; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott L; Poon, Ada S Y

    2015-01-01

    Optical or electrical stimulation of neural circuits in mice during natural behavior is an important paradigm for studying brain function. Conventional systems for optogenetics and electrical microstimulation require tethers or large head-mounted devices that disrupt animal behavior. We report a method for wireless powering of small-scale implanted devices based on the strong localization of energy that occurs during resonant interaction between a radio-frequency cavity and intrinsic modes in mice. The system features self-tracking over a wide (16 cm diameter) operational area, and is used to demonstrate wireless activation of cortical neurons with miniaturized stimulators (10 mm$^{3}$, 20 mg) fully implanted under the skin.

  2. A lymphatic defect causes ocular hypertension and glaucoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Benjamin R; Heinen, Stefan; Jeansson, Marie; Ghosh, Asish K; Fatima, Anees; Sung, Hoon-Ki; Onay, Tuncer; Chen, Hui; Yamaguchi, Shinji; Economides, Aris N; Flenniken, Ann; Gale, Nicholas W; Hong, Young-Kwon; Fawzi, Amani; Liu, Xiaorong; Kume, Tsutomu; Quaggin, Susan E

    2014-10-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness, afflicting more than 60 million people worldwide. Increased intraocular pressure (IOP) due to impaired aqueous humor drainage is a major risk factor for the development of glaucoma. Here, we demonstrated that genetic disruption of the angiopoietin/TIE2 (ANGPT/TIE2) signaling pathway results in high IOP, buphthalmos, and classic features of glaucoma, including retinal ganglion degeneration and vision loss. Eyes from mice with induced deletion of Angpt1 and Angpt2 (A1A2Flox(WB) mice) lacked drainage pathways in the corneal limbus, including Schlemm's canal and lymphatic capillaries, which share expression of the PROX1, VEGFR3, and FOXC family of transcription factors. VEGFR3 and FOXCs have been linked to lymphatic disorders in patients, and FOXC1 has been linked to glaucoma. In contrast to blood endothelium, in which ANGPT2 is an antagonist of ANGPT1, we have shown that both ligands cooperate to regulate TIE2 in the lymphatic network of the eye. While A1A2Flox(WB) mice developed high IOP and glaucoma, expression of ANGPT1 or ANGPT2 alone was sufficient for ocular drainage. Furthermore, we demonstrated that loss of FOXC2 from lymphatics results in TIE2 downregulation, suggesting a mechanism for ocular defects in patients with FOXC mutations. These data reveal a pathogenetic and molecular basis for glaucoma and demonstrate the importance of angiopoietin ligand cooperation in the lymphatic endothelium. PMID:25202984

  3. A lymphatic defect causes ocular hypertension and glaucoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Benjamin R.; Heinen, Stefan; Jeansson, Marie; Ghosh, Asish K.; Fatima, Anees; Sung, Hoon-Ki; Onay, Tuncer; Chen, Hui; Yamaguchi, Shinji; Economides, Aris N.; Flenniken, Ann; Gale, Nicholas W.; Hong, Young-Kwon; Fawzi, Amani; Liu, Xiaorong; Kume, Tsutomu; Quaggin, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness, afflicting more than 60 million people worldwide. Increased intraocular pressure (IOP) due to impaired aqueous humor drainage is a major risk factor for the development of glaucoma. Here, we demonstrated that genetic disruption of the angiopoietin/TIE2 (ANGPT/TIE2) signaling pathway results in high IOP, buphthalmos, and classic features of glaucoma, including retinal ganglion degeneration and vision loss. Eyes from mice with induced deletion of Angpt1 and Angpt2 (A1A2FloxWB mice) lacked drainage pathways in the corneal limbus, including Schlemm’s canal and lymphatic capillaries, which share expression of the PROX1, VEGFR3, and FOXC family of transcription factors. VEGFR3 and FOXCs have been linked to lymphatic disorders in patients, and FOXC1 has been linked to glaucoma. In contrast to blood endothelium, in which ANGPT2 is an antagonist of ANGPT1, we have shown that both ligands cooperate to regulate TIE2 in the lymphatic network of the eye. While A1A2FloxWB mice developed high IOP and glaucoma, expression of ANGPT1 or ANGPT2 alone was sufficient for ocular drainage. Furthermore, we demonstrated that loss of FOXC2 from lymphatics results in TIE2 downregulation, suggesting a mechanism for ocular defects in patients with FOXC mutations. These data reveal a pathogenetic and molecular basis for glaucoma and demonstrate the importance of angiopoietin ligand cooperation in the lymphatic endothelium. PMID:25202984

  4. Pathogenicity of Nocardia transvalensis for laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Gugnani, H C; Iboko, I C; Ikerionwu, S E

    1986-11-01

    Nocardia transvalensis was found to be virulent for laboratory mice both by intraperitoneal and intravenous routes of inoculation, the latter route producing a more progressive and disseminating infection. Cortisone administration was found to enhance the susceptibility of mice, the LD50 for the cortisone treated mice being five times less than that for the untreated animals. In the tissues of cortisone treated mice, N. transvalensis grew as dispersed filaments with coccobacillary forms or sometimes their loose aggregates, whereas in normal animals granule formation was a conspicuous feature. The pathogenicity of N. transvalensis is compared with that of N. asteroides, N. brasiliensis and N. caviae from published reports. PMID:3796715

  5. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling for a beam of muons, crucial for the requirements of a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. Muon cooling is achieved by measuring the reduction of the four dimensional transverse emittance for a beam of muons passing through low density absorbers and then accelerating the longitudinal component of the momentum using RF cavities. The absorbers are maintained in a focusing magnetic field to reduce the beta function of the beam and the RF cavities are kept inside coupling coils. The main goal of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, of order -10% for large emittance beams, with an accuracy of 1%(which imposes a requirement that the absolute emittance be measured with an accuracy of 0.1%). This paper will discuss the status of MICE, including the progress in commissioning the muon beam line at the ISIS accelerator at RAL, the construction of the different detector elements in MICE and the prospects for the future.

  6. RAP-011, an activin receptor ligand trap, increases hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Jacqueline M; Barkataki, Sangjucta; Berger, Alan E; Cheadle, Chris; Xue, Qian-Li; Sung, Victoria; Roy, Cindy N

    2015-01-01

    Over expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide is a common feature of iron-restricted anemia in humans. We investigated the erythroid response to either erythropoietin or RAP-011, a "murinized" ortholog of sotatercept, in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. Sotatercept, a soluble, activin receptor type IIA ligand trap, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of anemias associated with chronic renal disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, ?-thalassemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia and acts by inhibiting signaling downstream of activin and other Transforming Growth Factor-? superfamily members. We found that erythropoietin and RAP-011 increased hemoglobin concentration in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. While erythropoietin treatment depleted splenic iron stores in C57BL/6 mice, RAP-011 treatment did not deplete splenic iron stores in mice of either genotype. Bone marrow erythroid progenitors from erythropoietin-treated mice exhibited iron-restricted erythropoiesis, as indicated by increased median fluorescence intensity of transferrin receptor immunostaining by flow cytometry. In contrast, RAP-011-treated mice did not exhibit the same degree of iron-restricted erythropoiesis. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that RAP-011 can improve hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 transgenic mice. Our data support the hypothesis that RAP-011 has unique biologic effects which prevent or circumvent depletion of mouse splenic iron stores. RAP-011 may, therefore, be an appropriate therapeutic for trials in human anemias characterized by increased expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide and iron-restricted erythropoiesis. PMID:25236856

  7. Maintenance of donor phenotype after full-thickness skin transplantation from mice with chronic proliferative dermatitis (cpdm/cpdm) to C57BL/Ka and nude mice and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Gijbels, M J; HogenEsch, H; Bruijnzeel, P L; Elliott, G R; Zurcher, C

    1995-12-01

    Chronic proliferative dermatitis is a spontaneous mutation in C57BL/Ka mice (cpdm/cpdm) and is characterized by epithelial hyperproliferation, infiltration by eosinophils and macrophages, and vascular dilatation. To elucidate whether these pathologic features are the result of a local (skin) process or a consequence of a systemic disorder, transplantations were performed of full-thickness grafts of affected skin from cpdm/cpdm mice and normal skin from control (C57BL/Ka) mice on the back of cpdm/cpdm, C57BL/Ka and athymic nude mice. After 3 months, the grafts maintained the histologic phenotype of the donor animal. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 continued to be expressed by basal keratinocytes of the cpdm/cpdm grafts after transplantation. In contrast, the basal keratinocytes of the C57BL/Ka grafts onto cpdm/cpdm mice remained negative for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 3 months after transplantation. An increased number of proliferating keratinocytes was present in the cpdm/cpdm skin-graft transplanted to nudes or to C57BL/Ka mice based on short-term bromodeoxyuridine labeling. The bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in the keratinocytes of the control C57BL/Ka skin grafts transplanted to cpdm/cpdm, nude, or C57BL/Ka mice was the same as in the keratinocytes of normal C57BL/Ka mice. This study demonstrates that the pathologic features found in the cpdm/cpdm mice are the result of a disorder in the epidermis or dermis and not due to a systemic defect. PMID:7490470

  8. Lentiviral Integration Preferences in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shang-Hsun; Cheng, Pei-Hsun; Sullivan, Robert T.; Thomas, James W.; Chan, Anthony W.S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lentiviral gene transfer has a significant impact on the development of biomedical research. One of the most important features of lentiviruses is the capability to infect both dividing and nondividing cells. However, little is known whether integration preference exists, specifically in early embryos. An in-depth genome analysis on 112 independent lentiviral integration sites from 43 transgenic founder mice was performed to determine if there are preferable sites for lentiviral integration in early embryonic genome. Our results demonstrated that lentiviruses were biased in integrating within intragenic regions, especially in the introns. However, no integration preference was found associated with specific chromosomes, repetitive elements, or CpG islands, nor was there any preference for integrating at close proximity to transcription start sites. Our findings suggested that lentiviruses were biased to integrate into the intragenic regions of early embryonic genome of mouse. PMID:18821598

  9. Extra-prostatic Transgene-associated Neoplastic Lesions in Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice. PMID:24742627

  10. Modulation of arachidonic and linoleic acid metabolites in myeloperoxidase deficient mice during acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kubala, Lukas; Schmelzer, Kara R.; Klinke, Anna; Kolarova, Hana; Baldus, Stephan; Hammock, Bruce D.; Eiserich, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    Acute inflammation is a common feature of many life-threatening pathologies, including septic shock. One hallmark of acute inflammation is the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids forming bioactive products, which regulate inflammation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant phagocyte-derived hemoprotein released during phagocyte activation. Here, we investigated the role of MPO in modulating biologically active arachidonic acid (AA) and linoleic acid (LA) metabolites during acute inflammation. Wild-type and MPO-knockout (KO) mice were exposed to intraperitoneally injected endotoxin for 24 h, and plasma LA and AA oxidation products were comprehensively analyzed using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Compared to wild-type mice, MPO-KO mice had significantly lower plasma levels of LA epoxides and corresponding LA- and AA-derived fatty acid diols. AA and LA hydroxy intermediates (hydroxyeicosatetraenoic and hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids) were also significantly lower in MPO-KO mice. Conversely, MPO-deficient mice had significantly higher plasma levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes with well-known pro-inflammatory properties. In vitro experiments revealed significantly lower amounts of AA and LA epoxides, LA- and AA-derived fatty acid diols, and AA and LA hydroxy intermediates in stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils isolated from MPO-KO mice. Our results demonstrate that MPO modulates the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators during acute inflammation. In this way, may control acute inflammatory diseases. PMID:20156554

  11. Thymic epithelium determines a spontaneous chronic neuritis in Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer zu Horste, Gerd; Mausberg, Anne K; Cordes, Steffen; El-Haddad, Houda; Partke, Hans-Joachim; Leussink, Verena I; Roden, Michael; Martin, Stephan; Steinman, Lawrence; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C

    2014-09-15

    The NOD mouse strain spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes. A deficiency in costimulatory molecules, such as B7-2, on the NOD genetic background prevents diabetes but instead triggers an inflammatory peripheral neuropathy. This constitutes a shift in the target of autoimmunity, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that NOD mice deficient for isoforms of ICAM-1, which comediate costimulatory functions, spontaneously develop a chronic autoimmune peripheral neuritis instead of diabetes. The disease is transferred by CD4(+) T cells, which infiltrate peripheral nerves together with macrophages and B cells and are autoreactive against peripheral myelin protein zero. These Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice exhibit unaltered numbers of regulatory T cells, but increased IL-17-producing T cells, which determine the severity, but not the target specificity, of autoimmunity. Ab-mediated ICAM-1 blockade triggers neuritis only in young NOD mice. Thymic epithelium from Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice features an altered expression of costimulatory molecules and induces neuritis and myelin autoreactivity after transplantation into nude mice in vivo. Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice exhibit a specifically altered TCR repertoire. Our findings introduce a novel animal model of chronic inflammatory neuropathies and indicate that altered expression of ICAM-1 on thymic epithelium shifts autoimmunity specifically toward peripheral nerves. This improves our understanding of autoimmunity in the peripheral nervous system with potential relevance for human diseases. PMID:25108020

  12. Enhanced Susceptibility to Pulmonary Infection with Burkholderia cepacia in Cftr?/? Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Uma; Thanassoulis, George; Cherapanov, Vera; Lu, Annie; Sjolin, Carola; Steer, Brent; Wu, Yi Jun; Rotstein, Ori D.; Kent, Geraldine; McKerlie, Colin; Forstner, Janet; Downey, Gregory P.

    2001-01-01

    Progressive pulmonary infection is the dominant clinical feature of cystic fibrosis (CF), but the molecular basis for this susceptibility remains incompletely understood. To study this problem, we developed a model of chronic pneumonia by repeated instillation of a clinical isolate of Burkholderia cepacia (genomovar III, ET12 strain), an opportunistic gram-negative bacterium, from a case of CF into the lungs of Cftr m1unc?/? (Cftr?/?) and congenic Cftr+/+ controls. Nine days after the last instillation, the CF transmembrane regulator knockout mice showed persistence of viable bacteria with chronic severe bronchopneumonia while wild-type mice remained healthy. The histopathological changes in the lungs of the susceptible Cftr?/? mice were characterized by infiltration of a mixed inflammatory-cell population into the peribronchiolar and perivascular spaces, Clara cell hyperplasia, mucus hypersecretion in airways, and exudation into alveolar airspaces by a mixed population of macrophages and neutrophils. An increased proportion of neutrophils was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the Cftr?/? mice, which, despite an increased bacterial load, demonstrated minimal evidence of activation. Alveolar macrophages from Cftr?/? mice also demonstrated suboptimal activation. These observations suggest that the pulmonary host defenses are compromised in lungs from animals with CF, as manifested by increased susceptibility to bacterial infection and lung injury. This murine model of chronic pneumonia thus reflects, in part, the situation in human patients and may help elucidate the mechanisms leading to defective host defense in CF. PMID:11447196

  13. Remote sentry advanced technology demonstration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph A. Brooks; Michael A. Gallo

    1996-01-01

    Experiences in Operational Desert Shield and Desert Storm revealed deficiencies in several areas of major importance in the post-Cold Ware era. Early entry forces must be provided with improved warfighting capabilities, especially against heavy armor, without affecting their deployability. The Rapid Force Projection Initiative (RFPI) Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) is tasked with addressing this deficiency. The RFPI ACTD features

  14. Features | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content About Us Services Science For Our Staff Phonebook Poster Search form Search Main menu Home Science Publications Platinum Highlight Platinum Publications Technology Transfer Awards Health and Safety Outreach Students Features Poster

  15. Mice lacking the p43 mitochondrial T3 receptor become glucose intolerant and insulin resistant during aging.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Christelle; Blanchet, Emilie; Pessemesse, Laurence; Annicotte, Jean Sébastien; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Chabi, Béatrice; Levin, Jonathan; Fajas, Lluis; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal; Casas, François

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play an important regulatory role in energy expenditure regulation and are key regulators of mitochondrial activity. We have previously identified a mitochondrial triiodothyronine (T3) receptor (p43) which acts as a mitochondrial transcription factor of the organelle genome, which leads in vitro and in vivo, to a stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, we generated mice carrying a specific p43 invalidation. At 2 months of age, we reported that p43 depletion in mice induced a major defect in insulin secretion both in vivo and in isolated pancreatic islets, and a loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The present study was designed to determine whether p43 invalidation influences life expectancy and modulates blood glucose and insulin levels as well as glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity during aging. We report that from 4 months old onwards, mice lacking p43 are leaner than wild-type mice. p43-/- mice also have a moderate reduction of life expectancy compared to wild type. We found no difference in blood glucose levels, excepted at 24 months old where p43-/- mice showed a strong hyperglycemia in fasting conditions compared to controls animals. However, the loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was maintained whatever the age of mice lacking p43. If up to 12 months old, glucose tolerance remained unchanged, beyond this age p43-/- mice became increasingly glucose intolerant. In addition, if up to 12 months old p43 deficient animals were more sensitive to insulin, after this age we observed a loss of this capacity, culminating in 24 months old mice with a decreased sensitivity to the hormone. In conclusion, we demonstrated that during aging the depletion of the mitochondrial T3 receptor p43 in mice progressively induced an increased glycemia in the fasted state, glucose intolerance and an insulin-resistance several features of type-2 diabetes. PMID:24098680

  16. Mice Lacking the p43 Mitochondrial T3 Receptor Become Glucose Intolerant and Insulin Resistant during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Christelle; Blanchet, Emilie; Pessemesse, Laurence; Annicotte, Jean Sébastien; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Chabi, Béatrice; Levin, Jonathan; Fajas, Lluis; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal; Casas, François

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) play an important regulatory role in energy expenditure regulation and are key regulators of mitochondrial activity. We have previously identified a mitochondrial triiodothyronine (T3) receptor (p43) which acts as a mitochondrial transcription factor of the organelle genome, which leads in vitro and in vivo, to a stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, we generated mice carrying a specific p43 invalidation. At 2 months of age, we reported that p43 depletion in mice induced a major defect in insulin secretion both in vivo and in isolated pancreatic islets, and a loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The present study was designed to determine whether p43 invalidation influences life expectancy and modulates blood glucose and insulin levels as well as glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity during aging. We report that from 4 months old onwards, mice lacking p43 are leaner than wild-type mice. p43?/? mice also have a moderate reduction of life expectancy compared to wild type. We found no difference in blood glucose levels, excepted at 24 months old where p43?/? mice showed a strong hyperglycemia in fasting conditions compared to controls animals. However, the loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was maintained whatever the age of mice lacking p43. If up to 12 months old, glucose tolerance remained unchanged, beyond this age p43?/? mice became increasingly glucose intolerant. In addition, if up to 12 months old p43 deficient animals were more sensitive to insulin, after this age we observed a loss of this capacity, culminating in 24 months old mice with a decreased sensitivity to the hormone. In conclusion, we demonstrated that during aging the depletion of the mitochondrial T3 receptor p43 in mice progressively induced an increased glycemia in the fasted state, glucose intolerance and an insulin-resistance several features of type-2 diabetes. PMID:24098680

  17. Social approach to pain in laboratory mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dale J. Langford; Alexander H. Tuttle; Kara Brown; Sonya Deschenes; David B. Fischer; Amelia Mutso; Kathleen C. Root; Susana G. Sotocinal; Matthew A. Stern; Jeffrey S. Mogil; Wendy F. Sternberg

    2010-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that pain behavior in the mouse can be modulated by the presence of a conspecific, but what remains unclear is whether such pain behavior can serve the function of soliciting social approach. Using a novel social approach paradigm, we tested mice in various dyadic or triadic conditions, including “jailed” mice—some in pain via intraperitoneal injection

  18. THE SELECTIVE ADVANTAGE OF CRYPSIS IN MICE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sacha N. Vignieri; Joanna G. Larson; Hopi E. Hoekstra

    2010-01-01

    The light color of mice that inhabit the sandy dunes of Florida's coast have served as a textbook example of adaptation for nearly a century, despite the fact that the selective advantage of crypsis has never been directly tested or quantified in nature. Using plasticine mouse models of light and dark color, we demonstrate a strong selective advantage for mice

  19. North Carolina State Physics Demonstrations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-18

    The Lecture Demonstrations Facility is part of the physics department at North Carolina State University, and is tasked with supporting the teaching activities of the department's faculty and graduate students. This website features a number of online demonstrations that can be used by outside parties, who can click on the Visitor Access area to view some of these great videos. The demonstrations are divided into nine areas, including Optics, Modern Physics, and Waves and Oscillations. Each of these areas contains subtopics that will help users identify the specific subject of the demonstration, such as heat transfer applications or phase changes. Moving on, the Other Resources area includes online demonstration manuals from dozens of other schools, including Columbia University, Carnegie Mellon, and Macalester College.

  20. Endometrial regenerative cells as a novel cell therapy attenuate experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yongcheng; Xu, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Bai; Zhou, Guangying; Li, Hongyue; Du, Caigan; Han, Hongqiu; Wang, Hao

    2014-12-01

    BackgroundEndometrial regenerative cells (ERCs) are mesenchymal-like stem cells that can be non-invasively obtained from menstrual blood and are easily grown /generated at a large scale without tumorigenesis. We previously reported that ERCs exhibit unique immunoregulatory properties in vitro, however their immunosuppressive potential in protecting the colon from colitis has not been investigated. The present study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of ERCs in mediating immunomodulatory functions against colitis.MethodsColitis was induced by 4% dextran-sulfate-sodium (DSS, in drinking water) in BALB/c mice for 7 days. ERCs were cultured from healthy female menstrual blood, and injected (1 million/mouse/day, i.v.) into mice on days 2, 5, and 8 following colitis induction. Colonic and splenic tissues were collected on day 14 post-DSS-induction. Clinical signs, disease activity index (DAI), pathological and immunohistological changes, cytokine profiles and cell populations were evaluated.ResultsDSS-induced mice in untreated group developed severe colitis, characterized by body-weight loss, bloody stool, diarrhea, mucosal ulceration and colon shortening, as well as pathological changes of intra-colon cell infiltrations of neutrophils and Mac-1 positive cells. Notably, ERCs attenuated colitis with significantly reduced DAI, decreased levels of intra-colon IL-2 and TNF-ż, but increased expressions of IL-4 and IL-10. Compared with those of untreated colitis mice, splenic dendritic cells isolated from ERC-treated mice exhibited significantly decreased MHC-II expression. ERC-treated mice also demonstrated much less CD3+CD25+ active T cell and CD3+CD8+ T cell population and significantly higher level of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells.ConclusionsThis study demonstrated novel anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of ERCs in attenuating colitis in mice, and suggested that the unique features of ERCs make them a promising therapeutic tool for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:25475342

  1. Humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Macchiarini, Francesca; Manz, Markus G.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2005-01-01

    Animal models have been instrumental in increasing the understanding of human physiology, particularly immunity. However, these animal models have been limited by practical considerations and genetic diversity. The creation of humanized mice that carry partial or complete human physiological systems may help overcome these obstacles. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases convened a workshop on humanized mouse models for immunity in Bethesda, MD, on June 13–14, 2005, during which researchers discussed the benefits and limitations of existing animal models and offered insights into the development of future humanized mouse models. PMID:16301740

  2. Feature selection in bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lipo

    2012-06-01

    In bioinformatics, there are often a large number of input features. For example, there are millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are genetic variations which determine the dierence between any two unrelated individuals. In microarrays, thousands of genes can be proled in each test. It is important to nd out which input features (e.g., SNPs or genes) are useful in classication of a certain group of people or diagnosis of a given disease. In this paper, we investigate some powerful feature selection techniques and apply them to problems in bioinformatics. We are able to identify a very small number of input features sucient for tasks at hand and we demonstrate this with some real-world data.

  3. CXCL10 blockade protects mice from cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, Senthilkumar K; Singh, Udai P; Singh, Shailesh; Taub, Dennis D; Novakovic, Kristian R; Lillard, James W

    2008-01-01

    Background Alterations in serum CXCR3 ligand levels were examined in interstitial cystitis (IC) patients; similar expression patterns in serum as well as CXCR3, CXCR3 ligands, and cytokines expressed by peripheral and local leukocyte subpopulations were characterized during cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced acute cystitis in mice. Results Serum levels of monokine-induced by interferon-? (IFN-?) (MIG/CXCL9), IFN-?-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), and IFN-?-inducible T cell ? chemoattractant (I-TAC/CXCL11) were elevated in patients with IC. These clinical features closely correlated with CYP-induced cystitis in mice. Serum levels of these CXCR3 ligands and local T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines were also increased. We demonstrate that CXCR3 as well as CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 mRNA were significantly expressed by urinary bladder lymphocytes, while CXCR3 and CXCL9 transcripts were significantly expressed by iliac lymph node leukocytes following CYP treatment. We also show that the number of CD4+ T cells, mast cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and NKT cells were increased at systemic (spleen) and mucosal (urinary bladder and iliac lymph nodes) sites, following CYP-induced cystitis in mice. Importantly, CXCL10 blockade attenuated these increases caused by CYP. Conclusion Antibody (Ab)-mediated inhibition of the most abundant serum CXCR3 ligand, CXCL10, in mice decreased the local production of CXCR3 ligands as well as Th1 cytokines expressed by local leukocytes, and lowered corresponding serum levels to reduce the severity of CYP-induced cystitis. The present study is among the first to demonstrate some of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemokines in cystitis and may represent new drug target for this disease. PMID:18957084

  4. Mice Offer Lessons on Aging

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Krotz, Dan.

    2003-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Science Beat offers interesting feature articles about research from Berkeley lab and partner organizations. This article offers a fascinating look at aging research utilizing transgenic mice -- an inquiry into "the genetic roots of aging in everyone." The article includes Web links to related material from the institutions participating in these research projects, as well as links to academic articles from the journal Science (not available without paid subscription).

  5. Desert Features

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sand covers only about 20 percent of the Earth's deserts. Nearly 50 percent of desert surfaces are gravel plains where removal of fine-grained material by the wind has exposed loose gravel and occasional cobbles. This web page, produced by the U.S. Geological Survey, features text and photographs that describe desert landforms, soils, plants, and the role of water in the formation of desert landscapes.

  6. Volcanic Features

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Most people will never see the eruption of an active volcano. Even so, evidence of these dramatic displays can be found all over the world. In fact, more can be learned about some aspects of volcanic activity by exploring evidence left by past eruptions than by watching an eruption in progress. This interactive resource adapted from the National Park Service explores a variety of volcanic landforms and features, and describes how they form.

  7. Favorite Demonstration: Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jillian L. McCarty

    2001-12-01

    This demonstration closely simulates Io's surface and validates scientists' conclusions about this satellite of Jupiter. It illustrates the importance of teaching descriptive chemistry and is suitable for a general science class as well as introductory ch

  8. Clonal Structure of Carcinogen-induced Intestinal Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thliveris, Andrew T.; Clipson, Linda; White, Alanna; Waggoner, Jesse; Plesh, Lauren; Skinner, Bridget L.; Zahm, Christopher D.; Sullivan, Ruth; Dove, William F.; Newton, Michael A.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that intestinal tumors from ApcMin/+ (Min) mice and Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients are often polyclonal. We sought to determine whether polyclonality is unique to tumors arising from hereditary predispositions or, instead, is a common feature of intestinal tumorigenesis in other pathways to tumorigenesis. Ethylnitrosourea-induced intestinal tumors from mice wildtype at the Apc locus and chimeric for the Rosa26 lineage marker were analyzed. Many were overtly polyclonal, being composed of a mixture of Rosa26+ and Rosa26? neoplastic cells. Statistical analyses revealed that polyclonality could be explained by interactions between two initiated clones separated by a very short distance. The frequency of overtly polyclonal tumors and the range of interactions estimated in this model are similar to those observed when analyzing familial tumors from Min mice. Thus, polyclonality does not depend on the familial pathway to tumorigenesis. Interactions between two initiated clones might provide a selective advantage during the early stages of intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:21636550

  9. Establishment of primary human meningiomas as subcutaneous xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Malham, G M; Thomsen, R J; Synek, B J; Baguley, B C

    2001-08-01

    Meningiomas are the most frequently occurring benign central nervous system tumours. We determined whether a subcutaneous animal model of meningioma was feasible by implanting fresh meningioma tissue from six patients into 60 athymic (nude) mice, either as tissue blocks (38 mice) or as cell suspensions (22 mice). The tumour take-rates were 74% (block) and 50% (suspension), and the xenografts retained the original tumour grade and subtype morphology by light microscopy. Comparison of cell proliferation markers in xenografts and original tumours gave similar immunohistochemical score rates for Ki-67, but not for PCNA. With the exception of one atypical tumour surgical specimen, all tumours lacked p53 immunopositivity. Transmission electron microscopy of sections of tumour xenografts revealed ultrastructural features, including desmosomes and desmosome-like structures, characteristic of well-differentiated meningiomas. The xenografts grew progressively with a volume increase of more than 10-fold over 6-11 months and an apparent doubling time of 16 weeks. This study demonstrates the utility of the subcutaneous meningioma xenograft as a model for further biological and therapeutic studies. PMID:11599449

  10. Favorite Demonstration: A Fruity Biochemistry Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Brian R. Shmaefsky

    2005-05-01

    Inquiry, high-order thinking, reasoning skills, and critical thinking are buzzwords for the outcomes for which college science instructors strive. They can all be succinctly summarized as "get students thinking about what they are learning." Classroom demonstrations are a great vechicle for getting students to apply information they have heard in a lecture. A good example of this type of application is a demonstration that uses simple fruit and vegetable spoilage biochemistry principles to teach scientific reasoning skills.

  11. Key Features of Appraisal Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2003-01-01

    Provides an overview of performance management and appraisal in New Zealand schools. Outlines a model of principal appraisal that demonstrates an integration of development and accountability elements. Draws on three studies to identify key features of appraisal effectiveness. (SLD)

  12. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  13. Herschel's Interference Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkalskis, Benjamin S.; Freeman, J. Reuben

    2000-01-01

    Describes Herschel's demonstration of interference arising from many coherent rays. Presents a method for students to reproduce this demonstration and obtain beautiful multiple-beam interference patterns. (CCM)

  14. Zinc metabolism in genetically obese mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, M.L.; Failla, M.L.

    1986-03-05

    Recent reports indicate that the concentrations and total amounts of several essential trace metals in various tissues of genetically obese rodents differ markedly from lean controls. In the present studies the absorption, retention and tissue distribution of zinc was compared in obese (ob/ob) and lean (+/.) C57BL/6J mice. When administered 0.1 and 1 umole /sup 65/Zn by stomach tube and killed after 4 h, fasted 10 week old obese mice had 2.7 and 2.2 times more radioactivity in their carcasses, respectively, than age-matched lean mice. Higher levels of /sup 65/Zn were also present in the intestinal mucosa of obese mice. To eliminate possible differences in the effects of fasting and gastric emptying rates between the phenotypes, zinc absorption and retention were determined according to the method of Heth and Hoekstra. Analysis of data revealed that obese and lean mice absorbed 43 and 18% of the oral dose, respectively. Also, the rate of /sup 65/Zn excretion between 2 and 6 days post-treatment was similar for obese and lean mice. After 6 days obese mice had significantly lower levels of radioisotope in skin, muscle plus bone, spleen and testes and higher levels of /sup 65/Zn in liver, small intestine and adipose tissue compared to tissues from lean mice. These results demonstrate increased absorption, altered tissue distribution and similar excretion of zinc in ob/ob mice.

  15. Image feature localization by multiple hypothesis testing of Gabor features.

    PubMed

    Ilonen, Jarmo; Kamarainen, Joni-Kristian; Paalanen, Pekka; Hamouz, Miroslav; Kittler, Josef; Kälviäinen, Heikki

    2008-03-01

    Several novel and particularly successful object and object category detection and recognition methods based on image features, local descriptions of object appearance, have recently been proposed. The methods are based on a localization of image features and a spatial constellation search over the localized features. The accuracy and reliability of the methods depend on the success of both tasks: image feature localization and spatial constellation model search. In this paper, we present an improved algorithm for image feature localization. The method is based on complex-valued multi resolution Gabor features and their ranking using multiple hypothesis testing. The algorithm provides very accurate local image features over arbitrary scale and rotation. We discuss in detail issues such as selection of filter parameters, confidence measure, and the magnitude versus complex representation, and show on a large test sample how these influence the performance. The versatility and accuracy of the method is demonstrated on two profoundly different challenging problems (faces and license plates). PMID:18270121

  16. Smoking p66Shc Knocked Out Mice Develop Respiratory Bronchiolitis with Fibrosis but Not Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Cavarra, Eleonora; Fineschi, Silvia; Bartalesi, Barbara; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Lucattelli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The adaptor protein p66Shc regulates intracellular oxidant levels through the modulation of a forkhead-related transcription factor (FOXO3a). The genetic ablation of p66Shc (p66Shc–/–) renders mice resistant to oxidative stress and p53-dependent apoptosis. We investigated whether p66Shc ablation in mice modifies lung cellular and molecular responses to cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. No differences between wild type (WT) and p66Shc–/– mice were observed in terms of inflammation and oxidant burden after acute CS exposure; however,p66Shc ablation modifies specific features of chronic inflammation induced by repeated exposure to CS. Unlike WT mice, p66Shc–/– mice did not develop emphysema, showing protection toward oxidative damage to DNA and apoptosis as revealed by a trivial 8-hydroxyguanosine staining and faint TUNEL and caspase-3 positivity on alveolar epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, CS exposure in p66Shc–/– mice resulted in respiratory bronchiolitis with fibrosis in surrounded alveoli. Respiratory bronchiolitis was characterized by peribronchiolar infiltrates of lymphocytes and histiocytes, accumulation of ageing pigmented macrophages within and around bronchioles, and peribronchiolar fibrosis. The blockage of apoptosis interferes with the macrophage “clearance” from alveolar spaces, favouring the accumulation of aging macrophages into alveoli and the progressive accumulation of iron pigment in long-lived senescent cells. The presence of areas of interstitial and alveolar fibrosis in peripheral parenchyma often accompanied the bronchiolar changes. Macrophages from smoking p66Shc–/– mice elaborate M2 cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-13) and enzymes (i.e., chitinase and arginase I), which can promote TGF-beta expression, collagen deposition, and fibrosis in the surrounding areas. We demonstrate here that resistance to oxidative stress and p53-dependent apoptosis can modify tissue responses to CS caused by chronic inflammation without influencing early inflammatory response to CS exposure. PMID:25790295

  17. Airway remodeling is absent in CCR1-/- mice during chronic fungal allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Blease, K; Mehrad, B; Standiford, T J; Lukacs, N W; Kunkel, S L; Chensue, S W; Lu, B; Gerard, C J; Hogaboam, C M

    2000-08-01

    Asthmatic-like reactions characterized by elevated IgE, Th2 cytokines, C-C chemokines, eosinophilic inflammation, and persistent airway hyperresponsiveness follow pulmonary exposure to the spores or conidia from Aspergillus fumigatus fungus in sensitized individuals. In addition to these features, subepithelial fibrosis and goblet cell hyperplasia characterizes fungal-induced allergic airway disease in mice. Because lung concentrations of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha and RANTES were significantly elevated after A. fumigatus-sensitized mice received an intrapulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus spores or conidia, the present study addressed the role of their receptor, C-C chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1), in this model. A. fumigatus-sensitized CCR1 wild-type (+/+) and CCR1 knockout (-/-) mice exhibited similar increases in serum IgE and polymorphonuclear leukocyte numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Airway hyperresponsiveness was prominent in both groups of mice at 30 days after an intrapulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus spores or conidia. However, whole lung levels of IFN-gamma were significantly higher whereas IL-4, IL-13, and Th2-inducible chemokines such as C10, eotaxin, and macrophage-derived chemokine were significantly lower in whole lung samples from CCR1-/- mice compared with CCR1+/+ mice at 30 days after the conidia challenge. Likewise, significantly fewer goblet cells and less subepithelial fibrosis were observed around large airways in CCR1-/- mice at the same time after the conidia challenge. Thus, these findings demonstrate that CCR1 is a major contributor to the airway remodeling responses that arise from A. fumigatus-induced allergic airway disease. PMID:10903765

  18. Preventing formation of reticulon 3 immunoreactive dystrophic neurites improves cognitive function in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qi; Prior, Marguerite; Zhou, Xiangdong; Tang, Xiaoying; He, Wanxia; Hu, Xiangyou; Yan, Riqiang

    2013-02-13

    Neuritic dystrophy is one of the important pathological features associated with amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-dependent neuronal dysfunctions. We reported previously that reticulon-3 (RTN3) immunoreactive dystrophic neurites (RIDNs) are abundantly present in the hippocampus of AD patients, in AD mouse models, and in aged wild-type mice. Transgenic mice overexpressing the human RTN3 transgene spontaneously develop RIDNs in their hippocampi, and the formation of RIDNs correlates with the appearance of RTN3 aggregation. To further elucidate whether the formation of RIDNs is reversible, we generated transgenic mice expressing wild-type human RTN3 under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. Treatment with doxycycline for 2 months effectively turned off expression of the human RTN3 transgene, confirming the inducible nature of the system. However, the formation of hippocampal RIDNs was dependent on whether the transgene was turned off before or after the formation of RTN3 aggregates. When transgenic human RTN3 expression was turned off at young age, formation of RIDNs was essentially eliminated compared with the vehicle-treated transgenic mice. More importantly, a fear conditioning study demonstrated that contextual associative learning and memory in inducible transgenic mice was improved if the density of RIDNs was lowered. Additional mechanistic study suggested that a reduction in BDNF levels in transgenic mice might contribute to the reduced learning and memory in transgenic mice overexpressing RTN3. Hence, we conclude that age-dependent RIDNs cannot be effectively cleared once they have formed, and we postulate that successful prevention of RIDN formation should be initiated before RTN3 aggregation. PMID:23407961

  19. Muscle-specific expression of LARGE restores neuromuscular transmission deficits in dystrophic LARGEmyd mice

    PubMed Central

    Gumerson, Jessica D.; Davis, Carol S.; Kabaeva, Zhyldyz T.; Hayes, John M.; Brooks, Susan V.; Michele, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in several glycosyltransferases underlie a group of muscular dystrophies known as glycosylation-deficient muscular dystrophy. A common feature of these diseases is loss of glycosylation and consequent dystroglycan function that is correlated with severe pathology in muscle, brain and other tissues. Although glycosylation of dystroglycan is essential for function in skeletal muscle, whether glycosylation-dependent function of dystroglycan is sufficient to explain all complex pathological features associated with these diseases is less clear. Dystroglycan glycosylation is defective in LARGEmyd (myd) mice as a result of a mutation in like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (LARGE), a glycosyltransferase known to cause muscle disease in humans. We generated animals with restored dystroglycan function exclusively in skeletal muscle by crossing myd animals to a recently created transgenic line that expresses LARGE selectively in differentiated muscle. Transgenic myd mice were indistinguishable from wild-type littermates and demonstrated an amelioration of muscle disease as evidenced by an absence of muscle pathology, restored contractile function and a reduction in serum creatine kinase activity. Moreover, although deficits in nerve conduction and neuromuscular transmission were observed in myd animals, these deficits were fully rescued by muscle-specific expression of LARGE, which resulted in restored structure of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). These data demonstrate that, in addition to muscle degeneration and dystrophy, impaired neuromuscular transmission contributes to muscle weakness in dystrophic myd mice and that the noted defects are primarily due to the effects of LARGE and glycosylated dystroglycan in stabilizing the endplate of the NMJ. PMID:23222475

  20. Characterizing the Regional Structural Difference of the Brain between Tau Transgenic (rTg4510) and Wild-Type Mice Using MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhiyong Xie; Dewen Yang; Diane Stephenson; Daniel Morton; Carol Hicks; Tracy Brown; Thomas Bocan

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a rTg4510 transgenic mouse model demonstrates features resembling Alzheimer’s disease including neurofibrillary degeneration\\u000a and progressive neuronal loss. We investigated the volumetric differences of brain structures between transgenic and wild-type\\u000a mice using MR images of fourteen 5.5 month old female mice. Tensor-based morphometry and atlas-based segmentation were applied\\u000a to MRI images. Severe atrophy of hippocampus and neocortex as well as ventricular dilatation

  1. Facial features

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Allan

    2008-09-21

    THE STATE STANDARDS for this project are as follows; STANDARD 1 Making: Students will assemble and create works of art by experiencing a variety of art media and by learning the art elements and principles. STANDARD 2 Perceiving: Students will find meaning by analyzing, criticizing, and evaluating works of art. STANDARD 3 Expressing: Students will create meaning in art. STANDARD 4 Contextualizing: Students will find meaning in works of art through settings and other modes of learning. Below is a list of useful site to help in drawing facial features, along with useful tutorial and resources. QUICK TEST (test your ability and knowledge) * Draw a circle. * Draw a light vertical line at the center of the circle. * Make light horizontal dashes a little above the center of the circle. ...

  2. Laithwaite's Heavy Spinning Disk Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2014-09-01

    In 1974, Professor Eric Laithwaite demonstrated an unusually heavy gyroscope at a Royal Institution lecture in London. The demonstration was televised and can be viewed on YouTube.1 A recent version of the same experiment, together with partial explanations, attracted two million YouTube views in the first few months.2 In both cases, the gyroscope consisted of a 40-lb (18-kg) spinning disk on the end of a 3-ft (0.91-m) long axle. The most remarkable feature of the demonstration was that Laithwaite was able to lift the disk over his head with one hand, holding onto the far end of the axle. The impression was given that the 40-lb disk was almost weightless, or "as light as a feather" according to Laithwaite.

  3. Infant CPR Video Demonstration

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    Infant CPR Video Demonstration Video demonstration of CPR instruction for infants. RETURN TO MAIN PAGE These Videos Are For Educational Use Only And Are Not Authorized for Commercial Use. © 1998 - 2011 ...

  4. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are demonstrations of the optical activity of two sugar solutions, and the effects of various substituents on acid strength using an overhead projector. Materials and procedures for each demonstration are discussed. (CW)

  5. Cardio Lab Powerpoint Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Jeannette K Hafey (Springfield College Biology/Chemistry)

    2010-05-24

    Powerpoint presentation utilizing a Functional Heart Model to demonstrate the relationships among stroke volume, heart rate, and cardiac output. Demonstration also includes blood vessel radius and flow-pressure relationships. Oxygen consumption and VO2 MAX is discussed.

  6. Child CPR Video Demonstration

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    Child CPR Video Demonstration Video demonstration of standard CPR for children. RETURN TO MAIN PAGE These Videos Are For Educational Use Only And Are Not Authorized for Commercial Use. © 1998 - 2011 ...

  7. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  8. Traveling Wave Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluger-Bell, Barry

    1995-01-01

    Describes a traveling-wave demonstration that uses inexpensive materials (crepe-paper streamers) and is simple to assemble and perform. Explains how the properties of light waves are illustrated using the demonstration apparatus. (LZ)

  9. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  10. Using an OHP to Demonstrate Wave Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, F.

    1985-01-01

    Describes how, using an overhead projector (OHP) and a transparent roll of acetate film, it is possible to demonstrate: (1) travelling waves; (2) standing waves; and (3) phase and group velocity applied to waves. The set-ups provide a way to demonstrate features which are normally difficult to visualize and understand. (JN)

  11. Demonstrations in Introductory Geophysics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Schramm; S. Stein; S. van der Lee; L. Swafford; E. Klosko; J. Delaughter; M. Wysession

    2005-01-01

    Geophysical concepts are challenging to teach at introductory levels, because students need to understand both the underlying physics and its geological application. To address this, our introductory courses include class demonstrations and experiments to demonstrate underlying physical principles and their geological applications. Demonstrations and experiments have several advantages over computer simulations. First, computer simulations \\

  12. New Technology Demonstration Program

    E-print Network

    the basic functions covered by BCS's. These new energy information systems (EIS) include utility EIS, demand for this report, some features of this new wave of EIS products are supported. These vendors were chosen because

  13. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.

    2006-08-01

    By using astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients, I have been able to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students. I will present some of the edible demonstrations I have created including using popcorn to simulate radioactivity; using chocolate, nuts, and marshmallows to illustrate density and differentiation during the formation of the planets; and making big-bang brownies or chocolate chip-cookies to illustrate the expansion of the Universe. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented.

  14. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  15. Deficient Wnt signalling triggers striatal synaptic degeneration and impaired motor behaviour in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Galli, Soledad; Lopes, Douglas M; Ammari, Rachida; Kopra, Jaakko; Millar, Sarah E; Gibb, Alasdair; Salinas, Patricia C

    2014-01-01

    Synapse degeneration is an early and invariant feature of neurodegenerative diseases. Indeed, synapse loss occurs prior to neuronal degeneration and correlates with the symptom severity of these diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms that trigger synaptic loss remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that deficient Wnt signalling elicits synaptic degeneration in the adult striatum. Inducible expression of the secreted Wnt antagonist Dickkopf1 (Dkk1) in adult mice (iDkk1) decreases the number of cortico-striatal glutamatergic synapses and of D1 and D2 dopamine receptor clusters. Synapse loss occurs in the absence of axon retraction or cell death. The remaining excitatory terminals contain fewer synaptic vesicles and have a reduced probability of evoked transmitter release. IDkk1 mice show impaired motor coordination and are irresponsive to amphetamine. These studies identify Wnts as key endogenous regulators of synaptic maintenance and suggest that dysfunction in Wnt signalling contributes to synaptic degeneration at early stages in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25318560

  16. Deficient Wnt signalling triggers striatal synaptic degeneration and impaired motor behaviour in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Soledad; Lopes, Douglas M.; Ammari, Rachida; Kopra, Jaakko; Millar, Sarah E.; Gibb, Alasdair; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Synapse degeneration is an early and invariant feature of neurodegenerative diseases. Indeed, synapse loss occurs prior to neuronal degeneration and correlates with the symptom severity of these diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms that trigger synaptic loss remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that deficient Wnt signalling elicits synaptic degeneration in the adult striatum. Inducible expression of the secreted Wnt antagonist Dickkopf1 (Dkk1) in adult mice (iDkk1) decreases the number of cortico-striatal glutamatergic synapses and of D1 and D2 dopamine receptor clusters. Synapse loss occurs in the absence of axon retraction or cell death. The remaining excitatory terminals contain fewer synaptic vesicles and have a reduced probability of evoked transmitter release. IDkk1 mice show impaired motor coordination and are irresponsive to amphetamine. These studies identify Wnts as key endogenous regulators of synaptic maintenance and suggest that dysfunction in Wnt signalling contributes to synaptic degeneration at early stages in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25318560

  17. Molecular, Physiological, and Motor Performance Defects in DMSXL Mice Carrying >1,000 CTG Repeats from the Human DM1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Aline; Medja, Fadia; Nicole, Annie; Vignaud, Alban; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Ferry, Arnaud; Decostre, Valérie; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas; Baraibar, Martin; Gomes-Pereira, Mário; Puymirat, Jack; Bassez, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Munnich, Arnold; Gourdon, Genevičve

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3?UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro–RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice). After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice). Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing), were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances). We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic therapeutic strategies on molecular and physiological phenotypes. PMID:23209425

  18. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A F; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation training sessions that acutely increased plasma levels of corticosterone diminished subsequent immobility as a measure of behavioral despair on tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation also decreased subsequent freezing in the open field despite comparable levels of thigmotaxis in mice from both treatment conditions. Stress inoculation subsequently decreased novel-object exploration latencies and reduced corticosterone responses to repeated restraint. These results demonstrate that stress inoculation acutely stimulates glucocorticoid signaling and then enhances subsequent indications of active coping behavior in mice. Unlike mouse models that screen for the absence of vulnerability to stress or presence of traits that occur in resilient individuals, stress inoculation training reflects an experience-dependent learning-like process that resembles interventions designed to build resilience in humans. Mouse models of stress inoculation may provide novel insights for new preventive strategies or therapeutic treatments of human psychiatric disorders that are triggered and exacerbated by stressful life events.

  19. LIMB demonstration project extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    The purpose of the DOE limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension is to extend the data base on LIMB technology and to expand DOE's list of Clean Coal Technologies by demonstrating the Coolside process as part of the project. The main objectives of this project are: to demonstrate the general applicability of LIMB technology by testing 3 coals and 4 sorbents (total of 12 coal/sorbent combinations) at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant; and to demonstrate that Coolside is a viable technology for improving precipitator performance and reducing sulfur dioxide emissions while acceptable operability is maintained. Progress is reported. 3 figs.

  20. Protective effect of Acanthopanax gracilistylus-extracted Acankoreanogenin A on mice with fulminant hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-Xin; Li, Ning; Zhang, Zu-Ping; Liu, Hong-Bo; Zhou, Rong-Rong; Zhong, Bai-Yun; Zou, Ming-Xiang; Dai, Xia-Hong; Xiao, Mei-Fang; Liu, Xiang-Qian; Fan, Xue-Gong

    2011-08-01

    The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in both acute (IL-1? and TNF-?) and chronic [high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1)] phases, is thought to play important roles in the development of fulminant hepatitis (FH). Triterpenoid Acankoreanogenin A (AA) which is extracted from the leaves of the Acanthopanax gracilistylus W.W. Smith (AGS) has shown its inhibiting effect on TNF-?, IL-1? and HMGB1 release in vitro in our preliminary experiments. In present study, we investigated the effect of AA on mice with fulminant hepatitis in vivo. Fulminant hepatitis mice model was established by intraperitoneally injecting galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The levels of serum of TNF-?, IL-1?, ALT, AST and HMGB1 from AA-treated mice were measured at different time points. Our results demonstrated that pre-treatment of mice with AA markedly reduced the serum levels of TNF-?, IL-1?, HMGB1, ALT and AST with the improvement in histological features. And the survival rate from AA-treated fulminant hepatitis mice was increased. Furthermore, delayed administration of AA after peak occurrence of the early pro-inflammatory cytokines still endowed significant protection against GalN/LPS-induced lethality. The post-treatment of AA could significantly attenuate the release of HMGB1, but not the TNF-? and IL-1?. These results indicate that AA inhibits the systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokine HMGB1, and dose-dependently rescue the mice from lethal GalN/LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis, which suggests this component as a candidate therapy for fulminant hepatitis. PMID:21356341

  1. Strain-dependent genomic factors affect allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Kelada, Samir N P; Wilson, Mark S; Tavarez, Urraca; Kubalanza, Kari; Borate, Bhavesh; Whitehead, Greg S; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Roy, Michelle G; Olive, Michelle; Carpenter, Danielle E; Brass, David M; Wynn, Thomas A; Cook, Donald N; Evans, Christopher M; Schwartz, David A; Collins, Francis S

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is etiologically and clinically heterogeneous, making the genomic basis of asthma difficult to identify. We exploited the strain-dependence of a murine model of allergic airway disease to identify different genomic responses in the lung. BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J mice were sensitized with the immunodominant allergen from the Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus species of house dust mite (Der p 1), without exogenous adjuvant, and the mice then underwent a single challenge with Der p 1. Allergic inflammation, serum antibody titers, mucous metaplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness were evaluated 72 hours after airway challenge. Whole-lung gene expression analyses were conducted to identify genomic responses to allergen challenge. Der p 1-challenged BALB/cJ mice produced all the key features of allergic airway disease. In comparison, C57BL/6J mice produced exaggerated Th2-biased responses and inflammation, but exhibited an unexpected decrease in airway hyperresponsiveness compared with control mice. Lung gene expression analysis revealed genes that were shared by both strains and a set of down-regulated genes unique to C57BL/6J mice, including several G-protein-coupled receptors involved in airway smooth muscle contraction, most notably the M2 muscarinic receptor, which we show is expressed in airway smooth muscle and was decreased at the protein level after challenge with Der p 1. Murine strain-dependent genomic responses in the lung offer insights into the different biological pathways that develop after allergen challenge. This study of two different murine strains demonstrates that inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness can be decoupled, and suggests that the down-modulation of expression of G-protein-coupled receptors involved in regulating airway smooth muscle contraction may contribute to this dissociation. PMID:21378263

  2. Expression of prestin in OHCs is reduced in Spag6 gene knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghan; Li, Xiaofei; Zhang, Zhibing; Wang, Haibo; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-04-10

    Sperm-associated antigen 6 (Spag6) gene, which encodes an axonemal protein (SPAG6), ubiquitously expresses in tissue and organs containing ciliated cells. The present work was to investigate whether SPAG6 expressed in cochlear hair cells and, if so, to explore the presumable correlations between prestin and SPAG6. The distribution of SPAG6 in organ of Corti and the morphological features of hair cells in basilar membrane were investigated by immunofluorescent staining. The amount of prestin in Spag6 mutant mice was measured by Western blotting and real-time PCR, respectively. Additionally, co-immunoprecipitation tests were performed to confirm the presumed interaction between prestin and SPAG6. We observed that SPAG6 expressed in the cuticular plate in outer hair cells (OHCs) and prestin in the lateral wall of OHCs that located along with SPAG6 at this site. In comparison to Spag6 +/+ mice, Spag6 -/- mice showed apparent morphological abnormity of OHCs and lower intensity of prestin fluorescence. The expression of prestin in Spag6 -/- mice reduced significantly at both protein and mRNA levels. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation tests demonstrated the interaction between prestin and SPAG6. Taken together, these data indicate that SPAG6 is indispensible for the stability of OHCs by maintaining the normal expression of prestin, which implies that Spag6 gene is essential for mechanosensory function of OHCs. PMID:25748314

  3. Behavioral and Neural Correlates of Acute and Scheduled Hunger in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gunapala, Keith M.; Parfyonov, Maksim; Chang, Chris H.; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Steele, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    In rodents, daily feeding schedules induce food anticipatory activity (FAA) rhythms with formal properties suggesting mediation by food-entrained circadian oscillators (FEOs). The search for the neuronal substrate of FEOs responsible for FAA is an active area of research, but studies spanning several decades have yet to identify unequivocally a brain region required for FAA. Variability of results across studies leads to questions about underlying biology versus methodology. Here we describe in C57BL/6 male mice the effects of varying the ‘dose’ of caloric restriction (0%, 60%, 80%, 110%) on the expression of FAA as measured by a video-based analysis system, and on the induction of c-Fos in brain regions that have been implicated in FAA. We determined that more severe caloric restriction (60%) leads to a faster onset of FAA with increased magnitude. Using the 60% caloric restriction, we found little evidence for unique signatures of neuronal activation in the brains of mice anticipating a daily mealtime compared to mice that were fasted acutely or fed ad-libitum–even in regions such as the dorsomedial and ventrolateral hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and cerebellum that have previously been implicated in FAA. These results underscore the importance of feeding schedule parameters in determining quantitative features of FAA in mice, and demonstrate dissociations between behavioral FAA and neural activity in brain areas thought to harbor FEOs or participate in their entrainment or output. PMID:24806659

  4. The effects of hypermuscularity on shoulder morphology in myostatin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, David J; Hamrick, Mark W; Richmond, Brian G

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical loads, particularly those generated by skeletal muscle, play a significant role in determining long-bone shape and strength, but it is less clear how these loads influence the morphology of flat bones like the scapula. While scapular morphology has been shown to vary with locomotor mode in mammals, this study seeks to better understand whether genetically modified muscle size can influence scapular shape in the absence of significant locomotor differences. The soft- and hard-tissue morphological characteristics were examined in 11 hypermuscular, mutant (myostatin-deficient), 20 heterozygote, and 15 wild-type mouse shoulders. Body mass did not significantly differ among the genotype groups, but homozygous mutant and heterozygote mice had significantly larger shoulder muscles than wild-type mice. Mutant mice also differed significantly from the wild-type controls in several aspects of scapular size and shape, including glenohumeral joint orientation, total scapular length, superior border length, and supraspinous and infraspinous fossa length. Conversely, several traits describing superoinferior scapular breadth measures (e.g. total breadth and dorsal scapular fossa breadth) did not significantly differ between mutant and wild-type mice. Since the intrinsic musculature of the scapula is oriented in a mediolateral fashion, it follows that mediolaterally configured hard-tissue features like scapular length were most distinct among genotype groups. As had been noted previously with long bones, this study demonstrates that genetically enhanced muscle size has marked effects on the morphological characteristics of the shoulder. PMID:21332716

  5. MICE: a mouse imaging collaboration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, Jacek; Flask, Chris; Wilson, David; Johnson, David; Muzic, Raymond F., Jr.; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2006-03-01

    With the ever-increasing complexity of science and engineering, many important research problems are being addressed by collaborative, multidisciplinary teams. We present a web-based collaborative environment for small animal imaging research, called the Mouse Imaging Collaboration Environment (MICE). MICE provides an effective and user-friendly tool for managing and sharing of the terabytes of high-resolution and high-dimension image data generated at small animal imaging core facilities. We describe the design of MICE and our experience in the implementation and deployment of a beta-version baseline-MICE. The baseline-MICE provides an integrated solution from image data acquisition to end-user access and long-term data storage at our UH/Case Small Animal Imaging Resource Center. As image data is acquired from scanners, it is pushed to the MICE server which automatically stores it in a directory structure according to its DICOM metadata. The directory structure reflects imaging modality, principle investigators, animal models, scanning dates and study details. Registered end-users access this imaging data through an authenticated web-interface. Thumbnail images are created by custom scripts running on the MICE server while data down-loading is achieved through standard web-browser ftp. MICE provides a security infrastructure that manages user roles, their access privileges such as read/write, and the right to modify the access privileges. Additional data security measures include a two server paradigm with the Web access server residing outside a network firewall to provide access through the Internet, and the imaging data server - a large RAID storage system supporting flexible backup policies - residing behind the protected firewall with a dedicated link to the Web access server. Direct network link to the RAID storage system outside the firewall other than this dedicated link is not permitted. Establishing the initial image directory structure and letting the project leader manage data access through a web-interface represent Phase I implementation. In Phase II, features for uploading image analysis scripts and results back to the MICE server will be implemented, as well as mechanisms facilitating asynchronous and synchronous discussion, annotation, and analysis. Most of MICE features are being implemented in the Plone 5 object-oriented database environment which greatly shortens developmental time and effort by the reuse of a variety of Plone's open-source modules for Content Management Systems. 7, 8 The open-source modules are well suited as an implementation basis of MICE and provide data integration as a built-in primitive.

  6. Token Ring Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This applet demonstrates a Token Ring. Users may add or delete stations (or computers) from the ring. The applet allows the user to show data being circulated around the ring. Users may also select to demonstrate the cases when one of the stations is switched off, or monitoring. (UNC E-Learning Grant)

  7. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  8. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  9. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlman, Howard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes the construction of the Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator, which can be used to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena, including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems behave. Presents experiments, appropriate for classroom use, to demonstrate how the behavior of common physical systems change when…

  10. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  11. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  12. Demonstrating Newton's Second Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricker, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for demonstrating the second law of motion. Provides sample data and discusses the merits of this method over traditional methods of supplying a constant force. The method produces empirical best-fit lines which convincingly demonstrate that for a fixed mass, acceleration is proportional to force. (DDR)

  13. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  14. FDDI Ring Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This applet demonstrates an FDDI ring. Users may add or delete stations (or computers) from the ring. The applet allows the user to show data being circulated around the ring. Users may also select to demonstrate the cases when the ring becomes broken or when one of the stations is switched off. (UNC E-Learning Grant)

  15. Thermohaline Circulation Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cynthia Venn

    This activity helps the students to visualize the effects of temperature and salinity on water density, and the resulting thermohaline circulation. Important processes visualized in this demonstration are upwelling, downwelling, and the formation of haloclines, thermoclines and pycnoclines. In addition, mixing by advection is clearly demonstrated.

  16. A Greener Chemiluminescence Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jilani, Osman; Donahue, Trisha M.; Mitchell, Miguel O.

    2011-01-01

    Because they are dramatic and intriguing, chemiluminescence demonstrations have been used for decades to stimulate interest in chemistry. One of the most intense chemiluminescent reactions is the oxidation of diaryl oxalate diesters with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a fluorescer. In typical lecture demonstrations, the commercially…

  17. Automatic lighting controls demonstration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Rubinstein; R. Verderber

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least

  18. Otitis Media in Sperm-Associated Antigen 6 (Spag6)-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Li, Boqin; Bai, Xiaohui; Strauss, Jerome F.; Zhang, Zhibing; Wang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian SPAG6 protein is localized to the axoneme central apparatus, and it is required for normal flagella and cilia motility. Recent studies demonstrated that the protein also regulates ciliogenesis and cilia polarity in the epithelial cells of brain ventricles and trachea. Motile cilia are also present in the epithelial cells of the middle ear and Eustachian tubes, where the ciliary system participates in the movement of serous fluid and mucus in the middle ear. Cilia defects are associated with otitis media (OM), presumably due to an inability to efficiently transport fluid, mucus and particles including microorganisms. We investigated the potential role of SPAG6 in the middle ear and Eustachian tubes by studying mice with a targeted mutation in the Spag6 gene. SPAG6 is expressed in the ciliated cells of middle ear epithelial cells. The orientation of the ciliary basal feet was random in the middle ear epithelial cells of Spag6-deficient mice, and there was an associated disrupted localization of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein, FZD6. These features are associated with disordered cilia orientation, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, which leads to uncoordinated cilia beating. The Spag6 mutant mice were also prone to develop OM. However, there were no significant differences in bacterial populations, epithelial goblet cell density, mucin expression and Eustachian tube angle between the mutant and wild-type mice, suggesting that OM was due to accumulation of fluid and mucus secondary to the ciliary dysfunction. Our studies demonstrate a role for Spag6 in the pathogenesis of OM in mice, possibly through its role in the regulation of cilia/basal body polarity through the PCP-dependent mechanisms in the middle ear and Eustachian tubes. PMID:25393619

  19. LEARNING INVARIANT COLOR FEATURES WITH SPARSE TOPOGRAPHIC RESTRICTED BOLTZMANN MACHINES

    E-print Network

    LEARNING INVARIANT COLOR FEATURES WITH SPARSE TOPOGRAPHIC RESTRICTED BOLTZMANN MACHINES Hanlin Goh that are sparse and topographically organized. Upon analysis, the features learned are Gabor- like and demonstrate image transformations and changes in illumination color. Index Terms-- Unsupervised feature learning

  20. Tested Demonstrations: Spectroscopy Illustrated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for an experiment to prepare three metal derivatives of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and to determine some structural features of these derivatives based on their infrared spectra. Results and discussion of reactions involved are also provided. (JN)

  1. Radiation sensitivity of T-lymphocytes from immunodeficient wasted mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Padilla; C. Libertin; C. Krco; G. E. Woloschak

    1990-01-01

    Mice with the autosomal recessive gene wasted (wst\\/wst) exhibit neurologic disorders, reduced mucosal immune responses, and abnormal DNA repair mechanisms. The wst\\/wst mouse has been proposed as a murine model for the human disorder ataxia telangiectasia. Experiments were designed to examine the sensitivity of T-cells from wasted mice to ionizing radiation. Results demonstrated that T-cell clones derived from wasted mice

  2. Phenotypic Characterization of miR-92a?/? Mice Reveals an Important Function of miR-92a in Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Penzkofer, Daniela; Bonauer, Angelika; Fischer, Ariane; Tups, Alexander; Brandes, Ralf P.; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) emerged as key regulators of gene expression. Germline hemizygous deletion of the gene that encodes the miR-17?92 miRNA cluster was associated with microcephaly, short stature and digital abnormalities in humans. Mice deficient for the miR-17?92 cluster phenocopy several features such as growth and skeletal development defects and exhibit impaired B cell development. However, the individual contribution of miR-17?92 cluster members to this phenotype is unknown. Here we show that germline deletion of miR-92a in mice is not affecting heart development and does not reduce circulating or bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells, but induces skeletal defects. MiR-92a?/? mice are born at a reduced Mendelian ratio, but surviving mice are viable and fertile. However, body weight of miR-92a?/? mice was reduced during embryonic and postnatal development and adulthood. A significantly reduced body and skull length was observed in miR-92a?/? mice compared to wild type littermates. µCT analysis revealed that the length of the 5th mesophalanx to 5th metacarpal bone of the forelimbs was significantly reduced, but bones of the hindlimbs were not altered. Bone density was not affected. These findings demonstrate that deletion of miR-92a is sufficient to induce a developmental skeletal defect. PMID:24979655

  3. Hypomyelinated mutant mice. II. Myelination in vitro.

    PubMed

    Billings-Gagliardi, S; Adcock, L H; Schwing, G B; Wolf, M K

    1980-10-27

    Organotypic cultures of cerebellum from hypomyelinated mutant mice provide a powerful experimental system for studying the cell biology of the mutant diseases. We have examined the extent to which the culture system reproduces the diseases of three well-known mutants, qk, jpmsd, and jp. Quantitation of myelin profiles per sq. mm of section demonstrates that in vitro, as in situ, qk produces the most myelin jpmsd an intermediate amount, and jp the least. Myelin in qk cultures is unique in being invisible by light microscopy of the living culture. Hypomyelination of jp may be more severe in vitro than in situ. Cultures of jpmsd exhibit many of the ultrastructural features of cerebellar abnormalities that occur in situ: degree of hypomyelination, clustering of myelin segments, scarcity of oligodendrocytes, absence of nodes of Ranvier but presence of heminodes, and apparent structural integrity of the myelin sheaths. Correspondence between in vitro and in situ ultrastructure is more difficult to assess for jp, because the available sample of jp myelin in vitro is too small, and for qk, because the abnormalities observed in situ resemble nonspecific abnormalities of normal myelin in vitro. PMID:7417802

  4. Histopathological Study of the Lungs of Mice Receiving Human Secretory IgA and Challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    ALVAREZ, Nadine; INFANTE, Juan Francisco; BORRERO, Reinier; MATA, Dulce; PAYAN, JORGE BARRIOS-; HOSSAIN, Md. Murad; MOHD NOR, Norazmi; SARMIENTO, María Elena; HERNANDEZ-PANDO, Rogelio; ACOSTA, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Background: Humoral and cellular immune responses are associated with protection against extracellular and intracellular pathogens, respectively. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of receiving human secretory immunoglobulin A (hsIgA) on the histopathology of the lungs of mice challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methods: The hsIgA was purified from human colostrum and administered to Balb/c mice by the intranasal route prior to infection with M. tuberculosis or in a pre-incubated formulation with mycobacteria, with the principal aim to study its effect on qualitative pulmonary histopathology. Results: The intranasal administration of hsIgA and the pre-incubation of mycobacteria with this preparation was associated with the presence of organised granulomas with signs of immune activation and histological features related to efficient disease control. This effect was highly evident during the late stage of infection (60 days), as demonstrated by numerous organised granulomas with numerous activated macrophages in the lungs of treated mice. Conclusion: The administration of hsIgA to mice before intratracheal infection with M. tuberculosis or the pre-incubation of the bacteria with the antibody formulation induced the formation of well-organised granulomas and inflammatory lesions in lungs compared with non-treated animals which correlates with the protective effect already demonstrated by these antibody formulations. PMID:25246833

  5. Experimental infection in mice with Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, J S; Jensen, H E; Jensen, N E

    1995-06-01

    The pathogenicity of Bacillus licheniformis was assessed in normal and immunodepressed BALB/c mice. The animals were challenged intravenously with 4 x 10(7) colony forming units of B. licheniformis (ATCC 14580) and both normal and immunodepressed mice were susceptible. However, the infection was more severe in the immunosuppressed animals. In normal mice, lesions were restricted to the liver and kidneys, while lesions also occurred in other organs of immunodepressed mice. By crossed immunoelectrophoresis it was shown that antigens of B. licheniformis are potent immunogens, and the bacteria could be identified in tissue sections by immunostaining. Immunohistochemically, B. licheniformis was demonstrated in hepatic and pulmonic macrophages, and from some animals the bacteria were also reisolated. PMID:8546023

  6. Teaching Chemistry through Observation--The Exploding Can Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golestaneh, Kamran

    1998-01-01

    Describes procedures for a demonstration that features an exploding can. This demonstration prompts students to critically analyze the release of energy in an exothermic reaction, the work done in such a reaction, and the enthalpy. (DDR)

  7. Time Lapse Season Demonstrator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    This animation demonstrates the changing declination of the sun with a time-lapse animation. It shows how the shadow of a building changes over the course of a year as the declination of the sun changes.

  8. Water Contamination Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Summary: Misplaced Matter and Water Pollution The drinking water pollution demonstration provides a very simple but dramatic way to get students to think about water contamination and drinking water standards, ...

  9. Favorite Demonstration: Differential Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mark Francek

    2002-10-01

    In this inquiry-based demonstration, the consumption of a Baby Ruth candy bar is used to nurture students' interest in chemical and physical weathering. In addition, two other concepts can be illustrated: the difference between weathering and erosion and

  10. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  11. Thermal Conductivity Demonstrations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Summary Here are three ideas for demonstrating thermal conductivity to your students. I. Heat flow down a metal rod (or rods) is timed by seeing wax melt at different locations along the rod. II. A rod made of ...

  12. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  13. Copper Extraction Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Summary This demonstration uses sulfuric acid and crushed copper ore (malachite) to produce a solution of copper sulfate and carbonic acid in a beaker. When a freshly sanded nail is dropped into the copper sulfate ...

  14. Classroom Demonstration of Sunspots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Thomas O.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An overhead projector, projection screen, and clear tungsten Filament light bulb operated through a dimmer or variac switch are used to demonstrate the fact that black appearance of sunspots is due only to contrast and that sunspots are bright. (SK)

  15. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambly, Gordon F.; Goldsmith, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a method of demonstrating the optical activity of glucose using an overhead projector and easily obtainable materials. Explores the difference between reflected and transmitted light (Tyndall Effect) using sodium thiosulfate, hydrochloric acid, and an overhead projector. (ML)

  16. Innovative technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Luttrell, S.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Hartley, J.N. (Battelle Environmental Management Operations, Richland, WA (United States)); Hinchee, R. (Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The Innovative Technology Demonstration (ITD) program at Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, will demonstrate the overall utility and effectiveness of innovative technologies for site characterization, monitoring, and remediation of selected contaminated test sites. The current demonstration test sites include a CERCLA site on the NPL list, located under a building (Building 3001) that houses a large active industrial complex used for rebuilding military aircraft, and a site beneath and surrounding an abandoned underground tank vault used for storage of jet fuels and solvents. The site under Building 3001 (the NW Test Site) is contaminated with TCE and Cr{sup {plus}6}; the site with the fuel storage vault (the SW Tanks Site) is contaminated with fuels, BTEX and TCE. These sites and others have been identified for cleanup under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). This document describes the demonstrations that have been conducted or are planned for the TAFB.

  17. Innovative technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Luttrell, S.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hartley, J.N. [Battelle Environmental Management Operations, Richland, WA (United States); Hinchee, R. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The Innovative Technology Demonstration (ITD) program at Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, will demonstrate the overall utility and effectiveness of innovative technologies for site characterization, monitoring, and remediation of selected contaminated test sites. The current demonstration test sites include a CERCLA site on the NPL list, located under a building (Building 3001) that houses a large active industrial complex used for rebuilding military aircraft, and a site beneath and surrounding an abandoned underground tank vault used for storage of jet fuels and solvents. The site under Building 3001 (the NW Test Site) is contaminated with TCE and Cr{sup {plus}6}; the site with the fuel storage vault (the SW Tanks Site) is contaminated with fuels, BTEX and TCE. These sites and others have been identified for cleanup under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). This document describes the demonstrations that have been conducted or are planned for the TAFB.

  18. Demonstrating Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, David S.; Amundson, John C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes laboratory exercises with chickens selecting their food from dyed and natural corn kernels as a method of demonstrating natural selection. The procedure is based on the fact that organisms that blend into their surroundings escape predation. (BR)

  19. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  20. Witches' Potion Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Science House

    2014-01-28

    In this chemistry demonstration, learners will discover that phenolphthalein is an acid/base indicator. One learner will read a poem about four witches making a potion. Four learners will act out the parts, adding chemicals and water to different beakers (with adult supervision). Learners will enjoy the poem as the indicators react with the substances and change color. This is a fun chemistry demonstration to use during Halloween.

  1. Autophagy Controls Acquisition of Aging Features in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Stranks, Amanda J.; Hansen, Anne Louise; Panse, Isabel; Mortensen, Monika; Ferguson, David J.P.; Puleston, Daniel J.; Shenderov, Kevin; Watson, Alexander Scarth; Veldhoen, Marc; Phadwal, Kanchan; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages provide a bridge linking innate and adaptive immunity. An increased frequency of macrophages and other myeloid cells paired with excessive cytokine production is commonly seen in the aging immune system, known as ‘inflamm-aging’. It is presently unclear how healthy macrophages are maintained throughout life and what connects inflammation with myeloid dysfunction during aging. Autophagy, an intracellular degradation mechanism, has known links with aging and lifespan extension. Here, we show for the first time that autophagy regulates the acquisition of major aging features in macrophages. In the absence of the essential autophagy gene Atg7, macrophage populations are increased and key functions such as phagocytosis and nitrite burst are reduced, while the inflammatory cytokine response is significantly increased – a phenotype also observed in aged macrophages. Furthermore, reduced autophagy decreases surface antigen expression and skews macrophage metabolism toward glycolysis. We show that macrophages from aged mice exhibit significantly reduced autophagic flux compared to young mice. These data demonstrate that autophagy plays a critical role in the maintenance of macrophage homeostasis and function, regulating inflammation and metabolism and thereby preventing immunosenescence. Thus, autophagy modulation may prevent excess inflammation and preserve macrophage function during aging, improving immune responses and reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with inflamm-aging. PMID:25359593

  2. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the universe (using big-bang chocolate chip cookies); differentiation during the formation of the Earth and planets (using chocolate or chocolate milk with marshmallows, cereal, candy pieces or nuts); and radioactivity/radioactive dating (using popcorn). Other possible demonstrations include: plate tectonics (crackers with peanut butter and jelly); convection (miso soup or hot chocolate); mud flows on Mars (melted chocolate poured over angel food cake); formation of the Galactic disk (pizza); formation of spiral arms (coffee with cream); the curvature of Space (Pringles); constellations patterns with chocolate chips and chocolate chip cookies; planet shaped cookies; star shaped cookies with different colored frostings; coffee or chocolate milk measurement of solar radiation; Oreo cookie lunar phases. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  3. Phenolphthalein—Pink Tornado Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prall, Bruce R.

    2008-04-01

    The phenolphthalein-pink tornado demonstration utilizes the vortex generated by a spinning magnetic stirring bar in a 1 L graduated cylinder containing 0.01 M HCl to demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle as it applies to the phenolphthalein equilibrium in water H 2 In + 2H 2 O 2H 2 O + + In 2 - where H 2 In is phenophthalein. The addition of 3-4 drops of phenolphthalein indicator solution followed immediately by 3-4 drops of 50% (w/w) NaOH to the vortex of the HCl solution results in a shift to the right in the equilibrium owing to the reaction of OH - + H 3 O + to form water. This shift is accompanied by the vortex becoming visible by the appearance of a pinkish-red color caused by an increase in In 2- concentration within the localized region of the vortex. The demonstration also provides one an excellent opportunity to discuss the topics of limiting reagent and reagent in excess. Some insight regarding the extent to which uniform mixing is achieved when using a magnetic stirrer is also provided. Included is a note from the Feature Editor, Ed Vitz.

  4. Mathematical modeling of left ventricular dimensional changes in mice during aging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac aging is characterized by diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV), which is due in part to increased LV wall stiffness. In the diastolic phase, myocytes are relaxed and extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical determinant to the changes of LV wall stiffness. To evaluate the effects of ECM composition on cardiac aging, we developed a mathematical model to predict LV dimension and wall stiffness changes in aging mice by integrating mechanical laws and our experimental results. We measured LV dimension, wall thickness, LV mass, and collagen content for wild type (WT) C57/BL6J mice of ages ranging from 7.3 months to those of 34.0 months. The model was established using the thick wall theory and stretch-induced tissue growth to an isotropic and homogeneous elastic composite with mixed constituents. The initial conditions of the simulation were set based on the data from the young mice. Matlab simulations of this mathematical model demonstrated that the model captured the major features of LV remodeling with age and closely approximated experimental results. Specifically, the temporal progression of the LV interior and exterior dimensions demonstrated the same trend and order-of-magnitude change as our experimental results. In conclusion, we present here a validated mathematical model of cardiac aging that applies the thick-wall theory and stretch-induced tissue growth to LV remodeling with age. PMID:23281647

  5. Listeria Infection Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Brett Finlay (Howard Hughes Medical Institute; )

    2007-03-27

    Dr. Finlay and a student volunteer show how Listeria infects a cell, using a marble and some yellow gelatin. Also featured on the DVD 2000 and Beyond: Confronting the Microbe Menace, available free from HHMI. This video is one minute and 4 seconds in length, and available in MOV (7 MB) and WMV (10 MB). All Infectious Disease videos are located at: http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/disease/video.html.

  6. Demonstrations in Introductory Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Stein, S.; van der Lee, S.; Swafford, L.; Klosko, E.; Delaughter, J.; Wysession, M.

    2005-12-01

    Geophysical concepts are challenging to teach at introductory levels, because students need to understand both the underlying physics and its geological application. To address this, our introductory courses include class demonstrations and experiments to demonstrate underlying physical principles and their geological applications. Demonstrations and experiments have several advantages over computer simulations. First, computer simulations "work" even if the basic principle is wrong. In contrast, simple demonstrations show that a principle is physically correct, rather than a product of computer graphics. Second, many students are unfamiliar with once-standard experiments demonstrating ideas of classical physics used in geophysics. Demonstrations are chosen that we consider stimulating, relevant, inexpensive, and easy to conduct in a non-lab classroom. These come in several groups. Many deal with aspects of seismic waves, using springs, light beams, and other methods such as talking from outside the room to illustrate the frequency dependence of diffraction (hearing but not seeing around a corner). Others deal with heat and mass transfer, such as illustrating fractional crystallization with apple juice and the surface/volume effect in planetary evolution with ice. Plate motions are illustrated with paper cutouts showing effects like motion on transform faults and how the Euler vector geometry changes a plate boundary from spreading, to strike-slip, to convergence along the Pacific-North America boundary from the Gulf of California to Alaska. Radioactive decay is simulated by having the class rise and sit down as a result of coin flips (one tail versus two gives different decay rates and hence half lives). This sessions' goal of exchanging information about demonstrations is an excellent idea: some of ours are described on http://www.earth.nwu.edu/people/seth/202.

  7. Decomposition of interacting machining features based on the reasoning on the design features

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Zheng; Jamaludin Mohd Taib

    Currently, design and machining features diverge in meaning, even when they are interpreting the same object. This divergence\\u000a of feature interpretation provides a venue for research work to reduce the complexity that arises in recognizing interacting\\u000a machining features. Therefore, this paper demonstrates the recognition of design features with the aim to eventually decompose\\u000a the interacting machining features. Loop driving recognition

  8. Group features of small seismic waveforms

    E-print Network

    Wenlong Liu; Yucheng Liu

    Abstract: This paper demonstrates several group features observed from small seismic waveforms and distinguishes abnormal group features that preceded destructive major shocks from normal ones. Important group features discussed in this paper include direction of seismic wave’s first motion, amplitude ratio, half period of the first motion, frequency components of earthquakes, and linearity of seismic waveform. The group features illustrated in this paper have been used as important criteria in earthquake prediction.

  9. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-05-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  10. TRUEX hot demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  11. Video Demonstration: Proportions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    This video demonstration from Watch Know Learn will help students learning about proportions. The video will help students with some knowledge of proportions by showing examples of how to solve them. The definition of a proportion is included as well as examples of how to cross-multiply to solve proportion problems. The demonstration shows what a non-proportion problem looks like and how to solve it as well as a few examples of using the lowest common denominator to solve proportions. Flash player is required to view the video, and the running time for the video is 8:09.

  12. Standing Wave Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This demonstration is intended to help students better understand the electromagnetic spectrum. At the end of this activity students will be able to explain that energy travels from the sun to the earth by means of electromagnetic waves, and that the shorter the wavelength, the higher the energy per photon. They will understand why shorter wavelengths of electromagnetic energy carry more energy than longer wavelengths. Students will also be able to demonstrate how wavelength is measured. The teacher's guide contains detailed background material, learning goals, alignment to national standards, grade level/time, details on materials and preparation, procedure, assessment ideas, and modifications for alternative learners.

  13. Humoral immunity in humanized mice: a work in progress.

    PubMed

    Seung, Edward; Tager, Andrew M

    2013-11-01

    Humanized mice historically have not been good models of human humoral immunity induced by either infection or immunization. However, newer versions of humanized mice generated in severely immunodeficient mice with a targeted disruption of the IL2R?c gene have recently been reported to produce antigen-specific class-switched human antibodies, with some demonstrating neutralizing activities. Here we review the growing ability of humanized mice to support the study of human humoral immune responses, discussing the current and future potential of these models as well as their current limitations. PMID:24151323

  14. Humoral Immunity in Humanized Mice: A Work in Progress

    PubMed Central

    Seung, Edward; Tager, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Humanized mice historically have not been good models of human humoral immunity induced by either infection or immunization. However, newer versions of humanized mice generated in severely immunodeficient mice with a targeted disruption of the IL2R?c gene have recently been reported to produce antigen-specific class-switched human antibodies, with some demonstrating neutralizing activities. Here we review the growing ability of humanized mice to support the study of human humoral immune responses, discussing the current and future potential of these models as well as their current limitations. PMID:24151323

  15. Demonstrating carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Qader, A.; Hooper, B.; Stevens, G. (and others) [Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) (Australia)

    2009-11-15

    Australia is at the forefront of advancing CCS technology. The CO2CRC's H3 (Post-combustion) and Mulgrave (pre-combustion) capture projects are outlined. The capture technologies for these 2 demonstration projects are described. 1 map., 2 photos.

  16. AP Biology Demonstrations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The College Board The College Board (The College Board; )

    2003-06-03

    A collection of experiments and demonstrations presented by biology teachers addressing some of the most difficult-to-understand topics in the AP biology curriculum which include evolutionary traits, genetics, bacterial transformation, antibody diversity, comparative anatomy, photosynthesis, human genetics, protein synthesis, recombinant DNA and RNA polymerase.

  17. Structural Vibrations Laboratory Demonstrator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reen E Foley

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a laboratory demonstrator of structural vibrations. When the ground moves under a structure the effect on that structure is dependent upon the relationship between the frequency of the ground motion and the natural frequency of the structure. As this relationship, the frequency ratio, approaches one (1) the effect is at its

  18. Technology demonstration solar telescope

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Torben Andersen; Oddbjrn Engvold; Mette Owner-Pedersen

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual design of the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST) has evolved through the years. In 1995-97 it was discussed whether a technology demonstration telescope could be built at a lower cost than the LEST originally proposed. In 1997, a de-scoped LEST design, the so-called \\

  19. Demonstration Road Show

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Shropshire, Steven

    2009-04-06

    The Idaho State University Department of Physics conducts science demonstration shows at S. E. Idaho schools. Four different presentations are currently available; "Forces and Motion", "States of Matter", "Electricity and Magnetism", and "Sound and Waves". Information provided includes descriptions of the material and links to other resources.

  20. A Fruity Biochemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Classroom demonstrations are a great vehicle for getting students to apply information they have heard in a lecture. Educational research is replete with data showing that concept application in an inquiry setting reinforces long-term science content retention. This means that students learn best when they experience applications of concepts and…

  1. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  2. Simple SAR demonstrator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krzysztof Kulpa; Jacek Misiurewicz; Piotr Baranowski; Grzegorz Wojdolowicz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q

  3. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  4. Space fabrication demonstration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The lower right aluminum beam cap roll forming mill was delivered and installed in the beam builder. The beam was brought to full operational status and beams of one to six bay lengths were produced to demonstrate full system capability. Although the cap flange waviness problem persists, work is progressing within cost and schedule.

  5. DEMONSTRATION OF MICROFILTRATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in cooperation with E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Company, Inc. (DuPont) and the Oberlin Filter Company (Oberlin), undertook a field demonstration project to evaluate microfil...

  6. New Technology Demonstration Program

    E-print Network

    New Technology Demonstration Program Technical Brief FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Tom for saving energy in refrigerated walk-in coolers, and to evaluate the potential for this technology in Federal facilities. The focus of this study was on a single manufacturer of the technology, Nevada Energy

  7. Video Demonstration: Borescope Inspection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This module, produced by the Wind Technician TV project from Highland Community College, provides a video demonstration of the Everest XLG3 video probe used to inspect a wind turbine gearbox. This would be useful for students who are learning the visual inspection process and want to see how this specific technology works. Running time for the video is 2:59.

  8. Why Do Demonstration Projects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, John E.

    1977-01-01

    Concludes that doing demonstrations and innovations is "good" so long as we are willing to pursue "goods" other than gains in student cognitive and affective behavioral outcomes. The situation for public education is unsatisfactory because the effort has not been clearly productive. A viable new beginning requires the alteration of fundamental…

  9. Astronomy LITE Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2006-12-01

    Project LITE (Light Inquiry Through Experiments) is a materials, software, and curriculum development project. It focuses on light, optics, color and visual perception. According to two recent surveys of college astronomy faculty members, these are among the topics most often included in the large introductory astronomy courses. The project has aimed largely at the design and implementation of hands-on experiences for students. However, it has also included the development of lecture demonstrations that employ novel light sources and materials. In this presentation, we will show some of our new lecture demonstrations concerning geometrical and physical optics, fluorescence, phosphorescence and polarization. We have developed over 200 Flash and Java applets that can be used either by teachers in lecture settings or by students at home. They are all posted on the web at http://lite.bu.edu. For either purpose they can be downloaded directly to the user's computer or run off line. In lecture demonstrations, some of these applets can be used to control the light emitted by video projectors to produce physical effects in materials (e.g. fluorescence). Other applets can be used, for example, to demonstrate that the human percept of color does not have a simple relationship with the physical frequency of the stimulating source of light. Project LITE is supported by Grant #DUE-0125992 from the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education.

  10. Soil bioventing demonstration project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Cho; D. H. Kampbell; J. T. Wilson; D. C. DiGiulio

    1990-01-01

    A pilot scale demonstration project of a soil bioventing system, which utilizes the biodegradation in soil and physical removal of VOC by induced air flow, is in operation at the U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Field in Traverse City, Michigan. The system is being tested to determine its suitability for remediation of the vadose zone in conjunction with aquifer remediation at

  11. SOIL BIOVENTING DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale demonstration project of a soil bioventing system, which utilizes the biodegradation in soil and physical removal of VOC by induced air flow, is in operation at the U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Field in Traverse City, Michigan. he system is being tested to determine it...

  12. Rate of Solution Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Science House

    2014-01-28

    In this chemistry demonstration, learners investigate the factors that increase the rate of dissolution for a solid. Learners will compare how crushing sugar cubes, stirring and water temperature affect the rate at which the sugar dissolved. This resource guide includes extensions and notes about factors that accelerate dissolution and Henry's Law.

  13. Fuel Cell Demonstration Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald Brun

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing

  14. Astronomy Demonstrations and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    Demonstrations in astronomy classes seem to be more necessary than in physics classes for three reasons. First, many of the events are very large scale and impossibly remote from human senses. Secondly, while physics courses use discussions of one- and two-dimensional motion, three-dimensional motion is the normal situation in astronomy; thus,…

  15. Electromagnetic Induction Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Marsha Hobbs

    This simple demonstration shows the interaction between electricity and magnetism. Two coils of wire are held close to each other, but not touching. One is attached to a music source, such as a small radio or iPod, and the other is attached to an external speaker. Students can hear the music through the speaker even though there is no direct connection.

  16. ALASKA VILLAGE DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two demonstration projects were built as authorized by Section 113 of PL 92-500. Modular construction was used to provide central utility systems which included water supply, laundry, bathing, saunas, and wastewater treatment. Service to homes was by vehicular delivery. Fire dest...

  17. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Provides two demonstrations: (1) electrolyte migration of ions using colored ions which cross a strip of gelatin allowing for noticeable migration; and (2) photochemical reduction of Fe+3 by the citrate ion. Points out both reactions can be done in a Petri dish using common lab materials. (MVL)

  18. Female Mecp2(+/-) mice display robust behavioral deficits on two different genetic backgrounds providing a framework for pre-clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Samaco, Rodney C; McGraw, Christopher M; Ward, Christopher S; Sun, Yaling; Neul, Jeffrey L; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurological disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional modulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Typical RTT primarily affects girls and is characterized by a brief period of apparently normal development followed by the loss of purposeful hand skills and language, the onset of anxiety, hand stereotypies, autistic features, seizures and autonomic dysfunction. Mecp2 mouse models have extensively been studied to demonstrate the functional link between MeCP2 dysfunction and RTT pathogenesis. However, the majority of studies have focused primarily on the molecular and behavioral consequences of the complete absence of MeCP2 in male mice. Studies of female Mecp2(+/-) mice have been limited because of potential phenotypic variability due to X chromosome inactivation effects. To determine whether reproducible and reliable phenotypes can be detected Mecp2(+/-) mice, we analyzed Mecp2(+/-) mice of two different F1 hybrid isogenic backgrounds and at young and old ages using several neurobehavioral and physiological assays. Here, we report a multitude of phenotypes in female Mecp2(+/-) mice, some presenting as early as 5 weeks of life. We demonstrate that Mecp2(+/-) mice recapitulate several aspects of typical RTT and show that mosaic expression of MeCP2 does not preclude the use of female mice in behavioral and molecular studies. Importantly, we uncover several behavioral abnormalities that are present in two genetic backgrounds and report on phenotypes that are unique to one background. These findings provide a framework for pre-clinical studies aimed at improving the constellation of phenotypes in a mouse model of RTT. PMID:23026749

  19. BIOSYNTHESIS OF DIMETHYLNITROSAMINE IN DIMETHYLAMINE-TREATED MICE AFTER EXPOSURE TO NITROGEN DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    These studies demonstrate the nitrosating potential of NO2 in vivo in 1CR mice. Groups of mice were gavaged with 2 mg dimethylamine (DMA) and exposed to NO2 at levels from 0.04 to 44.5 ppm for periods up to 4 hours. Mice were individually frozen and blended to a powder, aliquots ...

  20. Developmental consequences of in utero sodium arsenate exposure in mice with folate transport deficiencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that mice lacking a functional folate binding protein 2 gene (Folbp2'/') were significantly more sensitive to in utero arsenic exposure than were the wild-type mice similarly exposed. When these mice were fed a folate-deficient diet, the embryotoxic effect of arsen...

  1. Sirt1-deficient mice exhibit an altered cartilage phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, Odile; Zaal, Kristien J.; Sanchez, Christelle; Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona; Gagarina, Viktoria; Song, Yingjie; He, Xiao Hong; McBurney, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We previously demonstrated that Sirt1 regulates apoptosis in cartilage in vitro. Here we attempt to examine in vivo cartilage homeostasis, using Sirt1 total body knockout (KO) mice. Method Articular cartilage was harvested from hind paws of 1-week and 3-week-old mice carrying wild type (WT) or null Sirt1 gene. Knees of Sirt1 haploinsufficient mice also were examined, at 6 months. Joint cartilage was processed for histologic examination or biochemical analyses of chondrocyte cultures. Results We found that articular cartilage tissue sections from Sirt1 KO mice up to 3 weeks of age exhibited low levels of type 2 collagen, aggrecan, and glycosaminoglycan content. In contrast, protein levels of MMP-13 were elevated in the Sirt1 KO mice, leading to a potential increase of cartilage breakdown, already shown in the heterozygous mice. Additional results showed elevated chondrocyte apoptosis in Sirt1 KO mice, as compared to WT controls. In addition to these observations, PTP1b (protein tyrosine phosphatase b) was elevated in the Sirt1 KO mice, in line with previous reports. Conclusion The findings from this animal model demonstrated that Sirt1 KO mice presented an altered cartilage phenotype, with an elevated apoptotic process and a potential degradative cartilage process. PMID:23587642

  2. Demonstration of Berry Phase in Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Hong-Ji; Ding, Liang-En

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the observed phase shift of the RF signal and its intensity dependence under extreme low pump and probe laser field conditions are dominated by Berry phase effect in optical spectroscopy with good adiabatic approximation, which provides all features' agreements between the theoretical and the experimental results.

  3. Technology Tips: Building Interactive Demonstrations with Sage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Maura

    2013-01-01

    Sage is an open-source software package that can be used in many different areas of mathematics, ranging from algebra to calculus and beyond. One of the most exciting pedagogical features of Sage (http://www.sagemath.org) is its ability to create interacts--interactive examples that can be used in a classroom demonstration or by students in a…

  4. Mice as reservoirs of the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Levine, J F; Wilson, M L; Spielman, A

    1985-03-01

    In evaluating the white-footed mouse as a reservoir host for the Lyme disease spirochete, we compared spirochete infection in vector ticks (Ixodes dammini) having different histories of attachment to these mice, estimated their relative importance as hosts for immature I. dammini and compared the seasonality of tick activity and spirochetemia in mice. Infection in trapped white-footed mice appears to be universal. Prevalence of spirochetal infection in I. dammini correlates with frequency of attachment to mice, and in mice, with the season of vector activity. The relative abundance of this mouse makes it numerically the most important host for I. dammini. Most immature I. dammini appear to attach to white-footed mice. Taken together, these considerations demonstrate that the white-footed mouse serves as reservoir for the Lyme disease spirochete in coastal Massachusetts. PMID:3985277

  5. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)], E-mail: jkoo001@umaryland.edu; Smiley, Mark A. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Lovering, Richard M. [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Margolis, Frank L. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  6. Hippocampal phenotypes in kalirin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhong; Cahill, Michael E.; Radulovic, Jelena; Wang, Jing; Campbell, Susan L.; Miller, Courtney A.; Sweatt, J. David; Penzes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of forebrain cellular structure and function by small GTPase pathways is crucial for normal and pathological brain development and function. Kalirin is a brain-specific activator of Rho-like small GTPases implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. We have recently demonstrated key roles for kalirin in cortical synaptic transmission, dendrite branching, spine density, and working memory. However, little is known about the impact of the complete absence of kalirin on the hippocampus in mice. We thus investigated hippocampal function, structure, and associated behavioral phenotypes in KALRN knockout (KO) mice we have recently generated. Here we show that KALRN KO mice had modest impairments in hippocampal LTP, but normal hippocampal synaptic transmission. In these mice, both context and cue-dependent fear conditioning were impaired. Spine density and dendrite morphology in hippocampal pyramidal neurons was not significantly affected in the KALRN KO mice, but small alterations in the gross morphology of the hippocampus were detected. These data suggest that hippocampal structure and function are more resilient to the complete loss of kalirin, and reveal impairments in fear learning. These studies allow the comparison of the phenotypes of different kalirin mutant mice and shed light on the brain region-specific functions of small GTPase signaling. PMID:20708080

  7. Bioreactor Landfill Demonstration Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Managed by the Florida Center for Solid and Hazardous Waste Management, this Website provides information on the Bioreactor Landfill Demonstration Project. The slow decomposition rates in current municipal landfills have prompted research in bioreactor landfills, which operate under the "wet cell" theory where moisture is added to enhance degradation. The Research section contains a plethora of material, including the Bioreactor Presentation, which consists of 60 slides outlining the project and solid waste issues, and A Proposed Bioreactor Landfill Demonstration Project, which is the proposal that started the project. The proposal is a great source of background information about bioreactor landfills. Though not all of the topics listed on the site have active links, the information available is worthwhile.

  8. Automatic lighting controls demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Mitigation Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  10. Computer controlled polisher demonstration.

    PubMed

    Jones, R A

    1980-06-15

    A recent effort was conducted to demonstrate the efficiency of the computer controlled polisher process. A computer algorithm was written that predicts the surface figure progress for each polishing cycle. A 1.8-m diam lightweight glass mirror was polished with the computer controlled polisher for four cycles. The prediction program was used to provide an estimate of expected figure improvement for each cycle. The activity used only 72 h of polishing time and improved the mirror surface from an rms figure error of 0.16-0.04 waves, where a wave is 0.633 microm. Even though this figure improvement lagged the predicted improvement due to metrology uncertainty, the rapid error correction demonstrates the computer controlled polisher to be a highly valuable manufacturing tool. PMID:20221183

  11. AVNG system demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Thron, Jonathan Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Arthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kondratov, Sergey [VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [VNIIEF; Razinkov, Sergey [VNIIEF

    2010-01-01

    An attribute measurement system (AMS) measures a number of unclassified attributes of potentially classified material. By only displaying these unclassified results as red or green lights, the AMS protects potentially classified information while still generating confidence in the measurement result. The AVNG implementation that we describe is an AMS built by RFNC - VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. To provide additional confidence, the AVNG was designed with two modes of operation. In the secure mode, potentially classified measurements can be made with only the simple red light/green light display. In the open mode, known unclassified material can be measured with complete display of the information collected from the radiation detectors. The AVNG demonstration, which occurred in Sarov, Russia in June 2009 for a joint US/Russian audience, included exercising both modes of AVNG operation using a number of multi-kg plutonium sources. In addition to describing the demonstration, we will show photographs and/or video taken of AVNG operation.

  12. Nucla CFB Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

  13. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris

    1988-01-01

    Describes two oscillating reactions: the Briggs-Raucher reaction using H202, KIO3, malonic acid, and MnSO4 which changes from yellow to blue, and the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction uses NaBrO3, NaBr, malonic acid, and ferroin solution and changes from red to blue. Includes a third color demonstration on the six oxidation states of manganese. (MVL)

  14. Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Parsonage, Tom; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrications of large Beryllium optical components are fundamentally limited by available facility capabilities. To overcome this limitation, NASA funded Brush Wellman Corp to study a Be joining process. Four 76 mm diameters samples and a 0.5 mm diameter Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (JBMD) were fabricated. This presentation will review the fabrication of these samples and summarize the results of their cryogenic testing at MSFCs XRCF.

  15. The Blowgun Demonstration Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukamoto, Koji; Uchino, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    We have found that a simple demonstration experiment using a match or a cotton swab and a drinking straw or an acrylic pipe serves as an effective introduction to dynamics. The most basic apparatus has a cotton swab serving as a dart and the straw as the blowgun. When blown from a starting point near the exit end of the straw, the cotton swab does…

  16. Space Fabrication Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The completion of assembly of the beam builder and its first automatic production of truss is discussed. A four bay, hand assembled, roll formed members truss was built and tested to ultimate load. Detail design of the fabrication facility (beam builder) was completed and designs for subsystem debugging are discussed. Many one bay truss specimens were produced to demonstrate subsystem operation and to detect problem areas.

  17. The Majorana Demonstrator

    E-print Network

    E. Aguayo; J. E. Fast; E. W. Hoppe; M. E. Keillor; J. D. Kephart; R. T. Kouzes; B. D. LaFerriere; J. Merriman; J. L. Orrell; N. R. Overman; F. T. Avignone III; H. O. Back; D. C. Combs; L. E. Leviner; A. R. Young; A. S. Barabash; S. I. Konovalov; I. Vanyushin; V. Yumatov; M. Bergevin; Y-D. Chan; J. A. Detwiler; J. C. Loach; R. D. Martin; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; K. Vetter; F. E. Bertrand; R. J. Cooper; D. C. Radford; R. L. Varner; C. -H. Yu; M. Boswell; S. R. Elliott; V. M. Gehman; A. Hime; M. F. Kidd; B. H. LaRoque; K. Rielage; M. C. Ronquest; D. Steele; V. Brudanin; V. Egorov; K. Gusey; O. Kochetov; M. Shirchenko; V. Timkin; E. Yakushev; M. Busch; J. Esterline; W. Tornow; C. D. Christofferson; M. Horton; S. Howard; V. Sobolev; J. I. Collar; N. Fields; R. J. Creswick; P. J. Doe; R. A. Johnson; A. Knecht; J. Leon; M. G. Marino; M. L. Miller; R. G. H. Robertson; A. G. Schubert; B. A. Wolfe; Yu. Efremenko; H. Ejiri; R. Hazama; M. Nomachi; T. Shima; P. Finnerty; F. M. Fraenkle; G. K. Giovanetti; M. P. Green; R. Henning; M. A. Howe; S. MacMullin; D. G. Phillips II; K. J. Snavely; J. Strain; K. Vorren; V. E. Guiseppe; C. Keller; D. -M. Mei; G. Perumpilly; K. Thomas; C. Zhang; A. L. Hallin; K. J. Keeter; L. Mizouni; J. F. Wilkerson

    2011-09-30

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program including background reduction techniques is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% in 76Ge is given.

  18. Loss of Asxl1 leads to myelodysplastic syndrome–like disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiapeng; Li, Zhaomin; He, Yongzheng; Pan, Feng; Chen, Shi; Rhodes, Steven; Nguyen, Lihn; Yuan, Jin; Jiang, Li; Yang, Xianlin; Weeks, Ophelia; Liu, Ziyue; Zhou, Jiehao; Ni, Hongyu; Cai, Chen-Leng; Xu, Mingjiang

    2014-01-01

    ASXL1 is mutated/deleted with high frequencies in multiple forms of myeloid malignancies, and its alterations are associated with poor prognosis. De novo ASXL1 mutations cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome characterized by multiple congenital malformations. We show that Asxl1 deletion in mice led to developmental abnormalities including dwarfism, anophthalmia, and 80% embryonic lethality. Surviving Asxl1?/? mice lived for up to 42 days and developed features of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), including dysplastic neutrophils and multiple lineage cytopenia. Asxl1?/? mice had a reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool, and Asxl1?/? HSCs exhibited decreased hematopoietic repopulating capacity, with skewed cell differentiation favoring granulocytic lineage. Asxl1+/? mice also developed mild MDS-like disease, which could progress to MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasm, demonstrating a haploinsufficient effect of Asxl1 in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. Asxl1 loss led to an increased apoptosis and mitosis in Lineage–c-Kit+ (Lin–c-Kit+) cells, consistent with human MDS. Furthermore, Asxl1?/? Lin–c-Kit+ cells exhibited decreased global levels of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 and altered expression of genes regulating apoptosis (Bcl2, Bcl2l12, Bcl2l13). Collectively, we report a novel ASXL1 murine model that recapitulates human myeloid malignancies, implying that Asxl1 functions as a tumor suppressor to maintain hematopoietic cell homeostasis. Future work is necessary to clarify the contribution of microenvironment to the hematopoietic phenotypes observed in the constitutional Asxl1?/? mice. PMID:24255920

  19. Fish Oil Has Beneficial Effects on Allergen-Induced Airway Inflammation and Hyperreactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bargut, Thereza Cristina Lonzetti; Ferreira, Tatiana Paula Teixeira; Daleprane, Julio Beltrame; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva, Patrícia Machado Rodrigues; Aguila, Marcia Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Background Fish oil (FO) is rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which have been suggested to be anti-inflammatory and are associated with improvement of several inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the influence of FO on allergen-induced lung inflammation and airway hyperreactivity in mice. Methods Male A/J mice were fed either a standard-chow (SC) or a FO diet (FO) for 8 weeks. After 4 weeks, each group was further randomized for ovalbumin (SC-OVA and FO-OVA) or saline (SC-SAL and FO-SAL) challenge. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine, 24h after the last challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed for leukocyte counts. Lung tissue mucus deposition, peribronchiolar matrix deposition and eosinophil infiltration were quantified. Serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG1 (ref 2.2), lung IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, INF? and eotaxin-1 and 2 were detected by ELISA and nuclear factor kappa B (NF?B), GATA-3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) expression was measured by Western blot. Results Levels of serum IgE and IgG1 were significantly higher in OVA sensitized mice. OVA challenge resulted in increased eosinophil infiltration, increased inflammatory cytokine production, peribronchiolar matrix and mucus deposition and airway hyperreactivity to aerosolized methacholine. Elevated lung NF?B and GATA-3 expression was noted in OVA-challenged mice. These changes were attenuated in mice fed with FO diet. Higher PPAR? expression was also detected in the lungs from the FO-fed groups. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that FO intake attenuated classical asthma features by suppressing the systemic sensitization, thus providing evidence that FO might be a prophylactic alternative for asthma prevention. PMID:24040386

  20. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (1) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems; (2) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit; and (3) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater. The demonstration project consists of several distinct phases: a preliminary phase to develop the LIMB process design applicable to the host boiler, a construction and start-up phase, and an operating and evaluation phase. The first major activity, the development of the Edgewater LIMB design, was completed in January 1986 and detailed engineering is now complete. Major boiler-related components were installed during a September 1986 boiler outage. Start-up activities began in March of 1987 with tuning of the low NO{sub x} burners. Sorbent injection activities were underway as of July 1987. 3 figs.

  1. Simple SAR demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Baranowski, Piotr; Wojdo?owicz, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q components) have been recorded on 2.5" HDD. The signal processing has been performed on standard PC computer after copying the recorded data. The aim of constructing simple and relatively cheap demonstrator was to provide the students the real-life unclassified radar signals and motivate them to test and develop various kinds of SAR and ISAR algorithms, including image formation, motion compensation and autofocusing. The simple microwave frontend hardware has a lot of non-idealities, so for obtaining nice SAR image it was necessary to develop the number of correction algorithms at the calibration stage. The SAR demonstrator have been tested using car as a moving platform. The flight tests with a small airborne platform are planned for the summer.

  2. Lunar Water Resource Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., the Carnegie-Mellon University, JPL, and NEPTEC, NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE. This project is a ground demonstration of a system that would be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, drill into the regolith, determine what volatiles are present, and quantify them in addition to recovering oxygen by hydrogen reduction. The Lunar Prospector has determined these craters contain enhanced hydrogen concentrations averaging about 0.1%. If the hydrogen is in the form of water, the water concentration would be around 1%, which would translate into billions of tons of water on the Moon, a tremendous resource. The Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is a part of RESOLVE designed to capture lunar water and hydrogen and quantify them as a backup to gas chromatography analysis. This presentation will briefly review the design of LWRD and some of the results of testing the subsystem. RESOLVE is to be integrated with the Scarab rover from CMIJ and the whole system demonstrated on Mauna Kea on Hawaii in November 2008. The implications of lunar water for Mars exploration are two-fold: 1) RESOLVE and LWRD could be used in a similar fashion on Mars to locate and quantify water resources, and 2) electrolysis of lunar water could provide large amounts of liquid oxygen in LEO, leading to lower costs for travel to Mars, in addition to being very useful at lunar outposts.

  3. Bladder outlet obstruction in male cystinuria mice

    PubMed Central

    Ercolani, Mathew; Sahota, Amrik; Schuler, Catherine; Yang, Min; Evan, Andrew P.; Reimer, David; Barone, Joseph G.; Tischfield, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cystinuria is the most common inherited cause of urinary tract stones in children. It can lead to obstructive uropathy, which is a major cause of renal failure. Genetic studies have identified two genes, SLC3A1 and SLC7A9, to be directly involved in cystine stone formation. Slc3a1 knockout male mice develop cystine stones in the bladder and, to a lesser extent, in the kidney. Slc3a1 knockout female mice also develop cystinuria, but they do not form stones. The specific aim of this study was to characterize bladder function in cystinuria mice. Methods Eight control (4 male, 4 female) and 16 Slc3a1 knockout (9 male, 7 female) mice of mixed strain background (C57B/129, age 4–5 months) were evaluated. Each mouse was anesthetized and the bladder dome catheterized for cystometry. Immediately following cystometry, the bladder was excised, weighed, and separated into three full thickness strips for contractile studies. Results Bladders from cystinuria male mice had significantly increased weight, all of them had stones, decreased compliance, and decreased contractile responses to field stimulation, ATP, carbachol, and KCl. Compared with controls, female knockout mice showed normal bladder weight, decreased voiding pressure, slightly decreased compliance, and slightly decreased contractile responses. Conclusions These studies clearly demonstrate that the bladder stones that developed in the male cystinuria mice resulted in a partial outlet obstruction. Although the female cystinuria mice did not have bladder stones, bladder function was mildly impaired; presumably by the presence of cystine crystals. PMID:19484501

  4. Generation of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Andrew; Haruyama, Naoto; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2009-01-01

    This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, and equipment required for successful generation of transgenic mice using pronuclear injection. The experimental methods and practical tips given here will help guide beginners in understanding what is required and what to avoid in these standard protocols for efficiently generating transgenic mice. PMID:19283729

  5. Protective effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on pancreatic islets in obese diabetic mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mitsugu Yamanaka; Yasushi Itakura; Tadashi Inoue; Atsushi Tsuchida; Tsutomu Nakagawa; Hiroshi Noguchi; Mutsuo Taiji

    2006-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) ameliorates glucose metabolism and energy expenditure in obese diabetic db\\/db mice. In the present study, the effect of BDNF treatment on pancreatic islets of db\\/db mice was examined, using vehicle-treated pair-fed db\\/db mice as controls. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (10 mg\\/kg) or vehicle was subcutaneously administered to male db\\/db mice for 4

  6. Sex Differences in the Regulation of Serotonergic Transmission and Behavior in 5HT Receptor Knockout Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle D Jones; Irwin Lucki

    2005-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between genetics, stress, and sex-linked differences in neurotransmitter systems. Examining serotonin (5-HT) receptor knockout mice on stress-induced behavioral depression, female 5-HT1B receptor knockout mice demonstrated significantly reduced immobility than either male 5-HT1B receptor knockout mice or male and female wild-type mice on the tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test. The behavioral phenotype

  7. Metabolomics reveals significant impairments in the immune system of the APP/PS1 transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Vitorica, Javier; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory processes and other failures related to the immune system are common features associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), in both brain and the peripheral system. Thus, the study of the main organs of the immune system may have a great potential for the elucidation of pathological mechanisms underlying these abnormalities. This is the first metabolomic investigation performed in spleen and thymus from transgenic mice of AD. Tissues were fingerprinted using a metabolomic platform comprising GC-MS and ultra-HPLC-MS. Multivariate statistics demonstrated significant differences in numerous metabolites between the APP/PS1 mice and wild-type controls, and it was proven that multiple biochemical pathways are disturbed in these organs including abnormal metabolism of phospholipids, energy deficiencies, altered homeostasis of amino acids, oxidative stress, and others. Therefore, these findings highlight the importance of the proper metabolic functioning of peripheral immune system in the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. PMID:25393935

  8. Lack of MHC expression and retention of ultrastructural characteristics by xenograft transmissible venereal tumor cells in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Harmelin, A; Pinthus, J H; Friedmann-Morvinski, D; Kaufman, K; Brenner, O

    2002-07-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is primarily a tumor of adult dogs with a high incidence of spontaneous regression. We recently reported a xenograft model of CTVT (XTVT) in NOD/SCID mice. XTVT cells retain cytological and histological features of CTVT as well as characteristic rearranged LINE/c-MYC junction [Am. J. Vet. Res. 62 (2001) 907]. In this paper, we demonstrate that XTVT cells maintain ultrastructural characteristics of CTVT and do not express MHC classes I and II molecules. PMID:12007890

  9. Santa Clara Demonstration Status

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O'Shea, Thomas P.

    1996-08-01

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. The commercial product specifications have been developed by working closely with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG). FCCG members include municipal utilities, rural electric co-ops, and investor owned utilities who have expressed interest in being the initial purchasers of the first commercial DFC power plants. The utility participants in the SCDP have been drawn from the membership of FCCG. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant, and FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer for the design and construction of the plant, and also provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

  10. Space Research Benefits Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Angie Jackman, a NASA project manager in microgravity research, demonstrates the enhanced resilience of undercooled metal alloys as compared to conventional alloys. Experiments aboard the Space Shuttle helped scientists refine their understanding of the physical properties of certain metal alloys when undercooled (i.e., kept liquid below their normal solidification temperature). This new knowledge then allowed scientists to modify a terrestrial production method so they can now make limited quantities marketed under the Liquid Metal trademark. The exhibit was a part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  11. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. f. Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management. g. Provide a better standard of healthcare for crew members through reductions in the time required by crew and ground personnel to provide medical treatment and the number of crew errors experienced during treatment.

  12. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  13. Demonstration tokamak power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Mattas, R.; Smith, D.L.; DeFreece, D.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design for a tokamak demonstration power plant (DEMO) was developed. A large part of the study focused on examining the key issues and identifying the R and D needs for: (1) current drive for steady-state operation, (2) impurity control and exhaust, (3) tritium breeding blanket, and (4) reactor configuration and maintenance. Impurity control and exhaust will not be covered in this paper but is discussed in another paper in these proceedings, entitled Key Issues of FED/INTOR Impurity Control System.

  14. Preliminary ocular histopathological observations on heterozygous NEMO-deficient mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen F. Oster; D. Scott McLeod; T. Otsuji; Morton F. Goldberg; Gerard A. Lutty

    2009-01-01

    The majority of patients with incontinentia pigmenti (IP) have a mutation in the nuclear factor-kappa-? essential modulator (NEMO) gene, and mice with a targeted deletion of NEMO exhibit skin pathology remarkably similar to the human disease. This study characterizes the retinal vascular abnormalities of NEMO-deficient mice, and compares this phenotype to known features of human IP. Nineteen heterozygous NEMO-deficient female

  15. BEAM Technology Flight Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, David

    2005-01-01

    As technologies advance, their growing complexity makes them harder to maintain. Detection methods for isolating and identifying impending problems are needed to balance this complexity. Through comparison of signal pairs from onboard sensors, the Beacon-based Exception Analysis For Multimissions (BEAM) algorithm can identify and help classify deviations in system operation from a data-trained statistical model. The goal of this task is to mature BEAM and validate its performance on a flying test bed. A series of F-18 flight demonstrations with BEAM monitoring engine parameters in real time was used to demonstrate in-the-field readiness. Captured F-18 and simulated F-18 engine data were used in model creation and training. The algorithm was then ported to the embedded system with a data buffering, file writing, and data-time-stamp monitoring shell to reduce the impact of embedded system faults on BEAM'S ability to correctly identify engine faults. Embedded system testing identified hardware related restrictions and contributed to iterative improvements in the code's runtime performance. The system was flown with forced engine flameouts and other pilot induced faults to simulate operation out of the norm. Successful detection of these faults, confirmed through post-flight data analysis, helped BEAM achieve TRL6.

  16. Residential Transactive Control Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Fuller, Jason C.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Somani, Abhishek

    2014-02-19

    Arguably the most exciting aspect of the smart grid vision is the full participation of end-use resources with all forms of generation and energy storage in the reliable and efficient operation of an electric power system. Engaging all of these resources in a collaborative manner that respects the objectives of each resource, is sensitive to the system and local constraints of electricity flow, and scales to the large number of devices and systems participating is a grand challenge. Distributed decision-making system approaches have been presented and experimentation is underway. This paper reports on the preliminary findings of a residential demand response demonstration that uses the bidding transactions of supply and end-use air conditioning resources communicating with a real-time, 5 minute market to balance the various needs of the participants on a distribution feeder. The nature of the demonstration, the value streams being explored, and the operational scenarios implemented to characterize the system response are summarized along with preliminary findings.

  17. Solar Thermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biesinger, K.; Cuppett, D.; Dyer, D.

    2012-01-30

    HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with â??Kalwallâ?? building panels. An added feature of the â??Kalwallâ?ť system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

  18. Ablation of TNF-RI/RII Expression in Alzheimer's Disease Mice Leads to an Unexpected Enhancement of Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Sara L.; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Habib, Diala; Narrow, Wade C.; Knowlden, Sara A.; Wright, Terry W.; Bowers, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severe memory loss and cognitive impairment. Neuroinflammation, including the extensive production of pro-inflammatory molecules and the activation of microglia, has been implicated in the disease process. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, a prototypic pro-inflammatory cytokine, is elevated in AD, is neurotoxic, and colocalizes with amyloid plaques in AD animal models and human brains. We previously demonstrated that the expression of TNF-? is increased in AD mice at ages preceding the development of hallmark amyloid and tau pathological features and that long-term expression of this cytokine in these mice leads to marked neuronal death. Such observations suggest that TNF-? signaling promotes AD pathogenesis and that therapeutics suppressing this cytokine's activity may be beneficial. To dissect TNF-? receptor signaling requirements in AD, we generated triple-transgenic AD mice (3xTg-AD) lacking both TNF-? receptor 1 (TNF-RI) and 2 (TNF-RII), 3xTg-ADxTNF-RI/RII knock out, the cognate receptors of TNF-?. These mice exhibit enhanced amyloid and tau-related pathological features by the age of 15 months, in stark contrast to age-matched 3xTg-AD counterparts. Moreover, 3xTg-ADxTNF-RI/RII knock out–derived primary microglia reveal reduced amyloid-? phagocytic marker expression and phagocytosis activity, indicating that intact TNF-? receptor signaling is critical for microglial-mediated uptake of extracellular amyloid-? peptide pools. Overall, our results demonstrate that globally ablated TNF receptor signaling exacerbates pathogenesis and argues against long-term use of pan-anti-TNF-? inhibitors for the treatment of AD. PMID:21835156

  19. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid running a multiphase low frequency AC signal. Electrostatically charged particles, such as those encountered on the moon, Mars, or an asteroid, are carried along by the traveling field due to the action of Coulomb and dielectrophoretic forces."2 The technical details have been described in a separate article. This document details the design and construction process of a small demonstration unit. Once finished, this device will go to the Office of the ChiefTechnologist at NASA headquarters, where it will be used to familiarize the public with the technology. 1 NASA KSC FO Intern, Prototype Development Laboratory, Kennedy Space Center, University of Central Florida Kennedy Space

  20. VPAC2 (vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor type 2) receptor deficient mice develop exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with increased Th1/Th17 and reduced Th2/Treg responses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yossan-Var; Abad, Catalina; Wang, Yuqi; Lopez, Robert; Waschek, James A

    2015-02-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) are two structurally-related neuropeptides with widespread expression in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although these peptides have been repeatedly shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory actions when administered in animal models of inflammatory disease, mice deficient in VIP and PACAP were recently shown to exhibit different phenotypes (ameliorated and exacerbated, respectively) in response to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Therefore, elucidating what are the specific immunoregulatory roles played by each of their receptor subtypes (VPAC1, VPAC2, and PAC1) is critical. In this study, we found that mice with a genetic deletion of VIPR2, encoding the VPAC2 receptor, exhibited exacerbated (MOG35-55)-induced EAE compared to wild type mice, characterized by enhanced clinical and histopathological features, increased proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IL-6, IFN-? (Th1), and IL-17 (Th17)) and reduced anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF?, and IL-4 (Th2)) in the CNS and lymph nodes. Moreover, the abundance and proliferative index of lymph node, thymus and CNS CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs were strikingly reduced in VPAC2-deficient mice with EAE. Finally, the in vitro suppressive activity of lymph node and splenic Tregs from VPAC2-deficient mice was impaired. Overall, our results demonstrate critical protective roles for PACAP and the VPAC2 receptor against autoimmunity, promoting the expansion and maintenance of the Treg pool. PMID:25305591

  1. Comparative analysis of single and combined APP/APLP knockouts reveals reduced spine density in APP-KO mice that is prevented by APPs? expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and synapse loss are key features of Alzheimer’s pathogenesis. Previously, we showed an essential function of APP and APLP2 for synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Here, we used organotypic hippocampal cultures to investigate the specific role(s) of APP family members and their fragments for dendritic complexity and spine formation of principal neurons within the hippocampus. Whereas CA1 neurons from APLP1-KO or APLP2-KO mice showed normal neuronal morphology and spine density, APP-KO mice revealed a highly reduced dendritic complexity in mid-apical dendrites. Despite unaltered morphology of APLP2-KO neurons, combined APP/APLP2-DKO mutants showed an additional branching defect in proximal apical dendrites, indicating redundancy and a combined function of APP and APLP2 for dendritic architecture. Remarkably, APP-KO neurons showed a pronounced decrease in spine density and reductions in the number of mushroom spines. No further decrease in spine density, however, was detectable in APP/APLP2-DKO mice. Mechanistically, using APPs?-KI mice lacking transmembrane APP and expressing solely the secreted APPs? fragment we demonstrate that APPs? expression alone is sufficient to prevent the defects in spine density observed in APP-KO mice. Collectively, these studies reveal a combined role of APP and APLP2 for dendritic architecture and a unique function of secreted APPs for spine density. PMID:24684730

  2. Satellite Feature Identification: Atmospheric Rivers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    The Satellite Feature Identification: Atmospheric Rivers module presents the global moisture transport phenomenon known as the Atmospheric River (AR). ARs are responsible for transporting the majority of maritime moisture from low to middle latitudes. Advanced satellite products, including Integrated Water Vapor and Total Precipitable Water, provide excellent observations of AR development and evolution.. This module demonstrates the usefulness of these products in forecasting the impacts of ARs, especially when they are combined with numerical weather prediction products. Several AR case studies highlight the importance of using satellite information regarding ARs and allow the user to practice forecasting their impacts. This module is part of the series: "Dynamic Feature Identification: The Satellite Palette".

  3. The evolution of hod mice The evolution of hod mice

    E-print Network

    Koellner, Peter

    The evolution of hod mice The evolution of hod mice Grigor Sargsyan UCLA Harvard Mamls February 20, 2011 Cambridge, Massachusetts The evolution of hod mice Grigor Sargsyan #12;The evolution of hod mice The beginnings CH in HOD Theorem (Harrington-Kechris) Assume V = L(R) + AD. Then HOD CH. The evolution of hod

  4. Demonstrating An Epidemic

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    M. Beth Powel

    2009-01-01

    This experiment allows learners to experience a small scale "epidemic," demonstrating the ease with which disease organisms are spread, and enables learners to determine the originator of the "epidemic." Learners will transfer live bacteria by hand contact, then transfer an inoculum to a nutrient agar plate for 24 hour incubation. After incubation, plates are observed for growth of the microbial agent. By arranging the plates in the order of hand contact, it can be determined which individual received the original contaminant and started the "epidemic," which individuals transferred the organism yet did not grow it out (carriers), and how dosage, or amount of contamination, affects getting a disease. Other means of microbial transmission (air, water, body fluids, fomites) may also be discussed. This lesson guide includes safety precautions, questions, and an additional activity to simulate vaccination.

  5. Shuttle bay telerobotics demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, W.; Cogeos, P.

    1987-01-01

    A demonstration of NASA's robotics capabilities should be a balanced agenda of servicing and assembly tasks combined with selected key technical experiments. The servicing tasks include refueling and module replacement. Refueling involves the mating of special fluid connectors while module replacement requires an array of robotic technologies such as special tools, the arm of a logistics tool, and the precision mating of orbital replacement units to guides. The assembly task involves the construction of a space station node and truss structure. The technological experiments will focus on a few important issues: the precision manipulation of the arms by a teleoperator, the additional use of several mono camera views in conjunction with the stereo system, the use of a general purpose end effector versus a caddy of tools, and the dynamics involved with using a robot with a stabilizer.

  6. Space Research Benefits Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An entranced youngster watches a demonstration of the enhanced resilience of undercooled metal alloys as compared to conventional alloys. Steel bearings are dropped onto plates made of steel, titanium alloy, and zirconium liquid metal alloy, so-called because its molecular structure is amorphous and not crystalline. The bearing on the liquid metal plate bounces for a minute or more longer than on the other plates. Experiments aboard the Space Shuttle helped scientists refine their understanding of the physical properties of certain metal alloys when undercooled (i.e., kept liquid below their normal solidification temperature). This new knowledge then allowed scientists to modify a terrestrial production method so they can now make limited quantities marketed under the Liquid Metal trademark. The exhibit was a part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  7. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    SciTech Connect

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  8. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  9. ARJIS satellite demonstration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severance, Steve; Williams, Carl

    2005-06-01

    In 2003, the California Space Authority (CSA) was provided funding by the U. S. Congress through the Defense Appropriations Act to develop a project that would demonstrate the U.S. space enterprise capability that would contribute to the effectiveness of those engaged in Homeland Security. The project was given broad latitude in selecting the area of Homeland Security to be addressed and the nature of the space technology to be applied. CSA became aware of a nascent law enforcement data-sharing project in the San Diego region known as the Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS). First developed by the police departments in San Diego, ARJIS is an innovative system that shares criminal justice information among 50 federal, state, and local agencies. ARJIS was completing a pilot project that enabled officers to receive information on handheld computers, which was transmitted wirelessly through cellular networks. The accessed information came from several databases that collectively contained the entire region's crime and arrest reports, traffic citations, and incidents, as well as state and county wants and warrants. The fundamental limitations that plague all cellular-based devices caught CSA's attention and resulted in a cooperative effort to harden the communications link between the patrol officer and critical data. The principal goal of the SATCOM development task was to create a proof-of-concept application that would use SATCOM links to augment the current ARJIS handheld wireless (cellular) capability. The successful technical demonstration and the positive support for satellite communications from the law enforcement community showed that this project filled a need-both for improved information sharing and for highly reliable communications systems.

  10. Good features to track

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianbo Shi; C. Toamsi

    1994-01-01

    No feature-based vision system can work until good features can be identified and tracked from frame to frame. Although tracking itself is by and large a solved problem, selecting features that can be tracked well and correspond to physical points in the world is still an open problem. We propose a feature selection criterion that is optimal by construction because

  11. Accelerating incomplete feature selection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuhua Qian; Jiye Liang; Wei Wei

    2009-01-01

    Feature selection from incomplete data aims to retain the discriminatory power of original features in rough set theory. Many feature selection algorithms are computationally time-consuming. To overcome this drawback, we introduce a theoretic framework based on rough set theory, called positive approximation, which can be used to accelerate a heuristic process of feature selection from incomplete data. Based on the

  12. Defective microglial development in the hippocampus of Cx3cr1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Francesca; Paolicelli, Rosa C.; Murana, Emanuele; Cortese, Barbara; Angelantonio, Silvia Di; Zurolo, Emanuele; Guiducci, Eva; Ferreira, Tiago A.; Garofalo, Stefano; Catalano, Myriam; D’Alessandra, Giuseppina; Porzia, Alessandra; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Mainiero, Fabrizio; Limatola, Cristina; Gross, Cornelius T.; Ragozzino, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells participate in brain development and influence neuronal loss and synaptic maturation. Fractalkine is an important neuronal chemokine whose expression increases during development and that can influence microglia function via the fractalkine receptor, CX3CR1. Mice lacking Cx3cr1 show a variety of neuronal defects thought to be the result of deficient microglia function. Activation of CX3CR1 is important for the proper migration of microglia to sites of injury and into the brain during development. However, little is known about how fractalkine modulates microglial properties during development. Here we examined microglial morphology, response to ATP, and K+ current properties in acute brain slices from Cx3cr1 knockout mice across postnatal hippocampal development. We found that fractalkine signaling is necessary for the development of several morphological and physiological features of microglia. Specifically, we found that the occurrence of an outward rectifying K+ current, typical of activated microglia, that peaked during the second and third postnatal week, was reduced in Cx3cr1 knockout mice. Fractalkine signaling also influenced microglial morphology and ability to extend processes in response to ATP following its focal application to the slice. Our results reveal the developmental profile of several morphological and physiological properties of microglia and demonstrate that these processes are modulated by fractalkine signaling. PMID:25873863

  13. Xyloketal B attenuates atherosclerotic plaque formation and endothelial dysfunction in apolipoprotein e deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Yan; Li, Jie; Yuan, Feng; Li, Mei; Zhang, Quan; Pang, Ji-Yan; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Fang-Yun; Sun, Hong-Shuo; Li, Qian; Cao, Lu; Xie, Yu; Lin, Yong-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Tan, Hong-Mei; Wang, Guan-Lei; Huang, Yun-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that xyloketal B, a novel marine compound with a unique chemical structure, has strong antioxidant actions and can protect against endothelial injury in different cell types cultured in vitro and model organisms in vivo. The oxidative endothelial dysfunction and decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability are critical for the development of atherosclerotic lesion. We thus examined whether xyloketal B had an influence on the atherosclerotic plaque area in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We found in our present study that the administration of xyloketal B dose-dependently decreased the atherosclerotic plaque area both in the aortic sinus and throughout the aorta in apoE-/- mice fed a high-fat diet. In addition, xyloketal B markedly reduced the levels of vascular oxidative stress, as well as improving the impaired endothelium integrity and NO-dependent aortic vasorelaxation in atherosclerotic mice. Moreover, xyloketal B significantly changed the phosphorylation levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt without altering the expression of total eNOS and Akt in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Here, it increased eNOS phosphorylation at the positive regulatory site of Ser-1177, while inhibiting phosphorylation at the negative regulatory site of Thr-495. Taken together, these findings indicate that xyloketal B has dramatic anti-atherosclerotic effects in vivo, which is partly due to its antioxidant features and/or improvement of endothelial function. PMID:25874925

  14. The selective advantage of crypsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Vignieri, Sacha N; Larson, Joanna G; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2010-07-01

    The light color of mice that inhabit the sandy dunes of Florida's coast have served as a textbook example of adaptation for nearly a century, despite the fact that the selective advantage of crypsis has never been directly tested or quantified in nature. Using plasticine mouse models of light and dark color, we demonstrate a strong selective advantage for mice that match their local background substrate. Further our data suggest that stabilizing selection maintains color matching within a single habitat, as models that are both lighter and darker than their local environment are selected against. These results provide empirical evidence in support of the hypothesis that visual hunting predators shape color patterning in Peromyscus mice and suggest a mechanism by which selection drives the pronounced color variation among populations. PMID:20163447

  15. Thyrotropin Signaling Confers More Aggressive Features with Higher Genomic Instability on BRAFV600E-Induced Thyroid Tumors in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Orim, Florence; Bychkov, Andrey; Shimamura, Mika; Nakashima, Masahiro; Ito, Masahiro; Matsuse, Michiko; Kurashige, Tomomi; Suzuki, Keiji; Saenko, Vladimir; Nagayama, Yuji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The BRAFV600E mutation is the most common genetic alteration in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). Transgenic mice overexpressing BRAFV600E in their thyroids under control of the thyroglobulin promoter (Tg-BRAF2 mice) developed invasive PTCs with high penetrance. However, these mice showed elevated thyrotropin (TSH) levels, which also stimulate the proliferation of thyrocytes and tumorigenesis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how TSH signaling cooperates with BRAFV600E in the process of thyroid carcinogenesis. Methods: We crossed Tg-BRAF2 mice with TSH receptor knockout (TshR?/?) mice. Four genetically distinct mice groups—Brafwt/TshR+/? (group 1), Brafwt/TshR?/? (group 2), Tg-BRAF2/TshR+/? (group 3), and Tg-BRAF2/TshR?/? (group 4)—were sacrificed at 12 and 24 weeks of age. We performed histopathological analysis. Genomic instability was evaluated by immunofluorescence for p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and ?H2AX. Invasiveness and genomic instability were also evaluated using thyroid PCCL3 cells expressing BRAFV600E. Results: Groups 3 and 4 developed distinct neoplasias comparable to human PTCs. Group 3 developed typically larger, more aggressive, invasive tumors compared to group 4. The frequency of 53BP1 and ?H2AX foci—indicators of genomic instability—in group 3 was higher than that in group 4. TSH also enhanced invasiveness and genomic instability in PCCL3 cells with BRAFV600E expression. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the TSH signaling confers more aggressive features in BRAFV600E-induced thyroid tumors in mice. This might be due, in part, to accelerated genomic instability. PMID:23924149

  16. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  17. Plug cluster module demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    The low pressure, film cooled rocket engine design concept developed during two previous ALRC programs was re-evaluated for application as a module for a plug cluster engine capable of performing space shuttle OTV missions. The nominal engine mixture ratio was 5.5 and the engine life requirements were 1200 thermal cycles and 10 hours total operating life. The program consisted of pretest analysis; engine tests, performed using residual components; and posttest analysis. The pretest analysis indicated that operation of the operation of the film cooled engine at O/F = 5.5 was feasible. During the engine tests, steady state wall temperature and performance measurement were obtained over a range of film cooling flow rates, and the durability of the engine was demonstrated by firing the test engine 1220 times at a nominal performance ranging from 430 - 432 seconds. The performance of the test engine was limited by film coolant sleeve damage which had occurred during previous testing. The post-test analyses indicated that the nominal performance level can be increased to 436 seconds.

  18. NASA Bioreactor Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Leland W. K. Chung (left), Director, Molecular Urology Therapeutics Program at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, is principal investigator for the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05). With him is Dr. Jun Shu, an assistant professor of Orthopedics Surgery from Kuming Medical University China. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  19. Orbital construction demonstration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA) was developed that can be used for evaluating and establishing practical large structural assembly operations. A flight plan for initial placement and continued utility is presented as a basic for an entirely new shuttle payload line-item having great future potential benefit for space applications. The OCDA is a three-axis stabilized platform in low-earth orbit with many structural nodals for mounting large construction and fabrication equipments. This equipment would be used to explore methods for constructing the large structures for future missions. The OCDA would be supported at regular intervals by the shuttle. Construction experiments and consumables resupply are performed during shuttle visit periods. A 250 kw solar array provides sufficient power to support the shuttle while attached to the OCDA and to run construction experiments at the same time. Wide band communications with a Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite compatible high gain antenna can be used between shuttle revisits to perform remote controlled, TV assisted construction experiments.

  20. Decreased Proteasomal Activity Causes Photoreceptor Degeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Ryo; Noda, Kousuke; Tomaru, Utano; Kamoshita, Mamoru; Ozawa, Yoko; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Noda, Mika; Kanda, Atsuhiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Kasahara, Masanori; Ishida, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To study the retinal degeneration caused by decreased proteasomal activity in ?5t transgenic (?5t-Tg) mice, an animal model of senescence acceleration. Methods. ?5t-Tg mice and age-matched littermate control (WT) mice were used. Proteasomal activities and protein level of poly-ubiquitinated protein in retinal extracts were quantified. Fundus images of ?5t-Tg mice were taken and their features were assessed. For histologic evaluation, the thicknesses of inner nuclear layer (INL), outer nuclear layer (ONL), and photoreceptor outer segment (OS) were measured. For functional analysis, ERG was recorded under scotopic and photopic illumination conditions. Immunofluorescence (IF) staining and TUNEL were performed to investigate the mechanism of photoreceptor degeneration. Results. Chymotrypsin-like activity was partially suppressed in retinal tissues of ?5t-Tg mice. Retinal degenerative changes with arterial attenuation were present in ?5t-Tg, but not in WT mice. Inner nuclear layer thickness showed no significant change between ?5t-Tg and WT mice at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of age. By contrast, thicknesses of ONL and OS in ?5t-Tg mice were significantly decreased at 3, 6, and 9 months compared with those in WT mice. Electroretinograms showed decrease of scotopic a-wave amplitude in ?5t-Tg mice. The number of TUNEL-positive cells in ONL were significantly increased in ?5t-Tg mice and colocalized with apoptosis-inducing factor, but not with cleaved caspase-3 and -9, indicating that the photoreceptor cell death was induced via a caspase-independent pathway. Conclusions. The current data showed that impaired proteasomal function causes photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:24994871

  1. Cochlear function in Prestin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheatham, M A; Huynh, K H; Gao, J; Zuo, J; Dallos, P

    2004-01-01

    Gross-potential recordings in mice lacking the Prestin gene indicate that compound action potential (CAP) thresholds are shifted by ?45 dB at 5 kHz and by ?60 dB at 33 kHz. However, in order to conclude that outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility is associated with the cochlear amplifier, frequency selectivity must be evaluated and the integrity of the OHC's forward transducer ascertained. The present report demonstrates no frequency selectivity in CAP tuning curves recorded in homozygotes. In addition, CAP input–output functions indicate that responses in knockout mice approach those in controls at high levels where the amplifier has little influence. Although the cochlear microphonic in knockout mice remains ?12 dB below that in wild-type mice even at the highest levels, this deficit is thought to reflect hair cell losses in mice lacking prestin. A change in OHC forward transduction is not implied because knockout mice display non-linear responses similar to those in controls. For example, homozygotes exhibit a bipolar summating potential (SP) with positive responses at high frequencies; negative responses at low frequencies. Measurement of intermodulation distortion also shows that the cubic difference tone, 2f1–f2, is ?20 dB down from the primaries in both homozygotes and their controls. Because OHCs are the sole generators of the negative SP and because 2f1–f2 is also thought to originate in OHC transduction, these data support the idea that forward transduction is not degraded in OHCs lacking prestin. Finally, application of AM1-43, which initially enters hair cells through their transducer channels, produces fluorescence in wild-type and knockout mice indicating transducer channel activity in both inner and outer hair cells. PMID:15319415

  2. Apollo 14 composite casting demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This program assisted in the design and implementation of the composite casting demonstration for the Apollo 14 mission. Both flight and control samples were evaluated. Some conclusions resulting from a comparison of the flight and control samples were: (1) Solidification in neither the flight nor control samples was truly directional. (2) Apparent intermittent contact of the melt with the container in the flight samples led to unusual nucleation and growth structures. (3) There was greater uniformity, on a macro scale, of both pores and structural features in the flight sample; presumably the result of the reduced gravity conditions. (4) It seems quite feasible to produce enhanced dispersions of gases and dense phases in a melt which is solidified in reduced gravity. (5) A two-stage heating/cooling cycle may help directional solidification. (6) Sample materials should be selected from materials in which the dispersant fully wets the matrix material. (7) Experiments should be conducted in two modes: (1) where the melt is in good thermal contact with the container, and (2) where the melt is in a free-float condition.

  3. Cold interferometric nulling demonstration in space (CINDIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noecker, Martin C.; Linfield, Roger; Miller, Dan; Osterman, David; Kilston, Steven; Lieber, Mike; Babb, Bill; Cavender, Andrew; Jacobs, Jack

    2003-11-01

    The Cold Interferometric Nulling Demonstration in Space (CINDIS) is a modest-cost technology demonstration mission, in support of interferometer architectures for Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF). It is designed to provide as complete as possible a demonstration of the key technologies needed for a TPF interferometer at low risk, for a cost less than $300M. CINDIS foregoes scientific objectives at the outset, enabling significant cost savings that allow us to demonstrate important features of a TPF interferometer, such as high-contrast nulling interferometry at 10 ?m wavelength, vibration control strategies, instrument pointing and path control, stray light control, and possibly 4-aperture compound nulling. This concept was developed in response to the NASA Extra-Solar Planets Advanced Concepts NRA (NRA-01-OSS-04); this paper presents the results of the first phase of the study.

  4. Mapping Pathological Phenotypes in Reelin Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Michetti, Caterina; Romano, Emilia; Altabella, Luisa; Caruso, Angela; Castelluccio, Paolo; Bedse, Gaurav; Gaetani, Silvana; Canese, Rossella; Laviola, Giovanni; Scattoni, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders with multifactorial origin characterized by social communication deficits and the presence of repetitive behaviors/interests. Several studies showed an association between the reelin gene mutation and increased risk of ASD and a reduced reelin expression in some brain regions of ASD subjects, suggesting a role for reelin deficiency in ASD etiology. Reelin is a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein playing important roles during development of the central nervous system. To deeply investigate the role of reelin dysfunction as vulnerability factor in ASD, we assessed the behavioral, neurochemical, and brain morphological features of reeler male mice. We recently reported a genotype-dependent deviation in the ultrasonic vocal repertoire and a general delay in motor development of reeler pups. We now report that adult male heterozygous (Het) reeler mice did not show social behavior and communication deficits during male–female social interactions. Wildtype and Het mice showed a typical light/dark locomotor activity profile, with a peak during the central interval of the dark phase. However, when faced with a mild stressful stimulus (a saline injection) only Het mice showed an over response to stress. In addition to the behavioral studies, we conducted high performance liquid chromatography and magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to investigate whether reelin mutation influences brain monoamine and metabolites levels in regions involved in ASD. Low levels of dopamine in cortex and high levels of glutamate and taurine in hippocampus were detected in Het mice, in line with clinical data collected on ASD children. Altogether, our data detected subtle but relevant neurochemical abnormalities in reeler mice supporting this mutant line, particularly male subjects, as a valid experimental model to estimate the contribution played by reelin deficiency in the global ASD neurobehavioral phenotype. PMID:25237666

  5. ApoE-Deficient Mice Develop Lesions of All Phases of Atherosclerosis Throughout the Arterial Tree

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yutaka Nakashima; Andrew S. Plump; Elaine W. Raines; Jan L. Breslow; Russell Ross

    2010-01-01

    Initial description of apolipoprotein (apo) E-de- ficient transgenic mice demonstrated the development of severe hypercholesterolemia due to probable delayed clear- ance of large atherogenic particles from the circulation. Ex- amination of these mice demonstrated foam cell accumulation in the aortic root and pulmonary arteries by 10 weeks of age. In the present study, the animals were fed either chow or

  6. Transgenic knockout mice with exclusively human sickle hemoglobinand sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paszty, C.; Brion, C.; Manci, E.; Witkowska, E.; Stevens, M.; Narla, M.; Rubin, E.

    1997-06-13

    To create mice expressing exclusively human sicklehemoglobin (HbS), transgenic mice expressing human alpha-, gamma-, andbeta[S]-globin were generated and bred with knockout mice that haddeletions of the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes. These sickle cellmice have the major features (irreversibly sickled red cells, anemia,multiorgan pathology) found in humans with sickle cell disease and, assuch, represent a useful in vivo system to accelerate the development ofimproved therapies for this common genetic disease.

  7. Sickness behavior is delayed in hypothyroid mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanessa Cardoso; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Sickness behavior is an expression of a motivational state triggered by activation of the peripheral innate immune system, whereby an organism reprioritizes its functions to fight infection. The relationship between thyroid hormone and immune cells is complex, and additional insights are needed about the involvement of the cross-talk between thyroid hormone, the central nervous system and immune function, as demonstrated by the consequences to sickness behavior. The aim of this work was to evaluate sickness behavior in hypothyroid mice. Control mice and mice treated with propylthiouracil (PTU) for 30days (0.05%; added to drinking water) received a single dose of LPS (200?g/kg; i.p.) or saline, and the behavioral response was assessed for 24h. We provide evidence that thyroid status acts a modulator for the development of depressive-like and exploratory behaviors in mice that are subjected to an immunological challenge because the PTU pretreatment delayed the LPS-induced behavioral changes observed in an open field test and in a forced swimming test. This response was observed concomitantly with a lower thermal index until 4h after the LPS administration. This result demonstrates that thyroid status modifies behavioral responses to immune challenge and suggests that thyroid hormones are essential for the manifestation of sickness behavior during endotoxemia. PMID:25524131

  8. 32 wk Old C3H/HeJ Mice Actively Respond to Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    Poliachik, Sandra L.; Threet, DeWayne; Srinivasan, Sundar; Gross, Ted S.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice are mildly responsive to mechanical loading compared to C57BL/6J (C57) mice. Guided by data indicating high baseline periosteal osteoblast activity in 16 wk C3H mice, we speculated that simply allowing the C3H mice to age until basal periosteal bone formation was equivalent to that of 16 wk C57 mice would restore mechanoresponsiveness in C3H mice. We tested this hypothesis by subjecting the right tibiae of 32 wk old C3H mice and 16 wk old C57 mice to low magnitude rest-inserted loading (peak strain: 1235??) and then exposing the right tibiae of 32 wk C3H mice to low (1085??) or moderate (1875 ??) magnitude cyclic loading. The osteoblastic response to loading on the endocortical and periosteal surfaces was evaluated via dynamic histomorphometry. At 32 wk of age, C3H mice responded to low magnitude rest-inserted loading with significantly elevated periosteal mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate and bone formation compared to unloaded contralateral bones. Surprisingly, the periosteal bone formation induced by low magnitude rest-inserted loading in C3H mice exceeded that induced in 16 wk C57 mice. At 32 wk of age, C3H mice also demonstrated an elevated response to increased magnitudes of cyclic loading. We conclude that a high level of basal osteoblast function in 16 wk C3H mice appears to overwhelm the ability of the tissue to respond to an otherwise anabolic mechanical loading stimulus. However, when basal surface osteoblast activity is equivalent to that of 16 wk C57 mice, C3H mice demonstrate a clear ability to respond to either rest-inserted or cyclic loading. PMID:18280231

  9. Feature Tracking Factorization

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Feature Tracking KLT Tracker Enhancements to KLT Experimental Results Factorization Tomasi-Kanade Experimental Results Factorization Tomasi-Kanade Algorithm Experimental Results Conclusions References Outline Factorization Tomasi-Kanade Algorithm Experimental Results 4 Conclusions 5 References #12;Feature Tracking

  10. Simple Buoyancy Demonstrations Using Saltwater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosby, Ronald M.; Petry, Douglas E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of saline solutions for demonstrations of buoyancy showing oscillations of the Cartesian diver. Describes the physical principles, preparation, and instructional uses for the demonstration. (YP)

  11. A Toxicogenomic Approach for the Prediction of Murine Hepatocarcinogenesis Using Ensemble Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Eichner, Johannes; Kossler, Nadine; Wrzodek, Clemens; Kalkuhl, Arno; Bach Toft, Dorthe; Ostenfeldt, Nina; Richard, Virgile; Zell, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The current strategy for identifying the carcinogenicity of drugs involves the 2-year bioassay in male and female rats and mice. As this assay is cost-intensive and time-consuming there is a high interest in developing approaches for the screening and prioritization of drug candidates in preclinical safety evaluations. Predictive models based on toxicogenomics investigations after short-term exposure have shown their potential for assessing the carcinogenic risk. In this study, we investigated a novel method for the evaluation of toxicogenomics data based on ensemble feature selection in conjunction with bootstrapping for the purpose to derive reproducible and characteristic multi-gene signatures. This method was evaluated on a microarray dataset containing global gene expression data from liver samples of both male and female mice. The dataset was generated by the IMI MARCAR consortium and included gene expression profiles of genotoxic and nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens obtained after treatment of CD-1 mice for 3 or 14 days. We developed predictive models based on gene expression data of both sexes and the models were employed for predicting the carcinogenic class of diverse compounds. Comparing the predictivity of our multi-gene signatures against signatures from literature, we demonstrated that by incorporating our gene sets as features slightly higher accuracy is on average achieved by a representative set of state-of-the art supervised learning methods. The constructed models were also used for the classification of Cyproterone acetate (CPA), Wy-14643 (WY) and Thioacetamid (TAA), whose primary mechanism of carcinogenicity is controversially discussed. Based on the extracted mouse liver gene expression patterns, CPA would be predicted as a nongenotoxic compound. In contrast, both WY and TAA would be classified as genotoxic mouse hepatocarcinogens. PMID:24040119

  12. Human Malaria in Immunocompromised Mice

    PubMed Central

    Badell, Edgar; Oeuvray, Claude; Moreno, Alicia; Soe, Soe; van Rooijen, Nico; Bouzidi, Ahmed; Druilhe, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    We have recently described that sustained Plasmodium falciparum growth could be obtained in immunodeficient mice. We now report the potential of this new mouse model by assaying the effect of the passive transfer of antibodies (Abs) which in humans have had a well-established effect. Our results show that the total African adult hyperimmune immunoglobulin Gs (HI-IgGs) strongly reduce P. falciparum parasitemia similarly to that reported in humans, but only when mice are concomitantly reconstituted with human monocytes (HuMNs). In contrast, neither HI-IgGs nor HuMNs alone had any direct effect upon parasitemia. We assessed the in vivo effect of epitope-specific human Abs affinity-purified on peptides derived either from the ring erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA) or the merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3). The inoculation of low concentrations of anti-synthetic peptide from MSP3, but not of anti-RESA Abs, consistently suppressed P. falciparum in the presence of HuMNs. Parasitemia decrease was stronger and faster than that observed using HI-IgGs and as fast as that induced by chloroquine. Our observations demonstrate that this mouse model is of great value to evaluate the protective effect of different Abs with distinct specificity in the same animal, a step hardly accessible and therefore never performed before in humans. PMID:11104807

  13. Good Features to Track

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianbo Shi Carlo Tomasi

    1994-01-01

    No feature-based vision system can work unless goodfeatures can be identified and tracked from frame toframe. Although tracking itself is by and large a solvedproblem, selecting features that can be tracked well andcorrespond to physical points in the world is still hard.We propose a feature selection criterion that is optimalby construction because it is based on how the trackerworks, and

  14. JCE Feature Columns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon L. Holmes

    1999-01-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using

  15. Features of the Sun

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Beverly Meier

    In this activity students study various features of the Sun in order to understand how the Sun varies. Students will learn that the Sun contains many complex features and compare this to their own prior knowledge about the Sun. Features studied include sunspots, plages, solar flares, prominences, filaments, the corona, helmet streamers, and coronal holes.

  16. Youth/Leader Demonstration/Illustrated Talk Guide

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    , machine, clothing, musical instrument or model, is used in the presentation. Example: A demonstration on "How to Sew on a Button", would feature someone actually sewing on a button. An ILLUSTRATED TALK

  17. The chemokine CCL5 induces CCR1-mediated hyperalgesia in mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 tumoral cells.

    PubMed

    Pevida, M; Lastra, A; Meana, Á; Hidalgo, A; Baamonde, A; Menéndez, Luis

    2014-02-14

    Although the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR1 has been demonstrated in several structures related to nociception, supporting the nociceptive role of chemokines able to activate it, the involvement of CCR1 in neoplastic pain has not been previously assessed. We have assayed the effects of a CCR1 antagonist, J113863, in two murine models of neoplastic hyperalgesia based on the intratibial injection of either NCTC 2472 fibrosarcoma cells, able to induce osteolytic bone injury, or B16-F10 melanoma cells, associated to mixed osteolytic/osteoblastic bone pathological features. The systemic administration of J113863 inhibited thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia in mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 cells. Moreover, in these mice, thermal hyperalgesia was counteracted following the peritumoral (10-30?g) but not spinal (3-5?g) administration of J113863. In contrast, hyperalgesia and allodynia measured in mice inoculated with B16-F10 cells remained unaffected after the administration of J113863. The inoculation of tumoral cells did not modify the levels of CCL3 at tumor or spinal cord. In contrast, although the concentration of CCL5 remained unmodified in mice inoculated with B16-F10 cells, increased levels of this chemokine were measured in tumor-bearing limbs, but not the spinal cord, of mice inoculated with NCTC 2472 cells. Increased levels of CCL5 were also found following the incubation of NCTC 2472, but not B16-F10, cells in the corresponding culture medium. The intraplantar injection of CCL5 (0.5ng) to naďve mice evoked thermal hyperalgesia prevented by the coadministration of J113863 or the CCR5 antagonist, d-Ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA), demonstrating that CCL5 can induce thermal hyperalgesia in mice through the activation of CCR1 or CCR5. However, contrasting with the inhibitory effect evoked by J113863, the systemic administration of DAPTA did not prevent tumoral hyperalgesia. Finally, the peritumoral administration of an anti-CCL5 antibody completely inhibited thermal hyperalgesia evoked by the inoculation of NCTC 2472 cells. PMID:24316469

  18. Oval cell proliferation in early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis in simian virus 40 large T transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bennoun, M.; Rissel, M.; Engelhardt, N.; Guillouzo, A.; Briand, P.; Weber-Benarous, A.

    1993-01-01

    In transgenic mice bearing the Simian Virus 40 large T antigen under the control of the human antithrombin III regulatory sequences, a stepwise progression toward hepatocellular carcinoma is observed. We have used two monoclonal antibodies (A6 and G7) developed against a surface antigen expressed in oval cells from dipin-treated mice, to analyze the emergence of such preneoplastic populations in the livers of antithrombin III Simian Virus 40 T transgenic mice. We show that a unique population of small heterogeneous epithelial cells, which probably corresponds to oval and/or transitional cells according to their morphological features, consistently appears at approximately the 10th week after birth and proliferates thereafter. This oval cell-like population stained positively for A6 and G7 monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, different subpopulations usually recognized as possible precursors of carcinoma cells including hyperplastic foci and neoplastic nodules as well as carcinoma cells, were also positive for A6 but not G7 monoclonal antibodies. Stimulation of cell proliferation by partial hepatectomy performed at the time of emergence of the oval-like cells resulted in a rapid increase in the number of oval/transitional A6-positive cells. Our findings support the view that a common mechanism may be involved in the development of carcinomas that are induced by chemical carcinogens and in transgenic mice expressing a potent oncogene under the control of a hepatic specific promoter. In addition, our findings demonstrate a specific precursor-product relationship between the appearance of the oval/transitional cells and the development of neoplastic hepatocytes in this transgenic model. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7694468

  19. Biotherapeutic effects of probiotic bacteria on candidiasis in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, R D; Pierson, C; Warner, T; Dohnalek, M; Farmer, J; Roberts, L; Hilty, M; Balish, E

    1997-01-01

    Four species of probiotic bacteria were assessed for their capacities to protect athymic bg/bg-nu/nu and euthymic bg/bg-nu/+ mice from mucosal and systemic candidiasis. Each bacterial species and Candida albicans colonized the gastrointestinal tracts of both strains of mice. The presence of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus casei GG, or Bifidobacterium animalis) in the gastrointestinal tracts prolonged the survival of adult and neonatal bg/bg-nu/nu mice compared to that of isogenic mice colonized with C. albicans alone. The incidence of systemic candidiasis in bg/bg-nu/nu mice was significantly reduced by each of the four probiotic bacterial species. The numbers of C. albicans present in the alimentary tracts of euthymic bg/bg-nu/+ mice were significantly reduced by L. casei GG and B. animalis. None of the probiotic bacteria species completely prevented mucosal candidiasis, but B. animalis reduced its incidence and severity. Probiotic bacteria also modulated antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses to C. albicans. The prolonged survival of mice, decreased severity of mucosal and systemic candidiasis, modulation of immune responses, decreased number of C. albicans in the alimentary tract, and reduced numbers of orogastric infections demonstrated not only that probiotic bacteria have biotherapeutic potential for prophylaxis against and therapy of this fungal disease but also that probiotic bacteria protect mice from candidiasis by a variety of immunologic (thymic and extrathymic) and nonimmunologic mechanisms in this model. PMID:9317023

  20. Effects of simulated heat waves on ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunling; Zhang, Shuyu; Tian, Ying; Wang, Baojian; Shen, Shuanghe

    2014-02-01

    The effects of simulated heat waves on body weight, body temperature, and biomarkers of cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice were investigated. Heat waves were simulated in a meteorological environment simulation chamber according to data from a heat wave that occurred in July 2001 in Nanjing, China. Eighteen ApoE-/- mice were divided into control group, heat wave group, and heat wave BH4 group. Mice in the heat wave and BH4 groups were exposed to simulated heat waves in the simulation chamber. Mice in BH4 group were treated with gastric lavage with BH4 2 h prior to heat wave exposure. Results showed that the heat waves did not significantly affect body weight or ET-1 levels. However, mice in the heat wave group had significantly higher rectal temperature and NO level and lower SOD activity compared with mice in the control group (p < 0.01), indicating that heat wave had negative effects on cardiac function in ApoE-/- mice. Gastric lavage with BH4 prior to heat wave exposure significantly reduced heat wave-induced increases in rectal temperature and decreases in SOD activity. Additionally, pretreatment with BH4 further increased NO level in plasma. Collectively, these beneficial effects demonstrate that BH4 may potentially mitigate the risk of coronary heart disease in mice under heat wave exposure. These results may be useful when studying the effects of heat waves on humans. PMID:24477215

  1. Enhanced pulmonary allergic responses to Aspergillus in CCR2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Blease, K; Mehrad, B; Standiford, T J; Lukacs, N W; Gosling, J; Boring, L; Charo, I F; Kunkel, S L; Hogaboam, C M

    2000-09-01

    Allergic responses to Aspergillus species exacerbate asthma and cystic fibrosis. The natural defense against live Aspergillus fumigatus spores or conidia depends on the recruitment and activation of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, events that are dependent on chemotactic cytokines. In this study, we explored the relative contribution of the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 receptor, CCR2, in the pulmonary response to A. fumigatus conidia. Following sensitization to soluble A. fumigatus Ags, mice lacking CCR2 due to targeted deletion were markedly more susceptible to the injurious effects of an intrapulmonary challenge with live conidia compared with mice that expressed CCR2 or CCR2+/+. CCR2-/- mice exhibited a major defect in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells, but these mice also had significantly more eosinophils and lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage samples. CCR2-/- mice also had significant increases in serum levels of total IgE and whole lung levels of IL-5, IL-13, eotaxin, and RANTES compared with CCR2+/+ mice. Airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness to spasmogens, and subepithelial fibrosis were significantly enhanced in CCR2-/- mice compared with CCR2+/+ mice after the conidia challenge. Thus, these findings demonstrate that CCR2 plays an important role in the immune response against A. fumigatus, thereby limiting the allergic airway inflammatory and remodeling responses to this fungus. PMID:10946288

  2. Effect of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition on apoptosis and beta amyloid load in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Puzzo, Daniela; Loreto, Carla; Giunta, Salvatore; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Frasca, Giuseppina; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Arancio, Ottavio; Palmeri, Agostino

    2014-03-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is accompanied by an increase of neuronal apoptosis and a dysregulation of neuroplasticity-related molecules such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotoxic factors including beta amyloid (A?) peptide. Because it has been previously demonstrated that phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) protect against hippocampal synaptic dysfunction and memory deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and physiological aging, we investigated the effect of a treatment with the PDE5-I, sildenafil, on cell death, pro- and antiapoptotic molecules, and A? production. We demonstrated that chronic intraperitoneal injection of sildenafil (3 mg/kg for 3 weeks) decreased terminal deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling-positive cells in the CA1 hippocampal area of 26-30-month-old mice, downregulating the proapoptotic proteins, caspase-3 and B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X, and increasing antiapoptotic molecules such as B-cell lymphoma protein-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Also, sildenafil reverted the shifting of amyloid precursor protein processing toward A?42 production and the increase of the A?42:A?40 ratio in aged mice. Our data suggest that PDE5-I might be beneficial to treat age-related detrimental features in a physiological mouse model of aging. PMID:24112792

  3. Morphology of the external genitalia of the adult male and female mice as an endpoint of sex differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Dana A.; Rodriguez, Esequiel; Cunha, Tristan; Menshenina, Julia; Barcellos, Dale; Chan, Lok Yun; Risbridger, Gail; Baskin, Laurence; Cunha, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Adult external genitalia (ExG) are the endpoints of normal sex differentiation. Detailed morphometric analysis and comparison of adult mouse ExG has revealed 10 homologous features distinguishing the penis and clitoris that define masculine vs. feminine sex differentiation. These features have enabled the construction of a simple metric to evaluate various intersex conditions in mutant or hormonally manipulated mice. This review focuses on the morphology of the adult mouse penis and clitoris through detailed analysis of histologic sections, scanning electron microscopy, and three-dimensional reconstruction. We also present previous results from evaluation of “non-traditional” mammals, such as the spotted hyena and wallaby to demonstrate the complex process of sex differentiation that involves not only androgen-dependent processes, but also estrogen-dependent and hormone-independent mechanisms. PMID:21893161

  4. Development of a Computational High-Throughput Tool for the Quantitative Examination of Dose-Dependent Histological Features.

    PubMed

    Nault, Rance; Colbry, Dirk; Brandenberger, Christina; Harkema, Jack R; Zacharewski, Timothy R

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution digitalizing of histology slides facilitates the development of computational alternatives to manual quantitation of features of interest. We developed a MATLAB-based quantitative histological analysis tool (QuHAnT) for the high-throughput assessment of distinguishable histological features. QuHAnT validation was demonstrated by comparison with manual quantitation using liver sections from mice orally gavaged with sesame oil vehicle or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 0.001-30 ?g/kg) every 4 days for 28 days, which elicits hepatic steatosis with mild fibrosis. A quality control module of QuHAnT reduced the number of quantifiable Oil Red O (ORO)-stained images from 3,123 to 2,756. Increased ORO staining was measured at 10 and 30 ?g/kg TCDD with a high correlation between manual and computational volume densities (Vv ), although the dynamic range of QuHAnT was 10-fold greater. Additionally, QuHAnT determined the size of each ORO vacuole, which could not be accurately quantitated by visual examination or manual point counting. PicroSirius Red quantitation demonstrated superior collagen deposition detection due to the ability to consider all images within each section. QuHAnT dramatically reduced analysis time and facilitated the comprehensive assessment of features improving accuracy and sensitivity and represents a complementary tool for tissue/cellular features that are difficult and tedious to assess via subjective or semiquantitative methods. PMID:25274660

  5. Atp13a2-deficient mice exhibit neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, limited ?-synuclein accumulation and age-dependent sensorimotor deficits

    PubMed Central

    Schultheis, Patrick J.; Fleming, Sheila M.; Clippinger, Amy K.; Lewis, Jada; Tsunemi, Taiji; Giasson, Benoit; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mazzulli, Joseph R.; Bardgett, Mark E.; Haik, Kristi L.; Ekhator, Osunde; Chava, Anil Kumar; Howard, John; Gannon, Matt; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Chen, Yinhuai; Prasad, Vikram; Linn, Stephen C.; Tamargo, Rafael J.; Westbroek, Wendy; Sidransky, Ellen; Krainc, Dimitri; Shull, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ATP13A2 (PARK9), encoding a lysosomal P-type ATPase, are associated with both Kufor–Rakeb syndrome (KRS) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). KRS has recently been classified as a rare genetic form of Parkinson's disease (PD), whereas NCL is a lysosomal storage disorder. Although the transport activity of ATP13A2 has not been defined, in vitro studies show that its loss compromises lysosomal function, which in turn is thought to cause neuronal degeneration. To understand the role of ATP13A2 dysfunction in disease, we disrupted its gene in mice. Atp13a2?/? and Atp13a2+/+ mice were tested behaviorally to assess sensorimotor and cognitive function at multiple ages. In the brain, lipofuscin accumulation, ?-synuclein aggregation and dopaminergic pathology were measured. Behaviorally, Atp13a2?/? mice displayed late-onset sensorimotor deficits. Accelerated deposition of autofluorescent storage material (lipofuscin) was observed in the cerebellum and in neurons of the hippocampus and the cortex of Atp13a2?/? mice. Immunoblot analysis showed increased insoluble ?-synuclein in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex or cerebellum. There was no change in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra or in striatal dopamine levels in aged Atp13a2?/? mice. These results show that the loss of Atp13a2 causes sensorimotor impairments, ?-synuclein accumulation as occurs in PD and related synucleinopathies, and accumulation of lipofuscin deposits characteristic of NCL, thus providing the first direct demonstration that null mutations in Atp13a2 can cause pathological features of both diseases in the same organism. PMID:23393156

  6. Role of connexin 32 in acetaminophen toxicity in a knockout mice model.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Isao; Maejima, Takanori; Kai, Kiyonori; Arakawa, Shingo; Teranishi, Munehiro; Sanbuissho, Atsushi

    2014-03-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), by which glutathione (GSH) and inorganic ions are transmitted to neighboring cells, is recognized as being largely involved in toxic processes of chemicals. We examined acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity clinicopathologically using male wild-type mice and mice lacking the gene for connexin32, a major gap junction protein in the liver [knockout (Cx32KO) mice]. When APAP was intraperitoneally administered at doses of 100, 200, or 300mg/kg, hepatic centrilobular necrosis with elevated plasma aminotransferase activities was observed in wild-type mice receiving 300mg/kg, and in Cx32KO mice given 100mg/kg or more. At 200mg/kg or more, hepatic GSH and GSSG contents decreased significantly and the effect was more severe in wild-type mice than in Cx32KO mice. On the other hand, markedly decreased GSH staining was observed in the hepatic centrilobular zones of Cx32KO mice compared to that of wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that Cx32KO mice are more susceptible to APAP hepatotoxicity than wild-type mice, and indicate that the distribution of GSH of the centrilobular zones in the hepatic lobules, rather than GSH and GSSG contents in the liver, is important in APAP hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, Cx32 protects against APAP-induced hepatic centrilobular necrosis in mice, which may be through the GSH transmission to neighboring hepatocytes by GJIC. PMID:24263089

  7. Thrombospondin1 Deficiency Attenuates Obesity-Associated Microvascular Complications in ApoE-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitiyiming, Hasiyeti; Clemons, Kate; Zhou, Qi; Norman, Heather; Wang, Shuxia

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and the increased development of vascular complications. Previously, we have demonstrated that thrombospondin1 (TSP1) regulates macrophage function and contributes to obesity associated inflammation and insulin resistance. However, the role of TSP1 in the development of obesity associated vascular complications is not clear. Therefore, in the current study, we investigated whether TSP1 deficiency protects mice from obesity associated micro as well as macro-vascular complications in ApoE-/- mice. In this study, male ApoE-/- mice and ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice were fed with a low-fat (LF) or a high-fat (HF) diet for 16 weeks. We found that body weight and fat mass increased similarly between the ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice and ApoE-/- mice under HF feeding conditions. However, as compared to obese ApoE-/- mice, obese ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice had improved glucose tolerance, increased insulin sensitivity, and reduced systemic inflammation. Aortic atherosclerotic lesion formation was similar in these two groups of mice. In contrast, albuminuria was attenuated and kidney fibrosis was reduced in obese ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice compared to obese ApoE-/- mice. The improved kidney function in obese ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice was associated with decreased renal lipid accumulation. Together, these data suggest that TSP1 deficiency did not affect the development of obesity associated macro-vascular complication, but attenuated obesity associated micro-vascular complications. PMID:25803585

  8. Thrombospondin1 Deficiency Attenuates Obesity-Associated Microvascular Complications in ApoE-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Maimaitiyiming, Hasiyeti; Clemons, Kate; Zhou, Qi; Norman, Heather; Wang, Shuxia

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and the increased development of vascular complications. Previously, we have demonstrated that thrombospondin1 (TSP1) regulates macrophage function and contributes to obesity associated inflammation and insulin resistance. However, the role of TSP1 in the development of obesity associated vascular complications is not clear. Therefore, in the current study, we investigated whether TSP1 deficiency protects mice from obesity associated micro as well as macro-vascular complications in ApoE-/- mice. In this study, male ApoE-/- mice and ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice were fed with a low-fat (LF) or a high-fat (HF) diet for 16 weeks. We found that body weight and fat mass increased similarly between the ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice and ApoE-/- mice under HF feeding conditions. However, as compared to obese ApoE-/- mice, obese ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice had improved glucose tolerance, increased insulin sensitivity, and reduced systemic inflammation. Aortic atherosclerotic lesion formation was similar in these two groups of mice. In contrast, albuminuria was attenuated and kidney fibrosis was reduced in obese ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice compared to obese ApoE-/- mice. The improved kidney function in obese ApoE-/-TSP1-/- mice was associated with decreased renal lipid accumulation. Together, these data suggest that TSP1 deficiency did not affect the development of obesity associated macro-vascular complication, but attenuated obesity associated micro-vascular complications. PMID:25803585

  9. Surgery-Related Thrombosis Critically Affects the Brain Infarct Volume in Mice Following Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Wang, Jixian; Yuan, Falei; Guan, Yongjing; Tang, Yaohui; He, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) model is widely used to mimic human focal ischemic stroke in order to study ischemia/reperfusion brain injury in rodents. In tMCAO model, intraluminal suture technique is widely used to achieve ischemia and reperfusion. However, variation of infarct volume in this model often requires large sample size, which hinders the progress of preclinical research. Our previous study demonstrated that infarct volume was related to the success of reperfusion although the reason remained unclear. The aim of present study is to explore the relationship between focal thrombus formation and model reproducibility with respect to infarct volume. We hypothesize that suture-induced thrombosis causes infarct volume variability due to insufficient reperfusion after suture withdrawal. Seventy-two adult male CD-1 mice underwent 90 minutes of tMCAO with or without intraperitoneal administration of heparin. Dynamic synchrotron radiation microangiography (SRA) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) were performed before and after tMCAO to observe the cerebral vascular morphology and to measure the cerebral blood flow in vivo. Infarct volume and neurological score were examined to evaluate severity of ischemic brain injury. We found that the rate of successful reperfusion was much higher in heparin-treated mice compared to that in heparin-free mice according to the result of SRA and LSCI at 1 and 3 hours after suture withdrawal (p<0.05). Pathological features and SRA revealed that thrombus formed in the internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery or anterior cerebral artery, which blocked reperfusion following tMCAO. LSCI showed that cortical collateral circulation could be disturbed by thrombi. Our results demonstrated that suture-induced thrombosis was a critical element, which affects the success of reperfusion. Appropriate heparin management provides a useful approach for improving reproducibility of reperfusion model in mice. PMID:24086572

  10. Feature Selection for SVMs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Weston; Sayan Mukherjee; Olivier Chapelle; Massimiliano Pontil; Tomaso Poggio; Vladimir Vapnik

    2000-01-01

    Abstract We introduce a method of feature selection for Support Vector Machines. The method is based upon finding those features which minimize bounds on the leave-one-out error. This search can be efficiently performed,via gradient descent. The resulting algorithms are shown to be superior to some standard feature selection algorithms on both toy data and real-life problems of face recognition, pedestrian

  11. Progress with the MICE scintillating fiber trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overton, Edward

    2013-12-01

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a proof of principle demonstration of ionization cooling, for application in a future neutrino factory or muon collider. MICE is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK), where a dedicated beam line has been commissioned to transport particles produced inside the ISIS accelerator facility. The beam emittance will be measured using two scintillating fiber trackers on each side of the cooling channel, which will be mounted inside a 4 T solenoid. As particles pass through the tracker, their position will be measured at 5 stations, each of which provides a position resolution of less than 0.5 mm. The fiber trackers have been validated using cosmic ray tests, which have allowed the light yield to be found. In addition, a spare tracking station was exposed to the MICE beam, which has enabled the tracker readout to be integrated with the MICE DAQ for the first time. This test required the integration gate on the D0 AFE-IIt readout boards to be synchronized with particle arrival by using diagnostic signals from the ISIS accelerator.

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G; Stott, E J; Hughes, M; Collins, A P

    1984-01-01

    The A2 strain of human respiratory syncytial virus replicated in the nose and lung of BALB/c mice, with virus growing to higher titers in older animals than in younger animals. Virus was recovered from the nose between days 2 and 7 with peak titers on days 3 and 4, and from the lungs between days 2 and 9, with peak titers on days 4 through 6. Serum antibody developed 2 weeks after infection. Viral antigen was demonstrated in the alveolar cells of the lung by immunofluorescence. Histopathological changes included infiltration by mononuclear cells of the peribronchiolar and perivascular tissue, some interstitial thickening, and formation of multinucleated giant cells. Virus could not be recovered from the respiratory tract of mice inoculated with bovine strains of respiratory syncytial virus. Growth of the A2 strain of human respiratory syncytial virus in different cell lines affected its infectivity for mice. Infection of BALB/c mice with respiratory syncytial virus provides a highly reproducible model for the study of the pathogenesis of and mechanisms of immunity to this virus. Images PMID:6693171

  13. CALIPSO Featured Articles

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-08-04

    CALIPSO Featured Articles     Polar Stratospheric Clouds  - CALIPSO caught a top-down glimpse of an unusual atmospheric phenomenon - polar stratospheric clouds. Whitewater-Baldy Fire in New Mexico ...

  14. Mice without myoglobin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Garry; George A. Ordway; John N. Lorenz; Nina B. Radford; Eva R. Chin; Robert W. Grange; Rhonda Bassel-Duby; R. Sanders Williams

    1998-01-01

    Myoglobin, an intracellular haemoprotein expressed in the heart and oxidative skeletal myofibres of vertebrates, binds molecular oxygen and may facilitate oxygen transport from erythrocytes to mitochondria, thereby maintaining cellular respiration during periods of high physiological demand. Here we show, however, that mice without myoglobin, generated by gene-knockout technology, are fertile and exhibit normal exercise capacity and a normal ventilatory response

  15. Mice and Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Shively; Thompson, Charles L.

    Observations and experiments with mice, developed and tested at the Pennsylvania Advancement School with underachieving boys in grades seven and eight, are described in this teachers' guide which includes copies of student worksheets for exercises needing them. In addition to lists of materials and procedural suggestions, ideas for guiding…

  16. Colorful Kindergarten Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobick, Bryna; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Developing kindergarten lessons can be very challenging, especially at the beginning of the school year when many students are just learning to cut paper and hold crayons. The author's favorite beginning unit of the year is "mice paintings," a practical introduction to drawing, color theory, and painting. This unit also incorporates children's…

  17. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Y.; Kizaki, M.; Kinjo, K.; Awaya, N.; Muto, A.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Hata, J.; Ueyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764578

  18. MicroRNA Profiling in Muc2 Knockout Mice of Colitis-Associated Cancer Model Reveals Epigenetic Alterations during Chronic Colitis Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zexin; Fang, Wenfeng; Yang, Yiqiong; Li, Xuhan; Li, Zhuangzhuang; Xiong, Bowen; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianguo; Kang, Kang; Gou, Deming; Yang, Wancai

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that genetic deletion of the Muc2 gene causes colorectal cancers in mice. The current study further showed that at the early stage (<3 months) the Muc2 knockout mice spontaneously developed chronic inflammation in colon and rectum, similar pathological features as human colitis; and at the late stage (>3 months) the mice exhibited colorectal cancer, including a unique phenotype of rectal prolapsed (rectal severe inflammation and adenocarcinoma). Thus, the age of 3 months might be the key point of the transition from chronic inflammation to cancer. To determine the mechanisms of the malignant transformation, we conducted miRNA array on the colonic epithelial cells from the 3-month Muc2?/? and +/+ mice. MicroRNA profiling showed differential expression of miRNAs (i.e. lower or higher expression enrichments) in Muc2?/? mice. 15 of them were validated by quantitative PCR. Based on relevance to cytokine and cancer, 4 miRNAs (miR-138, miR-145, miR-146a, and miR-150) were validate and were found significantly downregulated in human colitis and colorectal cancer tissues. The network of the targets of these miRNAs was characterized, and interestedly, miRNA-associated cytokines were significantly increased in Muc2?/?mice. This is the first to reveal the importance of aberrant expression of miRNAs in dynamically transformation from chronic colitis to colitis-associated cancer. These findings shed light on revealing the mechanisms of chronic colitis malignant transformation. PMID:24941171

  19. A Dramatic Flame Test Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kristin A.; Schreiner, Rodney

    2001-01-01

    Flame tests are used for demonstration of atomic structure. Describes a demonstration that uses spray bottles filled with methanol and a variety of salts to produce a brilliantly colored flame. (Contains 11 references.) (ASK)

  20. Revisiting the Electric Pickle Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The electric pickle is a classic demonstration that is widely used in both high school and college settings to explain the general principles behind atomic emission. The demonstration fails to provide an interesting multi-line spectrum.

  1. Evidence of Aortopathy in Mice with Haploinsufficiency of Notch1 in Nos3-Null Background

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Sara N.; Bosse, Kevin M.; Nadorlik, Holly A.; Lilly, Brenda; Garg, Vidu

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. While the exact etiology is unknown, genetic factors play an important role. Mutations in NOTCH1 have been linked to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and aortopathy in humans. The aim of this study was to determine if haploinsufficiency of Notch1 contributes to aortopathy using Notch1+/?; Nos3?/? mice. Echocardiographic analysis of Notch1+/?; Nos3?/? mice reveals effacement of the sinotubular junction and a trend toward dilation of the aortic sinus. Furthermore, examination of the proximal aorta of Notch1+/?; Nos3?/? mice reveals elastic fiber degradation, a trend toward increased matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression, and increased smooth muscle cell apoptosis, features characteristic of aneurysmal disease. Although at a lower penetrance, we also found features consistent with aortopathic changes in Notch1 heterozygote mice and in Nos3-null mice. Our findings implicate a novel role for Notch1 in aortopathy of the proximal aorta.

  2. The LRF transcription factor regulates mature B cell development and the germinal center response in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Nagisa; Maeda, Manami; Lee, Sung-Uk; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Li, Min; Williams, John C.; Wang, Lisheng; Su, Leila; Suzuki, Mai; Saito, Toshiki I.; Chiba, Shigeru; Casola, Stefano; Yagita, Hideo; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Tsuzuki, Shinobu; Bhatia, Ravi; Maeda, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    B cells play a central role in immune system function. Deregulation of normal B cell maturation can lead to the development of autoimmune syndromes as well as B cell malignancies. Elucidation of the molecular features of normal B cell development is important for the development of new target therapies for autoimmune diseases and B cell malignancies. Employing B cell–specific conditional knockout mice, we have demonstrated here that the transcription factor leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) forms an obligate dimer in B cells and regulates mature B cell lineage fate and humoral immune responses via distinctive mechanisms. Moreover, LRF inactivation in transformed B cells attenuated their growth rate. These studies identify what we believe to be a new key factor for mature B cell development and provide a rationale for targeting LRF dimers for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and B cell malignancies. PMID:21646720

  3. MMIC Phased Array Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A. (Compiler); Martzaklis, Konstantinos (Compiler); Zakrajsek, Robert J. (Compiler); Andro, Monty (Compiler); Turtle, John P.

    1996-01-01

    Over a one year period from May 1994 to May 1995, a number of demonstrations were conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in which voice, data, and/or video links were established via NASA's advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) between the ACTS link evaluation terminal (LET) in Cleveland, OH, and aeronautical and mobile or fixed Earth terminals having monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array antenna systems. This paper describes four of these. In one, a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice (and in one case video as well) links between the ACTS and an Army vehicle. The fourth demonstrated a high data rate downlink from ACTS to a fixed terminal. Array antenna systems used in these demonstrations were developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and Air Force experimental arrays using gallium arsenide MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The single 30 GHz transmit array was developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments. The three 20 GHz receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force array development contracts with Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The paper describes the four proof-of-concept arrays and the array control system. The system configured for each of the demonstrations is described, and results are discussed.

  4. Formation of Oceanic Features

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Katlyn Wicks

    2012-07-16

    This is a picture inquiry based lesson for students to explore four specific oceanic features (mid-ocean ridge, trench, seamount, and continental shelf). Groups of three students will observe and explain features found in pictures and share ideas with their peers.

  5. Finding Face Features

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Craw; David Tock; Alan Bennett

    1992-01-01

    We describe a computer program which understands a greyscale image of a face wellenough to locate individual face features such as eyes and mouth. The program has twodistinct components: modules designed to locate particular face features, usually in arestricted area; and the overall control strategy which activates modules on the basis ofthe current solution state, and assesses and integrates the

  6. Assessment of Dental Fluorosis in Mmp20+/? Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, R.; Tye, C.E.; Arun, A.; MacDonald, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Abrazinski, T.; Everett, E.T.; Whitford, G.M.; Bartlett, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie dental fluorosis are poorly understood. The retention of enamel proteins hallmarking fluorotic enamel may result from impaired hydrolysis and/or removal of enamel proteins. Previous studies have suggested that partial inhibition of Mmp20 expression is involved in the etiology of dental fluorosis. Here we ask if mice expressing only one functional Mmp20 allele are more susceptible to fluorosis. We demonstrate that Mmp20+/? mice express approximately half the amount of MMP20 as do wild-type mice. The Mmp20 heterozygous mice have normal-appearing enamel, with Vickers microhardness values similar to those of wild-type control enamel. Therefore, reduced MMP20 expression is not solely responsible for dental fluorosis. With 50-ppm-fluoride (F?) treatment ad libitum, the Mmp20+/? mice had F? tissue levels similar to those of Mmp20+/+ mice. No significant difference in enamel hardness was observed between the F?-treated heterozygous and wild-type mice. Interestingly, we did find a small but significant difference in quantitative fluorescence between these two groups, which may be attributable to slightly higher protein content in the Mmp20+/? mouse enamel. We conclude that MMP20 plays a nominal role in dental enamel fluorosis. PMID:21386097

  7. Thermal latency studies in opiate-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Schildhaus, Noam; Trink, Eliana; Polson, Chirs; DeTolla, Louis; Tyler, Betty M.; Jallo, George I.; Tok, Sino; Guarnieri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background: The change in the reaction time of a tail or paw exposed to a thermal stimulus is a measure of nociceptive activity in laboratory animals. Tail-flick and plantar thermal sensitivity (Hargreaves) tests are non-invasive, minimize stress, and can be used to screen animals for phenotype and drug activity. Objective: Hargreaves testing has been widely used in rats. We investigated its use to measure the activity of opiate analgesia in mice. Methods: Mice were used in thermal stimulus studies at 1-5 hours and 1-5 days to test acute and extended release preparations of buprenorphine. Results: Hargreaves testing had limited value at 1-5 hours because mice can have an obtunded response to opiate therapy. Tail-flick studies with restrained mice are not affected by the initial locomotor stimulation. Discussion: The present report describes a simple restraint system for mice. The utility of the system is demonstrated by examining the efficacy of acute and extended release buprenorphine injections in Balb/c and Swiss mice. Conclusion: Standardized tail-flick testing provides a sensitive robust method to monitor opiate activity in mice. PMID:24459403

  8. Abnormal regulation of TSG101 in mice with spongiform neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jian; Sun, Kaihua; Walker, Will P.; Bagher, Pooneh; Cota, Christina D.; Gunn, Teresa M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Spongiform neurodegeneration is characterized by the appearance of vacuoles throughout the central nervous system. It has many potential causes, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Mice lacking the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mahogunin Ring Finger-1 (MGRN1) develop age-dependent spongiform encephalopathy. We identified an interaction between a “PSAP” motif in MGRN1 and the ubiquitin E2 variant (UEV) domain of TSG101, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport I (ESCRT-I), and demonstrate that MGRN1 multimonoubiquitinates TSG101. We examined the in vivo consequences of loss of MGRN1 on TSG101 expression and function in the mouse brain. The pattern of TSG101 ubiquitination differed in the brains of wild-type mice and Mgrn1 null mutant mice: at 1 month of age, null mutant mice had less ubiquitinated TSG101, while in adults, mutant mice had more ubiquitinated, insoluble TSG101 than wild-type mice. There was an associated increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) levels in mutant brains. These results suggest that loss of MGRN1 promotes ubiquitination of TSG101 by other E3s and may prevent its disassociation from endosomal membranes or cause it to form insoluble aggregates. Our data implicate loss of normal TSG101 function in endo-lysosomal trafficking in the pathogenesis of spongiform neurodegeneration in Mgrn1 null mutant mice. PMID:19703557

  9. Prenatal androgen exposure programs metabolic dysfunction in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Alison V.; Nunemaker, Craig S.; Keller, Susanna R.; Moenter, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common fertility disorder with metabolic sequelae. Our lab previously characterized reproductive phenotypes in a prenatally androgenized (PNA) mouse model for PCOS. PNA mice exhibited elevated testosterone and luteinising hormone (LH) levels, irregular oestrous cycles, and neuroendocrine abnormalities suggesting increased central drive to the reproductive system. In this study we examined metabolic characteristics of female PNA mice. PNA mice exhibited increased fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) that were independent of age and were not associated with changes in body composition or peripheral insulin sensitivity. IGT was associated with defects in pancreatic islet function leading to an impaired response to high glucose, consistent with impaired insulin secretion. Exposure of isolated pancreatic islets to androgen in vitro demonstrated an impaired response to glucose stimulation similar to that in PNA mice, suggesting androgens may have activational in addition to organizational effects on pancreatic islet function. PNA mice also exhibited increased size of visceral adipocytes, suggesting androgens programmed differences in adipocyte differentiation and/or function. These studies demonstrate that in addition to causing reproductive axis abnormalities, in utero androgen exposure can induce long-term metabolic alterations in female mice. PMID:20713501

  10. Mice Drawer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancedda, Ranieri

    2008-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) facility which is able to support mice onboard the International Space Station during long-duration exploration missions (from 100 to 150-days) by living space, food, water, ventilation and lighting. Mice can be accommodated either individually (maximum 6) or in groups (4 pairs). MDS is integrated in the Space Shuttle middeck during transportation (uploading and downloading) to the ISS and in an EXPRESS Rack in Destiny, the US Laboratory during experiment execution. Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton. This bone loss experienced by astronauts is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population. MDS will help investigate the effects of unloading on transgenic (foreign gene that has been inserted into its genome to exhibit a particular trait) mice with the Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1, OSF-1, a growth and differentiation factor, and to study the genetic mechanisms underlying the bone mass pathophysiology. MDS will test the hypothesis that mice with an increased bone density are likely to be more protected from osteoporosis, when the increased bone mass is a direct effect of a gene involved in skeletogenesis (skeleton formation). Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease that afflicts millions worldwide. One of the physiological changes experienced by astronauts during space flight is the accelerated loss of bone mass due to the lack of gravitational loading on the skeleton, a loss that is similar to osteoporosis in the elderly population on Earth. Osteoblast Stimulating Factor-1 (OSF-1), also known as pleiotrophin (PTN) or Heparin-Binding Growth- Associated Molecule (HB-GAM) belongs to a family of secreted heparin binding proteins..OSF-1 is an extracellular matrix-associated growth and differentiation factor that is normally expressed in cartilage; it can stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of human osteoprogenitor cells (cell that differentiate into an osteoblast) in vitro. The Mice Drawer System will study the effects of microgravity on transgenic mouse bones in order to identify genetic mechanisms playing a role in the reduction of the bone mass observed in humans and animals as a consequence of long-duration (greater than 100 days) microgravity exposure. Onboard the ISS, MDS is relatively self-sufficient; a crewmember will check the health status of the rodents on a daily basis, by assessing them through the viewing window. Water levels will be assessed by the crew daily and refilled as needed. Replacement of the food bars and replacement of the waste filters will be conducted inflight by crewmembers every 20-days.

  11. Time Varying Feature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterhoff, J.; Simonis, I.; Atkinson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The infrastructure to gather, store and access information about our environment is improving and growing rapidly. The increasing amount of information allows us to get a better understanding of the current state of our environment, historical processes and to simulate and predict the future state of the environment. Finer grained spatial and temporal data and more reliable communications make it easier to model dynamic states and ephemeral features. The exchange of information within and across geospatial domains is facilitated through the use of harmonized information models. The Observations & Measurements (O&M) developed through OGC and standardised by ISO is an example of such a cross-domain information model. It is used in many domains, including meteorology, hydrology as well as the emergency management. O&M enables harmonized representation of common metadata that belong to the act of determining the state of a feature property, whether by sensors, simulations or humans. In addition to the resulting feature property value, information such as the result quality but especially the time that the result applies to the feature property can be represented. Temporal metadata is critical to modelling past and future states of a feature. The features, and the semantics of each property, are defined in domain specific Application Schema using the General Feature Model (GFM) from ISO 19109 and usually encoded following ISO 19136. However, at the moment these standards provide only limited support for the representation and handling of time varying feature data. Features like rivers, wildfires or gas plumes have a defined state - for example geographic extent - at any given point in time. To keep track of changes, a more complex model for example using time-series coverages is required. Furthermore, the representation and management of feature property value changes via the service interfaces defined by OGC and ISO - namely: WFS and WCS - would be rather complex. Keeping track of feature property value corrections or even feature (state change) cancellations for auditing purposes is also not easy to achieve. The aviation domain has strong requirements to represent and manage the state of aeronautical features through time. Being able to efficiently encode and manage feature state changes, keeping track of all changes for auditing purposes and being able to determine the future state of an aeronautical feature as currently known to the system are vital for aeronautical applications. In order to support these requirements, the Aeronautical Information Exchange Model (AIXM) which has been developed by the aviation domain is based on the so called AIXM Temporality Model (AIXM-TM). The AIXM-TM defines various rules for modeling, representing and handling the state of aeronautical features through time. This is a promising approach that can be incorporated into the GFM so that ultimately the modeling and management of time varying feature data is supported in an interoperable and harmonized way in all geospatial domains. This presentation gives an introduction to the main concepts of the AIXM-TM. It also shows how the GFM can be extended to support time varying feature data. Finally, the relationship of O&M and time varying features is discussed.

  12. JCE Feature Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum, and WWW Site Review. These columns differ from the print feature columns in that they use the Internet as the publication medium. Doing so allows these features to include continually updated information, digital components, and links to other online resources. The Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems feature of JCE Internet serves as a good example for the kinds of resources that you can expect to find in an online feature column. Like other columns it contains a mission statement that defines the role of the column. It includes a digital library of continually updated examples of conceptual questions and challenge problems. (As I write this we have just added several new questions to the library.) It also includes a list of links to related online resources, information for authors about how to write questions and problems, and information for teachers about how to use conceptual questions and challenge problems. Teaching with Technology home page at JCE Online. One-Stop Feature Shop The updated Feature area of JCE Online offers information about all JCE feature columns in one place. It gives you a quick and convenient way to access a group of articles in a particular subject area. It provides authors and readers with a good definition of the column and its mission. It complements the print feature columns with online resources. It provides up-to-date bibliographies for selected areas of interest. And last, but not least, it provides that email address you can use to send that message of appreciation to the feature editor for his or her contribution to JCE and the chemical education community.

  13. Analysis of PFOA in Dosed CD-1 Mice Part 2: Disposition of PFOA in Tissues and fluids from pregnant and lactating mice and their pups

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies in mice with multiple gestational exposures to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) demonstrate numerous dose dependent growth and developmental effects which appeared to worsen if offspring exposed in utero nursed from PFOA-exposed dams. To evaluate the disposition of ...

  14. Social reward among juvenile mice

    PubMed Central

    Panksepp, J B; Lahvis, G P

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian social relationships, such as mother–offspring attachments and pair bonds, can directly affect reproductive output. However, conspecifics approach one another in a comparatively broad range of contexts, so conceivably there are motivations for social congregation other than those underlying reproduction, parental care or territoriality. Here, we show that reward mediated by social contact is a fundamental aspect of juvenile mouse sociality. Employing a novel social conditioned place preference (SCPP) procedure, we demonstrate that social proximity is rewarding for juvenile mice from three inbred strains (A/J, C57BL/6J and DBA/2J), while mice from a fourth strain (BALB/cJ) are much less responsive to social contact. Importantly, this strain-dependent difference was not related to phenotypic variability in exploratory behavior or contextual learning nor influenced by the genetic background associated with maternal care or social conditioning. Furthermore, the SCPP phenotype was expressed early in development (postnatal day 25) and did not require a specific sex composition within the conditioning group. Finally, SCPP responses resulted from an interaction between two specifiable processes: one component of the interaction facilitated approach toward environments that were associated with social salience, whereas a second component mediated avoidance of environmental cues that predicted social isolation. We have thus identified a genetically prescribed process that can attribute value onto conditions predicting a general form of social contact. To our knowledge, this is the first definitive evidence to show that genetic variation can influence a form of social valuation not directly related to a reproductive behavior. PMID:17212648

  15. FGF23 Deficiency Leads to Mixed Hearing Loss and Middle Ear Malformation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lysaght, Andrew C.; Yuan, Quan; Fan, Yi; Kalwani, Neil; Caruso, Paul; Cunnane, MaryBeth; Lanske, Beate; Stankovi?, Konstantina M.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating hormone important in phosphate homeostasis. Abnormal serum levels of FGF23 result in systemic pathologies in humans and mice, including renal phosphate wasting diseases and hyperphosphatemia. We sought to uncover the role FGF23 plays in the auditory system due to shared molecular mechanisms and genetic pathways between ear and kidney development, the critical roles multiple FGFs play in auditory development and the known hearing phenotype in mice deficient in klotho (KL), a critical co-factor for FGF23 signaling. Using functional assessments of hearing, we demonstrate that Fgf mice are profoundly deaf. Fgf mice have moderate hearing loss above 20 kHz, consistent with mixed conductive and sensorineural pathology of both middle and inner ear origin. Histology and high-voltage X-ray computed tomography of Fgf mice demonstrate dysplastic bulla and ossicles; Fgf mice have near-normal morphology. The cochleae of mutant mice appear nearly normal on gross and microscopic inspection. In wild type mice, FGF23 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the cochlea. Measurements from Fgf mice do not match the auditory phenotype of Kl?/? mice, suggesting that loss of FGF23 activity impacts the auditory system via mechanisms at least partially independent of KL. Given the extensive middle ear malformations and the overlap of initiation of FGF23 activity and Eustachian tube development, this work suggests a possible role for FGF23 in otitis media. PMID:25243481

  16. Feature-selected tree-based classification.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Cecille; Kuli, Dana; Basir, Otman

    2013-12-01

    Feature selection can decrease classifier size and improve accuracy by removing noisy and/or redundant features. However, it is possible for feature selection to yield features that are only partially informative about the classes in the set. These features are beneficial for distinguishing between some classes but not others. In these cases, it is beneficial to divide the large classification problem into a set of smaller problems, where a more specific set of features can be used to classify different classes. Dividing a problem this way is also common when the base classifier is binary, and the problem needs to be reformulated as a set of two-class problems so it can be handled by the classifier. This paper presents a method for multiclass classification that simultaneously formulates a binary tree of simpler classification subproblems and performs feature selection for the individual classifiers. The feature selected hierarchical classifier (FSHC) is tested against several well-known techniques for multiclass division. Tests are run on nine different real data sets and one artificial data set using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The results show that the accuracy obtained by the FSHC is comparable with other common multiclass SVM methods. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the algorithm creates solutions with fewer classifiers, fewer features, and a shorter testing time than the other SVM multiclass extensions. PMID:23757587

  17. Ontology patterns for complex topographic feature yypes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varanka, Dalia E.

    2011-01-01

    Complex feature types are defined as integrated relations between basic features for a shared meaning or concept. The shared semantic concept is difficult to define in commonly used geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies. The role of spatial relations between complex feature parts was recognized in early GIS literature, but had limited representation in the feature or coverage data models of GIS. Spatial relations are more explicitly specified in semantic technology. In this paper, semantics for topographic feature ontology design patterns (ODP) are developed as data models for the representation of complex features. In the context of topographic processes, component assemblages are supported by resource systems and are found on local landscapes. The topographic ontology is organized across six thematic modules that can account for basic feature types, resource systems, and landscape types. Types of complex feature attributes include location, generative processes and physical description. Node/edge networks model standard spatial relations and relations specific to topographic science to represent complex features. To demonstrate these concepts, data from The National Map of the U. S. Geological Survey was converted and assembled into ODP.

  18. Integrating electrostatics with demonstrations and interactive teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wheijen

    2011-02-01

    Teaching electrostatics is challenging due to its complexity and high degree of abstraction. To facilitate students' understanding of the meanings and relations of the key terms, this paper describes a series of demonstrations and conceptual questions based on an interactive teaching approach. The context was an introductory university physics course for engineering and science students in Taiwan. Features of the teaching intervention include the utilization of a series of demonstrations for repeated practice applying the important concepts, the incorporation of derivations of equations and verbal elaboration of concepts, and the engagement of students in thinking and discussing. Data show that the teaching intervention benefited the students' academic performance and their satisfaction with the learning achievement.

  19. FeaturePlugin: feature modeling plug-in for Eclipse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michal Antkiewicz; Krzysztof Czarnecki

    2004-01-01

    Feature modeling is a key technique used in product-line development to model commonalities and variabilities of product-line members. In this paper, we present FeaturePlugin, a feature modeling plug-in for Eclipse. The tool supports cardinality-based feature modeling, specialization of feature diagrams, and configuration based on feature diagrams.

  20. Dengue Virus Tropism in Humanized Mice Recapitulates Human Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Javier; Rico-Hesse, Rebeca

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of dengue virus disease have been very difficult to develop because of the virus' specificity for infection and replication in certain human cells. We developed a model of dengue fever in immunodeficient mice transplanted with human stem cells from umbilical cord blood. These mice show measurable signs of dengue disease as in humans (fever, viremia, erythema and thrombocytopenia), and after infection with the most virulent strain of dengue serotype 2, humanized mice showed infection in human cells in bone marrow, spleen and blood. Cytokines and chemokines were secreted by these human cells into the mouse bloodstream. We demonstrated that the pathology of dengue virus infection in these mice follows that reported in human patients, making this the first valid and relevant model for studying dengue fever pathogenesis in humans. PMID:21695193

  1. Broad protection against influenza infection by vectored immunoprophylaxis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balazs, Alejandro B.; Bloom, Jesse D.; Hong, Christin M.; Rao, Dinesh S.; Baltimore, David

    2014-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies that target epitopes conserved among many strains of influenza virus have been recently isolated from humans. Here we demonstrate that adeno-associated viruses (AAV) encoding two such broadly neutralizing antibodies are protective against diverse influenza strains. Serum from mice that received a single intramuscular AAV injection efficiently neutralized all H1, H2 and H5 influenza strains tested. After infection with diverse strains of H1N1 influenza, treated mice showed minimal weight loss and lung inflammation. Protection lasted for at least 11 months after AAV injection. Notably, even immunodeficient and older mice were protected by this method, suggesting that expression of a monoclonal antibody alone is sufficient to protect mice from illness. If translated to humans, this prophylactic approach may be uniquely capable of protecting immunocompromised or elderly patient populations not reliably protected by existing vaccines. PMID:23728362

  2. Transplacental transfer of immune antibodies in the mouse demonstrated by antibody labeled in vivo with tritium

    E-print Network

    McKinney, Hubert Eugene

    1971-01-01

    neutralization titers. Passively immunized pregnant mice were shown to have labeled immunoglobulins in their blood sera, fetuses, and uterine secretions which were not demonstrable by serum neutralization tests. This experimental model proved to be a... membranes 31 Beta spectrum and effects of quenching. 37 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The objective of this project was to determine the amount of humoral antibody transferred across the placenta in pregnant mice. Transplacental immunity transfer has been...

  3. Favorite Demonstration: Demonstrating an Interactive Genetic Drift Exercise

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ashley J. R. Carter

    2003-03-01

    The exercise presented here is a hands-on demonstration of the phenomenon of genetic drift in populations. In particular, it reinforces the random nature of drift and demonstrates the effect that population size can have on the mean frequency of an allele

  4. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  5. Ultrasonic Sound as an Indicator of Acute Pain in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Wendy O; Riskin, Daniel K; Mott, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    In response to pain, mice may vocalize at frequencies above the range of human hearing (greater than 20 kHz). To determine whether an ultrasonic recording system is a reliable tool for assessing acute pain, we measured audible and ultrasonic vocalization in mice subjected to either nonpainful or potentially painful procedures performed routinely in animal facilities. Data were collected from 109 weanling mice (Mus musculus; B6, 129S6-Stab 5b) scheduled for 2 potentially painful procedures: DNA testing by tail snip and identification by ear notching. The mice each were assigned randomly to 1 of 4 groups: 1) actual tail snip, 2) sham tail snip, 3) actual ear notch, or 4) sham ear notch. Vocalizations during the treatments were recorded with an ultrasonic recorder. Most mice (65%; n = 55) demonstrated no vocal response to the potentially painful procedures. More mice that received actual tail snips produced audible sounds (11 of 29 mice) than did those that underwent sham tail snips (0 of 30 mice). In addition, audible vocalizations occurred more frequently during ear notch procedures (8 of 26 mice) than during sham ear-notch manipulations (2 of 24 mice). For all 20 of the mice that produced ultrasonic vocalizations, these calls were accompanied by simultaneous audible components. We conclude that ultrasonic vocalizations do not provide any more information than do audible vocalizations for assessing responses to potentially painful procedures. In addition, because many mice made no sound at all after a potentially painful stimulus, vocalizations generally are not good metrics of acute pain in laboratory mice. Alternatively, the lack of vocalizations in many of the mice may suggest that tail snipping and ear notching are not particularly painful procedures for most of these mice. PMID:18210991

  6. Intestine-Specific Deletion of Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein Increases Mortality in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhe; Xie, Yan; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Breed, Elise R.; Yoseph, Benyam P.; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO) exhibit a complete block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. Young (8–10 week) Mttp-IKO mice have improved survival when subjected to a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced sepsis. However, 80% of deaths in sepsis occur in patients over age 65. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age impacts outcome in Mttp-IKO mice subjected to sepsis. Methods Aged (20–24 months) Mttp-IKO mice and WT mice underwent intratracheal injection with P. aeruginosa. Mice were either sacrificed 24 hours post-operatively for mechanistic studies or followed seven days for survival. Results In contrast to young septic Mttp-IKO mice, aged septic Mttp-IKO mice had a significantly higher mortality than aged septic WT mice (80% vs. 39%, p?=?0.005). Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice exhibited increased gut epithelial apoptosis, increased jejunal Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-XL ratios yet simultaneously demonstrated increased crypt proliferation and villus length. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice also manifested increased pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels, suggesting increased neutrophil infiltration, as well as decreased systemic TNF? compared to aged septic WT mice. Conclusions Blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion alters mortality following sepsis in an age-dependent manner. Increases in gut apoptosis and pulmonary neutrophil infiltration, and decreased systemic TNF? represent potential mechanisms for why intestine-specific Mttp deletion is beneficial in young septic mice but harmful in aged mice as each of these parameters are altered differently in young and aged septic WT and Mttp-IKO mice. PMID:25010671

  7. Increasing Muscle Mass Improves Vascular Function in Obese (db/db) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shuiqing; Mintz, James D.; Salet, Christina D.; Han, Weihong; Giannis, Athanassios; Chen, Feng; Yu, Yanfang; Su, Yunchao; Fulton, David J.; Stepp, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Background A sedentary lifestyle is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and exercise has been shown to ameliorate this risk. Inactivity is associated with a loss of muscle mass, which is also reversed with isometric exercise training. The relationship between muscle mass and vascular function is poorly defined. The aims of the current study were to determine whether increasing muscle mass by genetic deletion of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle growth, can influence vascular function in mesenteric arteries from obese db/db mice. Methods and Results Myostatin expression was elevated in skeletal muscle of obese mice and associated with reduced muscle mass (30% to 50%). Myostatin deletion increased muscle mass in lean (40% to 60%) and obese (80% to 115%) mice through increased muscle fiber size (P<0.05). Myostatin deletion decreased adipose tissue in lean mice, but not obese mice. Markers of insulin resistance and glucose tolerance were improved in obese myostatin knockout mice. Obese mice demonstrated an impaired endothelial vasodilation, compared to lean mice. This impairment was improved by superoxide dismutase mimic Tempol. Deletion of myostatin improved endothelial vasodilation in mesenteric arteries in obese, but not in lean, mice. This improvement was blunted by nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor l?NG?nitroarginine methyl ester (l?NAME). Prostacyclin (PGI2)? and endothelium?derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)?mediated vasodilation were preserved in obese mice and unaffected by myostatin deletion. Reactive oxygen species) was elevated in the mesenteric endothelium of obese mice and down?regulated by deletion of myostatin in obese mice. Impaired vasodilation in obese mice was improved by NADPH oxidase inhibitor (GKT136901). Treatment with sepiapterin, which increases levels of tetrahydrobiopterin, improved vasodilation in obese mice, an improvement blocked by l?NAME. Conclusions Increasing muscle mass by genetic deletion of myostatin improves NO?, but not PGI2? or EDHF?mediated vasodilation in obese mice; this vasodilation improvement is mediated by down?regulation of superoxide. PMID:24965025

  8. Neonatal SSRI Exposure Programs a Hypermetabolic State in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kummet, Gary J.; Haskell, Sarah E.; Hermann, Gregory M.; Ni, Charles; Volk, Kenneth A.; Younes, Areej K.; Miller, Alise K.; Roghair, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy complicates up to 10% of pregnancies. During therapy, SSRIs exert pleiotropic antidepressant, anorexigenic, and neurotrophic effects. Intrauterine SSRI exposure has been modeled by neonatal administration to developmentally immature rodents, and it has paradoxically elicited features of adult depression. We hypothesized neonatal SSRI exposure likewise programs a rebound hypermetabolic state in adult mice. Methods. C57BL/6 pups were randomized to saline or sertraline (5?mg/kg/d) from P1–P14. Because estrogen increases tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) expression, a subset of female mice underwent sham surgery or bilateral ovariectomy (OVX). Metabolic rate was determined by indirect calorimetry. Results. In both male and female mice, neonatal SSRI exposure increased adult caloric intake and metabolic rate. SSRI-exposed female mice had significantly decreased adult weight with a relative increase in brain weight and melatonin excretion, independent of ovarian status. Cerebral cortex TPH2 expression was increased in SSRI-exposed male mice but decreased in OVX SSRI-exposed female mice. Conclusions. SSRI exposure during a critical neurodevelopmental window increases adult caloric intake and metabolic rate. Ovarian status modulated central TPH2 expression, but not adult energy balance, suggesting programmed neural connectivity or enhanced melatonin production may play a more important role in the post-SSRI hypermetabolic syndrome. PMID:22570769

  9. Decreased aggression and increased repetitive behavior in Pten haploinsufficient mice.

    PubMed

    Clipperton-Allen, A E; Page, D T

    2015-02-01

    Aggression is an aspect of social behavior that can be elevated in some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a concern for peers and caregivers. Mutations in Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), one of several ASD risk factors encoding negative regulators of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, have been reported in individuals with ASD and comorbid macrocephaly. We previously showed that a mouse model of Pten germline haploinsufficiency (Pten(+/-) ) has selective deficits, primarily in social behavior, along with broad overgrowth of the brain. Here, we further examine the social behavior of Pten(+/-) male mice in the resident-intruder test of aggression, using a comprehensive behavioral analysis to obtain an overall picture of the agonistic, non-agonistic and non-social behavior patterns of Pten(+/-) mice during a free interaction with a novel conspecific. Pten(+/-) male mice were involved in less aggression than their wild-type littermates. Pten(+/-) mice also performed less social investigation, including anogenital investigation and approaching and/or attending to the intruder, which is consistent with our previous finding of decreased sociability in the social approach test. In contrast to these decreases in social behaviors, Pten(+/-) mice showed increased digging. In summary, we report decreased aggression and increased repetitive behavior in Pten(+/-) mice, thus extending our characterization of this model of an ASD risk factor that features brain overgrowth and social deficits. PMID:25561290

  10. Satellite Feature Identification: Cyclogenesis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2012-08-17

    This module, Satellite Feature Identification: Cyclogenesis, uses water vapor satellite imagery to present a satellite perspective of basic features associated with the formation and development of extratropical cyclones. First, through an initial case study, the precursor elements leading to cyclogenesis are identified. Then three conceptual views of different ways cyclogenesis can evolve are presented along with additional examples to illustrate the concepts. Finally a series of exercises, again using real case studies, are used to emphasize the important points and provide realistic scenarios describing some of the many ways cyclogenesis reveals itself on satellite imagery. This module is part of the series: 'Dynamic Feature Identification: The Satellite Palette'.

  11. Thyroid Cancer - Featured Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Thyroid Cancer - Featured Clinical Trials The following list shows Featured Clinical Trials for a specific type of cancer. You may also want to view: Multiple Cancer Types - Featured Clinical Trials Supportive Care - Featured Clinical Trials

  12. Skin Cancer - Featured Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Skin Cancer - Featured Clinical Trials The following list shows Featured Clinical Trials for a specific type of cancer. You may also want to view: Multiple Cancer Types - Featured Clinical Trials Supportive Care - Featured Clinical Trials

  13. Demonstration Wetland at Henderson, Nevada

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Demonstration wetland at Henderson, Nevada, where vegetated hummocks were built into the wastewater treatment wetland to improve its effectiveness and sustainability, as well as provide quality wildlife habitat....

  14. Features in visual search combine linearly

    PubMed Central

    Pramod, R. T.; Arun, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Single features such as line orientation and length are known to guide visual search, but relatively little is known about how multiple features combine in search. To address this question, we investigated how search for targets differing in multiple features (intensity, length, orientation) from the distracters is related to searches for targets differing in each of the individual features. We tested race models (based on reaction times) and co-activation models (based on reciprocal of reaction times) for their ability to predict multiple feature searches. Multiple feature searches were best accounted for by a co-activation model in which feature information combined linearly (r = 0.95). This result agrees with the classic finding that these features are separable i.e., subjective dissimilarity ratings sum linearly. We then replicated the classical finding that the length and width of a rectangle are integral features—in other words, they combine nonlinearly in visual search. However, to our surprise, upon including aspect ratio as an additional feature, length and width combined linearly and this model outperformed all other models. Thus, length and width of a rectangle became separable when considered together with aspect ratio. This finding predicts that searches involving shapes with identical aspect ratio should be more difficult than searches where shapes differ in aspect ratio. We confirmed this prediction on a variety of shapes. We conclude that features in visual search co-activate linearly and demonstrate for the first time that aspect ratio is a novel feature that guides visual search. PMID:24715328

  15. Reprogramming in vivo produces teratomas and iPS cells with totipotency features.

    PubMed

    Abad, María; Mosteiro, Lluc; Pantoja, Cristina; Cańamero, Marta; Rayon, Teresa; Ors, Inmaculada; Grańa, Osvaldo; Megías, Diego; Domínguez, Orlando; Martínez, Dolores; Manzanares, Miguel; Ortega, Sagrario; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-10-17

    Reprogramming of adult cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) has opened new therapeutic opportunities; however, little is known about the possibility of in vivo reprogramming within tissues. Here we show that transitory induction of the four factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc in mice results in teratomas emerging from multiple organs, implying that full reprogramming can occur in vivo. Analyses of the stomach, intestine, pancreas and kidney reveal groups of dedifferentiated cells that express the pluripotency marker NANOG, indicative of in situ reprogramming. By bone marrow transplantation, we demonstrate that haematopoietic cells can also be reprogrammed in vivo. Notably, reprogrammable mice present circulating iPS cells in the blood and, at the transcriptome level, these in vivo generated iPS cells are closer to embryonic stem cells (ES cells) than standard in vitro generated iPS cells. Moreover, in vivo iPS cells efficiently contribute to the trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that they achieve a more plastic or primitive state than ES cells. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of in vivo iPS cells generates embryo-like structures that express embryonic and extraembryonic markers. We conclude that reprogramming in vivo is feasible and confers totipotency features absent in standard iPS or ES cells. These discoveries could be relevant for future applications of reprogramming in regenerative medicine. PMID:24025773

  16. ?-Tocopherol succinate protects mice against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj K; Wise, Stephen Y; Ducey, Elizabeth J; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O; Elliott, Thomas B; Singh, Vijay K

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of ?-tocopherol succinate (?-TS) in protecting mice from gastrointestinal syndrome induced by total-body irradiation. CD2F1 mice were injected subcutaneously with 400 mg/kg of ?-TS and exposed to different doses of (60)Co ? radiation, and 30-day survival was monitored. Jejunum sections were analyzed for crypts and villi, PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis), and apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling - TUNEL). The crypt regeneration in irradiated mice was evaluated by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Bacterial translocation from gut to heart, spleen and liver in ?-TS-treated and irradiated mice was evaluated by bacterial culture on sheep blood agar, colistin-nalidixic acid, and xylose-lysine-desoxycholate medium. Our results demonstrate that ?-TS enhanced survival in a significant number of mice irradiated with 9.5, 10, 11 and 11.5 Gy (60)Co ? radiation when administered 24 h before radiation exposure. ?-TS also protected the intestinal tissue of irradiated mice in terms of crypt and villus number, villus length and mitotic figures. TS treatment decreased the number of TUNEL- and PUMA-positive cells and increased the number of BrdU-positive cells in jejunum compared to vehicle-treated mice. Further, ?-TS inhibited gut bacterial translocation to the heart, spleen and liver in irradiated mice. Our data suggest that ?-TS protects mice from radiation-induced gastrointestinal damage by inhibiting apoptosis, promoting regeneration of crypt cells, and inhibiting translocation of gut bacteria. PMID:22013885

  17. State Machine Operation of the MICE Cooling Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The cooling channel for MICE has between 12 and 18 superconductnig solenoid coils in 3 to 7 magnets, depending on the staged development of the experiment. The magnets are coaxial and in close proximity which requires coordinated operation of the magnets when ramping, responding to quench conditions, and quench recovery. To reliably manage the operation of the magnets, MICE is implementing state machines for each magnet and an over-arching state machine for the magnets integrated in the cooling channel. The state machine transitions and operating parameters are stored/restored to/from the configuration database and coupled with MICE Run Control. Proper implementation of the state machines will not only ensure safe operation of the magnets, but will help ensure reliable data quality. A description of MICE, details of the state machines, and lessons learned from use of the state machines in recent magnet training tests will be discussed.

  18. Altered anxiety and defensive behaviors in Bax knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Luedke, Angela C; Boucher, Pierre O; Niel, Lee; Holmes, Melissa M

    2013-02-15

    Developmental neuronal cell death is critically regulated by the pro-death protein Bax. Bax-/- mice exhibit increased neuron number, the elimination of several neural sex differences, and altered socio-sexual behaviors. Here we examined the effects of Bax gene deletion on anxiety and defensive behaviors by comparing the responses of male and female wildtype and Bax-/- mice to two different tests. On the elevated plus maze, Bax-/- mice of both sexes made more entries into and spent more time in the outer portion of open arms, indicating decreased anxiety compared to wildtype animals. Next, we exposed mice to two odors: trimethylthiazoline (TMT), an olfactory component of fox feces that rodents find aversive, and butyric acid (BA), an aversive odor without ecological significance. Each odor was presented individually and all animals were tested with both odors in a counterbalanced design. TMT was consistently more aversive than BA across a variety of behaviors (e.g., mice spent less time close to the odor source). Overall, Bax -/- mice showed fewer stretch approaches to both TMT and BA than wildtypes, but they avoided the odor source more (e.g., fewer contacts and less time spent in proximity). Finally, no effect of genotype was seen in baseline olfactory behavior; all mice were able to locate a buried food item, demonstrating that Bax-/- mice do not have impaired olfaction per se. Collectively, these data suggest a change in strategy with anxiety and defensive behaviors in Bax-/- mice, indicating that alterations in cell number affect more general mechanisms of fear and anxiety in addition to behaviors directly related to reproduction. PMID:23142367

  19. DCTD — Featured Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Content Click here to view the Site Map Home | Sitemap | Contact DCTD Search this site Featured Trials Funding Opportunities Partnerships DCTD Programs Cancer Diagnosis Program Cancer Imaging Program Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Developmental

  20. Visualizing object detection features

    E-print Network

    Vondrick, Carl (Carl Martin)

    2013-01-01

    We introduce algorithms to visualize feature spaces used by object detectors. The tools in this paper allow a human to put on 'HOG goggles' and perceive the visual world as a HOG based object detector sees it. We found ...

  1. ADVERTISING FEATURE APPLICATION NOTES

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    ADVERTISING FEATURE APPLICATION NOTES NATURE METHODS MPep MALDI Chips for high-sensitivity and high- tion strategies. Matrix spots are located on an ultraphobic surface The surface surrounding the matrix

  2. The demonstration of recurrent demyelination and remyelination of axons in the central nervous system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Stidworthy Johnson; S. K. Ludwin

    1981-01-01

    A model for studying recurrent demyelination and remyelination in the central nervous system was developed by means of repeated administration of Cuprizone to mice. In contrast to the demyelination seen during the first course of Cuprizone, the recurrent demyelination was markedly protracted, displayed features of a “dying-back” gliopathy, and resulted in a greatly reduce inflammatory and glial reaction. The repeat

  3. Resistance to experimental colitis depends on cytoprotective heat shock proteins in macrophage migration inhibitory factor null mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatsuya Ohkawara; Jun Nishihira; Yoh Ishiguro; Eiji Otsubo; Koichi Nagai; Hiroshi Takeda; Mototsugu Kato; Takashi Yoshiki; Toshihiko Iwanaga; Masahiro Asaka

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor plays an important role in inflammatory diseases. We investigated the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in the development of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis using MIF null (?\\/?) mice. MIF?\\/? mice given 3% DSS showed no clinical and histological feature of colitis in contrast to wild-type (WT) mice. Lack of MIF suppressed the up-regulation

  4. Assessment of a non-invasive high-throughput classifier for behaviours associated with sleep and wake in mice.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Kevin D; Medonza, Dharshan C; Crane, Eli R; O'Hara, Bruce F

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a non-invasive high-throughput system for automatically detecting characteristic behaviours in mice over extended periods of time, useful for phenotyping experiments. The system classifies time intervals on the order of 2 to 4 seconds as corresponding to motions consistent with either active wake or inactivity associated with sleep. A single Polyvinylidine Difluoride (PVDF) sensor on the cage floor generates signals from motion resulting in pressure. This paper develops a linear classifier based on robust features extracted from normalized power spectra and autocorrelation functions, as well as novel features from the collapsed average (autocorrelation of complex spectrum), which characterize transient and periodic properties of the signal envelope. Performance is analyzed through an experiment comparing results from direct human observation and classification of the different behaviours with an automatic classifier used in conjunction with this system. Experimental results from over 28.5 hours of data from 4 mice indicate a 94% classification rate relative to the human observations. Examples of sequential classifications (2 second increments) over transition regions between sleep and wake behaviour are also presented to demonstrate robust performance to signal variation and explain performance limitations. PMID:18405376

  5. Significance Of Apoptosis And Its Relationship To Antioxidants After Ochratoxin A Administration In Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Faik Atroshi; Isa Biese; Hannu Saloniemi; Terhi Ali-Vehmas; Seppo Saari; Aldo Rizzo; Pirjo Veijalainen

    2000-01-01

    A study of the appearance of liver apoptosis after ochratoxin A (OTA) administration was performed in male mice. Administration of OTA twice a week for one or two weeks period results in the occurrence of apoptosis in mice's liver. The presence of intracellular apoptosis bod- ies was detected at two weeks after toxin treatment. Light microscopic examination demonstrated the presence

  6. Cholesterol and Bile Acid Metabolism Are Impaired in Mice Lacking the Nuclear Oxysterol Receptor LXR?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J Peet; Stephen D Turley; Wenzhen Ma; Bethany A Janowski; Jean-Marc A Lobaccaro; Robert E Hammer; David J Mangelsdorf

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that mice lacking the oxysterol receptor, LXR?, lose their ability to respond normally to dietary cholesterol and are unable to tolerate any amount of cholesterol in excess of that which they synthesize de novo. When fed diets containing cholesterol, LXR? (?\\/?) mice fail to induce transcription of the gene encoding cholesterol 7?-hydroxylase (Cyp7a), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile

  7. Novel Arterial Pathology in Mice and Humans Hemizygous for Elastin 1783 J. Clin. Invest.

    E-print Network

    Mecham, Robert

    Novel Arterial Pathology in Mice and Humans Hemizygous for Elastin 1783 J. Clin. Invest, November 1998, 1783­1787 http://www.jci.org Novel Arterial Pathology in Mice and Humans Hemizygous demonstrated that loss-of-function mu- tations in one elastin allele cause an inherited obstructive arterial

  8. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Cumulus Cells of Type I Diabetic Mice

    E-print Network

    Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Cumulus Cells of Type I Diabetic Mice Qiang Wang1 demonstrated in diabetic mice; however, the potential pathways by which maternal diabetes exerts its effects of maternal diabetes on the mitochondrial status in cumulus cells. We found an increased frequency

  9. Vasopressin Stimulates Ventromedial Hypothalamic Neurons via Oxytocin Receptors in Oxytocin Gene Knockout Male and Female Mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    André K. Ragnauth; Andrew Goodwillie; Cornelia Brewer; Louis J. Muglia; Donald W. Pfaff; Lee-Ming Kow

    2004-01-01

    A wealth of neuropharmacological data demonstrates that oxytocin (OT) actions in the mammalian forebrain support a wide variety of affiliative behaviors and repress aggressive behaviors. Based on that literature, it was expected that reproductive and affiliative behaviors would be vastly decreased and aggression markedly increased in OT gene knockout (OTKO) mice. The initial publications reporting the behaviors of these mice

  10. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF ACUTE AND SUBACUTE TREATMENT OF PHENOBARBITAL IN DIFFERENT STRAINS OF MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A strain specificity has been demonstrated for the effect of subsequent administration of phenobarbital. n which diethylnitresamine-initiated hepatocarcinogenesis was presented in C3H mice, inhibited in B6C3F1 (C57BL X C3M) and not affected in C57BL mice. herefore, we examined in...

  11. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF ACUTE AND SUBACUTE TREATMENT OF PHENOBARBITAL IN DIFFERENT STARINS OF MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A strain specificity has been demonstrated for the effect of subsequent administration of phenobarbital, in which diethylnitrosamine initiated hepatocarcinogensis was promoted in C3H mice, inhibited in B6C3F1 (C57BL X C3H) and not affect in C57BL mice. herefore, we examined in th...

  12. Selenium status alters the immune response and expulsion of adult Heligmosomodies bakeri in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heligmosomoides bakeri is a nematode with parasitic development exclusively in the small intestine of infected mice that induces a potent STAT6-dependent Th2 immune response. We previously demonstrated that host protective expulsion of adult H. bakeri was delayed in selenium (Se) deficient mice. ...

  13. Severe phenotype in mice with termination mutation in exon 2 of cystic fibrosis gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Hasty; Wanda K. O'Neal; Karen-Qianye Liu; Andrew P. Morris; Zsuzsa Bebok; Gleb B. Shumyatsky; Tamas Jilling; Eric J. Sorscher; Allan Bradley; Arthur L. Beaudet

    1995-01-01

    Mice with a termination codon mutation in exon 2 of the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene were generated using homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Animals homozygous for the mutant allele display a severe intestinal phenotype similar to that previously reported for CF mutant mice. The null nature of this allele was demonstrated by the absence of detectable wild-type mRNA, by

  14. A Classroom Demonstration of Psychrometrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jim A.; Nikolajczyk, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Presented is a bench-top demonstration of heating/humidification designed to provide visual confirmation of psychrometric principles outlined in thermodynamics texts. Includes a schematic sketch of the heater/humidifier apparatus, discussion of the six steps involved during the demonstration, and a table of experimental results. (JN)

  15. A Demonstration on Every Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Glenn M.

    1995-01-01

    Argues that inclusion of demonstrations on examinations increases students' ability to observe carefully the physical world around them, translate from observation in terms of models, and make quantitative estimates and physicist-type "back-of-the-envelope" calculations. Presents demonstration ideas covering the following topics: mechanics,…

  16. The "Mushroom Cloud" Demonstration Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzarasa, Guido; Sparnacci, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A revisitation of the classical "mushroom cloud" demonstration is described. Instead of aniline and benzoyl peroxide, the proposed reaction involves household chemicals such as alpha-pinene (turpentine oil) and trichloroisocyanuric acid ("Trichlor") giving an impressive demonstration of oxidation and combustion reactions that…

  17. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  18. Rocket Ignition Demonstrations Using Silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, Sibtosh; Santoro, Robert; Watkins, William B.; Kincaid, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    Rocket ignition demonstration tests using silane were performed at the Penn State Combustion Research Laboratory. A heat sink combustor with one injection element was used with gaseous propellants. Mixtures of silane and hydrogen were used as fuel, and oxygen was used as oxidizer. Reliable ignition was demonstrated using fuel lead and and a swirl injection element.

  19. Three Mechanical Demonstrations of Chaos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations showing chaotic motion, which makes long-term prediction impossible. Discusses the apparatus for the demonstrations and procedures for illustrating chaotic motion of pendulum, balls rolling in a double potential well, and a ball rolling on a balanced beam. (YP)

  20. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  1. C17 Prevents Inflammatory Arthritis and Associated Joint Destruction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Connie; Joyce-Shaikh, Barbara; Grein, Jeff; Moshrefi, Mehrdad; Raoufi, Fahimeh; Laface, Drake M.; McClanahan, Terril K.; Bourne, Patricia A.; Pierce, Robert H.; Gorman, Daniel M.; Pflanz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    C17 was first described about ten years ago as a gene expressed in CD34+ cells. A more recent study has suggested a role for C17 in chondrogenesis and development of cartilage. However, based on sequence analysis, we believe that C17 has homology to IL-2 and hence we present the hypothesis that C17 is a cytokine possessing immune-regulatory properties. We provide evidence that C17 is a secreted protein preferentially expressed in chondrocytes, hence in cartilage-rich tissues. Systemic expression of C17 in vivo reduces disease in a collagen antibody-induced arthritis model in mice (CAIA). Joint protection is evident by delayed disease onset, minimal edema, bone protection and absence of diverse histological features of disease. Expression of genes typically associated with acute joint inflammation and erosion of cartilage or bone is blunted in the presence of C17. Consistent with the observed reduction in bone erosion, we demonstrate reduced levels of RANKL in the paws and sera of mice over-expressing C17. Administration of C17 at the peak of disease, however, had no effect on disease progression, indicating that C17's immune-regulatory activity must be most prominent prior to or at the onset of severe joint inflammation. Based on this data we propose C17 as a cytokine that s contributes to immune homeostasis systemically or in a tissue-specific manner in the joint. PMID:21799806

  2. Favorite Demonstration: Demonstrating Emergent Properties in Dynamic Systems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Douglas S. Fink

    2009-09-01

    This demonstration was developed for an introduction to a soil science class to show how emergent properties are an essential behavior endemic to dynamic systems; explanations for their existence are not dependent on external forces. Emergent properties a

  3. Tested Demonstrations. A Chemiluminescence Demonstration - Oxalyl Chloride Oxidation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilber, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This inexpensive, effective chemiluminescence demonstration requires minimal preparation. It is based on the oxidation of oxalyl chloride by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an appropriate fluorescent sensitizer. The reaction mechanism is not completely understood. (BB)

  4. Tested Demonstrations: A Simple Demonstration of Reversible Oxygenation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kildahl, Nicholas K.

    1983-01-01

    Materials needed, reaction involved, and potential hazards are provided for a demonstration of reversible oxygenation. Also discusses the importance of the reaction in biological systems, focusing on hemoglobin/myoglobin and their function in mammals. (JM)

  5. Experimental osteoarthritis models in mice.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Julia; Grässel, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slowly progressing, degenerative disorder of synovial joints culminating in the irreversible destruction of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. It affects almost everyone over the age of 65 and influences life quality of affected individuals with enormous costs to the health care system. Current therapeutic strategies seek to ameliorate pain and increase mobility; however, to date none of them halts disease progression or regenerates damaged cartilage or bone. Thus, there is an ultimate need for the development of new, noninvasive treatments that could substitute joint replacement for late- or end-stage patients. Therefore, osteoarthritis animal models for mimicking of all OA features are important. Mice develop an OA pathology that is comparable to humans, rapidly develop OA due to the short lifetime and show reproducible OA symptoms. They provide a versatile and widely used animal model for analyzing molecular mechanisms of OA pathology. One major advantage over large animal models is the availability of knockout or transgenic mice strains to examine genetic predispositions/contributions to OA.In this chapter, we describe three widely used instability-inducing murine osteoarthritis models. The most common two methods for surgical induction are: (1) destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) and (2) anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). In the DMM model, the medial meniscotibial ligament is transected while in the ACLT model the anterior cruciate ligament is destroyed. In the third, chemical induced instability method, intraarticular collagenase is injected into the knee joint. Intraarticular collagenase weakens articular ligaments which cause instability of the joint, and full-blown OA develops within 6 weeks. For morphological evaluation, we correspond mainly to the recommendations of OARSI for histological assessment of osteoarthritis in mouse. For statistical evaluation summed or mean scores of all four knee areas (medial tibial plateau (MTP), medial tibial condyle (MFC), lateral tibial plateau (LTP) or lateral femoral condyle (LFC)), medial and/or lateral regions are used.In future, not only large animal models like guinea pigs, sheep, goats, or horses will be important for a better understanding of osteoarthritis, but especially the mouse model with its rapid development of osteoarthritis and its numerous advantages by providing knockout or transgenic strains will become more and more relevant for drug development and determination of genetic predispositions of osteoarthritis pathology. PMID:25064117

  6. INDUCTION OF TH2-LIKE IMMUNE RESPONSES BY C3H MICE BEARING A DEFINED FLORA FOLLOWING ONSET OF COLITIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Previous investigations from this laboratory have shown that infection of C3H strain mice with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae induces a typhlocolitis with features that are similar to ulcerative colitis. The immunological response of these conventional C3H/HeOuJ mice has been shown to be a ...

  7. Equine strangles modelled in mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Chanter; K. C. Smith; J. A. Mumford

    1995-01-01

    Small animal models of Streptococcus equi infection have been confined to parenteral injection of mice which subsequently develop a septicaemia. To devise a model of infection more closely resembling strangles, 4.9 × 106 cfu of S. equi were placed on the nares of C3H and Balb\\/c mice (fifteen of each). Compared with ten uninfected controls, infected mice sneezed more often

  8. Offsite demonstrations for MWLID technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, R. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The goal of the Offsite Demonstration Project for Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID)-developed environmental site characterization and remediation technologies is to facilitate the transfer, use, and commercialization of these technologies to the public and private sector. The meet this goal, the project identified environmental restoration needs of mixed waste and/or hazardous waste landfill owners (Native American, municipal, DOE, and DoD); documenting potential demonstration sites and the contaminants present at each site; assessing the environmental regulations that would effect demonstration activities; and evaluating site suitability for demonstrating MWLID technologies at the tribal and municipal sites identified. Eighteen landfill sites within a 40.2-km radius of Sandia National Laboratories are listed on the CERCLIS Site/Event Listing for the state of New Mexico. Seventeen are not located within DOE or DoD facilities and are potential offsite MWLID technology demonstration sites. Two of the seventeen CERCLIS sites, one on Native American land and one on municipal land, were evaluated and identified as potential candidates for off-site demonstrations of MWLID-developed technologies. Contaminants potentially present on site include chromium waste, household/commercial hazardous waste, volatile organic compounds, and petroleum products. MWLID characterization technologies applicable to these sites include Magnetometer Towed Array, Cross-borehole Electromagnetic Imaging, SitePlanner {trademark}/PLUME, Hybrid Directional Drilling, Seamist{trademark}/Vadose Zone Monitoring, Stripping Analyses, and x-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Heavy Metals.

  9. Modulation of Recombinant Antigenic Constructs Containing Multi-Epitopes towards Effective Reduction of Atherosclerotic Lesion in B6;129S-Ldlrtm1HerApobtm2Sgy/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Min; Chen, Daxin; Endresz, Valeria; Lantos, Ildiko; Szabo, Andrea; Kakkar, Vijay; Lu, Xinjie

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as a complex chronic inflammatory disease. Many more studies have extended vaccination against atherosclerosis by using epitopes from self-antigens or beyond and demonstrated that vaccination with antigens or derivatives could reduce the extent of the lesions in atherosclerosis-prone mice. Our previous study has demonstrated that construct AHHC [ApoB100688-707 + hHSP60303-312 + hHSP60153-163 + Cpn derived peptide (C)] significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AHHC can be modulated towards increased lesion reduction in mice by creating two other derivatives with a sequential epitope-substitution named RHHC in which A was replaced by an “R” (C5aR1-31) and RPHC with a further “H” (hHSP60303-312) conversion into “P” (protease-activated receptor-142-55) in mice. Antigenic epitopes were incorporated into a dendroaspin scaffold. Immunization of B6;129S-Ldlrtm1HerApobtm2Sgy/J mice with three constructs elicited production of high levels of antibodies against each epitope (apart from hHSP60153-163 and P which induced a low antibody response). Histological analyses demonstrated that the mice immunized with either RPHC or RHHC showed significant reductions in the size of atherosclerostic lesions compared to those with AHHC (69.5±1.1% versus 55.7±3.4%, P<0.01 or 65.6±1.3% versus 55.7±3.4%, P<0.01). Reduction of plaque size in the aortic sinus and descending aorta correlated with alterations in cellular immune responses when compared with controls. We conclude that a recombinant construct RPHC may provide new antigenic and structural features which are favorable for significant reduction in atherosclerotic lesion formation. This approach offers a novel strategy for developing anti-atherosclerotic agents. PMID:25830298

  10. Scn3b knockout mice exhibit abnormal ventricular electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Parvez; Gurung, Iman S; Pedersen, Thomas H; Thresher, Rosemary; Brice, Nicola; Lawrence, Jason; Grace, Andrew A; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2008-01-01

    We report for the first time abnormalities in cardiac ventricular electrophysiology in a genetically modified murine model lacking the Scn3b gene (Scn3b(-/-)). Scn3b(-/-) mice were created by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. RT-PCR analysis confirmed that Scn3b mRNA was expressed in the ventricles of wild-type (WT) hearts but was absent in the Scn3b(-/-) hearts. These hearts also showed increased expression levels of Scn1b mRNA in both ventricles and Scn5a mRNA in the right ventricles compared to findings in WT hearts. Scn1b and Scn5a mRNA was expressed at higher levels in the left than in the right ventricles of both Scn3b(-/-) and WT hearts. Bipolar electrogram and monophasic action potential recordings from the ventricles of Langendorff-perfused Scn3b(-/-) hearts demonstrated significantly shorter ventricular effective refractory periods (VERPs), larger ratios of electrogram duration obtained at the shortest and longest S(1)-S(2) intervals, and ventricular tachycardias (VTs) induced by programmed electrical stimulation. Such arrhythmogenesis took the form of either monomorphic or polymorphic VT. Despite shorter action potential durations (APDs) in both the endocardium and epicardium, Scn3b(-/-) hearts showed DeltaAPD(90) values that remained similar to those shown in WT hearts. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique applied to ventricular myocytes isolated from Scn3b(-/-) hearts demonstrated reduced peak Na(+) current densities and inactivation curves that were shifted in the negative direction, relative to those shown in WT myocytes. Together, these findings associate the lack of the Scn3b gene with arrhythmic tendencies in intact perfused hearts and electrophysiological features similar to those in Scn5a(+/-) hearts. PMID:19351516

  11. Scn3b knockout mice exhibit abnormal ventricular electrophysiological properties

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Parvez; Gurung, Iman S.; Pedersen, Thomas H.; Thresher, Rosemary; Brice, Nicola; Lawrence, Jason; Grace, Andrew A.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.

    2008-01-01

    We report for the first time abnormalities in cardiac ventricular electrophysiology in a genetically modified murine model lacking the Scn3b gene (Scn3b?/?). Scn3b?/? mice were created by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. RT-PCR analysis confirmed that Scn3b mRNA was expressed in the ventricles of wild-type (WT) hearts but was absent in the Scn3b?/? hearts. These hearts also showed increased expression levels of Scn1b mRNA in both ventricles and Scn5a mRNA in the right ventricles compared to findings in WT hearts. Scn1b and Scn5a mRNA was expressed at higher levels in the left than in the right ventricles of both Scn3b?/? and WT hearts. Bipolar electrogram and monophasic action potential recordings from the ventricles of Langendorff-perfused Scn3b?/? hearts demonstrated significantly shorter ventricular effective refractory periods (VERPs), larger ratios of electrogram duration obtained at the shortest and longest S1–S2 intervals, and ventricular tachycardias (VTs) induced by programmed electrical stimulation. Such arrhythmogenesis took the form of either monomorphic or polymorphic VT. Despite shorter action potential durations (APDs) in both the endocardium and epicardium, Scn3b?/? hearts showed ?APD90 values that remained similar to those shown in WT hearts. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique applied to ventricular myocytes isolated from Scn3b?/? hearts demonstrated reduced peak Na+ current densities and inactivation curves that were shifted in the negative direction, relative to those shown in WT myocytes. Together, these findings associate the lack of the Scn3b gene with arrhythmic tendencies in intact perfused hearts and electrophysiological features similar to those in Scn5a+/? hearts. PMID:19351516

  12. Notional Airspace Operations Demonstration Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trongale, Nicholas A.

    2006-01-01

    The airspace operations demonstration (AOD) is intended to show that the Access 5 Step 1 functional requirements can be met. The demonstration will occur in two phases. The initial on-range phase will be carried out in restricted airspace to demonstrate the cooperative collision avoidance (CCA) functional requirements and to provide risk-reduction for the AOD by allowing the test team to rehearse some elements of the demonstration mission. The CCA system to be used in these flights is based on Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) which is a commercially-available system by which airplanes constantly broadcast their current position and altitude to other aircraft and ground resources over a dedicated radio datalink. The final phase will occur in the national airspace (NAS) and will be the formal demonstration of the remainder of the proposed functional requirements. The general objectives of the AOD are as follows: (1) Demonstrate that the UAS can aviate in the NAS (2) Demonstrate that the UAS can navigate in the NAS (3) Demonstrate that the UAS can communicate with the NAS (4) Demonstrate that the UAS can perform selected collision avoidance functions in the NAS (5) Demonstrate that the UAS can evaluate and avoid weather conflicts in the NAS (6) Demonstrate that the UAS can provide adequate command and control in the NAS In addition to the stated objectives, there are a number of goals for the flight demonstration. The demo can be accomplished successfully without achieving these goals, but these goals are to be used as a guideline for preparing for the mission. The goals are: (1) Mission duration of at least 24 hours (2) Loiter over heavy traffic to evaluate the data block issue identified during the Access 5 Airspace Operations Simulations (3) Document the contingency management process and lessons learned (4) Document the coordination process for Ground Control Stations (GCS) handoff (5) Document lessons learned regarding the process of flying in the NAS Preliminary planning for a notional mission to achieve the objectives and goals has been prepared. The planning is intended to serve as a guide for detailed planning of the AOD.

  13. Local inflammatory reaction induced by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede venom in mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Louise Faggionato; Prezotto-Neto, José Pedro; Távora, Bianca de Carvalho Lins Fernandes; Antoniazzi, Marta Maria; Knysak, Irene; Gióia Guizze, Samuel Paulo; Santoro, Marcelo Larami; Barbaro, Katia Cristina

    2013-12-15

    Centipede envenomation is generally mild, and human victims usually manifest burning pain, erythema and edema. Despite the abundance and ubiquity of these animals, centipede venom has been poorly characterized in literature. For this reason, the aim of this work was to investigate local inflammatory features induced by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede envenomation in mice, evaluating edema formation, leukocyte infiltration, production of inflammatory mediators, and also performing histological analysis. The highest edematogenic activity induced by the venom, determined by plethysmometry, was noticed 0.5 h after injection in mice footpad. At 24 h, edema was still detected in animals that received 15 and 60 ?g of venom, and at 48 h, only in animals injected with 60 ?g of venom. In relation to leukocyte count, S. viridicornis venom induced cell recruitment, mainly neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, in all doses and time periods analyzed in comparison with PBS-injected mice. An increase in lymphocytes was detected especially between 1 and 24 h at 60 ?g dose. Besides, eosinophil recruitment was observed mainly for 15 and 60 ?g doses in early time periods. Edema formation and cell recruitment were also confirmed by histological analysis. Moreover, S. viridicornis venom stimulated the release of IL-6, MCP-1, KC, and IL-1?. Conversely, S. viridicornis venom did not induce the release of detectable levels of TNF-?. We demonstrated that the edematogenic activity induced by S. viridicornis venom was of rapid onset, and the venom stimulated secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators which contribute to the inflammatory reaction induced by S. viridicornis venom in an experimental model. PMID:24140924

  14. Studies on the correlation with olfactory dysfunction in a transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Ameer; Lee, Ji Hye; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Moon, Cheil

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of proteinaceous deposits in the brain. AD often results in olfactory dysfunction and impaired olfactory perceptual acuity may be a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Until recently, there is no Alzheimer's nanoscope or any other high-end microscope developed to be capable of seeing buried feature of AD clearly. Modern neuroimaging techniques are more effective only after the occurrence of cognitive impairment. Therefore, early detection of Alzheimer's disease is critical in developing effective treatment of AD. H and E (Haematoxyline and Eosin) staining is performed for examining gross morphological changes, while TUNEL (transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) staining for monitoring neuronal death in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and western blot are performed to examine ?-amyloid protein expression. AD model animals were Tg2576 (transgenic mice that overexpress a mutated form of the A? precursor protein), and 6 month (before onset of AD symptoms) and 14 month (after onset of AD symptoms) old WT (wild type) and transgenic mice were compared in their olfactory system. We found that in OE of Tg2576 mice, thickness and total number of cells were decreased, while the numbers of TUNEL-positive neurons, caspase-3 activation were significantly increased compared with age-matched WT. Our results demonstrate that the olfactory system may get deteriorated before onset of AD symptoms. Our findings imply that an olfactory biopsy could be served as an early and relatively simple diagnostic tool for potential AD patients.

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Precipitates Cognitive Impairment and Extracellular A? Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Toru; Arendash, Gary W.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many American soldiers, even those undiagnosed but likely suffering from mild TBI, display Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like cognitive impairments, suggesting a pathological overlap between TBI and AD. This study examined the cognitive and neurohistological effects of TBI in presymptomatic APP/PS1 AD-transgenic mice. AD mice and non-transgenic (NT) mice received an experimental TBI on the right parietal cortex using the controlled cortical impact model. Animals were trained in a water maze task for spatial memory before TBI, and then reevaluated in the same task at two and six weeks post-TBI. The results showed that AD mice with TBI made significantly more errors in the task than AD mice without TBI and NT mice regardless of TBI. A separate group of AD mice and NT mice were evaluated neurohistologically at six weeks after TBI. The number of extracellular beta-amyloid (A?)-deposits significantly increased by at least one fold in the cortex of AD mice that received TBI compared to the NT mice that received TBI or the AD and NT mice that underwent sham surgery. A significant decrease in MAP2 positive cells, indicating neuronal loss, was observed in the cortex of both the AD and NT mice that received TBI compared to the AD and NT mice subjected to sham surgery. Similar changes in extracellular A? deposits and MAP2 positive cells were also seen in the hippocampus. These results demonstrate for the first time that TBI precipitates cognitive impairment in presymptomatic AD mice, while also confirming extracellular A? deposits following TBI. The recognition of this pathological link between TBI and AD should aid in developing novel treatments directed at abrogating cellular injury and extracellular A? deposition in the brain. PMID:24223856

  16. DIESEL PARTICLE INSTILLATION ENHANCES INFLAMMATORY AND NEUROTROPHIN RESPONSES IN THE LUNGS OF ALLERGIC BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airways resistance and inflammation. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airways resistance associated with the allergen-specific airways responses in mice. ...

  17. Chronic treatment in vivo with ?-adrenoceptor agonists induces dysfunction of airway ?2-adrenoceptors and exacerbates lung inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rui; Degan, Simone; Theriot, Barbara S; Fischer, Bernard M; Strachan, Ryan T; Liang, Jiurong; Pierce, Richard A; Sunday, Mary E; Noble, Paul W; Kraft, Monica; Brody, Arnold R; Walker, Julia KL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inhalation of a ?-adrenoceptor agonist (?-agonist) is first-line asthma therapy, used for both prophylaxis against, and acute relief of, bronchoconstriction. However, repeated clinical use of ?-agonists leads to impaired bronchoprotection and, in some cases, adverse patient outcomes. Mechanisms underlying this ?2-adrenoceptor dysfunction are not well understood, due largely to the lack of a comprehensive animal model and the uncertainty as to whether or not bronchorelaxation in mice is mediated by ?2-adrenoceptors. Thus, we aimed to develop a mouse model that demonstrated functional ?-agonist-induced ?2-adrenoceptor desensitization in the context of allergic inflammatory airway disease. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We combined chronic allergen exposure with repeated ?-agonist inhalation in allergen-treated BALB/C mice and examined the contribution of ?2-adrenoceptors to albuterol-induced bronchoprotection using FVB/NJ mice with genetic deletion of ?2-adrenoceptors (KO). Associated inflammatory changes – cytokines (ELISA), cells in bronchoalevolar lavage and airway remodelling (histology) and ?2-adrenoceptor density (radioligand binding) – were also measured. KEY RESULTS ?2-Adrenoceptors mediated albuterol-induced bronchoprotection in mice. Chronic treatment with albuterol induced loss of bronchoprotection, associated with exacerbation of the inflammatory components of the asthma phenotype. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This animal model reproduced salient features of human asthma and linked loss of bronchoprotection with airway pathobiology. Accordingly, the model offers an advanced tool for understanding the mechanisms of the effects of chronic ?- agonist treatment on ?-adrenoceptor function in asthma. Such information may guide the clinical use of ?-agonists and provide insight into development of novel ?-adrenoceptor ligands for the treatment of asthma. PMID:22013997

  18. Novel Third-Law Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonc, William

    1995-01-01

    Presents an easy method to demonstrate Third-Law interactions using identical button magnets sliding along a smooth (nonmagnetic) knitting needle. Explains the gravitational and magnetic interactions in the case of horizontal and vertical positions of the needle. (JRH)

  19. Rotating Cylinder Treatment System Demonstration

    EPA Science Inventory

    In August 2008, a rotating cylinder treatment system (RCTSTM) demonstration was conducted near Gladstone, CO. The RCTSTM is a novel technology developed to replace the aeration/oxidation and mixing components of a conventional lime precipitation treatment s...

  20. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Edward Weber (Indiana University School of Medicine School of Medicine)

    2009-07-27

    This article provides a method to demonstrate the anatomy and physiology of advanced liver disease (specifically the portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension). CT images are used to emphasize the science.

  1. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  2. Classroom Demonstrations of Auditory Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haws, LaDawn; Oppy, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents activities to help students gain understanding about auditory perception. Describes demonstrations that cover topics, such as sound localization, wave cancellation, frequency/pitch variation, and the influence of media on sound propagation. (CMK)

  3. Status of the MAJORANA Demonstrator

    E-print Network

    C. Cuesta; N. Abgrall; I. J. Arnquist; F. T. Avignone III; A. S. Barabash; F. E. Bertrand; V. Brudanin; M. Busch; M. Buuck; D. Byram; A. S. Caldwell; Y-D. Chan; C. D. Christofferson; J. A. Detwiler; Yu. Efremenko; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. K. Giovanetti; J. Goett; M. P. Greenn; J. Gruszko; I. S. Guinn; V. E. Guiseppe; R. Henning; E. W. Hoppe; S. Howard; M. A. Howe; B. R. Jasinski; K. J. Keeter; M. F. Kidd; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; B. D. LaFerriere; J. Leon; J. MacMullin; R. D. Martin; S. J. Meijer; S. Mertens; J. L. Orrell; C. O'Shaughnessy; N. R. Overman; A. W. P. Poon; D. C. Radford; J. Rager; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; E. Romero-Romero; C. Schmitt; B. Shanks; M. Shirchenko; N. Snyder; A. M. Suriano; D. Tedeschi; V. Timkin; J. E. Trimble; R. L. Varner; S. Vasilyev; K. Vetter; K. Vorren; B. R. White; J. F. Wilkerson; C. Wiseman; W. Xu; E. Yakushev; C. -H. Yu; V. Yumatov

    2015-01-07

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the MAJORANA Demonstrator, an ultra-low background, 40-kg modular high purity Ge detector array to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in Ge. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale Ge-based neutrinoless double-beta decay searches that will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region, a major goal of the Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 count/tonne/year in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. The current status of the Demonstrator is discussed, as are plans for its completion.

  4. Demonstrating Forces between Parallel Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Blane

    2000-01-01

    Describes a physics demonstration that dramatically illustrates the mutual repulsion (attraction) between parallel conductors using insulated copper wire, wooden dowels, a high direct current power supply, electrical tape, and an overhead projector. (WRM)

  5. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  6. Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is part of RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). RESOLVE is an ISRU ground demonstration: (1) A rover to explore a permanently shadowed crater at the south or north pole of the Moon (2) Drill core samples down to 1 meter (3) Heat the core samples to 150C (4) Analyze gases and capture water and/or hydrogen evolved (5) Use hydrogen reduction to extract oxygen from regolith

  7. Slant Borehole Demonstration Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER, M.G.

    2000-07-19

    This report provides a summary of the demonstration project for development of a slant borehole to retrieve soil samples from beneath the SX-108 single-shell tank. It provides a summary of the findings from the demonstration activities and recommendations for tool selection and methods to deploy into the SX Tank Farm. Daily work activities were recorded on Drilling and Sampling Daily Work Record Reports. The work described in this document was performed during March and April 2000.

  8. Long distance laser communications demonstration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malcolm J. Northcott; A. McClaren; J. E. Graves; John Phillips; Don Driver; David Abelson; David W. Young; Joseph E. Sluz; Juan C. Juarez; Marc B. Airola; Raymond M. Sova; Harry Hurt; James Foshee

    2007-01-01

    AOptix demonstrated a simulated air-to-air laser communications (laser-com) system over a 147Km distance by establishing a laser communication link between the islands of Hawaii and Maui. We expect the atmospheric conditions encountered during this demonstration to be representative of the worst seeing conditions that could be expected for an actual air to air link. AOptix utilized laser-com terminal incorporating Adaptive

  9. Liquid spreading ASTP Science Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, S. V.; Facemire, B. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wetting and spreading phenomena are significant in a wide variety of processes. This report discusses the results of an ASTP Science Demonstration, 'Liquid Spreading', and compares these results to theoretical predictions. On earth the initial spreading of large liquid drops on solid surfaces is always dominated by gravity; in this demonstration the effect of gravity is greatly reduced so that surface energy forces are the controlling factor.

  10. From Simple Features to Sophisticated Evaluation Functions

    E-print Network

    Buro, Michael

    , we present experimental results for Othello, which demonstrate the po- tential of the described approach. Keywords: automatic feature construction, GLEM, Othello 1 Introduction Many AI systems use the presented techniques can be applied to the game of Othello and discuss the new approach with regard

  11. Mammographic features of early breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward A. Sickles

    1984-01-01

    Mammographic detection of breast cancer at the earliest possible stage requires optimal radiographic technique and a full knowledge of the subtle features with which very small cancers can present. Although some early cancers are identified as characteristic clusters of calcifications or as spiculated or multinodular (knobby) masses, others demonstrate less typical and sometimes much less obvious mammographic signs: the single

  12. Feature of the Month

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC) maintains a special section entitled "Feature of the Month," which provides detailed information on a timely subject. Previous features, accessible through the site archive, include 'Spring Migration Guide' (March), 'The Conservation Reserve Program' (June), and 'How Old Is My Deer?' (November). In response to scientific and public attention to amphibian malformations in the US and Canada, this month's feature highlights the North American Reporting Center for Amphibian Malformations (NARCAM), "a centralized database of confirmed malformation sightings and related information." The database includes background information, an online amphibian identification guide, a map of historical and recent reports, examples of malformations, a bibliography, forms for submitting reports, and technical information for researchers.

  13. Alpha-tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation combined injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Beattie, Lindsay A.; Ducey, Elizabeth J.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of alpha-tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors in mitigating combined injury associated with acute radiation exposure in combination with secondary physical wounding. CD2F1 mice were exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and then transfused intravenously with 5 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from TS- and AMD3100-injected mice after irradiation. Within 1 h after irradiation, mice were exposed to secondary wounding. Mice were observed for 30 d after irradiation and cytokine analysis was conducted by multiplex Luminex assay at various time-points after irradiation and wounding. Our results initially demonstrated that transfusion of TS-mobilized progenitors from normal mice enhanced survival of acutely irradiated mice exposed 24 h prior to transfusion to supralethal doses (11.5–12.5 Gy) of 60Co gamma-radiation. Subsequently, comparable transfusions of TS-mobilized progenitors were shown to significantly mitigate severe combined injuries in acutely irradiated mice. TS administered 24 h before irradiation was able to protect mice against combined injury as well. Cytokine results demonstrated that wounding modulates irradiation-induced cytokines. This study further supports the conclusion that the infusion of TS-mobilized progenitor-containing PBMCs acts as a bridging therapy in radiation-combined-injury mice. We suggest that this novel bridging therapeutic approach involving the infusion of TS-mobilized hematopoietic progenitors following acute radiation exposure or combined injury might be applicable to humans. PMID:23814114

  14. An Automated and Quantitative Method to Evaluate Progression of Striatal Pathology in Huntington's Disease Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xia; Wu, Jun; Egorova, Polina; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the Huntingtin protein which results in the selective degeneration of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN). A number of genetic mouse models have been developed to model HD phenotype. Most of these models display impaired performance in motor coordination assays and variety of neuropathological abnormalities. Quantitative neuropathological assessment in these mice requires application of stereological techniques and very labor-intensive and time consuming. Here, we report a development of a novel paradigm that simplifies and accelerates quantitative evaluation of striatal atrophy in HD mice. To achieve this goal, we crossed YAC128 HD transgenic mice with Rgs9-EGFP mice. In Rgs9-EGFP mice the EGFP transgene is expressed selectively in MSN neurons at high levels. Using high resolution fluorescence laser scanning imager, we have been able to precisely measure striatal area and intensity of EGFP expression in coronal slices from these mice at 2 months, 4 months and 9 months of age. Using this approach, we demonstrated significant reduction in striatal volume in YAC128 mice at 4 months and 9 months of age when compared to wild type littermates. We evaluated behavior performance of these mice at 2 months, 4 months and 6 months of age and demonstrated significant impairment of YAC128 mice in beam walk assay at 4 months and 6 months of age. This new mouse model and the quantitative neuropathological scoring paradigm may simplify and accelerate discovery of novel neuroprotective agents for HD. PMID:25575955

  15. Stromal Activation Associated with Development of Prostate Cancer in Prostate-Targeted Fibroblast Growth Factor 8b Transgenic Mice12

    PubMed Central

    Elo, Teresa D; Valve, Eeva M; Seppänen, Jani A; Vuorikoski, Heikki J; Mäkelä, Sari I; Poutanen, Matti; Kujala, Paula M; Härkönen, Pirkko L

    2010-01-01

    Expression of fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is commonly increased in prostate cancer. Experimental studies have provided evidence that it plays a role in prostate tumorigenesis and tumor progression. To study how increased FGF-8 affects the prostate, we generated and analyzed transgenic (TG) mice expressing FGF-8b under the probasin promoter that targets expression to prostate epithelium. Prostates of the TG mice showed an increased size and changes in stromal and epithelialmorphology progressing fromatypia and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mouse PIN, mPIN) lesions to tumors with highly variable phenotype bearing features of adenocarcinoma, carcinosarcoma, and sarcoma. The development of mPIN lesions was preceded by formation of activated stroma containing increased proportion of fibroblastic cells, rich vasculature, and inflammation. The association between advancing stromal and epithelial alterations was statistically significant. Microarray analysis and validation with quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of osteopontin and connective tissue growth factor was markedly upregulated in TG mouse prostates compared with wild type prostates. Androgen receptor staining was decreased in transformed epithelium and in hypercellular stroma but strongly increased in the sarcoma-like lesions. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that disruption of FGF signaling pathways by increased epithelial production of FGF-8b leads to strongly activated and atypical stroma, which precedes development of mPIN lesions and prostate cancer with mixed features of adenocarcinoma and sarcoma in the prostates of TG mice. The results suggest that increased FGF-8 in human prostate may also contribute to prostate tumorigenesis by stromal activation. PMID:21076617

  16. Wave rotor demonstrator engine assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the program was to determine a wave rotor demonstrator engine concept using the Allison 250 series engine. The results of the NASA LERC wave rotor effort were used as a basis for the wave rotor design. A wave rotor topped gas turbine engine was identified which incorporates five basic requirements of a successful demonstrator engine. Predicted performance maps of the wave rotor cycle were used along with maps of existing gas turbine hardware in a design point study. The effects of wave rotor topping on the engine cycle and the subsequent need to rematch compressor and turbine sections in the topped engine were addressed. Comparison of performance of the resulting engine is made on the basis of wave rotor topped engine versus an appropriate baseline engine using common shaft compressor hardware. The topped engine design clearly demonstrates an impressive improvement in shaft horsepower (+11.4%) and SFC (-22%). Off design part power engine performance for the wave rotor topped engine was similarly improved including that at engine idle conditions. Operation of the engine at off design was closely examined with wave rotor operation at less than design burner outlet temperatures and rotor speeds. Challenges identified in the development of a demonstrator engine are discussed. A preliminary design was made of the demonstrator engine including wave rotor to engine transition ducts. Program cost and schedule for a wave rotor demonstrator engine fabrication and test program were developed.

  17. Disposition of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Pregnant and Lactating CD-1 Mice and Their Pups

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies in mice prenatally-exposed to PFOA demonstrate growth and developmental effects, including impaired body weight gain and mammary gland development, delayed eye opening, and increased mortality. Those dose dependent effects appeared to worsen if offspring exposed ...

  18. Impairment of mice spermatogenesis by sodium arsenite.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Mónica; Matos, Rita Cerejeira; Oliveira, Helena; Nunes, Bruno; Pereira, Maria de Lourdes

    2012-03-01

    In order to assess the effect of arsenic on the male reproductive impairment in mice, 7-week-old animals were exposed to 7.5 mg sodium arsenite (NaAsO(2))/kg body weight, during 35 days (one spermatogenic cycle). One group of animals was sacrificed after exposure, while another group received distilled water for an additional period of 35 days, in order to study the spermatoxic effect and the recovery of spermatogenesis. In mice sacrificed after NaAsO(2) exposure, a decrease in testis/body weight ratio and reduction of tubular diameter were observed. Both groups of NaAsO(2)-exposed animals showed remarkable histopathological changes, such as sloughing of immature germ cells. Animals sacrificed after NaAsO(2) exposure showed decreased sperm motility, increased abnormal sperm morphology and decreased sperm viability. The effects of NaAsO(2) on sperm motility recovered to normal values after one spermatogenic cycle, while increased sperm abnormality was maintained. However, at this period, a decrease in acrosome integrity was detected. Concerning oxidative stress parameters, animals sacrificed after NaAsO(2) exposure showed a decreased selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity, which was not detected after the recovery. Conversely, at this period, total glutathione peroxidase activity increased in exposed animals. These results demonstrate the toxic effects of NaAsO(2) on mice spermatogenesis and show the lack of recovery after one spermatogenic cycle. PMID:21490070

  19. Induction of Overt Menstruation in Intact Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Marion; Döcke, Wolf-Dietrich; Müller, Andrea; Menning, Astrid; Röse, Lars; Zollner, Thomas Matthias; Gashaw, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    The complex tissue remodeling process of menstruation is experienced by humans and some primates, whereas most placental mammals, including mice, go through an estrous cycle. How menstruation and the underlying mechanisms evolved is still unknown. Here we demonstrate that the process of menstruation is not just species-specific but also depends on factors which can be induced experimentally. In intact female mice endogenous progesterone levels were raised by the induction of pseudopregnancy. Following an intrauterine oil injection, the decidualization of the endometrium was reliably induced as a prerequisite for menstruation. The natural drop of endogenous progesterone led to spontaneous breakdown of endometrial tissue within an average of 3 days post induction of decidualization. Interestingly, morphological changes such as breakdown and repair of the endometrial layer occurred in parallel in the same uterine horn. Most importantly, endometrial breakdown was accompanied by vaginally visible (overt) bleeding and flushing out of shed tissue comparable to human menstruation. Real-time PCR data clearly showed temporal changes in the expression of multiple factors participating in inflammation, angiogenesis, tissue modulation, proliferation, and apoptosis, as has been described for human menstruating endometrium. In conclusion, human menstruation can be mimicked in terms of extravaginally visible bleeding, tissue remodeling, and gene regulation in naturally non-menstruating species such as intact female mice without the need for an exogenous hormone supply. PMID:22412950

  20. Antifatigue effect of Gracilaria eucheumoides in mice

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, JIN-TING; WANG, MEI-YAN; ZHENG, LU-BIN

    2013-01-01

    Gracilaria eucheumoides Linn (Gracilariaceae; G. eucheumoides) is abundant in dietary fiber, which aids the clearance of excess cholesterol from the blood and maintains stable blood glucose levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antifatigue effect of G. eucheumoides in mice and the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this effect. Mice were randomly divided into four groups and three of the groups were administered different doses of G. eucheumoides extract. A loaded swimming test demonstrated that the swimming times of the low-, medium- and high-dose groups were longer than those of the control group. Examinations revealed that the liver and muscle glycogen, lactate dehydrogenase and blood glucose concentration levels of the treatment groups were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). However, this was not the case for lactic acid concentration (P>0.05). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the gene expression levels of glucose transport protein 4 and AMP-activated protein kinase in the medium-dose group exhibited the largest increases, compared with the other treatment groups, and were 3.0- and 1.8-fold higher than those in the control group, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that G. eucheumoides exerts an antifatigue effect on mice. PMID:24255683

  1. Magnetic and Cryogenic Design of MICE Coupling Solenoid Magnet System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Wang; Fengyu Xu; Hong Wu; Xiaokun Liu; Lankai Li; Xinglong Guo; Heng Pan; Anbin Chen; Michael Anthony Green; Derun R. Li; Steve P. Virostek

    2009-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling in a short section of a realistic cooling channel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The coupling magnet is a superconducting solenoid mounted around four 201 MHz RF cavities, which produces magnetic field up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep muons within

  2. Histochemical response of mice to mistletoe lectin I (ML I)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Gossrau; H. Franz

    1990-01-01

    The acute toxicity of lectin ML I from the toxic drug, mistletoe, was demonstrated in previous experiments. Because the reason for this extremely high toxicity is not yet clear, mice were studied histochemically at different times after treatment with various doses of ML I, ML I A or ML I B chain separately, or recombinations of ML I A and

  3. Impaired cerebellar functions in mutant mice lacking DNER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akira Tohgo; Mototsugu Eiraku; Taisuke Miyazaki; Eriko Miura; Shin-ya Kawaguchi; Miyuki Nishi; Masahiko Watanabe; Tomoo Hirano; Mineko Kengaku; Hiroshi Takeshima

    2006-01-01

    DNER is a transmembrane protein carrying extracellular EGF repeats and is strongly expressed in Purkinje cells (PCs) in the cerebellum. Current study indicated that DNER functions as a new Notch ligand and mediates the functional communication via cell–cell interaction. By producing and analyzing knockout mice lacking DNER, we demonstrate its essential roles in functional and morphological maturation of the cerebellum.

  4. Contact hypersensitivity response to o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol in mice.

    PubMed

    Stern, M L; Brown, T A; Brown, R D; Munson, A E

    1991-01-01

    o-Benzyl-p-chlorophenol was evaluated for its potential as a sensitizing agent for allergic contact hypersensitivity in mice. Female B6C3F1 mice were sensitized with 1.0, 3.0, and 10.0% o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol and challenged with 20.0% o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol. Doses of o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol were selected from assays for primary irritancy. Mice received 20 microliters by direct dermal application, for 5 days, to sites prepared by shaving, dermabrading and, in some mice, with intra dermal injection of Freund's complete adjuvant. The rest period was 7 days. Measurement of the contact hypersensitivity response in mice was by radioisotopic assay two days after challenge and mouse ear swelling test one and two days after challenge. Mice demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent contact hypersensitivity response to o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol with or without adjuvant pretreatment. PMID:1935704

  5. Escalator design features evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Deshpande, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Escalators are available with design features such as dual speed (90 and 120 fpm), mat operation and flat steps. These design features were evaluated based on the impact of each on capital and operating costs, traffic flow, and safety. A human factors engineering model was developed to analyze the need for flat steps at various speeds. Mat operation of escalators was found to be cost effective in terms of energy savings. Dual speed operation of escalators with the higher speed used during peak hours allows for efficient operation. A minimum number of flat steps required as a function of escalator speed was developed to ensure safety for the elderly.

  6. Substation fire protection features

    SciTech Connect

    Hausheer, T.G. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes Commonwealth Edison`s (ComEd) approach to substation fire protection. Substation fires can have a major operational, financial, as well as political impact on a utility. The overall Company philosophy encompasses both active and passive fire protection features to provide prompt detection, notification, and confinement of fire and its by-products. Conservatively designed smoke detection systems and floor and wall penetration seals form the backbone of this strategy. The Company has implemented a program to install these features in new and existing substations. Thus far these measures have been successful in mitigating the consequences of substation fires.

  7. A Flight Demonstration of Plasma Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schwenterly, WIlliam; Hitt, Michael; Lepore, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center has been engaged in the development of a variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (V ASIMR) for several years. This type of rocket could be used in the future to propel interplanetary spacecraft and has the potential to open the entire solar system to human exploration. One feature of this propulsion technology is the ability to vary its specific impulse so that it can be operated in a mode that maximizes propellant efficiency or a mode that maximizes thrust. Variation of specific impulse and thrust enhances the ability to optimize interplanetary trajectories and results in shorter trip times and lower propellant requirements than with a fixed specific impulse. In its ultimate application for interplanetary travel, the VASIMR would be a multi-megawatt device. A much lower power system is being designed for demonstration in the 2004 timeframe. This first space demonstration would employ a lO-kilowatt thruster aboard a solar powered spacecraft in Earth orbit. The 1O-kilowatt V ASIMR demonstration unit would operate for a period of several months with hydrogen or deuterium propellant with a specific impulse of 10,000 seconds.

  8. Macrophages prevent human red blood cell reconstitution in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Van Rooijen, Nico

    2011-01-01

    An animal model supporting human erythropoiesis will be highly valuable for assessing the biologic function of human RBCs under physiologic and disease settings, and for evaluating protocols of in vitro RBC differentiation. Herein, we analyzed human RBC reconstitution in NOD/SCID or NOD/SCID/?c?/? mice that were transplanted with human CD34+ fetal liver cells and fetal thymic tissue. Although a large number of human CD45?CD71+ nucleated immature erythroid cells were detected in the bone marrow, human RBCs were undetectable in the blood of these mice. Human RBCs became detectable in blood after macrophage depletion but disappeared again after withdrawal of treatment. Furthermore, treatment with human erythropoietin and IL-3 significantly increased human RBC reconstitution in macrophage-depleted, but not control, humanized mice. Significantly more rapid rejection of human RBCs than CD47-deficient mouse RBCs indicates that mechanisms other than insufficient CD47-SIRP? signaling are involved in human RBC xenorejection in mice. All considered, our data demonstrate that human RBCs are highly susceptible to rejection by macrophages in immunodeficient mice. Thus, strategies for preventing human RBC rejection by macrophages are required for using immunodeficient mice as an in vivo model to study human erythropoiesis and RBC function. PMID:21926352

  9. Norepinephrine Transporter Heterozygous Knockout Mice Exhibit Altered Transport and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fentress, HM; Klar, R; Krueger, JK; Sabb, T; Redmon, SN; Wallace, NM; Shirey-Rice, JK; Hahn, MK

    2013-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically-driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET+/?), demonstrating that they display an ~50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity, assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET+/? mouse establishes an activated state of existing, surface NET proteins. NET+/? mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris Water Maze. These data suggest recovery of near basal activity in NET+/? mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET+/? mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  10. Enhanced malignant tumorigenesis in Cdk4 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Macias, Everardo; Conti, Claudio J; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2004-03-11

    In a previous study, we reported that overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (CDK4) in mouse epidermis results in epidermal hyperplasia, hypertrophy and severe dermal fibrosis. In this study, we have investigated the susceptibility to skin tumor formation by forced expression of CDK4. Skin tumors from transgenic mice showed a dramatic increase in the rate of malignant progression to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in an initiation-promotion protocol. Histopathological analysis of papillomas from transgenic mice showed an elevated number of premalignant lesions characterized by dysplasia and marked atypia. Interestingly, transgenic mice also developed tumors in initiated but not promoted skin, demonstrating that CDK4 replaced the action of tumor promoters. These results suggest that expression of cyclin D1 upon ras activation synergizes with CDK4 overexpression. However, cyclin D1 transgenic mice and double transgenic mice for cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not show increased malignant progression in comparison to CDK4 transgenic mice. Biochemical analysis of tumors showed that CDK4 sequesters the CDK2 inhibitors p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, suggesting that indirect activation of CDK2 plays an important role in tumor development. These results indicate that, contrary to the general assumption, the catalytic subunit, CDK4, has higher oncogenic activity than cyclin D1, revealing a potential use of CDK4 as therapeutic target. PMID:14647432

  11. Genetically Enhanced Feature Selection of Discriminative Planetary Crater Image Features

    E-print Network

    Ding, Wei

    Genetically Enhanced Feature Selection of Discriminative Planetary Crater Image Features Joseph in supervised machine learning crater detection algorithms. To provide better classification of craters of a Bayesian classifier in crater detection using image texture features. I. INTRODUCTION Impact craters

  12. QUANTIFICATION OF RESERVE POOL DOPAMINE IN METHIONINE SULFOXIDE REDUCTASE A NULL MICE

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Andrea N.; Oien, Derek B.; Moskovitz, Jackob; Johnson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase A knockout (MsrA?/?) mice, which serve as a potential model for neurodegeneration, suffer from increased oxidative stress and have previously been found to have chronically elevated brain dopamine content levels relative to control mice. Additionally, these high levels parallel increased presynaptic dopamine release. In this work, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to quantify striatal reserve pool dopamine in knockout mice and wild-type control mice. Reserve pool dopamine efflux, induced by amphetamine, was measured in brain slices from knockout and wild type mice in the presence of ?-methyl-p-tyrosine, a dopamine synthesis inhibitor. Additionally, the stimulated release of reserve pool dopamine, mobilized by cocaine, was measured. Both efflux and stimulated release measurements were enhanced in slices from knockout mice, suggesting that these mice have greater reserve pool dopamine stores than wild-type and that these stores are effectively mobilized. Moreover, dopamine transporter labeling data indicate that the difference in measured dopamine efflux was likely not caused by altered dopamine transporter protein expression. Additionally, slices from MsrA?/? and wild-type mice were equally responsive to increasing extracellular calcium concentrations, suggesting that potential differences in either calcium entry or intracellular calcium handling are not responsible for increased reserve pool dopamine release. Collectively, these results demonstrate that MsrA?/? knockout mice maintain a larger dopamine reserve pool than wild-type control mice, and that this pool is readily mobilized. PMID:21219974

  13. Obesity?dependent dysregulation of glucose homeostasis in kinase suppressor of ras 2?/? mice

    PubMed Central

    Henry, MaLinda D.; Costanzo?Garvey, Diane L.; Klutho, Paula J.; Lewis, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Disruption of KSR2 in humans and mice decreases metabolic rate and induces obesity, coincident with dysregulation of glucose homeostasis. Relative to wild?type mice, ksr2?/? mice are small prior to weaning with normal glucose tolerance at 6 weeks of age, but demonstrate excess adiposity by 9 weeks and glucose intolerance by 12–14 weeks. Defects in AICAR tolerance, a measure of whole?body AMPK activation, are detectable only when ksr2?/? mice are obese. Food restriction prevents the obesity of adult ksr2?/? mice and normalizes glucose and AICAR sensitivity. Obesity and glucose intolerance return when ad lib feeding is restored to the diet?restricted mice, indicating that glucose dysregulation is secondary to obesity in ksr2?/? mice. The phenotype of C57BL/6 ksr2?/? mice, including obesity and obesity?related dysregulation of glucose homeostasis, recapitulates that of humans with KSR2 mutations, demonstrating the applicability of the C57BL/6 ksr2?/? mouse model to the study of the pathogenesis of human disease. These data implicate KSR2 as a physiological regulator of glucose metabolism during development affecting energy sensing, insulin signaling, and lipid storage, and demonstrate the value of the C57BL/6 ksr2?/? mouse model as a unique and relevant model system in which to develop and test therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and obesity?related metabolic disorders. PMID:24997067

  14. The Impact of Genetic Susceptibility to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus on Placental Malaria in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Waisberg, Michael; Lin, Christina K.; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Pena, Mirna; Orandle, Marlene; Bolland, Silvia; Pierce, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Severe malaria, including cerebral malaria (CM) and placental malaria (PM), have been recognized to have many of the features of uncontrolled inflammation. We recently showed that in mice genetic susceptibility to the lethal inflammatory autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), conferred resistance to CM. Protection appeared to be mediated by immune mechanisms that allowed SLE-prone mice, prior to the onset of overt SLE symptoms, to better control their inflammatory response to Plasmodium infection. Here we extend these findings to ask does SLE susceptibility have 1) a cost to reproductive fitness and/or 2) an effect on PM in mice? The rates of conception for WT and SLE susceptible (SLEs) mice were similar as were the number and viability of fetuses in pregnant WT and SLEs mice indicating that SLE susceptibility does not have a reproductive cost. We found that Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc) infection disrupted early stages of pregnancy before the placenta was completely formed resulting in massive decidual necrosis 8 days after conception. Pc-infected pregnant SLEs mice had significantly more fetuses (?1.8 fold) but SLE did not significantly affect fetal viability in infected animals. This was despite the fact that Pc-infected pregnant SLEs mice had more severe symptoms of malaria as compared to Pc-infected pregnant WT mice. Thus, although SLE susceptibility was not protective in PM in mice it also did not have a negative impact on reproductive fitness. PMID:23675429

  15. Schizophrenia classification using functional network features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rish, Irina; Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Heuton, Kyle

    2012-03-01

    This paper focuses on discovering statistical biomarkers (features) that are predictive of schizophrenia, with a particular focus on topological properties of fMRI functional networks. We consider several network properties, such as node (voxel) strength, clustering coefficients, local efficiency, as well as just a subset of pairwise correlations. While all types of features demonstrate highly significant statistical differences in several brain areas, and close to 80% classification accuracy, the most remarkable results of 93% accuracy are achieved by using a small subset of only a dozen of most-informative (lowest p-value) correlation features. Our results suggest that voxel-level correlations and functional network features derived from them are highly informative about schizophrenia and can be used as statistical biomarkers for the disease.

  16. Favorite Demonstrations: A Macroscopic Demonstration of a Microscopic Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellen, John W.

    1988-01-01

    Finding ways to demonstrate microscopic phenomena and contending with life science students' lack of interest in physical principles are two problems in laboratory courses. Describes a clinical laboratory test for parasite infection that can be used to effectively solve both of them. (RT)

  17. Tested Demonstrations. Brownian Motion: A Classroom Demonstration and Student Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirksey, H. Graden; Jones, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Shows how video recordings of the Brownian motion of tiny particles may be made. Describes a classroom demonstration and cites a reported experiment designed to show the random nature of Brownian motion. Suggests a student experiment to discover the distance a tiny particle travels as a function of time. (MVL)

  18. Demonstration Extension: Copper-to-Silver-to-Gold Penny Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitz, Ed

    2008-01-01

    This demonstration, if done in the original way, can lead to fires in waste containers (sometimes in the middle of the night after the experiment has been conducted), because pyrophoric zinc is generated by suspending powdered zinc in hot sodium hydroxide. This is avoided by using hot ZnSO[subscript 4].

  19. Dietary isoflavone increases insulin-like growth factor-I production, thereby promoting hair growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Harada, Naoaki; Kurihara, Hiroki; Nakagata, Naomi; Okajima, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    Sensory neurons release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) upon activation. We previously demonstrated that CGRP increases insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) production in various tissues of mice including the skin. We demonstrated that isoflavone increases the CGRP synthesis in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in rats. Since IGF-I plays a critical role in hair growth, we hypothesized that isoflavones may promote hair growth by increasing the IGF-I production in hair follicles. We examined this hypothesis using wild-type (WT) and CGRP-knockout (CGRP(-/-)) mice. Isoflavone significantly increased the CGRP mRNA levels in DRG neurons isolated from WT mice (P<.01). Administration of isoflavone for 3 weeks increased the dermal levels of CGRP, IGF-I and IGF-I mRNA in WT mice, but not in CGRP(-/-) mice. Isoflavone administration increased the immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I in hair follicle dermal papilla cells in WT mice. Significant enhancements of hair follicle morphogenesis, hair regrowth, and hair pigmentation were also observed in WT mice administered isoflavone. However, none of these effects in WT mice were observed in CGRP(-/-) mice. These observations strongly suggest that isoflavone might increase IGF-I production in the hair follicle dermal papilla cells in mice through increasing CGRP production in the sensory neurons, thereby promoting hair growth associated with melanogenesis in mice. PMID:20576422

  20. Abnormal fluid homeostasis in apelin receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Emma M; Newson, Michael J F; Pope, George R; Landgraf, Rainer; Lolait, Stephen J; O'Carroll, Anne-Marie

    2009-09-01

    The apelinergic system, comprised of apelin and its G protein-coupled receptor (APJ; APLNR as given in MGI Database), is expressed within key regions of the central nervous system associated with arginine vasopressin (AVP) synthesis and release as well as in structures involved in the control of drinking behaviour, including the magnocellular neurones of the hypothalamus, circumventricular organs, and the pituitary gland. This localisation is indicative of a possible functional role in fluid homeostasis. We investigated a role for APJ in the regulation of fluid balance using mice deficient for the receptor. Male APJ wild-type and knockout (APJ(-/-)) mice were housed in metabolic cages to allow determination of water intake and urine volume and osmolality. When provided with free access to water, APJ(-/-) mice drank significantly less than wild-types, while their urine volume and osmolality did not differ. Water deprivation for 24 h significantly reduced urine volume and increased osmolality in wild-type but not in APJ(-/-) mice. Baseline plasma AVP concentration increased comparably in both wild-type and APJ(-/-) mice following dehydration; however, APJ(-/-) mice were unable to concentrate their urine to the same extent as wild-type mice in response to the V2 agonist desmopressin. Analysis of c-fos (Fos as given in MGI Database) mRNA expression in response to dehydration showed attenuation of expression within the subfornical organ, accentuated expression in the paraventricular nucleus, but no differences in expression in the supraoptic nucleus nor median pre-optic nucleus in APJ(-/-) mice compared with wild-type. These findings demonstrate a physiological role for APJ in mechanisms of water intake and fluid retention and suggest an anti-diuretic effect of apelin in vivo. PMID:19578099