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Sample records for mice demonstrate features

  1. Interleukin-11 alters placentation and causes preeclampsia features in mice.

    PubMed

    Winship, Amy L; Koga, Kaori; Menkhorst, Ellen; Van Sinderen, Michelle; Rainczuk, Katarzyna; Nagai, Miwako; Cuman, Carly; Yap, Joanne; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Simmons, David; Young, Morag J; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-12-29

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 wk gestation. Abnormal extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion and remodeling of uterine spiral arterioles is thought to contribute to PE development. Interleukin-11 (IL11) impedes human EVT invasion in vitro and is elevated in PE decidua in women. We demonstrate that IL11 administered to mice causes development of PE features. Immunohistochemistry shows IL11 compromises trophoblast invasion, spiral artery remodeling, and placentation, leading to increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction, although nonpregnant mice were unaffected. Real-time PCR array analysis identified pregnancy-associated plasma protein A2 (PAPPA2), associated with PE in women, as an IL11 regulated target. IL11 increased PAPPA2 serum and placental tissue levels in mice. In vitro, IL11 compromised primary human EVT invasion, whereas siRNA knockdown of PAPPA2 alleviated the effect. Genes regulating uterine natural killer (uNK) recruitment and differentiation were down-regulated and uNK cells were reduced after IL11 treatment in mice. IL11 withdrawal in mice at onset of PE features reduced SBP and proteinuria to control levels and alleviated placental labyrinth defects. In women, placental IL11 immunostaining levels increased in PE pregnancies and in serum collected from women before development of early-onset PE, shown by ELISA. These results indicate that elevated IL11 levels result in physiological changes at the maternal-fetal interface, contribute to abnormal placentation, and lead to the development of PE. Targeting placental IL11 may provide a new treatment option for PE. PMID:26655736

  2. Software for Demonstration of Features of Chain Polymerization Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnowski, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Free software for the demonstration of the features of homo- and copolymerization processes (free radical, controlled radical, and living) is described. The software is based on the Monte Carlo algorithms and offers insight into the kinetics, molecular weight distribution, and microstructure of the macromolecules formed in those processes. It also

  3. Software for Demonstration of Features of Chain Polymerization Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnowski, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Free software for the demonstration of the features of homo- and copolymerization processes (free radical, controlled radical, and living) is described. The software is based on the Monte Carlo algorithms and offers insight into the kinetics, molecular weight distribution, and microstructure of the macromolecules formed in those processes. It also…

  4. Mast cells can promote the development of multiple features of chronic asthma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mang; Tsai, Mindy; Tam, See-Ying; Jones, Carol; Zehnder, James; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Bronchial asthma, the most prevalent cause of significant respiratory morbidity in the developed world, typically is a chronic disorder associated with long-term changes in the airways. We developed a mouse model of chronic asthma that results in markedly increased numbers of airway mast cells, enhanced airway responses to methacholine or antigen, chronic inflammation including infiltration with eosinophils and lymphocytes, airway epithelial goblet cell hyperplasia, enhanced expression of the mucin genes Muc5ac and Muc5b, and increased levels of lung collagen. Using mast cell–deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh and/or KitW/W-v) mice engrafted with FcRγ+/+ or FcRγ–/– mast cells, we found that mast cells were required for the full development of each of these features of the model. However, some features also were expressed, although usually at less than wild-type levels, in mice whose mast cells lacked FcRγ and therefore could not be activated by either antigen- and IgE-dependent aggregation of FcεRI or the binding of antigen-IgG1 immune complexes to FcγRIII. These findings demonstrate that mast cells can contribute to the development of multiple features of chronic asthma in mice and identify both FcRγ-dependent and FcRγ-independent pathways of mast cell activation as important for the expression of key features of this asthma model. PMID:16710480

  5. Intermittent cold stress enhances features of atherosclerotic plaque instability in apolipoprotein E‑deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Dachun; Li, De; Tang, Bing; Li, Xiuchuan; Yang, Yongjian; Ma, Shuangtao

    2014-10-01

    The cold weather is associated with an increased occurrence of acute coronary events. However, the mechanisms underlying cold‑induced myocardial infarctions have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, 20 male, eight week‑old, apolipoprotein E (ApoE)‑deficient mice were subjected to either control conditions or intermittent cold exposure for eight weeks. Mice in the cold group were placed in a cold room at 4˚C for 4 h per day, while the mice in the control group were kept in a room at 24˚C. Cold‑exposed mice did not significantly differ from control mice in body weight, fasting glucose concentration and plasma lipid levels, including triglyceride, total cholesterol, low‑density lipoprotein and high‑density lipoprotein. The hematoxylin and eosin‑stained sections of the aortic root demonstrated increased plaque size in the cold group compared with the control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, cold‑treated mice exhibited significantly decreased plaque collagen and vascular smooth muscle cell deposition and increased macrophage and lymphocyte content (P<0.05 or P<0.01), which are typical features of atherosclerotic plaque instability. Additionally, the protein expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2, MMP‑9 and MMP‑14 were significantly increased (P<0.05 or P<0.01), whereas tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)‑1 expression was decreased (P<0.05) following exposure to a cold environment. The present study demonstrated that chronic intermittent cold stress may increase atherosclerotic plaque size and promote plaque instability in ApoE‑deficient mice by altering the balance of MMPs and TIMPs. These findings may provide mechanistic insights into sudden cardiac death in cold environments. PMID:25109747

  6. Ultrastructural features of composite skin cultures grafted onto athymic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, C J; Oleson, M A; Hansbrough, J F; Morgan, J; Greenleaf, G; Wilkins, L

    1994-01-01

    Skin substitutes composed of cultured keratinocytes with or without a dermal substrate are now being used in the treatment of burns and other cutaneous wounds. Composite skin cultures (Graftskin, LSE), consisting of epidermal keratinocytes seeded on a fibroblast-containing collagen matrix and maintained at the air-liquid interface, develop a well differentiated epidermis in vitro with many of the morphological and biochemical features of intact skin. Basement membrane-associated antigens, developing hemidesmosomes and short segments of lamina densa are present at the dermal-epidermal junction in vitro, although the LSE lacks a continuous basement membrane. As epidermal differentiation proceeds, the culture develops a stratum corneum composed of electron-dense corneocytes surrounded by extracellular lipid. However, the intercorneocyte lipid lamellae do not exhibit the repeating pattern of broad and narrow electron lucent bands observed in electron micrographs of the stratum corneum of intact skin. In this study, LSE were grafted onto full thickness wounds in athymic mice. Animals were killed 6, 15, 30 and 60 d after surgery for examination by light and electron microscopy to identify any ultrastructural changes which occurred in the culture in response to the host environment. The grafted LSE integrated well into the host tissue and remained intact throughout the 60 d study period. At the dermal-epidermal junction, a continuous basement membrane with a well defined lamina densa was established by 15 d after surgery. An extensive network of anchoring fibrils was present by 30 d after surgery. Collagen fibrils within the dermal matrix condensed by 6 d after surgery and began organising into loosely packed bundles by 15 d after surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7961139

  7. Oxytocin knockout mice demonstrate enhanced intake of sweet and nonsweet carbohydrate solutions.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Rinaman, Linda; Vollmer, Regis R; Amico, Janet A

    2007-05-01

    Oxytocin knockout (OT KO) mice display enhanced intake of nutritive and nonnutritive sweet solutions (i.e., sucrose and saccharin) compared with wild-type (WT) mice of the same C57BL/6 background strain. The present study further investigated the differential behavioral response of OT KO and WT mice to sucrose solutions and also examined intake preferences of OT KO and WT mice for palatable but nonsweet isocaloric solutions of carbohydrate and fat. A progressive ratio operant licking procedure demonstrated that OT KO and WT mice display a similar motivational drive to consume 10% sucrose. A series of two-bottle intake tests revealed that OT KO mice consume significantly larger amounts of both sweet and nonsweet carbohydrate solutions (i.e., sucrose, Polycose, and cornstarch) compared with WT cohorts. Intake pattern analyses revealed that OT KO mice overconsume carbohydrate solutions by initiating more drinking bouts compared with WT mice; bout sizes did not differ between the genotypes. In contrast, OT KO and WT mice did not differ in their intake of Intralipid, a palatable soybean oil emulsion. These findings indicate that the absence of OT in mice does not affect their appetitive drive to consume palatable sucrose solutions. Instead, the absence of OT may increase daily intake of palatable sweet and nonsweet solutions of carbohydrate (but not fat) by selectively blunting or masking processes that contribute to postingestive satiety. PMID:17272659

  8. Neuropeptide B-deficient mice demonstrate hyperalgesia in response to inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michele A; Beuckmann, Carsten T; Williams, S Clay; Sinton, Christopher M; Motoike, Toshiyuki; Richardson, James A; Hammer, Robert E; Garry, Mary G; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2005-07-12

    Neuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W (NPW) have been recently identified as ligands for the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 7 and GPR8. The precise in vivo role of this neuropeptide-receptor pathway has not been fully demonstrated. In this paper, we report that NPB-deficient mice manifest a mild adult-onset obesity, similar to that reported in GPR7-null mice. NPB-deficient mice also exhibit hyperalgesia in response to inflammatory pain. Hyperalgesia was not observed in response to chemical pain, thermal pain, or electrical stimulation. NPB-deficient mice demonstrated intact behavioral responses to pain, and learning from the negative reinforcement of electrical stimulation was unaltered. Baseline anxiety was also unchanged as measured in both the elevated plus maze and time spent immobile in a novel environment. These data support the idea that NPB is a factor in the modulation of responses to inflammatory pain and body weight homeostasis. PMID:15983370

  9. Neuropeptide B-deficient mice demonstrate hyperalgesia in response to inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michele A.; Beuckmann, Carsten T.; Williams, S. Clay; Sinton, Christopher M.; Motoike, Toshiyuki; Richardson, James A.; Hammer, Robert E.; Garry, Mary G.; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2005-01-01

    Neuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W (NPW) have been recently identified as ligands for the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 7 and GPR8. The precise in vivo role of this neuropeptide-receptor pathway has not been fully demonstrated. In this paper, we report that NPB-deficient mice manifest a mild adult-onset obesity, similar to that reported in GPR7-null mice. NPB-deficient mice also exhibit hyperalgesia in response to inflammatory pain. Hyperalgesia was not observed in response to chemical pain, thermal pain, or electrical stimulation. NPB-deficient mice demonstrated intact behavioral responses to pain, and learning from the negative reinforcement of electrical stimulation was unaltered. Baseline anxiety was also unchanged as measured in both the elevated plus maze and time spent immobile in a novel environment. These data support the idea that NPB is a factor in the modulation of responses to inflammatory pain and body weight homeostasis. PMID:15983370

  10. Abnormal olfactory function demonstrated by manganese-enhanced MRI in mice with experimental neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Kivity, Shaye; Tsarfaty, Galia; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Blank, Miri; Manor, David; Konen, Eli; Chapman, Joab; Reichlin, Morris; Wasson, Craig; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Kushnir, Tammar

    2010-04-01

    Mice with experimental neuropsychiatric lupus (NPSLE), induced by anti-ribosomal-P antibodies, developed depression-like behavior and a diminished sense of smell. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) allows in vivo mapping of functional neuronal connections in the brain, including the olfactory tract. The aim of this study was to analyze and describe, via the MEMRI technique, the effect of the anti-ribosomal-P injection on the olfactory pathway. Twenty mice were intra-cerebra-ventricular injected to the right hemisphere: 10 with human anti-ribosomal-P antibodies and 10 with human IgG antibodies (control). Depression was addressed by forced swimming test and smell function was evaluated by smelling different concentrations of menthol. MEMRI was used to investigate the olfactory system in these mice. Passive transfer of anti-ribosomal-P to mice resulted in a depression-like behavior, accompanied with a significant deficit in olfactory function. MEMRI of these mice demonstrated significant reduction (P < 0.001) in normalized manganese enhancement ratios of olfactory structures, compared to control mice. We concluded that an impaired olfactory neuronal function in mice with experimental depression, mediated by passive transfer of human-anti-ribosomal-P, can be demonstrated by MEMRI. PMID:20398010

  11. Autism-associated gene Dlgap2 mutant mice demonstrate exacerbated aggressive behaviors and orbitofrontal cortex deficits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As elegant structures designed for neural communication, synapses are the building bricks of our mental functions. Recently, many studies have pointed out that synaptic protein-associated mutations may lead to dysfunctions of social cognition. Dlgap2, which encodes one of the main components of scaffold proteins in postsynaptic density (PSD), has been addressed as a candidate gene in autism spectrum disorders. To elucidate the disturbance of synaptic balance arising from Dlgap2 loss-of-function in vivo, we thus generated Dlgap2 −/− mice to investigate their phenotypes of synaptic function and social behaviors. Methods The creation of Dlgap2 −/− mice was facilitated by the recombineering-based method, Cre-loxP system and serial backcross. Reversal learning in a water T-maze was used to determine repetitive behaviors. The three-chamber approach task, resident–intruder test and tube task were performed to characterize the social behaviors of mutant mice. Cortical synaptosomal fraction, Golgi-Cox staining, whole-cell patch electrophysiology and transmission electron microscopy were all applied to investigate the function and structure of synapses in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) of Dlgap2 −/− mice. Results Dlgap2 −/− mice displayed exacerbated aggressive behaviors in the resident–intruder task, and elevated social dominance in the tube test. In addition, Dlgap2 −/− mice exhibited a clear reduction of receptors and scaffold proteins in cortical synapses. Dlgap2 −/− mice also demonstrated lower spine density, decreased peak amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic current and ultra-structural deficits of PSD in the OFC. Conclusions Our findings clearly demonstrate that Dlgap2 plays a vital role in social behaviors and proper synaptic functions of the OFC. Moreover, these results may provide valuable insights into the neuropathology of autism. PMID:25071926

  12. Trim37-deficient mice recapitulate several features of the multi-organ disorder Mulibrey nanism.

    PubMed

    Kettunen, Kaisa M; Karikoski, Riitta; Hämäläinen, Riikka H; Toivonen, Teija T; Antonenkov, Vasily D; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Voikar, Vootele; Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Ikonen, Elina; Sainio, Kirsi; Jalanko, Anu; Karlberg, Susann; Karlberg, Niklas; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Toppari, Jorma; Jauhiainen, Matti; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Jalanko, Hannu; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina

    2016-01-01

    Mulibrey nanism (MUL) is a rare autosomal recessive multi-organ disorder characterized by severe prenatal-onset growth failure, infertility, cardiopathy, risk for tumors, fatty liver, and type 2 diabetes. MUL is caused by loss-of-function mutations in TRIM37, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase belonging to the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family and having both peroxisomal and nuclear localization. We describe a congenic Trim37 knock-out mouse (Trim37(-/-)) model for MUL. Trim37(-/-) mice were viable and had normal weight development until approximately 12 months of age, after which they started to manifest increasing problems in wellbeing and weight loss. Assessment of skeletal parameters with computer tomography revealed significantly smaller skull size, but no difference in the lengths of long bones in Trim37(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type. Both male and female Trim37(-/-) mice were infertile, the gonads showing germ cell aplasia, hilus and Leydig cell hyperplasia and accumulation of lipids in and around Leydig cells. Male Trim37(-/-) mice had elevated levels of follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones, but maintained normal levels of testosterone. Six-month-old Trim37(-/-) mice had elevated fasting blood glucose and low fasting serum insulin levels. At 1.5 years Trim37(-/-) mice showed non-compaction cardiomyopathy, hepatomegaly, fatty liver and various tumors. The amount and morphology of liver peroxisomes seemed normal in Trim37(-/-) mice. The most consistently seen phenotypes in Trim37(-/-) mice were infertility and the associated hormonal findings, whereas there was more variability in the other phenotypes observed. Trim37(-/-) mice recapitulate several features of the human MUL disease and thus provide a good model to study disease pathogenesis related to TRIM37 deficiency, including infertility, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiomyopathy and tumorigenesis. PMID:27044324

  13. Aromatase Deficient Female Mice Demonstrate Altered Expression of Molecules Critical for Renal Calcium Reabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öz, Orhan K.; Hajibeigi, Asghar; Cummins, Carolyn; van Abel, Monique; Bindels, René J.; Kuro-o, Makoto; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2007-04-01

    The incidence of kidney stones increases in women after the menopause, suggesting a role for estrogen deficiency. In order to determine if estrogen may be exerting an effect on renal calcium reabsorption, we measured urinary calcium excretion in the aromatase-deficient female mouse (ArKO) before and following estrogen therapy. ArKO mice had hypercalciuria that corrected during estrogen administration. To evaluate the mechanism by which estrogen deficiency leads to hypercalciuria, we examined the expression of several proteins involved in distal tubule renal calcium reabsorption, both at the message and protein levels. Messenger RNA levels of TRPV5, TRPV6, calbindin-D28K, the Na+/Ca++ exchanger (NCX1), and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA1b) were significantly decreased in kidneys of ArKO mice. On the other hand, klotho mRNA levels were elevated in kidneys of ArKO mice. ArKO renal protein extracts had lower levels of calbindin-D28K but higher levels of the klotho protein. Immunochemistry demonstrated increased klotho expression in ArKO kidneys. Estradiol therapy normalized the expression of TRPV5, calbindin-D28K, PMCA1b and klotho. Taken together, these results demonstrate that estrogen deficiency produced by aromatase inactivation is sufficient to produce a renal leak of calcium and consequent hypercalciuria. This may represent one mechanism leading to the increased incidence of kidney stones following the menopause in women.

  14. Touchscreen tasks in mice to demonstrate differences between hippocampal and striatal functions.

    PubMed

    Delotterie, David F; Mathis, Chantal; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Rosenbrock, Holger; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia; Marti, Anelise

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, hippocampal and striatal regions are engaged in separable cognitive processes usually assessed through species-specific paradigms. To reconcile cognitive testing among species, translational advantages of the touchscreen-based automated method have been recently promoted. However, it remains undetermined whether similar neural substrates would be involved in such behavioral tasks both in humans and rodents. To address this question, the effects of hippocampal or dorso-striatal fiber-sparing lesions were first assessed in mice through a battery of tasks (experiment A) comprising the acquisition of two touchscreen paradigms, the Paired Associates Learning (dPAL) and Visuo-Motor Conditional Learning (VMCL) tasks, and a more classical T-maze alternation task. Additionally, we sought to determine whether post-acquisition hippocampal lesions would alter memory retrieval in the dPAL task (experiment B). Pre-training lesions of dorsal striatum caused major impairments in all paradigms. In contrast, pre-training hippocampal lesions disrupted the performance of animals trained in the T-maze assay, but spared the acquisition in touchscreen tasks. Nonetheless, post-training hippocampal lesions severely impacted the recall of the previously learned dPAL task. Altogether, our data show that, after having demonstrated their potential in genetically modified mice, touchscreens also reveal perfectly adapted to taxing functional implications of brain structures in mice by means of lesion approaches. Unlike its human counterpart requiring an intact hippocampus, the acquisition of the dPAL task requires the integrity of the dorsal striatum in mice. The hippocampus only later intervenes, when acquired information needs to be retrieved. Touchscreen assays may therefore be suited to study striatal- or hippocampal-dependent forms of learnings in mice. PMID:25687692

  15. Premature skin aging features rescued by inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity in XPC-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohsen; Mahfouf, Walid; Serrano-Sanchez, Martin; Raad, Houssam; Harfouche, Ghida; Bonneu, Marc; Claverol, Stephane; Mazurier, Frederic; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Taieb, Alain; Rezvani, Hamid Reza

    2015-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type C (XP-C) is characterized mostly by a predisposition to skin cancers and accelerated photoaging, but little is known about premature skin aging in this disease. By comparing young and old mice, we found that the level of progerin and p16(INK4a) expression, β-galactosidase activity, and reactive oxygen species, which increase with age, were higher in young Xpc(-/-) mice than in young Xpc(+/+) ones. The expression level of mitochondrial complexes and mitochondrial functions in the skin of young Xpc(-/-) was as low as in control aged Xpc(+/+)animals. Furthermore, the metabolic profile in young Xpc(-/-) mice resembled that found in aged Xpc(+/+) mice. Furthermore, premature skin aging features in young Xpc(-/-) mice were mostly rescued by inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 (NOX1) activity by using a NOX1 peptide inhibitor, suggesting that the continuous oxidative stress due to overactivation of NOX1 has a causative role in the underlying pathophysiology. PMID:25437426

  16. Chimeric Mice with Competent Hematopoietic Immunity Reproduce Key Features of Severe Lassa Fever.

    PubMed

    Oestereich, Lisa; Lüdtke, Anja; Ruibal, Paula; Pallasch, Elisa; Kerber, Romy; Rieger, Toni; Wurr, Stephanie; Bockholt, Sabrina; Pérez-Girón, José V; Krasemann, Susanne; Günther, Stephan; Muñoz-Fontela, César

    2016-05-01

    Lassa fever (LASF) is a highly severe viral syndrome endemic to West African countries. Despite the annual high morbidity and mortality caused by LASF, very little is known about the pathophysiology of the disease. Basic research on LASF has been precluded due to the lack of relevant small animal models that reproduce the human disease. Immunocompetent laboratory mice are resistant to infection with Lassa virus (LASV) and, to date, only immunodeficient mice, or mice expressing human HLA, have shown some degree of susceptibility to experimental infection. Here, transplantation of wild-type bone marrow cells into irradiated type I interferon receptor knockout mice (IFNAR-/-) was used to generate chimeric mice that reproduced important features of severe LASF in humans. This included high lethality, liver damage, vascular leakage and systemic virus dissemination. In addition, this model indicated that T cell-mediated immunopathology was an important component of LASF pathogenesis that was directly correlated with vascular leakage. Our strategy allows easy generation of a suitable small animal model to test new vaccines and antivirals and to dissect the basic components of LASF pathophysiology. PMID:27191716

  17. Diacylglycerol Lipase α Knockout Mice Demonstrate Metabolic and Behavioral Phenotypes Similar to Those of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Powell, David R.; Gay, Jason P.; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Doree, Deon; Savelieva, Katerina V.; Lanthorn, Thomas H.; Read, Robert; Vogel, Peter; Hansen, Gwenn M.; Brommage, Robert; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Desai, Urvi; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    After creating >4,650 knockouts (KOs) of independent mouse genes, we screened them by high-throughput phenotyping and found that cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) KO mice had the same lean phenotype published by others. We asked if our KOs of DAG lipase α or β (Dagla or Daglb), which catalyze biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid (EC) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), or Napepld, which catalyzes biosynthesis of the EC anandamide, shared the lean phenotype of Cnr1 KO mice. We found that Dagla KO mice, but not Daglb or Napepld KO mice, were among the leanest of 3651 chow-fed KO lines screened. In confirmatory studies, chow- or high fat diet-fed Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice were leaner than wild-type (WT) littermates; when data from multiple cohorts of adult mice were combined, body fat was 47 and 45% lower in Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice, respectively, relative to WT values. By contrast, neither Daglb nor Napepld KO mice were lean. Weanling Dagla KO mice ate less than WT mice and had body weight (BW) similar to pair-fed WT mice, and adult Dagla KO mice had normal activity and VO2 levels, similar to Cnr1 KO mice. Our Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also had low fasting insulin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and after glucose challenge had normal glucose but very low insulin levels. Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also showed similar responses to a battery of behavioral tests. These data suggest: (1) the lean phenotype of young Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice is mainly due to hypophagia; (2) in pathways where ECs signal through Cnr1 to regulate food intake and other metabolic and behavioral phenotypes observed in Cnr1 KO mice, Dagla alone provides the 2-AG that serves as the EC signal; and (3) small molecule Dagla inhibitors with a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that of Cnr1 inverse agonists are likely to mirror the ability of these Cnr1 inverse agonists to lower BW and improve glycemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also induce undesirable neuropsychiatric side-effects. PMID:26082754

  18. Demonstration of Nondeclarative Sequence Learning in Mice: Development of an Animal Analog of the Human Serial Reaction Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Michael A.; Hersch, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate nondeclarative sequence learning in mice using an animal analog of the human serial reaction time task (SRT) that uses a within-group comparison of behavior in response to a repeating sequence versus a random sequence. Ten female B6CBA mice performed eleven 96-trial sessions containing 24 repetitions of a 4-trial…

  19. C9orf72 BAC Transgenic Mice Display Typical Pathologic Features of ALS/FTD.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Jacqueline G; Bogdanik, Laurent; Muhammad, A K M G; Gendron, Tania F; Kim, Kevin J; Austin, Andrew; Cady, Janet; Liu, Elaine Y; Zarrow, Jonah; Grant, Sharday; Ho, Ritchie; Bell, Shaughn; Carmona, Sharon; Simpkinson, Megan; Lall, Deepti; Wu, Kathryn; Daughrity, Lillian; Dickson, Dennis W; Harms, Matthew B; Petrucelli, Leonard; Lee, Edward B; Lutz, Cathleen M; Baloh, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Noncoding expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the C9orf72 gene are the most common cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Here we report transgenic mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) containing the full human C9orf72 gene with either a normal allele (15 repeats) or disease-associated expansion (∼100-1,000 repeats; C9-BACexp). C9-BACexp mice displayed pathologic features seen in C9orf72 expansion patients, including widespread RNA foci and repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translated dipeptides, which were suppressed by antisense oligonucleotides targeting human C9orf72. Nucleolin distribution was altered, supporting that either C9orf72 transcripts or RAN dipeptides promote nucleolar dysfunction. Despite early and widespread production of RNA foci and RAN dipeptides in C9-BACexp mice, behavioral abnormalities and neurodegeneration were not observed even at advanced ages, supporting the hypothesis that RNA foci and RAN dipeptides occur presymptomatically and are not sufficient to drive neurodegeneration in mice at levels seen in patients. PMID:26637796

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1)-deficient mice demonstrate abnormal antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Helen E; Willimott, Shaun; Beswick, Richard W; Dantzer, Françoise; de Murcia, Josiane Ménissier; Yelamos, José; Wagner, Simon D

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosylation) of acceptor proteins is an epigenetic modification involved in DNA strand break repair, recombination and transcription. Here we provide evidence for the involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1) in antibody responses. Parp-1−/− mice had increased numbers of T cells and normal numbers of total B cells. Marginal zone B cells were mildly reduced in number, and numbers of follicular B cells were preserved. There were abnormal levels of basal immunoglobulins, with reduced levels of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) and increased levels of IgA and IgG2b. Analysis of specific antibody responses showed that T cell-independent responses were normal but T cell-dependent responses were markedly reduced. Germinal centres were normal in size and number. In vitro purified B cells from Parp-1−/− mice proliferated normally and showed normal IgM secretion, decreased switching to IgG2a but increased IgA secretion. Collectively our results demonstrate that Parp-1 has essential roles in normal T cell-dependent antibody responses and the regulation of isotype expression. We speculate that Parp-1 forms a component of the protein complex involved in resolving the DNA double-strand breaks that occur during class switch recombination. PMID:18778284

  1. GIP-Overexpressing Mice Demonstrate Reduced Diet-Induced Obesity and Steatosis, and Improved Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Jin; Nian, Cuilan; Karunakaran, Subashini; Clee, Susanne M.; Isales, Carlos M.; McIntosh, Christopher H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a gastrointestinal hormone that potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during a meal. Since GIP has also been shown to exert β-cell prosurvival and adipocyte lipogenic effects in rodents, both GIP receptor agonists and antagonists have been considered as potential therapeutics in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that chronically elevating GIP levels in a transgenic (Tg) mouse model would increase adipose tissue expansion and exert beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. In contrast, although GIP Tg mice demonstrated enhanced β-cell function, resulting in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, they exhibited reduced diet-induced obesity. Adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and hepatic steatosis were both greatly reduced, and a number of genes involved in lipid metabolism/inflammatory signaling pathways were found to be down-regulated. Reduced adiposity in GIP Tg mice was associated with decreased energy intake, involving overexpression of hypothalamic GIP. Together, these studies suggest that, in the context of over-nutrition, transgenic GIP overexpression has the potential to improve hepatic and adipocyte function as well as glucose homeostasis. PMID:22802954

  2. Demonstration of MHC class II-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes in mice against herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kolaitis, G; Doymaz, M; Rouse, B T

    1990-01-01

    In humans CD4+ major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T cells dominate cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to herpes simplex virus (HSV), whereas in the mouse only CD8+ MHC class I-restricted CTL have been reported. In this study, we demonstrate that a minor fraction (around 30%) of the response in draining lymph nodes of acute local HSV infections is attributable to CD4+ CTL mice. Such CTL were identified on the basis of antiserum inhibition studies, negative depletion approaches, as well as their differing antigen processing requirements to CD8+ MHC class I-restricted CTL. A possible role for CD4+ CTL as immunoregulators in local infections is discussed briefly. PMID:2210799

  3. Monoamine oxidase A and A/B knockout mice display autistic-like features

    PubMed Central

    Bortolato, Marco; Godar, Sean C.; Alzghoul, Loai; Zhang, Junlin; Darling, Ryan D.; Simpson, Kimberly L.; Bini, Valentina; Chen, Kevin; Wellman, Cara L.; Lin, Rick C. S.; Shih, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Converging lines of evidence show that a sizable subset of autism-spectrum disorders (ASDs) is characterized by increased blood levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), yet the mechanistic link between these two phenomena remains unclear. The enzymatic degradation of brain 5-HT is mainly mediated by monoamine oxidase (MAO)A and, in the absence of this enzyme, by its cognate isoenzyme MAOB. MAOA and A/B knockout (KO) mice display high 5-HT levels, particularly during early developmental stages. Here we show that both mutant lines exhibit numerous behavioural hallmarks of ASDs, such as social and communication impairments, perseverative and stereotypical responses, behavioural inflexibility, as well as subtle tactile and motor deficits. Furthermore, both MAOA and A/B KO mice displayed neuropathological alterations reminiscent of typical ASD features, including reduced thickness of the corpus callosum, increased dendritic arborization of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex and disrupted microarchitecture of the cerebellum. The severity of repetitive responses and neuropathological aberrances was generally greater in MAOA/B KO animals. These findings suggest that the neurochemical imbalances induced by MAOAdeficiency (either by itself or in conjunction with lack of MAOB) may result in an array of abnormalities similar to those observed in ASDs. Thus, MAOA and A/B KO mice may afford valuable models to help elucidate the neurobiological bases of these disorders and related neurodevelopmental problems. PMID:22850464

  4. Angiography reveals novel features of the retinal vasculature in healthy and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    McLenachan, Samuel; Magno, Aaron Len; Ramos, David; Catita, Joana; McMenamin, Paul G; Chen, Fred Kuanfu; Rakoczy, Elizabeth Piroska; Ruberte, Jesus

    2015-09-01

    The mouse retina is a commonly used animal model for the study of pathogenesis and treatment of blinding retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we aimed to characterize normal and pathological variations in vascular anatomy in the mouse retina using fluorescein angiography visualized with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography (SLO-OCT). We examined eyes from C57BL/6J wild type mice as well as the Ins2(Akita) and Akimba mouse models of diabetic retinopathy using the Heidelberg Retinal Angiography (HRA) and OCT system. Angiography was performed on three focal planes to examine distinct vascular layers. For comparison with angiographic data, ex vivo analyses, including Indian ink angiography, histology and 3D confocal scanning laser microscopy were performed in parallel. All layers of the mouse retinal vasculature could be readily visualized during fluorescein angiography by SLO-OCT. Blood vessel density was increased in the deep vascular plexus (DVP) compared with the superficial vascular plexus (SVP). Arteriolar and venular typologies were established and structural differences were observed between venular types. Unexpectedly, the hyaloid artery was found to persist in 15% of C57BL/6 mice, forming anastomoses with peripheral retinal capillaries. Fluorescein leakage was easily detected in Akimba retinae by angiography, but was not observed in Ins2(Akita) mice. Blood vessel density was increased in the DVP of 6 month old Ins2(Akita) mice, while the SVP displayed reduced branching in precapillary arterioles. In summary, we present the first comprehensive characterization of the mouse retinal vasculature by SLO-OCT fluorescein angiography. Using this clinical imaging technique, we report previously unrecognized variations in C57BL/6J vascular anatomy and novel features of vascular retinopathy in the Ins2(Akita) mouse model of diabetes. PMID:26122048

  5. Demonstration of an early and a late phase of ischemic preconditioning in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Wu, W J; Qiu, Y; Tang, X L; Yang, Z; Bolli, R

    1998-10-01

    It is unknown whether ischemic preconditioning (PC; either early or late) occurs in the mouse. The goal of this study was to answer this question and to develop a reliable and physiologically relevant murine model of both early and late ischemic PC. A total of 201 mice were used. In nonpreconditioned open-chest animals subjected to 30 min of coronary occlusion followed by 24 h of reperfusion, infarct size (tetrazolium staining) averaged 52% of the region at risk. When the 30-min occlusion was performed 10 min after a PC protocol consisting of six cycles of 4-min occlusion and 4-min reperfusion, infarct size was reduced by 75%, indicating an early PC effect. When the 30-min occlusion was performed 24 h after the same PC protocol, infarct size was reduced by 48%, indicating a late PC effect. In mice in which the 30-min occlusion was followed by 4 h of reperfusion, infarct size was similar to that observed after 24 h of reperfusion, indicating that a 4-h reperfusion interval is sufficient to detect the final extent of cell death in this model. Fundamental physiological variables (body temperature, arterial oxygenation, acid-base balance, heart rate, and arterial pressure) were measured and found to be within normal limits. Taken together, these results demonstrate that, in the mouse, a robust infarct-sparing effect occurs during both the early and the late phases of ischemic PC, although the early phase is more powerful. This murine model is physiologically relevant, provides reliable measurements, and should be useful for elucidating the cellular mechanisms of ischemic PC in genetically engineered animals. PMID:9746488

  6. Do Linguistic Features of Science Test Items Prevent English Language Learners from Demonstrating Their Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Tracy; Kachchaf, Rachel; Rosebery, Ann; Warren, Beth; O'Connor, Mary Catherine; Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Little research has examined individual linguistic features that influence English language learners (ELLs) test performance. Furthermore, research has yet to explore the relationship between the science strand of test items and the types of linguistic features the items include. Utilizing Differential Item Functioning, this study examines ELL…

  7. Immunohistochemical demonstration of the distribution of chloroquine (CQ) and its metabolites in CQ-poisoned mice.

    PubMed

    Koreeda, Ako; Yonemitsu, Kosei; Kohmatsu, Hiroe; Mimasaka, Sohtaro; Ohtsu, Yuki; Oshima, Toru; Fujiwara, Kunio; Tsunenari, Shigeyuki

    2007-07-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) distribution in tissues of acutely poisoned mice was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry using anti-CQ polyclonal antibodies (PAC). PAC recognized 4-amino-7-chloro-quinoline structure and sufficiently reacted with CQ and CQ's metabolite bisdesethyl-chloroquine. In the brain, CQ and its metabolites (CQs) localized in the region of the choroids plexus, indicating an important role in the blood-cerebrospinal barrier system. In the heart, most regions showed diffused positive staining, and relatively strong reaction was observed in Purkinje cells, indicating an important role in acute CQ toxicity. In the lungs, CQs were observed in the bronchial epithelium, type II pneumocytes, and on the surface of alveolar walls. It was suggested that CQs were excreted to the alveolar wall with surfactant phospholipids, which are produced by type II pneumocytes. In the liver, CQs were concentrated in the centrolobular area rather than in the periportal area, in agreement with CQ's metabolic pathway. In the kidneys, tubular cells were strongly stained compared to glomerular capsules, and the distal part of renal tubules was better stained than the proximal tubules. These findings suggested that CQs were predominantly excreted or reabsorbed through the distal tubules and the collecting duct. Distribution of CQs in tissues presented here were mostly consistent with the physico-chemical properties of CQ and its metabolites. However, the elucidation of CQs' localization in Purkinje cells remains open. Further experimental studies at the level of microorganella will be needed to clarify the present result. PMID:17593411

  8. Elovl2 ablation demonstrates that systemic DHA is endogenously produced and is essential for lipid homeostasis in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Pauter, Anna M.; Olsson, Petter; Asadi, Abolfazl; Herslöf, Bengt; Csikasz, Robert I.; Zadravec, Damir; Jacobsson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The potential role of endogenously synthesized PUFAs is a highly overlooked area. Elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (ELOVLs) in mammals is catalyzed by the ELOVL enzymes to which the PUFA elongase ELOVL2 belongs. To determine its in vivo function, we have investigated how ablation of ELOVL2, which is highly expressed in liver, affects hepatic lipid composition and function in mice. The Elovl2−/− mice displayed substantially decreased levels of 22:6(n-3), DHA, and 22:5(n-6), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) n-6, and an accumulation of 22:5(n-3) and 22:4(n-6) in both liver and serum, showing that ELOVL2 primarily controls the elongation process of PUFAs with 22 carbons to produce 24-carbon precursors for DHA and DPAn-6 formation in vivo. The impaired PUFA levels positively influenced hepatic levels of the key lipogenic transcriptional regulator sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), as well as its downstream target genes. Surprisingly, the Elovl2−/− mice were resistant to hepatic steatosis and diet-induced weight gain, implying that hepatic DHA synthesis via ELOVL2, in addition to controlling de novo lipogenesis, also regulates lipid storage and fat mass expansion in an SREBP-1c-independent fashion. The changes in fatty acid metabolism were reversed by dietary supplementation with DHA. PMID:24489111

  9. Glycine decarboxylase deficiency causes neural tube defects and features of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun Jin; Leung, Kit-Yi; Savery, Dawn; Hutchin, Tim; Prunty, Helen; Heales, Simon; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Brosnan, John T.; Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) acts in the glycine cleavage system to decarboxylate glycine and transfer a one-carbon unit into folate one-carbon metabolism. GLDC mutations cause a rare recessive disease non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH). Mutations have also been identified in patients with neural tube defects (NTDs); however, the relationship between NKH and NTDs is unclear. We show that reduced expression of Gldc in mice suppresses glycine cleavage system activity and causes two distinct disease phenotypes. Mutant embryos develop partially penetrant NTDs while surviving mice exhibit post-natal features of NKH including glycine accumulation, early lethality and hydrocephalus. In addition to elevated glycine, Gldc disruption also results in abnormal tissue folate profiles, with depletion of one-carbon-carrying folates, as well as growth retardation and reduced cellular proliferation. Formate treatment normalizes the folate profile, restores embryonic growth and prevents NTDs, suggesting that Gldc deficiency causes NTDs through limiting supply of one-carbon units from mitochondrial folate metabolism. PMID:25736695

  10. MRL/MpJ mice show unique pathological features after experimental kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Shiozuru, Daichi; Ichii, Osamu; Kimura, Junpei; Nakamura, Teppei; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Otsuka-Kanazawa, Saori; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Clarification of the renal repair process is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies for kidney injury. MRL/MpJ mice have a unique repair process characterized by low scar formation. The pathological features of experimentally injured MRL/MpJ and C57BL/6 mouse kidneys were compared to examine the renal repair process. The dilation and atrophy of renal tubules were observed in folic acid (FA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in both strains, and the histopathological injury scores and number of interleukin (IL)-1F6-positive damaged distal tubules and kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1)-positive damaged proximal tubules drastically increased 1 day after AKI induction. However, KIM-1-positive tubules and the elevation of serum renal function markers were significantly fewer and lower, respectively, in MRL/MpJ mice at days 2 and 7 after AKI. After traumatic kidney injury (TKI) via needle puncture, severe tubular necrotic lesions in the punctured area and fibrosis progressed in both strains. Indices for fibrosis such as aniline blue-positive area, number of alpha smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts, and messenger RNA expression levels of Tgfb1 and Mmp2 indicated lower fibrotic activity in MRL/MpJ kidneys. Characteristically, only MRL/MpJ kidneys manifested remarkable calcification around the punctured area beginning 7 days after TKI. The pathological features of injured MRL/MpJ and C57BL/6 kidneys differed, especially those of kidneys with mild proximal tubular injuries after FA-induced AKI. Lower fibrotic activity and increased calcification after TKI were observed in MRL/MpJ kidneys. These findings clarified the unique pathological characteristics of MRL/MpJ mouse kidneys and contribute to understanding of the renal repair process after kidney injury. PMID:26345626

  11. Mice Lacking Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Demonstrate Impaired Killing of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Gyurko, Robert; Boustany, Gabriel; Huang, Paul L.; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Genco, Caroline A.; Gibson III, Frank C.

    2003-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a primary etiological agent of generalized severe periodontitis, and emerging data suggest the importance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in periodontal tissue damage, as well as in microbial killing. Since nitric oxide (NO) released from inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been shown to possess immunomodulatory, cytotoxic, and antibacterial effects in experimental models, we challenged iNOS-deficient (iNOS−/−) mice with P. gingivalis by using a subcutaneous chamber model to study the specific contribution of NO to host defense during P. gingivalis infection. iNOS−/− mice inoculated with P. gingivalis developed skin lesions and chamber rejection with higher frequency and to a greater degree than similarly challenged C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice. Chamber fluid from iNOS−/− mice possessed significantly more P. gingivalis than that of WT mice. The immunoglobulin G responses to P. gingivalis in serum was similar in WT and iNOS−/− mice, and the inductions of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6, and prostaglandin E2 were comparable between the two mouse strains. Although no differences in total leukocyte counts in chamber fluids were observed between iNOS−/− and WT mice, the percentage of dead polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was significantly greater in iNOS−/− mouse chamber fluids than that of WT samples. Interestingly, casein-elicited PMNs from iNOS−/− mice released more superoxide than did WT PMNs when stimulated with P. gingivalis. These results indicate that modulation of superoxide levels is a mechanism by which NO influences PMN function and that NO is an important element of the host defense against P. gingivalis. PMID:12933833

  12. Type 2 Diabetic Mice Demonstrate Slender Long Bones with Increased Fragility Secondary to Increased Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Yuki; Fritton, J. Christopher; Yakar, Shoshana; Epstein, Sol; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Jepsen, Karl J.; LeRoith, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetics often demonstrate normal or increased bone mineral density, yet are at increased risk for bone fracture. Furthermore, the anti-diabetic oral thiazolidinediones (PPARγ agonists) have recently been shown to increase bone fractures. To investigate the etiology of possible structural and/or material quality defects, we have utilized a well-described mouse model of Type 2 diabetes (MKR). MKR mice exhibit muscle hypoplasia from birth with reduced mass by the pre-diabetic age of 3 weeks. A compensatory hyperplasia ensues during early (5 weeks) development; by 6–8 weeks muscle is normal in structure and function. Adult whole-bone mechanical properties were determined by 4-point bending to test susceptibility to fracture. Micro-computed tomography and cortical bone histomorphometry were utilized to assess static and dynamic indices of structure, bone formation and resorption. Osteoclastogenesis assays were performed from bone marrow-derived non-adherent cells. The 8-week and 16-week, but not 3-week, male MKR had slender (i.e., narrow relative to length) femurs that were 20% weaker (p<0.05) relative to WT control femurs. Tissue-level mineral density was not affected. Impaired periosteal expansion during early diabetes resulted from 250% more, and 40% less of the cortical bone surface undergoing resorption and formation, respectively (p<0.05). Greater resorption persisted in adult MKR on both periosteal and endosteal surfaces. Differences were not limited to cortical bone as the distal femur metaphysis of 16 week MKR contained less trabecular bone and trabecular separation was greater than in WT by 60% (p<0.05). At all ages, MKR marrow-derived cultures demonstrated the ability for enhanced osteoclast differentiation in response to M-CSF and RANK-L. Taken together, the MKR mouse model suggests that skeletal fragility in Type 2 diabetes may arise from reduced transverse bone accrual and increased osteoclastogenesis during growth that is accelerated by the diabetic/hyperinsulinemic milieu. Further, these results emphasize the importance of evaluating diabetic bone based on morphology in addition to bone mass. PMID:19150422

  13. Software defined networking (SDN) over space division multiplexing (SDM) optical networks: features, benefits and experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Amaya, N; Yan, S; Channegowda, M; Rofoee, B R; Shu, Y; Rashidi, M; Ou, Y; Hugues-Salas, E; Zervas, G; Nejabati, R; Simeonidou, D; Puttnam, B J; Klaus, W; Sakaguchi, J; Miyazawa, T; Awaji, Y; Harai, H; Wada, N

    2014-02-10

    We present results from the first demonstration of a fully integrated SDN-controlled bandwidth-flexible and programmable SDM optical network utilizing sliceable self-homodyne spatial superchannels to support dynamic bandwidth and QoT provisioning, infrastructure slicing and isolation. Results show that SDN is a suitable control plane solution for the high-capacity flexible SDM network. It is able to provision end-to-end bandwidth and QoT requests according to user requirements, considering the unique characteristics of the underlying SDM infrastructure. PMID:24663655

  14. Tears of the fascia cruris demonstrate characteristic sonographic features: a case series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; Webborn, Nick; Pritchard, Melanie; Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background fascia cruris (FC) tears have recently been recognised in the literature, although little is known about their characteristic ultrasound findings. The aim was to describe the echo-graphic features of FC tears in order to improve recognition and diagnosis. Methods the ultrasound reports and images of >600 patients attending a specialist musculoskeletal clinic for Achilles tendon ultrasound scans between October 2010–May 2014 were reviewed. Any patient diagnosed with a FC tear had a structured data set extracted. All ultrasound images were performed by one consultant radiologist. Bilateral Achilles images were available for analysis. Results sixteen patients from >600 subjects were diagnosed with a FC tear. Fourteen subjects were male and two female (mean age 37.8; range 23–61), with seven elite level sports men. Nine tears were right sided and seven left, with eight situated laterally and seven medially. Seven of the tears were situated in the musculotendinous junction. Symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy co-existed in ten of sixteen subjects (average transverse diameter of Achilles tendon = 7.1±2.0 mm). Conclusion FC tears should be considered in the differential diagnoses for Achillodynia, diagnosed using their characteristic ultrasound findings, with a hypoechoic area at the medial or lateral attachment to the Achilles tendon in the transverse plane. PMID:26958540

  15. Mlkl knockout mice demonstrate the indispensable role of Mlkl in necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianfeng; Huang, Zhe; Ren, Junming; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Peng; Li, Yangxin; Ma, Jianhui; Chen, Wanze; Zhang, Yingying; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Yang, Zhentao; Wu, Su-Qin; Chen, Lanfen; Han, Jiahuai

    2013-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (Mlkl) was recently found to interact with receptor interacting protein 3 (Rip3) and to be essential for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced programmed necrosis (necroptosis) in cultured cell lines. We have generated Mlkl-deficient mice by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-mediated gene disruption and found Mlkl to be dispensable for normal mouse development as well as immune cell development. Mlkl-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and macrophages both showed resistance to necrotic but not apoptotic stimuli. Mlkl-deficient MEFs and macrophages were indistinguishable from wild-type cells in their ability to activate NF-κB, ERK, JNK, and p38 in response to TNF and lipopolysaccharides (LPS), respectively. Consistently, Mlkl-deficient macrophages and mice exhibited normal interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and TNF production after LPS treatment. Mlkl deficiency protects mice from cerulean-induced acute pancreatitis, a necrosis-related disease, but has no effect on polymicrobial septic shock-induced animal death. Our results provide genetic evidence for the role of Mlkl in necroptosis. PMID:23835476

  16. Role of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Serial Feature-Positive Discrimination Task during Eyeblink Conditioning in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Ashrafur; Tanaka, Norifumi; Usui, Koji; Kawahara, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in eyeblink serial feature-positive discrimination learning in mice using the mAChR antagonist. A 2-s light cue was delivered 5 or 6 s before the presentation of a 350-ms tone paired with a 100-ms periorbital electrical shock (cued trial) but not before the tone-alone presentation (non-cued trial). Mice received 30 cued and 30 non-cued trials each day in a random order. We found that saline-injected control mice were successfully discriminating between cued and non-cued trials within a few days of conditioning. The mice responded more frequently to the tone in cued trials than in non-cued trials. Analysis of conditioned response (CR) dynamics revealed that the CR onset latency was shorter in cued trials than in non-cued trials, despite the CR peak amplitude not differing significantly between the two conditions. In contrast, scopolamine-injected mice developed an equal number of CRs with similar temporal patterns irrespective of the presence of the cue during the 7 days of conditioning, indicating in a failure to acquire conditional discrimination. In addition, the scopolamine administration to the control mice after they had successfully acquired discrimination did not impair the conditional discrimination and expression of pre-acquired CR. These results suggest that mAChRs may play a pivotal role in memory formation in the conditional brain state associated with the feature cue; however they are unlikely to be involved in the development of discrimination after conditional memory had formed in the serial feature-positive discrimination task during eyeblink conditioning. PMID:26808980

  17. Role of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Serial Feature-Positive Discrimination Task during Eyeblink Conditioning in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Ashrafur; Tanaka, Norifumi; Usui, Koji; Kawahara, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in eyeblink serial feature-positive discrimination learning in mice using the mAChR antagonist. A 2-s light cue was delivered 5 or 6 s before the presentation of a 350-ms tone paired with a 100-ms periorbital electrical shock (cued trial) but not before the tone-alone presentation (non-cued trial). Mice received 30 cued and 30 non-cued trials each day in a random order. We found that saline-injected control mice were successfully discriminating between cued and non-cued trials within a few days of conditioning. The mice responded more frequently to the tone in cued trials than in non-cued trials. Analysis of conditioned response (CR) dynamics revealed that the CR onset latency was shorter in cued trials than in non-cued trials, despite the CR peak amplitude not differing significantly between the two conditions. In contrast, scopolamine-injected mice developed an equal number of CRs with similar temporal patterns irrespective of the presence of the cue during the 7 days of conditioning, indicating in a failure to acquire conditional discrimination. In addition, the scopolamine administration to the control mice after they had successfully acquired discrimination did not impair the conditional discrimination and expression of pre-acquired CR. These results suggest that mAChRs may play a pivotal role in memory formation in the conditional brain state associated with the feature cue; however they are unlikely to be involved in the development of discrimination after conditional memory had formed in the serial feature-positive discrimination task during eyeblink conditioning. PMID:26808980

  18. Reduced TET2 function leads to T-cell lymphoma with follicular helper T-cell-like features in mice

    PubMed Central

    Muto, H; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Nagae, G; Shiozawa, Y; Miyake, Y; Yoshida, K; Enami, T; Kamada, Y; Kato, T; Uchida, K; Nanmoku, T; Obara, N; Suzukawa, K; Sanada, M; Nakamura, N; Aburatani, H; Ogawa, S; Chiba, S

    2014-01-01

    TET2 (Ten Eleven Translocation 2) is a dioxygenase that converts methylcytosine (mC) to hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC). TET2 loss-of-function mutations are highly frequent in subtypes of T-cell lymphoma that harbor follicular helper T (Tfh)-cell-like features, such as angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (30–83%) or peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (10–49%), as well as myeloid malignancies. Here, we show that middle-aged Tet2 knockdown (Tet2gt/gt) mice exhibit Tfh-like cell overproduction in the spleen compared with control mice. The Tet2 knockdown mice eventually develop T-cell lymphoma with Tfh-like features after a long latency (median 67 weeks). Transcriptome analysis revealed that these lymphoma cells had Tfh-like gene expression patterns when compared with splenic CD4-positive cells of wild-type mice. The lymphoma cells showed lower hmC densities around the transcription start site (TSS) and higher mC densities at the regions of the TSS, gene body and CpG islands. These epigenetic changes, seen in Tet2 insufficiency-triggered lymphoma, possibly contributed to predated outgrowth of Tfh-like cells and subsequent lymphomagenesis. The mouse model described here suggests that TET2 mutations play a major role in the development of T-cell lymphoma with Tfh-like features in humans. PMID:25501021

  19. CEP290 alleles in mice disrupt tissue-specific cilia biogenesis and recapitulate features of syndromic ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Rachel, Rivka A; Yamamoto, Erin A; Dewanjee, Mrinal K; May-Simera, Helen L; Sergeev, Yuri V; Hackett, Alice N; Pohida, Katherine; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Gotoh, Norimoto; Wickstead, Bill; Fariss, Robert N; Dong, Lijin; Li, Tiansen; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-07-01

    Distinct mutations in the centrosomal-cilia protein CEP290 lead to diverse clinical findings in syndromic ciliopathies. We show that CEP290 localizes to the transition zone in ciliated cells, precisely to the region of Y-linkers between central microtubules and plasma membrane. To create models of CEP290-associated ciliopathy syndromes, we generated Cep290(ko/ko) and Cep290(gt/gt) mice that produce no or a truncated CEP290 protein, respectively. Cep290(ko/ko) mice exhibit early vision loss and die from hydrocephalus. Retinal photoreceptors in Cep290(ko/ko) mice lack connecting cilia, and ciliated ventricular ependyma fails to mature. The minority of Cep290(ko/ko) mice that escape hydrocephalus demonstrate progressive kidney pathology. Cep290(gt/gt) mice die at mid-gestation, and the occasional Cep290(gt/gt) mouse that survives shows hydrocephalus and severely cystic kidneys. Partial loss of CEP290-interacting ciliopathy protein MKKS mitigates lethality and renal pathology in Cep290(gt/gt) mice. Our studies demonstrate domain-specific functions of CEP290 and provide novel therapeutic paradigms for ciliopathies. PMID:25859007

  20. Treatment with CB2 Agonist JWH-133 Reduces Histological Features Associated with Erectile Dysfunction in Hypercholesterolemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo Araujo; Costa-Fraga, Fabiana Pereira; Faye, Younouss; Savergnini, Silvia Quintao; Lenglet, Sébastien; Mach, François; Steffens, Sabine; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Souza dos Santos, Robson Augusto; da Silva, Rafaela Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is one of the most important risk factors for erectile dysfunction, mostly due to the impairment of oxidative stress and endothelial function in the penis. The cannabinoid system might regulate peripheral mechanisms of sexual function; however, its role is still poorly understood. We investigated the effects of CB2 activation on oxidative stress and fibrosis within the corpus cavernosum of hypercholesterolemic mice. Apolipoprotein-E-knockout mice were fed with a western-type diet for 11 weeks and treated with JWH-133 (selective CB2 agonist) or vehicle during the last 3 weeks. CB2 receptor expression, total collagen content, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production within the penis were assessed. In vitro corpus cavernosum strips preparation was performed to evaluate the nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. CB2 protein expression was shown in cavernosal endothelial and smooth muscle cells of wild type and hypercholesterolemic mice. Treatment with JWH-133 reduced ROS production and NADPH-oxidase expression in hypercholesterolemic mice penis. Furthermore, JWH-133 increased endothelial NO synthase expression in the corpus cavernosum and augmented NO bioavailability. The decrease in oxidative stress levels was accompanied with a reduction in corpus cavernosum collagen content. In summary, CB2 activation decreased histological features, which were associated with erectile dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:24302957

  1. Treatment with CB2 agonist JWH-133 reduces histological features associated with erectile dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    PubMed

    Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo Araujo; Costa-Fraga, Fabiana Pereira; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Faye, Younouss; Savergnini, Silvia Quintao; Lenglet, Sébastien; Mach, François; Steffens, Sabine; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; da Silva, Rafaela Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is one of the most important risk factors for erectile dysfunction, mostly due to the impairment of oxidative stress and endothelial function in the penis. The cannabinoid system might regulate peripheral mechanisms of sexual function; however, its role is still poorly understood. We investigated the effects of CB2 activation on oxidative stress and fibrosis within the corpus cavernosum of hypercholesterolemic mice. Apolipoprotein-E-knockout mice were fed with a western-type diet for 11 weeks and treated with JWH-133 (selective CB2 agonist) or vehicle during the last 3 weeks. CB2 receptor expression, total collagen content, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production within the penis were assessed. In vitro corpus cavernosum strips preparation was performed to evaluate the nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. CB2 protein expression was shown in cavernosal endothelial and smooth muscle cells of wild type and hypercholesterolemic mice. Treatment with JWH-133 reduced ROS production and NADPH-oxidase expression in hypercholesterolemic mice penis. Furthermore, JWH-133 increased endothelial NO synthase expression in the corpus cavernosum and augmented NO bioavailability. The decrease in oxidative stress levels was accompanied with a reduction in corpus cavernosum collagen content. In summary, CB2 activation decreased histological features, which were associated with erectile dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:24302957

  2. [DEMONSTRATION OF LIKELIHOOD OF THE NEGATIVE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL PROTECTION DURING TOTAL PROTON IRRADIATION OF MICE].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A A; Bulynina, T M; Molokanov, A G; Vorozhtsova, S V; Utina, D M; Severyukhin, Yu S; Ushakov, I B

    2015-01-01

    The experiments were performed with outbred CD-1 male mice (SPF category). Total irradiation at 1.0; 2.5 and 5.0 Gy by protons with the average energy of 170 MeV was conducted in a level medical beam of the phasotron at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Investigations. Targets were 2 points of in-depth dose distribution, i.e. beam entrance of the object, and modified Bragg peak. As a physical protector, the comb filter increases linear energy transfer (LET) of 170 MeV entrance protons from 0.49 keV/μm to 1.6 keV/μm and, according to the bone marrow test, doubles the biological effectiveness of protons when comparing radiation doses that cause 37% inhibition of blood cell formation in the bone marrow. Physical protection increases dose rate from 0.37 Gy/min for entrance protons to 0.8 Gy/min for moderated protons which more than in thrice reduces time of irradiation needed to reach an equal radiobiological effect. PMID:26554131

  3. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-3-deficient mice exhibit WHIM syndrome features and attenuated inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Teresa K.; Billard, Matthew J.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Foreman, Oded; Esserman, Denise A.; Chao, Nelson J.; Lento, William E.; Lee, David M.; Patel, Dhavalkumar; Siderovski, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine receptor interactions coordinate leukocyte migration in inflammation. Chemokine receptors are GPCRs that when activated, are phosphorylated by GRKs to turn off G protein-mediated signaling yet recruit additional signaling machinery. Recently, GRK3 was identified as a negative regulator of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling that is defective in human WHIM syndrome. Here, we report that GRK3−/− mice exhibit numerous features of human WHIM, such as impaired CXCL12-mediated desensitization, enhanced CXCR4 signaling to ERK activation, altered granulocyte migration, and a mild myelokathexis. Moreover, GRK3−/− protects mice from two acute models of inflammatory arthritis (K/BxN serum transfer and CAIA). In these granulocyte-dependent disease models, protection of GRK3−/− mice is mediated by retention of cells in the marrow, fewer circulating granulocytes in the peripheral blood, and reduced granulocytes in the joints during active inflammation. In contrast to WHIM, GRK3−/− mice have minimal hypogammaglobulinemia and a peripheral leukocytosis with increased lymphocytes and absent neutropenia. Thus, we conclude that the loss of GRK3-mediated regulation of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling contributes to some, but not all, of the complete WHIM phenotype and that GRK3 inhibition may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23935208

  4. Targeted disruption of the Hexa gene results in mice with biochemical and pathologic features of Tay-Sachs disease

    SciTech Connect

    Proia, R.L.; Yamanaka, S.; Johnson, M.D.

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease, the prototype of the G{sub M2} gangliosidoses, is a catastrophic neurodegenerative disorder of infancy. The disease is caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in an absence of the lysosomal enzyme, {beta}-hexosaminidase A. As consequence of the enzyme deficiency, G{sub M2} ganglioside accumulates progressively, beginning early in fetal life, to excessive amounts in the central nervous system (CNS). Rapid mental and motor deterioration starting in the first year of life leads to death by 2 to 4 years of age. Through the targeted disruption of the Hexa gene in embryonic stem cells, we have produced mice with biochemical and neuropathologic features of Tay-Sachs disease. The mutant mice exhibited less than 1% of normal {beta}-hexosaminidase A activity and accumulated G{sub M2} ganglioside in their CNS in an age-dependent manner. The accumulated ganglioside was stored in neurons as membranous cytoplasmic bodies characteristically found in the neurons of Tay-Sachs disease patients. At three to five months of age the mutant mice showed no apparent defects in motor or memory function. These {beta}-hexosaminidase A deficient mice should be useful for devising strategies to introduce functional enzymes and genes into the CNS. This model may also be valuable for studying the biochemical and pathologic changes occurring during the course of the disease.

  5. IL-21-driven neoplasms in SJL mice mimic some key features of human angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shweta; Chen, Jing; Nicolae, Alina; Wang, Hongsheng; Shin, Dong-Mi; Adkins, Elisabeth B; Sproule, Thomas J; Leeth, Caroline M; Sakai, Tomomi; Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Raffeld, Mark; Ward, Jerrold M; Rehg, Jerold E; Waldmann, Thomas A; Jaffe, Elaine S; Roopenian, Derry C; Morse, Herbert C

    2015-11-01

    SJL/J mice exhibit a high incidence of mature B-cell lymphomas that require CD4(+) T cells for their development. We found that their spleens and lymph nodes contained increased numbers of germinal centers and T follicular helper (TFH) cells. Microarray analyses revealed high levels of transcripts encoding IL-21 associated with high levels of serum IL-21. We developed IL-21 receptor (IL21R)-deficient Swiss Jim Lambart (SJL) mice to determine the role of IL-21 in disease. These mice had reduced numbers of TFH cells, lower serum levels of IL-21, and few germinal center B cells, and they did not develop B-cell tumors, suggesting IL-21-dependent B-cell lymphomagenesis. We also noted a series of features common to SJL disease and human angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), a malignancy of TFH cells. Gene expression analyses of AITL showed that essentially all cases expressed elevated levels of transcripts for IL21, IL21R, and a series of genes associated with TFH cell development and function. These results identify a mouse model with features of AITL and suggest that patients with the disease might benefit from therapeutic interventions that interrupt IL-21 signaling. PMID:26363366

  6. Cocaine Hydrolase Gene Transfer Demonstrates Cardiac Safety and Efficacy against Cocaine-Induced QT Prolongation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Vishakantha; Reyes, Santiago; Geng, Liyi; Gao, Yang; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Cocaine addiction is associated with devastating medical consequences, including cardiotoxicity and risk-conferring prolongation of the QT interval. Viral gene transfer of cocaine hydrolase engineered from butyrylcholinesterase offers therapeutic promise for treatment-seeking drug users. Although previous preclinical studies have demonstrated benefits of this strategy without signs of toxicity, the specific cardiac safety and efficacy of engineered butyrylcholinesterase viral delivery remains unknown. Here, telemetric recording of electrocardiograms from awake, unrestrained mice receiving a course of moderately large cocaine doses (30 mg/kg, twice daily for 3 weeks) revealed protection against a 2-fold prolongation of the QT interval conferred by pretreatment with cocaine hydrolase vector. By itself, this prophylactic treatment did not affect QT interval duration or cardiac structure, demonstrating that viral delivery of cocaine hydrolase has no intrinsic cardiac toxicity and, on the contrary, actively protects against cocaine-induced QT prolongation. PMID:26669428

  7. Featured Article: Female mice with loss-of-function ITCH display an altered reproductive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Stermer, Angela R; Myers, Jessica L; Murphy, Caitlin J; Di Bona, Kristin R; Matesic, Lydia; Richburg, John H

    2016-02-01

    Major progress in deciphering the role of the E3 ligase, ITCH, in animal physiology has come from the generation and identification of Itch loss-of-function mutant mice (itchy). Mutant mice display an autoimmune-like phenotype characterized by chronic dermatitis, which has been attributed to increased levels of ITCH target proteins (e.g. transcription factors JUNB and CJUN) in T cells. Autoimmune disorders also exist in humans with Itch frameshift mutations resulting in loss of functional ITCH protein. Recent phenotypic analysis of male itchy mice revealed reduced sperm production, although cross breeding experiments showed no difference in litter size when male itchy mice were bred to wild type females. However, a reduction in litter sizes did occur when itchy females were bred to wild type males. Based on these results, characterization of female reproductive function in itchy mice was performed. Developmental analysis of fetuses at gestational day 18.5, cytological evaluation of estrous cyclicity, histopathological analysis of ovaries, and protein analysis were used to investigate the itchy reproductive phenotype. Gross skeletal and soft tissue analysis of gestational day 18.5 itchy fetuses indicated no gross developmental deformities. Itchy females had reduced implantation sites, decreased corpora lutea, and increased estrous cycle length due to increased number of days in estrus compared to controls. Alterations in the expression of prototypical ITCH targets in the ovaries were not indicated, suggesting that an alteration in an as yet defined ovary-specific ITCH substrate or interaction with the altered immune system likely accounts for the disruption of female reproduction. This report indicates the importance of the E3 ligase, ITCH, in female reproduction. PMID:26515141

  8. Demonstration of pattern transfer into sub-100 nm polysilicon line/space features patterned with extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G. F.; Henderson, C. C.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Mangat, P. J. S.; Cobb, J.; Hector, S. D.

    1999-11-01

    In two separate experiments, we have successfully demonstrated the transfer of dense- and loose-pitch line/space (L/S) photoresist features, patterned with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, into an underlying hard mask material. In both experiments, a deep-UV photoresist ({approx}90 nm thick) was spin cast in bilayer format onto a hard mask (50-90 nm thick) and was subsequently exposed to EUV radiation using a 10x reduction EUV exposure system. The EUV reticle was fabricated at Motorola (Tempe, AZ) using a subtractive process with Ta-based absorbers on Mo/Si multilayer mask blanks. In the first set of experiments, following the EUV exposures, the L/S patterns were transferred first into a SiO{sub 2} hard mask (60 nm thick) using a reactive ion etch (RIE), and then into polysilicon (350 nm thick) using a triode-coupled plasma RIE etcher at the University of California, Berkeley, microfabrication facilities. The latter etch process, which produced steep (>85 degree sign ) sidewalls, employed a HBr/Cl chemistry with a large (>10:1) etch selectivity of polysilicon to silicon dioxide. In the second set of experiments, hard mask films of SiON (50 nm thick) and SiO{sub 2} (87 nm thick) were used. A RIE was performed at Motorola using a halogen gas chemistry that resulted in a hard mask-to-photoresist etch selectivity >3:1 and sidewall profile angles {>=}85 degree sign . Line edge roughness (LER) and linewidth critical dimension (CD) measurements were performed using Sandia's GORA(c) CD digital image analysis software. Low LER values (6-9 nm, 3{sigma}, one side) and good CD linearity (better than 10%) were demonstrated for the final pattern-transferred dense polysilicon L/S features from 80 to 175 nm. In addition, pattern transfer (into polysilicon) of loose-pitch (1:2) L/S features with CDs{>=}60 nm was demonstrated. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  9. Induced chromosome deletions cause hypersociability and other features of Williams–Beuren syndrome in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong Hua; Roy, Madhuri; Kuscuoglu, Unsal; Spencer, Corinne M; Halm, Birgit; Harrison, Katharine C; Bayle, Joseph H; Splendore, Alessandra; Ding, Feng; Meltzer, Leslie A; Wright, Elena; Paylor, Richard; Deisseroth, Karl; Francke, Uta

    2009-01-01

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Williams–Beuren syndrome is caused by spontaneous ∼1.5 Mb deletions comprising 25 genes on human chromosome 7q11.23. To functionally dissect the deletion and identify dosage-sensitive genes, we created two half-deletions of the conserved syntenic region on mouse chromosome 5G2. Proximal deletion (PD) mice lack Gtf2i to Limk1, distal deletion (DD) mice lack Limk1 to Fkbp6, and the double heterozygotes (D/P) model the complete human deletion. Gene transcript levels in brain are generally consistent with gene dosage. Increased sociability and acoustic startle response are associated with PD, and cognitive defects with DD. Both PD and D/P males are growth-retarded, while skulls are shortened and brains are smaller in DD and D/P. Lateral ventricle (LV) volumes are reduced, and neuronal cell density in the somatosensory cortex is increased, in PD and D/P. Motor skills are most impaired in D/P. Together, these partial deletion mice replicate crucial aspects of the human disorder and serve to identify genes and gene networks contributing to the neural substrates of complex behaviours and behavioural disorders. PMID:20049703

  10. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P.; Wilkinson, J.E.; Geisler, J.G. |

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (A{sup y}) or viable yellow (A{sup vy}) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant {open_quotes}obese yellow{close_quotes} a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Support vector machines using EEG features of cross-frequency coupling can predict treatment outcome in Mecp2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Colic, Sinisa; Wither, Robert G; Min Lang; Zhang Liang; Eubanks, James H; Bardakjian, Berj L

    2015-08-01

    Anti-convulsive drug treatments of epilepsy typically produce varied outcomes from one patient to the next, often necessitating patients to go through several anticonvulsive drug trials until an appropriate treatment is found. The focus of this study is to predict treatment outcome using a priori electroencephalogram (EEG) features for a rare genetic model of epilepsy seen in patients with Rett Syndrome. Previous work on Mecp2-deficient mice, exhibiting the symptoms of Rett syndrome, have revealed EEG-based biomarkers that track the pathology well. Specifically the presence of cross-frequency coupling of the delta-like (3-6 Hz) frequency range phase with the fast ripple (400 - 600 Hz) frequency range amplitude in long duration discharges was found to track seizure pathology. Support Vector Machines (SVM) were trained with features generated from phase-amplitude comodulograms and tested on (n=6) Mecp2-deficient mice to predict treatment outcome to Midazolam, a commonly used anti-convulsive drug. Using SVMs it was shown that it is possible to generate a likelihood score to predict treatment outcomes on all of the animal subjects. Identifying the most appropriate treatment a priori would potentially lead to improved treatment outcomes. PMID:26737563

  12. Ectopic clustering of Cajal-Retzius and subplate cells is an initial pathological feature in Pomgnt2-knockout mice, a model of dystroglycanopathy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Naoki; Yagi, Hirokazu; Kato, Koichi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of dystroglycan causes congenital muscular dystrophies associated with cobblestone lissencephaly, classified as dystroglycanopathy. However, pathological features in the onset of brain malformations, including the precise timing and primary cause of the pial basement membrane disruption and abnormalities in the migration of pyramidal neurons, remain unexplored. Using the Pomgnt2-knockout (KO) mouse as a dystroglycanopathy model, we show that breaches of the pial basement membrane appeared at embryonic day 11.5, coinciding with the ectopic clustering of Cajal-Retzius cells and subplate neurons and prior to the migration onset of pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, in the Pomgnt2-KO cerebral cortex, preplate splitting failure likely occurred due to the aggregation of Cajal-Retzius and subplate cells, and migrating pyramidal neurons lost polarity and radial orientation. Our findings demonstrate the initial pathological events in dystroglycanopathy mice and contribute to our understanding of how dystroglycan dysfunction affects brain development and progresses to cobblestone lissencephaly. PMID:26060116

  13. Triple monoamine uptake inhibitors demonstrate a pharmacologic association between excessive drinking and impulsivity in high alcohol-preferring (HAP) mice

    PubMed Central

    O’Tousa, David S.; Warnock, Kaitlin T.; Matson, Liana M.; Namjoshi, Ojas A.; Halcomb, Meredith E.; Cook, James; Grahame, Nicholas J.; June, Harry L.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of current drinkers in the US drink excessively, and are referred to as problem/hazardous drinkers. These individuals, who may not meet criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence, comprise binge, heavy drinkers, or both. Given their high prevalence, interventions that reduce the risk of binge and heavy drinking have important public health implications. Impulsivity has been repeatedly associated with excessive drinking in the clinical literature. As impulsivity is correlated with, and may play a critical role in the initiation and maintenance of excessive drinking, this behavior may be an important target for therapeutic intervention. Hence, a better understanding of pharmacological treatments capable of attenuating excessive drinking models and impulsivity may markedly improve clinical outcomes. The high alcohol-preferring (HAP) mice represent an optimal rodent model to study the relationship between impulsivity and excessive alcohol drinking, as recent evidence indicates they consume high levels of alcohol throughout their active cycle and are innately impulsive. Using this model, the present study demonstrates that the triple monoamine uptake inhibitors (TUIs) amitifadine and DOV 102, 677 effectively attenuate binge drinking, heavy drinking assessed via a 24-hour free-choice assay, and impulsivity measured by the delay discounting procedure. In contrast, 3-PBC, a GABA-A α1 preferring ligand, with mixed agonist-antagonist properties attenuates excessive drinking without affecting impulsivity. These findings suggest in the HAP mice, monoamine pathways may predominate as a common mechanism underlying impulsivity and excessive drinking, while the GABAergic system may be more salient in regulating excessive drinking. We further propose that TUIs such as amitifadine and DOV 102, 677 may be used to treat the co-occurrence of impulsivity and excessive drinking. PMID:24118509

  14. A diet rich in OMEGA-6 polyunsaturated fat and sucrose reproduces key features of metabolic syndrome in C57BL/6 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether a diet enriched in v-6 fatty acids and sucrose will reproduce features of metabolic syndrome in C57BL/6 mice. 4- to 7-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were randomized to chow (13% kcal fat, lard and corn oil) or high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet (48% kcal fat, corn oil) for a period ...

  15. In vivo demonstration of T lymphocyte migration and amelioration of ileitis in intestinal mucosa of SAMP1/Yit mice by the inhibition of MAdCAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, K; Tsuzuki, Y; Matsunaga, H; Inoue, T; Miyazaki, J; Hokari, R; Okada, Y; Kawaguchi, A; Nagao, S; Itoh, K; Matsumoto, S; Miura, S

    2005-01-01

    The aetiology of Crohn's disease (CD) remains unknown. Since SAMP1/Yit mice have been reported to develop CD-like spontaneous enteric inflammation, such mice have been studied as an animal model of CD. In this study, using this model we examined T lymphocyte migration in microvessels of intestinal mucosa in vivo and the expression of adhesion molecules by immunohistochemistry. Fluorescence-labelled T lymphocytes isolated from AKR/J (control) mice were injected into the tail veins of recipient mice, and T lymphocyte migration in the postcapillary venules of Peyer's patches, submucosal microvessels, and villus capillaries of the terminal ileum was monitored using an intravital microscope. Adhesion of T lymphocytes was significantly increased in 35 week old SAMP1/Yit mice compared with that in AKR/J or 15 week old SAMP1/Yit mice. Immunohistochemical study showed increased infiltration of CD4, CD8 and ?7-integrin-positive cells and increased expression of MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the terminal ileum of SAMP1/Yit mice. Antibodies against MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 significantly inhibited adhesion of T lymphocytes to microvessels of the terminal ileum, and anti-MAdCAM-1 antibody showed stronger suppressive effect than the anti-VCAM-1 antibody. Periodical administration of anti-MAdCAM-1 antibody twice a week for 7 weeks significantly ameliorated ileitis of SAMP1/Yit mice, but submucosal hypertrophy was not significantly suppressed. Anti-VCAM-1 antibody treatment failed to show significant resolution of ileitis. In addition, anti-MAdCAM-1 antibody treatment also attenuated established ileitis. The results demonstrate that, although MAdCAM-1 and VCAM-1 play an important role in T lymphocyteendothelial cell interactions in SAMP1/Yit mice, MAdCAM-1 may be a more appropriate target for therapeutic modulation of chronic ileitis. PMID:15762871

  16. Of Mice, Birds, and Men: The Mouse Ultrasonic Song System Has Some Features Similar to Humans and Song-Learning Birds

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, Gustavo; Zhou, Eric P.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2012-01-01

    Humans and song-learning birds communicate acoustically using learned vocalizations. The characteristic features of this social communication behavior include vocal control by forebrain motor areas, a direct cortical projection to brainstem vocal motor neurons, and dependence on auditory feedback to develop and maintain learned vocalizations. These features have so far not been found in closely related primate and avian species that do not learn vocalizations. Male mice produce courtship ultrasonic vocalizations with acoustic features similar to songs of song-learning birds. However, it is assumed that mice lack a forebrain system for vocal modification and that their ultrasonic vocalizations are innate. Here we investigated the mouse song system and discovered that it includes a motor cortex region active during singing, that projects directly to brainstem vocal motor neurons and is necessary for keeping song more stereotyped and on pitch. We also discovered that male mice depend on auditory feedback to maintain some ultrasonic song features, and that sub-strains with differences in their songs can match each other's pitch when cross-housed under competitive social conditions. We conclude that male mice have some limited vocal modification abilities with at least some neuroanatomical features thought to be unique to humans and song-learning birds. To explain our findings, we propose a continuum hypothesis of vocal learning. PMID:23071596

  17. GPR21 KO mice demonstrate no resistance to high fat diet induced obesity or improved glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinghong; Pan, Zheng; Baribault, Helene; Chui, Danny; Gundel, Caroline; Véniant, Murielle

    2016-01-01

    Gpr21 KO mice generated with Gpr21 KO ES cells obtained from Deltagen showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity when fed a high fat diet. Further mRNA expression analysis revealed changes in Rabgap1 levels and raised the possibility that Rabgap1 gene may have been modified. To assess this hypothesis a new Gpr21 KO mouse line using TALENS technology was generated. Gpr21 gene deletion was confirmed by PCR and Gpr21 and Rabgap1 mRNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR. The newly generated Gpr21 KO mice when fed a normal or high fat diet chow did not maintain their improved metabolic phenotype. In conclusion, Rabgap1 disturbance mRNA expression levels may have contributed to the phenotype of the originally designed Gpr21 KO mice. PMID:27081476

  18. GPR21 KO mice demonstrate no resistance to high fat diet induced obesity or improved glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghong; Pan, Zheng; Baribault, Helene; Chui, Danny; Gundel, Caroline; Véniant, Murielle

    2016-01-01

    Gpr21 KO mice generated with Gpr21 KO ES cells obtained from Deltagen showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity when fed a high fat diet. Further mRNA expression analysis revealed changes in Rabgap1 levels and raised the possibility that Rabgap1 gene may have been modified. To assess this hypothesis a new Gpr21 KO mouse line using TALENS technology was generated. Gpr21 gene deletion was confirmed by PCR and Gpr21 and Rabgap1 mRNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR. The newly generated Gpr21 KO mice when fed a normal or high fat diet chow did not maintain their improved metabolic phenotype. In conclusion, Rabgap1 disturbance mRNA expression levels may have contributed to the phenotype of the originally designed Gpr21 KO mice. PMID:27081476

  19. Boron neutron capture therapy demonstrated in mice bearing EMT6 tumors following selective delivery of boron by rationally designed liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kueffer, Peter J.; Maitz, Charles A.; Khan, Aslam A.; Schuster, Seth A.; Shlyakhtina, Natalia I.; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Brockman, John D.; Nigg, David W.; Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2013-01-01

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) following liposomal delivery of a 10B-enriched polyhedral borane and a carborane against mouse mammary adenocarcinoma solid tumors was investigated. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 134 nm or less, composed of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and incorporating Na3[1-(2′-B10H9)-2-NH3B10H8] in the aqueous interior and K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer, were injected into the tail veins of female BALB/c mice bearing right flank EMT6 tumors. Biodistribution studies indicated that two identical injections given 24 h apart resulted in tumor boron levels exceeding 67 µg/g tumor at 54 h—with tumor/blood boron ratios being greatest at 96 h (5.68:1; 43 µg boron/g tumor)—following the initial injection. For BNCT experiments, tumor-bearing mice were irradiated 54 h after the initial injection for 30 min with thermal neutrons, resulting in a total fluence of 1.6 × 1012 neutrons per cm2 (±7%). Significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in mice given BNCT vs. control mice (only 424% increase in tumor volume at 14 d post irradiation vs. 1551% in untreated controls). In a separate experiment in which mice were given a second injection/irradiation treatment 7 d after the first, the tumor growth was vastly diminished (186% tumor volume increase at 14 d). A similar response was obtained for mice irradiated for 60 min (169% increase at 14 d), suggesting that neutron fluence was the limiting factor controlling BNCT efficacy in this study. PMID:23536304

  20. Pituitary and ovarian abnormalities demonstrated by CT and ultrasound in children with features of the McCune-Albright syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Rieth, K.G.; Comite, F.; Shawker, T.H.; Cutler, G.B. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    In a random series of 97 children referred to the National Institutes of Health with a presumptive diagnosis of precocious puberty, eight girls were found to have features of the McCune-Albright syndrome, including fibrous dysplasia of bone and/or skin lesions resembling cafe au lait spots. Radiographic evaluation of these patients included computed tomography of the head and pelvic ultrasound. The pituitary glands were suspicious for abnormality in five of the eight girls. Seven girls underwent pelvic ultrasound, and in all of them the ovaries were considered to be abnormal for their chronological age; in addition, two had functional ovarian cysts. The role of diagnostic radiological studies in the diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed.

  1. Design and operating features of the high-level waste vitrification system for the West Valley demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Beary, M.M.; Barnes, S.M.; Berger, D.N.; Brouns, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Jones, R.M.; Peters, R.D.; Peterson, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    A liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melter system is the reference process for immobilization of the high-level liquid waste in the US and several foreign countries. This system has been under development for over ten years at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other national laboratories operated for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributed to this research through its Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and used applicable data to design and test melters and related systems using remote handling of simulated radioactive wastes. This report describes the equipment designed in support of the high-level waste vitrification program at West Valley, New York. Pacific Northwest Laboratory worked closely with West Valley Nuclear Services Company to design a liquid-fed ceramic melter, a liquid waste preparation and feed tank and pump, an off-gas treatment scrubber, and an enclosed turntable for positioning the waste canisters. Details of these designs are presented including the rationale for the design features and the alternatives considered.

  2. Decreased Levels of Proapoptotic Factors and Increased Key Regulators of Mitochondrial Biogenesis Constitute New Potential Beneficial Features of Long-lived Growth Hormone Receptor GeneDisrupted Mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Decreased somatotrophic signaling is among the most important mechanisms associated with extended longevity. Mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene (GH receptor knockout; GHRKO) are obese and dwarf, are characterized by a reduced weight and body size, undetectable levels of GH receptor, high concentration of serum GH, and greatly reduced plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I, and are remarkably long lived. Recent results suggest new features of GHRKO mice that may positively affect longevitydecreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. The alterations in levels of the proapoptotic factors and key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis were not further improved by two other potential life-extending interventionscalorie restriction and visceral fat removal. This may attribute the primary role to GH resistance in the regulation of apoptosis and mitochondrial biogenesis in GHRKO mice in terms of increased life span. PMID:23197187

  3. Plasma biomarkers of liver injury and inflammation demonstrate a lack of apoptosis during obstructive cholestasis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Park, B. Kevin; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-12-15

    Cholestasis is a pathological common component of numerous liver diseases that results in hepatotoxicity, inflammation, and cirrhosis when untreated. While the predominant hypothesis in cholestatic liver injury remains hepatocyte apoptosis due to direct toxicity of hydrophobic bile acid exposure, recent work suggests that the injury occurs through inflammatory necrosis. In order to resolve this controversy, we used novel plasma biomarkers to assess the mechanisms of cell death during early cholestatic liver injury. C57Bl/6 mice underwent bile duct ligation (BDL) for 6–72 h, or sham operation. Another group of mice were given D-galactosamine and endotoxin as a positive control for apoptosis and inflammatory necrosis. Plasma levels of full length cytokeratin-18 (FL-K18), microRNA-122 (miR-122) and high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) increased progressively after BDL with peak levels observed after 48 h. These results indicate extensive cell necrosis after BDL, which is supported by the time course of plasma alanine aminotransferase activities and histology. In contrast, plasma caspase-3 activity, cleaved caspase-3 protein and caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 fragments (cK18) were not elevated at any time during BDL suggesting the absence of apoptosis. In contrast, all plasma biomarkers of necrosis and apoptosis were elevated 6 h after Gal/End treatment. In addition, acetylated HMGB1, a marker for macrophage and monocyte activation, was increased as early as 12 h but mainly at 48–72 h. However, progressive neutrophil accumulation in the area of necrosis started at 6 h after BDL. In conclusion, these data indicate that early cholestatic liver injury in mice is an inflammatory event, and occurs through necrosis with little evidence for apoptosis. - Highlights: • The mechanism of cell death during cholestasis remains a controversial topic. • Plasma biomarkers offer new insight into cell death after bile duct ligation. • Cytokeratin-18, microRNA-122 and HMGB1 levels implicate necrosis. • Acetylated HMGB1 levels rise late after BDL confirming inflammation. • BDL-induced liver injury involves mainly inflammation and necrosis but no apoptosis.

  4. Revision of the functional analysis and structural features of immortalized dendritic cell lines derived from mice lacking both type I and type II interferon receptors.

    PubMed

    Nunez, R

    1999-05-01

    Cell lines with dendritic morphology were obtained from several organs of mice lacking both type I and II interferon receptors after a retroviral immortalization procedure. Their surface antigen phenotype was analyzed by flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies and their functional capabilities to induce antigen dependent specific immune response was also determined. Two representative cell lines called AG101 (skin-derived) and AG116 (brain-derived) were cloned and analyzed in more detail. Cytometric analysis showed that they constitutively expressed the cell surface markers CD45, CD1 1b, MHC class II, F4/80, N418, B7-2 and ICAM1. Despite both cell lines expressing Thy-1 only, the AG116 show CD4 but both were negative for CD8 and B220. The functional analysis showed that the cell lines were capable and very efficient at actively taking up, processing and presenting soluble antigens like Ovalbumin (OVA). The processed protein was presented by both cell lines to the OVA-peptide-specific T cell hybridoma BO97.105, which responded specifically with the production of IL-2. In addition AG101 and AG116 cells were able to induce in naive allogeneic T cells, a mixed lymphocyte reaction, determined by T cell proliferation and T cell dependent L-2 production. Moreover, the capability to prime naive syngeneic T cells was also demonstrated by loading AG101 and AG116 cells with soluble antigens, then co-culturing with naive T cells which yielded both T cell proliferation and IL-2 production. The cell lines priming capability was shown to be quite similar, as freshly isolated and cultured cutaneous dendritic cells from 129Sv/Lv mice (wtDCs) to prime naive T cells. In addition to a basal production of IL-6, the cell lines were found to increase their synthesis of IL-6 and IL-12 p40 after interaction with T cells in a similar way as mature wtDCs. Also it was determined that DC cell lines devoid of functional IFN system allow the replication of infectious agents like BDV and even are able to induce in vivo a specific humoral response against proteins of the BDV. Therefore, the cell lines AG101 and AG116 show structural and functional features of DCs. They are able to take up, process and present antigens as well as prime naive T cell in a similar manner as nontransformed DC. Therefore, these cell lines will be useful for studying the interactions between DC and the effectors cells of the immune response at the clonal level and in the absence of functional interferon receptors. PMID:10397174

  5. Hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia and increased serum potassium concentration as distinctive features of early hypomagnesemia in magnesium-deprived mice.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Bernardo; MacWilliams, Jacob R; Dey, Jason M; Courtright, Valerie B

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium-deficient patients show dysfunctional calcium (Ca(2+)) metabolism due to defective parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. In mice and rats, long-term magnesium (Mg(2+)) deprivation causes hyperphosphaturia and increases fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) secretion, despite normal serum phosphate (Pi) and Ca(2+). Electrolyte disturbances during early hypomagnesemia may explain the response of mice to long-term Mg(2+) deprivation, but our knowledge of electrolyte homeostasis during this stage is limited. This study compares the effect of both short- and long-term Mg(2+) restriction on the electrolyte balance in mice. Mice were fed control or Mg(2+)-deficient diets for one to three days, one week, or three weeks. Prior to killing the mice, urine was collected over 24 h using metabolic cages. Within 24 h of Mg(2+) deprivation, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia developed, and after three days of Mg(2+) deprivation, serum potassium (K(+)) was increased. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in urinary volume, hyperphosphaturia, hypocalciuria and decreased Mg(2+), sodium (Na(+)) and K(+) excretion. Surprisingly, after one week of Mg(2+) deprivation, serum K(+), Pi and Ca(2+) had normalized, showing that mineral homeostasis is most affected during early hypomagnesemia. Serum Pi and K(+) are known to stimulate secretion of FGF23 and aldosterone, which are usually elevated during Mg(2+) deficiency. Thus, the hyperphosphatemia and increased serum K(+) concentration observed during short-term Mg(2+) deprivation may help our understanding of adaptation to chronic Mg(2+) deficiency. PMID:26878252

  6. Morphological and immunocytochemical features of the pineal organ of C3H and C57BL mice at different stages of postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Brednow, K; Korf, H W

    1998-06-01

    Considerable progress is currently being made in elucidating the molecular basis of the circadian (photoneuroendocrine) system by use of transgenic mice generated from the inbred strains C57BL and C3H. As in all other vertebrate species, the pineal organ is an important component of the photoneuroendocrine system in these mouse strains, but very little is known about its morphological and immunocytochemical features. We therefore investigated the pineal organ and the adjacent epithalamic region of adult, 10-, and 5-day-old C57BL and C3H mice for S-antigen, serotonin, and dopamine-ss-hydroxylase (DBH) immunoreactions. In adult animals, the pineal organ was more than 2 times bigger in C3H than in C57BL mice. In younger animals, this difference was already evident, but less pronounced. The S-antigen immunoreactivity was more intense in adult C3H than in C57BL mice. This difference developed with increasing age; it was not yet detectable in 5-day-old animals. The intensity of the serotonin immunoreaction was similar in both strains at all stages investigated. However, the serotonin immunoreaction was more pronounced in adult than in young animals. The relative DBH-immunoreactive area (used as a marker for the sympathetic innervation of the pineal organ) was much bigger in C3H than in C57BL mice; within each strain it remained relatively constant during postnatal development. Adult individuals of both strains contained S-antigen- and serotonin-immunoreactive cells in the habenular complex. Their number increased with age, but they were always more numerous in C3H. In conclusion, the study has shown considerable differences in pineal morphology between C3H and C57BL, which may be related to the well-known differen- ces in melatonin formation between these two strains. PMID:9582409

  7. Studies on visceral Leishmania tropica infection in BALB/c mice. I. Clinical features and cellular changes.

    PubMed Central

    Djoko-Tamnou, J; Leclerc, C; Modabber, F; Chedid, L

    1981-01-01

    The visceral and lethal infection produced in BALB/c mice by Leishmania tropica (major) is accompanied by splenomegaly, anaemia and reversal of albumin-to-globulin ratio. The percentages of both B and T cells are decreased in the spleen. The spleen and lymph nodes become populated with large Ig-, Thy 1.2- 'null' cells. The similarity of some of these parameters with those produced in human kala-azar is discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7337976

  8. [Features of the B chromosome in Korean wood mice Apodemus peninsulae (Thomas, 1906) from Transbaikalia and the Far East identified by the FISH method].

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, N B; Kartavtseva, I V; Roslik, G V; Karamysheva, T V; Pavlenko, M V; Iwasa, M A; Koh, H S

    2015-03-01

    Korean field mice (Apodemus peninsulae) are widely distributed throughout northeastern Asia, including the Russian Far East, northern China, the Korean peninsula, Sakhalin, and Hokkaido. This mouse species is characterized by a high frequency of animals with B chromosomes differing in their number, morphology, and DNA composition in different geographical regions. For the first time a comparative analysis of DNA probes from B chromosomes with metaphase chromosomes of mice from Transbaikalia, the Far East (including the Russian Far East), Japan, and South Korea was conducted by in situ hybridization. B chromosomes in mice from the Russian Far East were shown to exhibit low variability in DNA content; however, the DNA composition of B chromosomes in species from Transbaikalia and Japan were highly variable. B chromosomes in A. peninsulae from the South Korean population demonstrate minor differences from those from the Russian Far East. We discuss the origin of B chromosomes in the studied region in comparison with previously obtained data for mice from Siberia and the Baikal region, as well as the dispersal routes of the Korean field mouse. PMID:26027373

  9. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated pools of neurons that may modulate specific cortical areas. PMID:27147975

  10. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated pools of neurons that may modulate specific cortical areas. PMID:27147975

  11. Peyer's Patch-Deficient Mice Demonstrate That Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Translocates across the Mucosal Barrier via both M Cells and Enterocytes but Has Inefficient Dissemination ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, Luiz E.; Petrofsky, Mary; Sommer, Sandra; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the agent of Johne's disease, infects ruminant hosts by translocation through the intestinal mucosa. A number of studies have suggested that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis interacts with M cells in the Peyer's patches of the small intestine. The invasion of the intestinal mucosa by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis, a pathogen known to interact with intestinal cells, was compared. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was capable of invading the mucosa, but it was significantly less efficient at dissemination than M. avium subsp. hominissuis. B-cell knockout (KO) mice, which lack Peyer's patches, were used to demonstrate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis enters the intestinal mucosa through enterocytes in the absence of M cells. In addition, the results indicated that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had equal abilities to cross the mucosa in both Peyer's patch and non-Peyer's patch segments of normal mice. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was also shown to interact with epithelial cells by an α5β1 integrin-independent pathway. Upon translocation, dendritic cells ingest M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, but this process does not lead to efficient dissemination of the infection. In summary, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis interacts with the intestinal mucosa by crossing both Peyer's patches and non-Peyer's patch areas but does not translocate or disseminate efficiently. PMID:20498259

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  13. Syndromic features and mild cognitive impairment in mice with genetic reduction on p300 activity: Differential contribution of p300 and CBP to Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome etiology.

    PubMed

    Viosca, Jose; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Olivares, Roman; Eckner, Richard; Barco, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a complex autosomal-dominant disease characterized by mental and growth retardation and skeletal abnormalities. A majority of the individuals diagnosed with RSTS carry heterozygous mutation in the gene CREBBP, but a small percentage of cases are caused by mutations in EP300. To investigate the contribution of p300 to RSTS pathoetiology, we carried out a comprehensive and multidisciplinary characterization of p300(+/-) mice. These mice exhibited facial abnormalities and impaired growth, two traits associated to RSTS in humans. We also observed abnormal gait, reduced swimming speed, enhanced anxiety in the elevated plus maze, and mild cognitive impairment during the transfer task in the water maze. These analyses demonstrate that p300(+/-) mice exhibit phenotypes that are reminiscent of neurological traits observed in RSTS patients, but their comparison with previous studies on CBP deficient strains also indicates that, in agreement with the most recent findings in human patients, the activity of p300 in cognition is likely less relevant or more susceptible to compensation than the activity of CBP. PMID:19822209

  14. Lipidomic profiling of phosphocholine-containing brain lipids in mice with sensorimotor deficits and anxiety-like features after exposure to Gulf War agents.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Laila; Evans, James E; Bishop, Alex; Reed, Jon M; Crynen, Gogce; Phillips, John; Pelot, Robert; Mullan, Myles A; Ferro, Austin; Mullan, Christopher M; Mullan, Michael J; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Crawford, Fiona C

    2012-12-01

    The central nervous system (CNS)-based symptoms of Gulf War Illness (GWI) include motor dysfunction, anxiety, and cognitive impairment. Gulf War (GW) agents, such as pyridostigmine bromide (PB), permethrin (PER), N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), and stress, are among the contributory factors to the pathobiology of GWI. This study characterizes disturbances in phosphocholine-containing lipids that accompany neurobehavioral and neuropathological features associated with GW agent exposure. Exposed mice received PB orally, dermal application of PER and DEET and restraint stress daily for 28 days, while controls received vehicle during this period. Neurobehavioral studies included the rotarod, open field, and Morris water maze tests. Histopathological assessments included glial fibrillary acid protein, CD45, and Nissl staining. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with source collision-induced dissociation in negative and positive ionization scanning modes was performed to characterize brain phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SM). A significant increase in ether containing PC (ePC34:0, ePC36:2, and ePC36:1) or long-chain fatty acid-containing PC (38:1, 40:4, 40:2) was observed in exposed mice compared with controls. Among differentially expressed PCs, levels of those with monounsaturated fatty acids were more affected than those with saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Sensorimotor deficits and anxiety, together with an increase in astrocytosis, were observed in exposed mice compared with controls. These lipid changes suggest that alterations in peroxisomal pathways and stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity accompany neurobehavioral and neuropathological changes after GW agent exposure and represent possible treatment targets for the CNS symptoms of GWI. PMID:22798222

  15. [11C]-Labeled Metformin Distribution in the Liver and Small Intestine Using Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography in Mice Demonstrates Tissue-Specific Transporter Dependency.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jonas B; Sundelin, Elias I; Jakobsen, Steen; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole L; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Jessen, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Metformin is the most commonly prescribed oral antidiabetic drug, with well-documented beneficial preventive effects on diabetic complications. Despite being in clinical use for almost 60 years, the underlying mechanisms for metformin action remain elusive. Organic cation transporters (OCT), including multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATE), are essential for transport of metformin across membranes, but tissue-specific activity of these transporters in vivo is incompletely understood. Here, we use dynamic positron emission tomography with [(11)C]-labeled metformin ([(11)C]-metformin) in mice to investigate the role of OCT and MATE in a well-established target tissue, the liver, and a putative target of metformin, the small intestine. Ablation of OCT1 and OCT2 significantly reduced the distribution of metformin in the liver and small intestine. In contrast, inhibition of MATE1 with pyrimethamine caused accumulation of metformin in the liver but did not affect distribution in the small intestine. The demonstration of OCT-mediated transport into the small intestine provides evidence of direct effects of metformin in this tissue. OCT and MATE have important but separate roles in uptake and elimination of metformin in the liver, but this is not due to changes in biliary secretion. [(11)C]-Metformin holds great potential as a tool to determine the pharmacokinetic properties of metformin in clinical studies. PMID:26993065

  16. Cutaneous barrier function after cold exposure in hairless mice: a model to demonstrate how cold interferes with barrier homeostasis among workers in the fish-processing industry.

    PubMed

    Halkier-Sørensen, L; Menon, G K; Elias, P M; Thestrup-Pedersen, K; Feingold, K R

    1995-03-01

    Dry skin and eczema only seldomly occur in workers in the Danish fish-processing industry (FPI) during work, when their fingers and palms have a low skin surface temperature, low transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and a high capacitance. However, shortly after work, when the skin temperature has become normal, TEWL levels increase to above normal, and capacitance decreases to below normal, followed by the development of dry skin or chapping, which subsequently revert to normal over a period of hours. These observations suggest that workers in the FPI may have a defect in skin barrier function, which is, however, masked by a low skin temperature, resulting in misleadingly low TEWL levels during work. To test this hypothesis, we disrupted the permeability barrier in hairless mice with topical acetone, and exposed the treated skin to ice for 3.5 h. Although TEWL rates immediately after cold exposure were low, suggesting normal barrier recovery, TEWL increased to levels slightly above pre-cold exposure levels (i.e. levels just after the barrier was disrupted with acetone) when the skin temperature reverted to normal (> or = 15 min). The changes in TEWL were paralleled by equivalent changes in percutaneous penetration of the electron-dense tracer lanthanum nitrate. This indicates that cold masks a defective barrier, and inhibits barrier repair. After a few hours at ambient temperatures, normal barrier recovery was observed. Electron microscopy revealed empty or partially empty lamellar bodies during the first 30 min post-cold exposure. After 1 h the majority of nascent LBs displayed normal morphology. Moreover, histochemical studies showed a delayed reappearance of stratum corneum intercellular lipids following cold exposure. These results demonstrate that cold exposure prevents barrier recovery after acetone disruption, and provide an explanation for the occupational dermatosis observed in the fish-processing industry and related occupations. PMID:7718455

  17. TU-A-12A-04: Quantitative Texture Features Calculated in Lung Tissue From CT Scans Demonstrate Consistency Between Two Databases From Different Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cunliffe, A; Armato, S; Castillo, R; Pham, N; Guerrero, T; Al-Hallaq, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the consistency of computed tomography (CT) scan texture features, previously identified as stable in a healthy patient cohort, in esophageal cancer patient CT scans. Methods: 116 patients receiving radiation therapy (median dose: 50.4Gy) for esophageal cancer were retrospectively identified. For each patient, diagnostic-quality pre-therapy (0-183 days) and post-therapy (5-120 days) scans (mean voxel size: 0.8mm×0.8mm×2.5mm) and a treatment planning scan and associated dose map were collected. An average of 501 32x32-pixel ROIs were placed randomly in the lungs of each pre-therapy scan. ROI centers were mapped to corresponding locations in post-therapy and planning scans using the displacement vector field output by demons deformable registration. Only ROIs with mean dose <5Gy were analyzed, as these were expected to contain minimal post-treatment damage. 140 texture features were calculated in pre-therapy and post-therapy scan ROIs and compared using Bland-Altman analysis. For each feature, the mean feature value change and the distance spanned by the 95% limits of agreement were normalized to the mean feature value, yielding normalized range of agreement (nRoA) and normalized bias (nBias). Using Wilcoxon signed rank tests, nRoA and nBias were compared with values computed previously in 27 healthy patient scans (mean voxel size: 0.67mm×0.67mm×1mm) acquired at a different institution. Results: nRoA was significantly (p<0.001) larger in cancer patients than healthy patients. Differences in nBias were not significant (p=0.23). The 20 features identified previously as having nRoA<20% for healthy patients had the lowest nRoA values in the current database, with an average increase of 5.6%. Conclusion: Despite differences in CT scanner type, scan resolution, and patient health status, the same 20 features remained stable (i.e., low variability and bias) in the absence of disease changes for databases from two institutions. Identification of these features is the first step towards quantifying radiation-induced changes between preand post-therapy scans. Supported, in part, by NIH Grant Nos. S10 RR021039, and P30 CA14599, the Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Fund for Cancer Research, Imaging Research Institute, Biological Sciences Division, The University of Chicago, and The Institute for Translational Medicine Pilot Award, The University of Chicago.

  18. Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-28

      Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction This routine demonstrates ... stored in a CALIPSO Lidar Level 2 Vertical Feature Mask feature classification flag value. It is written in Interactive Data ... Products Catalog . Download  Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction routine  (5 KB) Interactive ...

  19. Increased locomotor activity induced by heroin in mice: pharmacokinetic demonstration of heroin acting as a prodrug for the mediator 6-monoacetylmorphine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Ripel, Ase; Boix, Fernando; Normann, Per Trygve; Mørland, Jørg

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the relative importance of heroin and its metabolites in eliciting a behavioral response in mice by studying the relationship between concentrations of heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM), and morphine in brain tissue and the effects on locomotor activity. Low doses (subcutaneous) of heroin (< or =5 micromol/kg) or 6MAM (< or =15 micromol/kg) made the mice run significantly more than mice given equimolar doses of morphine. There were no differences in the response between heroin and 6MAM, although we observed a shift to the left of the dose-response curve for the maximal response of heroin. The behavioral responses were abolished by pretreatment with 1 mg/kg naltrexone. Heroin was detected in brain tissue after injection, but the levels were low and its presence too short-lived to be responsible for the behavioral response observed. The concentration of 6MAM in brain tissue increased shortly after administration of both heroin and 6MAM and the concentration changes during the first hour roughly reflected the changes in locomotor activity. Both the maximal and the total concentration of 6MAM were higher after administration of heroin than after administration of 6MAM itself. The morphine concentration increased slowly after injection and could not explain the immediate behavioral response. In summary, the locomotor activity response after injection of heroin was mediated by 6MAM, which increased shortly after administration. Heroin acted as an effective prodrug. The concentration of morphine was too low to stimulate the immediate response observed but might have an effect on the later part of the heroin-induced behavioral response curve. PMID:19541908

  20. A preclinical orthotopic model for glioblastoma recapitulates key features of human tumors and demonstrates sensitivity to a combination of MEK and PI3K pathway inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    El Meskini, Rajaa; Iacovelli, Anthony J.; Kulaga, Alan; Gumprecht, Michelle; Martin, Philip L.; Baran, Maureen; Householder, Deborah B.; Van Dyke, Terry; Weaver Ohler, Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest grade malignant brain tumor, are mostly ineffective, and better preclinical model systems are needed to increase the successful translation of drug discovery efforts into the clinic. Previous work describes a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model that contains perturbations in the most frequently dysregulated networks in GBM (driven by RB, KRAS and/or PI3K signaling and PTEN) that induce development of Grade IV astrocytoma with properties of the human disease. Here, we developed and characterized an orthotopic mouse model derived from the GEM that retains the features of the GEM model in an immunocompetent background; however, this model is also tractable and efficient for preclinical evaluation of candidate therapeutic regimens. Orthotopic brain tumors are highly proliferative, invasive and vascular, and express histology markers characteristic of human GBM. Primary tumor cells were examined for sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs. PI3K and MAPK pathway inhibitors, when used as single agents, inhibited cell proliferation but did not result in significant apoptosis. However, in combination, these inhibitors resulted in a substantial increase in cell death. Moreover, these findings translated into the in vivo orthotopic model: PI3K or MAPK inhibitor treatment regimens resulted in incomplete pathway suppression and feedback loops, whereas dual treatment delayed tumor growth through increased apoptosis and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Analysis of downstream pathway components revealed a cooperative effect on target downregulation. These concordant results, together with the morphologic similarities to the human GBM disease characteristics of the model, validate it as a new platform for the evaluation of GBM treatment. PMID:25431423

  1. A novel B-domain O-glycoPEGylated FVIII (N8-GP) demonstrates full efficacy and prolonged effect in hemophilic mice models

    PubMed Central

    Kjalke, Marianne; Karpf, Ditte M.; Balling, Kristoffer W.; Johansen, Peter B.; Elm, Torben; Øvlisen, Kristine; Möller, Flemming; Holmberg, Heidi L.; Gudme, Charlotte N.; Persson, Egon; Hilden, Ida; Pelzer, Hermann; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik; Jespersgaard, Christina; Bogsnes, Are; Pedersen, Anette A.; Kristensen, Anne K.; Peschke, Bernd; Kappers, Wendy; Rode, Frederik; Thim, Lars; Tranholm, Mikael; Ezban, Mirella; Olsen, Eva H. N.; Bjørn, Søren E.

    2013-01-01

    Frequent infusions of intravenous factor VIII (FVIII) are required to prevent bleeding associated with hemophilia A. To reduce the treatment burden, recombinant FVIII with a longer half-life was developed without changing the protein structure. FVIII–polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugates were prepared using an enzymatic process coupling PEG (ranging from 10 to 80 kDa) selectively to a unique O-linked glycan in the FVIII B-domain. Binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF) was maintained for all conjugates. Upon cleavage by thrombin, the B-domain and the associated PEG were released, generating activated FVIII (FVIIIa) with the same primary structure and specific activity as native FVIIIa. In both FVIII- and VWF-deficient mice, the half-life was found to increase with the size of PEG. In vivo potency and efficacy of FVIII conjugated with a 40-kDa PEG (N8-GP) and unmodified FVIII were not different. N8-GP had a longer duration of effect in FVIII-deficient mouse models, approximately a twofold prolonged half-life in mice, rabbits, and cynomolgus monkeys; however, the prolongation was less pronounced in rats. Binding capacity of N8-GP on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells was reduced compared with unmodified FVIII, resulting in several-fold reduced cellular uptake. In conclusion, N8-GP has the potential to offer efficacious prevention and treatment of bleeds in hemophilia A at reduced dosing frequency. PMID:23335368

  2. H9c2 and HL-1 cells demonstrate distinct features of energy metabolism, mitochondrial function and sensitivity to hypoxia-reoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Javadov, Sabzali; Sickinger, Stephan; Frotschnig, Sandra; Grimm, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of cardiac energy metabolism plays a critical role in many cardiac diseases, including heart failure, myocardial infarction and ischemia–reperfusion injury and organ transplantation. The characteristics of these diseases can be elucidated in vivo, though animal-free in vitro experiments, with primary adult or neonatal cardiomyocytes, the rat ventricular H9c2 cell line or the mouse atrial HL-1 cells, providing intriguing experimental alternatives. Currently, it is not clear how H9c2 and HL-1 cells mimic the responses of primary cardiomyocytes to hypoxia and oxidative stress. In the present study, we show that H9c2 cells are more similar to primary cardiomyocytes than HL-1 cells with regard to energy metabolism patterns, such as cellular ATP levels, bioenergetics, metabolism, function and morphology of mitochondria. In contrast to HL-1, H9c2 cells possess beta-tubulin II, a mitochondrial isoform of tubulin that plays an important role in mitochondrial function and regulation. We demonstrate that H9c2 cells are significantly more sensitive to hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in terms of loss of cell viability and mitochondrial respiration, whereas HL-1 cells were more resistant to hypoxia as evidenced by their relative stability. In comparison to HL-1 cells, H9c2 cells exhibit a higher phosphorylation (activation) state of AMP-activated protein kinase, but lower peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha levels, suggesting that each cell type is characterized by distinct regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results provide evidence that H9c2 cardiomyoblasts are more energetically similar to primary cardiomyocytes than are atrial HL-1 cells. H9c2 cells can be successfully used as an in vitro model to simulate cardiac ischemia–reperfusion injury. PMID:25450968

  3. Humanized Mice Recapitulate Key Features of HIV-1 Infection: A Novel Concept Using Long-Acting Anti-Retroviral Drugs for Treating HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nischang, Marc; Sutmuller, Roger; Gers-Huber, Gustavo; Audigé, Annette; Li, Duo; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Baenziger, Stefan; Hofer, Ursula; Schlaepfer, Erika; Regenass, Stephan; Amssoms, Katie; Stoops, Bart; Van Cauwenberge, Anja; Boden, Daniel; Kraus, Guenter; Speck, Roberto F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Humanized mice generate a lymphoid system of human origin subsequent to transplantation of human CD34+ cells and thus are highly susceptible to HIV infection. Here we examined the efficacy of antiretroviral treatment (ART) when added to food pellets, and of long-acting (LA) antiretroviral compounds, either as monotherapy or in combination. These studies shall be inspiring for establishing a gold standard of ART, which is easy to administer and well supported by the mice, and for subsequent studies such as latency. Furthermore, they should disclose whether viral breakthrough and emergence of resistance occurs similar as in HIV-infected patients when ART is insufficient. Methods/Principal Findings NOD/shi-scid/γcnull (NOG) mice were used in all experimentations. We first performed pharmacokinetic studies of the drugs used, either added to food pellets (AZT, TDF, 3TC, RTV) or in a LA formulation that permitted once weekly subcutaneous administration (TMC278: non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, TMC181: protease inhibitor). A combination of 3TC, TDF and TMC278-LA or 3TC, TDF, TMC278-LA and TMC181-LA suppressed the viral load to undetectable levels in 15/19 (79%) and 14/14 (100%) mice, respectively. In successfully treated mice, subsequent monotherapy with TMC278-LA resulted in viral breakthrough; in contrast, the two LA compounds together prevented viral breakthrough. Resistance mutations matched the mutations most commonly observed in HIV patients failing therapy. Importantly, viral rebound after interruption of ART, presence of HIV DNA in successfully treated mice and in vitro reactivation of early HIV transcripts point to an existing latent HIV reservoir. Conclusions/Significance This report is a unique description of multiple aspects of HIV infection in humanized mice that comprised efficacy testing of various treatment regimens, including LA compounds, resistance mutation analysis as well as viral rebound after treatment interruption. Humanized mice will be highly valuable for exploring the antiviral potency of new compounds or compounds targeting the latent HIV reservoir. PMID:22719966

  4. Specific suppression of insulin sensitivity in growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted (GHR-KO) mice attenuates phenotypic features of slow aging

    PubMed Central

    Arum, Oge; Boparai, Ravneet K; Saleh, Jamal K; Wang, Feiya; Dirks, Angela L; Turner, Jeremy G; Kopchick, John J; Liu, Jun-Li; Khardori, Romesh K; Bartke, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their extended lifespans, slow-aging growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene-disrupted (knockout) (GHR-KO) mice are hypoinsulinemic and highly sensitive to the action of insulin. It has been proposed that this insulin sensitivity is important for their longevity and increased healthspan. We tested whether this insulin sensitivity of the GHR-KO mouse is necessary for its retarded aging by abrogating that sensitivity with a transgenic alteration that improves development and secretory function of pancreatic β-cells by expressing Igf-1 under the rat insulin promoter 1 (RIP::IGF-1). The RIP::IGF-1 transgene increased circulating insulin content in GHR-KO mice, and thusly fully normalized their insulin sensitivity, without affecting the proliferation of any non-β-cell cell types. Multiple (nonsurvivorship) longevity-associated physiological and endocrinological characteristics of these mice (namely beneficial blood glucose regulatory control, altered metabolism, and preservation of memory capabilities) were partially or completely normalized, thus supporting the causal role of insulin sensitivity for the decelerated senescence of GHR-KO mice. We conclude that a delayed onset and/or decreased pace of aging can be hormonally regulated. PMID:25244225

  5. [Features of behavioral reactions of chronically irradiated mice in the raised crosswise labyrinth with various genetically determined radiosensitivity and possibilities of their modification by the fungal biopolymer complex].

    PubMed

    Seniuk, O F; Gorovoĭ, L F; Kovalev, V A; Palamar, L A; Krul', N I; Zhidkov, A V; Chemerskiĭ, G F; Kireev, S I; Khatuntseva, I V

    2013-01-01

    Structural elements of the central nervous system--neurons, along with the higher neuroendocrine structures and the hypothalamus centres, show high sensitivity to a chronic action of low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) in view of their extreme enrichment by phospholipids and intensive supply by oxygen, creating favorable conditions for the development of oxidizing stress. Stressful influences cause negative emotions in the behaviour of animals manifested as fear or uneasiness. The study represents the results of comparative research into the behavioral reactions characterized by uneasiness in the Balb/c and C57bl/6 mice exposed to a chronic irradiation at low doses. The chitin-melanin-glucan complex from fungi Fomes fomentarius (ChMG) was approved as an adaptive agent. It has been shown that under identical conditions, deposition levels of radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr are raised in mice with IR hypersensitivity--line Balb/c, in comparison with less radio sensitive mice--line C57bl/6. Simultaneously, Balb/c mice were observed to exhibit the signs of a more anxious behaviour in the new environment. Chronic external and internal radiation exposure to rare ionizing radiation at low doses promotes strengthening of anxiety and phobic reactions in mice with IR hypersensitivity. The use of ChMG in animals neutralized the increase in anxiety and phobic reactions after a prolonged irradiation, thus indicating the presence in ChMG of the anxiolitic activity along with the above mentioned powerful radiosorbent, antioxidant, gene protective and immunomodulatory properties. PMID:23786031

  6. Intravenous injection of AAVrh10-GALC after the neonatal period in twitcher mice results in significant expression in the central and peripheral nervous systems and improvement of clinical features.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohammad A; Rao, Han Zhi; Luzi, Paola; Luddi, Alice; Curtis, Mark T; Wenger, David A

    2015-03-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) or Krabbe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from the defective lysosomal enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The lack of GALC enzyme leads to severe neurological symptoms. While most human patients are infants who do not survive beyond 2 years of age, older patients are also diagnosed. In addition to human patients, several naturally occurring animal models, including dog, mouse, and monkey, have also been identified. The mouse model of Krabbe disease, twitcher (twi) mouse has been used for many treatment trials including gene therapy. Using the combination of intracerebroventricular, intracerebellar, and intravenous (iv) injection of the adeno-associated virus serotype rh10 (AAVrh10) expressing mouse GALC in neonate twi mice we previously have demonstrated a significantly extended normal life and exhibition of normal behavior in treated mice. In spite of the prolonged healthy life of these treated mice and improved myelination, it is unlikely that using multiple injection sites for viral administration will be approved for treatment of human patients. In this study, we have explored the outcome of the single iv injection of viral vector at post-natal day 10 (PND10). This has resulted in increased GALC activity in the central nervous system (CNS) and high GALC activity in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). As we have shown previously, an iv injection of AAVrh10 at PND2 results in a small extension of life beyond the typical lifespan of the untreated twi mice (~40 days). In this study, we report that mice receiving a single iv injection at PND10 had no tremor and continued to gain weight until a few weeks before they died. On average, they lived 20-25 days longer than untreated mice. We anticipate that this strategy in combination with other therapeutic options may be beneficial and applicable to treatment of human patients. PMID:25533112

  7. First Demonstration of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy-associated Prion Protein (PrPTSE) in Extracellular Vesicles from Plasma of Mice Infected with Mouse-adapted Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease by in Vitro Amplification*

    PubMed Central

    Saá, Paula; Yakovleva, Oksana; de Castro, Jorge; Vasilyeva, Irina; De Paoli, Silvia H.; Simak, Jan; Cervenakova, Larisa

    2014-01-01

    The development of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in three recipients of non-leukoreduced red blood cells from asymptomatic donors who subsequently developed the disease has confirmed existing concerns about the possible spread of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) via blood products. In addition, the presence of disease-associated misfolded prion protein (PrPTSE), generally associated with infectivity, has been demonstrated in the blood of vCJD patients. However, its origin and distribution in this biological fluid are still unknown. Various studies have identified cellular prion protein (PrPC) among the protein cargo in human blood-circulating extracellular vesicles released from endothelial cells and platelets, and exosomes isolated from the conditioned media of TSE-infected cells have caused the disease when injected into experimental mice. In this study, we demonstrate the detection of PrPTSE in extracellular vesicles isolated from plasma samples collected during the preclinical and clinical phases of the disease from mice infected with mouse-adapted vCJD and confirm the presence of the exosomal marker Hsp70 in these preparations. PMID:25157106

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations which are intended for chemistry college students. These demonstrations are: (1) enhancement of concentration quenching by micelles; and (2) the thermite lecture demonstration. (HM)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the following chemistry lecture demonstrations and experiments: (1) a versatile kinetic demonstration; (2) the Bakelite Demonstration; (3) applying Beer's law; and (4) entropy calculations. (HM)

  11. A novel mouse model with impaired dynein/dynactin function develops amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-like features in motor neurons and improves lifespan in SOD1-ALS mice.

    PubMed

    Teuling, Eva; van Dis, Vera; Wulf, Phebe S; Haasdijk, Elize D; Akhmanova, Anna; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Jaarsma, Dick

    2008-09-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive motor neuron degeneration and muscle paralysis. Genetic evidence from man and mouse has indicated that mutations in the dynein/dynactin motor complex are correlated with motor neuron degeneration. In this study, we have generated transgenic mice with neuron-specific expression of Bicaudal D2 N-terminus (BICD2-N) to chronically impair dynein/dynactin function. Motor neurons expressing BICD2-N showed accumulation of dynein and dynactin in the cell body, Golgi fragmentation and several signs of impaired retrograde trafficking: the appearance of giant neurofilament swellings in the proximal axon, reduced retrograde labelling by tracer injected in the muscle and delayed expression of the injury transcription factor ATF3 after axon transection. Despite these abnormalities, BICD2-N mice did not develop signs of motor neuron degeneration and motor abnormalities. Interestingly, the BICD2-N transgene increased lifespan in 'low copy' SOD1-G93A ALS transgenic mice. Our findings indicate that impaired dynein/dynactin function can explain several pathological features observed in ALS patients, but may be beneficial in some forms of ALS. PMID:18579581

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two chemistry demonstrations including a demonstration of chemical inhibition and "The Rayleigh Fountain" which demonstrates the polarity of the water molecule. Provides instructions and explanations for each demonstration. (CW)

  14. Green coffee polyphenols do not attenuate features of the metabolic syndrome and improve endothelial function in mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Li Kwok Cheong, J D; Croft, K D; Henry, P D; Matthews, V; Hodgson, J M; Ward, N C

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated the effects of the major polyphenol in coffee, chlorogenic acid (CGA), on obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, systemic oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in a mouse model of the metabolic syndrome. Thirty C57BL6 mice were randomly divided into (n=10/group) (i) normal diet (ND), (ii) high fat diet (HFD), or (iii) high fat diet supplemented with 0.5% w/w green coffee bean extract (GCE) rich in chlorogenic acid (HFD+GCE). The high fat diet consisted of 28% fat and all animals were maintained on their diets for 12 weeks. The mice fed a HFD and HFD+GCE displayed symptoms of the metabolic syndrome compared to their normal fed counterparts, although no endothelial dysfunction was detected in the abdominal aortas after 12 weeks. GCE did not attenuate HFD-induced obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance or systemic oxidative stress. Furthermore, GCE did not protect against ex vivo oxidant (hypochlorous acid)-induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:24583266

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student demonstrations. (CW)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  17. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) partition coefficients; (2) Rutherford simulation experiment; and (3) demonstration of the powerful oxidizing property of dimanganeseheptoxide. Background information, materials needed, and procedures are provided for each demonstration. (JN)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article details two demonstrations involving color changes. Included are "Manganese Color Reactions" and "Flame Colors Demonstration." Include a list of materials needed, procedures, cautions, and results. (CW)

  1. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for college level chemistry courses including: "Electrochemical Cells Using Sodium Silicate" and "A Simple, Vivid Demonstration of Selective Precipitation." Lists materials, preparation, procedures, and precautions. (CW)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a demonstration involving the controlled combustion of a mixture of metals with black and smokeless powder in a small Erlenmeyer flask. Also describes demonstrations using a device that precludes breathing of hazardous vapors during class demonstrations; the device is easy to transport and use in rooms without sinks. (JN)

  11. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  15. Long-Term Characterization of Retinal Degeneration in rd1 and rd10 Mice Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Michaels, Keith V.; Magee, Sienna S.; Maricle, Anastasiya; Davin, Sean P.; Garg, Anupam K.; Gale, Michael J.; Tu, Daniel C.; Wen, Yuquan; Erker, Laura R.; Francis, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We characterize the in vivo changes over time in the retinal structure of wild-type mice alongside two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. SD-OCT images were obtained using the Bioptigen spectral domain ophthalmic imaging system (SDOIS). Wild-type C57BL/6J, rd1 and rd10 mice ranging in age from P14 to P206 were sedated with 1% isoflurane. Horizontal and vertical linear scans through the optic nerve, and annular scans around the optic nerve were obtained. Results. SD-OCT imaging of wild-type mice demonstrated visibility of the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction, external limiting membrane (ELM), outer nuclear layer (ONL), and outer plexiform layer (OPL). At P14, most rd10 mice exhibited normal SD-OCT profiles, but some displayed changes in the IS/OS junction. At the same time point, rd1 mice had severe outer retinal degeneration. In rd10 mice, imaging revealed loss of the IS/OS junction by P18, hyperreflective changes in the ONL at P20, hyperreflective vitreous opacities, and shallow separation of the neural retina from the RPE. Retinal separations were not observed in rd1 mice. Segmentation analysis in wild-type mice demonstrated relatively little variability between animals, while in rd10 and rd1 mice there was a steady decline in outer retinal thickness. Histologic studies demonstrated correlation of retinal features with those seen on SD-OCT scans. Segmentation analysis provides a quantitative and reproducible method for measuring in vivo retinal changes in mice. Conclusions. SD-OCT provides a non-invasive method of following long-term retinal changes in mice in vivo. Although rd10 and rd1 mice have mutations in the same gene, they demonstrate significantly different features on SD-OCT. PMID:22562504

  16. Development and functional evaluation of biomimetic silicone surfaces with hierarchical micro/nano-topographical features demonstrates favourable in vitro foreign body response of breast-derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Daniel J T; Oikonomou, Antonios; Hill, Ernie; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-06-01

    Reproducing extracellular matrix topographical cues, such as those present within acellular dermal matrix (ADM), in synthetic implant surfaces, may augment cellular responses, independent of surface chemistry. This could lead to enhanced implant integration and performance while reducing complications. In this work, the hierarchical micro and nanoscale features of ADM were accurately and reproducibly replicated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), using an innovative maskless 3D grayscale fabrication process not previously reported. Human breast derived fibroblasts (n=5) were cultured on PDMS surfaces and compared to commercially available smooth and textured silicone implant surfaces, for up to one week. Cell attachment, proliferation and cytotoxicity, in addition to immunofluorescence staining, SEM imaging, qRT-PCR and cytokine array were performed. ADM PDMS surfaces promoted cell adhesion, proliferation and survival (p=<0.05), in addition to increased focal contact formation and spread fibroblast morphology when compared to commercially available implant surfaces. PCNA, vinculin and collagen 1 were up-regulated in fibroblasts on biomimetic surfaces while IL8, TNFα, TGFβ1 and HSP60 were down-regulated (p=<0.05). A reduced inflammatory cytokine response was also observed (p=<0.05). This study represents a novel approach to the development of functionalised biomimetic prosthetic implant surfaces which were demonstrated to significantly attenuate the acute in vitro foreign body reaction to silicone. PMID:25818416

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the photochromic behavior of mercury(II) bis(dithizonate) in providing a colorful demonstration of the effect that visible light can have on the conformation and bonding of molecules in solution. Provides a description of the demonstration itself, along with the preparation needed to complete it. (TW)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first (useful as an introduction to kinetics) shows how the rate of a reaction is fast at first and then gradually decreases to zero when one reactant has been used up. The second is a gas density demonstration using 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro ethane. (JN)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic

  10. Complete Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are demonstrations designed to reveal the important "nonsolvent" properties of water through its interaction with a toy called "Magic Sand" and other synthetic silica derivatives, especially those bonded with organic moities. The procedures for seven demonstrations along with a discussion of the effects are presented. (CW)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a demonstration involving the transformation of a hydrophobic liquid to a partially hydrophobic semisolid. Safety considerations are noted. (JN)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations suitable for chemistry instruction. One involves fractal structures obtained by electrodeposition of silver at an air-water interface and the other deals with molecular weights and music. (TW)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  11. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of various indicators to demonstrate chemical reactions; the display of sodium as a shiny metal; and the illustration of the attainment of chemical equilibrium with beakers of chemicals and an overhead projector. (MLH)

  12. Kinetic Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgardt, Erik D.; Ryan, Hank

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on chemical reaction kinetics that consists of a predemonstration activity, the demonstration, and a set of postdemonstration activities that help students transfer the concepts to actual chemical reactions. Simulates various aspects of chemical reaction kinetics. (JRH)

  13. Passive transfer of antibodies to the linear epitope 60 kD Ro 273–289 induces features of Sjögren's syndrome in naive mice

    PubMed Central

    Maier-Moore, J S; Kurien, B T; D'Souza, A; Bockus, L; Asfa, S; Dorri, Y; Hubbell, S; Yeliosof, O; Obeso, D; Schoeb, T R; Jonsson, R; Scofield, R H

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that primarily affects the lacrimal and salivary glands causing dry eyes and mouth. Antibodies to Ro60 are observed frequently in patients with SS; however, the role of these antibodies in SS initiation and progression remains unclear. The sequence Ro60 273–289 (Ro274) is a known B cell epitope of Ro60 and antibodies to this epitope have been observed in a subset of SS patients and in animals immunized with Ro60 protein. Animals immunized with Ro274 linear peptide develop a Sjögren's-like illness. We hypothesized that passive transfer of anti-Ro274-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G would induce a Sjögren's-like phenotype. To evaluate this hypothesis, we adoptively transferred affinity-purified Ro274 antibodies into naive BALB/c animals, then evaluated salivary gland histology, function and IgG localization 4 days post-transfer. At this time-point, there was no demonstrable mononuclear cell infiltration and salivary glands were histologically normal, but we observed a functional deficit in stimulated salivary flow of animals receiving Ro274 antibodies compared to animals receiving control IgG. Cellular fractionation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed Ro274-specific antibodies in the nucleus and cytoplasmic fractions of isolated parotid salivary gland cells that was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These data support the hypothesis that antibodies to Ro274 deposit in salivary glands can enter intact salivary gland cells and are involved in the dysregulation of salivary flow in SS. PMID:25370295

  14. Passive transfer of antibodies to the linear epitope 60 kD Ro 273-289 induces features of Sjögren's syndrome in naive mice.

    PubMed

    Maier-Moore, J S; Kurien, B T; D'Souza, A; Bockus, L; Asfa, S; Dorri, Y; Hubbell, S; Yeliosof, O; Obeso, D; Schoeb, T R; Jonsson, R; Scofield, R H

    2015-04-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that primarily affects the lacrimal and salivary glands causing dry eyes and mouth. Antibodies to Ro60 are observed frequently in patients with SS; however, the role of these antibodies in SS initiation and progression remains unclear. The sequence Ro60 273-289 (Ro274) is a known B cell epitope of Ro60 and antibodies to this epitope have been observed in a subset of SS patients and in animals immunized with Ro60 protein. Animals immunized with Ro274 linear peptide develop a Sjögren's-like illness. We hypothesized that passive transfer of anti-Ro274-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G would induce a Sjögren's-like phenotype. To evaluate this hypothesis, we adoptively transferred affinity-purified Ro274 antibodies into naive BALB/c animals, then evaluated salivary gland histology, function and IgG localization 4 days post-transfer. At this time-point, there was no demonstrable mononuclear cell infiltration and salivary glands were histologically normal, but we observed a functional deficit in stimulated salivary flow of animals receiving Ro274 antibodies compared to animals receiving control IgG. Cellular fractionation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed Ro274-specific antibodies in the nucleus and cytoplasmic fractions of isolated parotid salivary gland cells that was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These data support the hypothesis that antibodies to Ro274 deposit in salivary glands can enter intact salivary gland cells and are involved in the dysregulation of salivary flow in SS. PMID:25370295

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three broad classes of magnetic behavior: diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic. Presents a simple lecture demonstration using an overhead projector to synthesize triiron tetraoxide and to show its interaction with a magnetic field and comparing it to a paramagnetic material. (MVL)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in chemistry instruction. The first illustrates the preparation of a less common oxide of iron, showing why this oxide is rare. The second is an explosion reaction of hydrogen and oxygen that is recommended for use as an attention-getting device. (TW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  2. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  6. Vowel Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindau, Mona

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an inventory of the features that are necessary to describe vowel systems in the languages of the world. The relationship between the features and then articulatory and acoustic correlates is explored. (Author/NCR)

  7. An inbred line of transgenic mice expressing an internally deleted gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1). Young mice have a variable phenotype of a chondrodysplasia and older mice have osteoarthritic changes in joints.

    PubMed Central

    Helminen, H J; Kiraly, K; Pelttari, A; Tammi, M I; Vandenberg, P; Pereira, R; Dhulipala, R; Khillan, J S; Ala-Kokko, L; Hume, E L

    1993-01-01

    Studies were carried out on a line of transgenic mice that expressed an internally deleted COL2A1 gene and developed a phenotype resembling human chondrodysplasias (Vandenberg et al. 1991. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 88:7640-7644. Marked differences in phenotype were observed with propagation of the mutated gene in an inbred strain of mice in that approximately 15% of the transgenic mice had a cleft palate and a lethal phenotype, whereas the remaining mice were difficult to distinguish from normal littermates. 1-d- and 3-mo-old transgenic mice that were viable showed microscopic signs of chondrodysplasia with reduced amounts of collagen fibrils in the cartilage matrix, dilatation of the rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum in the chondrocytes, and decrease of optical path difference in polarized light microscopy. The transgenic mice also showed signs of disturbed growth as evidenced by lower body weight, lower length and weight of the femur, decreased bone collagen, decreased bone mineral, and decreased resistance of bone to breakage. Comparisons of mice ranging in age from 1 d to 15 mo demonstrated that there was decreasing evidence of a chondrodysplasia as the mice grew older. Instead, the most striking feature in the 15-mo-old mice were degenerative changes of articular cartilage similar to osteoarthritis. Images PMID:8349798

  8. Feature Indeterminacy and Feature Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, Mary; Kaplan, Ronald M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a theory of feature representation that accounts for feature indeterminacy and feature resolution within the lexical functional grammar (LFG) framework. The representations discussed, together with minimal extensions of LFG's description language, enable a simple and intuitive characterization of both these phenomena. (Author/VWL)

  9. Partial Return Yoke for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.; Plate, S; ,

    2013-05-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a large scale experiment which is presently assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, UK. The purpose of MICE is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling experimentally. Ionization cooling is an important accelerator concept which will be essential for future HEP experiments such as a potential Muon Collider or a Neutrino Factory. The MICE experiment will house up to 18 superconducting solenoids, all of which produce a substantial amount of magnetic flux. Recently it was realized that this magnetic flux leads to a considerable stray magnetic field in the MICE hall. This is a concern as technical equipment in the MICE hall may may be compromised by this. In July 2012 a concept called partial return yoke was presented to the MICE community, which reduces the stray field in the MICE hall to a safe level. This report summarizes the general concept, engineering considerations and the expected shielding performance.

  10. Immunopathogenesis of environmentally induced lupus in mice.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, V M; Satoh, M; Richards, H B; Yoshida, H; Shaw, M; Jennette, J C; Reeves, W H

    1999-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune syndrome defined by clinical and serologic features, including arthritis, glomerulonephritis, and certain autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear ribonucleoprotein (nRNP)/Smith antigen (Sm), DNA, and ribosomal P. Although lupus is considered primarily a genetic disorder, we recently demonstrated the induction of a syndrome strikingly similar to spontaneous lupus in many nonautoimmune strains of mice exposed to the isoprenoid alkane pristane (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane), a component of mineral oil. Intraperitoneal injection of pristane leads to the formation of lipogranulomas consisting of phagocytic cells that have engulfed the oil and collections of lymphocytes. Subsequently, pristane-treated BALB/c and SJL mice develop autoantibodies characteristic of SLE, including anti-nRNP/Sm, antiribosomal P, anti-Su, antichromatin, anti-single-stranded DNA, and anti-double-stranded DNA. This is accompanied by a severe glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition, mesangial or mesangiocapillary proliferation, and proteinuria. All inbred mice examined appear to be susceptible to this novel form of chemically induced lupus. Pristane-induced lupus is the only inducible model of autoimmunity associated with the clinical syndrome as well as with the characteristic serologic abnormalities of SLE. Defining the immunopathogenesis of pristane-induced lupus in mice may provide insight into the causes of spontaneous (idiopathic) lupus and also may lead to information concerning possible risks associated with the ingestion or inhalation of mineral oil and exposure to hydrocarbons in the environment. PMID:10502537

  11. Bioluminescent Leishmania expressing luciferase for rapid and high throughput screening of drugs acting on amastigote-harbouring macrophages and for quantitative real-time monitoring of parasitism features in living mice.

    PubMed

    Lang, Thierry; Goyard, Sophie; Lebastard, Mai; Milon, Geneviève

    2005-03-01

    In this study, we have established conditions for generating Leishmania amazonensis recombinants stably expressing the firefly luciferase gene. These parasites produced significant bioluminescent signals for both in vitro studies and the development of an in vivo model, allowing the course of the parasitism to be readily monitored in real time in the living animals such as laboratory mice. First, a model was established, using parasite-infected mouse macrophages for rapidly determining the activity of drugs against intracellular amastigotes. Results indicated that recombinant Leishmania can be reliably and confidently used to monitor compounds acting on intracellular amastigote-harbouring macrophages. Secondly, temporal analyses were performed following inoculation of metacyclic promastigotes into the ear dermis of BALB/c mice and the bioluminescent light transmitted through the tissue was imaged externally using a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Bioluminescent signals, measured at the inoculation site and in the draining lymph node of mice containing these parasites correlated well with the more classical quantification of parasites. These assays prove that the real-time bioluminescent assay is not only sensitive but also more rapid than culture-base techniques allowing to monitor parasite-load before any clinical signs of leishmaniasis are detectable. In short, this luciferase imaging study is useful to monitor the efficacy of anti-leishmanial drugs on live cell culture and to trace leishmanial infection in animal models. PMID:15679841

  12. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  13. Deletion of IL-12p35 induces liver fibrosis in dominant negative transforming growth factor β receptor type II mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Masanobu; Zhang, Weici; Yang, Guo-Xiang; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Ando, Yugo; Kawata, Kazuhito; Park, Ogyi; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Coppel, Ross L.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Ridgway, William M.; Gao, Bin; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Flavell, Richard; He, Xiao-Song; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that mice with a dominant negative transforming growth factor β receptor restricted to T cells (dnTGFβRII mice) develop an inflammatory biliary ductular disease that strongly resembles human primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Furthermore, deletion of the gene encoding interleukin (IL)-12p40 resulted in a strain (IL-12p40−/−dnTGFβRII) with dramatically reduced autoimmune cholangitis. To further investigate the role of the IL-12 cytokine family in dnTGFβRII autoimmune biliary disease, we deleted the gene encoding the IL-12p35 subunit from dnTGFβRII mice, resulting in an IL-12p35−/− dnTGFβRII strain which is deficient in two members of the IL-12 family, IL-12 and IL-35. In contrast to IL-12p40−/− mice, the IL-12p35−/− mice developed liver inflammation and bile duct damage with similar severity but delayed onset as the parental dnTGFβRII mice. The p35−/− mice also demonstrated a distinct cytokine profile characterized by a shift from a Th1 to a Th17 response. Strikingly, liver fibrosis was frequently observed in IL-12p35−/− mice. In conclusion, IL-12p35−/− dnTGFβRII mice, histologically and immunologically, reflect key features of PBC, providing a useful generic model to understand the immunopathology of human PBC. PMID:22576253

  14. Automatic Visual Tracking and Social Behaviour Analysis with Multiple Mice

    PubMed Central

    Giancardo, Luca; Sona, Diego; Huang, Huiping; Sannino, Sara; Managò, Francesca; Scheggia, Diego; Papaleo, Francesco; Murino, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Social interactions are made of complex behavioural actions that might be found in all mammalians, including humans and rodents. Recently, mouse models are increasingly being used in preclinical research to understand the biological basis of social-related pathologies or abnormalities. However, reliable and flexible automatic systems able to precisely quantify social behavioural interactions of multiple mice are still missing. Here, we present a system built on two components. A module able to accurately track the position of multiple interacting mice from videos, regardless of their fur colour or light settings, and a module that automatically characterise social and non-social behaviours. The behavioural analysis is obtained by deriving a new set of specialised spatio-temporal features from the tracker output. These features are further employed by a learning-by-example classifier, which predicts for each frame and for each mouse in the cage one of the behaviours learnt from the examples given by the experimenters. The system is validated on an extensive set of experimental trials involving multiple mice in an open arena. In a first evaluation we compare the classifier output with the independent evaluation of two human graders, obtaining comparable results. Then, we show the applicability of our technique to multiple mice settings, using up to four interacting mice. The system is also compared with a solution recently proposed in the literature that, similarly to us, addresses the problem with a learning-by-examples approach. Finally, we further validated our automatic system to differentiate between C57B/6J (a commonly used reference inbred strain) and BTBR T+tf/J (a mouse model for autism spectrum disorders). Overall, these data demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of this new machine learning system in the detection of social and non-social behaviours in multiple (>2) interacting mice, and its versatility to deal with different experimental settings and scenarios. PMID:24066146

  15. Space telerobotics technology demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szirmay, S. Z.; Schenker, P. S.; Rodriguez, G.; French, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the ongoing development of a telerobot demonstrator. The demonstrator is implemented as a laboratory-based research testbed, and will show proof-of-concept for supervised automation of space assembly, servicing, and repair operations. The demonstrator system features a hierarchically layered intelligent control architecture which enables automated planning and run-time sequencing of complex tasks by a supervisory human operator. The demonstrator also provides a full bilateral force-reflecting hand control teleroperations capability. The operator may switch smoothly between the automated and teleroperated tasking modes in run-time, either on a preplanned or operator-designated basis.

  16. Self-Tracking Energy Transfer for Neural Stimulation in Untethered Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, John S.; Tanabe, Yuji; Iyer, Shrivats Mohan; Christensen, Amelia J.; Grosenick, Logan; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott L.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Optical or electrical stimulation of neural circuits in mice during natural behavior is an important paradigm for studying brain function. Conventional systems for optogenetics and electrical microstimulation require tethers or large head-mounted devices that disrupt animal behavior. We report a method for wireless powering of small-scale implanted devices based on the strong localization of energy that occurs during resonant interaction between a radio-frequency cavity and intrinsic modes in mice. The system features self-tracking over a wide (16-cm diameter) operational area, and is used to demonstrate wireless activation of cortical neurons with miniaturized stimulators (10 mm3 , 20 mg) fully implanted under the skin.

  17. Restoration of lymphatic function rescues obesity in Prox1-haploinsufficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Noelia; Proulx, Steven T.; Karaman, Sinem; Dillard, Miriam E.; Johnson, Nicole; Detmar, Michael; Oliver, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Prox1 heterozygous mice have a defective lymphatic vasculature and develop late-onset obesity. Chyle abnormally leaks from those vessels, accumulates in the surrounding tissues, and causes an increase in adipose tissue. We characterized the lymphatics of Prox1+/− mice to determine whether the extent of obesity correlated with the severity of lymphatic defects. The lymphatic vasculature in Prox1+/− mice exhibited reduced tracer clearance from the ear skin, dysfunctional perfusion of the lower legs, and reduced tracer uptake into the deep lymphatic collectors during mechanostimulation prior to the onset of obesity. Ear lymphatic vessels and leg collectors in Prox1+/− mice were disorganized and irregular, further confirming that defective lymphatic vessels are associated with obesity in Prox1+/− mice. We now provide conclusive in vivo evidence that demonstrates that leaky lymphatics mediate obesity in Prox1+/− mice, as restoration of lymphatic vasculature function was sufficient to rescue the obesity features in Prox1+/− mice. Finally, depth-lipomic profiling of lymph contents showed that free fatty acids induce adipogenesis in vitro. PMID:26973883

  18. Myostatin induces DNA damage in skeletal muscle of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Sandhya; Subramanian, Subha; Juvvuna, Prasanna Kumar; McFarlane, Craig; Salerno, Monica Senna; Kambadur, Ravi; Sharma, Mridula

    2014-02-28

    One of the features of uncontrolled type 1 diabetes is oxidative stress that induces DNA damage and cell death. Skeletal muscle atrophy is also considerable in type 1 diabetes, however, the signaling mechanisms that induce oxidative stress culminating in muscle atrophy are not fully known. Here, we show that in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic wild type mice, hypo-phosphorylation of Akt, resulted in activation of Foxa2 transcription factor in the muscle. Foxa2 transcriptionally up-regulated Myostatin, contributing to exaggerated oxidative stress leading to DNA damage via p63/REDD1 pathway in skeletal muscle of Streptozotocin-treated wild type mice. In Myostatin(-/-) mice however, Streptozotocin treatment did not reduce Akt phosphorylation despite reduced IRS-1 signaling. Moreover, Foxa2 levels remained unaltered in Myostatin(-/-) mice, while levels of p63/REDD1 were higher compared with wild type mice. Consistent with these results, relatively less DNA damage and muscle atrophy was observed in Myostatin(-/-) muscle in response to Streptozotocin treatment. Taken together, our results for the first time show the role of Foxa2 in Myostatin regulation in skeletal muscle in diabetic mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate the mechanism by which Myostatin contributes to DNA damage in skeletal muscle of the diabetic mice that would lead to myofiber degeneration. PMID:24425880

  19. Myostatin Induces DNA Damage in Skeletal Muscle of Streptozotocin-induced Type 1 Diabetic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Sandhya; Subramanian, Subha; Juvvuna, Prasanna Kumar; McFarlane, Craig; Salerno, Monica Senna; Kambadur, Ravi; Sharma, Mridula

    2014-01-01

    One of the features of uncontrolled type 1 diabetes is oxidative stress that induces DNA damage and cell death. Skeletal muscle atrophy is also considerable in type 1 diabetes, however, the signaling mechanisms that induce oxidative stress culminating in muscle atrophy are not fully known. Here, we show that in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic wild type mice, hypo-phosphorylation of Akt, resulted in activation of Foxa2 transcription factor in the muscle. Foxa2 transcriptionally up-regulated Myostatin, contributing to exaggerated oxidative stress leading to DNA damage via p63/REDD1 pathway in skeletal muscle of Streptozotocin-treated wild type mice. In Myostatin−/− mice however, Streptozotocin treatment did not reduce Akt phosphorylation despite reduced IRS-1 signaling. Moreover, Foxa2 levels remained unaltered in Myostatin−/− mice, while levels of p63/REDD1 were higher compared with wild type mice. Consistent with these results, relatively less DNA damage and muscle atrophy was observed in Myostatin−/− muscle in response to Streptozotocin treatment. Taken together, our results for the first time show the role of Foxa2 in Myostatin regulation in skeletal muscle in diabetic mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate the mechanism by which Myostatin contributes to DNA damage in skeletal muscle of the diabetic mice that would lead to myofiber degeneration. PMID:24425880

  20. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-06

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  1. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-01

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  2. Key Features of Appraisal Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2003-01-01

    Provides an overview of performance management and appraisal in New Zealand schools. Outlines a model of principal appraisal that demonstrates an integration of development and accountability elements. Draws on three studies to identify key features of appraisal effectiveness. (SLD)

  3. Status of MICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling for a beam of muons, crucial for the requirements of a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. Muon cooling is achieved by measuring the reduction of the four dimensional transverse emittance for a beam of muons passing through low density absorbers and then accelerating the longitudinal component of the momentum using RF cavities. The absorbers are maintained in a focusing magnetic field to reduce the beta function of the beam and the RF cavities are kept inside coupling coils. The main goal of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, of order -10% for large emittance beams, with an accuracy of 1% (which imposes a requirement that the absolute emittance be measured with an accuracy of 0.1%). This paper will discuss the status of MICE, including the progress in commissioning the muon beam line at the ISIS accelerator at RAL, the construction of the different detector elements in MICE and the prospects for the future.

  4. Status of MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2010-03-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment currently under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The aim of the experiment is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling for a beam of muons, crucial for the requirements of a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. Muon cooling is achieved by measuring the reduction of the four dimensional transverse emittance for a beam of muons passing through low density absorbers and then accelerating the longitudinal component of the momentum using RF cavities. The absorbers are maintained in a focusing magnetic field to reduce the beta function of the beam and the RF cavities are kept inside coupling coils. The main goal of MICE is to measure a fractional drop in emittance, of order -10% for large emittance beams, with an accuracy of 1%(which imposes a requirement that the absolute emittance be measured with an accuracy of 0.1%). This paper will discuss the status of MICE, including the progress in commissioning the muon beam line at the ISIS accelerator at RAL, the construction of the different detector elements in MICE and the prospects for the future.

  5. Circadian characteristics of mice depleted with GPR7.

    PubMed

    Uchio, Naohiro; Doi, Masao; Matsuo, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Fumiyoshi; Mizoro, Yasutaka; Hondo, Mari; Sakurai, Takeshi; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2009-12-01

    GPR7, now known as a receptor of neuropeptide B and neuropeptide W, is expressed in neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the mammalian circadian center. By the quantitative in situ hybridization, we demonstrated that GPR7 mRNA showed a significant circadian rhythm in the SCN showing a peak at early subjective night in both light-dark and constant dark. We characterized the circadian feature of GPR7-knockout mice, but the period length and the phase-dependent phase shift to light exposure were not disordered in GPR7-knockout mice. Moreover, the food-anticipatory behavior in restricted feeding schedule was observed in this gene-deleted mouse similar to wild-type. These results indicate that the role of GPR7 may be subtle or limited in relation to the circadian clock despite its robust expression in the SCN. PMID:20051645

  6. Disrupted iron homeostasis causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Pavle; Matak, Andrija; Moustafa, Sarah; Aryal, Dipendra K.; Benner, Eric J.; Wetsel, William; Andrews, Nancy C.

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative disease. To begin to understand how neuronal iron handling might be involved, we focused on dopaminergic neurons and asked how inactivation of transport proteins affected iron homeostasis in vivo in mice. Loss of the cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, had no apparent consequences. However, loss of transferrin receptor 1, involved in iron uptake, caused neuronal iron deficiency, age-progressive degeneration of a subset of dopaminergic neurons, and motor deficits. There was gradual depletion of dopaminergic projections in the striatum followed by death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Damaged mitochondria accumulated, and gene expression signatures indicated attempted axonal regeneration, a metabolic switch to glycolysis, oxidative stress, and the unfolded protein response. We demonstrate that loss of transferrin receptor 1, but not loss of ferroportin, can cause neurodegeneration in a subset of dopaminergic neurons in mice. PMID:26929359

  7. Disrupted iron homeostasis causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Matak, Pavle; Matak, Andrija; Moustafa, Sarah; Aryal, Dipendra K; Benner, Eric J; Wetsel, William; Andrews, Nancy C

    2016-03-29

    Disrupted brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative disease. To begin to understand how neuronal iron handling might be involved, we focused on dopaminergic neurons and asked how inactivation of transport proteins affected iron homeostasis in vivo in mice. Loss of the cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, had no apparent consequences. However, loss of transferrin receptor 1, involved in iron uptake, caused neuronal iron deficiency, age-progressive degeneration of a subset of dopaminergic neurons, and motor deficits. There was gradual depletion of dopaminergic projections in the striatum followed by death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Damaged mitochondria accumulated, and gene expression signatures indicated attempted axonal regeneration, a metabolic switch to glycolysis, oxidative stress, and the unfolded protein response. We demonstrate that loss of transferrin receptor 1, but not loss of ferroportin, can cause neurodegeneration in a subset of dopaminergic neurons in mice. PMID:26929359

  8. Vapb/Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8 knock-in mice display slowly progressive motor behavior defects accompanying ER stress and autophagic response.

    PubMed

    Larroquette, Frdrique; Seto, Lesley; Gaub, Perrine L; Kamal, Brishna; Wallis, Deeann; Larivire, Roxanne; Valle, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; Tsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-11-15

    Missense mutations (P56S) in Vapb are associated with autosomal dominant motor neuron diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and lower motor neuron disease. Although transgenic mice overexpressing the mutant vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB) protein with neuron-specific promoters have provided some insight into the toxic properties of the mutant proteins, their role in pathogenesis remains unclear. To identify pathological defects in animals expressing the P56S mutant VAPB protein at physiological levels in the appropriate tissues, we have generated Vapb knock-in mice replacing wild-type Vapb gene with P56S mutant Vapb gene and analyzed the resulting pathological phenotypes. Heterozygous P56S Vapb knock-in mice show mild age-dependent defects in motor behaviors as characteristic features of the disease. The homozygous P56S Vapb knock-in mice show more severe defects compared with heterozygous mice reflecting the dominant and dose-dependent effects of P56S mutation. Significantly, the knock-in mice demonstrate accumulation of P56S VAPB protein and ubiquitinated proteins in cytoplasmic inclusions, selectively in motor neurons. The mutant mice demonstrate induction of ER stress and autophagic response in motor neurons before obvious onset of behavioral defects, suggesting that these cellular biological defects might contribute to the initiation of the disease. The P56S Vapb knock-in mice could be a valuable tool to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms by which the disease arises. PMID:26362257

  9. A role for Toll-like receptor 4 in the host response to the lung infection of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-A; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Kim, Jae-Eun; Kang, Min-Jung; Kim, Jee-Cheon; Oh, Sang-Muk; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Although a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb) lung infection model has been developed to study Y. pestis pathogenesis, it is still necessary to establish a new animal model to mimic the pathophysiological features induced by Y. pestis infection. Here, we provide a new lung infection model using the Yptb strain, IP2777, which displayed rapid spread of bacteria to the liver, spleen, and blood. In addition, we examined whether TLR4 is involved in Yptb-induced pathogenesis in the lung infection model of mice we generated. Following lung infection of WT and TLR4-deficient mice with the Yptb strain IP2777, the survival rate, bacterial colonization, histopathology, and level of cytokines and chemokines in the lung, spleen, liver, and blood were analyzed. TLR4-deficient mice had a lower survival rate than WT mice in response to Yptb lung infection. Although the bacterial colonization and pathology of the lung were comparable between WT and TLR4-deficient mice, those of the spleen and liver were more severe in TLR4-deficient mice. In addition, the levels of TNF-α and CXCL2 in the liver and IL-6 and CXCL2 in the blood were higher in TLR4-deficient mice than in WT mice. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 is necessary for optimal host protection against Yptb lung infection and TLR4-deficient mice may serve as a better genetic model of Yptb infection for mimicking Y. pestis infection. PMID:26851596

  10. CD8+ TCR Transgenic Strains Expressing Public versus Private TCR Targeting the Respiratory Syncytial Virus KdM282–90 Epitope Demonstrate Similar Functional Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Malloy, Allison M. W.; Graham, Barney S.; Ruckwardt, Tracy J.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has characterized the functional and clonotypic features of two respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epitope-specific T cell responses in mice. Following single-cell sequencing, we selected T cell receptor sequences to represent both a public and a private clone specific for the dominant KdM282–90 epitope for the generation of T cell receptor transgenic (TCR Tg) mice. We evaluated cells from these TCR Tg strains for three major functions of CD8+ T cells: proliferation, cytokine production and cytolytic activity. In vitro comparisons of the functional characteristics of T cells from the newly-generated mice demonstrated many similarities in their responsiveness to cognate antigen stimulation. Cells from both TRBV13-1 (private) and TRBV13-2 (public) TCR Tg mice had similar affinity, and proliferated similarly in vitro in response to cognate antigen stimulation. When transferred to BALB/c mice, cells from both strains demonstrated extensive proliferation in mediastinal lymph nodes following RSV infection, with TRBV13-2 demonstrating better in vivo proliferation. Both strains similarly expressed cytokines and chemokines following stimulation, and had similar Granzyme B and perforin expression, however cells expressing TRBV13-1 demonstrated better cytolytic activity than TRBV13-2 cells. These new, well-characterized mouse strains provide new opportunities to study molecular mechanisms that control the phenotype and function of CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:24897427

  11. Interventional effects of squid ink polysaccharides on cyclophosphamide-associated testicular damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Le, X Y; Luo, P; Gu, Y P; Tao, Y X; Liu, H Z

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP) is a commonly used antitumour and immunosuppressive drug, but it is inevitable that the chemotherapeutic agent may cause long-term or permanent reproductive damage on young male patients through inducing oxidative stress in the testes. Squid ink polysaccharides (SIP), a newly found marine glycosaminoglycon have been proved to have antioxidant capabilities and chemotherapy-protective activities on model animals in our recent investigations. This study was conducted to assess whether or not SIP could protect male mice against gonadotoxicity during CP exposure. Sexually mature male Kunming mice were allocated to one of four groups. CP was abdominally administered at dose of 15 mg/kg body weight to two groups of mice for ten weeks, once a week, one group of mice received SIP at dose of 80 mg/kg body weight by gavage for ten weeks, once a day. The other two groups comprised a vehicle treated group and an SIP treated group. Toxicity of CP and protective activity of SIP on the testes were assessed by: sperm parameters, organ index, testicular antioxidant ability, activities of marker enzymes, sex hormone content, and histopathological features. Data showed CP-induced, serious negative changes on murine sperm parameters, organ index, testicular antioxidant ability, activities of marker enzymes, sexual hormone contents, and histopathological features which were all significantly impaired by SIP. This study found that SIP were demonstrated to offer protective effects against CP-induced toxicity on testes in mice (Tab. 2, Fig. 3, Ref. 29). PMID:25924645

  12. RAP-011, an activin receptor ligand trap, increases hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Jacqueline M; Barkataki, Sangjucta; Berger, Alan E; Cheadle, Chris; Xue, Qian-Li; Sung, Victoria; Roy, Cindy N

    2015-01-01

    Over expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide is a common feature of iron-restricted anemia in humans. We investigated the erythroid response to either erythropoietin or RAP-011, a "murinized" ortholog of sotatercept, in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. Sotatercept, a soluble, activin receptor type IIA ligand trap, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of anemias associated with chronic renal disease, myelodysplastic syndrome, β-thalassemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia and acts by inhibiting signaling downstream of activin and other Transforming Growth Factor-β superfamily members. We found that erythropoietin and RAP-011 increased hemoglobin concentration in C57BL/6 mice and in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 over expressing mice. While erythropoietin treatment depleted splenic iron stores in C57BL/6 mice, RAP-011 treatment did not deplete splenic iron stores in mice of either genotype. Bone marrow erythroid progenitors from erythropoietin-treated mice exhibited iron-restricted erythropoiesis, as indicated by increased median fluorescence intensity of transferrin receptor immunostaining by flow cytometry. In contrast, RAP-011-treated mice did not exhibit the same degree of iron-restricted erythropoiesis. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that RAP-011 can improve hemoglobin concentration in hepcidin antimicrobial peptide 1 transgenic mice. Our data support the hypothesis that RAP-011 has unique biologic effects which prevent or circumvent depletion of mouse splenic iron stores. RAP-011 may, therefore, be an appropriate therapeutic for trials in human anemias characterized by increased expression of hepcidin antimicrobial peptide and iron-restricted erythropoiesis. PMID:25236856

  13. Pulmonary eosinophils and their role in immunopathologic responses to formalin-inactivated pneumonia virus of mice

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Qiu, Zhijun; Phipps, Simon; Foster, Paul S.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced disease is the term used to describe the aberrant Th2 skewed responses to naturally-acquired human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) infection observed in individuals vaccinated with formalin-inactivated viral antigens. Here we explore this paradigm with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a pathogen that faithfully reproduces features of severe hRSV infection in a rodent host. We demonstrate that PVM infection in mice vaccinated with formalin-inactivated antigens from PVM-infected cells (PVM Ags) yields Th2-skewed hypersensitivity, analogous to that observed in response to hRSV. Specifically, we detect elevated levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of PVM-infected mice that were vaccinated with PVM Ags, but not among mice vaccinated with formalin-inactivated antigens from uninfected cells (Ctrl Ags). Interestingly, infection in PVM Ag-vaccinated mice was associated with a ~10-fold reduction in lung virus titer and protection against weight loss when compared to infected mice vaccinated with Ctrl Ags, despite the absence of serum neutralizing antibodies. Given recent findings documenting a role for eosinophils in promoting clearance of hRSV in vivo, we explored the role of eosinophils in altering the pathogenesis of disease with eosinophil-deficient mice. We found that eosinophil deficiency had no impact on virus titer in PVM Ags-vaccinated mice, nor on weight loss or levels of CCL11 (eotaxin-1), interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-5, or IL-13 in BAL fluid. However, levels of both IL-4 and CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α) in BAL fluid were markedly diminished in PVM Ag-vaccinated, PVM-infected eosinophil-deficient mice when compared to wild type controls (246 words). PMID:19542471

  14. Maintenance of donor phenotype after full-thickness skin transplantation from mice with chronic proliferative dermatitis (cpdm/cpdm) to C57BL/Ka and nude mice and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Gijbels, M J; HogenEsch, H; Bruijnzeel, P L; Elliott, G R; Zurcher, C

    1995-12-01

    Chronic proliferative dermatitis is a spontaneous mutation in C57BL/Ka mice (cpdm/cpdm) and is characterized by epithelial hyperproliferation, infiltration by eosinophils and macrophages, and vascular dilatation. To elucidate whether these pathologic features are the result of a local (skin) process or a consequence of a systemic disorder, transplantations were performed of full-thickness grafts of affected skin from cpdm/cpdm mice and normal skin from control (C57BL/Ka) mice on the back of cpdm/cpdm, C57BL/Ka and athymic nude mice. After 3 months, the grafts maintained the histologic phenotype of the donor animal. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 continued to be expressed by basal keratinocytes of the cpdm/cpdm grafts after transplantation. In contrast, the basal keratinocytes of the C57BL/Ka grafts onto cpdm/cpdm mice remained negative for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 3 months after transplantation. An increased number of proliferating keratinocytes was present in the cpdm/cpdm skin-graft transplanted to nudes or to C57BL/Ka mice based on short-term bromodeoxyuridine labeling. The bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in the keratinocytes of the control C57BL/Ka skin grafts transplanted to cpdm/cpdm, nude, or C57BL/Ka mice was the same as in the keratinocytes of normal C57BL/Ka mice. This study demonstrates that the pathologic features found in the cpdm/cpdm mice are the result of a disorder in the epidermis or dermis and not due to a systemic defect. PMID:7490470

  15. MICE Staging and Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick

    2010-03-01

    Ionization cooling will be a key technique for a high-intensity Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a high-precision, staged accelerator experiment being performed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Its goal is the first demonstration, with 0.1% resolution, of the feasibility of reducing the transverse emittance of a beam of muons by ionization cooling in low-Z absorbers. MICE is being staged in the following steps: I. Creating and characterizing a beam of muons; II. Measuring their emittance; III. Systematic comparison of successive measurements; IV. Inserting absorber; V. Reaccelerating longitudinally; and VI. Complete "10%-cooling" test. Step I is currently in progress with Step II to commence next year; completion of Step VI is anticipated in ˜2012.

  16. SpaceFibre Demonstrator (Demonstration and Testing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfers, T.; Rastetter, P.; Papadas, C.; Parkes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Currently Astrium GmbH and ISD S.A. are planning the development of a demonstrator for SpaceFibre. The SpaceFibre demonstrator will be used to execute functional performance tests and EMC (Electro Magnetic Compatibility) tests. University of Dundee is program prime contractor and provides Astrium with the SpaceFibre IP core. The work is shared between the two partners in the following way: • Astrium: Prime Contractor and Technical Coordination; FPGA Design; EMC Testing • ISD: Development of Demonstrator Board including housing, development of test bed and functional performance testing. The driving requirements for this development are: • SpaceFibre performance, while implementing it into space equivalent components • Design and MAIT of the demonstrator in such a way that representative EMC testing is possible.

  17. Extra-prostatic transgene-associated neoplastic lesions in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice. PMID:24742627

  18. Thymic epithelium determines a spontaneous chronic neuritis in Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer zu Horste, Gerd; Mausberg, Anne K; Cordes, Steffen; El-Haddad, Houda; Partke, Hans-Joachim; Leussink, Verena I; Roden, Michael; Martin, Stephan; Steinman, Lawrence; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C

    2014-09-15

    The NOD mouse strain spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes. A deficiency in costimulatory molecules, such as B7-2, on the NOD genetic background prevents diabetes but instead triggers an inflammatory peripheral neuropathy. This constitutes a shift in the target of autoimmunity, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that NOD mice deficient for isoforms of ICAM-1, which comediate costimulatory functions, spontaneously develop a chronic autoimmune peripheral neuritis instead of diabetes. The disease is transferred by CD4(+) T cells, which infiltrate peripheral nerves together with macrophages and B cells and are autoreactive against peripheral myelin protein zero. These Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice exhibit unaltered numbers of regulatory T cells, but increased IL-17-producing T cells, which determine the severity, but not the target specificity, of autoimmunity. Ab-mediated ICAM-1 blockade triggers neuritis only in young NOD mice. Thymic epithelium from Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice features an altered expression of costimulatory molecules and induces neuritis and myelin autoreactivity after transplantation into nude mice in vivo. Icam1(tm1Jcgr)NOD mice exhibit a specifically altered TCR repertoire. Our findings introduce a novel animal model of chronic inflammatory neuropathies and indicate that altered expression of ICAM-1 on thymic epithelium shifts autoimmunity specifically toward peripheral nerves. This improves our understanding of autoimmunity in the peripheral nervous system with potential relevance for human diseases. PMID:25108020

  19. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  20. Herschel's Interference Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkalskis, Benjamin S.; Freeman, J. Reuben

    2000-01-01

    Describes Herschel's demonstration of interference arising from many coherent rays. Presents a method for students to reproduce this demonstration and obtain beautiful multiple-beam interference patterns. (CCM)

  1. Why Demonstrations Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Richard

    2005-01-01

    With the current focus on constructivist perspectives, science demonstrations have fallen out of favor in some circles. Demonstrations are easy to do and offer many benefits and unique opportunities in the constructivist classroom. With careful use, demonstrations can be powerful teaching tools. A wonderful quality of a demonstration (or a series…

  2. Paroxysmal Dyskinesias in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Thomas L.; Rao, Lekha M.; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2009-01-01

    Animal models of human disease are important tools for revealing the underlying mechanisms of pathophysiology and developing therapeutic strategies. Several unique mouse calcium channel mutants have been identified with nonepileptic, episodic dyskinetic movements that are phenotypically similar to human paroxysmal dyskinesias. In this report, video demonstrations of these motor attacks are provided for two previously described mouse mutants, tottering and lethargic, as well as a new one, rocker. Semiquantitative comparisons using two different rating scales reveal differences in attack morphology, severity, and duration among the strains. These mice provide three independent models of paroxysmal dyskinesia and support for prior proposals that channelopathies may underlie the human disorders. PMID:17999434

  3. The MICE Run Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, or a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The new MICE Run Control has been developed to ensure proper sequencing of equipment and use of system resources to protect data quality. A description of this system, its implementation, and performance during recent muon beam data collection will be discussed.

  4. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  5. Laithwaite's Heavy Spinning Disk Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2014-09-01

    In 1974, Professor Eric Laithwaite demonstrated an unusually heavy gyroscope at a Royal Institution lecture in London. The demonstration was televised and can be viewed on YouTube.1 A recent version of the same experiment, together with partial explanations, attracted two million YouTube views in the first few months.2 In both cases, the gyroscope consisted of a 40-lb (18-kg) spinning disk on the end of a 3-ft (0.91-m) long axle. The most remarkable feature of the demonstration was that Laithwaite was able to lift the disk over his head with one hand, holding onto the far end of the axle. The impression was given that the 40-lb disk was almost weightless, or "as light as a feather" according to Laithwaite.

  6. Report on modular hydropower demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Pelton, F.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes an Energy Authority project to demonstrate the use of modular small hydropower systems at two sites. The project demonstrated that 'off-the-shelf' components can be used to construct a functionally reliable, cost-effective hydropower system at a significant savings over custom-designed systems. A key feature of the modular system is the replacement of the conventional hydroelectric turbine with a pump operated in reverse. Also, the construction of a water-intake system in the dam is replaced with a siphon penstock. Further cost and time savings are gained from the use of a prefabricated powerhouse and automated control equipment. The project demonstrated that modular systems are an attractive option for sites with capacities from under 100 to 500 kilowatts. The modular concept is applicable at about 250 sites Statewide, with a combined capacity of up to 400 MW.

  7. Dental and Cranial Pathologies in Mice Lacking the Cl(-) /H(+) -Exchanger ClC-7.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Paine, Michael L

    2015-08-01

    ClC-7 is a 2Cl(-) /1H(+) -exchanger expressed at late endosomes and lysosomes, as well as the ruffled border of osteoclasts. ClC-7 deficiencies in mice and humans lead to impaired osteoclast function and therefore osteopetrosis. Failure of tooth eruption is also apparent in ClC-7 mutant animals, and this has been attributed to the osteoclast dysfunction and the subsequent defect in alveolar bone resorptive activity surrounding tooth roots. Ameloblasts also express ClC-7, and this study aims to determine the significance of ClC-7 in enamel formation by examining the dentitions of ClC-7 mutant mice. Micro-CT analysis revealed that the molar teeth of 3-week old ClC-7 mutant mice had no roots, and the incisors were smaller than their age-matched controls. Despite these notable developmental differences, the enamel and dentin densities of the mutant mice were comparable to those of the wild-type littermates. Scanning electron microscopy showed normal enamel crystallite and prismatic organization in the ClC-7 mutant mice, although the enamel was thinner (hypoplastic) than in controls. These results suggested that ClC-7 was not critical to enamel and dentin formation, and the observed tooth defects may be related more to a resulting alveolar bone phenotype. Micro-CT analysis also revealed abnormal features in the calvarial bones of the mutant mice. The cranial sutures in ClC-7 mutant mice remained open compared to the closed sutures seen in the control mice at 3 weeks. These data demonstrate that ClC-7 deficiency impacts the development of the dentition and calvaria, but does not significantly disrupt amelogenesis. PMID:25663454

  8. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes several chemistry demonstrations that use an overhead projector. Some of the demonstrations deal with electrochemistry, and another deals with the reactions of nonvolatile immiscible liquid in water. (TW)

  9. Traveling Wave Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluger-Bell, Barry

    1995-01-01

    Describes a traveling-wave demonstration that uses inexpensive materials (crepe-paper streamers) and is simple to assemble and perform. Explains how the properties of light waves are illustrated using the demonstration apparatus. (LZ)

  10. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  11. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details two demonstrations for use with an overhead projector in a chemistry lecture. Includes "A Very Rapidly Growing Silicate Crystal" and "A Colorful Demonstration to Simulate Orbital Hybridization." The materials and directions for each demonstration are included as well as a brief explanation of the essential learning involved. (CW)

  12. Classroom Demonstrations: Individual Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Sandra M.

    These demonstrations stress individual differences, a concept becoming increasingly important in psychological research. Intended for use in undergraduate psychology courses, four demonstrations that illustrate common examples of human variation are described. The demonstrations deal with the following individual differences: taste blindness,…

  13. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Described are three chemistry demonstrations designed to be used with overhead projectors. One activity suggests an activity for determining unknown liquids. The second activity describes a plastic spot plate for overhead demonstrations. Also described is a demonstration to show pH of selected chemicals. (RH)

  14. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  15. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  16. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.

    2006-08-01

    By using astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients, I have been able to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students. I will present some of the edible demonstrations I have created including using popcorn to simulate radioactivity; using chocolate, nuts, and marshmallows to illustrate density and differentiation during the formation of the planets; and making big-bang brownies or chocolate chip-cookies to illustrate the expansion of the Universe. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented.

  17. The MICE Particle Identification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomilov, M.; MICE Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at the ISIS accelerator located at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, will be the first experiment to study muon cooling at high precision. Demonstration of muon ionization cooling is a major technological step towards the construction of a neutrino factory or a muon collider. A muon beam is produced via pion decay in the MICE beam line within a range of emittances and momenta. Muon purity is assured by a system of detectors for particle identification (PID). We describe briefly the PID system here.

  18. Helicopter detection and classification demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Koersel, Antonius C.

    2000-07-01

    A technology demonstrator that detects and classifies different helicopter types automatically, was developed at TNO-FEL. The demonstrator is based on a PC, which receives its acoustic input from an all-weather microphone. The demonstrator uses commercial off-the-shelf hardware to digitize the acoustic signal. The user-interface and the signal processing software are written in MatLabTM. The demonstrator detects the noise from helicopters; the classification is performed using a database with helicopter-specific features. The demonstrator currently contains information of 11 different helicopter types, but can easily be expanded to include additional types of helicopters. The input signal is analyzed in real time, the result is a classification ranging from `no target' to `helicopter type x', e.g. Lynx Mk2. If the helicopter is classified, its relative speed is estimated as well. The algorithm was developed and tested using a database of different helicopters (hovering and moving) recorded at distances ranging from 90 meter up to 8 kilometer. The sensitivity to noise was investigated using jet, tank, artillery and environmental (wind and turbulence) noise as input.

  19. Long term effects of high fat or high carbohydrate diets on glucose tolerance in mice with heterozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1a (CPT-1a) deficiency: Diet influences on CPT1a deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Lara R; Tian, Liqun; Hamm, Doug A; Schoeb, Trenton R; Gower, Barbara A; Nagy, Tim R; Wood, Philip A

    2011-08-22

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal fatty acid metabolism is an important feature in the mechanisms of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1a (CPT-1a, liver isoform) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We investigated the role of CPT-1a in the development of impaired glucose tolerance using a mouse model for CPT-1a deficiency when challenged by either a high-carbohydrate (HCD) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for a total duration of up to 46 weeks. METHODS: Insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were assessed in heterozygous CPT-1a deficient (CPT-1a+/-) male mice after being fed either a HCD or a HFD for durations of 28 weeks and 46 weeks. Both glucose and insulin tolerance tests were used to investigate beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. Differences in islet insulin content and hepatic steatosis were evaluated by morphological analysis. RESULTS: CPT-1a+/- mice were more insulin sensitive than CPT-1a+/+ mice when fed either HCD or HFD. The increased insulin sensitivity was associated with an increased expression of Cpt-1b (muscle isoform) in liver, as well as increased microvesicular hepatic steatosis compared to CPT-1a+/+ mice. CPT-1a+/- mice were more glucose tolerant than CPT-1a+/+ mice when fed the HCD, but there was no significant difference when fed HFD. Moreover, CPT-1a+/- mice fed HFD or HCD had fewer and smaller pancreatic islets than CPT-1a+/+ mice. CONCLUSIONS: CPT-1a deficiency preserved insulin sensitivity when challenged by long term feeding of either diet. Furthermore, CPT-1a deficient mice had distinct phenotypes dependent on the diet fed demonstrating that both diet and genetics collectively play a role in the development of impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:22229081

  20. Sedative effects of inhaled benzylacetone and structural features contributing to its activity.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Takashi; Ito, Michiho; Kitayama, Takashi; Isomori, Sachiko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Benzylacetone is released by heated agarwood, when inhaled it has a potent effect on reducing the locomotor activity of mice. This study investigated the relationships between the sedative activities of benzylacetone and its derivatives as well as the chemical structures of these compounds by comparing their activities in mice treated with a series of compounds. It was demonstrated that benzylacetone-like compounds had sedative activities and their intensities varied depending on the functional group in the carbon chain, the substituent in the benzene ring, and their combinations. A quantitative structure-activity relationship study was carried out using a series of 17 benzylacetone derivatives to determine the structural features with significant for the sedative activity. PMID:23995659

  1. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical

  2. METCAN demonstration manual, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-J.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The various features of the Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) computer program to simulate the high temperature nonlinear behavior of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites are demonstrated. Different problems are used to demonstrate various capabilities of METCAN for both static and cyclic analyses. A complete description of the METCAN output file is also included to help interpret results.

  3. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  4. Oral Resveratrol Prevents Osteoarthritis Progression in C57BL/6J Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hailun; Li, Keyu; Li, Xingyao; Yu, Xiaolu; Wang, Wei; Ding, Lifeng; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The effects of resveratrol on osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis have been demonstrated in vitro and in animal models employing intra-articular injections. However, the potential for oral resveratrol supplements to mediate protective effects on OA have not been examined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the potential anti-OA effects of oral resveratrol on mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). C57BL/6J male mice were fed either a standard diet or a HFD, and a subset of the latter also received varying doses of resveratrol. Twelve weeks later, all of the animals were sacrificed and knee joints were evaluated with histological, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL analyses. Mice that received a HFD had significantly greater body weights than the control mice and also exhibited features consistent with knee OA. The mice that received a HFD in combination with low, intermediate, or high doses of resveratrol were only slightly heavier than the control mice at the end of 12 weeks. Quantitative histological assessments indicated that resveratrol treatment partly recovered joint structure in the mice that received a HFD, while high doses of resveratrol prevented the degradation of type II collagen into C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and retained type II collagen expression in cartilage. Furthermore, TUNEL analyses revealed a reduction in chondrocyte apoptosis in the resveratrol-treated mice compared with the HFD mice. Thus, oral resveratrol appears to exert anti-OA effects in a mouse model of HFD-induced OA, thereby highlighting the potential preventive and therapeutic value of administering resveratrol for obesity-associated OA. PMID:27104565

  5. Oral Resveratrol Prevents Osteoarthritis Progression in C57BL/6J Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hailun; Li, Keyu; Li, Xingyao; Yu, Xiaolu; Wang, Wei; Ding, Lifeng; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The effects of resveratrol on osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis have been demonstrated in vitro and in animal models employing intra-articular injections. However, the potential for oral resveratrol supplements to mediate protective effects on OA have not been examined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the potential anti-OA effects of oral resveratrol on mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). C57BL/6J male mice were fed either a standard diet or a HFD, and a subset of the latter also received varying doses of resveratrol. Twelve weeks later, all of the animals were sacrificed and knee joints were evaluated with histological, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL analyses. Mice that received a HFD had significantly greater body weights than the control mice and also exhibited features consistent with knee OA. The mice that received a HFD in combination with low, intermediate, or high doses of resveratrol were only slightly heavier than the control mice at the end of 12 weeks. Quantitative histological assessments indicated that resveratrol treatment partly recovered joint structure in the mice that received a HFD, while high doses of resveratrol prevented the degradation of type II collagen into C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and retained type II collagen expression in cartilage. Furthermore, TUNEL analyses revealed a reduction in chondrocyte apoptosis in the resveratrol-treated mice compared with the HFD mice. Thus, oral resveratrol appears to exert anti-OA effects in a mouse model of HFD-induced OA, thereby highlighting the potential preventive and therapeutic value of administering resveratrol for obesity-associated OA. PMID:27104565

  6. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  7. Progressive Retinal Degeneration and Accumulation of Autofluorescent Lipopigments in Progranulin Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hafler, Brian P.; Klein, Zoe A.; Zhou, Z. Jimmy; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior investigations have shown that patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) develop neurodegeneration characterized by vision loss, motor dysfunction, seizures, and often early death. Neuropathological analysis of patients with NCL shows accumulation of intracellular autofluorescent storage material, lipopigment, throughout neurons in the central nervous system including in the retina. A recent study of a sibling pair with adult onset NCL and retinal degeneration showed linkage to the region of the progranulin (GRN) locus and a homozygous mutation was demonstrated in GRN. In particular, the sibling pair with a mutation in GRN developed retinal degeneration and optic atrophy. This locus for this form of adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis was designated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-11 (CLN11). Based on these clinical observations, we wished to determine whether Grn-null mice develop accumulation of autofluorescent particles and retinal degeneration. Retinas of both wild-type and Progranulin deficient mice were examined by immunostaining and autofluorescence. Accumulation of autofluorescent material was present in Progranulin deficient mice at 12 months. Degeneration of multiple classes of neurons including photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells was noted in mice at 12 and 18 months. Our data shows that Grn?/? mice develop degenerative pathology similar to features of human CLN11. PMID:25234724

  8. Altered social cognition in male BDNF heterozygous mice and following chronic methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Manning, Elizabeth E; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2016-05-15

    Growing clinical evidence suggests that persistent psychosis which occurs in methamphetamine users is closely related to schizophrenia. However, preclinical studies in animal models have focussed on psychosis-related behaviours following methamphetamine, and less work has been done to assess endophenotypes relevant to other deficits observed in schizophrenia. Altered social behaviour is a feature of both the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia, and significantly impacts patient functioning. We recently found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) heterozygous mice show disrupted sensitization to methamphetamine, supporting other work suggesting an important role of this neurotrophin in the pathophysiology of psychosis and the neuronal response to stimulant drugs. In the current study, we assessed social and cognitive behaviours in methamphetamine-treated BDNF heterozygous mice and wildtype littermate controls. Following chronic methamphetamine exposure male wildtype mice showed a 50% reduction in social novelty preference. Vehicle-treated male BDNF heterozygous mice showed a similar impairment in social novelty preference, with a trend for no further disruption by methamphetamine exposure. Female mice were unaffected in this task, and no groups showed any changes in sociability or short-term spatial memory. These findings suggest that chronic methamphetamine alters behaviour relevant to disruption of social cognition in schizophrenia, supporting other studies which demonstrate a close resemblance between persistent methamphetamine psychosis and schizophrenia. Together these findings suggest that dynamic regulation of BDNF signalling is necessary to mediate the effects of methamphetamine on behaviours relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:26965573

  9. Cerebellar-Dependent Expression of Motor Learning during Eyeblink Conditioning in Head-Fixed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heiney, Shane A.; Wohl, Margot P.; Chettih, Selmaan N.; Ruffolo, Luis I.

    2014-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning in restrained rabbits has served as an excellent model of cerebellar-dependent motor learning for many decades. In mice, the role of the cerebellum in eyeblink conditioning is less clear and remains controversial, partly because learning appears to engage fear-related circuits and lesions of the cerebellum do not abolish the learned behavior completely. Furthermore, experiments in mice are performed using freely moving systems, which lack the stability necessary for mapping out the essential neural circuitry with electrophysiological approaches. We have developed a novel apparatus for eyeblink conditioning in head-fixed mice. Here, we show that the performance of mice in our apparatus is excellent and that the learned behavior displays two hallmark features of cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning in rabbits: (1) gradual acquisition; and (2) adaptive timing of conditioned movements. Furthermore, we use a combination of pharmacological inactivation, electrical stimulation, single-unit recordings, and targeted microlesions to demonstrate that the learned behavior is completely dependent on the cerebellum and to pinpoint the exact location in the deep cerebellar nuclei that is necessary. Our results pave the way for using eyeblink conditioning in head-fixed mice as a platform for applying next-generation genetic tools to address molecular and circuit-level questions about cerebellar function in health and disease. PMID:25378152

  10. HSP27 Alleviates Cardiac Aging in Mice via a Mechanism Involving Antioxidation and Mitophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shenglan; Wang, Yana; Zhang, Xiaojin; Kong, Qiuyue; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Ding, Zhengnian

    2016-01-01

    Aging-induced cardiac dysfunction is a prominent feature of cardiac aging. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) protects cardiac function against ischemia or chemical challenge. We hypothesized that HSP27 attenuates cardiac aging. Transgenic (Tg) mice with cardiac-specific expression of the HSP27 gene and wild-type (WT) littermates were employed in the experiments. Echocardiography revealed a significant decline in the cardiac function of old WT mice compared with young WT mice. In striking contrast, the aging-induced impairment of cardiac function was attenuated in old Tg mice compared with old WT mice. Levels of cardiac aging markers were lower in old Tg mouse hearts than in old WT mouse hearts. Less interstitial fibrosis and lower contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins were detected in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Furthermore, old Tg hearts demonstrated lower accumulation of LC3-II and p62 than old WT hearts. Levels of Atg13, Vps34, and Rab7 were also higher in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Additionally, old Tg hearts had higher levels of PINK1 and Parkin than old WT hearts, suggesting that mitophagy was activated in old Tg hearts. Taken together, HSP27 alleviated cardiac aging and this action involved antioxidation and mitophagy activation. PMID:27110324

  11. Characterization of Sleeping Beauty Transposition and Its Application to Genetic Screening in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Kyoji; Yusa, Kosuke; Yae, Kojiro; Odajima, Junko; Fischer, Sylvia E. J.; Keng, Vincent W.; Hayakawa, Tomoko; Mizuno, Sumi; Kondoh, Gen; Ijiri, Takashi; Matsuda, Yoichi; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.; Takeda, Junji

    2003-01-01

    The use of mutant mice plays a pivotal role in determining the function of genes, and the recently reported germ line transposition of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon would provide a novel system to facilitate this approach. In this study, we characterized SB transposition in the mouse germ line and assessed its potential for generating mutant mice. Transposition sites not only were clustered within 3 Mb near the donor site but also were widely distributed outside this cluster, indicating that the SB transposon can be utilized for both region-specific and genome-wide mutagenesis. The complexity of transposition sites in the germ line was high enough for large-scale generation of mutant mice. Based on these initial results, we conducted germ line mutagenesis by using a gene trap scheme, and the use of a green fluorescent protein reporter made it possible to select for mutant mice rapidly and noninvasively. Interestingly, mice with mutations in the same gene, each with a different insertion site, were obtained by local transposition events, demonstrating the feasibility of the SB transposon system for region-specific mutagenesis. Our results indicate that the SB transposon system has unique features that complement other mutagenesis approaches. PMID:14645530

  12. Transgenic mice overexpressing reticulon 3 develop neuritic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiangyou; Shi, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; He, Wanxia; Yi, Hong; Yin, Xinghua; Gearing, Marla; Levey, Allan; Yan, Riqiang

    2007-01-01

    Dystrophic neurites are swollen dendrites or axons recognizable near amyloid plaques as a part of important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report herein that reticulon 3 (RTN3) is accumulated in a distinct population of dystrophic neurites named as RTN3 immunoreactive dystrophic neurites (RIDNs). The occurrence of RIDNs is concomitant with the formation of high-molecular-weight RTN3 aggregates in brains of AD cases and mice expressing mutant APP. Ultrastructural analysis confirms accumulation of RTN3-containing aggregates in RIDNs. It appears that the protein level of RTN3 governs the formation of RIDNs because transgenic mice expressing RTN3 will develop RIDNs, initially in the hippocampal CA1 region, and later in other hippocampal and cortical regions. Importantly, we show that the presence of dystrophic neurites in Tg-RTN3 mice causes impairments in spatial learning and memory, as well as synaptic plasticity, implying that RIDNs potentially contribute to AD cognitive dysfunction. Together, we demonstrate that aggregation of RTN3 contributes to AD pathogenesis by inducing neuritic dystrophy. Inhibition of RTN3 aggregation is likely a therapeutic approach for reducing neuritic dystrophy. PMID:17476306

  13. Tested Demonstrations: Spectroscopy Illustrated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for an experiment to prepare three metal derivatives of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and to determine some structural features of these derivatives based on their infrared spectra. Results and discussion of reactions involved are also provided. (JN)

  14. Microgravity Plant Growth Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Two visitors watch a TV monitor showing plant growth inside a growth chamber designed for operation aboard the Space Shuttle as part of NASA's Space Product Development program. The exhibit, featuring work by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, was at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  15. Features of Positive Developmental Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Reed; Eccles, Jacquelynne; Gootman, Jennifer Appleton

    2004-01-01

    There is very little research that directly specifies what programs can do to facilitate positive adolescent development, or how to tailor these programs to the individual needs of adolescents. However, there is a broad base of knowledge about how development occurs that can be drawn upon. Research demonstrates that certain features of the…

  16. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia

  17. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  18. Demonstrating Newton's Second Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricker, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for demonstrating the second law of motion. Provides sample data and discusses the merits of this method over traditional methods of supplying a constant force. The method produces empirical best-fit lines which convincingly demonstrate that for a fixed mass, acceleration is proportional to force. (DDR)

  19. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  20. A Greener Chemiluminescence Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jilani, Osman; Donahue, Trisha M.; Mitchell, Miguel O.

    2011-01-01

    Because they are dramatic and intriguing, chemiluminescence demonstrations have been used for decades to stimulate interest in chemistry. One of the most intense chemiluminescent reactions is the oxidation of diaryl oxalate diesters with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a fluorescer. In typical lecture demonstrations, the commercially…

  1. A Greener Chemiluminescence Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jilani, Osman; Donahue, Trisha M.; Mitchell, Miguel O.

    2011-01-01

    Because they are dramatic and intriguing, chemiluminescence demonstrations have been used for decades to stimulate interest in chemistry. One of the most intense chemiluminescent reactions is the oxidation of diaryl oxalate diesters with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a fluorescer. In typical lecture demonstrations, the commercially

  2. USFWS demonstration fees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Jonathan; Vaske, Jerry; Donnelly, Maureen; Shelby, Lori

    2002-01-01

    This study examined National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) visitors' reactions to changes in fees implemented as part of the fee demonstration program. Visitors' evaluations of the fees paid were examined in addition to their beliefs about fees and the fee demonstration program, and the impact of fees paid on their intention to return. All results were analyzed relative to socio-demographic characteristics.

  3. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  4. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more

  5. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these

  6. Inertia Demonstration Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karioris, Frank G.

    1978-01-01

    Explains the inertia ball demonstration qualitatively. For the advanced level the demonstration is treated as a forced harmonic oscillator and the results verified analytically. Computer-generated graphs show that with a rapid pull, the upper cord may break, or the upper and lower cords may break simultaneously. (Author/GA)

  7. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  8. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  9. The Microgravity Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Wargo, Michael J.

    The Microgravity Demonstrator is a tool used to create microgravity conditions in the classroom. A series of demonstrations is used to provide a dramatically visual, physical connection between free-fall and microgravity conditions in order to understand why various types of experiments are performed under microgravity conditions. The manual is…

  10. Cholinergic influences on feature binding.

    PubMed

    Botly, Leigh C P; De Rosa, Eve

    2007-04-01

    The binding problem refers to the fundamental challenge of the central nervous system to integrate sensory information registered by multiple brain regions to form a unified neural representation of a stimulus. Human behavioral, neuropsychological, and functional neuroimaging evidence suggests a fundamental role for attention in feature binding; however, its neurochemical basis is currently unknown. This study examined whether acetylcholine (ACh), a neuromodulator that has been implicated in attentional processes, plays a critical role in feature binding. Using a within-subjects pharmacological design and the cholinergic muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, the present experiments demonstrate, in a rat model, a critical role for the cortical muscarinic cholinergic system in feature binding. Specifically, ACh and the attentional resources that it supports are essential for the initial feature binding process but are not required to maintain neural representations of bound stimuli. PMID:17469916

  11. Designing using manufacturing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsi, T.; Hoque, A. S. M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a design system that enables the composition of a part using manufacturing features. Features are selected from feature libraries. Upon insertion, the system ensures that the feature does not contradict the design-for-manufacture rules. This helps eliminating costly manufacturing problems. The system is developed as an extension to a commercial CAD/CAM system Pro/Engineer.

  12. Smoking p66Shc Knocked Out Mice Develop Respiratory Bronchiolitis with Fibrosis but Not Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Cavarra, Eleonora; Fineschi, Silvia; Bartalesi, Barbara; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Lucattelli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The adaptor protein p66Shc regulates intracellular oxidant levels through the modulation of a forkhead-related transcription factor (FOXO3a). The genetic ablation of p66Shc (p66Shc–/–) renders mice resistant to oxidative stress and p53-dependent apoptosis. We investigated whether p66Shc ablation in mice modifies lung cellular and molecular responses to cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. No differences between wild type (WT) and p66Shc–/– mice were observed in terms of inflammation and oxidant burden after acute CS exposure; however,p66Shc ablation modifies specific features of chronic inflammation induced by repeated exposure to CS. Unlike WT mice, p66Shc–/– mice did not develop emphysema, showing protection toward oxidative damage to DNA and apoptosis as revealed by a trivial 8-hydroxyguanosine staining and faint TUNEL and caspase-3 positivity on alveolar epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, CS exposure in p66Shc–/– mice resulted in respiratory bronchiolitis with fibrosis in surrounded alveoli. Respiratory bronchiolitis was characterized by peribronchiolar infiltrates of lymphocytes and histiocytes, accumulation of ageing pigmented macrophages within and around bronchioles, and peribronchiolar fibrosis. The blockage of apoptosis interferes with the macrophage “clearance” from alveolar spaces, favouring the accumulation of aging macrophages into alveoli and the progressive accumulation of iron pigment in long-lived senescent cells. The presence of areas of interstitial and alveolar fibrosis in peripheral parenchyma often accompanied the bronchiolar changes. Macrophages from smoking p66Shc–/– mice elaborate M2 cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-13) and enzymes (i.e., chitinase and arginase I), which can promote TGF-beta expression, collagen deposition, and fibrosis in the surrounding areas. We demonstrate here that resistance to oxidative stress and p53-dependent apoptosis can modify tissue responses to CS caused by chronic inflammation without influencing early inflammatory response to CS exposure. PMID:25790295

  13. Smoking p66Shc knocked out mice develop respiratory bronchiolitis with fibrosis but not emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Benedetta; De Cunto, Giovanna; Cavarra, Eleonora; Fineschi, Silvia; Bartalesi, Barbara; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Lucattelli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The adaptor protein p66Shc regulates intracellular oxidant levels through the modulation of a forkhead-related transcription factor (FOXO3a). The genetic ablation of p66Shc (p66Shc-/-) renders mice resistant to oxidative stress and p53-dependent apoptosis. We investigated whether p66Shc ablation in mice modifies lung cellular and molecular responses to cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. No differences between wild type (WT) and p66Shc-/- mice were observed in terms of inflammation and oxidant burden after acute CS exposure; however,p66Shc ablation modifies specific features of chronic inflammation induced by repeated exposure to CS. Unlike WT mice, p66Shc-/- mice did not develop emphysema, showing protection toward oxidative damage to DNA and apoptosis as revealed by a trivial 8-hydroxyguanosine staining and faint TUNEL and caspase-3 positivity on alveolar epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, CS exposure in p66Shc-/- mice resulted in respiratory bronchiolitis with fibrosis in surrounded alveoli. Respiratory bronchiolitis was characterized by peribronchiolar infiltrates of lymphocytes and histiocytes, accumulation of ageing pigmented macrophages within and around bronchioles, and peribronchiolar fibrosis. The blockage of apoptosis interferes with the macrophage "clearance" from alveolar spaces, favouring the accumulation of aging macrophages into alveoli and the progressive accumulation of iron pigment in long-lived senescent cells. The presence of areas of interstitial and alveolar fibrosis in peripheral parenchyma often accompanied the bronchiolar changes. Macrophages from smoking p66Shc-/- mice elaborate M2 cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-13) and enzymes (i.e., chitinase and arginase I), which can promote TGF-beta expression, collagen deposition, and fibrosis in the surrounding areas. We demonstrate here that resistance to oxidative stress and p53-dependent apoptosis can modify tissue responses to CS caused by chronic inflammation without influencing early inflammatory response to CS exposure. PMID:25790295

  14. Loss of Bace1 in Mice Does Not Alter the Severity of Caerulein Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Mario; Tuennemann, Jan; Sommerer, Ines; Mössner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Context Beta-site alpha-amyloid protein cleaving enzyme1 (BACE1) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Additional to its moderate expression in the brain, high levels of BACE1 mRNA were found in the pancreas. Murine Bace1 has been immunohistochemicaly detected at the apical pole of acinar cells within the exocrine pancreas of mice and Bace1 activity was observed in pancreatic juice. In vitro experiments revealed enteropeptidase as a putative substrate for Bace1 suggesting a role in acute pancreatitis. Objective The aim of this study was to address a protective mechanism of Bace1 in acute experimental pancreatitis in mice. Methods Acute experimental pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein in homozygote Bace1-/- mice and wild type mice. Serum and tissue analyses were carried out after 4 h, 8 h and 24 h. Measurement of plasma amylase and lipase was performed to confirm pancreatitis induction. In order to assess the severity of pancreatitis H&E stained pancreatic sections were examined regarding edema, inflammation and apoptosis. Immunohistochemical detection of myeloperoxidase (MPO) positive cells was carried out to further quantify the extent of inflammation. Expression of Bace2 within the pancreas was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Results We demonstrate that total loss of Bace1 in mice leads to no alterations in the course of acute experimental caerulein-pancreatitis. Bace1-/- mice develop a moderate pancreatitis that is comparable in histomorphological and serological features with those seen in wild type mice. Discussion We discuss the results in the context of the applied caerulein induced edematous pancreatitis model and possible compensatory mechanisms via Bace2 that might be responsible for the observed results. PMID:25961820

  15. Sporadic colon cancer murine models demonstrate the value of autoantibody detection for preclinical cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Barderas, Rodrigo; Villar-Vázquez, Roi; Fernández-Aceñero, María Jesús; Babel, Ingrid; Peláez-García, Alberto; Torres, Sofía; Casal, J. Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Although autoantibody detection has been proposed for diagnosis of colorectal cancer, little is known about their initial production and development correlation with cancer progression. Azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-treated mice developed colon adenocarcinoma in the distal colon similar to human sporadic colon cancer. We assessed this model together with AOM and DSS-only models for their applicability to early detection of cancer. All AOM/DSS-treated mice produced autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens analogous to those observed in human colon cancer patients. Autoantibody response was related to tumor antigen overexpression. Cancer autoantibodies were detected 21 days after starting treatment, when no malignant histopathological features were detectable, and they increased according to tumor progression. When carcinogenesis was induced separately by AOM or DSS, only those mice that developed malignant lesions produced significant levels of autoantibodies. These findings demonstrate that autoantibody development is an early event in tumorigenesis and validates its use for preclinical colon cancer diagnosis. PMID:24126910

  16. Classroom Demonstration of Sunspots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Thomas O.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An overhead projector, projection screen, and clear tungsten Filament light bulb operated through a dimmer or variac switch are used to demonstrate the fact that black appearance of sunspots is due only to contrast and that sunspots are bright. (SK)

  17. Five amazing physics demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, Neil

    2015-04-01

    There's nothing better than a good physics demonstration to illustrate the subject's fundamental principles. Neil Downie, who has run Saturday science clubs for children for more than two decades, presents his five best demos of all time.

  18. Floating Magnet Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature demonstration of a floating magnet using a high-temperature superconductor is described. The setup and operation of the apparatus are described. The technical details of the effect are discussed. (CW)

  19. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  20. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  1. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are two demonstrations for teaching chemistry using the overhead projector. Included are "Oxidation of Cyclohexanol--An Amoebalike Reaction," and "A Diels-Alder Reaction for the Overhead Projector." Materials and procedures are detailed. (CW)

  2. EVA Retriever Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The EVA retriever is demonstrated in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The retriever moves on the air bearing table 'searching' for its target, in this case tools 'dropped' by astronauts on orbit.

  3. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  4. Demonstrating Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, David S.; Amundson, John C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes laboratory exercises with chickens selecting their food from dyed and natural corn kernels as a method of demonstrating natural selection. The procedure is based on the fact that organisms that blend into their surroundings escape predation. (BR)

  5. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambly, Gordon F.; Goldsmith, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a method of demonstrating the optical activity of glucose using an overhead projector and easily obtainable materials. Explores the difference between reflected and transmitted light (Tyndall Effect) using sodium thiosulfate, hydrochloric acid, and an overhead projector. (ML)

  6. Remote Agent Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.; Kurien, James; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    We describe the computer demonstration of the Remote Agent Experiment (RAX). The Remote Agent is a high-level, model-based, autonomous control agent being validated on the NASA Deep Space 1 spacecraft.

  7. Innovative technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Luttrell, S.P. ); Hartley, J.N. ); Hinchee, R. )

    1992-04-01

    The Innovative Technology Demonstration (ITD) program at Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, will demonstrate the overall utility and effectiveness of innovative technologies for site characterization, monitoring, and remediation of selected contaminated test sites. The current demonstration test sites include a CERCLA site on the NPL list, located under a building (Building 3001) that houses a large active industrial complex used for rebuilding military aircraft, and a site beneath and surrounding an abandoned underground tank vault used for storage of jet fuels and solvents. The site under Building 3001 (the NW Test Site) is contaminated with TCE and Cr{sup {plus}6}; the site with the fuel storage vault (the SW Tanks Site) is contaminated with fuels, BTEX and TCE. These sites and others have been identified for cleanup under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). This document describes the demonstrations that have been conducted or are planned for the TAFB.

  8. Innovative technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Luttrell, S.P.; Hartley, J.N.; Hinchee, R.

    1992-04-01

    The Innovative Technology Demonstration (ITD) program at Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, will demonstrate the overall utility and effectiveness of innovative technologies for site characterization, monitoring, and remediation of selected contaminated test sites. The current demonstration test sites include a CERCLA site on the NPL list, located under a building (Building 3001) that houses a large active industrial complex used for rebuilding military aircraft, and a site beneath and surrounding an abandoned underground tank vault used for storage of jet fuels and solvents. The site under Building 3001 (the NW Test Site) is contaminated with TCE and Cr{sup {plus}6}; the site with the fuel storage vault (the SW Tanks Site) is contaminated with fuels, BTEX and TCE. These sites and others have been identified for cleanup under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). This document describes the demonstrations that have been conducted or are planned for the TAFB.

  9. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  10. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the universe (using big-bang chocolate chip cookies); differentiation during the formation of the Earth and planets (using chocolate or chocolate milk with marshmallows, cereal, candy pieces or nuts); and radioactivity/radioactive dating (using popcorn). Other possible demonstrations include: plate tectonics (crackers with peanut butter and jelly); convection (miso soup or hot chocolate); mud flows on Mars (melted chocolate poured over angel food cake); formation of the Galactic disk (pizza); formation of spiral arms (coffee with cream); the curvature of Space (Pringles); constellations patterns with chocolate chips and chocolate chip cookies; planet shaped cookies; star shaped cookies with different colored frostings; coffee or chocolate milk measurement of solar radiation; Oreo cookie lunar phases. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  11. Chronic antigen-antibody-complex glomerulonephritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Steward, M. W.; Collins, M. J.; Stanley, C.; Devey, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    Daily injection of human serum albumin into mice genetically selected to produce low-affinity antibody to protein antigens resulted in a more severe antigen-antibody-complex-induced glomerulonephritis than in mice producing high-affinity antibody. The low-affinity mice had higher levels of circulating antigen-antibody complexes, greater impairment of renal function and reduced reticuloendothelial clearance of 125I-PVP compared to high-affinity mice. Electron microscopy of glomeruli revealed the presence of subepithelial electron-dense deposits in low-affinity mice and predominantly subendothelial-mesangial deposits in high-affinity mice which corresponded to the predominantly capillary staining in low-affinity mice and mesangial staining in high-affinity mice by immunofluorescence. Auto-radiography of electron-microscopy sections demonstrated the presence of antigen in the electron-dense deposits, indicating that these deposits indeed contained antigen-antigen complexes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6459798

  12. Demonstrations in Introductory Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Stein, S.; van der Lee, S.; Swafford, L.; Klosko, E.; Delaughter, J.; Wysession, M.

    2005-12-01

    Geophysical concepts are challenging to teach at introductory levels, because students need to understand both the underlying physics and its geological application. To address this, our introductory courses include class demonstrations and experiments to demonstrate underlying physical principles and their geological applications. Demonstrations and experiments have several advantages over computer simulations. First, computer simulations "work" even if the basic principle is wrong. In contrast, simple demonstrations show that a principle is physically correct, rather than a product of computer graphics. Second, many students are unfamiliar with once-standard experiments demonstrating ideas of classical physics used in geophysics. Demonstrations are chosen that we consider stimulating, relevant, inexpensive, and easy to conduct in a non-lab classroom. These come in several groups. Many deal with aspects of seismic waves, using springs, light beams, and other methods such as talking from outside the room to illustrate the frequency dependence of diffraction (hearing but not seeing around a corner). Others deal with heat and mass transfer, such as illustrating fractional crystallization with apple juice and the surface/volume effect in planetary evolution with ice. Plate motions are illustrated with paper cutouts showing effects like motion on transform faults and how the Euler vector geometry changes a plate boundary from spreading, to strike-slip, to convergence along the Pacific-North America boundary from the Gulf of California to Alaska. Radioactive decay is simulated by having the class rise and sit down as a result of coin flips (one tail versus two gives different decay rates and hence half lives). This sessions' goal of exchanging information about demonstrations is an excellent idea: some of ours are described on http://www.earth.nwu.edu/people/seth/202.

  13. Solar Energy Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Solar energy furnishes all of the heating and hot water needs, plus 80 percent of the air conditioning, for the two-story Reedy Creek building. A unique feature of this installation is that the 16 semi-cylindrical solar collectors (center photo on opposite page with closeup of a single collector below it) are not mounted atop the roof as is customary, they actually are the roof. This arrangement eliminates the usual trusses, corrugated decking and insulating concrete in roof construction; that, in turn, reduces overall building costs and makes the solar installation more attractive economically. The Reedy Creek collectors were designed and manufactured by AAI Corporation of Baltimore, Maryland.

  14. Interactive Lecture Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, David R.; Thornton, Ronald K.

    2004-03-01

    Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) are designed to enhance conceptual learning in physics lectures through active engagement of students in the learning process. Students observe real physics demonstrations, make predictions about the outcomes on a prediction sheet, and collaborate with fellow students by discussing their predictions in small groups. Students then examine the results of the live demonstration (often displayed as real-time graphs using computer data acquisition tools), compare these results with their predictions, and attempt to explain the observed phenomena. ILDs are available for all of the major topics in the introductory physics course and can be used within the traditional structure of an introductory physics course. All of the printed materials needed to implement them are included in this book.

  15. Autonomous docking ground demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Steve L.; Le, Thomas Quan; Othon, L. T.; Prather, Joseph L.; Eick, Richard E.; Baxter, Jim M.; Boyd, M. G.; Clark, Fred D.; Spehar, Peter T.; Teters, Rebecca T.

    1991-01-01

    The Autonomous Docking Ground Demonstration is an evaluation of the laser sensor system to support the docking phase (12 ft to contact) when operated in conjunction with the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) software. The docking mechanism being used was developed for the Apollo/Soyuz Test Program. This demonstration will be conducted using the 6-DOF Dynamic Test System (DTS). The DTS simulates the Space Station Freedom as the stationary or target vehicle and the Orbiter as the active or chase vehicle. For this demonstration, the laser sensor will be mounted on the target vehicle and the retroflectors will be on the chase vehicle. This arrangement was chosen to prevent potential damage to the laser. The laser sensor system, GN&C, and 6-DOF DTS will be operated closed-loop. Initial conditions to simulate vehicle misalignments, translational and rotational, will be introduced within the constraints of the systems involved.

  16. TRUEX hot demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  17. PhenolphthaleinPink Tornado Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prall, Bruce R.

    2008-04-01

    The phenolphthalein-pink tornado demonstration utilizes the vortex generated by a spinning magnetic stirring bar in a 1 L graduated cylinder containing 0.01 M HCl to demonstrate Le Chtelier's principle as it applies to the phenolphthalein equilibrium in water H 2 In + 2H 2 O 2H 2 O + + In 2 - where H 2 In is phenophthalein. The addition of 3-4 drops of phenolphthalein indicator solution followed immediately by 3-4 drops of 50% (w/w) NaOH to the vortex of the HCl solution results in a shift to the right in the equilibrium owing to the reaction of OH - + H 3 O + to form water. This shift is accompanied by the vortex becoming visible by the appearance of a pinkish-red color caused by an increase in In 2- concentration within the localized region of the vortex. The demonstration also provides one an excellent opportunity to discuss the topics of limiting reagent and reagent in excess. Some insight regarding the extent to which uniform mixing is achieved when using a magnetic stirrer is also provided. Included is a note from the Feature Editor, Ed Vitz.

  18. Innovative technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Luttrell, S.P.; Hartley, J.N.; Hinchee, R.

    1992-08-01

    Environmental Management Operations (EMO) is conducting an Innovative Technology Demonstration Program for Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB). Several innovative technologies are being demonstrated to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ. The bioremediation demonstration will evaluate a bioventing process in which the naturally occurring consortium of soil bacteria will be stimulated to aerobically degrade soil contaminants, including fuel and TCE, in situ.

  19. Innovative technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Hartley, J.N.; Luttrell, S.P.

    1992-04-01

    Currently, several innovative technologies are being demonstrated at Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB) to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells have been successfully installed at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site to test new methods of in situ remediation of soils and ground water. This emerging technology was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. A demonstration of two in situ sensor systems capable of providing real-time data on contamination levels will be conducted and evaluated concurrently with the SGE demonstration activities. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ.

  20. Innovative technology demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Hartley, J.N.; Luttrell, S.P.

    1992-04-01

    Currently, several innovative technologies are being demonstrated at Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB) to address specific problems associated with remediating two contaminated test sites at the base. Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is a form of testing that can rapidly characterize a site. This technology was selected to evaluate its applicability in the tight clay soils and consolidated sandstone sediments found at TAFB. Directionally drilled horizontal wells have been successfully installed at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site to test new methods of in situ remediation of soils and ground water. This emerging technology was selected as a method that may be effective in accessing contamination beneath Building 3001 without disrupting the mission of the building, and in enhancing the extraction of contamination both in ground water and in soil. A soil gas extraction (SGE) demonstration, also known as soil vapor extraction, will evaluate the effectiveness of SGE in remediating fuels and TCE contamination contained in the tight clay soil formations surrounding the abandoned underground fuel storage vault located at the SW Tanks Site. In situ sensors have recently received much acclaim as a technology that can be effective in remediating hazardous waste sites. Sensors can be useful for determining real-time, in situ contaminant concentrations during the remediation process for performance monitoring and in providing feedback for controlling the remediation process. A demonstration of two in situ sensor systems capable of providing real-time data on contamination levels will be conducted and evaluated concurrently with the SGE demonstration activities. Following the SGE demonstration, the SGE system and SW Tanks test site will be modified to demonstrate bioremediation as an effective means of degrading the remaining contaminants in situ.

  1. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R. J.

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  2. Demonstrating marketing accountability.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, William R; Britt, Jason; Taylor, Jan; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Adkins, Wanda; Springate, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Pressure on health care marketers to demonstrate effectiveness of their strategies and show their contribution to organizational goals is growing. A seven-tiered model based on the concepts of structure (having the right people, systems), process (doing the right things in the right way), and outcomes (results) is discussed. Examples of measures for each tier are provided and the benefits of using the model as a tool for measuring, organizing, tracking, and communicating appropriate information are provided. The model also provides a framework for helping management understand marketing's value and can serve as a vehicle for demonstrating marketing accountability. PMID:19064476

  3. The MICE luminosity monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, A.; Forrest, D.; Soler, F. J. P.

    2013-02-01

    The MICE experiment will provide the first measurement of ionisation cooling, a technique suitable for reducing the transverse emittance of a tertiary muon beam in a future neutrino factory accelerator facility. MICE is presently in the final stages of commissioning its beam line. The MICE luminosity monitor has proved an invaluable tool throughout this process, providing independent measurements of particle rate from the MICE target, normalisation for beam line detectors and verification of simulation codes.

  4. Increased Adiposity in Annexin A1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akasheh, Rand T.; Pini, Maria; Pang, Jingbo; Fantuzzi, Giamila

    2013-01-01

    Production of Annexin A1 (ANXA1), a protein that mediates the anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids, is altered in obesity, but its role in modulation of adiposity has not yet been investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate modulation of ANXA1 in adipose tissue in murine models of obesity and to study the involvement of ANXA1 in diet-induced obesity in mice. Significant induction of ANXA1 mRNA was observed in adipose tissue of both C57BL6 and Balb/c mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity versus mice on chow diet. Upregulation of ANXA1 mRNA was independent of leptin or IL-6, as demonstrated by use of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and IL-6 KO mice. Compared to WT mice, female Balb/c ANXA1 KO mice on HFD had increased adiposity, as indicated by significantly elevated body weight, fat mass, leptin levels, and adipocyte size. Whereas Balb/c WT mice upregulated expression of enzymes involved in the lipolytic pathway in response to HFD, this response was absent in ANXA1 KO mice. A significant increase in fasting glucose and insulin levels as well as development of insulin resistance was observed in ANXA1 KO mice on HFD compared to WT mice. Elevated plasma corticosterone levels and blunted downregulation of 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in adipose tissue was observed in ANXA1 KO mice compared to diet-matched WT mice. However, no differences between WT and KO mice on either chow or HFD were observed in expression of markers of adipose tissue inflammation. These data indicate that ANXA1 is an important modulator of adiposity in mice, with female ANXA1 KO mice on Balb/c background being more susceptible to weight gain and diet-induced insulin resistance compared to WT mice, without significant changes in inflammation. PMID:24312665

  5. Increased adiposity in annexin A1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Akasheh, Rand T; Pini, Maria; Pang, Jingbo; Fantuzzi, Giamila

    2013-01-01

    Production of Annexin A1 (ANXA1), a protein that mediates the anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids, is altered in obesity, but its role in modulation of adiposity has not yet been investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate modulation of ANXA1 in adipose tissue in murine models of obesity and to study the involvement of ANXA1 in diet-induced obesity in mice. Significant induction of ANXA1 mRNA was observed in adipose tissue of both C57BL6 and Balb/c mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity versus mice on chow diet. Upregulation of ANXA1 mRNA was independent of leptin or IL-6, as demonstrated by use of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and IL-6 KO mice. Compared to WT mice, female Balb/c ANXA1 KO mice on HFD had increased adiposity, as indicated by significantly elevated body weight, fat mass, leptin levels, and adipocyte size. Whereas Balb/c WT mice upregulated expression of enzymes involved in the lipolytic pathway in response to HFD, this response was absent in ANXA1 KO mice. A significant increase in fasting glucose and insulin levels as well as development of insulin resistance was observed in ANXA1 KO mice on HFD compared to WT mice. Elevated plasma corticosterone levels and blunted downregulation of 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in adipose tissue was observed in ANXA1 KO mice compared to diet-matched WT mice. However, no differences between WT and KO mice on either chow or HFD were observed in expression of markers of adipose tissue inflammation. These data indicate that ANXA1 is an important modulator of adiposity in mice, with female ANXA1 KO mice on Balb/c background being more susceptible to weight gain and diet-induced insulin resistance compared to WT mice, without significant changes in inflammation. PMID:24312665

  6. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations using the overhead projector: (1) describes how to build a projecting voltmeter and presents uses for the classroom; and (2) investigates the color of fluorescent solutions by studying the absorption and transmission of light through the solutions. (MVL)

  7. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  8. Space fabrication demonstration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The lower right aluminum beam cap roll forming mill was delivered and installed in the beam builder. The beam was brought to full operational status and beams of one to six bay lengths were produced to demonstrate full system capability. Although the cap flange waviness problem persists, work is progressing within cost and schedule.

  9. The "Golden Penny" Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szczepankiewicz, Steven H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents the view that the explanation of the Golden Penny Experiment found in popular chemistry textbooks is insufficient or incorrect in part. Reports a series of electrochemical measurements that lead to a logical explanation for this demonstration and to a simplified design that makes it safer. (DDR)

  10. Demonstrating the Current Meter

    The floodwaters from Arkansas, Illinois and Missouri are making their way downstream now to Mississippi and Louisiana. In preparation, USGS scientist Glen Stevens demonstrates the current meter to Hannah Hamilton, also with USGS. The current meter is one of the two primary ways that USGS measures st...

  11. ALASKA VILLAGE DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two demonstration projects were built as authorized by Section 113 of PL 92-500. Modular construction was used to provide central utility systems which included water supply, laundry, bathing, saunas, and wastewater treatment. Service to homes was by vehicular delivery. Fire dest...

  12. Demonstrating carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Qader, A.; Hooper, B.; Stevens, G.

    2009-11-15

    Australia is at the forefront of advancing CCS technology. The CO2CRC's H3 (Post-combustion) and Mulgrave (pre-combustion) capture projects are outlined. The capture technologies for these 2 demonstration projects are described. 1 map., 2 photos.

  13. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Provides two demonstrations: (1) electrolyte migration of ions using colored ions which cross a strip of gelatin allowing for noticeable migration; and (2) photochemical reduction of Fe+3 by the citrate ion. Points out both reactions can be done in a Petri dish using common lab materials. (MVL)

  14. A Fruity Biochemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Classroom demonstrations are a great vehicle for getting students to apply information they have heard in a lecture. Educational research is replete with data showing that concept application in an inquiry setting reinforces long-term science content retention. This means that students learn best when they experience applications of concepts and

  15. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are three chemistry demonstrations: (1) a simple qualitative technique for taste pattern recognition in structure-activity relationships; (2) a microscale study of gaseous diffusion using bleach, HCl, ammonia, and phenolphthalein; and (3) the rotation of polarized light by stereoisomers of limonene. (MVL)

  16. Musical acoustics demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekje, P. L.

    2003-10-01

    The ASA Musical Acoustics Demonstrations website (trial version at http://www.bw.edu/~phoekje) includes sound files, video clips, program code listings, and other material for demonstrations related to musical acoustics. Many of the sound demonstrations may be experienced either as expositions, in which the phenomena are explained before they are presented, or as experiments, in which the explanation comes after listeners have had the opportunity to draw their own conclusions. Suggestions are provided for apparatus construction and classroom experiments, as well as for building simple musical instruments. Software is recommended if it is available free and compatible with multiple personal computer operating systems. For example, Audacity (http://audacity.sourceforce.net) is a sound file editor and analyzer that can be used to visually represent sounds and manipulate them. Source files are included for the synthesized sound examples, which were created in Csound (http://csounds.com), so that interested users may create their own variations. Source code is also included for visual demonstrations created in Visual Python and Python (http://www.python.org), an efficient, high level programming language. Suggestions, criticisms, and contributions are always welcome! [Work supported by ASA and Baldwin-Wallace College.

  17. A Fruity Biochemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Classroom demonstrations are a great vehicle for getting students to apply information they have heard in a lecture. Educational research is replete with data showing that concept application in an inquiry setting reinforces long-term science content retention. This means that students learn best when they experience applications of concepts and…

  18. Calculus Demonstrations Using MATLAB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Peter K.; Harman, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The note discusses ways in which technology can be used in the calculus learning process. In particular, five MATLAB programs are detailed for use by instructors or students that demonstrate important concepts in introductory calculus: Newton's method, differentiation and integration. Two of the programs are animated. The programs and the…

  19. More Diamagnetism Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conery, Chris; Goodrich, L. F.; Stauffer, T. C.

    2003-02-01

    Inspired by, among others, Charles Sawicki's description of an inexpensive diamagnetic levitation apparatus, we built two such devices for classroom use and for educational outreach at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colo. With a slightly different setup, the same demonstration can be done horizontally on an overhead projector.

  20. Why Demonstrations Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The author remembers how exciting it was when the teacher had "stuff" on the front desk: unfamiliar objects and other things out of place in the traditional classroom. Years later, as a new teacher, the author learned the importance of building lessons around concepts and that demonstrations are an integral part of concept development in science.…

  1. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.

  2. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  3. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,

  4. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  5. A Biofeedback Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Michael K.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a demonstration for measurement of biophysical signals produced by the human body. The signals, after amplification, could provide acoustical feedback through a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO), or they could be seen either with an oscilloscope or a high speed chart recorder. (GA)

  6. SOIL BIOVENTING DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale demonstration project of a soil bioventing system, which utilizes the biodegradation in soil and physical removal of VOC by induced air flow, is in operation at the U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Field in Traverse City, Michigan. he system is being tested to determine it...

  7. Astronomy Demonstrations and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckroth, Charles A.

    Demonstrations in astronomy classes seem to be more necessary than in physics classes for three reasons. First, many of the events are very large scale and impossibly remote from human senses. Secondly, while physics courses use discussions of one- and two-dimensional motion, three-dimensional motion is the normal situation in astronomy; thus,…

  8. A multidimensional representation model of geographic features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Usery, E. Lynn; Timson, George; Coletti, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A multidimensional model of geographic features has been developed and implemented with data from The National Map of the U.S. Geological Survey. The model, programmed in C++ and implemented as a feature library, was tested with data from the National Hydrography Dataset demonstrating the capability to handle changes in feature attributes, such as increases in chlorine concentration in a stream, and feature geometry, such as the changing shoreline of barrier islands over time. Data can be entered directly, from a comma separated file, or features with attributes and relationships can be automatically populated in the model from data in the Spatial Data Transfer Standard format.

  9. Evaluation of the Medicaid Competition Demonstrations

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Deborah A.; Rossiter, Louis F.; Fox, Peter D.; Meyer, Jack A.; Hurley, Robert E.; Carey, Timothy S.; Paul, John E.

    1989-01-01

    In 1983, the Health Care Financing Administration funded a multiyear evaluation of Medicaid demonstrations in six States. The alternative delivery systems represented by the demonstrations contained a number of innovative features, most notably capitation, case management, limitations on provider choice, and provider competition. Implementation and operation issues as well as demonstration effects on utilization and cost of care, administrative costs, rate setting, biased selection, quality of care, and access and satisfaction were evaluated. Both primary and secondary data sources were used in the evaluation. This article contains an overview and summary of evaluation findings on the effects of the demonstrations. PMID:10313460

  10. Collaborative Writing Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yong Mei Fung

    2010-01-01

    As part of a research study on collaborative writing, this paper discusses defining and facilitating features that occur during face-to-face collaboration, based on the literature and research. The defining features are mutual interaction, negotiations, conflict, and shared expertise. Facilitating features include affective factors, use of L1,…

  11. Urinary Bladder Dysfunction in Transgenic Sickle Cell Disease Mice

    PubMed Central

    Claudino, Mário Angelo; Leiria, Luiz Osório Silveira; da Silva, Fábio Henrique; Alexandre, Eduardo Costa; Renno, Andre; Mónica, Fabiola Zakia; de Nucci, Gilberto; Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto; Antunes, Edson; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Franco-Penteado, Carla Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background Urological complications associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), include nocturia, enuresis, urinary infections and urinary incontinence. However, scientific evidence to ascertain the underlying cause of the lower urinary tract symptoms in SCD is lacking. Objective Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate urinary function, in vivo and ex vivo, in the Berkeley SCD murine model (SS). Methods Urine output was measured in metabolic cage for both wild type and SS mice (25-30 g). Bladder strips and urethra rings were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. In isolated detrusor smooth muscle (DSM), relaxant response to mirabegron and isoproterenol (1nM-10μM) and contractile response to (carbachol (CCh; 1 nM-100μM), KCl (1 mM-300mM), CaCl2 (1μM-100mM), α,β-methylene ATP (1, 3 and 10 μM) and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1-32 Hz) were measured. Phenylephrine (Phe; 10nM-100μM) was used to evaluate the contraction mechanism in the urethra rings. Cystometry and histomorphometry were also performed in the urinary bladder. Results SS mice present a reduced urine output and incapacity to produce typical bladder contractions and bladder emptying (ex vivo), compared to control animals. In DSM, relaxation in response to a selective β3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron) and to a non-selective β-adrenergic (isoproterenol) agonist were lower in SS mice. Additionally, carbachol, α, β-methylene ATP, KCl, extracellular Ca2+ and electrical-field stimulation promoted smaller bladder contractions in SS group. Urethra contraction induced by phenylephrine was markedly reduced in SS mice. Histological analyses of SS mice bladder revealed severe structural abnormalities, such as reductions in detrusor thickness and bladder volume, and cell infiltration. Conclusions Taken together, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that SS mice display features of urinary bladder dysfunction, leading to impairment in urinary continence, which may have an important role in the pathogenesis of the enuresis and infections observed the SCD patients. PMID:26241312

  12. BTBR ob/ob mice as a novel diabetic neuropathy model: neurological characterization and gene expression analyses

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Phillipe D.; Hur, Junguk; Hayes, John M.; Backus, Carey; Sakowski, Stacey A.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Given the lack of treatments for diabetic neuropathy (DN), a common diabetic complication, accurate disease models are necessary. Characterization of the leptin-deficient BTBR ob/ob mouse, a type 2 diabetes model, demonstrated that the mice develop robust diabetes coincident with severe neuropathic features, including nerve conduction deficits and intraepidermal nerve fiber loss by 9 and 13 weeks of age, respectively, supporting its use as a DN model. To gain insight into DN mechanisms, we performed microarray analysis on sciatic nerve from BTBR ob/ob mice, identifying 1,503 and 642 differentially expressed genes associated with diabetes at 5 and 13 weeks, respectively. Further analyses identified overrepresentation of inflammation and immune-related functions in BTBR ob/ob mice, which interestingly were more highly represented at 5 weeks, an observation that may suggest a contributory role in DN onset. To complement the gene expression analysis, we demonstrated that protein levels of select cytokines were significantly upregulated at 13 weeks in BTBR ob/ob mouse sciatic nerve. Furthermore, we compared our array data to that from an established DN model, the C57BKS db/db mouse, which reflected a common dysregulation of inflammatory and immune-related pathways. Together, our data demonstrate that BTBR ob/ob mice develop rapid and robust DN associated with dysregulated inflammation and immune-related processes. PMID:25447227

  13. Feature-by-Feature – Evaluating De Novo Sequence Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Vezzi, Francesco; Narzisi, Giuseppe; Mishra, Bud

    2012-01-01

    The whole-genome sequence assembly (WGSA) problem is among one of the most studied problems in computational biology. Despite the availability of a plethora of tools (i.e., assemblers), all claiming to have solved the WGSA problem, little has been done to systematically compare their accuracy and power. Traditional methods rely on standard metrics and read simulation: while on the one hand, metrics like N50 and number of contigs focus only on size without proportionately emphasizing the information about the correctness of the assembly, comparisons performed on simulated dataset, on the other hand, can be highly biased by the non-realistic assumptions in the underlying read generator. Recently the Feature Response Curve (FRC) method was proposed to assess the overall assembly quality and correctness: FRC transparently captures the trade-offs between contigs' quality against their sizes. Nevertheless, the relationship among the different features and their relative importance remains unknown. In particular, FRC cannot account for the correlation among the different features. We analyzed the correlation among different features in order to better describe their relationships and their importance in gauging assembly quality and correctness. In particular, using multivariate techniques like principal and independent component analysis we were able to estimate the “excess-dimensionality” of the feature space. Moreover, principal component analysis allowed us to show how poorly the acclaimed N50 metric describes the assembly quality. Applying independent component analysis we identified a subset of features that better describe the assemblers performances. We demonstrated that by focusing on a reduced set of highly informative features we can use the FRC curve to better describe and compare the performances of different assemblers. Moreover, as a by-product of our analysis, we discovered how often evaluation based on simulated data, obtained with state of the art simulators, lead to not-so-realistic results. PMID:22319599

  14. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full-scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO and NO emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  15. Mars Umbilical Technology Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houshangi, Nasser

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a autonomous umbilical mating for the mars umbilical technology demonstrator. The Mars Umbilical Technology Demonstrator (MUTD) shall provide electrical power and fiber optic data cable connections between two simulated mars vehicles. The Omnibot is used to provide the mobile base for the system. The mate to umbilical plate is mounted on a three axis Cartesian table, which is installed on the Omnibot mobile base. The Omnibot is controlled in a teleoperated mode. The operator using the vision system will guide the Omnibot to get close to the mate to plate. The information received from four ultrasonic sensors is used to identify the position of mate to plate and mate the umbilical plates autonomously. A successful experimentation verifies the approach.

  16. Nucla CFB Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

  17. Education Demonstration Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, A.; Lee, R. L.

    2005-10-01

    Several GA Fusion Education Program plasma related demonstration items were developed this year. A 120 V ac powered electromagnetic coil shows eddy current levitation over an aluminum sheet and continuously changing magnetic force interactions using additional permanent magnets. A 300 V dc plasma device, with variable current capability and analog data ports, is used to develop plasma I/V plots. An on-demand (via push button) fully enclosed 24 in. Jacob's ladder provides air plasma and buoyancy effects. A low cost Mason jar vacuum chamber filled with inert gas shows pressure and gas species plasma characteristics when excited by a Tesla coil. These demonstration items are used in the Scientist-In-the-Classroom program, GA facility tours, and teacher seminars to present plasma to students and teachers. Three very popular Build-It workshops were held to enable teachers to build these items and take them back to their classroom.

  18. Space Fabrication Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The completion of assembly of the beam builder and its first automatic production of truss is discussed. A four bay, hand assembled, roll formed members truss was built and tested to ultimate load. Detail design of the fabrication facility (beam builder) was completed and designs for subsystem debugging are discussed. Many one bay truss specimens were produced to demonstrate subsystem operation and to detect problem areas.

  19. Projectile Motion Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Erlend H.

    2008-12-01

    For a recent lecture, I went to our apparatus stock room and took out our venerable Sargent-Welch projectile apparatus that demonstrates that a dropped ball and a horizontally launched ball hit the floor at the same time, if they are simultaneously released. A problem with this apparatus is that its small size makes it difficult for a large class to see what is going on. Furthermore, the projectiles are ball bearings, which tend to roll under chairs, benches, etc.

  20. The Blowgun Demonstration Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsukamoto, Koji; Uchino, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    We have found that a simple demonstration experiment using a match or a cotton swab and a drinking straw or an acrylic pipe serves as an effective introduction to dynamics. The most basic apparatus has a cotton swab serving as a dart and the straw as the blowgun. When blown from a starting point near the exit end of the straw, the cotton swab does…

  1. Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Parsonage, Tom; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fabrications of large Beryllium optical components are fundamentally limited by available facility capabilities. To overcome this limitation, NASA funded Brush Wellman Corp to study a Be joining process. Four 76 mm diameters samples and a 0.5 mm diameter Joined Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (JBMD) were fabricated. This presentation will review the fabrication of these samples and summarize the results of their cryogenic testing at MSFCs XRCF.

  2. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris

    1988-01-01

    Describes two oscillating reactions: the Briggs-Raucher reaction using H202, KIO3, malonic acid, and MnSO4 which changes from yellow to blue, and the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction uses NaBrO3, NaBr, malonic acid, and ferroin solution and changes from red to blue. Includes a third color demonstration on the six oxidation states of manganese. (MVL)

  3. Lunar Water Resource Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., the Carnegie-Mellon University, JPL, and NEPTEC, NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE. This project is a ground demonstration of a system that would be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, drill into the regolith, determine what volatiles are present, and quantify them in addition to recovering oxygen by hydrogen reduction. The Lunar Prospector has determined these craters contain enhanced hydrogen concentrations averaging about 0.1%. If the hydrogen is in the form of water, the water concentration would be around 1%, which would translate into billions of tons of water on the Moon, a tremendous resource. The Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD) is a part of RESOLVE designed to capture lunar water and hydrogen and quantify them as a backup to gas chromatography analysis. This presentation will briefly review the design of LWRD and some of the results of testing the subsystem. RESOLVE is to be integrated with the Scarab rover from CMIJ and the whole system demonstrated on Mauna Kea on Hawaii in November 2008. The implications of lunar water for Mars exploration are two-fold: 1) RESOLVE and LWRD could be used in a similar fashion on Mars to locate and quantify water resources, and 2) electrolysis of lunar water could provide large amounts of liquid oxygen in LEO, leading to lower costs for travel to Mars, in addition to being very useful at lunar outposts.

  4. Teaching Chemistry through Observation--The Exploding Can Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golestaneh, Kamran

    1998-01-01

    Describes procedures for a demonstration that features an exploding can. This demonstration prompts students to critically analyze the release of energy in an exothermic reaction, the work done in such a reaction, and the enthalpy. (DDR)

  5. The mesenchymal stem cells derived from transgenic mice carrying human coagulation factor VIII can correct phenotype in hemophilia A mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Gong, Xiuli; Gong, Zhijuan; Ren, Xiaoyie; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao

    2013-12-20

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. Previous studies showed that introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified by FVIII-expressing retrovirus may result in phenotypic correction of HA animals. This study aimed at the investigation of an alternative gene therapy strategy that may lead to sustained FVIII transgene expression in HA mice. B-domain-deleted human FVIII (hFVIIIBD) vector was microinjected into single-cell embryos of wild-type mice to generate a transgenic mouse line, from which hFVIIIBD-MSCs were isolated, followed by transplantation into HA mice. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of hFVIIIBD in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of hFVIIIBD positive staining in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. ELISA indicated that plasma hFVIIIBD level in recipient mice reached its peak (77 ng/mL) at the 3rd week after implantation, and achieved sustained expression during the 5-week observation period. Plasma FVIII activities of recipient HA mice increased from 0% to 32% after hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplantation. APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) value decreased in hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplanted HA mice compared with untreated HA mice (45.5 s vs. 91.3 s). Our study demonstrated an effective phenotypic correction in HA mice using genetically modified MSCs from hFVIIIBD transgenic mice. PMID:24377868

  6. Deficient Wnt signalling triggers striatal synaptic degeneration and impaired motor behaviour in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Soledad; Lopes, Douglas M.; Ammari, Rachida; Kopra, Jaakko; Millar, Sarah E.; Gibb, Alasdair; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Synapse degeneration is an early and invariant feature of neurodegenerative diseases. Indeed, synapse loss occurs prior to neuronal degeneration and correlates with the symptom severity of these diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms that trigger synaptic loss remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that deficient Wnt signalling elicits synaptic degeneration in the adult striatum. Inducible expression of the secreted Wnt antagonist Dickkopf1 (Dkk1) in adult mice (iDkk1) decreases the number of cortico-striatal glutamatergic synapses and of D1 and D2 dopamine receptor clusters. Synapse loss occurs in the absence of axon retraction or cell death. The remaining excitatory terminals contain fewer synaptic vesicles and have a reduced probability of evoked transmitter release. IDkk1 mice show impaired motor coordination and are irresponsive to amphetamine. These studies identify Wnts as key endogenous regulators of synaptic maintenance and suggest that dysfunction in Wnt signalling contributes to synaptic degeneration at early stages in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25318560

  7. Mthfr as a modifier of the retinal phenotype of Crb1(rd8/rd8) mice.

    PubMed

    Markand, Shanu; Saul, Alan; Tawfik, Amany; Cui, Xuezhi; Rozen, Rima; Smith, Sylvia B

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in crumb homologue 1 (CRB1) in humans are associated with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). There is no clear genotype-phenotype correlation for human CRB1 mutations in RP and LCA. The high variability in clinical features observed in CRB1 mutations suggests that environmental factors or genetic modifiers influence severity of CRB1 related retinopathies. Retinal degeneration 8 (rd8) is a spontaneous mutation in the Crb1 gene (Crb1(rdr/rd8)). Crb1(rdr/rd8) mice present with focal disruption in the outer retina manifesting as white spots on fundus examination. Mild retinal dysfunction with decreased b-wave amplitude has been reported in Crb1(rdr/rd8) mice at 18 months. Methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a crucial enzyme of homocysteine metabolism. MTHFR mutations are prevalent in humans and are linked to a broad spectrum of disorders including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. We recently reported the retinal phenotype in Mthfr-deficient (Mthfr(+/-)) heterozygous mice. At 24 weeks the mice showed decreased RGC function, thinner nerve fiber layer, focal areas of vascular leakage and 20% fewer cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Considering the variability in CRB1-related retinopathies and the high occurrence of human MTHFR mutations we evaluated whether Mthfr deficiency influences rd8 retinal phenotype. Mthfr heterozygous mice with rd8 mutations (Mthfr(+/-)(rd8/rd8)) and Crb(rd8/rd8) mice (Mthfr(+/+rd8/rd8)) mice were subjected to comprehensive retinal evaluation using ERG, fundoscopy, fluorescein angiography (FA), morphometric and retinal flat mount immunostaining analyses of isolectin-B4 at 8-54 wks. Assessment of retinal function revealed a significant decrease in the a-, b- and c-wave amplitudes in Mthfr(+/-)(rd8/rd8) mice at 52 wks. Fundoscopic evaluation demonstrated the presence of signature rd8 spots in Mthfr(+/+rd8/rd8) mice and an increase in the extent of these rd8 spots in Mthfr(+/-)(rd8/rd8) mice at 24 weeks and beyond. FA revealed marked vascular leakage, ischemia and vascular tortuosity in Mthfr(+/-)(rd8/rd8) mice at 24 and 52 weeks. Retinal dysplasia was observed in ∼14-33% Mthfr(+/-)(rd8/rd8) mice by morphometric analysis. This was accompanied by a ∼20% reduction in cells of the GCL of Mthfr(+/-)(rd8/rd8) mice at 24 and 52 weeks. Retinal flat mount immunostaining with isolectin-B4 showed neovascularization and loss of blood vessel integrity in Mthfr(+/-)(rd8/rd8) mice in contrast to mild vasculopathy in Mthfr(+/+rd8/rd8) mice. Taken together, our data support an earlier onset and worsened retinal phenotype when Mthfr and rd8 mutations coexist. Our study sets the stage for future studies to investigate the role of MTHFR deficiency in human CRB1 retinopathies. PMID:26646559

  8. Demonstration tokamak power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Mattas, R.; Smith, D.L.; DeFreece, D.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design for a tokamak demonstration power plant (DEMO) was developed. A large part of the study focused on examining the key issues and identifying the R and D needs for: (1) current drive for steady-state operation, (2) impurity control and exhaust, (3) tritium breeding blanket, and (4) reactor configuration and maintenance. Impurity control and exhaust will not be covered in this paper but is discussed in another paper in these proceedings, entitled Key Issues of FED/INTOR Impurity Control System.

  9. TRW utility demonstration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The TRW Advanced Entrained Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/oil unit to fire 2.5% sulfur coal. The slagging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Environmental Standards. During this report period, activity continued to address the total program funding shortfall. Ideas and responsibilities for further evaluation have been put forward to reduce the shortfall. In addition, an effort aimed at gaining additional program sponsorships, was initiated.

  10. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  11. Santa Clara Demonstration Status

    SciTech Connect

    Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O'Shea, Thomas P.

    1996-08-01

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. The commercial product specifications have been developed by working closely with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG). FCCG members include municipal utilities, rural electric co-ops, and investor owned utilities who have expressed interest in being the initial purchasers of the first commercial DFC power plants. The utility participants in the SCDP have been drawn from the membership of FCCG. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant, and FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer for the design and construction of the plant, and also provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

  12. Space Research Benefits Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Angie Jackman, a NASA project manager in microgravity research, demonstrates the enhanced resilience of undercooled metal alloys as compared to conventional alloys. Experiments aboard the Space Shuttle helped scientists refine their understanding of the physical properties of certain metal alloys when undercooled (i.e., kept liquid below their normal solidification temperature). This new knowledge then allowed scientists to modify a terrestrial production method so they can now make limited quantities marketed under the Liquid Metal trademark. The exhibit was a part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  13. Demonstration of optical microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotz, Kenneth T.; Kalogerakis, Konstantinos S.; Noble, Kyle A.; Smith, Sarah E.; Faris, Gregory W.

    2004-06-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for the control of small droplets using laser-based heating. Temperature dependent interfacial surface tensions were the primary force used to move droplets. With this approach, ~1.7 μL to 14 pL droplets were moved on a bare, unmodified polystyrene surface, at speeds of up to 3 mm/s. Upon contact, droplets spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed within 33 ms. We performed an optical absorption-based protein assay using horseradish peroxidase and a chromogenic substrate (ABTS), and readily detected as little as ~125 attomoles of reacting enzyme.

  14. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. f. Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management. g. Provide a better standard of healthcare for crew members through reductions in the time required by crew and ground personnel to provide medical treatment and the number of crew errors experienced during treatment.

  15. AVO interoperability demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Francois; Allen, Mark; Ochsenbein, Francois; Wicenec, Andreas J.; Arviset, Christophe; Micol, Alberto; Mann, Robert G.; Rixon, Guy T.; Didelon, Pierre; Garrington, Simon T.; Richards, Anita M. S.

    2002-12-01

    AVO Work Area 2 consists of deployment and demonstration of an interoperability prototype. Access to archives of all the partners (ESO, ESA, AstroGrid, Terapix, Jodrell Bank) is implemented via the CDS data federation and integration tools: VizieR and Aladin. The prototype is available for science usage and more functionalities, based in particular on the usage of Uniform Content Descriptors (UCDs) for data mining, will be developed. Case by case discussion with data providers will help to establish a set of practical recommendations for interoperability. Science requirements and new technologies studied by the other AVO work Areas will also be tested. Discussions on standards are ongoing among all VO projects.

  16. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  17. Solar Thermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biesinger, K.; Cuppett, D.; Dyer, D.

    2012-01-30

    HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with ‘Kalwall’ building panels. An added feature of the “Kalwall” system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

  18. Inflammatory responses to pneumovirus infection in IFN-alpha beta R gene-deleted mice.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Tara L; Dyer, Kimberly D; Ellis, John A; Bonville, Cynthia A; Foster, Barbara; Prussin, Calman; Easton, Andrew J; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2005-10-01

    Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; family Paramyxoviridae) is a natural pathogen of rodents that reproduces important clinical features of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection in humans. As anticipated, PVM infection induces transcription of IFN antiviral response genes preferentially in wild-type over IFN-alphabetaR gene-deleted (IFN-alphabetaR-/-) mice. However, we demonstrate that PVM infection results in enhanced expression of eotaxin-2 (CCL24), thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (CCL17), and the proinflammatory RNase mouse eosinophil-associated RNase (mEar) 11, and decreased expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-5, IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10, and TLR-3 in lung tissue of IFN-alphabetaR-/- mice when compared with wild type. No differential expression of chemokines MIP-1alpha or MIP-2 or Th2 cytokines IL-4 or IL-5 was observed. Differential expression of proinflammatory mediators was associated with distinct patterns of lung pathology. The widespread granulocytic infiltration and intra-alveolar edema observed in PVM-infected, wild-type mice are replaced with patchy, dense inflammatory foci localized to the periphery of the larger blood vessels. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from IFN-alphabetaR-/- mice yielded 7- to 8-fold fewer leukocytes overall, with increased percentages of eosinophils, monocytes, and CD4+ T cells, and decreased percentage of CD8+ T cells. Differential pathology is associated with prolonged survival of the IFN-alphabetaR-/- mice (50% survival at 10.8 +/- 0.6 days vs the wild type at 9.0 +/- 0.3 days; p < 0.02) despite increased virus titers. Overall, our findings serve to identify novel transcripts that are differentially expressed in the presence or absence of IFN-alphabetaR-mediated signaling, further elucidating interactions between the IFN and antiviral inflammatory responses in vivo. PMID:16177121

  19. A single dose of hypnotic corrects sleep and EEG abnormalities in symptomatic Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Sandor; Varga, Janos; Morton, A Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    Sleep and electroencephalogram abnormalities are prominent early features of Huntington's disease (HD) that typically appear before the onset of characteristic motor symptoms. The changes in sleep and electroencephalogram seen in HD patients are largely recapitulated in mouse models of HD such as transgenic R6/2 lines. To test whether or not drugs with hypnotic properties can correct the sleep and electroencephalogram abnormalities seen in HD mice, we treated male wild-type (WT; N = 7) and R6/2 mice (N = 9) acutely with intraperitoneal injections of vehicle, zolpidem (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) or amitriptyline (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg), and then monitored their sleep-wake behavior. In R6/2 mice, both zolpidem and amitriptyline suppressed the abnormally high REM sleep amount and electroencephalographic gamma (30-46 Hz) oscillations in a dose-dependent manner. Amitriptyline's effect on sleep was similar in both genotypes, whereas zolpidem showed significant genotype differences. Zolpidem exerted a strong hypnotic effect in WT mice by increasing electroencephalographic delta power, doubling the mean bout duration and the total amount of non-rapid eye movement sleep. However, no such effect was seen in R6/2 mice. Our study demonstrates that the pathophysiological changes seen in sleep and electroencephalogram are not 'hard-wired' in HD brain and can be reversed even at late stages of the disease. The diminished hypnotic effect of zolpidem suggests that the GABAergic control of sleep-wake states is impaired in HD mice. A better understanding of the neurochemical basis underlying these abnormalities should lead to more effective and rational therapies for HD. PMID:26805423

  20. Pathogenesis of Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous in Mice Lacking the Arf Tumor Suppressor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Amy C.; Thornton, J. Derek; Liu, Jiewiu; Wang, XiaoFei; Zuo, Jian; Jablonski, Monica M.; Chaum, Edward; Zindy, Frederique; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV) is an idiopathic developmental eye disease associated with failed involution of the hyaloid vasculature. The present work addressed the pathogenesis of PHPV in a mouse model that replicates many aspects of the human disease. Methods Ophthalmoscopic and histologic analyses documented pathologic processes in eyes of mice lacking the Arf gene compared with Ink4a-deficient and wild-type control animals. Immunohistochemical staining, in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR demonstrated the expression of relevant gene products. Arf gene expression was determined by in situ hybridization using wholemounts of wild-type mouse eyes and by immunofluorescence staining for green fluores-cent protein (GFP) in Arf+/GFP heterozygous knock-in mouse eyes. Results Abnormalities in Arf−/− mice mimicked those found in patients with severe PHPV. The mice had microphthalmia; fibrovascular, retrolental tissue containing retinal pigment epithelial cells and remnants of the hyaloid vascular system; posterior lens capsule destruction with lens degeneration and opacity; and severe retinal dysplasia and detachment. Eyes of mice lacking the overlapping Ink4a gene were normal. Arf was selectively expressed in perivascular cells within the vitreous of the postnatal eye. Cells composing the retrolental mass in Arf−/− mice expressed the Arf promoter. The remnant hyaloid vessels expressed Flk-1. Its ligand, vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf), was expressed in the retrolental tissue and the adjacent dysplastic neuroretina. Conclusions Arf−/− mice have features that accurately mimic severe PHPV. In the HVS, Arf expression in perivascular cells may block their accumulation or repress Vegf expression to promote HVS involution and prevent PHPV. PMID:15452040

  1. Increased Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions in Mice with a Detached Tectorial Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cheatham, Mary Ann; Ahmad, Aisha; Zhou, Yingjie; Goodyear, Richard J; Dallos, Peter; Richardson, Guy P

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in genes encoding tectorial membrane (TM) proteins are a significant cause of human hereditary hearing loss (Hildebrand et al. 2011), and several mouse models have been developed to study the functional significance of this accessory structure in the mammalian cochlea. In this study, we use otoacoustic emissions (OAE), signals obtained from the ear canal that provide a measure of cochlear function, to characterize a mouse in which the TM is detached from the spiral limbus due to an absence of otoancorin (Otoa, Lukashkin et al. 2012). Our results demonstrate that spontaneous emissions (SOAE), sounds produced in the cochlea without stimulation, increase dramatically in mice with detached TMs even though their hearing sensitivity is reduced. This behavior is unusual because wild-type (WT) controls are rarely spontaneous emitters. SOAEs in mice lacking Otoa predominate around 7 kHz, which is much lower than in either WT animals when they generate SOAEs or in mutant mice in which the TM protein Ceacam16 is absent (Cheatham et al. 2014). Although both mutants lack Hensen's stripe, loss of this TM feature is only observed in regions coding frequencies greater than ~15 kHz in WT mice so its loss cannot explain the low-frequency, de novo SOAEs observed in mice lacking Otoa. The fact that ~80 % of mice lacking Otoa produce SOAEs even when they generate smaller distortion product OAEs suggests that the active process is still functioning in these mutants but the system(s) involved have become less stable due to alterations in TM structure. PMID:26691158

  2. Impact of PPAR-α induction on glucose homoeostasis in alcohol-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Valérie; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Lanthier, Nicolas; Sempoux, Christine; Cani, Patrice D; van Rooijen, Nico; Stärkel, Peter; Horsmans, Yves; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol consumption is a major cause of liver disease. It also associates with increased cardiovascular risk and Type 2 diabetes. ALD (alcoholic liver disease) and NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) share pathological features, pathogenic mechanisms and pattern of disease progression. In NAFLD, steatosis, lipotoxicity and liver inflammation participate to hepatic insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to verify the effect of alcohol on hepatic insulin sensitivity and to evaluate the role of alcohol-induced steatosis and inflammation on glucose homoeostasis. C57BL/6J mice were fed for 20 days a modified Lieber-DeCarli diet in which the alcohol concentration was gradually increased up to 35% of daily caloric intake. OH (alcohol liquid diet)-fed mice had liver steatosis and inflammatory infiltration. In addition, these mice developed insulin resistance in the liver, but not in muscles, as demonstrated by euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp and analysis of the insulin signalling cascade. Treatment with the PPAR-α (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-α) agonist Wy14,643 protected against OH-induced steatosis and KC (Kupffer cell) activation and almost abolished OH-induced insulin resistance. As KC activation may modulate insulin sensitivity, we repeated the clamp studies in mice depleted in KC to decipher the role of macrophages. Depletion of KC using liposomes-encapsuled clodronate in OH-fed mice failed both to improve hepatic steatosis and to restore insulin sensitivity as assessed by clamp. Our study shows that chronic alcohol consumption induces steatosis, KC activation and hepatic insulin resistance in mice. PPAR-α agonist treatment that prevents steatosis and dampens hepatic inflammation also prevents alcohol-induced hepatic insulin resistance. However, KC depletion has little impact on OH-induced metabolic disturbances. PMID:23758436

  3. PFBC Utility Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

  4. Reactor vessel sectioning demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, R.A.

    1981-09-01

    A technical demonstration was successfully completed of simulated reactor vessel sectioning using the combined techniques of air arc gouging and flame cutting. A 4-ft x 3-ft x 9-in. thick sample was fabricated of A36 carbon steel to simulate a reactor vessel wall. A 1/4-in. layer of stainless steel (SS) was tungsten inert gas (TIG)-welded to the carbon steel. Several techniques were considered to section the simulated reactor vessel; air arc gouging was selected to penetrate the stainless steel, and flame cutting was selected to sever the carbon steel. Three sectioning operations were demonstrated. For all three, the operating parameters were the same; but the position of the sample was varied. For the first cut, the sample was placed in a horizontal position, and it was successfully severed from the SS side. For the second cut, the sample was turned over and cut from the carbon steel side. Cutting from the carbon steel side has the advantages of cost reduction

  5. Residential Transactive Control Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Fuller, Jason C.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Somani, Abhishek

    2014-02-19

    Arguably the most exciting aspect of the smart grid vision is the full participation of end-use resources with all forms of generation and energy storage in the reliable and efficient operation of an electric power system. Engaging all of these resources in a collaborative manner that respects the objectives of each resource, is sensitive to the system and local constraints of electricity flow, and scales to the large number of devices and systems participating is a grand challenge. Distributed decision-making system approaches have been presented and experimentation is underway. This paper reports on the preliminary findings of a residential demand response demonstration that uses the bidding transactions of supply and end-use air conditioning resources communicating with a real-time, 5 minute market to balance the various needs of the participants on a distribution feeder. The nature of the demonstration, the value streams being explored, and the operational scenarios implemented to characterize the system response are summarized along with preliminary findings.

  6. Vortex Apparatus and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerin, Said

    2010-05-01

    Vortex flow, from millimeter to kilometer in scale, is important in many scientific and technological areas. Examples are seen in water strider locomotion, from industrial pipe flow (wastewater treatment) to air traffic control (safe distance between aircrafts on a runway ready for takeoff) to atmospheric studies.2-5 In this paper, we focus on a particular vortex known as bathtub vortex (BTV). It occurs when water is drained from a hole at the bottom of a container such as a bathtub or a sink under the action of gravity. The vortex has a funnel shape with a central air core, resembling a tornado. We have designed a portable apparatus to demonstrate bathtub vortex on a continual basis. The apparatus consists of a clear cylinder supported by a frame over a water reservoir and a submersible pump. Young and old have been equally amazed by watching the demonstrations at various public presentations held at the University of the Pacific recently. With material cost of less than 100, the apparatus can be easily fabricated and used at other universities. With a short set-up time, it is an ideal device for promoting science to the general public, and it can be used to enhance lectures in physics courses as well.

  7. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Craig; Carroll, Paul; Bell, Abigail

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and posted for universal access at www.nreca.coop/smartgrid. This research is available for widespread distribution to both cooperative members and non-members. These reports are listed in Table 1.2. Interoperability: The deliverable in this area was the advancement of the MultiSpeak™ interoperability standard from version 4.0 to version 5.0, and improvement in the MultiSpeak™ documentation to include more than 100 use cases. This deliverable substantially expanded the scope and usability of MultiSpeak, ™ the most widely deployed utility interoperability standard, now in use by more than 900 utilities. MultiSpeak™ documentation can be accessed only at www.multispeak.org. Cyber Security: NRECA’s starting point was to develop cyber security tools that incorporated succinct guidance on best practices. The deliverables were: cyber security extensions to MultiSpeak,™ which allow more security message exchanges; a Guide to Developing a Cyber Security and Risk Mitigation Plan; a Cyber Security Risk Mitigation Checklist; a Cyber Security Plan Template that co-ops can use to create their own cyber security plans; and Security Questions for Smart Grid Vendors.

  8. Technology Tips: Building Interactive Demonstrations with Sage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Maura

    2013-01-01

    Sage is an open-source software package that can be used in many different areas of mathematics, ranging from algebra to calculus and beyond. One of the most exciting pedagogical features of Sage (http://www.sagemath.org) is its ability to create interacts--interactive examples that can be used in a classroom demonstration or by students in a…

  9. Demonstration of Berry Phase in Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Hong-Ji; Ding, Liang-En

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the observed phase shift of the RF signal and its intensity dependence under extreme low pump and probe laser field conditions are dominated by Berry phase effect in optical spectroscopy with good adiabatic approximation, which provides all features' agreements between the theoretical and the experimental results.

  10. Technology Tips: Building Interactive Demonstrations with Sage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Maura

    2013-01-01

    Sage is an open-source software package that can be used in many different areas of mathematics, ranging from algebra to calculus and beyond. One of the most exciting pedagogical features of Sage (http://www.sagemath.org) is its ability to create interacts--interactive examples that can be used in a classroom demonstration or by students in a

  11. Icariin, a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, improves learning and memory in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by stimulation of NO/cGMP signalling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng; Gong, Qi-Hai; Xu, Ya-Sha; Wang, Li-Na; Jin, Hai; Li, Fei; Li, Li-Sheng; Ma, Yue-Ming; Shi, Jing-Shan

    2014-06-01

    Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors are predominantly used in the treatment of erectile dysfunction, and have been recently shown to have a potential therapeutic effect for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) through stimulation of nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signalling by elevating cGMP, which is a secondary messenger involved in processes of neuroplasticity. In the present study, the effects of a PDE5 inhibitor, icarrin (ICA), on learning and memory as well as the pathological features in APP/PS1 transgenic AD mice were investigated. Ten-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic mice overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP695swe) and presenilin 1 (PS1-dE9) were given ICA (30 and 60 mg/kg) or sildenafil (SIL) (2 mg/kg), age-matched wild-type (WT) mice were given ICA (60 mg/kg), and APP/PS1 and WT control groups were given an isovolumic vehicle orally twice a day for four months. Results demonstrated that ICA treatments significantly improved learning and memory of APP/PS1 transgenic mice in Y-maze tasks. The amyloid precursor protein (APP), amyloid-beta (Aβ1-40/42) and PDE5 mRNA and/or protein levels were increased in the hippocampus and cortex of APP/PS1 mice, and ICA treatments decreased these physiopathological changes. Furthermore, ICA-treated mice showed an increased expression of three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms at both mRNA and protein levels, together with increased NO and cGMP levels in the hippocampus and cortex of mice. These findings demonstrate that ICA improves learning and memory functions in APP/PS1 transgenic mice possibly through the stimulation of NO/cGMP signalling and co-ordinated induction of NOS isoforms. PMID:24513083

  12. Molecular, Physiological, and Motor Performance Defects in DMSXL Mice Carrying >1,000 CTG Repeats from the Human DM1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Aline; Medja, Fadia; Nicole, Annie; Vignaud, Alban; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Ferry, Arnaud; Decostre, Valérie; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas; Baraibar, Martin; Gomes-Pereira, Mário; Puymirat, Jack; Bassez, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Munnich, Arnold; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3′UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro–RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice). After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice). Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing), were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances). We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic therapeutic strategies on molecular and physiological phenotypes. PMID:23209425

  13. Estradiol-Treated Female Mice as Surrogate Hosts for Neisseria gonorrhoeae Genital Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jerse, Ann E.; Wu, Hong; Packiam, Mathanraj; Vonck, Rachel A.; Begum, Afrin A.; Garvin, Lotisha E.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, animal modeling of gonorrhea has been hampered by the exclusive adaptation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to humans. Genital tract infection can be established in female mice that are treated with 17β-estradiol, however, and many features of experimental murine infection mimic human infection. Here we review the colonization kinetics and host response to experimental murine gonococcal infection, including mouse strain differences and evidence that IL-17 responses, toll-like receptor 4, and T regulatory cells play a role in infection. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the mouse system and the potential of transgenic mice to circumvent host restrictions. Additionally, we review studies with genetically defined mutants that demonstrated a role for sialyltransferase and the MtrC–MtrD–MtrE active efflux pump in evading innate defenses in vivo, but not for factors hypothesized to protect against the phagocytic respiratory burst and H2O2-producing lactobacilli. Studies using estradiol-treated mice have also revealed the existence of non-host-restricted iron sources in the female genital tract and the influence of hormonal factors on colonization kinetics and selection for opacity (Opa) protein expression. Recent work by others with estradiol-treated mice that are transgenic for human carcinoembryonic adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) supports a role for Opa proteins in enhancing cellular attachment and thus reduced shedding of N. gonorrhoeae. Finally we discuss the use of the mouse model in product testing and a recently developed gonorrhea chlamydia coinfection model. PMID:21747807

  14. Chimeric TK-NOG Mice: A Predictive Model for Cholestatic Human Liver Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dan; Wu, Manhong; Nishimura, Sachiko; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Michie, Sara A.; Zheng, Ming; Yang, Zicheng; Yates, Alexander John; Day, Jeffrey S.; Hillgren, Kathleen M.; Takeda, Saori Takedai; Guan, Yuan; Guo, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    Due to the substantial interspecies differences in drug metabolism and disposition, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans is often not predicted by studies performed in animal species. For example, a drug (bosentan) used to treat pulmonary artery hypertension caused unexpected cholestatic liver toxicity in humans, which was not predicted by preclinical toxicology studies in multiple animal species. In this study, we demonstrate that NOG mice expressing a thymidine kinase transgene (TK-NOG) with humanized livers have a humanized profile of biliary excretion of a test (cefmetazole) drug, which was shown by an in situ perfusion study to result from interspecies differences in the rate of biliary transport and in liver retention of this drug. We also found that readily detectable cholestatic liver injury develops in TK-NOG mice with humanized livers after 1 week of treatment with bosentan (160, 32, or 6 mg/kg per day by mouth), whereas liver toxicity did not develop in control mice after 1 month of treatment. The laboratory and histologic features of bosentan-induced liver toxicity in humanized mice mirrored that of human subjects. Because DILI has become a significant public health problem, drug safety could be improved if preclinical toxicology studies were performed using humanized TK-NOG. PMID:25424997

  15. Brainwide distribution and variance of amyloid-beta deposits in tg-ArcSwe mice.

    PubMed

    Lillehaug, Sveinung; Syverstad, Gry H; Nilsson, Lars N G; Bjaalie, Jan G; Leergaard, Trygve B; Torp, Reidun

    2014-03-01

    Transgenic mice carrying the Arctic (E693G) and Swedish (KM670/6701NL) amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) develop amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposits in the brain that resemble Alzheimer's disease neuropathology. Earlier studies of this model have documented morphologic features in selected parts of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, but the spatial distribution within the brain and variance of Aβ deposits within a group of tg-ArcSwe mice is unknown. Using immunohistochemistry and brainwide microscopic analysis of 12-month-old tg-ArcSwe mice, we show that Aβx-40 plaque deposits are consistently present in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus and variably present in other regions. Using quantitative image analysis, we demonstrated that the average Aβ burden in the cortex and hippocampus is similar across animals, with coefficients of variance of 22% and 25%, respectively. This indicates that interventional studies of tg-ArcSwe mice are feasible using region-of-interest comparisons and that interventional trials require larger group sizes than commonly used. We also present an online atlas providing access to images showing the detailed characteristics and spatial distribution patterns of Aβx-40 labeling. PMID:24126157

  16. Behavioral and Neural Correlates of Acute and Scheduled Hunger in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gunapala, Keith M.; Parfyonov, Maksim; Chang, Chris H.; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Steele, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    In rodents, daily feeding schedules induce food anticipatory activity (FAA) rhythms with formal properties suggesting mediation by food-entrained circadian oscillators (FEOs). The search for the neuronal substrate of FEOs responsible for FAA is an active area of research, but studies spanning several decades have yet to identify unequivocally a brain region required for FAA. Variability of results across studies leads to questions about underlying biology versus methodology. Here we describe in C57BL/6 male mice the effects of varying the ‘dose’ of caloric restriction (0%, 60%, 80%, 110%) on the expression of FAA as measured by a video-based analysis system, and on the induction of c-Fos in brain regions that have been implicated in FAA. We determined that more severe caloric restriction (60%) leads to a faster onset of FAA with increased magnitude. Using the 60% caloric restriction, we found little evidence for unique signatures of neuronal activation in the brains of mice anticipating a daily mealtime compared to mice that were fasted acutely or fed ad-libitum–even in regions such as the dorsomedial and ventrolateral hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and cerebellum that have previously been implicated in FAA. These results underscore the importance of feeding schedule parameters in determining quantitative features of FAA in mice, and demonstrate dissociations between behavioral FAA and neural activity in brain areas thought to harbor FEOs or participate in their entrainment or output. PMID:24806659

  17. Adaptive feature extraction expert

    SciTech Connect

    Yuschik, M.

    1983-01-01

    The identification of discriminatory features places an upper bound on the recognition rate of any automatic speech recognition (ASR) system. One way to structure the extraction of features is to construct an expert system which applies a set of rules to identify particular properties of the speech patterns. However, these patterns vary for an individual speaker and from speaker to speaker so that another expert is actually needed to learn the new variations. The author investigates the problem by using sets of discriminatory features that are suggested by a feature generation expert, improves the selectivity of these features with a training expert, and finally develops a minimally spanning feature set with a statistical selection expert. 12 references.

  18. Long-term effects of high-fat or high-carbohydrate diets on glucose tolerance in mice with heterozygous carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1a deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, L R; Tian, L; Hamm, D A; Schoeb, T R; Gower, B A; Nagy, T R; Wood, P A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Abnormal fatty acid metabolism is an important feature in the mechanisms of insulin resistance and ?-cell dysfunction. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1a (CPT-1a, liver isoform) has a pivotal role in the regulation of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We investigated the role of CPT-1a in the development of impaired glucose tolerance using a mouse model for CPT-1a deficiency when challenged by either a high-carbohydrate (HCD) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for a total duration of up to 46 weeks. Methods: Insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were assessed in heterozygous CPT-1a-deficient (CPT-1a+/?) male mice after being fed either a HCD or a HFD for durations of 28 weeks and 46 weeks. Both glucose and insulin tolerance tests were used to investigate ?-cell function and insulin sensitivity. Differences in islet insulin content and hepatic steatosis were evaluated by morphological analysis. Results: CPT-1a+/? mice were more insulin-sensitive than CPT-1a+/+ mice when fed either HCD or HFD. The increased insulin sensitivity was associated with an increased expression of Cpt-1b (muscle isoform) in liver, as well as increased microvesicular hepatic steatosis compared with CPT-1a+/+ mice. CPT-1a+/? mice were more glucose tolerant than CPT-1a+/+ mice when fed the HCD, but there was no significant difference when fed HFD. Moreover, CPT-1a+/? mice fed HFD or HCD had fewer and smaller pancreatic islets than CPT-1a+/+ mice. Conclusions: CPT-1a deficiency preserved insulin sensitivity when challenged by long-term feeding of either diet. Furthermore, CPT-1a-deficient mice had distinct phenotypes dependent on the diet fed demonstrating that both diet and genetics collectively have a role in the development of impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:22229081

  19. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid running a multiphase low frequency AC signal. Electrostatically charged particles, such as those encountered on the moon, Mars, or an asteroid, are carried along by the traveling field due to the action of Coulomb and dielectrophoretic forces."2 The technical details have been described in a separate article. This document details the design and construction process of a small demonstration unit. Once finished, this device will go to the Office of the ChiefTechnologist at NASA headquarters, where it will be used to familiarize the public with the technology. 1 NASA KSC FO Intern, Prototype Development Laboratory, Kennedy Space Center, University of Central Florida Kennedy Space

  20. Quantification of alcohol drinking patterns in mice.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, Manuela; Leixner, Sarah; Spanagel, Rainer; Bilbao, Ainhoa

    2015-11-01

    The use of mice in alcohol research provides an excellent model system for a better understanding of the genetics and neurobiology of alcohol addiction. Almost 60 years ago, alcohol researchers began to test strains of mice for alcohol preference and intake. In particular, various voluntary alcohol drinking paradigms in the home cage were developed. In mouse models of voluntary oral alcohol consumption, animals have concurrent access to water and either one or several concentrated alcohol solutions in their home cages. Although these models have high face validity, many experimental conditions require a more precise monitoring of alcohol consumption in mice in order to capture the role of specific strains or genes, or any other manipulation on alcohol drinking behavior. Therefore, we have developed a fully automated, highly precise monitoring system for alcohol drinking in mice in the home cage. This system is now commercially available. We show that this drinkometer system allows for detecting differences in drinking behavior (i) in transgenic mice, (ii) following alcohol deprivation, and (iii) following stress applications that are usually not detected by classical home-cage drinking paradigms. In conclusion, our drinkometer system allows disturbance-free and high resolution monitoring of alcohol drinking behavior. In particular, micro-drinking and circadian drinking patterns can be monitored in genetically modified and inbred strains of mice after environmental and pharmacological manipulation, and therefore this system represents an improvement in measuring behavioral features that are of relevance for the development of alcohol use disorders. PMID:26515884

  1. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  2. Springtime Demonstrations in Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelson, Edward; Grant, Roderick M.; Jossem, E. Leonard; Kagan, Harris P.

    1998-04-01

    This demo show will introduce a selection of pleasurable and puzzling phenomena. From the customary big bang to the very perplexing behavior of an ordinary light bulb, there will be something to amaze and intrigue everyone. Our unicyclist will answer Alexander Pope's question: "Shall gravitation cease if you go by?'' See the world's largest soap film and the spectrum obtained without a prism or a slit, and see if the electrical demonstrations will work. The audience will receive a list of demos and a list of references and explanations. Contributing Authors: Mark J. Nandor, The Ohio State Univ., Richard A. Noll, The Ohio State Univ., Maarten Rutgers, The Ohio State Univ., Harold Whitt, The Ohio State Univ.

  3. The GLORIA demonstrator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majcher, A.; Ćwiek, A.; Ćwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Zaremba, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2013-10-01

    GLORIA stands for "GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array" and it is the first free and open-access network of robotic telescopes on the world. Based on a Web 2.0 environment amateur and professional users can do research in astronomy by observing with robotic telescopes, and/or analyzing data acquired with GLORIA, or from other free access databases. GLORIA project develops free standards, protocols and tools for controlling Robotic Telescopes and related instrumentation, for scheduling observations in the telescope network, and for conducting so-called off-line experiments based on the analysis of astronomical data. This contribution summarizes the implementation and results from the first research level off-line demonstrator experiment implemented in GLORIA, which was base on the data collected with the "Pi of the Sky" telescope in Chile.

  4. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    SciTech Connect

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  5. Space Research Benefits Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An entranced youngster watches a demonstration of the enhanced resilience of undercooled metal alloys as compared to conventional alloys. Steel bearings are dropped onto plates made of steel, titanium alloy, and zirconium liquid metal alloy, so-called because its molecular structure is amorphous and not crystalline. The bearing on the liquid metal plate bounces for a minute or more longer than on the other plates. Experiments aboard the Space Shuttle helped scientists refine their understanding of the physical properties of certain metal alloys when undercooled (i.e., kept liquid below their normal solidification temperature). This new knowledge then allowed scientists to modify a terrestrial production method so they can now make limited quantities marketed under the Liquid Metal trademark. The exhibit was a part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  6. Structural assembly demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The experiment is of an operational variety, designed to assess crew capability in Large Space System (LSS) assembly. The six Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment objectives include: (1) the establishment of a quantitative correlation between LSS neutral buoyancy simulation and on-orbit assembly operations in order to enhance the validity of those assembly simulations; (2) the quantitative study of the capabilities and mechanics of human assembly in an Extravehicular Activity environment; (3) the further corroboration of the LSS Assembly Analysis cost algorithm through the obtainment of hard data base information; (4) the verification of LSS assembly techniques and timeless, as well as the identification of crew imposed loads and assembly aid requirements and concepts; (5) verification of a Launch/Assembly Platform structure concept for other LSS missions; and (6) lastly, to advance thermal control concepts through a flexible heat pipe.

  7. ARJIS satellite demonstration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severance, Steve; Williams, Carl

    2005-06-01

    In 2003, the California Space Authority (CSA) was provided funding by the U. S. Congress through the Defense Appropriations Act to develop a project that would demonstrate the U.S. space enterprise capability that would contribute to the effectiveness of those engaged in Homeland Security. The project was given broad latitude in selecting the area of Homeland Security to be addressed and the nature of the space technology to be applied. CSA became aware of a nascent law enforcement data-sharing project in the San Diego region known as the Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS). First developed by the police departments in San Diego, ARJIS is an innovative system that shares criminal justice information among 50 federal, state, and local agencies. ARJIS was completing a pilot project that enabled officers to receive information on handheld computers, which was transmitted wirelessly through cellular networks. The accessed information came from several databases that collectively contained the entire region's crime and arrest reports, traffic citations, and incidents, as well as state and county wants and warrants. The fundamental limitations that plague all cellular-based devices caught CSA's attention and resulted in a cooperative effort to harden the communications link between the patrol officer and critical data. The principal goal of the SATCOM development task was to create a proof-of-concept application that would use SATCOM links to augment the current ARJIS handheld wireless (cellular) capability. The successful technical demonstration and the positive support for satellite communications from the law enforcement community showed that this project filled a need-both for improved information sharing and for highly reliable communications systems.

  8. Of Mice and Men: Experimental Induction of Calcium Oxalate Nephrolithiasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saeed R.; Glenton, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Availability of various transgenic and knockout mice provides an excellent opportunity to better understand the pathophysiology of calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone disease. However attempts to produce CaOx nephrolithiasis in mice have not been very successful. We have hypothesized that CaOx nephrolithiasis in mice requires increasing the urinary excretion of calcium as well as oxalate and that experimentally induced hyperoxaluria alone is not sufficient. To provide evidence we induced hyperoxaluria by administering hyperoxaluria inducing agents to normocalciuric as well as hypercalciuric mice and investigated various aspects of nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods Ethylene glycol (EG), glyoxylate (GOx) or hydroxyl proline (HLP) were administered through diet to male and female normocalciuric B6 mice as well as hypercalciuric Npt2a −/− mice for 4 weeks. 24 hour urine samples were collected on 0.3,7,14,21 and 28 days and analyzed for pH, creatinine, lactate dehydrogensae (LDH) calcium and oxalate. Kidneys were examined using light microscopy. Urine was examined for crystals using both light and scanning electron microscopy. Results Hypercalciuric mice on HLP did not tolerate the treatment and had to be sacrificed before 28 days. All mice receiving EG, GOx or HLP became hyperoxaluric and demonstrated CaOx crystalluria. None of the female mice, normo or hypercalciuric developed renal CaOx crystal deposits. All mice on Gox and some on EG developed CaOx nephrolithiais. Kidneys of all mice showed epithelial injury. Male mice particularly on GOx showed more renal injury and migration of inflammatory cells into the interstitium around the crystal deposits. Conclusions Results confirm that induction of hyperoxaluria alone is not sufficient for CaOx nephrolithiais in mice. Hypercalciuria is also required. Kidneys of male mice are more prone to injury than those of female mice and are susceptible to CaOx crystal deposition. Perhaps epithelial injury promotes crystal retention. Thus CaOx nephrolithiais in mice is gender dependent and requires both hypercalciuria and hyperoxaluria. PMID:20663521

  9. Otitis Media in Sperm-Associated Antigen 6 (Spag6)-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Li, Boqin; Bai, Xiaohui; Strauss, Jerome F.; Zhang, Zhibing; Wang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian SPAG6 protein is localized to the axoneme central apparatus, and it is required for normal flagella and cilia motility. Recent studies demonstrated that the protein also regulates ciliogenesis and cilia polarity in the epithelial cells of brain ventricles and trachea. Motile cilia are also present in the epithelial cells of the middle ear and Eustachian tubes, where the ciliary system participates in the movement of serous fluid and mucus in the middle ear. Cilia defects are associated with otitis media (OM), presumably due to an inability to efficiently transport fluid, mucus and particles including microorganisms. We investigated the potential role of SPAG6 in the middle ear and Eustachian tubes by studying mice with a targeted mutation in the Spag6 gene. SPAG6 is expressed in the ciliated cells of middle ear epithelial cells. The orientation of the ciliary basal feet was random in the middle ear epithelial cells of Spag6-deficient mice, and there was an associated disrupted localization of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein, FZD6. These features are associated with disordered cilia orientation, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, which leads to uncoordinated cilia beating. The Spag6 mutant mice were also prone to develop OM. However, there were no significant differences in bacterial populations, epithelial goblet cell density, mucin expression and Eustachian tube angle between the mutant and wild-type mice, suggesting that OM was due to accumulation of fluid and mucus secondary to the ciliary dysfunction. Our studies demonstrate a role for Spag6 in the pathogenesis of OM in mice, possibly through its role in the regulation of cilia/basal body polarity through the PCP-dependent mechanisms in the middle ear and Eustachian tubes. PMID:25393619

  10. Adaptive unsupervised slow feature analysis for feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xingjian; Liu, Chuancai; Wang, Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Slow feature analysis (SFA) extracts slowly varying features out of the input data and has been successfully applied on pattern recognition. However, SFA heavily relies on the constructed time series when SFA is applied on databases that neither have obvious temporal structure nor have label information. Traditional SFA constructs time series based on k-nearest neighborhood (k-NN) criterion. Specifically, the time series set constructed by k-NN criterion is likely to include noisy time series or lose suitable time series because the parameter k is difficult to determine. To overcome these problems, a method called adaptive unsupervised slow feature analysis (AUSFA) is proposed. First, AUSFA designs an adaptive criterion to generate time series for characterizing submanifold. The constructed time series have two properties: (1) two points of time series lie on the same submanifold and (2) the submanifold of the time series is smooth. Second, AUSFA seeks projections that simultaneously minimize the slowness scatter and maximize the fastness scatter to extract slow discriminant features. Extensive experimental results on three benchmark face databases demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  11. Phenotypic Characterization of miR-92a?/? Mice Reveals an Important Function of miR-92a in Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Penzkofer, Daniela; Bonauer, Angelika; Fischer, Ariane; Tups, Alexander; Brandes, Ralf P.; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) emerged as key regulators of gene expression. Germline hemizygous deletion of the gene that encodes the miR-17?92 miRNA cluster was associated with microcephaly, short stature and digital abnormalities in humans. Mice deficient for the miR-17?92 cluster phenocopy several features such as growth and skeletal development defects and exhibit impaired B cell development. However, the individual contribution of miR-17?92 cluster members to this phenotype is unknown. Here we show that germline deletion of miR-92a in mice is not affecting heart development and does not reduce circulating or bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells, but induces skeletal defects. MiR-92a?/? mice are born at a reduced Mendelian ratio, but surviving mice are viable and fertile. However, body weight of miR-92a?/? mice was reduced during embryonic and postnatal development and adulthood. A significantly reduced body and skull length was observed in miR-92a?/? mice compared to wild type littermates. CT analysis revealed that the length of the 5th mesophalanx to 5th metacarpal bone of the forelimbs was significantly reduced, but bones of the hindlimbs were not altered. Bone density was not affected. These findings demonstrate that deletion of miR-92a is sufficient to induce a developmental skeletal defect. PMID:24979655

  12. NASA Bioreactor Demonstration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Leland W. K. Chung (left), Director, Molecular Urology Therapeutics Program at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, is principal investigator for the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05). With him is Dr. Jun Shu, an assistant professor of Orthopedics Surgery from Kuming Medical University China. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  13. Orbital construction demonstration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA) was developed that can be used for evaluating and establishing practical large structural assembly operations. A flight plan for initial placement and continued utility is presented as a basic for an entirely new shuttle payload line-item having great future potential benefit for space applications. The OCDA is a three-axis stabilized platform in low-earth orbit with many structural nodals for mounting large construction and fabrication equipments. This equipment would be used to explore methods for constructing the large structures for future missions. The OCDA would be supported at regular intervals by the shuttle. Construction experiments and consumables resupply are performed during shuttle visit periods. A 250 kw solar array provides sufficient power to support the shuttle while attached to the OCDA and to run construction experiments at the same time. Wide band communications with a Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite compatible high gain antenna can be used between shuttle revisits to perform remote controlled, TV assisted construction experiments.

  14. Plug cluster module demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    The low pressure, film cooled rocket engine design concept developed during two previous ALRC programs was re-evaluated for application as a module for a plug cluster engine capable of performing space shuttle OTV missions. The nominal engine mixture ratio was 5.5 and the engine life requirements were 1200 thermal cycles and 10 hours total operating life. The program consisted of pretest analysis; engine tests, performed using residual components; and posttest analysis. The pretest analysis indicated that operation of the operation of the film cooled engine at O/F = 5.5 was feasible. During the engine tests, steady state wall temperature and performance measurement were obtained over a range of film cooling flow rates, and the durability of the engine was demonstrated by firing the test engine 1220 times at a nominal performance ranging from 430 - 432 seconds. The performance of the test engine was limited by film coolant sleeve damage which had occurred during previous testing. The post-test analyses indicated that the nominal performance level can be increased to 436 seconds.

  15. Gait recognition based on fusion features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haizhen; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Xi

    2009-10-01

    Gait recognition and analysis is a promising biometrics technology finding applications in numerous sectors of our society. This paper proposes a new fusion algorithm where the static and dynamic features are fused to obtain optimal performance. The new fusion algorithm divides decision situations into two categories. The wavelet moment is used to describe the static features of gait sequence images, and the three widths of the body contour are used to describe the dynamic features. In addition, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for feature transformation of spatial templates is proposed. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm performs an encouraging recognition rate.

  16. Time Varying Feature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterhoff, J.; Simonis, I.; Atkinson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The infrastructure to gather, store and access information about our environment is improving and growing rapidly. The increasing amount of information allows us to get a better understanding of the current state of our environment, historical processes and to simulate and predict the future state of the environment. Finer grained spatial and temporal data and more reliable communications make it easier to model dynamic states and ephemeral features. The exchange of information within and across geospatial domains is facilitated through the use of harmonized information models. The Observations & Measurements (O&M) developed through OGC and standardised by ISO is an example of such a cross-domain information model. It is used in many domains, including meteorology, hydrology as well as the emergency management. O&M enables harmonized representation of common metadata that belong to the act of determining the state of a feature property, whether by sensors, simulations or humans. In addition to the resulting feature property value, information such as the result quality but especially the time that the result applies to the feature property can be represented. Temporal metadata is critical to modelling past and future states of a feature. The features, and the semantics of each property, are defined in domain specific Application Schema using the General Feature Model (GFM) from ISO 19109 and usually encoded following ISO 19136. However, at the moment these standards provide only limited support for the representation and handling of time varying feature data. Features like rivers, wildfires or gas plumes have a defined state - for example geographic extent - at any given point in time. To keep track of changes, a more complex model for example using time-series coverages is required. Furthermore, the representation and management of feature property value changes via the service interfaces defined by OGC and ISO - namely: WFS and WCS - would be rather complex. Keeping track of feature property value corrections or even feature (state change) cancellations for auditing purposes is also not easy to achieve. The aviation domain has strong requirements to represent and manage the state of aeronautical features through time. Being able to efficiently encode and manage feature state changes, keeping track of all changes for auditing purposes and being able to determine the future state of an aeronautical feature as currently known to the system are vital for aeronautical applications. In order to support these requirements, the Aeronautical Information Exchange Model (AIXM) which has been developed by the aviation domain is based on the so called AIXM Temporality Model (AIXM-TM). The AIXM-TM defines various rules for modeling, representing and handling the state of aeronautical features through time. This is a promising approach that can be incorporated into the GFM so that ultimately the modeling and management of time varying feature data is supported in an interoperable and harmonized way in all geospatial domains. This presentation gives an introduction to the main concepts of the AIXM-TM. It also shows how the GFM can be extended to support time varying feature data. Finally, the relationship of O&M and time varying features is discussed.

  17. JCE Feature Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum, and WWW Site Review. These columns differ from the print feature columns in that they use the Internet as the publication medium. Doing so allows these features to include continually updated information, digital components, and links to other online resources. The Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems feature of JCE Internet serves as a good example for the kinds of resources that you can expect to find in an online feature column. Like other columns it contains a mission statement that defines the role of the column. It includes a digital library of continually updated examples of conceptual questions and challenge problems. (As I write this we have just added several new questions to the library.) It also includes a list of links to related online resources, information for authors about how to write questions and problems, and information for teachers about how to use conceptual questions and challenge problems. Teaching with Technology home page at JCE Online. One-Stop Feature Shop The updated Feature area of JCE Online offers information about all JCE feature columns in one place. It gives you a quick and convenient way to access a group of articles in a particular subject area. It provides authors and readers with a good definition of the column and its mission. It complements the print feature columns with online resources. It provides up-to-date bibliographies for selected areas of interest. And last, but not least, it provides that email address you can use to send that message of appreciation to the feature editor for his or her contribution to JCE and the chemical education community.

  18. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-05-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  19. VLBI2010 Demonstrator Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niell, A.

    2008-12-01

    The next generation geodetic VLBI instrument is being developed with a goal of 1 mm position uncertainty in twenty-four hours. Knowing that spatial and temporal fluctuations in the atmosphere delay are a major component of the error in position determination, the VLBI2010 committee has carried out a large number of simulations to arrive at design goals for the antenna system. These goals are fast slewing antennas and high delay precision per observation. With existing and anticipated data recording capabilities, these translate to an antenna diameter of 12 m or larger and a per-observation delay precision of approximately 4 psec. The major innovation for the VLBI2010 concept that allows the use of relatively small antennas to achieve these goals is the proposal to observe in four frequency bands, instead of the two currently used, in order to gain the higher precision of phase delays compared to the group delay. The other advance that enables the use of small antennas is the significant increase in data acquisition rates that has been made possible by the development of disk-based recorders and digital back ends. To evaluate this concept, a prototype of the feed-to-recorder system has been implemented by the Broadband Development Team* on two antennas, the 5 m MV-3 antenna at Goddard Space Flight Center near Washington, D.C., and the 18 m Westford antenna at Haystack Observatory near Boston. The system includes a broadband feed and low noise amplifiers covering the range approximately 2 GHz to 13 GHz, all cooled to 20K; a newly developed phase calibration generator; a flexible local oscillator (LO) that allows selection of any band in the range of the feed/LNAs; Digital Back End; and a disk-based recorder capable of a sustained rate of 2 gigabits per second (gbps). Four sets of the LO/DBE/recorder chain are used at each antenna to give a total record rate of 8 gbps. The systems have been successfully used in the band 8.5 to 9 GHz with one set of the recorder chain. Observations demonstrating the full four-band configuration are planned for October. In this talk the results of these tests, the improvements that are anticipated for the operational VLBI2010 network, and the status of other developments in the next generation of geodetic VLBI systems will be presented. * Bruce Whittier, Mike Titus, Jason SooHoo, Dan Smythe, Alan Rogers, Jay Redmond, Mike Poirier, Chuck Kodak, Alan Hinton, Ed Himwich, Skip Gordon, Mark Evangelista, Irv Diegel, Brian Corey, Tom Clark, Chris Beaudoin (in reverse alphabetical order)

  20. Hepcidin as a therapeutic tool to limit iron overload and improve anemia in ?-thalassemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gardenghi, Sara; Ramos, Pedro; Marongiu, Maria Franca; Melchiori, Luca; Breda, Laura; Guy, Ella; Muirhead, Kristen; Rao, Niva; Roy, Cindy N.; Andrews, Nancy C.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Follenzi, Antonia; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Ginzburg, Yelena; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.; Giardina, Patricia J.; Grady, Robert W.; Rivella, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Excessive iron absorption is one of the main features of ?-thalassemia and can lead to severe morbidity and mortality. Serial analyses of ?-thalassemic mice indicate that while hemoglobin levels decrease over time, the concentration of iron in the liver, spleen, and kidneys markedly increases. Iron overload is associated with low levels of hepcidin, a peptide that regulates iron metabolism by triggering degradation of ferroportin, an iron-transport protein localized on absorptive enterocytes as well as hepatocytes and macrophages. Patients with ?-thalassemia also have low hepcidin levels. These observations led us to hypothesize that more iron is absorbed in ?-thalassemia than is required for erythropoiesis and that increasing the concentration of hepcidin in the body of such patients might be therapeutic, limiting iron overload. Here we demonstrate that a moderate increase in expression of hepcidin in ?-thalassemic mice limits iron overload, decreases formation of insoluble membrane-bound globins and reactive oxygen species, and improves anemia. Mice with increased hepcidin expression also demonstrated an increase in the lifespan of their red cells, reversal of ineffective erythropoiesis and splenomegaly, and an increase in total hemoglobin levels. These data led us to suggest that therapeutics that could increase hepcidin levels or act as hepcidin agonists might help treat the abnormal iron absorption in individuals with ?-thalassemia and related disorders. PMID:21099112

  1. Apollo 14 composite casting demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This program assisted in the design and implementation of the composite casting demonstration for the Apollo 14 mission. Both flight and control samples were evaluated. Some conclusions resulting from a comparison of the flight and control samples were: (1) Solidification in neither the flight nor control samples was truly directional. (2) Apparent intermittent contact of the melt with the container in the flight samples led to unusual nucleation and growth structures. (3) There was greater uniformity, on a macro scale, of both pores and structural features in the flight sample; presumably the result of the reduced gravity conditions. (4) It seems quite feasible to produce enhanced dispersions of gases and dense phases in a melt which is solidified in reduced gravity. (5) A two-stage heating/cooling cycle may help directional solidification. (6) Sample materials should be selected from materials in which the dispersant fully wets the matrix material. (7) Experiments should be conducted in two modes: (1) where the melt is in good thermal contact with the container, and (2) where the melt is in a free-float condition.

  2. The Point-of-View in Feature Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scruton, Judson

    1979-01-01

    Discusses Tom Wolfe's point of view techniques and uses excerpts from two feature articles to demonstrate the basic point of view question for feature writers: how close do they want to get to their subjects? (GT)

  3. New features in MEDM.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K., Jr.

    1999-04-13

    MEDM, which is derived from Motif Editor and Display Manager, is the primary graphical interface to the EPICS control system. This paper describes new features that have been added to MEDM in the last two years. These features include new editing capabilities, a PV Info dialog box, a means of specifying limits and precision, a new implementation of the Cartesian Plot, new features for several objects, new capability for the Related Display, help, a user-configurable Execute Menu, reconfigured start-up options, and availability for Windows 95/98/NT. Over one hundred bugs have been fixed, and the program is quite stable and in extensive use.

  4. Orthotopic xenografts of RCC retain histological, immunophenotypic and genetic features of tumors in patients

    PubMed Central

    Grisanzio, Chiara; Seeley, Apryle; Chang, Michelle; Collins, Michael; Di Napoli, Arianna; Cheng, Su-Chun; Percy, Andrew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Signoretti, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an aggressive malignancy with limited responsiveness to existing treatments. In vivo models of human cancer, including RCC, are critical for developing more effective therapies. Unfortunately, current RCC models do not accurately represent relevant properties of the human disease. The goal of this study was to develop clinically relevant animal models of RCC for preclinical investigations. We transplanted intact human tumor tissue fragments orthotopically in immunodeficient mice. The xenografts were validated by comparing the morphologic, phenotypic, and genetic characteristics of the kidney tumor tissues before and after implantation. Twenty kidney tumors were transplanted into mice. Successful tumor growth was detected in 19 cases (95%). The histopathologic and immunophenotypic features of the xenografts and those of the original tumors largely overlapped in all the cases. Evaluation of genetic alterations in a subset of 10 cases demonstrated that the grafts largely retained the genetic features of the pre-implantation RCC tissues. Indeed, primary tumors and corresponding grafts displayed identical VHL mutations. Moreover, an identical pattern of DNA copy amplification or loss was observed in 6 of 10 cases (60%). In summary, orthotopic engrafting of RCC tissue fragments can be successfully used to generate animal models that closely resemble RCC in patients. These models will be invaluable for in vivo preclinical drug testing, and for deeper understanding of kidney carcinogenesis. PMID:21710693

  5. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Generation of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Andrew; Haruyama, Naoto; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2009-01-01

    This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, and equipment required for successful generation of transgenic mice using pronuclear injection. The experimental methods and practical tips given here will help guide beginners in understanding what is required and what to avoid in these standard protocols for efficiently generating transgenic mice. PMID:19283729

  7. Features in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Harris, Craig C.; Simmons, Karen E.

    1987-03-01

    A systematic, uniform search of Voyage 2 photopolarimeter system (PSS) data set for all significant features of Saturn's rings is described. On August 25, 1981, the PSS observed the occultation of the star Delta Scorpii by the rings of Saturn, and the timing of the data taking was rapid enough that the spatial resolution in the radial direction in the ring plane was better than 100 m. Tabular information and figures for 216 significant features that were found are presented.

  8. Feature Characterization Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-08-03

    FCLib is a data analysis toolkit constructed to meet the needs of data discovery in large-scale, spatio-temporal data such as finite element simulation data. FCLib is a C library toolkit of building blocks that can be assembled into complex analyses. Important features of FCLib include the following: (1) Support of feature-based analysis, (2) minimization of low-oevel processing, (3) ease of use, and (4) applicable to the wide variety of science domains.

  9. Partial return yoke for MICE step IV and final step

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Plate, S.; Berg, J. S.; Tarrant, J.; Bross, A.

    2015-05-03

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  10. Partial Return Yoke for MICE Step IV and Final Step

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, Holger; Plate, Stephen; Berg, J.Scott; Tarrant, Jason; Bross, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  11. Favorite Demonstrations: Gaseous Diffusion: A Demonstration of Graham's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.; Ebner, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid are used to illustrate rates of diffusion (Graham's Law). Simple equipment needed for the demonstration include a long tube, rubber stoppes, and cotton. Two related demonstrations are also explained. (DH)

  12. Budget constrained non-monotonic feature selection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiqin; Xu, Zenglin; Lyu, Michael R; King, Irwin

    2015-11-01

    Feature selection is an important problem in machine learning and data mining. We consider the problem of selecting features under the budget constraint on the feature subset size. Traditional feature selection methods suffer from the "monotonic" property. That is, if a feature is selected when the number of specified features is set, it will always be chosen when the number of specified feature is larger than the previous setting. This sacrifices the effectiveness of the non-monotonic feature selection methods. Hence, in this paper, we develop an algorithm for non-monotonic feature selection that approximates the related combinatorial optimization problem by a Multiple Kernel Learning (MKL) problem. We justify the performance guarantee for the derived solution when compared to the global optimal solution for the related combinatorial optimization problem. Finally, we conduct a series of empirical evaluation on both synthetic and real-world benchmark datasets for the classification and regression tasks to demonstrate the promising performance of the proposed framework compared with the baseline feature selection approaches. PMID:26433049

  13. Progress of the MICE experiment at RAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.

    2013-04-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. The demonstration comprises one cell of the US Neutrino Factory Study II cooling channel. Results obtained on the construction of the beamline and its instrumentation (STEP I) will be reviewed, together with progress towards final measurements of ionization cooling (STEP IV and VI).

  14. Colonization and pathogenesis of Cryptococcus neoformans in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Salkowski, C A; Bartizal, K F; Balish, M J; Balish, E

    1987-01-01

    Congenitally immunodeficient nude (nu/nu) mice and their immunocompetent littermates (nu/+) were used to determine whether the absence of thymus-matured T cells would alter the capacity of Cryptococcus neoformans to colonize their mucosal surfaces or enhance their susceptibility to systemic cryptococcosis, or both, following oral challenge. We present data demonstrating that an encapsulated strain of C. neoformans serotype A colonized the alimentary tracts of germfree, conventional, and antibiotic-treated conventional nu/nu mice. Scanning electron microscopy showed that C. neoformans adhered to the epithelial surfaces of the oral cavities, esophagi, and gastrointestinal tracts of monoassociated nu/nu and nu/+ mice, and culture data showed that there were more viable C. neoformans cells in the alimentary tracts of nu/nu mice than of nu/+ mice. Tetracycline-treated conventional nu/nu, but not nu/+, mice were also colonized with C. neoformans following intragastric challenge. C. neoformans-monoassociated and tetracycline-treated conventional nu/nu mice succumbed to disseminated cryptococcosis with cerebral involvement 3 to 4 weeks after oral challenge, whereas no mortality was observed for similarily challenged nu/+ mice. These results demonstrate that an encapsulated strain of C. neoformans can colonize mucosal surfaces and cause systemic cryptococcosis in immunodeficient nu/nu mice, suggesting that the alimentary tract can be a portal of entry for C. neoformans in an immunodeficient host. These data also indicate that functional T cells play an important role in resistance to systemic cryptococcosis of endogenous origin. Images PMID:3305359

  15. Gradual Elimination of Retroviruses in YBR/Ei Mice

    PubMed Central

    MacDearmid, Cameron C.; Case, Laure K.; Starling, Christa L.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.

    2006-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), a well-characterized retrovirus that causes mammary tumors in susceptible mice, is commonly used to investigate virus-host interactions. We have shown that YBR/Ei mice demonstrate a novel, dominant mechanism of resistance to MMTV infection and MMTV-induced mammary tumors. MMTV can both establish infection in YBR/Ei mice and be transmitted by YBR/Ei mice as an infectious virus. However, virus production is severely attenuated, resulting in gradual clearance of infection in successive generations. Our transfer experiments showed that T cells generated in MMTV-infected resistant mice were required to restrict MMTV replication in susceptible mice. These results emphasize the importance of inducing T-cell responses for effective protection against retroviral infections. PMID:16474128

  16. Contact hypersensitivity response to isophorone diisocyanate in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.L.; Brown, T.A.; Brown, R.D.; Munson, A.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Isophorone diisocyanate was evaluated for its potential as a sensitizing agent for allergic contact hypersensitivity in mice. Female B6C3F1 mice were sensitized with 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0% isophorone diisocyanate and challenged with 3.0% isophorone diisocyanate. Doses of isophorone diisocyanate were selected from assays for primary irritancy. Mice received 20 microliters by direct dermal application, for 5 days, to sites prepared by shaving, dermabrading and, in some mice, with intra dermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. The rest period was 7 days. Measurement of the contact hypersensitivity response in mice was by radioisotopic assay two days after challenge and mouse ear swelling one and two days after challenge. Mice demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent contact hypersensitivity responses to isophorone diisocyanate with or without adjuvant pretreatment.

  17. Knockout of Foxp2 disrupts vocal development in mice.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, Gregg A; McGinley, Matthew J; McCormick, David A

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP2 gene is important for the development of proper speech motor control in humans. However, the role of the gene in general vocal behavior in other mammals, including mice, is unclear. Here, we track the vocal development of Foxp2 heterozygous knockout (Foxp2+/-) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates from juvenile to adult ages, and observe severe abnormalities in the courtship song of Foxp2+/- mice. In comparison to their WT littermates, Foxp2+/- mice vocalized less, produced shorter syllable sequences, and possessed an abnormal syllable inventory. In addition, Foxp2+/- song also exhibited irregular rhythmic structure, and its development did not follow the consistent trajectories observed in WT vocalizations. These results demonstrate that the Foxp2 gene is critical for normal vocal behavior in juvenile and adult mice, and that Foxp2 mutant mice may provide a tractable model system for the study of the gene's role in general vocal motor control. PMID:26980647

  18. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung Smiley, Mark A.; Lovering, Richard M.; Margolis, Frank L.

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  19. Gliovascular disruption and cognitive deficits in a mouse model with features of small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Holland, Philip R; Searcy, James L; Salvadores, Natalia; Scullion, Gillian; Chen, Guiquan; Lawson, Greig; Scott, Fiona; Bastin, Mark E; Ihara, Masafumi; Kalaria, Rajesh; Wood, Emma R; Smith, Colin; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Horsburgh, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major cause of age-related cognitive impairment and dementia. The pathophysiology of SVD is not well understood and is hampered by a limited range of relevant animal models. Here, we describe gliovascular alterations and cognitive deficits in a mouse model of sustained cerebral hypoperfusion with features of SVD (microinfarcts, hemorrhage, white matter disruption) induced by bilateral common carotid stenosis. Multiple features of SVD were determined on T2-weighted and diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging scans and confirmed by pathologic assessment. These features, which were absent in sham controls, included multiple T2-hyperintense infarcts and T2-hypointense hemosiderin-like regions in subcortical nuclei plus increased cerebral atrophy compared with controls. Fractional anisotropy was also significantly reduced in several white matter structures including the corpus callosum. Investigation of gliovascular changes revealed a marked increase in microvessel diameter, vascular wall disruption, fibrinoid necrosis, hemorrhage, and blood-brain barrier alterations. Widespread reactive gliosis, including displacement of the astrocytic water channel, aquaporin 4, was observed. Hypoperfused mice also demonstrated deficits in spatial working and reference memory tasks. Overall, gliovascular disruption is a prominent feature of this mouse, which could provide a useful model for early-phase testing of potential SVD treatment strategies. PMID:25669904

  20. Status of the Medicaid competition demonstrations

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    In 1982, the Health Care Financing Administration approved funding for demonstration programs in six States to test a variety of alternative delivery strategies for Medicaid recipients. A number of innovative health service delivery features have been used in these programs, including competition, capitation, case management, and limitations on provider choice. These strategies have been tried in order to address the key Medicaid problems of cost containment and access to appropriate and high quality care. This article provides an overview of how the demonstration sites have approached the task of designing, developing, and implementing their various programs. PMID:10312013

  1. Status of MICE, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, Alan D.; MICE Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate transverse muon ionization cooling and is thus a strategic R&D project for future muon facilities. It is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the United Kingdom.

  2. Developmental consequences of in utero sodium arsenate exposure in mice with folate transport deficiencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that mice lacking a functional folate binding protein 2 gene (Folbp2'/') were significantly more sensitive to in utero arsenic exposure than were the wild-type mice similarly exposed. When these mice were fed a folate-deficient diet, the embryotoxic effect of arsen...

  3. BIOSYNTHESIS OF DIMETHYLNITROSAMINE IN DIMETHYLAMINE-TREATED MICE AFTER EXPOSURE TO NITROGEN DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    These studies demonstrate the nitrosating potential of NO2 in vivo in 1CR mice. Groups of mice were gavaged with 2 mg dimethylamine (DMA) and exposed to NO2 at levels from 0.04 to 44.5 ppm for periods up to 4 hours. Mice were individually frozen and blended to a powder, aliquots ...

  4. C/EBP Homologous Protein-induced Macrophage Apoptosis Protects Mice from Steatohepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Malhi, Harmeet; Kropp, Erin M.; Clavo, Vinna F.; Kobrossi, Christina R.; Han, JaeSeok; Mauer, Amy S.; Yong, Jing; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by liver steatosis; inflammation and fibrosis are features of the progressive form nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response is postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. In particular, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) is undetectable under normal conditions but is induced by cellular stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress. Chop wild type (Chop+/+) and knock-out (Chop−/−) mice were used in these studies to elucidate the role of CHOP in the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease. Paradoxically, Chop−/− mice developed greater liver injury, inflammation, and fibrosis than Chop+/+ mice, with greater macrophage activation. Primary, bone marrow-derived, and peritoneal macrophages from Chop+/+ and Chop−/− were challenged with palmitic acid, an abundant saturated free fatty acid in plasma and liver lipids. Where palmitic acid treatment activated Chop+/+ and Chop−/− macrophages, Chop−/− macrophages were resistant to its lipotoxicity. Chop−/− mice were sensitized to liver injury in a second model of dietary steatohepatitis using the methionine-choline-deficient diet. Analysis of bone marrow chimeras between Chop−/− and Chop+/+ mice demonstrated that Chop in macrophages protects from liver injury and inflammation when fed the methionine-choline-deficient diet. We conclude that Chop deletion has a proinflammatory effect in fatty liver injury apparently due to decreased cell death of activated macrophages, resulting in their net accumulation in the liver. Thus, macrophage CHOP plays a key role in protecting the liver from steatohepatitis likely by limiting macrophage survival during lipotoxicity. PMID:23720735

  5. Microcephalia with mandibular and dental dysplasia in adult Zmpste24-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    de Carlos, F; Varela, I; Germanà, A; Montalbano, G; Freije, J M P; Vega, J A; López-Otin, C; Cobo, J M

    2008-01-01

    ZMPSTE24 (also called FACE-1) is a zinc-metalloprotease involved in the post-translational processing of prelamin A to mature lamin A, a major component of the nuclear envelope. Mutations in the ZMPSTE24 gene or in that encoding its substrate prelamin A (LMNA) result in a series of human inherited diseases known collectively as laminopathies and showing regional or systemic manifestations (i.e. the Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome). Typically, patients suffering some laminopathies show craniofacial or mandible anomalies, aberrant dentition or facial features characteristic of aged persons. To analyse whether Zmpste24−/– mice reproduce the cranial phenotype observed in humans due to mutations in ZMPSTE24or LMNA, we conducted a craniometric study based on micro-computer tomography (µCT) images. Furthermore, using simple radiology, µCT, µCT-densitometry and scanning electron microscopy, we analysed the mandible and the teeth from Zmpste24−/– mice. Finally, the structure of the lower incisor was investigated using an H&E technique. The results demonstrate that Zmpste24−/– mice are microcephalic and show mandibular and dental dysplasia affecting only the mandible teeth. In all cases, the lower incisor of mice lacking Zmpste24 was smaller than in control animals, showed cylindrical morphology and a transverse fissure at the incisal edge, and the pulpal cavity was severely reduced. Structurally, the dental layers were normally arranged but cellular layers were disorganized. The inferior molars showed a reduced cusp size. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that Zmpste24−/– mice represent a good model to analyse the craniofacial and teeth malformations characteristic of lamin-related pathologies, and might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular events underlying these diseases. PMID:19014358

  6. Loss of Asxl1 leads to myelodysplastic syndrome–like disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiapeng; Li, Zhaomin; He, Yongzheng; Pan, Feng; Chen, Shi; Rhodes, Steven; Nguyen, Lihn; Yuan, Jin; Jiang, Li; Yang, Xianlin; Weeks, Ophelia; Liu, Ziyue; Zhou, Jiehao; Ni, Hongyu; Cai, Chen-Leng; Xu, Mingjiang

    2014-01-01

    ASXL1 is mutated/deleted with high frequencies in multiple forms of myeloid malignancies, and its alterations are associated with poor prognosis. De novo ASXL1 mutations cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome characterized by multiple congenital malformations. We show that Asxl1 deletion in mice led to developmental abnormalities including dwarfism, anophthalmia, and 80% embryonic lethality. Surviving Asxl1−/− mice lived for up to 42 days and developed features of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), including dysplastic neutrophils and multiple lineage cytopenia. Asxl1−/− mice had a reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool, and Asxl1−/− HSCs exhibited decreased hematopoietic repopulating capacity, with skewed cell differentiation favoring granulocytic lineage. Asxl1+/− mice also developed mild MDS-like disease, which could progress to MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasm, demonstrating a haploinsufficient effect of Asxl1 in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. Asxl1 loss led to an increased apoptosis and mitosis in Lineage–c-Kit+ (Lin–c-Kit+) cells, consistent with human MDS. Furthermore, Asxl1−/− Lin–c-Kit+ cells exhibited decreased global levels of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 and altered expression of genes regulating apoptosis (Bcl2, Bcl2l12, Bcl2l13). Collectively, we report a novel ASXL1 murine model that recapitulates human myeloid malignancies, implying that Asxl1 functions as a tumor suppressor to maintain hematopoietic cell homeostasis. Future work is necessary to clarify the contribution of microenvironment to the hematopoietic phenotypes observed in the constitutional Asxl1−/− mice. PMID:24255920

  7. 10 CFR 71.41 - Demonstration of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Demonstration of compliance. 71.41 Section 71.41 Energy... Approval Standards § 71.41 Demonstration of compliance. (a) The effects on a package of the tests specified... demonstration acceptable to the Commission, as appropriate for the particular feature being considered....

  8. Simple Buoyancy Demonstrations Using Saltwater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosby, Ronald M.; Petry, Douglas E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of saline solutions for demonstrations of buoyancy showing oscillations of the Cartesian diver. Describes the physical principles, preparation, and instructional uses for the demonstration. (YP)

  9. The Stimulus Properties of LSD in C57BL/6 Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Winter, J. C.; Kiers, A. K.; Zimmerman, M. D.; Reissig, C. J; Eckler, J.R.; Ullrich, T.; Rice, K. C.; Rabin, R. A.; Richards, J. B.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale Drug-induced stimulus control has proven to be a powerful tool for the assessment of a wide range of psychoactive drugs. Though a variety of species have been employed, the majority of studies have been in the rat. However, with the development of techniques which permit the genetic modification of mice, the latter species has taken on new importance. Lysergic acid diethylamide [LSD], the prototypic indoleamine hallucinogen, has not previously been trained as a discriminative stimulus in mice. Objective To demonstrate the feasibility of LSD-induced stimulus control in the mouse and to provide a preliminary characterization of the stimulus properties of LSD in that species. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were trained using a left or right nose-poke operant on a fixed-ratio 10, water reinforced task following the injection of lysergic acid diethylamide [LSD, 0.17 or 0.30 mg/kg, SC; 15 min pretreatment] or vehicle. Results Stimulus control was established in 6 of 16 mice at a dose of LSD of 0.17 mg/kg after 39 sessions. An increase in dose to 0.30 mg/kg for the remaining mice resulted in stimulus control in an additional 5 subjects. In the low dose group, subsequent experiments demonstrated an orderly dose-effect relationship for LSD and a rapid offset of drug action with an absence of LSD effects 60 min after injection. When LSD [0.17 mg/kg] was administered in combination with the selective 5-HT2A antagonist, M100907, LSD-appropriate responding was significantly but incompletely reduced to approximately 50%; concurrently, response rates declined significantly. In mice trained with a dose of LSD of 0.30 mg/kg, full generalization to the phenethylamine hallucinogen, [-]-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine [DOM] was observed. Conclusions The present data demonstrate the feasibility of LSD-induced stimulus control in the mouse. The general features of stimulus control by LSD in the mouse closely resemble those observed in the rat but the present data suggest that there may be significant differences as well. PMID:16005500

  10. Three featured plenary sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    The conference included three plenary sessions. The plenary on Governance, Security, Economy, and the Ecosystem of the Changing Arctic featured Vera Alexander, president, Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.; Alan Thornhill, chief environmental officer, U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; and Fran Ulmer, chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission. A plenary on the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea featured Ambassador David Balton, deputy assistant secretary for oceans and fisheries, U.S. Department of State; and Rear Admiral Frederick Kenney Jr., judge advocate general and chief counsel, U.S. Coast Guard. The plenary on Science and the 21st Century featured Phil Keslin, chief technology officer, small lab within Google.

  11. Escalator design features evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Deshpande, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Escalators are available with design features such as dual speed (90 and 120 fpm), mat operation and flat steps. These design features were evaluated based on the impact of each on capital and operating costs, traffic flow, and safety. A human factors engineering model was developed to analyze the need for flat steps at various speeds. Mat operation of escalators was found to be cost effective in terms of energy savings. Dual speed operation of escalators with the higher speed used during peak hours allows for efficient operation. A minimum number of flat steps required as a function of escalator speed was developed to ensure safety for the elderly.

  12. Defective pro alpha 2(I) collagen synthesis in a recessive mutation in mice: a model of human osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Chipman, S D; Sweet, H O; McBride, D J; Davisson, M T; Marks, S C; Shuldiner, A R; Wenstrup, R J; Rowe, D W; Shapiro, J R

    1993-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue associated with fractures, osteopenia, and short stature. OI results from mutations affecting the pro alpha 1 or pro alpha 2 gene of type I collagen. We describe a strain of mice with a nonlethal recessively inherited mutation (oim) that results in phenotypic and biochemical features that simulate moderate to severe human OI. The phenotype of homozygous oim mice includes skeletal fractures, limb deformities, generalized osteopenia, and small body size. Their femurs are smaller and demonstrate marked cortical thinning and fewer medullary trabeculae than those of wild-type mice. Breeding studies show the mutation is inherited in most crosses as a single recessive gene on chromosome 6, near the murine Cola-2 gene. Biochemical analysis of skin and bone, as well as isolated dermal fibroblast cultures, demonstrate that alpha 1(I) homotrimeric collagen accumulates in these tissues and is secreted by fibroblasts. Short labeling studies in fibroblasts demonstrate an absence of pro alpha 2(I) collagen chains. Nucleotide sequencing of the cDNA encoding the COOH-propeptide reveals a G deletion at pro alpha 2(I) nucleotide 3983; this results in an alteration of the sequence of the last 48 amino acids. The oim mouse will facilitate the study of type I collagen-related skeletal disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8446583

  13. Ontology patterns for complex topographic feature yypes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varanka, Dalia E.

    2011-01-01

    Complex feature types are defined as integrated relations between basic features for a shared meaning or concept. The shared semantic concept is difficult to define in commonly used geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies. The role of spatial relations between complex feature parts was recognized in early GIS literature, but had limited representation in the feature or coverage data models of GIS. Spatial relations are more explicitly specified in semantic technology. In this paper, semantics for topographic feature ontology design patterns (ODP) are developed as data models for the representation of complex features. In the context of topographic processes, component assemblages are supported by resource systems and are found on local landscapes. The topographic ontology is organized across six thematic modules that can account for basic feature types, resource systems, and landscape types. Types of complex feature attributes include location, generative processes and physical description. Node/edge networks model standard spatial relations and relations specific to topographic science to represent complex features. To demonstrate these concepts, data from The National Map of the U. S. Geological Survey was converted and assembled into ODP.

  14. Video tracking using learned hierarchical features.

    PubMed

    Li Wang; Ting Liu; Gang Wang; Kap Luk Chan; Qingxiong Yang

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to learn hierarchical features for visual object tracking. First, we offline learn features robust to diverse motion patterns from auxiliary video sequences. The hierarchical features are learned via a two-layer convolutional neural network. Embedding the temporal slowness constraint in the stacked architecture makes the learned features robust to complicated motion transformations, which is important for visual object tracking. Then, given a target video sequence, we propose a domain adaptation module to online adapt the pre-learned features according to the specific target object. The adaptation is conducted in both layers of the deep feature learning module so as to include appearance information of the specific target object. As a result, the learned hierarchical features can be robust to both complicated motion transformations and appearance changes of target objects. We integrate our feature learning algorithm into three tracking methods. Experimental results demonstrate that significant improvement can be achieved using our learned hierarchical features, especially on video sequences with complicated motion transformations. PMID:25700445

  15. Pharmacogenomic effect of vitamin E on kidney structure and function in transgenic mice with the haptoglobin 2-2 genotype and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nakhoul, Farid M; Miller-Lotan, Rachel; Awad, Hoda; Asleh, Rabea; Jad, Kheir; Nakhoul, Nakhoul; Asaf, Roy; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Levy, Andrew P

    2009-04-01

    Polymorphic loci regulating oxidative stress are potential susceptibility genes for diabetic nephropathy (DN). Haptoglobin (Hp) is an antioxidant protein which serves to protect against oxidative stress induced by extracorpuscular hemoglobin. There are two alleles at the Hp locus, 1 and 2. The Hp 1 protein is a superior antioxidant to the Hp 2 protein. The Hp 2 allele has been associated with increased prevalence of DN and appears to be associated with a more rapid progression to end-stage renal disease. We sought to recapitulate this association between Hp genotype and DN in mice genetically modified at the Hp locus. We assessed morphometric, histologic, and functional parameters involved in the development and progression of DN in mice with diabetes mellitus (DM) with either the Hp 2-2 or Hp 1-1 genotype. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that glomerular and proximal tubular hypertrophy were significantly increased in Hp 2-2 DM mice. Histological analysis demonstrated that Hp 2-2 DM mice had significantly more collagen type IV, smooth muscle actin, and increased renal iron deposition. Studies of renal function demonstrated creatinine clearance time and albuminuria were increased in Hp 2-2 DM mice. Vitamin E provided significant protection against the development of functional and histological features characteristic of DN to Hp 2-2 DM but not to Hp 1-1 DM mice. These studies serve to strengthen the association between the Hp 2-2 genotype and diabetic renal disease and suggest a pharmacogenomic interaction may exist between the Hp genotype and vitamin E. PMID:19176700

  16. Radiographic features of gout.

    PubMed

    Cardenosa, G; DeLuca, S A

    1990-02-01

    Hyperuricemia is the hallmark of gout. Deposition of monosodium urate crystals in the joints and periarticular soft tissues can lead to arthritic changes. Radiographic features include periarticular soft tissue swelling, "punched-out" bony erosions and joint space narrowing. Although gout has a predilection for the first metatarsophalangeal joint, it may also affect the feet, hands, wrists, elbows and knees. PMID:2301206

  17. Assistive Technologies, Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wobschall, Rachel, Ed.; Lakin, Charlie, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This feature issue of a newsletter on community integration of individuals with developmental disabilities considers the role of assistive technologies. It describes efforts to utilize consumer direction, public policy, creativity, energy, and professional know-how in the pursuit of technology-based opportunities to enhance community inclusion,…

  18. Feature- Spring 2010

    Cancer.gov

    NCI CAM News is a twice yearly newsletter produced by OCCAM to bring you information on the National Cancer Institute's latest CAM activities. Featured in the newsletter are: Highlights of NCI-sponsored CAM research Resources for researchers such as funding opportunities and grant writing workshops Upcoming meetings and lectures

  19. Main features of meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 17, outlines the main features of meiosis, beginning with its significance and proceeding through the meiotic stages. Meiosis is the most important modification of mitosis because it is the reduction division that gives rise to the haploid generation in the life cycle. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Basosquamous Carcinoma: Histopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nádia Lages; Verli, Flaviana Dornela; de Miranda, João Luiz; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida

    2012-01-01

    Basosquamous carcinoma (BSC) is a rare aggressive epithelial neoplasm with features of both basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, with a tendency toward local recurrence and a propensity for lymph node and distant metastases. The aim of the present study was to report the case of a 63-year-old Caucasian male with BSC in the auricular region. PMID:23112359

  1. Local Feature Selection for Data Classification.

    PubMed

    Armanfard, Narges; Reilly, James P; Komeili, Majid

    2016-06-01

    Typical feature selection methods choose an optimal global feature subset that is applied over all regions of the sample space. In contrast, in this paper we propose a novel localized feature selection (LFS) approach whereby each region of the sample space is associated with its own distinct optimized feature set, which may vary both in membership and size across the sample space. This allows the feature set to optimally adapt to local variations in the sample space. An associated method for measuring the similarities of a query datum to each of the respective classes is also proposed. The proposed method makes no assumptions about the underlying structure of the samples; hence the method is insensitive to the distribution of the data over the sample space. The method is efficiently formulated as a linear programming optimization problem. Furthermore, we demonstrate the method is robust against the over-fitting problem. Experimental results on eleven synthetic and real-world data sets demonstrate the viability of the formulation and the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. In addition we show several examples where localized feature selection produces better results than a global feature selection method. PMID:26390448

  2. Knockout of Epstein-Barr Virus BPLF1 Retards B-Cell Transformation and Lymphoma Formation in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangming; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Montgomery, Nathan D.; Su, Lishan; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BPLF1 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is classified as a late lytic cycle protein but is also found in the viral tegument, suggesting its potential involvement at both initial and late stages of viral infection. BPLF1 possesses both deubiquitinating and deneddylating activity located in its N-terminal domain and is involved in processes that affect viral infectivity, viral DNA replication, DNA repair, and immune evasion. A recently constructed EBV BPLF1-knockout (KO) virus was used in conjunction with a humanized mouse model that can be infected with EBV, enabling the first characterization of BPLF1 function in vivo. Results demonstrate that the BPLF1-knockout virus is approximately 90% less infectious than wild-type (WT) virus. Transformation of human B cells, a hallmark of EBV infection, was delayed and reduced with BPLF1-knockout virus. Humanized mice infected with EBV BPLF1-knockout virus showed less weight loss and survived longer than mice infected with equivalent infectious units of WT virus. Additionally, splenic tumors formed in 100% of mice infected with WT EBV but in only 25% of mice infected with BPLF1-KO virus. Morphological features of spleens containing tumors were similar to those in EBV-induced posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) and were almost identical to cases seen in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The presence of EBV genomes was detected in all mice that developed tumors. The results implicate BPLF1 in human B-cell transformation and tumor formation in humanized mice. PMID:26489865

  3. Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss, Reduced Neurite Complexity and Autophagic Abnormalities in Transgenic Mice Expressing G2019S Mutant LRRK2

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Brian M.; Stafa, Klodjan; Kim, Jaekwang; Banerjee, Rebecca; Westerlund, Marie; Pletnikova, Olga; Glauser, Liliane; Yang, Lichuan; Liu, Ying; Swing, Deborah A.; Beal, M. Flint; Troncoso, Juan C.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Galter, Dagmar; Thomas, Bobby; Lee, Michael K.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 mutations represent the most common cause of PD with clinical and neurochemical features that are largely indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. Currently, transgenic mice expressing wild-type or disease-causing mutants of LRRK2 have failed to produce overt neurodegeneration, although abnormalities in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission have been observed. Here, we describe the development and characterization of transgenic mice expressing human LRRK2 bearing the familial PD mutations, R1441C and G2019S. Our study demonstrates that expression of G2019S mutant LRRK2 induces the degeneration of nigrostriatal pathway dopaminergic neurons in an age-dependent manner. In addition, we observe autophagic and mitochondrial abnormalities in the brains of aged G2019S LRRK2 mice and markedly reduced neurite complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons. These new LRRK2 transgenic mice will provide important tools for understanding the mechanism(s) through which familial mutations precipitate neuronal degeneration and PD. PMID:21494637

  4. Altered Tnnt3 characterizes selective weakness of fast fibers in mice overexpressing FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Sancisi, Valentina; Germinario, Elena; Esposito, Alessandra; Morini, Elisabetta; Peron, Samantha; Moggio, Maurizio; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Danieli-Betto, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a common hereditary myopathy, is characterized by atrophy and weakness of selective muscle groups. FSHD is considered an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance and unpredictable variability of clinical expression within families. Mice overexpressing FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1), a candidate gene for this disease, develop a progressive myopathy with features of the human disorder. Here, we show that in FRG1-overexpressing mice, fast muscles, which are the most affected by the dystrophic process, display anomalous fast skeletal troponin T (fTnT) isoform, resulting from the aberrant splicing of the Tnnt3 mRNA that precedes the appearance of dystrophic signs. We determine that muscles of FRG1 mice develop less strength due to impaired contractile properties of fast-twitch fibers associated with an anomalous MyHC-actin ratio and a reduced sensitivity to Ca2+. We demonstrate that the decrease of Ca2+ sensitivity of fast-twitch fibers depends on the anomalous troponin complex and can be rescued by the substitution with the wild-type proteins. Finally, we find that the presence of aberrant splicing isoforms of TNNT3 characterizes dystrophic muscles in FSHD patients. Collectively, our results suggest that anomalous TNNT3 profile correlates with the muscle impairment in both humans and mice. On the basis of these results, we propose that aberrant fTnT represents a biological marker of muscle phenotype severity and disease progression. PMID:24305066

  5. Phenylthiocarbamide produces conditioned taste aversions in mice.

    PubMed

    St John, Steven J; Pour, Lindsay; Boughter, John D

    2005-06-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that SWR/J (SW) mice avoid phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) to a greater degree than C3HeB/FeJ mice in 48 h, two-bottle preference tests given in ascending series. The authors hypothesized, based also on previous work, that SW mice might form a conditioned taste aversion over time due to the toxic properties of PTC. We directly tested this hypothesis by attempting to condition a taste aversion to sucrose by injections of PTC. In experiment 1, PTC was nearly as effective as a strong dose of LiCl in reducing sucrose drinking. In experiment 2, the sucrose aversions were parametrically modified by both sucrose concentration and PTC dose, a hallmark of conditioned taste aversion. We conclude that PTC can cause a conditioned taste aversion and discuss the importance of considering toxic effects of aversive tastants when analyzing behavioral strain differences. PMID:15800216

  6. NAD metabolism in HPRT-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacomelli, Gabriella; Di Marcello, Federica; Notarantonio, Laura; Sestini, Silvia; Cerboni, Barbara; Bertelli, Matteo; Pompucci, Giuseppe; Jinnah, Hyder A.

    2016-01-01

    The activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) is virtually absent in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by uric acid accumulation and neurodevelopmental dysfunction. The biochemical basis for the neurological and behavioral abnormalities have not yet been completely explained. Prior studies of cells from affected patients have shown abnormalities of NAD metabolism. In the current studies, NAD metabolism was evaluated in HPRT gene knock-out mice. NAD content and the activities of the enzymes required for synthesis and breakdown of this coenzyme were investigated in blood, brain and liver of HPRT− and control mice. NAD concentration and enzyme activities were found to be significantly increased in liver, but not in brain or blood of the HPRT− mice. These results demonstrate that changes in NAD metabolism occur in response to HPRT deficiency depending on both species and tissue type. PMID:19319672

  7. Development of a computational high-throughput tool for the quantitative examination of dose-dependent histological features.

    PubMed

    Nault, Rance; Colbry, Dirk; Brandenberger, Christina; Harkema, Jack R; Zacharewski, Timothy R

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution digitalizing of histology slides facilitates the development of computational alternatives to manual quantitation of features of interest. We developed a MATLAB-based quantitative histological analysis tool (QuHAnT) for the high-throughput assessment of distinguishable histological features. QuHAnT validation was demonstrated by comparison with manual quantitation using liver sections from mice orally gavaged with sesame oil vehicle or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 0.001-30 μg/kg) every 4 days for 28 days, which elicits hepatic steatosis with mild fibrosis. A quality control module of QuHAnT reduced the number of quantifiable Oil Red O (ORO)-stained images from 3,123 to 2,756. Increased ORO staining was measured at 10 and 30 μg/kg TCDD with a high correlation between manual and computational volume densities (Vv ), although the dynamic range of QuHAnT was 10-fold greater. Additionally, QuHAnT determined the size of each ORO vacuole, which could not be accurately quantitated by visual examination or manual point counting. PicroSirius Red quantitation demonstrated superior collagen deposition detection due to the ability to consider all images within each section. QuHAnT dramatically reduced analysis time and facilitated the comprehensive assessment of features improving accuracy and sensitivity and represents a complementary tool for tissue/cellular features that are difficult and tedious to assess via subjective or semiquantitative methods. PMID:25274660

  8. Development of a Computational High-Throughput Tool for the Quantitative Examination of Dose-Dependent Histological Features

    PubMed Central

    Nault, Rance; Colbry, Dirk; Brandenberger, Christina; Harkema, Jack R.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution digitalizing of histology slides facilitates the development of computational alternatives to manual quantitation of features of interest. We developed a MATLAB-based quantitative histological analysis tool (QuHAnT) for the high-throughput assessment of distinguishable histological features. QuHAnT validation was demonstrated by comparison with manual quantitation using liver sections from mice orally gavaged with sesame oil vehicle or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 0.001–30 µg/kg) every 4 days for 28 days, which elicits hepatic steatosis with mild fibrosis. A quality control module of QuHAnT reduced the number of quantifiable Oil Red O (ORO)-stained images from 3,123 to 2,756. Increased ORO staining was measured at 10 and 30 µg/kg TCDD with a high correlation between manual and computational volume densities (Vv), although the dynamic range of QuHAnT was 10-fold greater. Additionally, QuHAnT determined the size of each ORO vacuole, which could not be accurately quantitated by visual examination or manual point counting. PicroSirius Red quantitation demonstrated superior collagen deposition detection due to the ability to consider all images within each section. QuHAnT dramatically reduced analysis time and facilitated the comprehensive assessment of features improving accuracy and sensitivity and represents a complementary tool for tissue/cellular features that are difficult and tedious to assess via subjective or semiquantitative methods. PMID:25274660

  9. Decreased Proteasomal Activity Causes Photoreceptor Degeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Ryo; Noda, Kousuke; Tomaru, Utano; Kamoshita, Mamoru; Ozawa, Yoko; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Noda, Mika; Kanda, Atsuhiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Kasahara, Masanori; Ishida, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To study the retinal degeneration caused by decreased proteasomal activity in β5t transgenic (β5t-Tg) mice, an animal model of senescence acceleration. Methods. β5t-Tg mice and age-matched littermate control (WT) mice were used. Proteasomal activities and protein level of poly-ubiquitinated protein in retinal extracts were quantified. Fundus images of β5t-Tg mice were taken and their features were assessed. For histologic evaluation, the thicknesses of inner nuclear layer (INL), outer nuclear layer (ONL), and photoreceptor outer segment (OS) were measured. For functional analysis, ERG was recorded under scotopic and photopic illumination conditions. Immunofluorescence (IF) staining and TUNEL were performed to investigate the mechanism of photoreceptor degeneration. Results. Chymotrypsin-like activity was partially suppressed in retinal tissues of β5t-Tg mice. Retinal degenerative changes with arterial attenuation were present in β5t-Tg, but not in WT mice. Inner nuclear layer thickness showed no significant change between β5t-Tg and WT mice at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of age. By contrast, thicknesses of ONL and OS in β5t-Tg mice were significantly decreased at 3, 6, and 9 months compared with those in WT mice. Electroretinograms showed decrease of scotopic a-wave amplitude in β5t-Tg mice. The number of TUNEL-positive cells in ONL were significantly increased in β5t-Tg mice and colocalized with apoptosis-inducing factor, but not with cleaved caspase-3 and -9, indicating that the photoreceptor cell death was induced via a caspase-independent pathway. Conclusions. The current data showed that impaired proteasomal function causes photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:24994871

  10. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  11. Morbid Obesity Attenuates the Skeletal Abnormalities Associated with Leptin Deficiency in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Russell T.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Wong, Carmen P.; Olson, Dawn A.; Branscum, Adam J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice are morbidly obese and exhibit low total bone mass and mild osteopetrosis. In order to disassociate the skeletal effects of leptin deficiency from those associated with morbid obesity, we evaluated bone mass, architecture, gene expression, and indices of bone turnover in wild type (WT) mice, ob/ob mice fed ad libitum (ob/ob), and ob/ob mice pair fed to WT mice (pair-fed ob/ob). Mice were maintained at 32°C (thermoneutral) from 6 to 18 weeks of age to minimize differences in resting energy expenditure. ob/ob mice were heavier, had more abdominal white adipose tissue (WAT), and were hyperglycemic compared to WT mice. Femur length, bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density, and midshaft femur cortical thickness were lower in ob/ob mice than in WT mice. Cancellous bone volume fraction was higher but indices of bone formation and resorption were lower in ob/ob compared to WT mice; reduced bone resorption in ob/ob mice resulted in pathological retention of calcified cartilage. Pair-fed ob/ob mice were lighter, had lower WAT, uterine weight, and serum glucose than ob/ob mice. Similarly, femoral length, BMC, and cortical thickness were lower in pair-fed ob/ob mice compared to ob/ob mice, as were indices of cancellous bone formation and resorption. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity, calcified cartilage and cancellous bone volume fraction were higher at one or more cancellous sites in pair-fed ob/ob mice compared to ob/ob mice. These findings demonstrate that the skeletal abnormalities caused by leptin deficiency are markedly attenuated in morbidly obese ob/ob mice. PMID:24990938

  12. Cochlear function in Prestin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Cheatham, M A; Huynh, K H; Gao, J; Zuo, J; Dallos, P

    2004-11-01

    Gross-potential recordings in mice lacking the Prestin gene indicate that compound action potential (CAP) thresholds are shifted by approximately 45 dB at 5 kHz and by approximately 60 dB at 33 kHz. However, in order to conclude that outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility is associated with the cochlear amplifier, frequency selectivity must be evaluated and the integrity of the OHC's forward transducer ascertained. The present report demonstrates no frequency selectivity in CAP tuning curves recorded in homozygotes. In addition, CAP input-output functions indicate that responses in knockout mice approach those in controls at high levels where the amplifier has little influence. Although the cochlear microphonic in knockout mice remains approximately 12 dB below that in wild-type mice even at the highest levels, this deficit is thought to reflect hair cell losses in mice lacking prestin. A change in OHC forward transduction is not implied because knockout mice display non-linear responses similar to those in controls. For example, homozygotes exhibit a bipolar summating potential (SP) with positive responses at high frequencies; negative responses at low frequencies. Measurement of intermodulation distortion also shows that the cubic difference tone, 2f(1)-f(2), is approximately 20 dB down from the primaries in both homozygotes and their controls. Because OHCs are the sole generators of the negative SP and because 2f(1)-f(2) is also thought to originate in OHC transduction, these data support the idea that forward transduction is not degraded in OHCs lacking prestin. Finally, application of AM1-43, which initially enters hair cells through their transducer channels, produces fluorescence in wild-type and knockout mice indicating transducer channel activity in both inner and outer hair cells. PMID:15319415

  13. Mapping Pathological Phenotypes in Reelin Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Michetti, Caterina; Romano, Emilia; Altabella, Luisa; Caruso, Angela; Castelluccio, Paolo; Bedse, Gaurav; Gaetani, Silvana; Canese, Rossella; Laviola, Giovanni; Scattoni, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders with multifactorial origin characterized by social communication deficits and the presence of repetitive behaviors/interests. Several studies showed an association between the reelin gene mutation and increased risk of ASD and a reduced reelin expression in some brain regions of ASD subjects, suggesting a role for reelin deficiency in ASD etiology. Reelin is a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein playing important roles during development of the central nervous system. To deeply investigate the role of reelin dysfunction as vulnerability factor in ASD, we assessed the behavioral, neurochemical, and brain morphological features of reeler male mice. We recently reported a genotype-dependent deviation in the ultrasonic vocal repertoire and a general delay in motor development of reeler pups. We now report that adult male heterozygous (Het) reeler mice did not show social behavior and communication deficits during male–female social interactions. Wildtype and Het mice showed a typical light/dark locomotor activity profile, with a peak during the central interval of the dark phase. However, when faced with a mild stressful stimulus (a saline injection) only Het mice showed an over response to stress. In addition to the behavioral studies, we conducted high performance liquid chromatography and magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to investigate whether reelin mutation influences brain monoamine and metabolites levels in regions involved in ASD. Low levels of dopamine in cortex and high levels of glutamate and taurine in hippocampus were detected in Het mice, in line with clinical data collected on ASD children. Altogether, our data detected subtle but relevant neurochemical abnormalities in reeler mice supporting this mutant line, particularly male subjects, as a valid experimental model to estimate the contribution played by reelin deficiency in the global ASD neurobehavioral phenotype. PMID:25237666

  14. Central and peripheral defects in motor units of the diaphragm of spinal muscular atrophy mice.

    PubMed

    Neve, Anuja; Trüb, Judith; Saxena, Smita; Schümperli, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by motoneuron loss and muscle weakness. However, the structural and functional deficits that lead to the impairment of the neuromuscular system remain poorly defined. By electron microscopy, we previously found that neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and muscle fibres of the diaphragm are among the earliest affected structures in the severe mouse SMA model. Because of certain anatomical features, i.e. its thinness and its innervation from the cervical segments of the spinal cord, the diaphragm is particularly suitable to characterize both central and peripheral events. Here we show by immunohistochemistry that, at postnatal day 3, the cervical motoneurons of SMA mice receive less stimulatory synaptic inputs. Moreover, their mitochondria become less elongated which might represent an early stage of degeneration. The NMJs of the diaphragm of SMA mice show a loss of synaptic vesicles and active zones. Moreover, the partly innervated endplates lack S100 positive perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs). We also demonstrate the feasibility of comparing the proteomic composition between diaphragm regions enriched and poor in NMJs. By this approach we have identified two proteins that are significantly upregulated only in the NMJ-specific regions of SMA mice. These are apoptosis inducing factor 1 (AIFM1), a mitochondrial flavoprotein that initiates apoptosis in a caspase-independent pathway, and four and a half Lim domain protein 1 (FHL1), a regulator of skeletal muscle mass that has been implicated in several myopathies. PMID:26621405

  15. Behavior and the cholinergic parameters in olfactory bulbectomized female rodents: Difference between rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Stepanichev, Mikhail; Markov, Daniil; Pasikova, Natalia; Gulyaeva, Natalia

    2016-01-15

    Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) in rodents induces a wide spectrum of functional disturbances, including behavioral, neurochemical, and neuromorphological alterations. We have examined the effects of OBX on behavior and the parameters of the cholinergic system in female rats and mice. In rats, OBX resulted in the appearance of some depressive-like behavioral marks, such as the decreased sucrose consumption, hyperactivity, impaired short-term memory and anxiety-like behavioral features, such as shortened presence in the center of the open field arena or open arms of the elevated plus-maze and an enhancement of avoidance behavior. These behavioral abnormalities could be associated with disturbances in hippocampal function, this suggestion being supported by the presence of cellular changes in this brain structure. No effect of OBX on the number of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band as well as on the acetylcholine content and acetylcholinesterase activity in the septum, hippocampus, and neocortex could be detected. In contrast, in mice, OBX impaired spontaneous alternation behavior and decreased the number of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band. These data demonstrate that rats and mice differently respond to OBX, in particular, OBX does not significantly affect the cholinergic system in rats. PMID:26431763

  16. Quantification of pain in sickle mice using facial expressions and body measurements.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Aditya; Gupta, Mihir; Lamarre, Yann; Jahagirdar, Balkrishna; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-03-01

    Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell disease (SCD). Subjects typically quantify pain by themselves, which can be biased by other factors leading to overtreatment or under-treatment. Reliable and accurate quantification of pain, in real time, might enable to provide appropriate levels of analgesic treatment. The mouse grimace scale (MGS), a standardized behavioral coding system with high accuracy and reliability has been used to quantify varied types of pain. We hypothesized that addition of the objective parameters of body length and back curvature will strengthen the reproducibility of MGS. We examined MGS scores and body length and back curvature of transgenic BERK sickle and control mice following cold treatment or following treatment with analgesic cannabinoid CP55,940. We observed that sickle mice demonstrated decreased length and increased back curvature in response to cold. These observations correlate with changes in facial expression for the MGS score. CP55,940 treatment of sickle mice showed an increase in body length and a decrease in back curvature concordant with MGS scores indicative of an analgesic effect. Thus, body parameters combined with facial expressions may provide a quantifiable unbiased method for objective measure of pain in SCD. PMID:26852657

  17. Xyloketal B attenuates atherosclerotic plaque formation and endothelial dysfunction in apolipoprotein e deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Yan; Li, Jie; Yuan, Feng; Li, Mei; Zhang, Quan; Huang, Yun-Ying; Pang, Ji-Yan; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Fang-Yun; Sun, Hong-Shuo; Li, Qian; Cao, Lu; Xie, Yu; Lin, Yong-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Tan, Hong-Mei; Wang, Guan-Lei

    2015-04-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that xyloketal B, a novel marine compound with a unique chemical structure, has strong antioxidant actions and can protect against endothelial injury in different cell types cultured in vitro and model organisms in vivo. The oxidative endothelial dysfunction and decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability are critical for the development of atherosclerotic lesion. We thus examined whether xyloketal B had an influence on the atherosclerotic plaque area in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We found in our present study that the administration of xyloketal B dose-dependently decreased the atherosclerotic plaque area both in the aortic sinus and throughout the aorta in apoE-/- mice fed a high-fat diet. In addition, xyloketal B markedly reduced the levels of vascular oxidative stress, as well as improving the impaired endothelium integrity and NO-dependent aortic vasorelaxation in atherosclerotic mice. Moreover, xyloketal B significantly changed the phosphorylation levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt without altering the expression of total eNOS and Akt in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Here, it increased eNOS phosphorylation at the positive regulatory site of Ser-1177, while inhibiting phosphorylation at the negative regulatory site of Thr-495. Taken together, these findings indicate that xyloketal B has dramatic anti-atherosclerotic effects in vivo, which is partly due to its antioxidant features and/or improvement of endothelial function. PMID:25874925

  18. Eliminating microglia in Alzheimer's mice prevents neuronal loss without modulating amyloid-β pathology.

    PubMed

    Spangenberg, Elizabeth E; Lee, Rafael J; Najafi, Allison R; Rice, Rachel A; Elmore, Monica R P; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2016-04-01

    In addition to amyloid-β plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation is considered a key feature of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia surrounding amyloid plaques, implicating their role in disease pathogenesis. Microglia in the healthy adult mouse depend on colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signalling for survival, and pharmacological inhibition of this receptor results in rapid elimination of nearly all of the microglia in the central nervous system. In this study, we set out to determine if chronically activated microglia in the Alzheimer's disease brain are also dependent on CSF1R signalling, and if so, how these cells contribute to disease pathogenesis. Ten-month-old 5xfAD mice were treated with a selective CSF1R inhibitor for 1 month, resulting in the elimination of ∼80% of microglia. Chronic microglial elimination does not alter amyloid-β levels or plaque load; however, it does rescue dendritic spine loss and prevent neuronal loss in 5xfAD mice, as well as reduce overall neuroinflammation. Importantly, behavioural testing revealed improvements in contextual memory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that microglia contribute to neuronal loss, as well as memory impairments in 5xfAD mice, but do not mediate or protect from amyloid pathology. PMID:26921617

  19. MnTBAP Therapy Attenuates Renal Fibrosis in Mice with 5/6 Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Mao, Song; Zhang, Yue; Gong, Wei; Jia, Zhanjun; Huang, Songming; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is a common pathological feature of all kinds of chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) with uncertain mechanisms. Accumulating evidence demonstrated an important role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CKD. Here we hypothesized that MnTBAP (manganese (III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride), a cell-permeable mimic of superoxide dismutase (SOD), may protect against the fibrotic response in CKD by antagonizing oxidative stress. To verify this hypothesis, we performed experiments in tubular epithelial cells and mice with 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx). In mouse tubular epithelial cells, TGF-β1 induced a significant transition to fibrotic phenotype in line with a remarkable mitochondrial dysfunction, which was markedly improved by MnTBAP (1.14 μM) pretreatment. In remnant kidneys of 5/6 Nx mice, tubulointerstitial fibrosis occurred in parallel with mitochondrial abnormality in renal tubular cells. Administration of MnTBAP significantly attenuated the deposition of extracellular matrix as evidenced by the blocked expressions of fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen III. Masson staining also displayed an ameliorated accumulation of collagenous matrix in MnTBAP-treated mice. Moreover, MnTBAP also significantly improved the severity of proteinuria without altering CKD-related hypertension. Collectively, MnTBAP therapy served as a promising strategy in preventing renal fibrosis in CKDs possibly via antagonizing mitochondrial-derived oxidative stress and subsequent protection of mitochondrial function. PMID:26989454

  20. MnTBAP Therapy Attenuates Renal Fibrosis in Mice with 5/6 Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Mao, Song; Zhang, Yue; Gong, Wei; Jia, Zhanjun; Huang, Songming; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is a common pathological feature of all kinds of chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) with uncertain mechanisms. Accumulating evidence demonstrated an important role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CKD. Here we hypothesized that MnTBAP (manganese (III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride), a cell-permeable mimic of superoxide dismutase (SOD), may protect against the fibrotic response in CKD by antagonizing oxidative stress. To verify this hypothesis, we performed experiments in tubular epithelial cells and mice with 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx). In mouse tubular epithelial cells, TGF-β1 induced a significant transition to fibrotic phenotype in line with a remarkable mitochondrial dysfunction, which was markedly improved by MnTBAP (1.14 μM) pretreatment. In remnant kidneys of 5/6 Nx mice, tubulointerstitial fibrosis occurred in parallel with mitochondrial abnormality in renal tubular cells. Administration of MnTBAP significantly attenuated the deposition of extracellular matrix as evidenced by the blocked expressions of fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen III. Masson staining also displayed an ameliorated accumulation of collagenous matrix in MnTBAP-treated mice. Moreover, MnTBAP also significantly improved the severity of proteinuria without altering CKD-related hypertension. Collectively, MnTBAP therapy served as a promising strategy in preventing renal fibrosis in CKDs possibly via antagonizing mitochondrial-derived oxidative stress and subsequent protection of mitochondrial function. PMID:26989454

  1. Defective microglial development in the hippocampus of Cx3cr1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Francesca; Paolicelli, Rosa C.; Murana, Emanuele; Cortese, Barbara; Di Angelantonio, Silvia; Zurolo, Emanuele; Guiducci, Eva; Ferreira, Tiago A.; Garofalo, Stefano; Catalano, Myriam; D’Alessandro, Giuseppina; Porzia, Alessandra; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Mainiero, Fabrizio; Limatola, Cristina; Gross, Cornelius T.; Ragozzino, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells participate in brain development and influence neuronal loss and synaptic maturation. Fractalkine is an important neuronal chemokine whose expression increases during development and that can influence microglia function via the fractalkine receptor, CX3CR1. Mice lacking Cx3cr1 show a variety of neuronal defects thought to be the result of deficient microglia function. Activation of CX3CR1 is important for the proper migration of microglia to sites of injury and into the brain during development. However, little is known about how fractalkine modulates microglial properties during development. Here we examined microglial morphology, response to ATP, and K+ current properties in acute brain slices from Cx3cr1 knockout mice across postnatal hippocampal development. We found that fractalkine signaling is necessary for the development of several morphological and physiological features of microglia. Specifically, we found that the occurrence of an outward rectifying K+ current, typical of activated microglia, that peaked during the second and third postnatal week, was reduced in Cx3cr1 knockout mice. Fractalkine signaling also influenced microglial morphology and ability to extend processes in response to ATP following its focal application to the slice. Our results reveal the developmental profile of several morphological and physiological properties of microglia and demonstrate that these processes are modulated by fractalkine signaling. PMID:25873863

  2. Factors Affecting Formation of Incomplete Vi Antibody in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Sidney; Currie, Julius A.; Tully, Joseph G.

    1965-01-01

    Gaines, Sidney (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), Julius A. Currie, and Joseph G. Tully. Factors affecting formation of incomplete Vi antibody in mice. J. Bacteriol. 90:635–642. 1965.—Single immunizing doses of purified Vi antigen elicited complete and incomplete Vi antibodies in BALB/c mice, but only incomplete antibody in Cinnamon mice. Three of six other mouse strains tested responded like BALB/c mice; the remaining three, like Cinnamon mice. Varying the quantity of antigen injected or the route of administration failed to stimulate the production of detectable complete Vi antibody in Cinnamon mice. Such antibody was evoked in these animals by multiple injections of Vi antigen or by inoculating them with Vi-containing bacilli or Vi-coated erythrocytes. The early protection afforded by serum from Vi-immunized BALB/c mice coincided with the appearance of incomplete Vi antibody, 1 day prior to the advent of complete antibody. Persistence of incomplete as well as complete antibody in the serum of immunized mice was demonstrated for at least 56 days after injection of 10 μg of Vi antigen. Incomplete Vi antibody was shown to have blocking ability, in vitro bactericidal activity, and the capability of protecting mice against intracerebral as well as intraperitoneal challenge with virulent typhoid bacilli. Production of incomplete and complete Vi antibodies was adversely affected by immunization with partially depolymerized Vi antigens. PMID:16562060

  3. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore » can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less

  4. Unidentified Infrared Emission Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joblin, Christine

    2015-03-01

    When referring to unidentified infrared emission features, one has in mind the series of aromatic IR bands (AIBs) between 3.3 and 15 μm that are observed in emission in many environments where UV photons irradiate interstellar matter. These bands are now used by astronomers to classify objects and characterize local physical conditions. However, a deep analysis cannot proceed without understanding the properties of the band carriers. Large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules are attractive candidates but interstellar species are still poorly characterized. Various studies emphasize the need for tackling the link between molecular aromatic species, aliphatic material and very small carbonaceous grains. Other unidentified emission features such as the 6.9, 21 and 30 μm bands could be involved in the evolutionary scenario.

  5. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  6. Human Endometrial Side Population Cells Exhibit Genotypic, Phenotypic and Functional Features of Somatic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cervelló, Irene; Gil-Sanchis, Claudia; Mas, Aymara; Delgado-Rosas, Francisco; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Galán, Amparo; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastian; Navarro, Ismael; Ferro, Jaime; Horcajadas, José Antonio; Esteban, Francisco José; O'Connor, José Enrique; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC) population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP) cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC. PMID:20585575

  7. Wild 2 Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    These images taken by NASA's Stardust spacecraft highlight the diverse features that make up the surface of comet Wild 2. Side A (see Figure 1) shows a variety of small pinnacles and mesas seen on the limb of the comet. Side B (see Figure 1) shows the location of a 2-kilometer (1.2-mile) series of aligned scarps, or cliffs, that are best seen in the stereo images.

  8. Visualizing complex hydrodynamic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Jill L.; Marshall, Robert E.; Yen, Chieh-Cheng

    1990-08-01

    The Lake Erie Forecasting System is a cooperative project by university, private and governmental institutions to provide continuous forecasting of three-dimensional structure within the lake. The forecasts will include water velocity and temperature distributions throughout the body of water, as well as water level and wind-wave distributions at the lake's surface. Many hydrodynamic features can be extracted from this data, including coastal jets, large-scale thermocline motion and zones of upwelling and downwelling. A visualization system is being developed that will aid in understanding these features and their interactions. Because of the wide variety of features, they cannot all be adequately represented by a single rendering technique. Particle tracing, surface rendering, and volumetric techniques are all necessary. This visualization effortis aimed towards creating a system that will provide meaningful forecasts for those using the lake for recreational and commercial purposes. For example, the fishing industry needs to know about large-scale thermocline motion in order to find the best fishing areas and power plants need to know water intAke temperatures. The visualization system must convey this information in a manner that is easily understood by these users. Scientists must also be able to use this system to verify their hydrodynamic simulation. The focus of the system, therefore, is to provide the information to serve these diverse interests, without overwhelming any single user with unnecessary data.

  9. Intestinal Microbiota of Mice Influences Resistance to Staphylococcus aureus Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    D'Ortona, Samantha; Ahnger-Pier, Kathryn; Duan, Biyan; Surana, Neeraj K.; Lu, Roger; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Shan, Qiang; Priebe, Gregory P.; Pier, Gerald B.

    2015-01-01

    Th17 immunity in the gastrointestinal tract is regulated by the intestinal microbiota composition, particularly the presence of segmented filamentous bacteria (sfb), but the role of the intestinal microbiota in pulmonary host defense is not well explored. We tested whether altering the gut microbiota by acquiring sfb influences the susceptibility to staphylococcal pneumonia via induction of type 17 immunity. Groups of C57BL/6 mice which differed in their intestinal colonization with sfb were challenged with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an acute lung infection model. Bacterial burdens, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell counts, cell types, and cytokine levels were compared between mice from different vendors, mice from both vendors after cohousing, mice given sfb orally prior to infection, and mice with and without exogenous interleukin-22 (IL-22) or anti-IL-22 antibodies. Mice lacking sfb developed more severe S. aureus pneumonia than mice colonized with sfb, as indicated by higher bacterial burdens in the lungs, lung inflammation, and mortality. This difference was reduced when sfb-negative mice acquired sfb in their gut microbiota through cohousing with sfb-positive mice or when given sfb orally. Levels of type 17 immune effectors in the lung were higher after infection in sfb-positive mice and increased in sfb-negative mice after acquisition of sfb, as demonstrated by higher levels of IL-22 and larger numbers of IL-22+ TCRβ+ cells and neutrophils in BALF. Exogenous IL-22 protected mice from S. aureus pneumonia. The murine gut microbiota, particularly the presence of sfb, promotes pulmonary type 17 immunity and resistance to S. aureus pneumonia, and IL-22 protects against severe pulmonary staphylococcal infection. PMID:26216419

  10. Methylphenidate restores novel object recognition in DARPP-32 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Heyser, Charles J; McNaughton, Caitlyn H; Vishnevetsky, Donna; Fienberg, Allen A

    2013-09-15

    Previously, we have shown that Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa (DARPP-32) knockout mice required significantly more trials to reach criterion than wild-type mice in an operant reversal-learning task. The present study was conducted to examine adult male and female DARPP-32 knockout mice and wild-type controls in a novel object recognition test. Wild-type and knockout mice exhibited comparable behavior during the initial exploration trials. As expected, wild-type mice exhibited preferential exploration of the novel object during the substitution test, demonstrating recognition memory. In contrast, knockout mice did not show preferential exploration of the novel object, instead exhibiting an increase in exploration of all objects during the test trial. Given that the removal of DARPP-32 is an intracellular manipulation, it seemed possible to pharmacologically restore some cellular activity and behavior by stimulating dopamine receptors. Therefore, a second experiment was conducted examining the effect of methylphenidate. The results show that methylphenidate increased horizontal activity in both wild-type and knockout mice, though this increase was blunted in knockout mice. Pretreatment with methylphenidate significantly impaired novel object recognition in wild-type mice. In contrast, pretreatment with methylphenidate restored the behavior of DARPP-32 knockout mice to that observed in wild-type mice given saline. These results provide additional evidence for a functional role of DARPP-32 in the mediation of processes underlying learning and memory. These results also indicate that the behavioral deficits in DARPP-32 knockout mice may be restored by the administration of methylphenidate. PMID:23906769

  11. Intestinal Microbiota of Mice Influences Resistance to Staphylococcus aureus Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gauguet, Stefanie; D'Ortona, Samantha; Ahnger-Pier, Kathryn; Duan, Biyan; Surana, Neeraj K; Lu, Roger; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Shan, Qiang; Priebe, Gregory P; Pier, Gerald B

    2015-10-01

    Th17 immunity in the gastrointestinal tract is regulated by the intestinal microbiota composition, particularly the presence of segmented filamentous bacteria (sfb), but the role of the intestinal microbiota in pulmonary host defense is not well explored. We tested whether altering the gut microbiota by acquiring sfb influences the susceptibility to staphylococcal pneumonia via induction of type 17 immunity. Groups of C57BL/6 mice which differed in their intestinal colonization with sfb were challenged with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an acute lung infection model. Bacterial burdens, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell counts, cell types, and cytokine levels were compared between mice from different vendors, mice from both vendors after cohousing, mice given sfb orally prior to infection, and mice with and without exogenous interleukin-22 (IL-22) or anti-IL-22 antibodies. Mice lacking sfb developed more severe S. aureus pneumonia than mice colonized with sfb, as indicated by higher bacterial burdens in the lungs, lung inflammation, and mortality. This difference was reduced when sfb-negative mice acquired sfb in their gut microbiota through cohousing with sfb-positive mice or when given sfb orally. Levels of type 17 immune effectors in the lung were higher after infection in sfb-positive mice and increased in sfb-negative mice after acquisition of sfb, as demonstrated by higher levels of IL-22 and larger numbers of IL-22(+) TCR?(+) cells and neutrophils in BALF. Exogenous IL-22 protected mice from S. aureus pneumonia. The murine gut microbiota, particularly the presence of sfb, promotes pulmonary type 17 immunity and resistance to S. aureus pneumonia, and IL-22 protects against severe pulmonary staphylococcal infection. PMID:26216419

  12. Teaching and Demonstrating Classical Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, John; Fernald, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Discusses classroom demonstrations of classical conditioning and notes tendencies to misrepresent Pavlov's procedures. Describes the design and construction of the conditioner that is used for demonstrating classical conditioning. Relates how students experience conditioning, generalization, extinction, discrimination, and spontaneous recovery.

  13. A Dramatic Flame Test Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kristin A.; Schreiner, Rodney

    2001-01-01

    Flame tests are used for demonstration of atomic structure. Describes a demonstration that uses spray bottles filled with methanol and a variety of salts to produce a brilliantly colored flame. (Contains 11 references.) (ASK)

  14. Revisiting the Electric Pickle Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The electric pickle is a classic demonstration that is widely used in both high school and college settings to explain the general principles behind atomic emission. The demonstration fails to provide an interesting multi-line spectrum.

  15. Effect of low frequency low energy pulsing electromagnetic fields on mice injected with cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Cadossi, R.; Zucchini, P.; Emilia, G.; Franceschi, C.; Cossarizza, A.; Santantonio, M.; Mandolini, G.; Torelli, G. )

    1991-03-01

    C3H mice have been used to investigate the effect of a combination of cyclophosphamide (CY) and electromagnetic fields (PEMF). Mice were injected i.p. with a single dose of 200 mg/kg body weight of CY and then exposed to PEMF 24 h per day. In an initial series of experiments immediately after CY injection mice were exposed to PEMF until sacrifice. WBC counts in the peripheral blood demonstrated a quicker decline in WBC at days 1 and 2 in mice exposed to PEMF. Groups of mice were sacrificed at days 1, 4, 6, 8, and 10 after CY injection. In mice exposed to PEMF the spleen weight was less than in controls at days 6, 8, and 10. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that the labeling index of bone marrow smears did not significantly differ between controls and experimental mice exposed to PEMF, whereas the spleen labeling index proved to be higher among control mice versus mice exposed to PEMF at day 6, and higher among mice exposed to PEMF versus controls at day 8. In a second series of experiments mice were exposed to PEMF only over the 24 h following CY injection. We found that the spleens of mice exposed to PEMF weighed less than those of controls at days 6 and 8. The labeling index of bone marrow did evidence a slight decrease among mice exposed to PEMF at days 8 and 10 after CY injection versus control mice. The spleen labeling index proved to be lower in experimental mice exposed to PEMF than in controls at days 4, 6, and 8. Mice were then injected with CY, half were exposed to PEMF, and 24 h later bone marrow was recovered from both groups of animals. The same number of bone marrow cells was injected via the tail vein into recipient mice irradiated to 8.5 Gy.

  16. Computed tomographic features of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlberg, J.L.; Sandler, M.A.; Madrazo, B.L.

    1983-04-01

    A patient wit esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) was examined with computed tomography (CT). CT demonstrated marked thichening of the esophageal wall, diffuse irregularity of the esophageal lumen, and intramural gas collections-features typical of this entity. In the proper clinical setting, CT can confirm the diagnosis of EIPD, especially when other studies are equivocal. However, this case also demonstrates some of the limitations of CT in differentiating benign and malignant esophageal disorders.

  17. Favorite Demonstrations for College Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Peer-reviewed, classroom-tested, and tailored specifically for introductory science courses, Favorite Demonstrations is a complement to every college instructor's lesson plans. The book is an all-in-one compilation of 36 popular classroom demonstrations published since 1993 in the "Favorite Demonstration" column of NSTA's Journal of College …

  18. Transgenic knockout mice with exclusively human sickle hemoglobinand sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paszty, C.; Brion, C.; Manci, E.; Witkowska, E.; Stevens, M.; Narla, M.; Rubin, E.

    1997-06-13

    To create mice expressing exclusively human sicklehemoglobin (HbS), transgenic mice expressing human alpha-, gamma-, andbeta[S]-globin were generated and bred with knockout mice that haddeletions of the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes. These sickle cellmice have the major features (irreversibly sickled red cells, anemia,multiorgan pathology) found in humans with sickle cell disease and, assuch, represent a useful in vivo system to accelerate the development ofimproved therapies for this common genetic disease.

  19. MicroRNA changes, activation of progenitor cells and severity of liver injury in mice induced by choline and folate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tryndyak, Volodymyr P; Marrone, April K; Latendresse, John R; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Beland, Frederick A; Pogribny, Igor P

    2016-02-01

    Dietary deficiency in methyl-group donors and cofactors induces liver injury that resembles many pathophysiological and histopathological features of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), including an altered expression of microRNAs (miRNAs). We evaluated the consequences of a choline- and folate-deficient (CFD) diet on the expression of miRNAs in the livers of male A/J and WSB/EiJ mice. The results demonstrate that NAFLD-like liver injury induced by the CFD diet in A/J and WSB/EiJ mice was associated with marked alterations in hepatic miRNAome profiles, with the magnitude of miRNA expression changes being greater in WSB/EiJ mice, the strain characterized by the greatest severity of liver injury. Specifically, WSB/EiJ mice exhibited more prominent changes in the expression of common miRNAs as compared to A/J mice and distinct miRNA alterations, including the overexpression of miR-134, miR-409-3p, miR-410 and miR-495 miRNAs that were accompanied by an activation of hepatic progenitor cells and fibrogenesis. This in vivo finding was further confirmed by in vitro experiments showing an overexpression of these miRNAs in undifferentiated progenitor hepatic HepaRG cells compared to in fully differentiated HepaRG cells. Additionally, a marked elevation of miR-134, miR-409-3p, miR-410 and miR-495 was found in plasma of WSB/EiJ mice fed the CFD diet, while none of the miRNAs was changed in plasma of A/J mice. These findings suggest that miRNAs may be crucial regulators responsible for the progression of NAFLD and may be useful as noninvasive diagnostic indicators of the severity and progression of NAFLD. PMID:26878785

  20. Developmental onset of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity involves Toll-like receptor 2-dependent signaling in humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1 mice.

    PubMed

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Chen, Shujuan; Nguyen, Nghia; Tukey, Robert H

    2014-02-21

    Biological and signaling events that connect developmentally induced hyperbilirubinemia to bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction (BIND) and CNS toxicity in humans are poorly understood. In mammals, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) is the sole enzyme responsible for bilirubin glucuronidation, a rate-limiting step necessary for bilirubin metabolism and clearance. Humanized mice that express the entire UGT1 locus (hUGT1) and the UGT1A1 gene, develop neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, with 8-10% of hUGT1 mice succumbing to CNS damage, a phenotype that is presented by uncontrollable seizures. We demonstrate that neuroinflammation and reactive gliosis are prominent features of bilirubin brain toxicity, and a disturbed redox status resulting from activation of NADPH oxidase is an important contributing mechanism found in BIND. Using knock-out mice and primary brain cells, we connect a key pattern recognition receptor, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), to hyperbilirubinemia-induced signaling. We illustrate a requirement for TLR2 signaling in regulating gliosis, proinflammatory mediators, and oxidative stress when neonatal mice encounter severe hyperbilirubinemia. TLR2-mediated gliosis strongly correlates with pronounced neuroinflammation in the CNS with up-regulation of TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6, creating a pro-inflammatory CNS environment. Gene expression and immunohistochemistry staining show that hUGT1/Tlr2(-/-) mice fail to activate glial cells, proinflammatory cytokines, and stress response genes. In addition, bilirubin-induced apoptosis was significantly enhanced by blocking TLR2 signaling indicating its anti-apoptotic property. Consequently, a higher neonatal death rate (57.1%) in hUGT1/Tlr2(-/-) mice was observed when compared with hUGT1 mice (8.7%). These results suggest that TLR2 signaling and microglia neuroinflammation are linked to a repair and/or protection mode against BIND. PMID:24403077

  1. Sickness behavior is delayed in hypothyroid mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanessa Cardoso; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Sickness behavior is an expression of a motivational state triggered by activation of the peripheral innate immune system, whereby an organism reprioritizes its functions to fight infection. The relationship between thyroid hormone and immune cells is complex, and additional insights are needed about the involvement of the cross-talk between thyroid hormone, the central nervous system and immune function, as demonstrated by the consequences to sickness behavior. The aim of this work was to evaluate sickness behavior in hypothyroid mice. Control mice and mice treated with propylthiouracil (PTU) for 30days (0.05%; added to drinking water) received a single dose of LPS (200μg/kg; i.p.) or saline, and the behavioral response was assessed for 24h. We provide evidence that thyroid status acts a modulator for the development of depressive-like and exploratory behaviors in mice that are subjected to an immunological challenge because the PTU pretreatment delayed the LPS-induced behavioral changes observed in an open field test and in a forced swimming test. This response was observed concomitantly with a lower thermal index until 4h after the LPS administration. This result demonstrates that thyroid status modifies behavioral responses to immune challenge and suggests that thyroid hormones are essential for the manifestation of sickness behavior during endotoxemia. PMID:25524131

  2. Glomerular injury in mice induced by Agkistrodon venom.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, N.; Sugimoto, K.; Sugihara, H.; Shirasawa, H.; Muro, H.; Kaneko, M.; Nikai, T.; Shibata, K.

    1986-01-01

    Glomerular injury was produced in mice after a single LD50 intravenous dose of purified 100-pace snake venom (Agkistrodon acutus). Characteristic features in glomeruli where the venom was demonstrated immunohistochemically included cystic lesions of the capillary tufts, thrombosis, subsequent proliferative and sclerotic changes, and crescent formation. Venom was recognized immunohistochemically in the glomerular endothelium, visceral basement membrane, mesangium, epithelium, and Bowman's capsule. Venom transfer across the basement membrane or into cells required less than 2 hours. Within this period mesangiolysis occurred due to the protease activity of the venom. Cystic lesions with fibrin thrombi then developed, which were replaced by proliferative and sclerotic changes after 3 days. Crescent formation began within 48 hours and was completed within a few days. Microangiography revealed hemodynamic changes in the intrarenal vasculature after venom treatment. Immune complex deposition was not found in any tissue. The study demonstrates the moderately constant potency (LD50) of Agkistron acutus venom, and documents it as a useful tool for quantitative studies of renal lesions. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:3511722

  3. Features of MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorley, T.; James, M.; Booth, T.; Brown, F.; Bull, J.; Cox, L. J.; Durkee, J.; Elson, J.; Fensin, M.; Forster, R. A.; Hendricks, J.; Hughes, H. G.; Johns, R.; Kiedrowski, B.; Martz, R.; Mashnik, S.; McKinney, G.; Pelowitz, D.; Prael, R.; Sweezy, J.; Waters, L.; Wilcox, T.; Zukaitis, T.

    2014-06-01

    MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, but it is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of six years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in Los Alamos National Laboratory's X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3) and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Radiation Transport Modeling Team (NEN-5) respectively, have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and major bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 1.60 and MCNPX 2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities only will be developed and released in MCNP6. In fact, the initial release of MCNP6 contains numerous new features not previously found in either code. These new features are summarized in this document. Packaged with MCNP6 is also the new production release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data files usable by MCNP. The high quality of the overall merged code, usefulness of these new features, along with the desire in the user community to start using the merged code, have led us to make the first MCNP6 production release: MCNP6 version 1. High confidence in the MCNP6 code is based on its performance with the verification and validation test suites, comparisons to its predecessor codes, our automated nightly software debugger tests, the underlying high quality nuclear and atomic databases, and significant testing by many beta testers.

  4. qFeature

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-09-14

    This package contains statistical routines for extracting features from multivariate time-series data which can then be used for subsequent multivariate statistical analysis to identify patterns and anomalous behavior. It calculates local linear or quadratic regression model fits to moving windows for each series and then summarizes the model coefficients across user-defined time intervals for each series. These methods are domain agnostic—but they have been successfully applied to a variety of domains, including commercial aviation andmore » electric power grid data.« less

  5. qFeature

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-14

    This package contains statistical routines for extracting features from multivariate time-series data which can then be used for subsequent multivariate statistical analysis to identify patterns and anomalous behavior. It calculates local linear or quadratic regression model fits to moving windows for each series and then summarizes the model coefficients across user-defined time intervals for each series. These methods are domain agnostic—but they have been successfully applied to a variety of domains, including commercial aviation and electric power grid data.

  6. Teaching Group Communication with Feature Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Russell F., II

    While a number of feature films can be used in group-process instruction, "Twelve Angry Men" and "The Breakfast Club" are particularly valuable for analyzing group communication patterns and strategies. "Twelve Angry Men" demonstrates that persuasion in groups can take place through a variety of methods. Exercises based on the film can raise…

  7. Schizophrenia classification using functional network features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rish, Irina; Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Heuton, Kyle

    2012-03-01

    This paper focuses on discovering statistical biomarkers (features) that are predictive of schizophrenia, with a particular focus on topological properties of fMRI functional networks. We consider several network properties, such as node (voxel) strength, clustering coefficients, local efficiency, as well as just a subset of pairwise correlations. While all types of features demonstrate highly significant statistical differences in several brain areas, and close to 80% classification accuracy, the most remarkable results of 93% accuracy are achieved by using a small subset of only a dozen of most-informative (lowest p-value) correlation features. Our results suggest that voxel-level correlations and functional network features derived from them are highly informative about schizophrenia and can be used as statistical biomarkers for the disease.

  8. Effect of Weight-Reduction in Obese Mice Lacking Toll-Like Receptor 5 and C57BL/6 Mice Fed a Low-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shao-Chun; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Lu, Tsu-Hsiang; Tzeng, Siou-Ling; Wu, Yi-Chan; Wu, Chia-Jung; Lin, Chia-Wei; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aims to investigate the effect of feeding low-fat diet (LFD) to diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice lacking TLR5 (TLR5−/−), which have a tendency to develop glucose intolerance with increased adiposity, compared to that in C57BL/6 mice. Results. TLR5−/− and C57BL/6 male mice were divided into three subgroups: (1) control, mice were fed a standard AIN-76A (fat: 11.5 kcal%) diet for 12 weeks; (2) DIO, mice were fed a 58 kcal% high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks; and (3) diet, mice were fed a HFD for 8 weeks to induce obesity and then switched to a 10.5 kcal% LFD for 4 weeks. The glucose intolerance in DIO TLR5−/− mice was more significant than that in DIO C57BL/6 mice and was not attenuated by a switch to the LFD. Weight-reduction with LFD had significantly decreased the epididymal fat mass in C57BL/6 mice but not in TLR5−/− mice. In addition, the LFD-fed TLR5−/− mice showed significantly higher expression of ghrelin in the serum and resistin in the epididymal fat than that in C57BL/6 mice. Conclusions. This study demonstrated that TLR5 gene knockout impairs some effects of weight-reduction in DIO. PMID:26681840

  9. MMIC Phased Array Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A. (Compiler); Martzaklis, Konstantinos (Compiler); Zakrajsek, Robert J. (Compiler); Andro, Monty (Compiler); Turtle, John P.

    1996-01-01

    Over a one year period from May 1994 to May 1995, a number of demonstrations were conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in which voice, data, and/or video links were established via NASA's advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) between the ACTS link evaluation terminal (LET) in Cleveland, OH, and aeronautical and mobile or fixed Earth terminals having monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array antenna systems. This paper describes four of these. In one, a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice (and in one case video as well) links between the ACTS and an Army vehicle. The fourth demonstrated a high data rate downlink from ACTS to a fixed terminal. Array antenna systems used in these demonstrations were developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and Air Force experimental arrays using gallium arsenide MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The single 30 GHz transmit array was developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments. The three 20 GHz receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force array development contracts with Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The paper describes the four proof-of-concept arrays and the array control system. The system configured for each of the demonstrations is described, and results are discussed.

  10. Antinuclear antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Teague, P. O.; Friou, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Seven-week-old and 16-week-old A/Jax mice were injected with viable spleen cells or homogenates of spleen cells obtained from older syngeneic mice which either had autoimmune anti-deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) antibody in their sera or lacked this activity. None of the 7-week-old recipients developed detectable anti-DNP antibody. However, most of the animals in the 16-week-old group developed this autoantibody. The viability of the cells and the presence of or absence of anti-DNP antibody in the donor's sera did not appear to influence the autoimmune response of these recipients. When viable thymus cells which were obtained from young A/Jax mice were transferred to groups of older syngeneic animals that had developed anti-DNP antibody spontaneously, the anti-DNP decreased or disappeared from the sera of most recipients. Untreated controls did not show this variation. When 36-week-old A/Jax mice which lacked anti-DNP antibody were injected with thymus or spleen cells obtained from young donors, none of the recipients or untreated controls developed anti-DNP antibody. After specific immunization with DNP, however, the control animals began to produce autoimmune anti-DNP antibody while the animals treated with thymus or spleen cells remained unresponsive. These observations support the hypothesis that in A/Jax mice: (1) autoimmunity to DNP may result from failure of normal homeostasis mechanisms which allow proliferation of autoimmune cells; (2) the number of cells with autoimmune potential may increase during ageing; (3) the efficiency of the homeostasis system may decrease during ageing as the result of microbial or genetic factors; and (4) cells which participate in homeostasis are found in the thymus and spleen of young mice and may be the thymus dependent lymphocytes. PMID:5307745

  11. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  12. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg

  13. Genetic feature selection for gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafazzoli, Faezeh; Bebis, George; Louis, Sushil; Hussain, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Many research studies have demonstrated that gait can serve as a useful biometric modality for human identification at a distance. Traditional gait recognition systems, however, have mostly been evaluated without explicitly considering the most relevant gait features, which might have compromised performance. We investigate the problem of selecting a subset of the most relevant gait features for improving gait recognition performance. This is achieved by discarding redundant and irrelevant gait features while preserving the most informative ones. Motivated by our previous work on feature subset selection using genetic algorithms (GAs), we propose using GAs to select an optimal subset of gait features. First, features are extracted using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) on spatiotemporal projections of gait silhouettes. Then, GA is applied to select a subset of eigenvectors in KPCA space that best represents a subject's identity. Each gait pattern is then represented by projecting it only on the eigenvectors selected by the GA. To evaluate the effectiveness of the selected features, we have experimented with two different classifiers: k nearest-neighbor and Naïve Bayes classifier. We report considerable gait recognition performance improvements on the Georgia Tech and CASIA databases.

  14. Passive Safety Features for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, Daniel T

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in the size and complexity of commercial nuclear power plants in the 1970s spawned an interest in smaller, simpler designs that are inherently or intrinsically safe through the use of passive design features. Several designs were developed, but none were ever built, although some of their passive safety features were incorporated into large commercial plant designs that are being planned or built today. In recent years, several reactor vendors are actively redeveloping small modular reactor (SMR) designs with even greater use of passive features. Several designs incorporate the ultimate in passive safety they completely eliminate specific accident initiators from the design. Other design features help to reduce the likelihood of an accident or help to mitigate the accident s consequences, should one occur. While some passive safety features are common to most SMR designs, irrespective of the coolant technology, other features are specific to water, gas, or liquid-metal cooled SMR designs. The extensive use of passive safety features in SMRs promise to make these plants highly robust, protecting both the general public and the owner/investor. Once demonstrated, these plants should allow nuclear power to be used confidently for a broader range of customers and applications than will be possible with large plants alone.

  15. Hierarchical feature selection for erythema severity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Shi, Chenbo; Shu, Chang

    2014-10-01

    At present PASI system of scoring is used for evaluating erythema severity, which can help doctors to diagnose psoriasis [1-3]. The system relies on the subjective judge of doctors, where the accuracy and stability cannot be guaranteed [4]. This paper proposes a stable and precise algorithm for erythema severity estimation. Our contributions are twofold. On one hand, in order to extract the multi-scale redness of erythema, we design the hierarchical feature. Different from traditional methods, we not only utilize the color statistical features, but also divide the detect window into small window and extract hierarchical features. Further, a feature re-ranking step is introduced, which can guarantee that extracted features are irrelevant to each other. On the other hand, an adaptive boosting classifier is applied for further feature selection. During the step of training, the classifier will seek out the most valuable feature for evaluating erythema severity, due to its strong learning ability. Experimental results demonstrate the high precision and robustness of our algorithm. The accuracy is 80.1% on the dataset which comprise 116 patients' images with various kinds of erythema. Now our system has been applied for erythema medical efficacy evaluation in Union Hosp, China.

  16. The MICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2003-08-01

    One of the most important requirements for a neutrino factory and a muon collider is the ability to cool the muons to increase the phase space density. As all existing cooling techniques do not work for muons, a new method has been proposed: ionization cooling. As this is a completely unproven technique, a series of experiments is being built to investigate the cooling process in some detail. MICE is the last and biggest of these and is being designed to show that ionization cooling works and to learn more about the cooling process itself. This paper describes MICE in some detail and outlines its expected performance in measuring cooling.

  17. Recursive Feature Extraction in Graphs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-08-14

    ReFeX extracts recursive topological features from graph data. The input is a graph as a csv file and the output is a csv file containing feature values for each node in the graph. The features are based on topological counts in the neighborhoods of each nodes, as well as recursive summaries of neighbors' features.

  18. [Development of a hepatitis B virus carrier transgenic mice model].

    PubMed

    Caner, Müge; Arat, Sezen; Bircan, Rifat

    2008-01-01

    The studies for the development of transgenic mice models which provide important profits for the studies concerning immunopathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are in progress since 20 years. For this purpose different lineages bearing whole HBV genome or selected viral genes have been developed and their usage in clarifying the HBV replication and pathogenesis mechanisms have been emphasized. The aim of this study was to develop and breed a HBV carrier mice model. In the study the full HBV genome has been transferred to mouse embryos by microinjection procedure. Following transgenic manipulation, the HBV carriers among the daughter mice have been detected by molecular methods in which HBV-DNA replication and expression have been shown. The manipulations for transgene transfers have been performed in TUBITAK Marmara Research Center Transgene Laboratory, Gebze, Istanbul. The HBV-DNA carrier mice have been demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the DNA samples obtained from tail tissues and also by dot-blot hybridization of the mice sera. Integrated HBV-DNA has been detected by applying in-situ hybridization to the liver tissue sections. HBV-DNA expression has been shown by reverse transcriptase PCR method with total RNA molecules that have been isolated from the liver tissues of the HBV-DNA carrier mice. HBsAg has been detected in the liver by immunohistochemical method, and HBsAg and HBeAg have additionally been demonstrated by ELISA. HBV genome, expression of the genome and the expression products have been determined in approximately 10% of the mice of which HBV-DNA have been transferred. By inbreeding heterozygote carrier mice, homozygote HBV transgenic mice line have been obtained. These HBV transgenic mice are the first lineages developed in our country. It is hopefully thought that this HBV carrier transgenic mouse model may contribute to the studies on the pathogenesis of HBV infections which are important health problems in the world as well as in Turkey. PMID:18444564

  19. Human malignant melanoma heterotransplanted to nude mice.

    PubMed

    Tropé, C; Johnsson, J E; Alm, P; Landberg, T; Olsson, H; Wennerberg, J

    1981-01-01

    Five different human malignant melanoma were heterotransplanted subcutaneously to nude mice. When small tissue pieces were used 3 out of 5 tumors grew. Subcutaneous injections of suspended tumor cells were also made, but all failed to take. Metastatic or infiltrative growth was never seen in the mice observed for up to 2.5 months. The successful grafts largely retained the original morphologicaL features. The three successfully transplanted tumors could all be serially transferred with 100% tumor take. In one case passage time was reduced from 40 days to 15 days. As measured with 3H-thymidine incorporation the proliferation rate increased during the passages. These changes might be due to a selection of more rapidly growing tumor cells in the nudes. PMID:7312076

  20. Demonstration Wetland at Henderson, Nevada

    Demonstration wetland at Henderson, Nevada, where vegetated hummocks were built into the wastewater treatment wetland to improve its effectiveness and sustainability, as well as provide quality wildlife habitat....

  1. 32 wk Old C3H/HeJ Mice Actively Respond to Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    Poliachik, Sandra L.; Threet, DeWayne; Srinivasan, Sundar; Gross, Ted S.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice are mildly responsive to mechanical loading compared to C57BL/6J (C57) mice. Guided by data indicating high baseline periosteal osteoblast activity in 16 wk C3H mice, we speculated that simply allowing the C3H mice to age until basal periosteal bone formation was equivalent to that of 16 wk C57 mice would restore mechanoresponsiveness in C3H mice. We tested this hypothesis by subjecting the right tibiae of 32 wk old C3H mice and 16 wk old C57 mice to low magnitude rest-inserted loading (peak strain: 1235με) and then exposing the right tibiae of 32 wk C3H mice to low (1085με) or moderate (1875 με) magnitude cyclic loading. The osteoblastic response to loading on the endocortical and periosteal surfaces was evaluated via dynamic histomorphometry. At 32 wk of age, C3H mice responded to low magnitude rest-inserted loading with significantly elevated periosteal mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate and bone formation compared to unloaded contralateral bones. Surprisingly, the periosteal bone formation induced by low magnitude rest-inserted loading in C3H mice exceeded that induced in 16 wk C57 mice. At 32 wk of age, C3H mice also demonstrated an elevated response to increased magnitudes of cyclic loading. We conclude that a high level of basal osteoblast function in 16 wk C3H mice appears to overwhelm the ability of the tissue to respond to an otherwise anabolic mechanical loading stimulus. However, when basal surface osteoblast activity is equivalent to that of 16 wk C57 mice, C3H mice demonstrate a clear ability to respond to either rest-inserted or cyclic loading. PMID:18280231

  2. Feature Engineering for Drug Name Recognition in Biomedical Texts: Feature Conjunction and Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shengyu; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Drug name recognition (DNR) is a critical step for drug information extraction. Machine learning-based methods have been widely used for DNR with various types of features such as part-of-speech, word shape, and dictionary feature. Features used in current machine learning-based methods are usually singleton features which may be due to explosive features and a large number of noisy features when singleton features are combined into conjunction features. However, singleton features that can only capture one linguistic characteristic of a word are not sufficient to describe the information for DNR when multiple characteristics should be considered. In this study, we explore feature conjunction and feature selection for DNR, which have never been reported. We intuitively select 8 types of singleton features and combine them into conjunction features in two ways. Then, Chi-square, mutual information, and information gain are used to mine effective features. Experimental results show that feature conjunction and feature selection can improve the performance of the DNR system with a moderate number of features and our DNR system significantly outperforms the best system in the DDIExtraction 2013 challenge. PMID:25861377

  3. Feature engineering for drug name recognition in biomedical texts: feature conjunction and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Drug name recognition (DNR) is a critical step for drug information extraction. Machine learning-based methods have been widely used for DNR with various types of features such as part-of-speech, word shape, and dictionary feature. Features used in current machine learning-based methods are usually singleton features which may be due to explosive features and a large number of noisy features when singleton features are combined into conjunction features. However, singleton features that can only capture one linguistic characteristic of a word are not sufficient to describe the information for DNR when multiple characteristics should be considered. In this study, we explore feature conjunction and feature selection for DNR, which have never been reported. We intuitively select 8 types of singleton features and combine them into conjunction features in two ways. Then, Chi-square, mutual information, and information gain are used to mine effective features. Experimental results show that feature conjunction and feature selection can improve the performance of the DNR system with a moderate number of features and our DNR system significantly outperforms the best system in the DDIExtraction 2013 challenge. PMID:25861377

  4. Lumican overexpression exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced renal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Mei; Ma, Ling; Jin, Yu-Nan; Yu, Yan-Qiu

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of lumican in mice with endotoxin-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Lumican transgenic mice and wild‑type mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg/kg) to establish a model of ARF. The mice were sacrificed at 24 h and the blood and renal tissue samples were collected. The value of serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were measured to determine renal function. An ELISA was used to determined the concentrations of renal cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10. The protein expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) and nuclear factor (NF)κB in renal tissues were assessed using western blot analysis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling was performed to monitor apoptosis of renal tissue. Light microscopy and electron microscopy were used to observe structural changes in the renal tissues. Following the administration of LPS, the SCr and BUN values of mice in the lumican transgenic group were higher compared with those in the control group. The expression levels of renal TLR4, NFκB, TNFα, IL‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10 were upregulated in the lumican transgenic mice compared with those in the wild‑type control group. Apoptosis was detected predominantly on the renal tubule. There was a significant difference in the optical density of apoptotic bodies between the control mice and the lumican transgenic mice. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated more severe renal tissue injury in the lumican transgenic mice compared with that in the control mice. In conclusion, LPS may cause excessive apoptosis in the renal tubular cells via the TLR4 signal transduction pathway, a decrease in the number of renal tubular cells and ARF. Lumican may be important in mice with LPS-induced ARF. PMID:26081832

  5. Experimental infection of mice with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Seong, Giyong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to test the ability of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to infect mice. Two mice each were either mock infected or inoculated with one of three BVDV strains by the intraperitoneal (IP) (n = 8) or intranasal (IN) (n = 8) route. All mice were euthanized at day 7 postinfection (p.i.). None of the infected mice exhibited any clinical signs of illness; however, the tissues harvested after BVDV challenge showed significant histopathological changes. Blood samples from five mice that were injected IP and one mouse that was inoculated IN were positive for BVDV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the presence of viral antigen in the organs of mice infected with three BVDV strains. In IP-injected mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the spleen (5/6), mesenteric lymph nodes (4/6), lymphatic tissue of the lung (3/6), lung (1/6), and stomach (1/6) of the infected mice; however, it was not detected in the liver (0/6) or kidney (0/6). In IN-inoculated mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the lung and mesenteric lymph nodes of one BVDV-infected mouse but was not detected in other tissues. The results of this study suggest that the spleen is the most reliable tissue for BVDV antigen detection using IHC in the IP-injected group. Our study demonstrates that mice can be infected by BVDV. This is the first report of BVDV infection in mice. PMID:25850760

  6. Reprogramming in vivo produces teratomas and iPS cells with totipotency features.

    PubMed

    Abad, María; Mosteiro, Lluc; Pantoja, Cristina; Cañamero, Marta; Rayon, Teresa; Ors, Inmaculada; Graña, Osvaldo; Megías, Diego; Domínguez, Orlando; Martínez, Dolores; Manzanares, Miguel; Ortega, Sagrario; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-10-17

    Reprogramming of adult cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) has opened new therapeutic opportunities; however, little is known about the possibility of in vivo reprogramming within tissues. Here we show that transitory induction of the four factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc in mice results in teratomas emerging from multiple organs, implying that full reprogramming can occur in vivo. Analyses of the stomach, intestine, pancreas and kidney reveal groups of dedifferentiated cells that express the pluripotency marker NANOG, indicative of in situ reprogramming. By bone marrow transplantation, we demonstrate that haematopoietic cells can also be reprogrammed in vivo. Notably, reprogrammable mice present circulating iPS cells in the blood and, at the transcriptome level, these in vivo generated iPS cells are closer to embryonic stem cells (ES cells) than standard in vitro generated iPS cells. Moreover, in vivo iPS cells efficiently contribute to the trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that they achieve a more plastic or primitive state than ES cells. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of in vivo iPS cells generates embryo-like structures that express embryonic and extraembryonic markers. We conclude that reprogramming in vivo is feasible and confers totipotency features absent in standard iPS or ES cells. These discoveries could be relevant for future applications of reprogramming in regenerative medicine. PMID:24025773

  7. Integrating electrostatics with demonstrations and interactive teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wheijen

    2011-02-01

    Teaching electrostatics is challenging due to its complexity and high degree of abstraction. To facilitate students' understanding of the meanings and relations of the key terms, this paper describes a series of demonstrations and conceptual questions based on an interactive teaching approach. The context was an introductory university physics course for engineering and science students in Taiwan. Features of the teaching intervention include the utilization of a series of demonstrations for repeated practice applying the important concepts, the incorporation of derivations of equations and verbal elaboration of concepts, and the engagement of students in thinking and discussing. Data show that the teaching intervention benefited the students' academic performance and their satisfaction with the learning achievement.

  8. More features, greater connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Changes in our political infrastructure, the continuing frailties of our economy, and a stark growth in population, have greatly impacted upon the perceived stability of the NHS. Healthcare teams have had to adapt to these changes, and so too have the technologies upon which they rely to deliver first-class patient care. Here Sarah Hunt, marketing co-ordinator at Aid Call, assesses how the changing healthcare environment has affected one of its fundamental technologies - the nurse call system, argues the case for wireless such systems in terms of what the company claims is greater adaptability to changing needs, and considers the ever-wider range of features and functions available from today's nurse call equipment, particularly via connectivity with both mobile devices, and ancillaries ranging from enuresis sensors to staff attack alert 'badges'. PMID:26548128

  9. Dynamic features of combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic features of combustion are discussed for four important cases: ignition, inflammation, explosion, and detonation. Ignition, the initiation of a self-sustained exothermic process, is considered in the simplest case of a closed thermodynamic system and its stochastic distribution. Inflammation, the initiation and propagation of self-sustained flames, is presented for turbulent flow. Explosion, the dynamic effects caused by the deposition of exothermic energy in a compressible medium, is illustrated by self-similar blast waves with energy deposition at the front and the adiabatic non-self-similar wave. Detonation, the most comprehensive illustration of all the dynamic effects of combustion, is discussed with a phenomenological account of the development and structure of the wave.

  10. Resilient emotionality and molecular compensation in mice lacking the oligodendrocyte-specific gene Cnp1

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, N M; Touma, C; Palme, R; Sibille, E

    2011-01-01

    Altered oligodendrocyte structure and function is implicated in major psychiatric illnesses, including low cell number and reduced oligodendrocyte-specific gene expression in major depressive disorder (MDD). These features are also observed in the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) rodent model of the illness, suggesting that they are consequential to environmental precipitants; however, whether oligodendrocyte changes contribute causally to low emotionality is unknown. Focusing on 2′-3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (Cnp1), a crucial component of axoglial communication dysregulated in the amygdala of MDD subjects and UCMS-exposed mice, we show that altered oligodendrocyte integrity can have an unexpected functional role in affect regulation. Mice lacking Cnp1 (knockout, KO) displayed decreased anxiety- and depressive-like symptoms (i.e., low emotionality) compared with wild-type animals, a phenotypic difference that increased with age (3–9 months). This phenotype was accompanied by increased motor activity, but was evident before neurodegenerative-associated motor coordination deficits (⩽9–12 months). Notably, Cnp1KO mice were less vulnerable to developing a depressive-like syndrome after either UCMS or chronic corticosterone exposure. Cnp1KO mice also displayed reduced fear expression during extinction, despite normal amygdala c-Fos induction after acute stress, together implicating dysfunction of an amygdala-related neural network, and consistent with proposed mechanisms for stress resiliency. However, the Cnp1KO behavioral phenotype was also accompanied by massive upregulation of oligodendrocyte- and immune-related genes in the basolateral amygdala, suggesting an attempt at functional compensation. Together, we demonstrate that the lack of oligodendrocyte-specific Cnp1 leads to resilient emotionality. However, combined with substantial molecular changes and late-onset neurodegeneration, these results suggest the low Cnp1 seen in MDD may cause unsustainable and maladaptive molecular compensations contributing to the disease pathophysiology. PMID:22832658

  11. Psychological stress-induced catecholamines accelerates cutaneous aging in mice.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Santos Lima-Cezar, Gracineide; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2015-12-01

    Psychological stress may be an important extrinsic factor which influences aging process. However, neither study demonstrated the mechanism by which chronic stress participates in skin aging. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic psychological stress on mice skin. Mice were daily submitted to rotational stress, for 28 days, until euthanasia. After 28 days, mice were killed and normal skin was analyzed. Macroscopically, dorsum skin of chronically stressed mice presented more wrinkled when compared to that of nonstressed mice. In mice skin, chronic stress increased lipid peroxidation, carbonyl protein content, nitrotyrosine levels, neutrophil infiltration, neutrophil elastase, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and metalloproteinase-8 levels. Nevertheless, chronic stress reduced dermis thickness, collagen type I, fibrilin-1 and elastin protein levels in mice skin. In in vitro assays, murine skin fibroblasts were exposed to elevated epinephrine levels plus inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), fibroblast activity was evaluated in a short time. In skin fibroblast culture, treatment with inhibitors of ROS and RNS synthesis abolished the increase in carbonyl protein content and lipid peroxide accumulation induced by epinephrine. In conclusion, chronic psychological stress may be an important extrinsic factor, which contributes to skin aging in mice. PMID:26541702

  12. Crybb2 deficiency impairs fertility in female mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qian; Sun, Li-Li; Xiang, Fen-Fen; Gao, Li; Jia, Yin; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Tao, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Li, Wen-Jie

    2014-10-10

    Beta-B2-crystallin (CRYBB2), encoded by Crybb2 gene, is a major protein in the mammalian eye lens that plays an important role in maintaining the transparency of the ocular lens. However, CRYBB2 also plays important roles in many extra-lenticular tissues and organs such as the retina, brain and testis. Our previous studies demonstrated that male Crybb2 deficient (Crybb2(-/-)) mice have reduced fertility compared with wild-type (WT) mice, while female Crybb2(-/-) mice exhibited reduced ovary weights and shorter estrous cycle percentages. Here we specifically investigated the role of CRYBB2 in the female reproductive system. Our studies revealed that ovaries from female Crybb2(-/-) mice exhibited significantly reduced numbers of primordial, secondary and pre-ovulatory follicles when compared with WT mice, while the rate of atretic follicles was also increased. Additionally, fewer eggs were collected from the oviduct of Crybb2(-/-) female mice after superovulation. Estrogen levels were higher in the metestrus and diestrus cycles of female Crybb2(-/-) mice, while progesterone levels were lower in diestrus cycles. Furthermore, the expression of survival and cell cycle genes, Bcl-2, Cdk4 and Ccnd2, were significantly decreased in granulosa cells isolated from female Crybb2(-/-) mice, consistent with the predominant expression of CRYBB2 in ovarian granulosa cells. Our results reveal a critical role for CRYBB2 in female fertility and specific effects on the proliferation and survival status of ovarian granulosa cells. PMID:25245288

  13. Inflammatory responses to acute pneumovirus infection in neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The innate immune responses of neonates differ dramatically from those of adults. Here we examine the acute inflammatory responses of neonatal and weanling mice infected with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a rodent pathogen (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Pneumovirus) that replicates the sequelae of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection. Results We demonstrate that virus replication proceeds indistinguishably in all age groups (inoculated at 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks of age), although inflammatory responses vary in extent and character. Some of the biochemical mediators detected varied minimally with age at inoculation. Most of the mediators evaluated demonstrated elevated expression over baseline correlating directly with age at the time of virus inoculation. Among the latter group are CCL2, CCL3, and IFN-γ, all cytokines previously associated with PVM-induced inflammatory pathology in mature mice. Likewise, we detect neutrophil recruitment to lung tissue in all age groups, but recruitment is most pronounced among the older (3 - 4 week old) mice. Interestingly, all mice exhibit failure to thrive, lagging in expected weight gain for given age, including the youngest mice that present little overt evidence of inflammation. Conclusions Our findings among the youngest mice may explain in part the phenomenon of atypical or minimally symptomatic respiratory infections in human neonates, which may be explored further with this infection model. PMID:21078159

  14. Gene expression: RNA interference in adult mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Anton P.; Meuse, Leonard; Pham, Thu-Thao T.; Conklin, Douglas S.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Kay, Mark A.

    2002-07-01

    RNA interference is an evolutionarily conserved surveillance mechanism that responds to double-stranded RNA by sequence-specific silencing of homologous genes. Here we show that transgene expression can be suppressed in adult mice by synthetic small interfering RNAs and by small-hairpin RNAs transcribed in vivo from DNA templates. We also show the therapeutic potential of this technique by demonstrating effective targeting of a sequence from hepatitis C virus by RNA interference in vivo.

  15. Age-related changes in core body temperature and activity in triple-transgenic Alzheimer’s disease (3xTgAD) mice

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Elysse M.; Brown, Timothy M.; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Smith, Jennifer C. M.; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Allan, Stuart M.; Lawrence, Catherine B.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterised, not only by cognitive deficits and neuropathological changes, but also by several non-cognitive behavioural symptoms that can lead to a poorer quality of life. Circadian disturbances in core body temperature and physical activity are reported in AD patients, although the cause and consequences of these changes are unknown. We therefore characterised circadian patterns of body temperature and activity in male triple transgenic AD mice (3xTgAD) and non-transgenic (Non-Tg) control mice by remote radiotelemetry. At 4 months of age, daily temperature rhythms were phase advanced and by 6 months of age an increase in mean core body temperature and amplitude of temperature rhythms were observed in 3xTgAD mice. No differences in daily activity rhythms were seen in 4- to 9-month-old 3xTgAD mice, but by 10 months of age an increase in mean daily activity and the amplitude of activity profiles for 3xTgAD mice were detected. At all ages (4–10 months), 3xTgAD mice exhibited greater food intake compared with Non-Tg mice. The changes in temperature did not appear to be solely due to increased food intake and were not cyclooxygenase dependent because the temperature rise was not abolished by chronic ibuprofen treatment. No β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques or neurofibrillary tangles were noted in the hypothalamus of 3xTgAD mice, a key area involved in temperature regulation, although these pathological features were observed in the hippocampus and amygdala of 3xTgAD mice from 10 months of age. These data demonstrate age-dependent changes in core body temperature and activity in 3xTgAD mice that are present before significant AD-related neuropathology and are analogous to those observed in AD patients. The 3xTgAD mouse might therefore be an appropriate model for studying the underlying mechanisms involved in non-cognitive behavioural changes in AD. PMID:22864021

  16. Varying irrelevant phonetic features hinders learning of the feature being trained.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Mark; Wong, Patrick C M

    2016-01-01

    Learning to distinguish nonnative words that differ in a critical phonetic feature can be difficult. Speech training studies typically employ methods that explicitly direct the learner's attention to the relevant nonnative feature to be learned. However, studies on vision have demonstrated that perceptual learning may occur implicitly, by exposing learners to stimulus features, even if they are irrelevant to the task, and it has recently been suggested that this task-irrelevant perceptual learning framework also applies to speech. In this study, subjects took part in a seven-day training regimen to learn to distinguish one of two nonnative features, namely, voice onset time or lexical tone, using explicit training methods consistent with most speech training studies. Critically, half of the subjects were exposed to stimuli that varied not only in the relevant feature, but in the irrelevant feature as well. The results showed that subjects who were trained with stimuli that varied in the relevant feature and held the irrelevant feature constant achieved the best learning outcomes. Varying both features hindered learning and generalization to new stimuli. PMID:26827023

  17. Linear dimensionality reduction applied to scale invariant feature transformation and speeded up robust feature descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Ricardo Eugenio González; Schwartz, William Robson; Pedrini, Helio

    2014-05-01

    Robust local descriptors usually consist of high-dimensional feature vectors to describe distinctive characteristics of images. The high dimensionality of a feature vector incurs considerable costs in terms of computational time and storage. It also results in the curse of dimensionality that affects the performance of several tasks that use feature vectors, such as matching, retrieval, and classification of images. To address these problems, it is possible to employ some dimensionality reduction techniques, leading frequently to information lost and, consequently, accuracy reduction. This work aims at applying linear dimensionality reduction to the scale invariant feature transformation and speeded up robust feature descriptors. The objective is to demonstrate that even risking the decrease of the accuracy of the feature vectors, it results in a satisfactory trade-off between computational time and storage requirements. We perform linear dimensionality reduction through random projections, principal component analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and partial least squares in order to create lower dimensional feature vectors. These new reduced descriptors lead us to less computational time and memory storage requirements, even improving accuracy in some cases. We evaluate reduced feature vectors in a matching application, as well as their distinctiveness in image retrieval. Finally, we assess the computational time and storage requirements by comparing the original and the reduced feature vectors.

  18. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  19. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  20. Optics Demonstrations Using Cylindrical Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the main properties of cylindrical lenses and propose several demonstrational experiments that can be performed with them. Specifically we use simple glasses full of water to demonstrate some basic geometrical optics principles and phenomena. We also present some less standard experiments that can be performed with such…