Science.gov

Sample records for mice show disturbances

  1. Gelsemine alleviates both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in partial sciatic nerve ligation mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-er; Li, Ya-dong; Luo, Yan-jia; Wang, Tian-xiao; Wang, Hui-jing; Chen, Shuo-nan; Qu, Wei-min; Huang, Zhi-li

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Gelsemine, an alkaloid from the Chinese herb Gelsemium elegans (Gardn & Champ) Benth., is effective in mitigating chronic pain in rats. In the present study we investigated whether the alkaloid improved sleep disturbance, the most common comorbid symptoms of chronic pain, in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Methods: Mice were subjected to partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). After the mice were injected with gelsemine or pregabalin (the positive control) intraperitoneally, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed, and electroencephalogram (EEG)/electromyogram (EMG) recording was performed. Motor performance of the mice was assessed using rota-rod test. c-Fos expression in the brain was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining. Results: In PSNL mice, gelsemine (2 and 4 mg/kg) increased the mechanical threshold for 4 h and prolonged the thermal latencies for 3 h. Furthermore, gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at 6:30 AM) increased non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) sleep, decreased wakefulness, but did not affect REM sleep during the first 3 h in PSNL mice. Sleep architecture analysis showed that gelsemine decreased the mean duration of wakefulness and increased the total number of episodes of NREM sleep during the first 3 h after the dosing. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg) did not impair motor coordination in PSNL mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex, and gelsemine (4 mg/kg) decreased c-Fos expression by 58%. Gelsemine (4 mg/kg, administered at either 6:30 AM or 8:30 PM) did not produce hypnotic effect in normal mice. Pregabalin produced similar antinociceptive and hypnotic effects, but impaired motor coordination in PSNL mice. Conclusion: Gelsemine is an effective agent for treatment of both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice; anterior cingulate cortex might play a role in the hypnotic effects of gelsemine. PMID:26388157

  2. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung Smiley, Mark A.; Lovering, Richard M.; Margolis, Frank L.

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  3. Maternal disturbance in activated sphingolipid metabolism causes pregnancy loss in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Li, Cuiling; Olivera, Ana; Bielawski, Jacek; Bielawska, Alicja; Deng, Chu-Xia; Proia, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Uterine decidualization, a process that occurs in response to embryo implantation, is critical for embryonic survival and thus is a key event for successful pregnancy. Here we show that the sphingolipid metabolic pathway is highly activated in the deciduum during pregnancy and disturbance of the pathway by disruption of sphingosine kinase (Sphk) genes causes defective decidualization with severely compromised uterine blood vessels, leading to early pregnancy loss. Sphk-deficient female mice (Sphk1–/–Sphk2+/–) exhibited both an enormous accumulation of dihydrosphingosine and sphingosine and a reduction in phosphatidylethanolamine levels in pregnant uteri. These mice also revealed increased cell death in decidual cells, decreased cell proliferation in undifferentiated stromal cells, and massive breakage of decidual blood vessels, leading to uterine hemorrhage and early embryonic lethality. Thus, sphingolipid metabolism regulates proper uterine decidualization and blood vessel stability. Our findings also suggest that disturbance in sphingolipid metabolism may be considered as a cause of pregnancy loss in humans. PMID:17885683

  4. Caveolin-2-deficient mice show increased sensitivity to endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Cecilia J; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Jasmin, Jean-François; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Sotgia, Federica; Frank, Philippe G

    2011-01-01

    Caveolin proteins are structural components of caveolae and are involved in the regulation of many biological processes. Recent studies have shown that caveolin-1 modulates inflammatory responses and is important for sepsis development. In the present study, we show that caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 have opposite roles in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis using caveolin-deficient (Cav-1-/- and Cav-2-/-) mice for each of these proteins. While Cav-1-/- mice displayed delayed mortality following challenge with LPS, Cav-2-/- mice were more sensitive to LPS compared to wild-type (WT). With Cav-2-/- mice, this effect was associated with increased intestinal injury and increased intestinal permeability. This negative outcome was also correlated with enhanced expression of iNOS in intestinal epithelial cells, and enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO). By contrast, Cav-1-/- mice demonstrated a decrease in iNOS expression with decreased NO production, but no alteration in intestinal permeability. The differential expression of iNOS was associated with a significant increase in STAT-1 activation in these mice. Intestinal cells of Cav-2-/- mice showed increased phosphorylation of STAT-1 at tyrosine 701 compared to wild-type. However, Cav-1-/- mice-derived intestinal cells showed decreased levels of phosphorylation of STAT-1 at tyrosine 701. Since caveolin-2 is almost completely absent in Cav-1-/- mice, we conclude that it is not just the absence of caveolin-2 that is responsible for the observed effects, but that the balance between caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 is important for iNOS expression and ultimately for sepsis outcome. PMID:21670588

  5. Hyperprolactinemia induced by hCG leads to metabolic disturbances in female mice.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Laura D; Stevens, Guillermina; Bonaventura, Maria Marta; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A; Poutanen, Matti; Calandra, Ricardo S; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Rulli, Susana B

    2016-07-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a growing epidemic; it increases the risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, fatty liver, and several cancers. Several reports have indicated a link between hormonal imbalances and insulin resistance or obesity. Transgenic (TG) female mice overexpressing the human chorionic gonadotropin β-subunit (hCGβ+ mice) exhibit constitutively elevated levels of hCG, increased production of testosterone, progesterone and prolactin, and obesity. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of hCG hypersecretion on possible alterations in the glucose and lipid metabolism of adult TG females. We evaluated fasting serum insulin, glucose, and triglyceride levels in adult hCGβ+ females and conducted intraperitoneal glucose and insulin tolerance tests at different ages. TG female mice showed hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and dyslipidemia, as well as glucose intolerance and insulin resistance at 6 months of age. A 1-week treatment with the dopamine agonist cabergoline applied on 5-week-old hCGβ+ mice, which corrected hyperprolactinemia, hyperandrogenism, and hyperprogesteronemia, effectively prevented the metabolic alterations. These data indicate a key role of the hyperprolactinemia-induced gonadal dysfunction in the metabolic disturbances of hCGβ+ female mice. The findings prompt further studies on the involvement of gonadotropins and prolactin on metabolic disorders and might pave the way for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27154336

  6. Mice Lacking Endoglin in Macrophages Show an Impaired Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda-Fernández, Luisa; Recio-Poveda, Lucía; Aristorena, Mikel; Lastres, Pedro; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; de las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Corbí, Ángel; Arthur, Helen M.; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Botella, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin is an auxiliary receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily and plays an important role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall. Mutations in endoglin gene (ENG) or in the closely related TGF-β receptor type I ACVRL1/ALK1 are responsible for a rare dominant vascular dysplasia, the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Endoglin is also expressed in human macrophages, but its role in macrophage function remains unknown. In this work, we show that endoglin expression is triggered during the monocyte-macrophage differentiation process, both in vitro and during the in vivo differentiation of blood monocytes recruited to foci of inflammation in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. To analyze the role of endoglin in macrophages in vivo, an endoglin myeloid lineage specific knock-out mouse line (Engfl/flLysMCre) was generated. These mice show a predisposition to develop spontaneous infections by opportunistic bacteria. Engfl/flLysMCre mice also display increased survival following LPS-induced peritonitis, suggesting a delayed immune response. Phagocytic activity is impaired in peritoneal macrophages, altering one of the main functions of macrophages which contributes to the initiation of the immune response. We also observed altered expression of TGF-β1 target genes in endoglin deficient peritoneal macrophages. Overall, the altered immune activity of endoglin deficient macrophages could help to explain the higher rate of infectious diseases seen in HHT1 patients. PMID:27010826

  7. Environmental enrichment induces behavioural disturbances in neuropeptide Y knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Florian; Wegerer, Vanessa; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Fröhlich, Esther E.; Bock, Elisabeth; Pritz, Elisabeth; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) refers to the provision of a complex and stimulating housing condition which improves well-being, behaviour and brain function of laboratory animals. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of EE are only partially understood. In the current report, we describe a link between EE and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on findings from NPY knockout (KO) mice exposed to EE. Relative to EE-housed wildtype (WT) animals, NPY KO mice displayed altered behaviour as well as molecular and morphological changes in amygdala and hippocampus. Exposure of WT mice to EE reduced anxiety and decreased central glucocorticoid receptor expression, effects which were absent in NPY KO mice. In addition, NPY deletion altered the preference of EE items, and EE-housed NPY KO mice responded to stress with exaggerated hyperthermia, displayed impaired spatial memory, had higher hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity, effects which were not seen in WT mice. Accordingly, these findings suggest that NPY contributes to the anxiolytic effect of EE and that NPY deletion reverses the beneficial effects of EE into a negative experience. The NPY system could thus be a target for “enviromimetics”, therapeutics which reproduce the beneficial effects of enhanced environmental stimulation. PMID:27305846

  8. Environmental enrichment induces behavioural disturbances in neuropeptide Y knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Florian; Wegerer, Vanessa; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Hassan, Ahmed M; Fröhlich, Esther E; Bock, Elisabeth; Pritz, Elisabeth; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) refers to the provision of a complex and stimulating housing condition which improves well-being, behaviour and brain function of laboratory animals. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of EE are only partially understood. In the current report, we describe a link between EE and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on findings from NPY knockout (KO) mice exposed to EE. Relative to EE-housed wildtype (WT) animals, NPY KO mice displayed altered behaviour as well as molecular and morphological changes in amygdala and hippocampus. Exposure of WT mice to EE reduced anxiety and decreased central glucocorticoid receptor expression, effects which were absent in NPY KO mice. In addition, NPY deletion altered the preference of EE items, and EE-housed NPY KO mice responded to stress with exaggerated hyperthermia, displayed impaired spatial memory, had higher hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity, effects which were not seen in WT mice. Accordingly, these findings suggest that NPY contributes to the anxiolytic effect of EE and that NPY deletion reverses the beneficial effects of EE into a negative experience. The NPY system could thus be a target for "enviromimetics", therapeutics which reproduce the beneficial effects of enhanced environmental stimulation. PMID:27305846

  9. Croton grewioides Baill. (Euphorbiaceae) Shows Antidiarrheal Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anne Dayse Soares; de Melo e Silva, Karoline; Neto, José Clementino; Costa, Vicente Carlos de Oliveira; Pessôa, Hilzeth de Luna F.; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; Cavalcante, Fabiana de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Based on chemotaxonomy, we decided to investigate the possible antidiarrheal activity in mice of a crude ethanolic extract obtained from aerial parts of Croton grewioides (CG-EtOH). We tested for any possible toxicity in rat erythrocytes and acute toxicity in mice. Antidiarrheal activity was assessed by determining the effect of CG-EtOH on defecation frequency, liquid stool, intestinal motility and intestinal fluid accumulation. CG-EtOH showed no in vitro cytotoxicity and was not orally lethal. In contrast, the extract given intraperitoneally (at 2000 mg/kg) was lethal, but only in females. CG-EtOH produced a significant and equipotent antidiarrheal activity, both in defecation frequency (ED50 = 106.0 ± 8.1 mg/kg) and liquid stools (ED50 = 105.0 ± 9.2 mg/kg). However, CG-EtOH (125 mg/kg) decreased intestinal motility by only 22.7% ± 4.4%. Moreover, extract markedly inhibited the castor oil-induced intestinal contents (ED50 = 34.6 ± 5.4 mg/kg). We thus conclude that CG-EtOH is not orally lethal and contains active principles with antidiarrheal activity, and this effect seems to involve mostly changes in intestinal secretion. SUMMARY CG-EtOH showed no in vitro cytotoxicity and was not orally lethal. In contrast, the extract given intraperitoneally (at 2000 mg/kg) was lethal, but only in females.CG-EtOH probably contains active metabolites with antidiarrheal activity.CG-EtOH reduced the frequency and number of liquid stools.Metabolites presents in the CG-EtOH act mainly by reducing intestinal fluid and, to a lesser extent, reducing intestinal motility. Abbreviations Used: CG-EtOH: crude ethanolic extract obtained from the aerial parts of C. grewioides; WHO: World Health Organization; ED50: dose of a drug that produces 50% of its maximum effect; Emax: maximum effect PMID:27365990

  10. Impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Kirfel, Jutta Pantelis, Dimitrios; Kabba, Mustapha; Kahl, Philip; Roeper, Anke; Kalff, Joerg C.; Buettner, Reinhard

    2008-12-10

    Four and one half LIM domain protein FHL2 participates in many cellular processes involved in tissue repair such as regulation of gene expression, cytoarchitecture, cell adhesion, migration and signal transduction. The repair process after wounding is initiated by the release of peptides and bioactive lipids. These molecules induce synthesis and deposition of a provisional extracellular matrix. We showed previously that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) triggers a signal transduction cascade mediating nuclear translocation of FHL2 in response to activation of the RhoA GTPase. Our present study shows that FHL2 is an important signal transducer influencing the outcome of intestinal anastomotic healing. Early wound healing is accompanied by reconstitution and remodelling of the extracellular matrix and collagen is primarily responsible for wound strength. Our results show that impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen III metabolism. Impaired collagen III synthesis reduced the mechanical stability of the anastomoses and led to lower bursting pressure in Fhl2-deficient mice after surgery. Our data confirm that FHL2 is an important factor regulating collagen expression in the early phase of wound healing, and thereby is critically involved in the physiologic process of anastomosis healing after bowel surgery and thus may represent a new therapeutic target.

  11. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  12. Divergent responses of viral and bacterial communities in the gut microbiome to dietary disturbances in mice.

    PubMed

    Howe, Adina; Ringus, Daina L; Williams, Ryan J; Choo, Zi-Ning; Greenwald, Stephanie M; Owens, Sarah M; Coleman, Maureen L; Meyer, Folker; Chang, Eugene B

    2016-05-01

    To improve our understanding of the stability of mammalian intestinal communities, we characterized the responses of both bacterial and viral communities in murine fecal samples to dietary changes between high- and low-fat (LF) diets. Targeted DNA extraction methods for bacteria, virus-like particles and induced prophages were used to generate bacterial and viral metagenomes as well as 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons. Gut microbiome communities from two cohorts of C57BL/6 mice were characterized in a 6-week diet perturbation study in response to high fiber, LF and high-refined sugar, milkfat (MF) diets. The resulting metagenomes from induced bacterial prophages and extracellular viruses showed significant overlap, supporting a largely temperate viral lifestyle within these gut microbiomes. The resistance of baseline communities to dietary disturbances was evaluated, and we observed contrasting responses of baseline LF and MF bacterial and viral communities. In contrast to baseline LF viral communities and bacterial communities in both diet treatments, baseline MF viral communities were sensitive to dietary disturbances as reflected in their non-recovery during the washout period. The contrasting responses of bacterial and viral communities suggest that these communities can respond to perturbations independently of each other and highlight the potentially unique role of viruses in gut health. PMID:26473721

  13. Behavioral disturbances in adult mice following neonatal virus infection or kynurenine treatment--role of brain kynurenic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Cong; Holtze, Maria; Powell, Susan B; Terrando, Niccolò; Larsson, Markus K; Persson, Anna; Olsson, Sara K; Orhan, Funda; Kegel, Magdalena; Asp, Linnea; Goiny, Michel; Schwieler, Lilly; Engberg, Göran; Karlsson, Håkan; Erhardt, Sophie

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to infections in early life is considered a risk-factor for developing schizophrenia. Recently we reported that a neonatal CNS infection with influenza A virus in mice resulted in a transient induction of the brain kynurenine pathway, and subsequent behavioral disturbances in immune-deficient adult mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate a potential role in this regard of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous antagonist at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor and at the cholinergic α7 nicotinic receptor. C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with neurotropic influenza A/WSN/33 virus (2400 plaque-forming units) at postnatal day (P) 3 or with L-kynurenine (2×200 mg/kg/day) at P7-16. In mice neonatally treated with L-kynurenine prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle, anxiety, and learning and memory were also assessed. Neonatally infected mice showed enhanced sensitivity to D-amphetamine-induced (5 mg/kg i.p.) increase in locomotor activity as adults. Neonatally L-kynurenine treated mice showed enhanced sensitivity to D-amphetamine-induced (5 mg/kg i.p.) increase in locomotor activity as well as mild impairments in prepulse inhibition and memory. Also, D-amphetamine tended to potentiate dopamine release in the striatum in kynurenine-treated mice. These long-lasting behavioral and neurochemical alterations suggest that the kynurenine pathway can link early-life infection with the development of neuropsychiatric disturbances in adulthood. PMID:24140727

  14. Treatment of GABA from Fermented Rice Germ Ameliorates Caffeine-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mabunga, Darine Froy N.; Gonzales, Edson Luck T.; Kim, Hee Jin; Choung, Se Young

    2015-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is involved in sleep physiology. Caffeine is widely used psychoactive substance known to induce wakefulness and insomnia to its consumers. This study was performed to examine whether GABA extracts from fermented rice germ ameliorates caffeine-induced sleep disturbance in mice, without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination. Indeed, caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration of mice. Conversely, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA treatment (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg, p.o.), especially at 100 mg/kg, normalized the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine. In locomotor tests, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA slightly but not significantly reduced the caffeine-induced increase in locomotor activity without affecting motor coordination. Additionally, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA per se did not affect the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination of mice. In conclusion, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA supplementation can counter the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine, without affecting the general locomotor activities of mice. PMID:25995826

  15. Treatment of GABA from Fermented Rice Germ Ameliorates Caffeine-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mabunga, Darine Froy N; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Kim, Hee Jin; Choung, Se Young

    2015-05-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is involved in sleep physiology. Caffeine is widely used psychoactive substance known to induce wakefulness and insomnia to its consumers. This study was performed to examine whether GABA extracts from fermented rice germ ameliorates caffeine-induced sleep disturbance in mice, without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination. Indeed, caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration of mice. Conversely, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA treatment (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg, p.o.), especially at 100 mg/kg, normalized the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine. In locomotor tests, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA slightly but not significantly reduced the caffeine-induced increase in locomotor activity without affecting motor coordination. Additionally, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA per se did not affect the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination of mice. In conclusion, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA supplementation can counter the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine, without affecting the general locomotor activities of mice. PMID:25995826

  16. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... the animal is, in fact, infected with such disease. If it is found on such tests to be infected,...

  17. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... the animal is, in fact, infected with such disease. If it is found on such tests to be infected,...

  18. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... the animal is, in fact, infected with such disease. If it is found on such tests to be infected,...

  19. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... the animal is, in fact, infected with such disease. If it is found on such tests to be infected,...

  20. Effects of sex hormone disturbances on craniofacial growth in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Ohtani, J; Shigekawa, M; Kawata, T; Kaku, M; Kohno, S; Tsutsui, K; Tenjo, K; Motokawa, M; Tohma, Y; Tanne, K

    2004-03-01

    It is well-known that sex hormones influence bone metabolism. However, it remains unclear as to how sex hormones affect bone growth in newborn mice. In this study, we performed orchiectomy (ORX) and ovariectomy (OVX) on newborn mice, and examined the effects on craniofacial growth morphometrically. ORX and OVX were performed on five-day-old C57BL/6J mice. Four weeks after surgery, lateral cephalograms were taken of all of the mice, with the use of a rat and mouse cephalometer. Cephalometric analysis of the craniofacial skeleton was performed by means of a personal computer. Inhibition of craniofacial growth was found in the experimental groups but not in the sham-operated groups. In the nasomaxillary bone and mandible, the amount of growth was significantly reduced. These results suggest that craniofacial growth is inhibited by sex hormone disturbances not only in puberty but also immediately after birth. PMID:14981129

  1. Narp knockout mice show normal reactivity to novelty but attenuated recovery from neophobia.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Ashley M; Lee, Jongah J; Tao, Bo; Smith, Dani R; Johnson, Alexander W; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2013-11-15

    Narp knockout (KO) mice demonstrate cognitive inflexibility and addictive behavior, which are associated with abnormal reactivity to a novel stimulus. To assess reactivity to novelty, we tested Narp KO and wild-type (WT) mice on a neophobia procedure. Both Narp KO and WT mice showed a similar decrease in consumption upon initial exposure to a novel flavor, but Narp KO mice did not increase consumption with subsequent exposures to the novel flavor like the WT mice. Therefore, Narp KO mice do not have abnormal reactivity to novelty but show deficits in adapting behavior to reflect the updated value of a stimulus. PMID:24120400

  2. The Mediterranean Benthic Herbivores Show Diverse Responses to Extreme Storm Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Jordi F.; Gera, Alessandro; Romero, Javier; Farina, Simone; Garcia-Rubies, Antoni; Hereu, Bernat; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Catastrophic storms have been observed to be one of the major elements in shaping the standing structure of marine benthic ecosystems. Yet, little is known about the effect of catastrophic storms on ecosystem processes. Specifically, herbivory is the main control mechanism of macrophyte communities in the Mediterranean, with two main key herbivores: the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and the fish Sarpa salpa. Consequently, the effects of extreme storm events on these two herbivores (at the population level and on their behaviour) may be critical for the functioning of the ecosystem. With the aim of filling this gap, we took advantage of two parallel studies that were conducted before, during and after an unexpected catastrophic storm event. Specifically, fish and sea urchin abundance were assessed before and after the storm in monitored fixed areas (one site for sea urchin assessment and 3 sites for fish visual transects). Additionally, we investigated the behavioural response to the disturbance of S. salpa fishes that had been tagged with acoustic transmitters. Given their low mobility, sea urchins were severely affected by the storm (ca. 50% losses) with higher losses in those patches with a higher density of sea urchins. This may be due to a limited availability of refuges within each patch. In contrast, fish abundance was not affected, as fish were able to move to protected areas (i.e. deeper) as a result of the high mobility of this species. Our results highlight that catastrophic storms differentially affect the two dominant macroherbivores of rocky macroalgal and seagrass systems due to differences in mobility and escaping strategies. This study emphasises that under catastrophic disturbances, the presence of different responses among the key herbivores of the system may be critical for the maintenance of the herbivory function. PMID:23667512

  3. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated Lys104Glu mutation in the myosin regulatory light chain causes diastolic disturbance in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Muthu, Priya; Duggal, Divya; Farman, Gerrie P; Sorensen, Lars; Pozios, Iraklis; Abraham, Theodore P; Moore, Jeffrey R; Borejdo, Julian; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2014-09-01

    We have examined, for the first time, the effects of the familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)-associated Lys104Glu mutation in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). Transgenic mice expressing the Lys104Glu substitution (Tg-MUT) were generated and the results were compared to Tg-WT (wild-type human ventricular RLC) mice. Echocardiography with pulse wave Doppler in 6month-old Tg-MUT showed early signs of diastolic disturbance with significantly reduced E/A transmitral velocities ratio. Invasive hemodynamics in 6month-old Tg-MUT mice also demonstrated a borderline significant prolonged isovolumic relaxation time (Tau) and a tendency for slower rate of pressure decline, suggesting alterations in diastolic function in Tg-MUT. Six month-old mutant animals had no LV hypertrophy; however, at >13months they displayed significant hypertrophy and fibrosis. In skinned papillary muscles from 5 to 6month-old mice a mutation induced reduction in maximal tension and slower muscle relaxation rates were observed. Mutated cross-bridges showed increased rates of binding to the thin filaments and a faster rate of the power stroke. In addition, ~2-fold lower level of RLC phosphorylation was observed in the mutant compared to Tg-WT. In line with the higher mitochondrial content seen in Tg-MUT hearts, the MUT-myosin ATPase activity was significantly higher than WT-myosin, indicating increased energy consumption. In the in vitro motility assay, MUT-myosin produced higher actin sliding velocity under zero load, but the velocity drastically decreased with applied load in the MUT vs. WT myosin. Our results suggest that diastolic disturbance (impaired muscle relaxation, lower E/A) and inefficiency of energy use (reduced contractile force and faster ATP consumption) may underlie the Lys104Glu-mediated HCM phenotype. PMID:24992035

  4. Chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals disturbs the hepatic expression of circadian genes in lean and obese mice.

    PubMed

    Anthérieu, Sébastien; Le Guillou, Dounia; Coulouarn, Cédric; Begriche, Karima; Trak-Smayra, Viviane; Martinais, Sophie; Porceddu, Mathieu; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Drinking water can be contaminated with pharmaceuticals. However, it is uncertain whether this contamination can be harmful for the liver, especially during obesity. Hence, the goal of our study was to determine whether chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals could have deleterious effects on livers of lean and obese mice. To this end, lean and ob/ob male mice were treated for 4 months with a mixture of 11 drugs provided in drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10⁶ ng/l. At the end of the treatment, some liver and plasma abnormalities were observed in ob/ob mice treated with the cocktail containing 10⁶ ng/l of each drug. For this dosage, a gene expression analysis by microarray showed altered expression of circadian genes (e.g. Bmal1, Dbp, Cry1) in lean and obese mice. RT-qPCR analyses carried out in all groups of animals confirmed that expression of 8 different circadian genes was modified in a dose-dependent manner. For some genes, a significant modification was observed for dosages as low as 10²-10³ ng/l. Drug mixture and obesity presented an additive effect on circadian gene expression. These data were validated in an independent study performed in female mice. Thus, our study showed that chronic exposure to trace pharmaceuticals disturbed hepatic expression of circadian genes, particularly in obese mice. Because some of the 11 drugs can be found in drinking water at such concentrations (e.g. acetaminophen, carbamazepine, ibuprofen) our data could be relevant in environmental toxicology, especially for obese individuals exposed to these contaminants. PMID:24525044

  5. Metabolic disturbances and worsening of atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-/- mice after cola beverages drinking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a major health burden. Metabolic disorders had been associated with large consumption of soft drinks. The rising incidence of atherosclerosis and metabolic alterations warrants the study of long-term soft drink consumption’ effects on metabolism and atherosclerosis in genetic deficiency of apolipoprotein E which typically develops spontaneous atherosclerosis and metabolic alterations. Methods ApoE-/- mice were randomized in 3 groups accordingly with free access to: water (W), regular cola (C) or light cola (L). After 8 weeks, 50% of the animals in each group were euthanized (Treatment: W8, C8, L8). The remaining mice (all groups) drank water for 8 weeks and were euthanized (Washout: W16, C16, L16). Body weight and food and drink consumption were periodically measured. Blood was collected (biochemistry). At autopsy, transverse aortic sinus sections were serially cut and stained (histomorphometry); livers and kidneys were processed (microscopy). MANOVA (identification of variance factors) was followed by ANOVA and LSD tests (within-factor differences between levels). Conventionally a p< 0.05 was considered significant. Results Treatment increased drinking volumes (vs W8: 4 fold C8, p<0.0001; +47% L8, p<0.02). Only C reduced eating amounts (–54%, p<0.05 vs W8). I). Compared with W8: C8 developed hyperglycemia (+43%, p<0.03) and increased non-HDL cholesterol (+54%, p<0.05); L8 showed decreased glycemia (–15%, p<0.05 vs W8) and increased creatinine (2.5 fold, p<0.04), urea (+74, p<0.03) and aspartate-aminotransferase (2.8 fold, p<0.05). Hypercreatininemia was observed in L16 (2.7 fold vs W16, p<0.05). Hypertriglyceridemia (+91%, p<0.008) and hyperuremia (+68%, p<0.03) developed over time of study (age). II). Treatment caused plaque area increase (vs W8: 28% C8, p<0.02 and 50% L8, p<0.01; vs W16: 43% C16, p<0.05 and 68% L16, p<0.02) and stenosis (vs W8: 38% C8, p<0.04 and 57% L8, p<0.01; vs W16: 71% C16, p<0.01 and 46% L16, p<0

  6. Female mice heterozygous for creatine transporter deficiency show moderate cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Hautman, Emily R; Kokenge, Amanda N; Udobi, Kenea C; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V; Skelton, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Creatine transporter (CrT) deficiency (CTD) is an X-linked disorder characterized by intellectual disability and speech delay. There have been reports that show female carriers have clinical symptoms. We have created CrT knockout (CrT(-/y)) mice in which males show severe cognitive deficits as a model of this disorder. The purpose of this study was to examine if the female carrier mice show cognitive deficits. Reductions in Cr levels as well as CrT transcript were observed in the brains of the female CrT(+/-) mice. CrT(+/-) mice show hyperactivity and increased latency to find the cued platform in the Morris water maze (MWM). CrT(+/-) female mice showed deficits in MWM hidden platform acquisition but not during reversal testing. Memory deficits on probe trials were observed during both phases. Novel object recognition memory and contextual fear memory were not affected in female CrT(+/-) mice. Female CrT(+/-) mice show moderate cognitive deficits, which is consistent with some of the human data. Female CrT(+/-) mice could prove to be beneficial in further understanding CTD and testing therapeutic approaches. PMID:23716276

  7. Chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals disturbs the hepatic expression of circadian genes in lean and obese mice

    SciTech Connect

    Anthérieu, Sébastien; Le Guillou, Dounia; Coulouarn, Cédric; Begriche, Karima; Trak-Smayra, Viviane; Martinais, Sophie; Porceddu, Mathieu; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Drinking water can be contaminated with pharmaceuticals. However, it is uncertain whether this contamination can be harmful for the liver, especially during obesity. Hence, the goal of our study was to determine whether chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals could have deleterious effects on livers of lean and obese mice. To this end, lean and ob/ob male mice were treated for 4 months with a mixture of 11 drugs provided in drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10{sup 6} ng/l. At the end of the treatment, some liver and plasma abnormalities were observed in ob/ob mice treated with the cocktail containing 10{sup 6} ng/l of each drug. For this dosage, a gene expression analysis by microarray showed altered expression of circadian genes (e.g. Bmal1, Dbp, Cry1) in lean and obese mice. RT-qPCR analyses carried out in all groups of animals confirmed that expression of 8 different circadian genes was modified in a dose-dependent manner. For some genes, a significant modification was observed for dosages as low as 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} ng/l. Drug mixture and obesity presented an additive effect on circadian gene expression. These data were validated in an independent study performed in female mice. Thus, our study showed that chronic exposure to trace pharmaceuticals disturbed hepatic expression of circadian genes, particularly in obese mice. Because some of the 11 drugs can be found in drinking water at such concentrations (e.g. acetaminophen, carbamazepine, ibuprofen) our data could be relevant in environmental toxicology, especially for obese individuals exposed to these contaminants. - Highlights: • The contamination of drinking water with drugs may have harmful effects on health. • Some drugs can be more hepatotoxic in the context of obesity and fatty liver. • Effects of chronic exposure of trace drugs were studied in lean and obese mouse liver. Drugs and obesity present additive effects on circadian gene expression and toxicity. • Trace

  8. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Shu, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis expressions, attenuated hepatic insulin resistance and lipid accumulation, and improved insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice. BAIBA reduced hepatic ER stress and apoptosis in type 2 diabetic mice. Furthermore, BAIBA alleviated ER stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells with glucosamine-induced insulin resistance. Hepatic AMPK phosphorylation was reduced in STZ/HFD mice and glucosamine-treated HepG2 cells, which were restored by BAIBA treatment. The suppressive effects of BAIBA on glucosamine-induced ER stress were reversed by knockdown of AMPK with siRNA. In addition, BAIBA prevented thapsigargin- or tunicamycin-induced ER stress, and tunicamycin–induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that BAIBA attenuates hepatic ER stress, apoptosis and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes. AMPK signaling is involved to the role of BAIBA in attenuating ER stress. PMID:26907958

  9. Effects of voluntary running and soy supplementation on diet-induced metabolic disturbances and inflammation in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigated the effects of voluntary running and soy supplementation on diet-induced metabolic disturbance and inflammation in male C57BL/6 mice using a 2x2x2 design in which the effects of diet (AIN93G or its modification with 45% calories from fat), activity level (sedentary or ...

  10. Mice overexpressing corticotropin-releasing factor show brain atrophy and motor dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Miriam; Fleming, Sheila M.; Million, Mulugeta; Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2010-01-01

    Chronic stress and persistently high glucocorticoid levels can induce brain atrophy. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model of chronic stress with elevated brain CRF and plasma corticosterone levels and Cushing’s syndrome. The brain structural alterations in the CRF-OE mice, however, are not well known. We found that adult male and female CRF-OE mice had significantly lower whole brain and cerebellum weights than their wild type (WT) littermates (347.7 ± 3.6 vs. 460.1 ± 4.3 and 36.3 ± 0.8 vs. 50.0 ± 1.3 mg, respectively) without sex-related difference. The epididymal/parametrial fat mass was significantly higher in CRF-OE mice. The brain weight was inversely correlated to epididymal/parametrial fat weight, but not to body weight. Computerized image analysis system in Nissl stained brain sections of female mice showed that the anterior cingulate and sensorimotor cortexes of CRF-OE mice were significantly thinner, and the volumes of the hippocampus, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and amygdala were significantly reduced compared to WT, while the locus coeruleus showed a non-significant increase. Motor functions determined by beam crossing and gait analysis showed that CRF-OE mice took longer time and more steps to traverse a beam with more errors, and displayed reduced stride length compared to their WT littermates. These data show that CRF-OE mice display brain size reduction associated with alterations of motor coordination and an increase in visceral fat mass providing a novel animal model to study mechanisms involved in brain atrophy under conditions of sustained elevation of brain CRF and circulating glucocorticoid levels. PMID:20132869

  11. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter knock-down mice show sexual dimorphism on memory.

    PubMed

    Capettini, Suellem B; Moraes, Márcio F D; Prado, Vânia F; Prado, Marco A M; Pereira, Grace S

    2011-04-25

    The key neural substrates involved in memory and cognitive tasks have been reported to receive important modulation from ovarian hormones. In fact, neurochemical systems associated with cognitive functions, such as the cholinergic system, are, at least in part, under modulation of estrogens. Here we show that vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) mutant mice, which express lower levels of the VAChT (VAChT KD) and reduced acetylcholine release, present sexual dimorphism on memory. We evaluate short- and long-term object recognition memories (STM and LTM) in both sexes. We have showed previously, and confirm here, that VAChT KDHET male mice present deficits in both STM and LTM object recognition memories in comparison with WT. In contrast, VAChT KDHET female mice present deficit in LTM, but not in STM. To test if the female hormones levels could be a determinant factor on sexual dimorphism observed, we submitted female mice to ovariectomy (OVX) or sham-surgery. After 1 week (1 w), we evaluate STM. Female hormone deprivation promotes STM impairment in VAChT KDHET, but not in WT female mice. Our results strongly suggest that the sexual dimorphism observed in VAChT KDHET mice on STM is due to modulation of cholinergic system by ovarian hormones. PMID:21329745

  12. Transgenic mice over-expressing carbonic anhydrase I showed aggravated joint inflammation and tissue destruction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have demonstrated that carbonic anhydrase I (CA1) stimulates calcium salt precipitation and cell calcification, which is an essential step in new bone formation. Our study had reported that CA1 encoding gene has a strong association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), two rheumatic diseases with abnormal new bone formation and bone resorption in joints. This study investigated the effect of CA1 on joint inflammation and tissue destruction in transgenic mice that over-express CA1 (CA1-Tg). Methods CA1-Tg was generated with C57BL/6J mice by conventional methods. CA1-Tg was treated with collagen-II to induce arthritis (CIA). Wild-type mice, CA1-Tg treated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and transgenic mice over-expressing PADI4 (PADI4-Tg), a gene known to be involved in rheumatoid arthritis, were used as controls. Histochemistry and X-ray radiographic assay were used to examine joint destruction. Western blotting and real time-PCR were used to examine CA1 expression. Results CIA was observed in 60% of CA1-Tg, 20% of PADI4-Tg and 20% of wild-type mice after collagen injections. No CIA was found in CA1-Tg mice that received injections of BSA. The arthritic score was 5.5 ± 0.84 in the CA1-Tgs but the score was less than 2 in the injected wild-type mice and the PADI4-Tgs. The thickness of the hind paws in the CA1-Tgs was 3.46 ± 0.11 mm, which was thicker than that of PADI4-Tgs (2.23 ± 0.08 mm), wild-type mice (2.08 ± 0.06 mm) and BSA-treated CA1-Tgs (2.04 ± 0.07 mm). Histochemistry showed obvious inflammation, synovial hyperplasia and bone destruction in the joints of CA1-Tg that was not detected in PADI4-Tgs or wild-type mice. X-ray assays showed bone fusion in the paws and spines of CA1-Tg mice. Conclusion Over-expression of CA1 may aggravate joint inflammation and tissue destruction in the transgenic mice. PMID:23256642

  13. Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure during pregnancy disturbs temporal sex determination regulation in mice offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongan; Liu, Wei; Yang, Qing; Yu, Mingxi; Zhang, Zhou

    2015-10-01

    Animal researches and clinical studies have supported the relevance between phthalates exposure and testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). These disorders may comprise common origin in fetal life, especially during sex determination and differentiation, where the mechanism remains unclear. The present study evaluated the disturbances in gene regulatory networks of sex determination in fetal mouse by in utero Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) exposure. Temporal expression of key sex determination genes were examined during the critical narrow time window, using whole-mount in situ hybridization and quantitative-PCR. DEHP exposure resulted in significant reduction in mRNA of Sry during sex determination from gestation day (GD) 11.0 to 11.5 in male fetal mice, and the increasing of Sry expression to threshold level on GD 11.5 was delayed. Meanwhile, Gadd45g and Gata4, the upstream genes of Sry, and downstream gene Sox9 were also significantly downregulated in expression. In fetal females, the expression of Wnt4 and beta-catenin were up-regulated by DEHP exposure. Taken together, the results suggest that the potential mechanism of gonadal development disorder by DEHP may origin from repression of important male sex determination signaling pathway, involving Gadd45g → Gata4 → Sry → Sox9. The results would promote a better understanding of the association between phthalate esters (PAEs) exposure and the reductive disorder. PMID:26219507

  14. DEHP exposure in utero disturbs sex determination and is potentially linked with precocious puberty in female mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongan; Yang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Yu, Mingxi; Zhang, Zhou; Cui, Xiaoyu

    2016-09-15

    Human's ubiquitous exposure to di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is thought to be associated with female reproductive toxicity. Previous studies found that DEHP inhibited follicle growth and decreased estradiol levels in adult female mice. However, limited information is available on the link between in utero DEHP exposure and ovarian development in female mouse offspring. The present study evaluates the disturbances in regulatory genes involved in female sex determination and the ovarian outcomes in fetal and postnatal female mice treated with in utero DEHP exposure. Pregnant mice were exposed to DEHP by gavage, with the dosage regime beginning at human relevant exposure levels. After in utero DEHP exposure, increased follicular atresia was observed in the female pups at postnatal days (PND) 21. Foxl2 expression was significantly upregulated, and Fst was significantly downregulated by DEHP above 2mg/kg/d at PND 1 and 21. This suggests that lesion of granulosa cell differentiation and disturbance of follicle development in postnatal female mice. The expression of Cyp11a1 and Star were significantly downregulated by in utero DEHP exposure, indicating effects on estradiol biosynthesis. The female sex determination pathway was disturbed in fetus by DEHP at 2mg/kg/d and above during the critical time window of sex determination causing significant upregulation of Foxl2, Wnt4, β-catenin and Fst. Furthermore, the increased expression of Wnt4 was supported by whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH). These results suggest a possible association between in utero DEHP exposure and precocious puberty in the postnatal life of mice offspring, where disturbance of the sex determination regulating pathway acted as an important mechanism. PMID:27495896

  15. Curcumin-treated cancer cells show mitotic disturbances leading to growth arrest and induction of senescence phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mosieniak, Grażyna; Sliwinska, Małgorzata A; Przybylska, Dorota; Grabowska, Wioleta; Sunderland, Piotr; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Sikora, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Cellular senescence is recognized as a potent anticancer mechanism that inhibits carcinogenesis. Cancer cells can also undergo senescence upon chemo- or radiotherapy. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, shows anticancer properties both in vitro and in vivo. Previously, we have shown that treatment with curcumin leads to senescence of human cancer cells. Now we identified the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We observed a time-dependent accumulation of mitotic cells upon curcumin treatment. The time-lapse analysis proved that those cells progressed through mitosis for a significantly longer period of time. A fraction of cells managed to divide or undergo mitotic slippage and then enter the next phase of the cell cycle. Cells arrested in mitosis had an improperly formed mitotic spindle and were positive for γH2AX, which shows that they acquired DNA damage during prolonged mitosis. Moreover, the DNA damage response pathway was activated upon curcumin treatment and the components of this pathway remained upregulated while cells were undergoing senescence. Inhibition of the DNA damage response decreased the number of senescent cells. Thus, our studies revealed that the induction of cell senescence upon curcumin treatment resulted from aberrant progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, the DNA damage acquired by cancer cells, due to mitotic disturbances, activates an important molecular mechanism that determines the potential anticancer activity of curcumin. PMID:26916504

  16. BALB/c Mice Show Impaired Hepatic Tolerogenic Response Following AAV Gene Transfer to the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Breous, Ekaterina; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Wilson, James M

    2010-01-01

    Following adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer to the liver, both C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice show long-term expression of nonself transgene antigens along with the absence of a transgene-specific immune response. However, in this study, we report that despite the equal ability to induce T-cell tolerance to vector-encoded antigens, the underlying mechanisms are entirely different in these two strains. We have previously shown that in C57BL/6 mice, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses to systemic AAV-delivered antigens are suppressed by combined actions of hepatic regulatory T cells (Tregs), Kupffer cells, and hepatic suppressive cytokines. In stark contrast, our present findings reveal that such tolerogenic response is not induced in the liver of BALB/c mice systemically administered with AAV. As a result, these mice fail to suppress a transgene-specific CTL response induced by a strong immunogenic challenge and express dramatically reduced levels of AAV-encoded antigen. Interestingly, there was active B-cell tolerance to the transgene antigen, which was mediated by splenic Tregs. We conclude that lack of tolerance induction in the liver renders BALB/c mice susceptible to CTL-mediated clearance of transduced hepatocytes. PMID:20068550

  17. Sodium fluoride and sulfur dioxide affected male reproduction by disturbing blood-testis barrier in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhai; Li, Zhihui; Qie, Mingli; Zheng, Ruibo; Shetty, Jagathpala; Wang, Jundong

    2016-08-01

    Fluoride and sulfur dioxide (SO2), two well-known environmental toxicants, have been implicated to have adverse effects on male reproductive health in humans and animals. The objective of this study to investigate if the BTB is one of the pathways that lead to reproductive toxicity of sodium fluoride and sulfur dioxide alone or in combination, in view of the key role of blood testis barrier (BTB) in testis. The results showed that a marked decrease in sperm quality, and altered morphology and ultrastructure of BTB in testis of mice exposure to fluoride (100 mg NaF/L in drinking water) or/and sulfur dioxide (28 mg SO2/m(3), 3 h/day). Meanwhile, the mRNA expression levels of some vital BTB-associated proteins, including occluding, claudin-11, ZO-1, Ncadherin, α-catenin, and connexin-43 were all strikingly reduced after NaF exposure, although only the reduction of DSG-2 was statistically significant in all treatment groups. Moreover, the proteins expressions also decreased significantly in claudin-11, N-cadherin, α-catenin, connexin-43 and desmoglein-2 in mice treated with fluoride and/or SO2. These changes in BTB structure and constitutive proteins may therefore be connected with the low sperm quality in these mice. The role of fluoride should deserves more attention in this process. PMID:27237588

  18. Irxl1 mutant mice show reduced tendon differentiation and no patterning defects in musculoskeletal system development.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Machii, Masashi; Xue, XiaoDong; Sultana, Nishat; Hikosaka, Keisuke; Sharkar, Mohammad T K; Uezato, Tadayoshi; Matsuda, Masashi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miura, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Irxl1 (Iroquois-related homeobox like-1) is a newly identified three amino-acid loop extension (TALE) homeobox gene, which is expressed in various mesoderm-derived tissues, particularly in the progenitors of the musculoskeletal system. To analyze the roles of Irxl1 during embryonic development, we generated mice carrying a null allele of Irxl1. Mice homozygous for the targeted allele were viable, fertile, and showed reduced tendon differentiation. Skeletal morphology and skeletal muscle weight in Irxl1-knockout mice appeared normal. Expression patterns of several marker genes for cartilage, tendon, and muscle progenitors in homozygous mutant embryos were unchanged. These results suggest that Irxl1 is required for the tendon differentiation but dispensable for the patterning of the musculoskeletal system in development. PMID:21254332

  19. Meal time shift disturbs circadian rhythmicity along with metabolic and behavioral alterations in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji-Ae; Han, Dong-Hee; Noh, Jong-Yun; Kim, Mi-Hee; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin; Kim, Chang-Ju; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Cho, Sehyung

    2012-01-01

    In modern society, growing numbers of people are engaged in various forms of shift works or trans-meridian travels. Such circadian misalignment is known to disturb endogenous diurnal rhythms, which may lead to harmful physiological consequences including metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and gastric disorders as well as other physical and mental disorders. However, the precise mechanism(s) underlying these changes are yet unclear. The present work, therefore examined the effects of 6 h advance or delay of usual meal time on diurnal rhythmicities in home cage activity (HCA), body temperature (BT), blood metabolic markers, glucose homeostasis, and expression of genes that are involved in cholesterol homeostasis by feeding young adult male mice in a time-restrictive manner. Delay of meal time caused locomotive hyperactivity in a significant portion (42%) of subjects, while 6 h advance caused a torpor-like symptom during the late scotophase. Accordingly, daily rhythms of blood glucose and triglyceride were differentially affected by time-restrictive feeding regimen with concurrent metabolic alterations. Along with these physiological changes, time-restrictive feeding also influenced the circadian expression patterns of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) as well as most LDLR regulatory factors. Strikingly, chronic advance of meal time induced insulin resistance, while chronic delay significantly elevated blood glucose levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that persistent shifts in usual meal time impact the diurnal rhythms of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms in addition to HCA and BT, thereby posing critical implications for the health and diseases of shift workers. PMID:22952870

  20. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins. PMID:24694979

  1. PFOS induced lipid metabolism disturbances in BALB/c mice through inhibition of low density lipoproteins excretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Yu; Liang, Yong; Li, Jia; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Aiqian; Fu, Jianjie; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-04-01

    Male BALB/c mice fed with either a regular or high fat diet were exposed to 0, 5 or 20 mg/kg perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) for 14 days. Increased body weight, serum glucose, cholesterol and lipoprotein levels were observed in mice given a high fat diet. However, all PFOS-treated mice got reduced levels of serum lipid and lipoprotein. Decreasing liver glycogen content was also observed, accompanied by reduced serum glucose levels. Histological and ultrastructural examination detected more lipid droplets accumulated in hepatocytes after PFOS exposure. Moreover, transcripitonal activity of lipid metabolism related genes suggests that PFOS toxicity is probably unrelevant to PPARα's transcription. The present study demonstrates a lipid disturbance caused by PFOS and thus point to its role in inhibiting the secretion and normal function of low density lipoproteins.

  2. Mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase show increased vulnerability to mitochondrial toxins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichuan; Shi, Qingli; Ho, Daniel J.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Wille, Elizabeth J.; Xu, Hui; Chen, HL; Zhang, Steven; Stack, Cliona M.; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Gibson, Gary E.; Beal, M. Flint

    2013-01-01

    The activity of a key mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), declines in many neurodegenerative diseases. KGDHC consists of three subunits. The dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) component is unique to KGDHC. DLST+/- mice showed reduced mRNA and protein levels and decreased brain mitochondrial KGDHC activity. Neurotoxic effects of mitochondrial toxins were exacerbated in DLST+/- mice. MPTP produced a significantly greater reduction of striatal dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of DLST+/- mice. DLST deficiency enhanced the severity of lipid peroxidation in the substantia nigra after MPTP treatment. Striatal lesions induced by either malonate or 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) were significantly larger in DLST+/- mice than in wildtype controls. DLST deficiency enhanced the 3-NP inhibition of mitochondria enzymes, and 3-NP induced protein and DNA oxidations. These observations support the hypothesis that reductions in KGDHC may impair the adaptability of the brain and contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19660549

  3. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase knockout mice show resistance to obesity when fed high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Akiyama, Nobuteru; Ito, Takahito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Nanchi, Isamu; Notoya, Mitsuru; Oka, Shogo; Yukioka, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Ghrelin is an appetite-stimulating hormone secreted from stomach. Since the discovery that acylation of the serine-3 residue by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is essential for exerting its functions, GOAT has been regarded as an therapeutic target for attenuating appetite, and thus for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. However, contrary to the expectations, GOAT-knockout (KO) mice have not shown meaningful body weight reduction, under high-fat diet. Here, in this study, we sought to determine whether GOAT has a role in body weight regulation and glucose metabolism with a focus on dietary sucrose, because macronutrient composition of diet is important for appetite regulation. We found that peripherally administered acylated-ghrelin, but not unacylated one, stimulated sucrose consumption in a two-bottle-drinking test. The role of acylated-ghrelin in sucrose preference was further supported by the finding that GOAT KO mice consumed less sucrose solution compared with WT littermates. Then, we investigated the effect of dietary composition of sucrose on food intake and body weight in GOAT KO and WT mice. As a result, when fed on high-fat diet, food intake and body weight were similar between GOAT KO and WT mice. However, when fed on high-fat, high-sucrose diet, GOAT KO mice showed significantly reduced food intake and marked resistance to obesity, leading to amelioration of glucose metabolism. These results suggest that blockade of acylated-ghrelin production offers therapeutic potential for obesity and metabolic disorders caused by overeating of palatable food. PMID:26645250

  4. Map showing areas of visible land disturbances caused by two military training operations in the Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prose, D.V.

    1986-01-01

    Land disturbances caused by these training exercises are still evident today throughout the designated training areas (Lathrop, 1983; Prose, 1985; Prose and Metzger, 1985). The World War II base-camp locations are easily identified because the networks of dirt roads are still used by campers, hunters, artifact seekers, and other visitors. Vehicle trails and single tracks remain on many relatively stable surfaces and are most conspicuous on surfaces composed of a veneer of stones (desert pavement).

  5. EPA prevents fat mass expansion and metabolic disturbances in mice fed with a Western diet.

    PubMed

    Pinel, Alexandre; Pitois, Elodie; Rigaudiere, Jean-Paul; Jouve, Chrystele; De Saint-Vincent, Sarah; Laillet, Brigitte; Montaurier, Christophe; Huertas, Alain; Morio, Beatrice; Capel, Frederic

    2016-08-01

    The impact of alpha linolenic acid (ALA), EPA, and DHA on obesity and metabolic complications was studied in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HF) diet. HF diets were supplemented with ALA, EPA, or DHA (1% w/w) and given to C57BL/6J mice for 16 weeks and to Ob/Ob mice for 6 weeks. In C57BL/6J mice, EPA reduced plasma cholesterol (-20%), limited fat mass accumulation (-23%) and adipose cell hypertrophy (-50%), and reduced plasma leptin concentration (-60%) compared with HF-fed mice. Furthermore, mice supplemented with EPA exhibited a higher insulin sensitivity (+24%) and glucose tolerance (+20%) compared with HF-fed mice. Similar effects were observed in EPA-supplemented Ob/Ob mice, although fat mass accumulation was not prevented. By contrast, in comparison with HF-fed mice, DHA did not prevent fat mass accumulation, increased plasma leptin concentration (+128%) in C57BL/6J mice, and did not improve glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J and Ob/Ob mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, DHA stimulated leptin expression whereas EPA induced adiponectin expression, suggesting that improved leptin/adiponectin balance may contribute to the protective effect of EPA. In conclusion, supplementation with EPA, but not ALA and DHA, could preserve glucose homeostasis in an obesogenic environment and limit fat mass accumulation in the early stage of weight gain. PMID:27307576

  6. Cyclooxygenase-1 null mice show reduced neuroinflammation in response to β-amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang-Ho; Bosetti, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Several independent epidemiological studies indicate that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), supporting the inflammatory cascade hypothesis. Although the first clinical trial with indomethacin, a preferential cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 inhibitor, showed beneficial effects, subsequent large clinical trials, mostly using COX-2 inhibitors, failed to show any beneficial effect in AD patients with mild to severe cognitive impairment. These combined data suggest that either an early treatment is crucial to stop the mechanisms underlying the disease before the onset of the symptoms, or that preferential COX-1 inhibition, rather than COX-2, is beneficial. Therefore, a full understanding of the physiological, pathological, and/or neuroprotective role of COX isoforms may help to develop better therapeutic strategies for the prevention or treatment of AD. In this study, we examined the effect of COX-1 genetic deletion on the inflammatory response and neurodegeneration induced by β-amyloid. β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) was centrally injected in the lateral ventricle of COX-1-deficient (COX-1-/-) and their respective wild-type (WT) mice. In COX-1-/- mice, Aβ1-42-induced inflammatory response and neuronal damage were attenuated compared to WT mice, as shown by Fluoro-Jade B and nitrotyrosine staining. These results indicate that inhibition of COX-1 activity may be valid therapeutic strategy to reduce brain inflammatory response and neurodegeneration. PMID:20157512

  7. Continuous administration of polyphenols from aqueous rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) extract ameliorates dietary-induced metabolic disturbances in hyperlipidemic mice.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Debón, R; Rull, A; Rodríguez-Sanabria, F; Iswaldi, I; Herranz-López, M; Aragonès, G; Camps, J; Alonso-Villaverde, C; Menéndez, J A; Micol, V; Segura-Carretero, A; Joven, J

    2011-03-15

    The incidence of obesity and related metabolic diseases is increasing globally. Current medical treatments often fail to halt the progress of such disturbances, and plant-derived polyphenols are increasingly being investigated as a possible way to provide safe and effective complementary therapy. Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) is a rich source of polyphenols without caloric and/or stimulant components. We have tentatively characterized 25 phenolic compounds in rooibos extract and studied the effects of continuous aqueous rooibos extract consumption in mice. The effects of this extract, which contained 25% w/w of total polyphenol content, were negligible in animals with no metabolic disturbance but were significant in hyperlipemic mice, especially in those in which energy intake was increased via a Western-type diet that increased the risk of developing metabolic complications. In these mice, we found hypolipemiant activity when given rooibos extract, with significant reductions in serum cholesterol, triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations. Additionally, we found changes in adipocyte size and number as well as complete prevention of dietary-induced hepatic steatosis. These effects were not related to changes in insulin resistance. Among other possible mechanisms, we present data indicating that the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the resulting regulation of cellular energy homeostasis may play a significant role in these effects of rooibos extract. Our findings suggest that adding polyphenols to the daily diet is likely to help in the overall management of metabolic diseases. PMID:21211952

  8. Interaction of (+)-amphetamine with cerebral dopaminergic neurones in two strains of mice, that show different temperature responses to this drug

    PubMed Central

    Caccia, S.; Cecchetti, G.; Garattini, S.; Jori, A.

    1973-01-01

    1. (+)-Amphetamine sulphate elicits a dose-dependent hyperthermia in NMRI mice but it does not significantly increase the body temperature of C3H mice. 2. When low doses of (+)-amphetamine are given, the body temperature of C3H mice decreases. 3. (+)-Amphetamine decreases the noradrenaline concentration in the brain-stem and increases the homovanillic acid concentration (HVA) in the striatum of NMRI mice, but only slightly reduces the noradrenaline concentration and does not change the HVA concentration in the brains of C3H mice. 4. The two strains appear to show a difference in the metabolism of dopamine in the striatum. The rates at which dopamine disappears from the tissue after blocking catecholamine synthesis with α-methyltyrosine and the rates at which HVA accumulates after blocking the active transport of this metabolite out of the brain with probenecid suggest that the turnover of dopamine is lower in C3H mice than in NMRI mice. PMID:4777703

  9. Pretargeting in tumored mice with radiolabeled morpholino oligomer showing low kidney uptake.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guozheng; He, Jiang; Dou, Shuping; Gupta, Suresh; Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc; Rusckowski, Mary; Hnatowich, Donald J

    2004-03-01

    We have recently shown that accumulation in mouse kidneys of technetium-99m labeled phosphorodiamidate morpholinos (MORFs) increases with the number of cytosines in the base sequence. To improve tumor/kidney ratios in tumored mice, pretargeting studies were performed with a cytosine-free MORF. An 18-mer MORF (5'-TCTTCTACTTCACAACTA) was conjugated to the anti-CEA antibody MN14 (Immunomedics) and administered to nude mice bearing LS174T tumors. Thereafter, the (99m)Tc-labeled cytosine-free cMORF (5'-TAGTTGTGAAGTAGAAGA-amide-MAG(3)) was administered. For comparison, the identical study was repeated but with our original pair of 18-mer MORFs (5'-GGGTGTACGTCACAACTA-conjugated MN14 and (99m)Tc-labeled 5'-TAGTTGTGACGTACACCC-amide-MAG(3)). Surface plasmon resonance was used to show that the hybridization affinities of the original and the modified pair of MORFs were essentially equal. Hybridization of the cytosine-free cMORF-(99m)Tc to MN14-MORF was demonstrated in vitro by size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography. At 3 h, kidney levels in normal mice were 2.0%ID/organ for the modified cMORF vs. 4.1%ID/organ for the original cMORF sequence, while at 24 h, these values were 0.9% vs 1.8%ID/organ. Pretargeting studies in tumored mice receiving 25 microg of conjugated antibody, 0.5 microg of labeled cMORF 48 h later, followed by imaging and sacrifice at 3 h showed that kidney levels were reduced using the cytosine-free cMORF. Moreover, tumor accumulation was about 3.6%ID/g and was independent of sequence. The whole-body images clearly reflected the improved tumor to kidney ratios. By choosing a cytosine-free base sequence for pretargeting studies, kidney accumulation of cMORF-(99m)Tc was reduced without adversely influencing tumor accumulation. The lowering of kidney radioactivity levels in this way may be important to reduce toxicity to this organ in connection with pretargeting radiotherapy studies. PMID:14691611

  10. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure. PMID:26073556

  11. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure. PMID:26073556

  12. Mice lacking brain-type creatine kinase activity show defective thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Streijger, Femke; Pluk, Helma; Oerlemans, Frank; Beckers, Gaby; Bianco, Antonio C.; Ribeiro, Miriam O.; Wieringa, Bé; Van der Zee, Catharina E.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    The cytosolic brain-type creatine kinase and mitochondrial ubiquitous creatine kinase (CK-B and UbCKmit) are expressed during the prepubescent and adult period of mammalian life. These creatine kinase (CK) isoforms are present in neural cell types throughout the central and peripheral nervous system and in smooth muscle containing tissues, where they have an important role in cellular energy homeostasis. Here, we report on the coupling of CK activity to body temperature rhythm and adaptive thermoregulation in mice. With both brain-type CK isoforms being absent, the body temperature reproducibly drops ~1.0°C below normal during every morning (inactive) period in the daily cycle. Facultative non-shivering thermogenesis is also impaired, since CK−−/−− mice develop severe hypothermia during 24 h cold exposure. A relationship with fat metabolism was suggested because comparison of CK−−/−− mice with wildtype controls revealed decreased weight gain associated with less white and brown fat accumulation and smaller brown adipocytes. Also, circulating levels of glucose, triglycerides and leptin are reduced. Extensive physiological testing and uncoupling protein1 analysis showed, however, that the thermogenic problems are not due to abnormal responsiveness of brown adipocytes, since noradrenaline infusion produced a normal increase of body temperature. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cyclic drop in morning temperature is also not related to altered rhythmicity with reduced locomotion, diminished food intake or increased torpor sensitivity. Although several integral functions appear altered when CK is absent in the brain, combined findings point into the direction of inefficient neuronal transmission as the dominant factor in the thermoregulatory defect. PMID:19419668

  13. Mice Lacking GD3 Synthase Display Morphological Abnormalities in the Sciatic Nerve and Neuronal Disturbances during Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Resende, Victor Túlio; Gomes, Tiago Araújo; de Lima, Silmara; Nascimento-Lima, Maiara; Bargas-Rega, Michele; Santiago, Marcelo Felipe; Reis, Ricardo Augusto de Melo; de Mello, Fernando Garcia

    2014-01-01

    The ganglioside 9-O-acetyl GD3 is overexpressed in peripheral nerves after lesioning, and its expression is correlated with axonal degeneration and regeneration in adult rodents. However, the biological roles of this ganglioside during the regenerative process are unclear. We used mice lacking GD3 synthase (Siat3a KO), an enzyme that converts GM3 to GD3, which can be further converted to 9-O-acetyl GD3. Morphological analyses of longitudinal and transverse sections of the sciatic nerve revealed significant differences in the transverse area and nerve thickness. The number of axons and the levels of myelin basic protein were significantly reduced in adult KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The G-ratio was increased in KO mice compared to WT mice based on quantification of thin transverse sections stained with toluidine blue. We found that neurite outgrowth was significantly reduced in the absence of GD3. However, addition of exogenous GD3 led to neurite growth after 3 days, similar to that in WT mice. To evaluate fiber regeneration after nerve lesioning, we compared the regenerated distance from the lesion site and found that this distance was one-fourth the length in KO mice compared to WT mice. KO mice in which GD3 was administered showed markedly improved regeneration compared to the control KO mice. In summary, we suggest that 9-O-acetyl GD3 plays biological roles in neuron-glia interactions, facilitating axonal growth and myelination induced by Schwann cells. Moreover, exogenous GD3 can be converted to 9-O-acetyl GD3 in mice lacking GD3 synthase, improving regeneration. PMID:25330147

  14. Mice lacking GD3 synthase display morphological abnormalities in the sciatic nerve and neuronal disturbances during peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Resende, Victor Túlio; Araújo Gomes, Tiago; de Lima, Silmara; Nascimento-Lima, Maiara; Bargas-Rega, Michele; Santiago, Marcelo Felipe; Reis, Ricardo Augusto de Melo; de Mello, Fernando Garcia

    2014-01-01

    The ganglioside 9-O-acetyl GD3 is overexpressed in peripheral nerves after lesioning, and its expression is correlated with axonal degeneration and regeneration in adult rodents. However, the biological roles of this ganglioside during the regenerative process are unclear. We used mice lacking GD3 synthase (Siat3a KO), an enzyme that converts GM3 to GD3, which can be further converted to 9-O-acetyl GD3. Morphological analyses of longitudinal and transverse sections of the sciatic nerve revealed significant differences in the transverse area and nerve thickness. The number of axons and the levels of myelin basic protein were significantly reduced in adult KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The G-ratio was increased in KO mice compared to WT mice based on quantification of thin transverse sections stained with toluidine blue. We found that neurite outgrowth was significantly reduced in the absence of GD3. However, addition of exogenous GD3 led to neurite growth after 3 days, similar to that in WT mice. To evaluate fiber regeneration after nerve lesioning, we compared the regenerated distance from the lesion site and found that this distance was one-fourth the length in KO mice compared to WT mice. KO mice in which GD3 was administered showed markedly improved regeneration compared to the control KO mice. In summary, we suggest that 9-O-acetyl GD3 plays biological roles in neuron-glia interactions, facilitating axonal growth and myelination induced by Schwann cells. Moreover, exogenous GD3 can be converted to 9-O-acetyl GD3 in mice lacking GD3 synthase, improving regeneration. PMID:25330147

  15. Systemic PPARγ deletion causes severe disturbance in fluid homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Panasiuk, Alexandra; Downton, Maicy; Zhao, Daqiang; Yang, Baoxue; Jia, Zhanjun; Yang, Tianxin

    2015-11-01

    The pharmacological action of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ in promoting sodium and water retention is well documented as highlighted by the major side-effect of body weight gain and edema associated with thiazolidinedione use. However, a possible physiological role of PPARγ in regulation of fluid metabolism has not been reported by previous studies. Here we analyzed fluid metabolism in inducible whole-body PPARγ knockout mice. The null mice developed severe polydipsia and polyuria, reduced urine osmolality, and modest hyperphagia. The phenomenon persisted during 3 days of pair feeding and pair drinking, accompanied by progressive weight loss. After 24 h water deprivation, the null mice had a lower urine osmolality, a higher urine volume, a greater weight loss, and a greater rise in hematocrit than the floxed control. Urinary vasopressin (AVP) excretion was not different between the genotypes under basal condition or after WD. The response of urine osmolality to acute and chronic 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin treatment was attenuated in the null mice, but the total abundance or phosphorylation of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the kidney or AVP-induced cAMP production in inner medullary collecting duct suspensions was unaffected. Overall, PPARγ participates in physiological control of fluid homeostasis through an unknown mechanism involving cAMP/AQP2-independent enhancement of AVP response. PMID:26330489

  16. Metabolic and structural bone disturbances induced by hyperlipidic diet in mice treated with simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Soares, Evelise Aline; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Nakagaki, Wilson Romero; Fernandes, Geraldo José Medeiros; Garcia, José Antônio Dias; Camilli, José Angelo

    2015-08-01

    Simvastatin can modulate lipid and bone metabolism. However, information related to the interaction between diet and simvastatin on bone structure and biomechanics is scarce. Thus, this study evaluated the effects of simvastatin on femoral biomechanics and cortical/trabecular bone structure in wild-type mice nourished with a hyperlipidic diet. Three-month-old male wild-type mice (C57BL6 strain) were divided into four groups: (1) group W, nourished with a standard diet; (2) group WH, fed a hyperlipidic diet; (3) group WS, nourished with a standard diet plus oral simvastatin (20 mg/kg/day); and (4) group WHS, fed a hyperlipidic diet plus oral simvastatin (20 mg/kg/day). All animals received only their specific diet and water for 60 days. Blood samples were collected for the analysis of calcium, triglycerides, total cholesterol (TC) and fraction serum levels. Diet manipulation was able to induce a dyslipidaemic status in mice, characterized by triglyceride and TC rise in WH animals. Simvastatin prevented hypercholesterolaemia and reduced TC and LDL serum levels, but did not prevent hypertriglyceridaemia and HDL serum levels in the WHS group. In the WH mice the hyperlipidaemia was associated with reduction in trabecular bone thickness, femur structural and material property alterations. Simvastatin prevented these morphological alterations and minimized femur biomechanical changes in WHS mice. Taken together, the results indicated that the hyperlipidic diet intake acts as a risk factor for bone integrity, generating bones with reduced resistance and more susceptible to fractures, an effect attenuated by simvastatin that is potentially related to the modulatory action of this drug on lipid and bone metabolism. PMID:26175225

  17. Disturbed flow induces systemic changes in metabolites in mouse plasma: a metabolomics study using ApoE⁻/⁻ mice with partial carotid ligation.

    PubMed

    Go, Young-Mi; Kim, Chan Woo; Walker, Douglas I; Kang, Dong Won; Kumar, Sandeep; Orr, Michael; Uppal, Karan; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Jo, Hanjoong; Jones, Dean P

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed blood flow (d-flow) occurring in branched and curved arteries promotes endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, in part, by altering gene expression and epigenomic profiles in endothelial cells. While a systemic metabolic change is known to play a role in atherosclerosis, it is unclear whether it can be regulated by local d-flow. Here, we tested this hypothesis by carrying out a metabolomics study using blood plasma samples obtained from ApoE(-/-) mice that underwent a partial carotid ligation surgery to induce d-flow. Mice receiving sham ligation were used as a control. To study early metabolic changes, samples collected from 1 wk after partial ligation when endothelial dysfunction occurs, but before atheroma develops, were analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. A metabolome-wide association study showed that 128 metabolites were significantly altered in the ligated mice compared with the sham group. Of these, sphingomyelin (SM; m/z 703.5747), a common mammalian cell membrane sphingolipid, was most significantly increased in the ligated mice. Of the 128 discriminatory metabolites, 18 and 41 were positively and negatively correlated with SM, respectively. The amino acids methionine and phenylalanine were increased by d-flow, while phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were decreased by d-flow, and these metabolites were correlated with SM. Other significantly affected metabolites included dietary and environmental agents. Pathway analysis showed that the metabolic changes of d-flow impacted broad functional networks. These results suggest that signaling from d-flow occurring in focal regions induces systemic metabolic changes associated with atherosclerosis. PMID:25377480

  18. Disturbed flow induces systemic changes in metabolites in mouse plasma: a metabolomics study using ApoE−/− mice with partial carotid ligation

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Kim, Chan Woo; Walker, Douglas I.; Kang, Dong Won; Kumar, Sandeep; Orr, Michael; Uppal, Karan; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed blood flow (d-flow) occurring in branched and curved arteries promotes endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, in part, by altering gene expression and epigenomic profiles in endothelial cells. While a systemic metabolic change is known to play a role in atherosclerosis, it is unclear whether it can be regulated by local d-flow. Here, we tested this hypothesis by carrying out a metabolomics study using blood plasma samples obtained from ApoE−/− mice that underwent a partial carotid ligation surgery to induce d-flow. Mice receiving sham ligation were used as a control. To study early metabolic changes, samples collected from 1 wk after partial ligation when endothelial dysfunction occurs, but before atheroma develops, were analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. A metabolome-wide association study showed that 128 metabolites were significantly altered in the ligated mice compared with the sham group. Of these, sphingomyelin (SM; m/z 703.5747), a common mammalian cell membrane sphingolipid, was most significantly increased in the ligated mice. Of the 128 discriminatory metabolites, 18 and 41 were positively and negatively correlated with SM, respectively. The amino acids methionine and phenylalanine were increased by d-flow, while phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were decreased by d-flow, and these metabolites were correlated with SM. Other significantly affected metabolites included dietary and environmental agents. Pathway analysis showed that the metabolic changes of d-flow impacted broad functional networks. These results suggest that signaling from d-flow occurring in focal regions induces systemic metabolic changes associated with atherosclerosis. PMID:25377480

  19. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice on high-fat diet show autoimmune injury on kidney and aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuehai; Lu, Huixia; Huang, Ziyang; Lin, Huili; Lei, Zhenmin; Tang, Mengxiong; Gao, Fei; Dong, Mei; Li, Rongda; Lin, Ling

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibodies were similar in ApoE{sup −/−} and Fas{sup −/−} mice. • The spleen weights and glomerular areas were similar in ApoE{sup −/−} and Fas{sup −/−} mice. • Expressions of IgG and C3 in glomeruli were similar in ApoE{sup −/−} and Fas{sup −/−} mice. • IgG, C3 and macrophage infiltration in aortic plaques were found in ApoE{sup −/−} mice. - Abstract: Background: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE{sup −/−}) mice is a classic model of atherosclerosis. We have found that ApoE{sup −/−} mice showed splenomegaly, higher titers of serum anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-dsDNA antibody compared with C57B6/L (B6) mice. However, whether ApoE{sup −/−} mice show autoimmune injury remains unclear. Methods and results: Six females and six males in each group, ApoE{sup −/−}, Fas{sup −/−} and B6 mice, were used in this study. The titers of serum ANA, anti-dsDNA antibody and creatinine and urine protein were measured by ELISA after 4 months of high-fat diet. The spleen weight and the glomerular area were determined. The expressions of IgG, C3 and macrophage in kidney and atherosclerotic plaque were detected by immunostaining followed by morphometric analysis. Similar to the characteristics of Fas{sup −/−} mice, a model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ApoE{sup −/−} mice, especially female, displayed significant increases of spleen weight and glomerular area when compared to B6 mice. Also, elevated titers of serum ANA, anti-dsDNA antibody and creatinine and urine protein. Moreover, the expressions of IgG, C3 and macrophage in glomeruli and aortic plaques were found in ApoE{sup −/−} mice. In addition, the IgG and C3 expressions in glomeruli and plaques significantly increased (or a trend of increase) in female ApoE{sup −/−} mice compared with males. Conclusions: Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice on high-fat diet show autoimmune injury on kidney and aorta.

  20. Behavioral disturbances in estrogen-related receptor alpha-null mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huxing; Lu, Yuan; Khan, Michael Z; Anderson, Rachel M; McDaniel, Latisha; Wilson, Hannah E; Yin, Terry C; Radley, Jason J; Pieper, Andrew A; Lutter, Michael

    2015-04-21

    Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are common and severe mental illnesses of unknown etiology. Recently, we identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) that is associated with the development of eating disorders. However, little is known about ESRRA function in the brain. Here, we report that Esrra is expressed in the mouse brain and demonstrate that Esrra levels are regulated by energy reserves. Esrra-null female mice display a reduced operant response to a high-fat diet, compulsivity/behavioral rigidity, and social deficits. Selective Esrra knockdown in the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices of adult female mice recapitulates reduced operant response and increased compulsivity, respectively. These results indicate that Esrra deficiency in the mouse brain impairs behavioral responses in multiple functional domains. PMID:25865889

  1. Behavioral Disturbances in Estrogen-Related Receptor alpha-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Huxing; Lu, Yuan; Khan, Michael Z.; Anderson, Rachel M.; McDaniel, Latisha; Wilson, Hannah E.; Yin, Terry C.; Radley, Jason J.; Pieper, Andrew A.; Lutter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are common and severe mental illnesses of unknown etiology. Recently, we identified a rare missense mutation in the transcription factor estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRA) that is associated with the development of eating disorders. However, little is known about ESRRA function in the brain. Here, we report that Esrra is expressed in the mouse brain and demonstrate that Esrra levels are regulated by energy reserves. Esrra-null female mice display a reduced operant response to a high-fat diet, compulsivity/behavioral rigidity, and social deficits. Selective Esrra knockdown in the prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortices of adult female mice recapitulates reduced operant response and increased compulsivity, respectively. These results indicate that Esrra deficiency in the mouse brain impairs behavioral responses in multiple functional domains. PMID:25865889

  2. Impaired adiponectin signaling contributes to disturbed catabolism of branched-chain amino acids in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lian, Kun; Du, Chaosheng; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Di; Yan, Wenjun; Zhang, Haifeng; Hong, Zhibo; Liu, Peilin; Zhang, Lijian; Pei, Haifeng; Zhang, Jinglong; Gao, Chao; Xin, Chao; Cheng, Hexiang; Xiong, Lize; Tao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) accumulated in type 2 diabetes are independent contributors to insulin resistance. The activity of branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, rate-limiting enzyme in BCAA catabolism, is reduced in diabetic states, which contributes to elevated BCAA concentrations. However, the mechanisms underlying decreased BCKD activity remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial phosphatase 2C (PP2Cm), a newly identified BCKD phosphatase that increases BCKD activity, was significantly downregulated in ob/ob and type 2 diabetic mice. Interestingly, in adiponectin (APN) knockout (APN(-/-)) mice fed with a high-fat diet (HD), PP2Cm expression and BCKD activity were significantly decreased, whereas BCKD kinase (BDK), which inhibits BCKD activity, was markedly increased. Concurrently, plasma BCAA and branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKA) were significantly elevated. APN treatment markedly reverted PP2Cm, BDK, BCKD activity, and BCAA and BCKA levels in HD-fed APN(-/-) and diabetic animals. Additionally, increased BCKD activity caused by APN administration was partially but significantly inhibited in PP2Cm knockout mice. Finally, APN-mediated upregulation of PP2Cm expression and BCKD activity were abolished when AMPK was inhibited. Collectively, we have provided the first direct evidence that APN is a novel regulator of PP2Cm and systematic BCAA levels, suggesting that targeting APN may be a pharmacological approach to ameliorating BCAA catabolism in the diabetic state. PMID:25071024

  3. Spatial disturbances in altered mucosal and luminal gut viromes of diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Soo; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-05-01

    Gut microbial biogeography is a key feature of host-microbe relationships. In gut viral ecology, biogeography and responses to dietary intervention remain poorly understood. Here, we conducted a metagenomic study to determine the composition of the mucosal and luminal viromes of the gut and to evaluate the impact of a Western diet on gut viral ecology. We found that mucosal and luminal viral assemblages comprised predominantly temperate phages. The mucosal virome significantly differed from the luminal virome in low-fat diet-fed lean mice, where spatial variation correlated with bacterial microbiota from the mucosa and lumen. The mucosal and luminal viromes of high-fat, high-sucrose 'Western' diet-fed obese mice were significantly enriched with temperate phages of the Caudovirales order. Interestingly, this community alteration occurred to a greater extent in the mucosa than lumen, leading to loss of spatial differences; however, these changes recovered after switching to a low-fat diet. Temperate phages enriched in the Western diet-induced obese mice were associated with the Bacilli, Negativicutes and Bacteroidia classes and temperate phages from the Bacteroidia class particularly encoded stress and niche-specific functions advantageous to bacterial host adaptation. This study illustrates a biogeographic view of the gut virome and phage-bacterial host connections under the diet-induced microbial dysbiosis. PMID:26690305

  4. Ultrasonic Vocalizations of Male Mice Differ among Species and Females Show Assortative Preferences for Male Calls

    PubMed Central

    Musolf, Kerstin; Meindl, Stefanie; Larsen, Angela L.; Kalcounis-Rueppell, Matina C.; Penn, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Male house mice (Mus musculus) emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during courtship, which attract females, and we aimed to test whether females use these vocalizations for species or subspecies recognition of potential mates. We recorded courtship USVs of males from different Mus species, Mus musculus subspecies, and populations (F1 offspring of wild-caught Mus musculus musculus, Mus musculus domesticus (and F1 hybrid crosses), and Mus spicilegus), and we conducted playback experiments to measure female preferences for male USVs. Male vocalizations contained at least seven distinct syllable types, whose frequency of occurrence varied among species, subspecies, and populations. Detailed analyses of multiple common syllable types indicated that Mus musculus and Mus spicilegus could be discriminated based on spectral and temporal characteristics of their vocalizations, and populations of Mus musculus were also distinctive regardless of the classification model used. Females were able to discriminate USVs from different species, and showed assortative preferences for conspecific males. We found no evidence that females discriminate USVs of males from a different subspecies or separate populations of the same species, even though our spectral analyses identified acoustic features that differ between species, subspecies, and populations of the same species. Our results provide the first comparison of USVs between Mus species or between Mus musculus subspecies, and the first evidence that male USVs potentially facilitate species recognition. PMID:26309246

  5. Long-Lived αMUPA Mice Show Attenuation of Cardiac Aging and Leptin-Dependent Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Esther; Kornowski, Ran; Gavrieli, Reut; Fratty, Ilana; Greenberg, Gabriel; Waldman, Maayan; Birk, Einat; Shainberg, Asher; Akirov, Amit; Miskin, Ruth; Hochhauser, Edith

    2015-01-01

    αMUPA transgenic mice spontaneously consume less food compared with their wild type (WT) ancestors due to endogenously increased levels of the satiety hormone leptin. αMUPA mice share many benefits with mice under caloric restriction (CR) including an extended life span. To understand mechanisms linked to cardiac aging, we explored the response of αMUPA hearts to ischemic conditions at the age of 6, 18, or 24 months. Mice were subjected to myocardial infarction (MI) in vivo and to ischemia/reperfusion ex vivo. Compared to WT mice, αMUPA showed functional and histological advantages under all experimental conditions. At 24 months, none of the WT mice survived the first ischemic day while αMUPA mice demonstrated 50% survival after 7 ischemic days. Leptin, an adipokine decreasing under CR, was consistently ~60% higher in αMUPA sera at baseline. Leptin levels gradually increased in both genotypes 24h post MI but were doubled in αMUPA. Pretreatment with leptin neutralizing antibodies or with inhibitors of leptin signaling (AG-490 and Wortmannin) abrogated the αMUPA benefits. The antibodies also reduced phosphorylation of the leptin signaling components STAT3 and AKT specifically in the αMUPA myocardium. αMUPA mice did not show elevation in adiponectin, an adipokine previously implicated in CR-induced cardioprotection. WT mice treated for short-term CR exhibited cardioprotection similar to that of αMUPA, however, along with increased adiponectin at baseline. Collectively, the results demonstrate a life-long increased ischemic tolerance in αMUPA mice, indicating the attenuation of cardiac aging. αMUPA cardioprotection is mediated through endogenous leptin, suggesting a protective pathway distinct from that elicited under CR. PMID:26673217

  6. Eya1-deficient mice lack ears and kidneys and show abnormal apoptosis of organ primordia.

    PubMed

    Xu, P X; Adams, J; Peters, H; Brown, M C; Heaney, S; Maas, R

    1999-09-01

    Haploinsufficiency for human EYA1, a homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster gene eyes absent (eya), results in the dominantly inherited disorders branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome and branchio-oto (BO) syndrome, which are characterized by craniofacial abnormalities and hearing loss with (BOR) or without (BO) kidney defects. To understand the developmental pathogenesis of organs affected in these syndromes, we inactivated the gene Eya1 in mice. Eya1 heterozygotes show renal abnormalities and a conductive hearing loss similar to BOR syndrome, whereas Eya1 homozygotes lack ears and kidneys due to defective inductive tissue interactions and apoptotic regression of the organ primordia. Inner ear development in Eya1 homozygotes arrests at the otic vesicle stage and all components of the inner ear and specific cranial sensory ganglia fail to form. In the kidney, Eya1 homozygosity results in an absence of ureteric bud outgrowth and a subsequent failure of metanephric induction. Gdnf expression, which is required to direct ureteric bud outgrowth via activation of the c-ret Rtk (refs 5, 6, 7, 8), is not detected in Eya1-/- metanephric mesenchyme. In Eya1-/- ear and kidney development, Six but not Pax expression is Eya1 dependent, similar to a genetic pathway elucidated in the Drosophila eye imaginal disc. Our results indicate that Eya1 controls critical early inductive signalling events involved in ear and kidney formation and integrate Eya1 into the genetic regulatory cascade controlling kidney formation upstream of Gdnf. In addition, our results suggest that an evolutionarily conserved Pax-Eya-Six regulatory hierarchy is used in mammalian ear and kidney development. PMID:10471511

  7. B-Cell-Deficient Mice Show an Exacerbated Inflammatory Response in a Model of Chlamydophila abortus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Buendía, Antonio J.; Del Río, Laura; Ortega, Nieves; Sánchez, Joaquín; Gallego, María C.; Caro, María R.; Navarro, Jose A.; Cuello, Francisco; Salinas, Jesús

    2002-01-01

    The resolution of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection is dependent on gamma interferon and CD8+ T cells, and classically, B cells have been considered to play a minimal role in host defense. The role of B cells in the immune response was studied by using a model of infection in mice with genetically modified immunoglobulin M transmembrane domains (μMT). In the absence of B cells, infection with C. abortus leads to an acute severe fatal disease that involves a disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome. μMT mice displayed an increased level of proinflammatory cytokines in serum, and an increased number of neutrophils was observed in the lesions. The possible deleterious role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of disease in μMT mice was determined by depletion of the neutrophils with the monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5. This led to an enhancement of the bacterial burden and early mortality in both μMT and wild-type mice, while necrotic lesions remained. Analysis of the presence of immunoregulatory cytokines showed significantly lower levels of transforming growth factor β in the sera of μMT mice. However, mice lacking mature B cells were able to establish a specific immune response that protected them from a secondary challenge. Taken together, these data suggest an immunomodulatory role for B cells in the early events of C. abortus primary infection that can protect mice against an exaggerated inflammatory response. PMID:12438369

  8. IL-1 receptor-antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout mice show anxiety-like behavior by aging.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Chisato; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Odaka, Haruki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Kiyama, Yuji; Manabe, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2015-07-10

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) plays a critical role in stress responses, and its mRNA is induced in the brain by restraint stress. Previously, we reported that IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout (KO) mice, which lacked IL-1Ra molecules that antagonize the IL-1 receptor, showed anti-depression-like behavior via adrenergic modulation at the age of 8 weeks. Here, we report that IL-1Ra KO mice display an anxiety-like phenotype that is induced spontaneously by aging in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test. This anxiety-like phenotype was improved by the administration of diazepam. The expression of the anxiety-related molecule glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was significantly reduced in 20-week-old but not in 11-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. The expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) was not altered between IL-1Ra KO mice and WT littermates at either 11 or 20 weeks old. Analysis of monoamine concentration in the hippocampus revealed that tryptophan, the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), and the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly increased in 20-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to littermate WT mice. These findings strongly suggest that the anxiety-like behavior observed in older mice was caused by the complicated alteration of monoamine metabolism and/or GR expression in the hippocampus. PMID:26002078

  9. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice show increased titers of serum anti-nuclear and anti-dsDNA antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuehai; Huang, Ziyang; Lu, Huixia; Lin, Huili; Wang, Zhenhua; Chen, Xiaoqing; Ouyang, Qiufang; Tang, Mengxiong; Hao, Panpan; Ni, Jingqin; Xu, Dongming; Zhang, Mingxiang; Zhang, Qunye; Lin, Ling; and others

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibodies were higher in ApoE{sup -/-} than C57B6/L mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spleen was greater and splenocyte apoptosis lower in ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of TLR4 was lower in spleen tissue of ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TLR4 pathway may participate in maintaining the balance of splenocyte apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TLR4 pathway may participate in antibody production in spleen tissue. -- Abstract: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice, atherosclerosis-prone mice, show an autoimmune response, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. We investigated the pathogenesis in female and male ApoE{sup -/-} mice. The spleens of all ApoE{sup -/-} and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were weighed. The serum IgG level and titers of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody were assayed by ELISA. Apoptosis of spleen tissue was evaluated by TUNEL. TLR4 level in spleen tissue was tested by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Levels of MyD88, p38, phosphorylated p38 (pp38), interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) in spleen tissue were detected by Western blot analysis. We also survey the changes of serum autoantibodies, spleen weight, splenocyte apoptosis and the expressions of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue in male ApoE{sup -/-} mice after 4 weeks of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Toll-like receptor 4 ligand, administration. ApoE{sup -/-} mice showed splenomegaly and significantly increased serum level of IgG and titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibody as compared with B6 mice. Splenocyte apoptosis and the expression of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue were significantly lower in ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. The expression of TLR4, MyD88, IRF3, pp38, and Bax differed by sex in ApoE{sup -/-} spleen tissue. The

  10. Relaxin improves multiple markers of wound healing and ameliorates the disturbed healing pattern of genetically diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Minutoli, Letteria; Calò, Margherita; Lo Cascio, Patrizia; Caccia, Paolo; Pizzino, Gabriele; Pallio, Giovanni; Micali, Antonio; Vaccaro, Mario; Saitta, Antonino; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic mice are characterized by a disrupted expression pattern of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), and impaired vasculogenesis during healing. Experimental evidence suggests that RLX (relaxin) can improve several parameters associated with wound healing. Therefore we investigated the effects of porcine-derived RLX in diabetes-related wound-healing defects in genetically diabetic mice. An incisional wound model was produced on the back of female diabetic C57BL/KsJ-m+/+Leptdb (db+/db+) mice and their normal littermates (db+/+m). Animals were treated daily with porcine RLX (25 μg/mouse per day, subcutaneously) or its vehicle. Mice were killed on 3, 6 and 12 days after skin injury for measurements of VEGF mRNA and protein synthesis, SDF-1α (stromal cell-derived factor-1α) mRNA and eNOS (endothelial NO synthase) expression. Furthermore, we evaluated wound-breaking strength, histological changes, angiogenesis and vasculogenesis at day 12. Diabetic animals showed a reduced expression of VEGF, eNOS and SDF-1α compared with non-diabetic animals. At day 6, RLX administration resulted in an increase in VEGF mRNA expression and protein wound content, in eNOS expression and in SDF-1α mRNA. Furthermore, the histological evaluation indicated that RLX improved the impaired wound healing, enhanced the staining of MMP-11 (matrix metalloproteinase-11) and increased wound-breaking strength at day 12 in diabetic mice. Immunohistochemistry showed that RLX in diabetic animals augmented new vessel formation by stimulating both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. RLX significantly reduced the time to complete skin normalization and this effect was abrogated by a concomitant treatment with antibodies against VEGF and CXCR4 (CXC chemokine receptor 4), the SDF-1α receptor. These data strongly suggest that RLX may have a potential application in diabetes-related wound disorders. PMID:23742173

  11. Mice lacking the Parkinson's related GPR37/PAEL receptor show non-motor behavioral phenotypes: age and gender effect.

    PubMed

    Mandillo, S; Golini, E; Marazziti, D; Di Pietro, C; Matteoni, R; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    2013-06-01

    Non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been often described at different stages of the disease but they are poorly understood. We observed specific phenotypes related to these symptoms in mice lacking the PD-associated GPR37/PAEL receptor. GPR37 is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in the mammalian central nervous system. It is a substrate of parkin and it is involved in the pathogenesis of PD. GPR37 interacts with the dopamine transporter (DAT), modulating nigro-striatal dopaminergic signaling and behavioral responses to amphetamine and cocaine. GPR37 knockout (KO) mice are resistant to MPTP and exhibit several motor behavioral abnormalities related to altered dopaminergic system function. To evaluate non-motor behavioral domains, adult and aged, male and female GPR37 KO mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates were analyzed in a series of cross-sectional studies. Aged GPR37 KO female mice showed mild improvements in olfactory function, while anxiety and depression-like behaviors appeared to be significantly increased. A reduction of the startle response to acoustic stimuli was observed only in adult GPR37 KO mice of both genders. Furthermore, HPLC analysis of major neurotransmitter levels revealed gender differences in the striatum, hippocampus and olfactory bulb of mutant mice. The absence of GPR37 receptor could have a neuroprotective effect in an age and gender-dependent manner, and the study of this receptor could be valuable in the search for novel therapeutic targets. PMID:23574697

  12. Mice repeatedly exposed to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus show perseverative behaviors, impaired sensorimotor gating, and immune activation in rostral diencephalon.

    PubMed

    Macrì, Simone; Ceci, Chiara; Onori, Martina Proietti; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Bartolini, Erika; Altabella, Luisa; Canese, Rossella; Imperi, Monica; Orefici, Graziella; Creti, Roberta; Margarit, Immaculada; Magliozzi, Roberta; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS) may constitute a vulnerability factor in the onset and course of pediatric motor disturbances. GAS infections/colonization can stimulate the production of antibodies, which may cross the blood brain barrier, target selected brain areas (e.g. basal ganglia), and exacerbate motor alterations. Here, we exposed developing SJL male mice to four injections with a GAS homogenate and evaluated the following domains: motor coordination; general locomotion; repetitive behaviors; perseverative responses; and sensorimotor gating (pre-pulse inhibition, PPI). To demonstrate that behavioral changes were associated with immune-mediated brain alterations, we analyzed, in selected brain areas, the presence of infiltrates and microglial activation (immunohistochemistry), monoamines (HPLC), and brain metabolites (in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy). GAS-exposed mice showed increased repetitive and perseverative behaviors, impaired PPI, and reduced concentrations of serotonin in prefrontal cortex, a brain area linked to the behavioral domains investigated, wherein they also showed remarkable elevations in lactate. Active inflammatory processes were substantiated by the observation of infiltrates and microglial activation in the white matter of the anterior diencephalon. These data support the hypothesis that repeated GAS exposure may elicit inflammatory responses in brain areas involved in motor control and perseverative behavior, and result in phenotypic abnormalities. PMID:26304458

  13. Mice repeatedly exposed to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus show perseverative behaviors, impaired sensorimotor gating, and immune activation in rostral diencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Macrì, Simone; Ceci, Chiara; Onori, Martina Proietti; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Bartolini, Erika; Altabella, Luisa; Canese, Rossella; Imperi, Monica; Orefici, Graziella; Creti, Roberta; Margarit, Immaculada; Magliozzi, Roberta; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to Group-A β-Haemolytic Streptococcus (GAS) may constitute a vulnerability factor in the onset and course of pediatric motor disturbances. GAS infections/colonization can stimulate the production of antibodies, which may cross the blood brain barrier, target selected brain areas (e.g. basal ganglia), and exacerbate motor alterations. Here, we exposed developing SJL male mice to four injections with a GAS homogenate and evaluated the following domains: motor coordination; general locomotion; repetitive behaviors; perseverative responses; and sensorimotor gating (pre-pulse inhibition, PPI). To demonstrate that behavioral changes were associated with immune-mediated brain alterations, we analyzed, in selected brain areas, the presence of infiltrates and microglial activation (immunohistochemistry), monoamines (HPLC), and brain metabolites (in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy). GAS-exposed mice showed increased repetitive and perseverative behaviors, impaired PPI, and reduced concentrations of serotonin in prefrontal cortex, a brain area linked to the behavioral domains investigated, wherein they also showed remarkable elevations in lactate. Active inflammatory processes were substantiated by the observation of infiltrates and microglial activation in the white matter of the anterior diencephalon. These data support the hypothesis that repeated GAS exposure may elicit inflammatory responses in brain areas involved in motor control and perseverative behavior, and result in phenotypic abnormalities. PMID:26304458

  14. Female mice lacking Xist RNA show partial dosage compensation and survive to term.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Kirby, James E; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Lee, Jeannie T

    2016-08-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) compensates for differences in X-chromosome number between male and female mammals. XCI is orchestrated by Xist RNA, whose expression in early development leads to transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome in the female. Knockout studies have established a requirement for Xist with inviability of female embryos that inherit an Xist deletion from the father. Here, we report that female mice lacking Xist RNA can, surprisingly, develop and survive to term. Xist-null females are born at lower frequency and are smaller at birth, but organogenesis is mostly normal. Transcriptomic analysis indicates significant overexpression of hundreds of X-linked genes across multiple tissues. Therefore, Xist-null mice can develop to term in spite of a deficiency of dosage compensation. However, the degree of X-autosomal dosage imbalance was less than anticipated (1.14-fold to 1.36-fold). Thus, partial dosage compensation can be achieved without Xist, supporting the idea of inherent genome balance. Nevertheless, to date, none of the mutant mice has survived beyond weaning stage. Sudden death is associated with failure of postnatal organ maturation. Our data suggest Xist-independent mechanisms of dosage compensation and demonstrate that small deviations from X-autosomal balance can have profound effects on overall fitness. PMID:27542829

  15. Mice with selective elimination of striatal acetylcholine release are lean, show altered energy homeostasis and changed sleep/wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Monica S; De Jaeger, Xavier; Drangova, Maria; Prado, Marco A M; Gros, Robert; Prado, Vania F

    2013-03-01

    Cholinergic neurons are known to regulate striatal circuits; however, striatal-dependent physiological outcomes influenced by acetylcholine (ACh) are still poorly under;?>stood. Here, we used vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice, in which we selectively ablated the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum to dissect the specific roles of striatal ACh in metabolic homeostasis. We report that VAChT(D) (2-Cre-flox/flox) mice are lean at a young age and maintain this lean phenotype with time. The reduced body weight observed in these mutant mice is not attributable to reduced food intake or to a decrease in growth rate. In addition, changed activity could not completely explain the lean phenotype, as only young VAChT(D) (2-Cre-flox/flox) mice showed increased physical activity. Interestingly, VAChT(D) (2-Cre-flox/flox) mice show several metabolic changes, including increased plasma levels of insulin and leptin. They also show increased periods of wakefulness when compared with littermate controls. Taken together, our data suggest that striatal ACh has an important role in the modulation of metabolism and highlight the importance of striatum cholinergic tone in the regulation of energy expenditure. These new insights on how cholinergic neurons influence homeostasis open new avenues for the search of drug targets to treat obesity. PMID:23240572

  16. TAp73 knockout mice show morphological and functional nervous system defects associated with loss of p75 neurotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Niklison-Chirou, Maria Victoria; Steinert, Joern R; Agostini, Massimiliano; Knight, Richard A; Dinsdale, David; Cattaneo, Antonio; Mak, Tak W; Melino, Gerry

    2013-11-19

    Total and N-terminal isoform selective p73 knockout mice show a variety of central nervous system defects. Here we show that TAp73 is a transcriptional activator of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) and that p75(NTR) mRNA and protein levels are strongly reduced in the central and peripheral nervous systems of p73 knockout mice. In parallel, primary cortical neurons from p73 knockout mice showed a reduction in neurite outgrowth and in nerve growth factor-mediated neuronal differentiation, together with reduced miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequencies and behavioral defects. p73 null mice also have impairments in the peripheral nervous system with reduced thermal sensitivity, axon number, and myelin thickness. At least some of these morphological and functional impairments in p73 null cells can be rescued by p75(NTR) re-expression. Together, these data demonstrate that loss of p75(NTR) contributes to the neurological phenotype of p73 knockout mice. PMID:24190996

  17. Behavioral phenotyping of heterozygous acetylcholinesterase knockout (AChE+/-) mice showed no memory enhancement but hyposensitivity to amnesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Espallergues, Julie; Galvan, Laurie; Sabatier, Florence; Rana-Poussine, Vanessa; Maurice, Tangui; Chatonnet, Arnaud

    2010-01-20

    Decrease in the expression or activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymatic activity results in increased cholinergic tonus in the brain and periphery, with concomitant regulations of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors expression. We generated AChE knockout mice and characterized the behavioral phenotype of heterozygous animals, focusing on learning and memory functions. Male and female, AChE+/- and AChE+/+ littermate controls (129 sv strain) were tested at 5-9 weeks of age. AChE activity was significantly decreased in the hippocampus and cortex of AChE+/- mice, but butyrylcholinesterase activity was preserved. AChE+/- mice failed to show any difference in terms of locomotion, exploration and anxiety parameters in the open-field test. Animals were then tested for place learning in the water-maze. They were trained using a 'sustained acquisition' protocol (3 swim trials per day) or a 'mild acquisition' protocol (2 swim trials per day) to locate an invisible platform in fixed position (reference memory procedure). Then, during 3 days, they were trained to locate the platform in a variable position (working memory procedure). Learning profiles and probe test performances were similar for AChE+/- and AChE+/+ mice. Mice were then treated with the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine (0.5, 5 mg/kg) 20 min before each training session. Scopolamine impaired learning at both doses in AChE+/+ mice, but only at the highest dose in AChE+/- mice. Moreover, the intracerebroventricular injection of amyloid-beta25-35 peptide, 9 nmol, 7 days before water-maze acquisition, failed to induce learning deficits in AChE+/- mice, but impaired learning in AChE+/+ controls. The peptide failed to be toxic in forebrain structures of AChE+/- mice, since an increase in lipid peroxidation levels was measured in the hippocampus of AChE+/+ but not AChE+/- mice. We conclude that the increase in cholinergic tonus observed in AChE+/- mice did not result in increased memory functions but

  18. Effect of cannabidiol on sepsis-induced motility disturbances in mice: involvement of CB receptors and fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    de Filippis, D; Iuvone, T; d'amico, A; Esposito, G; Steardo, L; Herman, A G; Pelckmans, P A; de Winter, B Y; de Man, J G

    2008-08-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory condition that is associated with reduced propulsive gastrointestinal motility (ileus). A therapeutic option to treat sepsis is to promote intestinal propulsion preventing bacterial stasis, overgrowth and translocation. Recent evidence suggests that anti-oxidants improve sepsis-induced ileus. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa, exerts strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects without binding to cannabinoid CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. Cannabidiol also regulates the activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which is the main enzyme involved in endocannabinoid breakdown and which modulates gastrointestinal motility. Because of the therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in several pathologies, we investigated its effect on sepsis-induced ileus and on cannabinoid receptor and FAAH expression in the mouse intestine. Sepsis was induced by treating mice with lipopolysaccharides for 18 h. Sepsis led to a decrease in gastric emptying and intestinal transit. Cannabidiol further reduced gastrointestinal motility in septic mice but did not affect gastrointestinal motility in control mice. A low concentration of the CB(1) antagonist AM251 did not affect gastrointestinal motility in control mice but reversed the effect of cannabidiol in septic mice. Sepsis was associated with a selective upregulation of intestinal CB(1) receptors without affecting CB(2) receptor expression and with increased FAAH expression. The increase in FAAH expression was completely reversed by cannabidiol but not affected by AM251. Our results show that sepsis leads to an imbalance of the endocannabinoid system in the mouse intestine. Despite its proven anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, cannabidiol may be of limited use for the treatment of sepsis-induced ileus. PMID:18373655

  19. Female, but not male, mice show delayed cutaneous wound healing following aspirin administration.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Jeanine S; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2013-02-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX) is an enzyme that participates in the wound healing process. Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, simultaneously inhibits the aromatase activity of COX-1 and COX-2 isoforms, which is needed for prostaglandin synthesis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether aspirin, and thus COX inhibition, distinctly affects cutaneous wound healing in female and male mice. Female and male BALB/c mice were treated with aspirin (25 mg/kg per day) for 16 days until they were killed. The control group received vehicle (saline) only. A full-thickness excisional lesion was made on the back, 2 days after aspirin administration started, and macroscopic, histological and biochemical parameters were evaluated. Sections were stained and immunostained for microscopic analysis. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, hydroxyproline quantity and the protein expression of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also determined. Female control and aspirin-treated groups exhibited delayed wound closure and re-epithelization compared with the male control and aspirin-treated groups, respectively. The female control group exhibited reduced MPO activity and a decreased number of macrophage inhibitory factor-positive cells compared with the male control group. In the female aspirin-treated group, MPO activity and the number of F4/80-positive macrophages was higher than in the control group. Collagen was reduced only in the female aspirin-treated group. The expression of vWF and VEGF protein was increased in the female aspirin-treated group. In conclusion, aspirin administration impaired the wound healing process in BALB/c female, but not male, mice. PMID:23240590

  20. Novel repetitive sequence families showing size and frequency polymorphism in the genomes of mice.

    PubMed

    Kominami, R; Urano, Y; Mishima, Y; Muramatsu, M; Moriwaki, K; Yoshikura, H

    1983-04-01

    A middle repetitive sequence, PR1, originally found in mouse rDNA appeared as satellite-like bands when EcoRI and BglII digests of genomic DNA were subjected to Southern blot hybridization using PR1 as probe. The copy number and sizes of PR1-related satellite-like bands, designated as PR1 families, differed remarkably among the subspecies and laboratory strains of mice when the EcoRI digests of genomic DNAs were compared. These bands were not detected in rat and human DNAs. A unit of PR1 sequence was determined by examining cloned EcoRI 3.5 kb (kb, 10(3) bases) fragment and 6.6 kb rDNA by cross-hybridization and sequence analysis: 3.5 kb and 6.6 kb DNAs are composed of homologous PR1 regions and the flanking non-homologous sequences. The results indicate that amplification of different sequences containing PR1 has occurred in different subspecies and strains of mice, and that the segments of satellite-like bands are likely to have been created by recombination of the PR1 sequence with other DNA segments before amplification. The chromosomal distribution of the 3.5 kb PR1 family was studied by back-crossing the female F1 between BALB/c and DDD/1 to male DDD/1. The segregation data strongly suggest that most, if not all, of this family are located on a single chromosome. The stability of these PR1 families in the genomes of cultured cells of a given strain was also examined. An extra band homologous to PR1 appeared in their genomes, but was not detected in other tissues, indicating that some PR1 families may change even during cell propagation. PMID:6302286

  1. Mice with mutant Inf2 show impaired podocyte and slit diaphragm integrity in response to protamine-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Balajikarthick; Sun, Hua; Yan, Paul; Charoonratana, Victoria T; Higgs, Henry N; Wang, Fang; Lai, Ka-Man V; Valenzuela, David M; Brown, Elizabeth J; Schlöndorff, Johannes S; Pollak, Martin R

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in the INF2 (inverted formin 2) gene, encoding a diaphanous formin family protein that regulates actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cause human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). INF2 interacts directly with certain other mammalian diaphanous formin proteins (mDia) that function as RhoA effector molecules. FSGS-causing INF2 mutations impair these interactions and disrupt the ability of INF2 to regulate Rho/Dia-mediated actin dynamics in vitro. However, the precise mechanisms by which INF2 regulates and INF2 mutations impair glomerular structure and function remain unknown. Here, we characterize an Inf2 R218Q point-mutant (knockin) mouse to help answer these questions. Knockin mice have no significant renal pathology or proteinuria at baseline despite diminished INF2 protein levels. INF2 mutant podocytes do show impaired reversal of protamine sulfate-induced foot process effacement by heparin sulfate perfusion. This is associated with persistent podocyte cytoplasmic aggregation, nephrin phosphorylation, and nephrin and podocin mislocalization, as well as impaired recovery of mDia membrane localization. These changes were partially mimicked in podocyte outgrowth cultures, in which podocytes from knockin mice show altered cellular protrusions compared to those from wild-type mice. Thus, in mice, normal INF2 function is not required for glomerular development but normal INF2 is required for regulation of the actin-based behaviors necessary for response to and/or recovery from injury. PMID:27350175

  2. Coumarin compounds of Biebersteinia multifida roots show potential anxiolytic effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional preparations of the root of Biebersteinia multifida DC (Geraniaceae), a native medicinal plant of Irano-Turanian floristic region, have been used for the treatment of phobias as anxiolytic herbal preparation. Methods We utilized the phobic behavior of mice in an elevated plus-maze as a model to evaluate the anxiolytic effect of the plant extract and bio-guided fractionation was applied to isolate the active compounds. Total root extract, alkaline and ether fraction were administered to mice at different doses 30 and 90 min prior to the maze test. Saline and diazepam were administered as negative and positive controls, respectively. The time spent in open and closed arms, an index of anxiety behavior and entry time, was measured as an index of animal activity. Results The total root extract exhibited anxiolytic effect which was comparable to diazepam but with longer duration. This sustained effect of the crude extract was sustained for 90 min and was even more after injection of 45 mg/kg while the effect of diazepam had been reduced by 90 min. The anxiolytic effect factor was only present in the alkaline fraction and displayed its effect at lower doses than diazepam while pure vasicinone as the previously known alkaloid did not shown anxiolytic effect. The effect of the alkaline fraction was in a dose dependent manner starting at 0.2 mg/kg with a maximum at 1.0 mg/kg. Bio-guided fractionation using a variety of chromatographic methods led to isolation and purification of three coumarin derivatives from the bioactive fraction, including umbelliferone, scopoletin, and ferulic acid. Conclusion For the first time, bio-guided fractionation of the root extract of B. multifida indicates significant sustained anxiolytic effects which led to isolation of three coumarin derivatives with well-known potent MAO inhibitory and anti-anxiety effects. These data contribute to evidence-based traditional use of B. multifida root for anxiety disorders. PMID

  3. Mice doubly-deficient in lysosomal hexosaminidase A and neuraminidase 4 show epileptic crises and rapid neuronal loss.

    PubMed

    Seyrantepe, Volkan; Lema, Pablo; Caqueret, Aurore; Dridi, Larbi; Bel Hadj, Samar; Carpentier, Stephane; Boucher, Francine; Levade, Thierry; Carmant, Lionel; Gravel, Roy A; Hamel, Edith; Vachon, Pascal; Di Cristo, Graziella; Michaud, Jacques L; Morales, Carlos R; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2010-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is a severe lysosomal disorder caused by mutations in the HexA gene coding for the α-subunit of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase A, which converts G(M2) to G(M3) ganglioside. Hexa(-/-) mice, depleted of β-hexosaminidase A, remain asymptomatic to 1 year of age, because they catabolise G(M2) ganglioside via a lysosomal sialidase into glycolipid G(A2), which is further processed by β-hexosaminidase B to lactosyl-ceramide, thereby bypassing the β-hexosaminidase A defect. Since this bypass is not effective in humans, infantile Tay-Sachs disease is fatal in the first years of life. Previously, we identified a novel ganglioside metabolizing sialidase, Neu4, abundantly expressed in mouse brain neurons. Now we demonstrate that mice with targeted disruption of both Neu4 and Hexa genes (Neu4(-/-);Hexa(-/-)) show epileptic seizures with 40% penetrance correlating with polyspike discharges on the cortical electrodes of the electroencephalogram. Single knockout Hexa(-/-) or Neu4(-/-) siblings do not show such symptoms. Further, double-knockout but not single-knockout mice have multiple degenerating neurons in the cortex and hippocampus and multiple layers of cortical neurons accumulating G(M2) ganglioside. Together, our data suggest that the Neu4 block exacerbates the disease in Hexa(-/-) mice, indicating that Neu4 is a modifier gene in the mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, reducing the disease severity through the metabolic bypass. However, while disease severity in the double mutant is increased, it is not profound suggesting that Neu4 is not the only sialidase contributing to the metabolic bypass in Hexa(-/-) mice. PMID:20862357

  4. Otx1 null mutant mice show partial segregation of sensory epithelia comparable to lamprey ears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Signore, M.; Simeone, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the development of inner ear innervation in Otx1 null mutants, which lack a horizontal canal, between embryonic day 12 (E12) and postnatal day 7 (P7) with DiI and immunostaining for acetylated tubulin. Comparable to control animals, horizontal crista-like fibers were found to cross over the utricle in Otx1 null mice. In mutants these fibers extend toward an area near the endolymphatic duct, not to a horizontal crista. Most Otx1 null mutants had a small patch of sensory hair cells at this position. Measurement of the area of the utricular macula suggested it to be enlarged in Otx1 null mutants. We suggest that parts of the horizontal canal crista remain incorporated in the utricular sensory epithelium in Otx1 null mutants. Other parts of the horizontal crista appear to be variably segregated to form the isolated patch of hair cells identifiable by the unique fiber trajectory as representing the horizontal canal crista. Comparison with lamprey ear innervation reveals similarities in the pattern of innervation with the dorsal macula, a sensory patch of unknown function. SEM data confirm that all foramina are less constricted in Otx1 null mutants. We propose that Otx1 is not directly involved in sensory hair cell formation of the horizontal canal but affects the segregation of the horizontal canal crista from the utricle. It also affects constriction of the two main foramina in the ear, but not their initial formation. Otx1 is thus causally related to horizontal canal morphogenesis as well as morphogenesis of these foramina.

  5. Mice lacking Asic3 show reduced anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze and reduced aggression.

    PubMed

    Wu, W-L; Lin, Y-W; Min, M-Y; Chen, C-C

    2010-08-01

    Sensing external stimulation is crucial for central processing in the brain and subsequent behavioral expression. Although sensory alteration or deprivation may result in behavioral changes, most studies related to the control of behavior have focused on central mechanisms. Here we created a sensory deficit model of mice lacking acid-sensing ion channel 3 (Asic3(-/-)) to probe behavioral alterations. ASIC3 is predominately distributed in the peripheral nervous system. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry used to examine the expression of Asic3 in the mouse brain showed near-background mRNA and protein levels of ASIC3 throughout the whole brain, except for the sensory mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus. Consistent with the expression results, Asic3 knockout had no effect on synaptic plasticity of the hippocampus and the behavioral tasks of motor function, learning and memory. In anxiety behavior tasks, Asic3(-/-) mice spent more time in the open arms of an elevated plus maze than did their wild-type littermates. Asic3(-/-) mice also displayed less aggressiveness toward intruders but more stereotypic repetitive behaviors during resident-intruder testing than did wild-type littermates. Therefore, loss of ASIC3 produced behavioral changes in anxiety and aggression in mice, which suggests that ASIC3-dependent sensory activities might relate to the central process of emotion modulation. PMID:20497234

  6. Recombinant murine toxin from Yersinia pestis shows high toxicity and β-adrenergic blocking activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanxiao; Zhou, Yazhou; Feng, Na; Wang, Qiong; Tian, Guang; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Zizhong; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2016-05-01

    Yersinia pestis murine toxin (Ymt) encoded on pMT1 is a 61-kDa protein, a member of the phospholipase D superfamily, which is found in all the domains of life. It is considered to be an intracellular protein required for the survival of Y. pestis in the midgut of the flea, but the exact role of Ymt in the pathogenesis of Y. pestis has not been clarified. Purified Ymt is highly toxic to mice and rats, but the exact mechanism of the animals' death is unclear. Here, we prepared a recombinant Ymt in Escherichia coli BL21 cells, and determined its toxicity and activity. We demonstrated that recombinant Ymt was as toxic to mice as the native protein when administered via the intraperitoneal or intravenous route, and inhibited the elevation of blood sugar caused by adrenaline. We also demonstrated that recombinant Ymt was highly toxic to mice when administered via the muscular or subcutaneous route. We also show that the multiple organ congestion or hemorrhage caused by Ymt poisoning may explain the death of the mice. PMID:26774329

  7. AhrdCyp1a2(−/−) mice show increased susceptibility to PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Christine Perdan; Altenhofen, Emily; Ashworth, Amy; Brown, Austin; Kamau-Cheggeh, Cellestine; Curran, Melinda; Evans, Amber; Floyd, Rikki; Fowler, Jocelyn; Garber, Helen; Hays, Breann; Kraemer, Sarah; Lang, Anna; Mynhier, Andrea; Samuels, Ashton; Strohmaier, Carly

    2012-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are developmental neurotoxicants that produce cognitive and behavioral changes in children exposed during gestation and lactation. Coplanar PCBs bind the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and can be sequestered in liver by cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2). The AHR is a ligand-activated transcription factor which increases expression of the CYP1 family, including CYP1A2. Our previous work examining genetic susceptibility to developmental PCB neurotoxicity showed that AhrbCyp1a2(−/−) mice with the high-affinity Ahrb allele and lacking CYP1A2 were most susceptible while AhrbCyp1a2(+/+) and poor-affinity AhrdCyp1a2(+/+) mice were resistant. To follow up, a fourth line of mice was generated with the AhrdCyp1a2(−/−) genotype and compared with the background strain AhrbCyp1a2(+/+). Dams received a PCB mixture or the corn oil vehicle at gestational day 10 (GD10) and postnatal day 5 (PND5). Offspring were tested at PND60 in open field locomotor, acoustic startle with pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), novel object recognition and Morris water maze. Locomotor activity was increased in PCB-treated AhrbCyp1a2(+/+) mice, but no differences were seen in control v. PCB-treated AhrdCyp1a2(−/−) mice. PCB-treated AhrdCyp1a2(−/−) mice had a higher baseline startle response and significantly reduced pre-pulse inhibition at the 74dB level compared with corn oil-treated controls (P<0.05). PCB-treated AhrdCyp1a2(−/−) mice had impairments in novel objective recognition (P<0.05) and during all three hidden platform phases of Morris water maze (P<0.01). Combined with our previous findings, these results indicate Cyp1a2 genotype is more important in susceptibility to PCB-induced deficits in learning and memory, but Ahr genotype appears more important when assessing acoustic startle-PPI and locomotor activity. PMID:22935098

  8. Mice devoid of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) show normal expression of type I interferon genes.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, L F; Ruffner, H; Stark, G; Aguet, M; Weissmann, C

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) binds tightly to the interferon (IFN)-beta promoter and has been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs. We generated mice devoid of functional IRF-1 by targeted gene disruption. As reported by others, IRF-1-deficient mice showed a discrete phenotype: the CD4/CD8 ratio was increased and IFN-gamma-induced levels of macrophage iNO synthase mRNA were strongly diminished. However, type I IFN induction in vivo by virus or double-stranded RNA was unimpaired, as evidenced by serum IFN titers and IFN mRNA levels in spleen, liver and lung. There was also no impairment in the response of type I IFN-inducible genes. Therefore, IRF-1 is not essential for these processes in vivo. Images PMID:7957048

  9. Mice with Deficient BK Channel Function Show Impaired Prepulse Inhibition and Spatial Learning, but Normal Working and Spatial Reference Memory

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Erin; Ruettiger, Lukas; Ruth, Peter; Schmid, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in the large-conductance, voltage- and calcium activated potassium channels (BK channels) have been recently implicated in mental retardation, autism and schizophrenia which all come along with severe cognitive impairments. In the present study we investigate the effects of functional BK channel deletion on cognition using a genetic mouse model with a knock-out of the gene for the pore forming α-subunit of the channel. We tested the F1 generation of a hybrid SV129/C57BL6 mouse line in which the slo1 gene was deleted in both parent strains. We first evaluated hearing and motor function to establish the suitability of this model for cognitive testing. Auditory brain stem responses to click stimuli showed no threshold differences between knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Despite of muscular tremor, reduced grip force, and impaired gait, knockout mice exhibited normal locomotion. These findings allowed for testing of sensorimotor gating using the acoustic startle reflex, as well as of working memory, spatial learning and memory in the Y-maze and the Morris water maze, respectively. Prepulse inhibition on the first day of testing was normal, but the knockout mice did not improve over the days of testing as their wild-type littermates did. Spontaneous alternation in the y-maze was normal as well, suggesting that the BK channel knock-out does not impair working memory. In the Morris water maze knock-out mice showed significantly slower acquisition of the task, but normal memory once the task was learned. Thus, we propose a crucial role of the BK channels in learning, but not in memory storage or recollection. PMID:24303038

  10. Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate Exposure In Utero Damages Sertoli Cell Differentiation Via Disturbance of Sex Determination Pathway in Fetal and Postnatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongan; Yang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Yu, Mingxi; Zhang, Zhou; Cui, Xiaoyu

    2016-07-01

    Mice may share similar mechanism with human underlying reproductive toxicity induced by di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which is not supposed to be associated with decreased testicular testosterone. Pregnant mice were exposed to DEHP by gavage, with the dosage regime beginning at human relevant exposure level. After in utero DEHP exposure, loss of Sertoli cells and germ cells were observed in the male pups at postnatal days 21. And SRY-related HMG box 9 (SOX9), Fibroblast growth factor-9 (FGF9), and Double-sex and Mab-3 related transcripttion factor 1 (DMRT1) proteins were significantly downregulated by DEHP at 2 mg/kg/d and above, suggesting the depression of Sertoli cell differentiation. The repression of Sox9 genes expression was supported by whole-mount in situ hybridization and real-time real-time-quantitative PCR. The expressions of Cyp11α1 and Star were not significantly affected by in utero DEHP exposure, indicating the absence of effects on testosterone biosynthesis. Furthermore, the testosterone-independent pathway regulating Sertoli cells differentiation was disturbed in fetus by DEHP at 2 mg/kg/d and above during the critical time window of sex determination, involving Gadd45g → Gata4/Fog2 → Sry → Sox9 → Fgf9 The results suggest that in utero DEHP exposure damaged Sertoli cells in the postnatal life of mice offspring via disturbance of the differentiation regulating pathway, potentially inducing declines in spermatogenesis. PMID:27060630

  11. Heterozygous caveolin-3 mice show increased susceptibility to palmitate-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Talukder, M A Hassan; Preda, Marilena; Ryzhova, Larisa; Prudovsky, Igor; Pinz, Ilka M

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance and diabetes are comorbidities of obesity and affect one in 10 adults in the United States. Despite the high prevalence, the mechanisms of cardiac insulin resistance in obesity are still unclear. We test the hypothesis that the insulin receptor localizes to caveolae and is regulated through binding to caveolin-3 (CAV3). We further test whether haploinsufficiency forCAV3 increases the susceptibility to high-fat-induced insulin resistance. We used in vivo and in vitro studies to determine the effect of palmitate exposure on global insulin resistance, contractile performance of the heart in vivo, glucose uptake in the heart, and on cellular signaling downstream of theIR We show that haploinsufficiency forCAV3 increases susceptibility to palmitate-induced global insulin resistance and causes cardiomyopathy. On the basis of fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) experiments, we show thatCAV3 andIRdirectly interact in cardiomyocytes. Palmitate impairs insulin signaling by a decrease in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt that corresponds to an 87% decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake inHL-1 cardiomyocytes. Despite loss of Akt phosphorylation and lower glucose uptake, palmitate increased insulin-independent serine phosphorylation ofIRS-1 by 35%. In addition, we found lipid induced downregulation ofCD36, the fatty acid transporter associated with caveolae. This may explain the problem the diabetic heart is facing with the simultaneous impairment of glucose uptake and lipid transport. Thus, these findings suggest that loss ofCAV3 interferes with downstream insulin signaling and lipid uptake, implicatingCAV3 as a regulator of theIRand regulator of lipid uptake in the heart. PMID:27033451

  12. The APOE4 allele shows opposite sex bias in microbleeds and Alzheimer's disease of humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Christensen, Amy; Moser, Alexandra; Liu, Jiahui; Pike, Christian J; Smith, Conor; LaDu, Mary Jo; Sullivan, Patrick M; Morgan, Todd E; Dolzhenko, Egor; Charidimou, Andreas; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Wiberg, Maria Kristofferson; Shams, Sara; Chiang, Gloria Chia-Yi; Finch, Caleb E

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein APOE4 allele confers greater risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) for women than men, in conjunction with greater clinical deficits per unit of AD neuropathology (plaques, tangles). Cerebral microbleeds, which contribute to cognitive dysfunctions during AD, also show APOE4 excess, but sex-APOE allele interactions are not described. We report that elderly men diagnosed for mild cognitive impairment and AD showed a higher risk of cerebral cortex microbleeds with APOE4 allele dose effect in 2 clinical cohorts (ADNI and KIDS). Sex-APOE interactions were further analyzed in EFAD mice carrying human APOE alleles and familial AD genes (5XFAD (+/-) /human APOE(+/+)). At 7 months, E4FAD mice had cerebral cortex microbleeds with female excess, in contrast to humans. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, plaques, and soluble Aβ also showed female excess. Both the cerebral microbleeds and cerebral amyloid angiopathy increased in proportion to individual Aβ load. In humans, the opposite sex bias of APOE4 allele for microbleeds versus the plaques and tangles is the first example of organ-specific, sex-linked APOE allele effects, and further shows AD as a uniquely human condition. PMID:26686669

  13. [IMMUNOCYTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DISTURBANCES IN THE STRUCTURE OF SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEXES IN SPERMATOCYTE NUCLEI IN MICE UNDER EXPOSURE TO ROCKET FUEL COMPONENT].

    PubMed

    Lovinskaya, A V; Kolumbayeva, S Zh; Abilev, S K; Kolomiets, O L

    2016-01-01

    There was performed an assessment of genotoxic effects of rocket fuel component--unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH, heptyl)--on forming germ cells of male mice. Immunocytochemically there was studied the structure of meiotic nuclei at different times after the intraperitoneal administration of UDMH to male mice. There were revealed following types of disturbances of the structure of synaptonemal complexes (SCs) of meiotic chromosomes: single and multiple fragments of SCs associations of autosomes with a sex bivalent, atypical structure of the SCs with a frequency higher than the reference level. In addition, there were found the premature desinapsis of sex bivalents, the disorder offormation of the genital corpuscle and ring SCs. Established disorders in SCs of spermatocytes, analyzed at 38th day after the 10-days intoxication of animal by the component of rocket fuel, attest to the risk of permanent persistence of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in the pool of stem cells. PMID:27266032

  14. HIV-1 Nef mutations abrogating downregulation of CD4 affect other Nef functions and show reduced pathogenicity in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Zaher . E-mail: Zaher.Hanna@ircm.qc.ca; Priceputu, Elena; Hu, Chunyan; Vincent, Patrick; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2006-03-01

    HIV-1 Nef has the ability to downmodulate CD4 cell surface expression. Several studies have shown that CD4 downregulation is required for efficient virus replication and high infectivity. However, the pathophysiological relevance of this phenomenon in vivo, independently of its role in sustaining high virus loads, remains unclear. We studied the impact of the CD4 downregulation function of Nef on its pathogenesis in vivo, in the absence of viral replication, in the CD4C/HIV transgenic (Tg) mouse model. Two independent Nef mutants (RD35/36AA and D174K), known to abrogate CD4 downregulation, were tested in Tg mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed that downregulation of murine CD4 was severely decreased or abrogated on Tg T cells expressing respectively Nef{sup RD35/36AA} and Nef{sup D174K}. Similarly, the severe depletion of double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} and of single-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup -} thymocytes, usually observed with Nef{sup Wt}, was not detected in Nef{sup RD35/36AA} and Nef{sup D174K} Tg mice. However, both mutant Tg mice showed a partial depletion of peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells. This was accompanied, as previously reported for Net{sup Wt} Tg mice, by the presence of an activated/memory-like phenotype (CD69{sup +}, CD25{sup +}, CD44{sup +}, CD45RB{sup Low}, CD62{sup Low}) of CD4{sup +} T cells expressing Nef{sup RD35/36AA} and to a lesser extent Nef{sup D174K}. In addition, both mutants retained the ability to block CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation in vitro after anti-CD3 stimulation, but not to enhance apoptosis/death of CD4{sup +} T cells. Therefore, it appears that Nef-mediated CD4 downregulation is associated with thymic defects, but segregates independently of the activated/memory-like phenotype, of the partial depletion and of the impaired in vitro proliferation of peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells. Histopathological assessment revealed the total absence of or decrease severity and frequency of organ AIDS-like diseases (lung, heart and kidney

  15. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells From Diabetic Mice Show Impaired Vascular Stabilization in a Murine Model of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cronk, Stephen M.; Kelly-Goss, Molly R.; Ray, H. Clifton; Mendel, Thomas A.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; Bruce, Anthony C.; Dey, Bijan K.; Guendel, Alexander M.; Tavakol, Daniel N.; Herman, Ira M.; Yates, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is characterized by progressive vascular dropout with subsequent vision loss. We have recently shown that an intravitreal injection of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can stabilize the retinal microvasculature, enabling repair and regeneration of damaged capillary beds in vivo. Because an understanding of ASC status from healthy versus diseased donors will be important as autologous cellular therapies are developed for unmet clinical needs, we took advantage of the hyperglycemic Akimba mouse as a preclinical in vivo model of diabetic retinopathy in an effort aimed at evaluating therapeutic efficacy of adipose-derived stem cells (mASCs) derived either from healthy, nondiabetic or from diabetic mice. To these ends, Akimba mice received intravitreal injections of media conditioned by mASCs or mASCs themselves, subsequent to development of substantial retinal capillary dropout. mASCs from healthy mice were more effective than diabetic mASCs in protecting the diabetic retina from further vascular dropout. Engrafted ASCs were found to preferentially associate with the retinal vasculature. Conditioned medium was unable to recapitulate the vasoprotection seen with injected ASCs. In vitro diabetic ASCs showed decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis compared with healthy mASCs. Diabetic ASCs also secreted less vasoprotective factors than healthy mASCs, as determined by high-throughput enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our findings suggest that diabetic ASCs are functionally impaired compared with healthy ASCs and support the utility of an allogeneic injection of ASCs versus autologous or conditioned media approaches in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25769654

  16. Chidamide and 5-flurouracil show a synergistic antitumor effect on human colon cancer xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Qiu, S; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Zheng, Y; Su, X; Chen, B; Chen, H

    2016-01-01

    Chidamide is a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that increases the acetylation of histone H3 by inhibiting the activity of HDAC1 and HDAC2. We previously found that treatment of human colon cancer cells with chidamide led to cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/1 phase in vitro. The present study extended the observations in vivo and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. In nude mice bearing human colon cancer LoVo cell xenografts, chidamide alone or in combination with 5-flurouracil (5-Fu) reduced the expression of HDAC1 and HDAC2, accompanied with increased acetylation of histone H3. Chidamide alone inhibited the tumor growth and induce cell apoptosis in tumor-bearing mice. Combined treatment of chidamide with 5-Fu enhanced the anti-tumor activity of 5-Fu. Western blotting analysis showed that chidamide alone or in combination with 5-Fu upregulated the expressions of cleaved Caspase-3 and cleaved poly-ADP (adenosine diphosphate)-ribose polymerase (PARP). In addition, chidamide alone or in combination with 5-Fu increased the p53, phosphorylated-p53 (p-p53), p21 and γH2AX levels, but suppressed cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) expression in tumor cells. Chidamide alone or in combination with 5-Fu down regulated the expressions of p-AKT, p-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p-p70S6K, p-Raf, and p44/42 mitogen activated protein kinase (Erk1/2), indicating the blockage of these signaling pathways. The results demonstrated that chidamide alone or in combination with 5-Fu exerted anti-tumor activity in nude mice bearing human colon cancer LoVo cell xenografts, and several signaling pathways might be involved in the chidamide-induced tumor growth inhibition and tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:26774139

  17. Atf3 mutant mice show reduced axon regeneration and impaired regeneration-associated gene induction after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gey, Manuel; Wanner, Renate; Schilling, Corinna; Pedro, Maria T; Sinske, Daniela; Knöll, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Axon injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) induces a regeneration-associated gene (RAG) response. Atf3 (activating transcription factor 3) is such a RAG and ATF3's transcriptional activity might induce 'effector' RAGs (e.g. small proline rich protein 1a (Sprr1a), Galanin (Gal), growth-associated protein 43 (Gap43)) facilitating peripheral axon regeneration. We provide a first analysis of Atf3 mouse mutants in peripheral nerve regeneration. In Atf3 mutant mice, facial nerve regeneration and neurite outgrowth of adult ATF3-deficient primary dorsal root ganglia neurons was decreased. Using genome-wide transcriptomics, we identified a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster (vasoactive intestinal peptide (Vip), Ngf, Grp, Gal, Pacap) regulated by ATF3. Exogenous administration of neuropeptides enhanced neurite growth of Atf3 mutant mice suggesting that these molecules might be effector RAGs of ATF3's pro-regenerative function. In addition to the induction of growth-promoting molecules, we present data that ATF3 suppresses growth-inhibiting molecules such as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2. In summary, we show a pro-regenerative ATF3 function during PNS nerve regeneration involving transcriptional activation of a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster. ATF3 is a general injury-inducible factor, therefore ATF3-mediated mechanisms identified herein might apply to other cell and injury types. PMID:27581653

  18. Atf3 mutant mice show reduced axon regeneration and impaired regeneration-associated gene induction after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Gey, Manuel; Wanner, Renate; Schilling, Corinna; Pedro, Maria T.; Sinske, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Axon injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) induces a regeneration-associated gene (RAG) response. Atf3 (activating transcription factor 3) is such a RAG and ATF3's transcriptional activity might induce ‘effector’ RAGs (e.g. small proline rich protein 1a (Sprr1a), Galanin (Gal), growth-associated protein 43 (Gap43)) facilitating peripheral axon regeneration. We provide a first analysis of Atf3 mouse mutants in peripheral nerve regeneration. In Atf3 mutant mice, facial nerve regeneration and neurite outgrowth of adult ATF3-deficient primary dorsal root ganglia neurons was decreased. Using genome-wide transcriptomics, we identified a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster (vasoactive intestinal peptide (Vip), Ngf, Grp, Gal, Pacap) regulated by ATF3. Exogenous administration of neuropeptides enhanced neurite growth of Atf3 mutant mice suggesting that these molecules might be effector RAGs of ATF3's pro-regenerative function. In addition to the induction of growth-promoting molecules, we present data that ATF3 suppresses growth-inhibiting molecules such as chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2. In summary, we show a pro-regenerative ATF3 function during PNS nerve regeneration involving transcriptional activation of a neuropeptide-encoding RAG cluster. ATF3 is a general injury-inducible factor, therefore ATF3-mediated mechanisms identified herein might apply to other cell and injury types. PMID:27581653

  19. Galanin 3 receptor-deficient mice show no alteration in the oxazolone-induced contact dermatitis phenotype.

    PubMed

    Botz, Bálint; Brunner, Susanne M; Kemény, Ágnes; Pintér, Erika; McDougall, Jason J; Kofler, Barbara; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-09-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is an inflammatory skin disease induced by allergen exposure and characterized by erythema, oedema and immune cell infiltration. The sensory peptide galanin (GAL) and its three receptors (GAL1-3 ) are involved in regulating inflammation. As GAL and its receptors are expressed in human and murine skin and GAL expression is increased in oxazolone-induced contact allergy, it could play a role in dermatitis. As GAL reduces neurogenic plasma extravasation in the mouse skin via GAL3 activation, the role of GAL3 in the oxazolone-induced dermatitis model was explored. Following topical challenge with oxazolone, GAL3 gene-deficient mice showed a trend towards reduced ear thickness. Plasma extravasation and neutrophil infiltration increased considerably upon oxazolone challenge in both GAL3 knockout animals and wild-type controls without any observable effect of the gene deletion. We conclude that a lack of GAL3 does not influence oxazolone-induced ACD. PMID:27121264

  20. Deficiency of prolyl oligopeptidase in mice disturbs synaptic plasticity and reduces anxiety-like behaviour, body weight, and brain volume.

    PubMed

    Höfling, Corinna; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Jaako, Külli; Peltonen, Iida; Männistö, Pekka T; Nurmi, Antti; Vartiainen, Nina; Morawski, Markus; Zharkovsky, Alexander; Võikar, Vootele; Roßner, Steffen; García-Horsman, J Arturo

    2016-06-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP) has been implicated in neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation and has been considered a drug target to enhance memory in dementia. However, the true physiological role of PREP is not yet understood. In this paper, we report the phenotyping of a mouse line where the PREP gene has been knocked out. This work indicates that the lack of PREP in mice causes reduced anxiety but also hyperactivity. The cortical volumes of PREP knockout mice were smaller than those of wild type littermates. Additionally, we found increased expression of diazepam binding inhibitor protein in the cortex and of the somatostatin receptor-2 in the hippocampus of PREP knockout mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and tail suspension test revealed lack of response of PREP knockout mice to lipopolysaccharide insult. Further analysis revealed significantly increased levels of polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule in PREP deficient mice. These findings might be explained as possible alteration in brain plasticity caused by PREP deficiency, which in turn affect behaviour and brain development. PMID:26996375

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (PTP alpha) knockout mice show deficits in Morris water maze learning, decreased locomotor activity, and decreases in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Matthew R; Ponniah, Sathivel; Wang, Dennis Z-M; Doetschman, Thomas; Vorhees, Charles V; Pallen, Catherine J

    2003-09-12

    Receptor PTPalpha is a widely expressed transmembrane enzyme enriched in brain. PTPalpha knockout (PTPalpha(-/-)) mice are viable and display no gross abnormalities. Brain and embryo derived fibroblast src and fyn activity is reduced to <50% in PTPalpha(-/-) mice. These protein kinases are implicated in multiple aspects of neuronal development and function. However, the effect of the loss of function of the PTPalpha gene on behavior has yet to be investigated. PTPalpha(-/-) and WT mice were tested for anxiety, swimming ability, spatial learning, cued learning, locomotor activity, and novel object recognition (NOR). PTPalpha(-/-) mice were indistinguishable from WT in swimming ability, cued learning and novel object recognition. Knockout mice showed decreased anxiety without an increase in head dips and stretch-attend movements. During Morris water maze (MWM) learning, PTPalpha(-/-) mice had increased latencies to reach the goal compared to WT on acquisition, but no memory deficit on probe trials. On reversal learning, knockout mice showed no significant effects. PTPalpha(-/-) mice showed decreased exploratory locomotor activity, but responded normally to a challenge dose of D-methamphetamine. The data suggest that PTPalpha serves a regulatory function in learning and other forms of neuroplasticity. PMID:12932834

  2. Construction and characterization of an infectious clone of coxsackievirus A6 that showed high virulence in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lisheng; Li, Shuxuan; Liu, Yajing; Hou, Wangheng; Lin, Qiaona; Zhao, Huan; Xu, Longfa; He, Delei; Ye, Xiangzhong; Zhu, Hua; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2015-12-01

    Atypical hand, foot, and mouth disease (aHFMD) outbreaks have been frequently reported worldwide in recent years. It is believed that coxsackievirus A6 (CA6) is the major pathogen for aHFMD. Studies regarding CA6 infection are limited and the genetic mechanism for the high pathogenicity of some new CA6 variants is still unclear. Infectious clones are powerful tools for studying the genetic mechanisms of RNA viruses. In this study, we describe the construction of a full-length cDNA clone of CA6 strain TW-2007-00141. The whole genome of CA6 was amplified in a single step and ligated into a plasmid vector through an efficient cloning method, Gibson assembly. The whole genome sequence of CA6 strain TW-2007-00141 was determined and phylogenetic analysis indicated that it shared a high degree of similarity (≥94%) with the CA6 strains found in Taiwan in 2009. The infectious clone of CA6 viruses were recovered by transfection into 293FT cells and showed similar biological properties to the parental virus. Viral particles were purified by CsCl isopycnic centrifugation, and two types of viral particles were observed under transmission electron microscopy. The rescued virus showed high virulence in one-day-old suckling mice. This clone may be useful for establishing animal models for the evaluation of CA6 vaccine efficiency in future. PMID:26272672

  3. Yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, ameliorates memory disturbance and abnormal social interaction with anti-aggregation effect of cerebral amyloid β proteins in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, H; Takayama, S; Iwasaki, K; Tabuchi, M; Yamaguchi, T; Sekiguchi, K; Ikarashi, Y; Kudo, Y; Kase, Y; Arai, H; Yaegashi, N

    2011-04-28

    The deposition of amyloid β protein (Aβ) is a consistent pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Therefore, inhibition of Aβ aggregation in the brain is an attractive therapeutic and preventive strategy in the development of disease-modifying drugs for AD. An in vitro study demonstrated that yokukansan (YKS), a traditional Japanese medicine, inhibited Aβ aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. An in vivo study demonstrated that YKS and Uncaria hook (UH), a constituent of YKS, prevented the accumulation of cerebral Aβ. YKS also improved the memory disturbance and abnormal social interaction such as increased aggressive behavior and decreased social behavior in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice. These results suggest that YKS is likely to be a potent and novel therapeutic agent to prevent and/or treat AD, and that this may be attributed to UH. PMID:21303686

  4. Effects of disturbed liver growth and oxidative stress of high-fat diet-fed dams on cholesterol metabolism in offspring mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Juhae

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Changes in nutritional status during gestation and lactation have detrimental effects on offspring metabolism. Several animal studies have shown that maternal high-fat diet (HFD) can predispose the offspring to development of obesity and metabolic diseases, however the mechanisms underlying these transgenerational effects are poorly understood. Therefore, we examined the effect of maternal HFD consumption on metabolic phenotype and hepatic expression of involved genes in dams to determine whether any of these parameters were associated with the metabolic outcomes in the offspring. MATERIALS/METHODS Female C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat diet (LFD: 10% calories from fat) or a high-fat diet (HFD: 45% calories from fat) for three weeks before mating, and during pregnancy and lactation. Dams and their male offspring were studied at weaning. RESULTS Dams fed an HFD had significantly higher body and adipose tissue weights and higher serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels than dams fed an LFD. Hepatic lipid levels and mRNA levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism, including LXRα, SREBP-2, FXR, LDLR, and ABCG8 were significantly changed by maternal HFD intake. Significantly lower total liver DNA and protein contents were observed in dams fed an HFD, implicating the disturbed liver adaptation in the pregnancy-related metabolic demand. HFD feeding also induced significant oxidative stress in serum and liver of dams. Offspring of dams fed an HFD had significantly higher serum cholesterol levels, which were negatively correlated with liver weights of dams and positively correlated with hepatic lipid peroxide levels in dams. CONCLUSIONS Maternal HFD consumption induced metabolic dysfunction, including altered liver growth and oxidative stress in dams, which may contribute to the disturbed cholesterol homeostasis in the early life of male mice offspring. PMID:27478544

  5. Prevention of di (2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate-induced Testicular Disturbance in Mice by Co-administration of L-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zohre; Mohammadi, Moslem; Eimani, Hossein; Shafaroudi, Majid Malekzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Background di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is widely used in the plastic industry and can induce reproductive toxicity. On the other hand, L-carnitine (LC) plays a crucial role in sperm metabolism and maturation. This study evaluates the effect of LC on body and testis weight, testis tissue, count, motility, viability, morphology, and chromatin quality of epididymal sperm, testicular spermatid number (TSN) per gram testis and daily sperm production (DSP) in LC-treated mice. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, adult male NMRI mice (mean age: 4 weeks) were given doses of DEHP and LC by gavaging for 2 weeks. All samples were assessed according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Sperm morphology was assessed using Papanicolaou staining and sperm chromatin quality by aniline-blue staining. The left testes were fixed in Bouinś solution for histological examination and the end slices were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The right testes were homogenized, and then TSN and DSP were calculated with an improved Neubauer haemocytometer and respective frames. Paired t-test, ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were utilized for data analysis. Results Co-administration of DEHP and LC not only prevented significant gains in testicular weight, but also maintained the sperm’s normal morphology and chromatin quality (p<0.05). In addition, LC recovered histological changes, TSN, DSP, and sperm count. Conclusion These results demonstrated that oral administration of LC partially or generally protects spermatogenesis from DEHP-toxicity in mice. PMID:25101163

  6. Aged neuronal nitric oxide knockout mice show preserved olfactory learning in both social recognition and odor-conditioning tasks

    PubMed Central

    James, Bronwen M.; Li, Qin; Luo, Lizhu; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence for both neurotoxic and neuroprotective roles of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain and changes in the expression of the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS) gene occur during aging. The current studies have investigated potential support for either a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role of NO derived from nNOS in the context of aging by comparing olfactory learning and locomotor function in young compared to old nNOS knockout (nNOS−/−) and wildtype control mice. Tasks involving social recognition and olfactory conditioning paradigms showed that old nNOS−/− animals had improved retention of learning compared to similar aged wildtype controls. Young nNOS−/− animals showed superior reversal learning to wildtypes in a conditioned learning task, although their performance was weakened with age. Interestingly, whereas young nNOS−/− animals were impaired in long term memory for social odors compared to wildtype controls, in old animals this pattern was reversed, possibly indicating beneficial compensatory changes influencing olfactory memory may occur during aging in nNOS−/− animals. Possibly such compensatory changes may have involved increased NO from other NOS isoforms since the memory deficit in young nNOS−/− animals could be rescued by the NO-donor, molsidomine. Both nNOS−/− and wildtype animals showed an age-associated decline in locomotor activity although young nNOS−/− animals were significantly more active than wildtypes, possibly due to an increased interest in novelty. Overall our findings suggest that lack of NO release via nNOS may protect animals to some extent against age-associated cognitive decline in memory tasks typically involving olfactory and hippocampal regions, but not against declines in reversal learning or locomotor activity. PMID:25870540

  7. Clustered epitopes within a new poly-epitopic HIV-1 DNA vaccine shows immunogenicity in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Jafarpour, Nazli; Memarnejadian, Arash; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Kohram, Fatemeh; Aghababa, Haniyeh; Khoramabadi, Nima; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2014-08-01

    Despite a huge number of studies towards vaccine development against human immunodeficiency virus-1, no effective vaccine has been approved yet. Thus, new vaccines should be provided with new formulations. Herein, a new DNA vaccine candidate encoding conserved and immunogenic epitopes from HIV-1 antigens of tat, pol, gag and env is designed and constructed. After bioinformatics analyses to find the best epitopes and their tandem, nucleotide sequence corresponding to the designed multiepitope was synthesized and cloned into pcDNA3.1+ vector. Expression of pcDNA3.1-tat/pol/gag/env plasmid was evaluated in HEK293T cells by RT-PCR and western-blotting. Seven groups of BALB/c mice were intramuscularly immunized three times either with 50, 100, 200 µg of plasmid in 2-week intervals or with similar doses of insert-free plasmid. Two weeks after the last injection, proliferation of T cells and secretion of IL4 and IFN-γ cytokines were evaluated using Brdu and ELISA methods, respectively. Results showed the proper expression of the plasmid in protein and mRNA levels. Moreover, the designed multiepitope plasmid was capable of induction of both proliferation responses as well as IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokine production in a considerable level compared to the control groups. Overall, our primary data warranted further detailed studies on the potency of this vaccine. PMID:24842263

  8. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 attenuates disturbances induced by neuroleptics: the effect on catalepsy and gastric ulcers in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Jelovac, N; Sikiric, P; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Marovic, A; Perovic, D; Seiwerth, S; Mise, S; Turkovic, B; Dodig, G; Miklic, P; Buljat, G; Prkacin, I

    1999-08-20

    A gastric pentadecapeptide, BPC 157, with the amino acid sequence, Gly-Glu-Pro-Pro-Pro-Gly-Lys-Pro-Ala-Asp-Asp-Ala-Gly-Leu-Val, MW 1419, known to have a variety of protective effects in gastrointestinal tract and other organs, was recently shown to particularly affect dopamine systems. For instance, it blocks the stereotypy produced acutely by amphetamine in rats, and the development of haloperidol-induced supersensitivity to amphetamine in mice. Consequently, whether pentadecapeptide BPC 157, that by itself has no cataleptogenic effect in normal animals, may attenuate the immediate effects of neuroleptics application, particularly catalepsy, was the focus of the present report. Prominent catalepsy, otherwise consistently seen in the mice treated with haloperidol (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) and fluphenazine (0.3125, 0.625, 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) after 1.5, 3, 4.5, 6 and 7.5 h following administration, was markedly attenuated when pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg or 10 ng/kg b.w., i.p.) was coadministered with the neuroleptic. The number of cataleptic mice was markedly lower throughout most of the experimental period. Moreover, on challenge with lower doses of neuroleptics, catalepsy appearance was postponed and the mice, otherwise cataleptic since the earliest period, became cataleptic later, not before 3 or 4.5 h after neuroleptic administration, especially if protected with higher pentadecapeptide dose. Besides catalepsy, coadministration of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157, given in the above mentioned doses, reduced not only catalepsy but somatosensory disorientation (for 7.5 h after administration of a neuroleptic, assessed at intervals of 1.5 h, by a simple scoring system [0-5]) in haloperidol- or fluphenazine-challenged mice as it did in mice treated with sulpiride (20, 40, 80 and 160 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) or with clozapine (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg b.w., i.p.), in which case catalepsy was absent. In other experiments, considering

  9. Transgenic mice overexpressing glia maturation factor-β, an oxidative stress inducible gene, show premature aging due to Zmpste24 down-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, Jun-ichi; Takenaka, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Glia Maturation Factor-β (GMF), a brain specific protein, is induced by proteinuria in renal tubules. Ectopic GMF overexpression causes apoptosis in vitro via cellular vulnerability to oxidative stress. In order to examine the roles of GMF in non-brain tissue, we constructed transgenic mice overexpressing GMF (GMF-TG). The GMF-TG mice exhibited appearance phenotypes associated with premature aging. The GMF-TG mice also demonstrated short lifespans and reduced hair regrowth, suggesting an accelerated aging process. The production of an abnormal lamin A, a nuclear envelope protein, plays a causal role in both normal aging and accelerated aging diseases, known as laminopathies. Importantly, we identified the abnormal lamin A (prelamin A), accompanied by a down-regulation of a lamin A processing enzyme (Zmpste24) in the kidney of the GMF-TG mice. The GMF-TG mice showed accelerated aging in the kidney, compared with wild-type mice, showing increased TGF-β1, CTGF gene and serum creatinine. The gene expression of p21/waf1 was increased at an earlier stage of life, at 10 weeks, which was in turn down-regulated at a later stage, at 60 weeks. In conclusion, we propose that GMF-TG mice might be a novel mouse model of accelerated aging, due to the abnormal lamin A. PMID:26232943

  10. Transgenic mice overexpressing glia maturation factor-β, an oxidative stress inducible gene, show premature aging due to Zmpste24 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Rika; Asai, Kanae; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Takenaka, Masaru

    2015-07-01

    Glia Maturation Factor-β (GMF), a brain specific protein, is induced by proteinuria in renal tubules. Ectopic GMF overexpression causes apoptosisin vitro via cellular vulnerability to oxidative stress. In order to examine the roles of GMF in non-brain tissue, we constructed transgenic mice overexpressing GMF (GMF-TG). The GMF-TG mice exhibited appearance phenotypes associated with premature aging. The GMF-TG mice also demonstrated short lifespans and reduced hair regrowth, suggesting an accelerated aging process. The production of an abnormal lamin A, a nuclear envelope protein, plays a causal role in both normal aging and accelerated aging diseases, known as laminopathies. Importantly, we identified the abnormal lamin A (prelamin A), accompanied by a down-regulation of a lamin A processing enzyme (Zmpste24) in the kidney of the GMF-TG mice. The GMF-TG mice showed accelerated aging in the kidney, compared with wild-type mice, showing increased TGF-β1, CTGF gene and serum creatinine. The gene expression of p21/waf1 was increased at an earlier stage of life, at 10 weeks, which was in turn down-regulated at a later stage, at 60 weeks. In conclusion, we propose that GMF-TG mice might be a novel mouse model of accelerated aging, due to the abnormal lamin A. PMID:26232943

  11. Mice Abundant in Muricholic Bile Acids Show Resistance to Dietary Induced Steatosis, Weight Gain, and to Impaired Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bonde, Ylva; Eggertsen, Gösta; Rudling, Mats

    2016-01-01

    High endogenous production of, or treatment with muricholic bile acids, strongly reduces the absorption of cholesterol. Mice abundant in muricholic bile acids may therefore display an increased resistance against dietary induced weight gain, steatosis, and glucose intolerance due to an anticipated general reduction in lipid absorption. To test this hypothesis, mice deficient in steroid 12-alpha hydroxylase (Cyp8b1-/-) and therefore abundant in muricholic acids were monitored for 11 weeks while fed a high fat diet. Food intake and body and liver weights were determined, and lipids in liver, serum and feces were measured. Further, responses during oral glucose and intraperitoneal insulin tolerance tests were evaluated. On the high fat diet, Cyp8b1-/- mice displayed less weight gain compared to wildtype littermates (Cyp8b1+/+). In addition, liver enlargement with steatosis and increases in serum LDL-cholesterol were strongly attenuated in Cyp8b1-/- mice on high fat diet. Fecal excretion of cholesterol was increased and there was a strong trend for doubled fecal excretion of free fatty acids, while excretion of triglycerides was unaltered, indicating dampened lipid absorption. On high fat diet, Cyp8b1-/- mice also presented lower serum glucose levels in response to oral glucose gavage or to intraperitoneal insulin injection compared to Cyp8b1+/+. In conclusion, following exposure to a high fat diet, Cyp8b1-/- mice are more resistant against weight gain, steatosis, and to glucose intolerance than Cyp8b1+/+ mice. Reduced lipid absorption may in part explain these findings. Overall, the results suggest that muricholic bile acids may be beneficial against the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26824238

  12. A Genetic and Pathologic Study of a DENV2 Clinical Isolate Capable of Inducing Encephalitis and Hematological Disturbances in Immunocompetent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Jaime Henrique; Pereira Bizerra, Raíza Sales; dos Santos Alves, Rúbens Prince; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria Elisabete; Levi, José Eduardo; Capurro, Margareth Lara; de Souza Ferreira, Luís Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the causative agent of dengue fever (DF), a mosquito-borne illness endemic to tropical and subtropical regions. There is currently no effective drug or vaccine formulation for the prevention of DF and its more severe forms, i.e., dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). There are two generally available experimental models for the study of DENV pathogenicity as well as the evaluation of potential vaccine candidates. The first model consists of non-human primates, which do not develop symptoms but rather a transient viremia. Second, mouse-adapted virus strains or immunocompromised mouse lineages are utilized, which display some of the pathological features of the infection observed in humans but may not be relevant to the results with regard to the wild-type original virus strains or mouse lineages. In this study, we describe a genetic and pathological study of a DENV2 clinical isolate, named JHA1, which is naturally capable of infecting and killing Balb/c mice and reproduces some of the symptoms observed in DENV-infected subjects. Sequence analyses demonstrated that the JHA1 isolate belongs to the American genotype group and carries genetic markers previously associated with neurovirulence in mouse-adapted virus strains. The JHA1 strain was lethal to immunocompetent mice following intracranial (i.c.) inoculation with a LD50 of approximately 50 PFU. Mice infected with the JHA1 strain lost weight and exhibited general tissue damage and hematological disturbances, with similarity to those symptoms observed in infected humans. In addition, it was demonstrated that the JHA1 strain shares immunological determinants with the DENV2 NGC reference strain, as evaluated by cross-reactivity of anti-envelope glycoprotein (domain III) antibodies. The present results indicate that the JHA1 isolate may be a useful tool in the study of DENV pathogenicity and will help in the evaluation of anti-DENV vaccine formulations as well as

  13. Mice lacking Programmed cell death-1 show a role for CD8(+) T cells in long-term immunity against blood-stage malaria.

    PubMed

    Horne-Debets, Joshua M; Karunarathne, Deshapriya S; Faleiro, Rebecca J; Poh, Chek Meng; Renia, Laurent; Wykes, Michelle N

    2016-01-01

    Even after years of experiencing malaria, caused by infection with Plasmodium species, individuals still have incomplete immunity and develop low-density parasitemia on re-infection. Previous studies using the P. chabaudi (Pch) mouse model to understand the reason for chronic malaria, found that mice with a deletion of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1KO) generate sterile immunity unlike wild type (WT) mice. Here we investigated if the mechanism underlying this defect during acute immunity also impacts on long-term immunity. We infected WT and PD-1KO mice with Pch-malaria and measured protection as well as immune responses against re-infections, 15 or 20 weeks after the original infection had cleared. WT mice showed approximately 1% parasitemia compared to sterile immunity in PD-1KO mice on re-infection. An examination of the mechanisms of immunity behind this long-term protection in PD-1KO mice showed a key role for parasite-specific CD8(+) T cells even when CD4(+) T cells and B cells responded to re-infection. These studies indicate that long-term CD8(+) T cell-meditated protection requires consideration for future malaria vaccine design, as part of a multi-cell type response. PMID:27217330

  14. Mice lacking Programmed cell death-1 show a role for CD8+ T cells in long-term immunity against blood-stage malaria

    PubMed Central

    Horne-Debets, Joshua M.; Karunarathne, Deshapriya S.; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Poh, Chek Meng; Renia, Laurent; Wykes, Michelle N.

    2016-01-01

    Even after years of experiencing malaria, caused by infection with Plasmodium species, individuals still have incomplete immunity and develop low-density parasitemia on re-infection. Previous studies using the P. chabaudi (Pch) mouse model to understand the reason for chronic malaria, found that mice with a deletion of programmed cell death-1 (PD-1KO) generate sterile immunity unlike wild type (WT) mice. Here we investigated if the mechanism underlying this defect during acute immunity also impacts on long-term immunity. We infected WT and PD-1KO mice with Pch-malaria and measured protection as well as immune responses against re-infections, 15 or 20 weeks after the original infection had cleared. WT mice showed approximately 1% parasitemia compared to sterile immunity in PD-1KO mice on re-infection. An examination of the mechanisms of immunity behind this long-term protection in PD-1KO mice showed a key role for parasite-specific CD8+ T cells even when CD4+ T cells and B cells responded to re-infection. These studies indicate that long-term CD8+ T cell-meditated protection requires consideration for future malaria vaccine design, as part of a multi-cell type response. PMID:27217330

  15. The combination therapy of α-galactosylceramide and 5-fluorouracil showed antitumor effect synergistically against liver tumor in mice.

    PubMed

    Aketa, Hiroshi; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Kohga, Keisuke; Tsunematsu, Hinako; Aono, Satoshi; Shimizu, Satoshi; Kodama, Takahiro; Nawa, Takatoshi; Shigekawa, Minoru; Hikita, Hayato; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Hosui, Atsushi; Miyagi, Takuya; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Norio; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2013-09-01

    α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) has been reported to be therapeutic against metastatic liver tumors in mice. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of combined chemo-immunotherapy using α-GalCer and anticancer drugs. In this study, we evaluated the antitumor effect of the combination therapy of α-GalCer and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) against liver tumors of MC38 colon cancer cells. The liver weights of tumor-bearing mice treated with the combination were significantly lower than those of nontreated mice and of mice treated with 5-FU or α-GalCer alone. No toxic effects on the liver and renal functions were observed in any of the treatment groups. α-GalCer treatment induced significant activation of liver NK cells in vivo, but 5-FU treatment did not. 5-FU treatment resulted in a significant upregulation of NKG2D activating molecules (Rae-1 and H60) and DNAM-1 ligands (CD112 and CD155) on MC38 cells, but α-GalCer did not. The cytolytic activity of α-GalCer-activated liver mononuclear cells against 5-FU-treated MC38 cells was significantly higher than that against nontreated cells. The increase of the cytolytic activity induced by 5-FU partially depended on NKG2D-Rae-1 or H60 signals. Depletion of NK cells significantly inhibited the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU against MC38 liver tumors, which suggested that the antitumor effect of 5-FU partially depended on the cytolytic activity of NK cells. These results demonstrated that the combination therapy of α-GalCer and 5-FU produced synergistic antitumor effects against liver tumors by increasing the expression of NK activating molecules on cancer cells. This study suggests a promising new chemo-immunotherapy against metastatic liver cancer. PMID:23420533

  16. LRRTM1-deficient mice show a rare phenotype of avoiding small enclosures—A tentative mouse model for claustrophobia-like behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Laakso, T.; Lauren, J.; Strittmatter, S.M.; Airaksinen, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    The LRRTM family proteins have been shown to act as synaptogenic cell adhesion molecules via interaction with presynaptic neurexins and are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. LRRTM1-knockout mice have subtle morphological deficits in excitatory hippocampal synapses and were suggested to have impaired cognitive function. Here we report that LRRTM1-knockout mice exhibit an extraordinary phenotype of avoiding small enclosures. In the light–dark box, the knockout mice escape to dark through a standard opening as quickly as wild-type littermates but avoid escaping through a small doorway. While all wild-type mice spontaneously enter a small tube, most knockout mice do not. This apparent aversion to enter narrow space may explain other abnormalities such as increased time in open arms in the elevated plus maze and less visits through a tunnel in the IntelliCage. Moreover, LRRTM1-knockout mice show increased social interaction, reduced nest building and MK801-induced locomotion, and slower swim speed but normal water maze learning. Since LRRTM1 is predominantly expressed in thalamus, hippocampus and limbic cortex, specific synaptic defects in those areas presumably cause these behavioural abnormalities. PMID:23089646

  17. γδ T-cell-deficient mice show alterations in mucin expression, glycosylation, and goblet cells but maintain an intact mucus layer.

    PubMed

    Kober, Olivia I; Ahl, David; Pin, Carmen; Holm, Lena; Carding, Simon R; Juge, Nathalie

    2014-04-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is maintained by a hierarchy of immune defenses acting in concert to minimize contact between luminal microorganisms and the intestinal epithelial cell surface. The intestinal mucus layer, covering the gastrointestinal tract epithelial cells, contributes to mucosal homeostasis by limiting bacterial invasion. In this study, we used γδ T-cell-deficient (TCRδ(-/-)) mice to examine whether and how γδ T-cells modulate the properties of the intestinal mucus layer. Increased susceptibility of TCRδ(-/-) mice to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis is associated with a reduced number of goblet cells. Alterations in the number of goblet cells and crypt lengths were observed in the small intestine and colon of TCRδ(-/-) mice compared with C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice. Addition of keratinocyte growth factor to small intestinal organoid cultures from TCRδ(-/-) mice showed a marked increase in crypt growth and in both goblet cell number and redistribution along the crypts. There was no apparent difference in the thickness or organization of the mucus layer between TCRδ(-/-) and WT mice, as measured in vivo. However, γδ T-cell deficiency led to reduced sialylated mucins in association with increased gene expression of gel-secreting Muc2 and membrane-bound mucins, including Muc13 and Muc17. Collectively, these data provide evidence that γδ T cells play an important role in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis by regulating mucin expression and promoting goblet cell function in the small intestine. PMID:24503767

  18. Enzyme-treated Asparagus officinalis extract shows neuroprotective effects and attenuates cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takuya; Ito, Tomohiro; Wakame, Koji; Kitadate, Kentaro; Arai, Takashi; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Kizaki, Takako; Sato, Shogo; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Akagawa, Kimio; Ishida, Hitoshi; Ohno, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Increases in the number of patients with dementia involving Alzheimer's disease (AD) are seen as a grave public health problem. In neurodegenerative disorders involving AD, biological stresses, such as oxidative and inflammatory stress, induce neural cell damage. Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a popular vegetable, and an extract prepared from this reportedly possesses various beneficial biological activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) on neuronal cells and early cognitive impairment of senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. The expression of mRNAs for factors that exert cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic functions, such as heat-shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1, was upregulated in NG108-15 neuronal cells by treatment with ETAS. Moreover, when release of lactate dehydrogenase from damaged NG108-15 cells was increased for cells cultured in medium containing either the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside or the hypoxia mimic reagent cobalt chloride, ETAS significantly attenuated this cell damage. Also, when contextual fear memory, which is considered to be a hippocampus-dependent memory, was significantly impaired in SAMP8 mice, ETAS attenuated the cognitive impairment. These results suggest that ETAS produces cytoprotective effects in neuronal cells and attenuates the effects on the cognitive impairment of SAMP8 mice. PMID:24660475

  19. Mice Over-Expressing the Myocardial Creatine Transporter Develop Progressive Heart Failure and Show Decreased Glycolytic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Darci; Hove, Michiel ten; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Wu, Colin O.; Sebag-Montefiore, Liam; Aponte, Angel M.; Lygate, Craig A.; Wallis, Julie; Clarke, Kieran; Watkins, Hugh; Balaban, Robert S.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic phenotype of the failing heart includes a decrease in phosphocreatine and total creatine concentration [Cr], potentially contributing to contractile dysfunction. Surprisingly, in 32 week old mice over-expressing the myocardial creatine transporter (CrT-OE), we previously demonstrated that elevated [Cr] correlates with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and failure. The aim of this study was to determine the temporal relationship between elevated [Cr] and the onset of cardiac dysfunction and to screen for potential molecular mechanisms. CrT-OE mice were compared with wild-type (WT) littermate controls longitudinally using cine-MRI to measure cardiac function and single-voxel 1H-MRS to measure [Cr] in vivo at 6, 16, 32, and 52 weeks of age. CrT-OE mice had elevated [Cr] at 6 weeks (mean 1.9-fold), which remained constant throughout life. Despite this increased [Cr], LV dysfunction was not apparent until 16 weeks and became more pronounced with age. Additionally, LV tissue from 12 to 14 week old CrT-OE mice was compared to WT using 2D difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE). These analyses detected a majority of the heart’s metabolic enzymes and identified 7 proteins that were differentially expressed between groups. The most pronounced protein changes were related to energy metabolism: α- and β-enolase were selectively decreased (p<0.05), while the remaining enzymes of glycolysis were unchanged. Consistent with a decrease in enolase content, its activity was significantly lower in CrT-OE hearts (in WT, 0.59±0.02 μmol ATP produced/μg protein/min; CrT-OE, 0.31±0.06; p<0.01). Additionally, anaerobic lactate production was decreased in CrT-OE mice (in WT, 102±3 μmol/g wet myocardium; CrT-OE, 78±13; p=0.02), consistent with decreased glycolytic capacity. Finally, we found that enolase may be regulated by increased expression of the β-enolase repressor transcription factor, which was significantly increased in CrT-OE hearts. This study

  20. Preventive effects of procyanidin A2 on glucose homeostasis, pancreatic and duodenal homebox 1, and glucose transporter 2 gene expression disturbance induced by bisphenol A in male mice.

    PubMed

    Ahangarpour, A; Afshari, G; Mard, S A; Khodadadi, A; Hashemitabar, M

    2016-04-01

    Procyanidins (PCs) as oligomeric compounds with antidiabetic properties formed from catechin and epicatechin molecules. Bisphenol A(BPA) is a common chemical material use in food and beverage packaging. The aim of this study was to explore the protective effects of procyanidin A2 (PCA2) against glucose homeostasis disturbance and gene expression of pancreatic and duodenal homebox 1 (Pdx1) as well as glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) induced by BPA in male mice. First tested these five concentrations of PCA2 (3 - 300 μM) alone and in combination with BPA(100 μg/L), on insulin secretion from isolated islets at in vitro condition. Next, examined the influence of BPA and PCA2 on islet apoptosis using flowcytometry. At in vivo condition, the BPA (100 μg/kg) and PCA2 (10 μmol/kg) administered for 20 days then, blood glucose and insulin, Pdx1 and, Glut2 genes expression, and oxidative stress markers examined. The results indicated that PCA2 strongly prevents islet cells apoptosis induced by BPA and, co-administration of PCA2 and BPA modified hyperglycemia. BPA reduced Pdx1 and Glut2 mRNA expression and antioxidant level in pancreas tissue, whereas PCA2 prevented from these effects. The findings from these studies suggest that use of PCA2 rich plants have preventive effects on hyperglycemia, and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27226184

  1. Mice Homozygous for a Deletion in the Glaucoma Susceptibility Locus INK4 Show Increased Vulnerability of Retinal Ganglion Cells to Elevated Intraocular Pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2016-04-01

    A genomic region located on chromosome 9p21 is associated with primary open-angle glaucoma and normal tension glaucoma in genome-wide association studies. The genomic region contains the gene for a long noncoding RNA called CDKN2B-AS, two genes that code for cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors 2A and 2B (CDKN2A/p16(INK4A) and CDKN2B/p15(INK4B)) and an additional protein (p14(ARF)). We used a transgenic mouse model in which 70 kb of murine chromosome 4, syntenic to human chromosome 9p21, are deleted to study whether this deletion leads to a discernible phenotype in ocular structures implicated in glaucoma. Homozygous mice of this strain were previously reported to show persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Fundus photography and optical coherence tomography confirmed that finding but showed no abnormalities for heterozygous mice. Optokinetic response, eletroretinogram, and histology indicated that the heterozygous and mutant retinas were normal functionally and morphologically, whereas glial cells were activated in the retina and optic nerve head of mutant eyes. In quantitative PCR, CDKN2B expression was reduced by approximately 50% in the heterozygous mice and by 90% in the homozygous mice, which suggested that the CDKN2B knock down had no deleterious consequences for the retina under normal conditions. However, compared with wild-type and heterozygous animals, the homozygous mice are more vulnerable to retinal ganglion cell loss in response to elevated intraocular pressure. PMID:26883755

  2. Cyclophilin D Knock-Out Mice Show Enhanced Resistance to Osteoporosis and to Metabolic Changes Observed in Aging Bone

    PubMed Central

    White, Noelle S; Nadtochiy, Sergiy M.; Bentley, Karen L. de Mesy; Brookes, Paul S; Jonason, Jennifer H.; Eliseev, Roman A.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic factors associated with aging, such as oxidative stress and hormone depletion converge on mitochondria and impair their function via opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). The MPTP is a large non-selective pore regulated by cyclophilin D (CypD) that disrupts mitochondrial membrane integrity. MPTP involvement has been firmly established in degenerative processes in heart, brain, and muscle. Bone has high energy demands and is therefore expected to be highly sensitive to mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite this, the role of mitochondria and the MPTP in bone maintenance and bone pathology has not been elucidated. Our goal was to determine whether mitochondria are impaired in aging bone and to see if protecting mitochondria from MPTP opening via CypD deletion protects against bone loss. We found that bone mass, strength, and formation progressively decline over the course of 18 months in C57BL/6J mice. Using metabolomics and electron microscopy, we determined that oxidative metabolism is impaired in aging bone leading to a glycolytic shift, imbalance in nucleotides, and decreased NAD+/NADH ratio. Mitochondria in osteocytes appear swollen which is a major marker of MPTP opening. CypD deletion by CypD knockout mouse model (CypD KO) protects against bone loss in 13- and 18-month-old mice and prevents decline in bone formation and mitochondrial changes observed in wild type C57BL/6J mice. Together, these data demonstrate that mitochondria are impaired in aging bone and that CypD deletion protects against this impairment to prevent bone loss. This implicates CypD-regulated MPTP and mitochondrial dysfunction in the impairment of bone cells and in aging-related bone loss. Our findings suggest mitochondrial metabolism as a new target for bone therapeutics and inhibition of CypD as a novel strategy against bone loss. PMID:27183225

  3. Maneb disturbs expression of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, increases reactive oxygen species production, and induces genotoxicity in liver of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Ben Saad, Hajer; Hamdaoui, Latifa; Karray, Aida; Boudawara, Tahia; Ben Ali, Yassine; Zeghal, Najiba

    2015-08-01

    Maneb (MB), a fungicide largely used in agriculture throughout the world including Tunisia, protects many vegetables, fruits and field crops against a wide spectrum of fungal diseases. However there is a lack of informations regarding the risks arising from MB exposure on non target organisms, especially mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological, biochemical and molecular aspects of liver injury after exposure of mice to MB. Four doses of MB corresponding to 1/8 (group D1), 1/6 (group D2), 1/4 (group D3), and 1/2 (group D4) of lethal dose (DL50 = 1500 mg/kg body weight) were administered to adult mice. Oxidative stress parameters were also objectified by molecular and histological endpoints in the liver. Maneb caused hepatotoxicity as characterized by the significant increase in the levels of malondialdehyde and protein oxidation marker, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP). The activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and the levels of glutathione decreased significantly in all treated mice, while vitamin C levels decreased only in group D4. We also noted a significant decrease in gene expression of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase enzymes. Maneb caused nucleic acids degradation testifying its genotoxicity. Yet, biochemical markers in plasma showed a decrease in total protein and an increase in aspartate, alanine amino transferases and bilirubin levels in all treatment groups. Moreover, plasma levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol significantly increased, while those of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased. These biochemical alterations were correlated with significantly histological changes. Our data showed, for the first time, that intraperitoneal injection of very high non environmentally relevant MB concentrations to adult mice resulted in oxidative stress leading to hepatotoxicity and the impairment of defense systems, confirming the

  4. Not all water mazes are created equal: cyclin D2 knockout mice with constitutively suppressed adult hippocampal neurogenesis do show specific spatial learning deficits

    PubMed Central

    Garthe, A; Huang, Z; Kaczmarek, L; Filipkowski, R K; Kempermann, G

    2014-01-01

    Studies using the Morris water maze to assess hippocampal function in animals, in which adult hippocampal neurogenesis had been suppressed, have yielded seemingly contradictory results. Cyclin D2 knockout (Ccnd2−/−) mice, for example, have constitutively suppressed adult hippocampal neurogenesis but had no overt phenotype in the water maze. In other paradigms, however, ablation of adult neurogenesis was associated with specific deficits in the water maze. Therefore, we hypothesized that the neurogenesis-related phenotype might also become detectable in Ccnd2−/− mice, if we used the exact setup and protocol that in our previous study had revealed deficits in mice with suppressed adult neurogenesis. Ccnd2−/− mice indeed learned the task and developed a normal preference for the goal quadrant, but were significantly less precise for the exact goal position and were slower in acquiring efficient and spatially more precise search strategies. Upon goal reversal (when the hidden platform was moved to a new position) Ccnd2−/− mice showed increased perseverance at the former platform location, implying that they were less flexible in updating the previously learned information. Both with respect to adult neurogenesis and behavioral performance, Ccnd2+/− mice ranged between wild types and knockouts. Importantly, hippocampus-dependent learning was not generally impaired by the mutation, but specifically functional aspects relying on precise and flexible encoding were affected. Whether ablation of adult neurogenesis causes a specific behavioral phenotype thus also depends on the actual task demands. The test parameters appear to be important variables influencing whether a task can pick up a contribution of adult neurogenesis to test performance. PMID:24602283

  5. Mice with mutations of Dock7 have generalized hypopigmentation and white-spotting but show normal neurological function.

    PubMed

    Blasius, Amanda L; Brandl, Katharina; Crozat, Karine; Xia, Yu; Khovananth, Kevin; Krebs, Philippe; Smart, Nora G; Zampolli, Antonella; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Beutler, Bruce A

    2009-02-24

    The classical recessive coat color mutation misty (m) arose spontaneously on the DBA/J background and causes generalized hypopigmentation and localized white-spotting in mice, with a lack of pigment on the belly, tail tip, and paws. Here we describe moonlight (mnlt), a second hypopigmentation and white-spotting mutation identified on the C57BL/6J background, which yields a phenotypic copy of m/m coat color traits. We demonstrate that the 2 mutations are allelic. m/m and mnlt/mnlt phenotypes both result from mutations that truncate the dedicator of cytokinesis 7 protein (DOCK7), a widely expressed Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Although Dock7 is transcribed at high levels in the developing brain and has been implicated in both axon development and myelination by in vitro studies, we find no requirement for DOCK7 in neurobehavioral function in vivo. However, DOCK7 has non-redundant role(s) related to the distribution and function of dermal and follicular melanocytes. PMID:19202056

  6. Mice with different susceptibility to tick-borne encephalitis virus infection show selective neutralizing antibody response and inflammatory reaction in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical course of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a disease caused by TBE virus, ranges from asymptomatic or mild influenza-like infection to severe debilitating encephalitis or encephalomyelitis. Despite the medical importance of this disease, some crucial steps in the development of encephalitis remain poorly understood. In particular, the basis of the disease severity is largely unknown. Methods TBE virus growth, neutralizing antibody response, key cytokine and chemokine mRNA production and changes in mRNA levels of cell surface markers of immunocompetent cells in brain were measured in mice with different susceptibilities to TBE virus infection. Results An animal model of TBE based on BALB/c-c-STS/A (CcS/Dem) recombinant congenic mouse strains showing different severities of the infection in relation to the host genetic background was developed. After subcutaneous inoculation of TBE virus, BALB/c mice showed medium susceptibility to the infection, STS mice were resistant, and CcS-11 mice were highly susceptible. The resistant STS mice showed lower and delayed viremia, lower virus production in the brain and low cytokine/chemokine mRNA production, but had a strong neutralizing antibody response. The most sensitive strain (CcS-11) failed in production of neutralizing antibodies, but exhibited strong cytokine/chemokine mRNA production in the brain. After intracerebral inoculation, all mouse strains were sensitive to the infection and had similar virus production in the brain, but STS mice survived significantly longer than CcS-11 mice. These two strains also differed in the expression of key cytokines/chemokines, particularly interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) in the brain. Conclusions Our data indicate that the genetic control is an important factor influencing the clinical course of TBE. High neutralizing antibody response might be crucial for preventing host fatality, but high

  7. Transgenic mice ectopically expressing HOXA5 in the dorsal spinal cord show structural defects of the cervical spinal cord along with sensory and motor defects of the forelimb.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Karin E; Abbott, Matthew A; Joksimovic, Milan; Lueth, Paul A; Sonea, Ioana M; Jeannotte, Lucie; Tuggle, Christopher K

    2004-06-21

    Mutation of murine Hoxa5 has shown that HOXA5 controls lung, gastrointestinal tract and vertebrae development. Hoxa5 is also expressed in the spinal cord, yet no central nervous system phenotype has been described in Hoxa5 knockouts. To identify the role of Hoxa5 in spinal cord development, we developed transgenic mice that express HOXA5 in the dorsal spinal cord in the brachial region. Using HOXA5-specific antibodies, we show this expression pattern is ectopic as the endogenous protein is expressed only in the ventral spinal cord at this anterio-posterior level. This transgenic line (Hoxa5SV2) also displays forelimb-specific motor and sensory defects. Hoxa5SV2 transgenic mice cannot support their body weight in a forelimb hang, and forelimb strength is decreased. However, Rotarod performance was not impaired in Hoxa5SV2 mice. Hoxa5SV2 mice also show a delayed forelimb response to noxious heat, although hindlimb response time was normal. Administration of an analgesic significantly reduced the hang test defect and decreased the transgene effect on forelimb strength, indicating that pain pathways may be affected. The morphology of transgenic cervical (but not lumbar) spinal cord is highly aberrant. Nissl staining indicates superficial laminae of the dorsal horn are severely disrupted. The distribution of cells and axons immunoreactive for substance P, neurokinin-B, and their primary receptors were aberrant only in transgenic cervical spinal cord. Further, we see increased levels of apoptosis in transgenic spinal cord at embryonic day 13.5. Our evidence suggests apoptosis due to HOXA5 misexpression is a major cause of loss of superficial lamina cells in Hoxa5SV2 mice. PMID:15158076

  8. Microtubule-associated protein tau (Mapt) is expressed in terminally differentiated odontoblasts and severely down-regulated in morphologically disturbed odontoblasts of Runx2 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshihiro; Baba, Tomomi T; Mori, Masako; Moriishi, Takeshi; Komori, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    Runx2 is an essential transcription factor for osteoblast and odontoblast differentiation and the terminal differentiation of chondrocytes. We have previously shown that the terminal differentiation of odontoblasts is inhibited in Runx2 transgenic {Tg(Col1a1-Runx2)} mice under the control of the 2.3-kb Col1a1 promoter, which directs the transgene expression to osteoblasts and odontoblasts. Odontoblasts show severe reductions in Dspp and nestin expression and lose their characteristic polarized morphology, including a long process extending to dentin, in Tg(Col1a1-Runx2) mice. We study the molecular mechanism of odontoblast morphogenesis by comparing gene expression in the molars of wild-type and Tg(Col1a1-Runx2) mice, focusing on cytoskeleton-related genes. Using microarray, we found that the gene expression of microtubule-associated protein tau (Mapt), a neuronal phosphoprotein with important roles in neuronal biology and microtubule dynamics and assembly, was high in wild-type molars but severely reduced in Tg(Col1a1-Runx2) molars. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Mapt was specifically expressed in terminally differentiated odontoblasts including their processes in wild-type molars but its expression was barely detectable in Tg(Col1a1-Runx2) molars. Double-staining of Mapt and Runx2 showed their reciprocal expression in odontoblasts. Mapt and tubulin co-localized in odontoblasts in wild-type molars. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis demonstrated Mapt lying around α-tubulin-positive filamentous structures in odontoblast processes. Thus, Mapt is a useful marker for terminally differentiated odontoblasts and might play an important role in odontoblast morphogenesis. PMID:25707508

  9. Cerebellar Nuclei Neurons Show Only Small Excitatory Responses to Optogenetic Olivary Stimulation in Transgenic Mice: In Vivo and In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huo; Yang, Bo; Jaeger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    To study the olivary input to the cerebellar nuclei (CN) we used optogenetic stimulation in transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in olivary neurons. We obtained in vivo extracellular Purkinje cell (PC) and CN recordings in anesthetized mice while stimulating the contralateral inferior olive (IO) with a blue laser (single pulse, 10–50 ms duration). Peri-stimulus histograms (PSTHs) were constructed to show the spike rate changes after optical stimulation. Among 29 CN neurons recorded, 15 showed a decrease in spike rate of variable strength and duration, and only 1 showed a transient spiking response. These results suggest that direct olivary input to CN neurons is usually overridden by stronger PC inhibition triggered by climbing fiber responses. To further investigate the direct input from the climbing fiber collaterals we also conducted whole cell recordings in brain slices, where we used local stimulation with blue light. Due to the expression of ChR2 in PC axons as well as the IO in our transgenic line, strong inhibitory responses could be readily triggered with optical stimulation (13 of 15 neurons). After blocking this inhibition with GABAzine, only in 5 of 13 CN neurons weak excitatory responses were revealed. Therefore our in vitro results support the in vivo findings that the excitatory input to CN neurons from climbing fiber collaterals in adult mice is masked by the inhibition under normal conditions. PMID:27047344

  10. Exposure of Neonatal Mice to Tobacco Smoke Disturbs Synaptic Proteins and Spatial Learning and Memory from Late Infancy to Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Torres, Larissa Helena; Garcia, Raphael C T; Blois, Anne M M; Dati, Lívia M M; Durão, Ana Carolina; Alves, Adilson Silva; Pacheco-Neto, Maurílio; Mauad, Thais; Britto, Luiz R G; Xavier, Gilberto Fernando; Camarini, Rosana; Marcourakis, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the early postnatal period has been associated with several diseases; however, little is known about the brain effects of ETS exposure during this critical developmental period or the long-term consequences of this exposure. This study investigated the effects of the early postnatal ETS exposure on both reference and working memory, synaptic proteins and BDNF from late infancy to early adulthood (P3-P73). BALB/c mice were exposed to ETS generated from 3R4F reference research cigarettes (0.73 mg of nicotine/cigarette) from P3 to P14. Spatial reference and working memory were evaluated in the Morris water maze during infancy (P20-P29), adolescence (P37-P42) and adulthood (P67-P72). Synapsin, synaptophysin, PSD95 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were assessed at P15, P35 and P65 by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Mice that were exposed to ETS during the early postnatal period showed poorer performance in the spatial reference memory task. Specifically, the ETS-exposed mice exhibited a significantly reduced time and distance traveled in the target quadrant and in the platform location area than the controls at all ages evaluated. In the spatial working memory task, ETS disrupted the maintenance but not the acquisition of the critical spatial information in both infancy and adolescence. ETS also induced changes in synaptic components, including decreases in synapsin, synaptophysin, PSD95 and BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Exposure to ETS in the early postnatal period disrupts both spatial reference and working memory; these results may be related to changes in synaptogenesis in the hippocampus. Importantly, most of these effects were not reversed even after a long exposure-free period. PMID:26305213

  11. Exposure of Neonatal Mice to Tobacco Smoke Disturbs Synaptic Proteins and Spatial Learning and Memory from Late Infancy to Early Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Larissa Helena; Garcia, Raphael C. T.; Blois, Anne M. M.; Dati, Lívia M. M.; Durão, Ana Carolina; Alves, Adilson Silva; Pacheco-Neto, Maurílio; Mauad, Thais; Britto, Luiz R. G.; Xavier, Gilberto Fernando; Camarini, Rosana; Marcourakis, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the early postnatal period has been associated with several diseases; however, little is known about the brain effects of ETS exposure during this critical developmental period or the long-term consequences of this exposure. This study investigated the effects of the early postnatal ETS exposure on both reference and working memory, synaptic proteins and BDNF from late infancy to early adulthood (P3-P73). BALB/c mice were exposed to ETS generated from 3R4F reference research cigarettes (0.73 mg of nicotine/cigarette) from P3 to P14. Spatial reference and working memory were evaluated in the Morris water maze during infancy (P20-P29), adolescence (P37-P42) and adulthood (P67-P72). Synapsin, synaptophysin, PSD95 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were assessed at P15, P35 and P65 by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Mice that were exposed to ETS during the early postnatal period showed poorer performance in the spatial reference memory task. Specifically, the ETS-exposed mice exhibited a significantly reduced time and distance traveled in the target quadrant and in the platform location area than the controls at all ages evaluated. In the spatial working memory task, ETS disrupted the maintenance but not the acquisition of the critical spatial information in both infancy and adolescence. ETS also induced changes in synaptic components, including decreases in synapsin, synaptophysin, PSD95 and BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Exposure to ETS in the early postnatal period disrupts both spatial reference and working memory; these results may be related to changes in synaptogenesis in the hippocampus. Importantly, most of these effects were not reversed even after a long exposure-free period. PMID:26305213

  12. Adolescent mice show anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior and the reduction of long-term potentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 synapses after neonatal maternal separation.

    PubMed

    Shin, S Y; Han, S H; Woo, R-S; Jang, S H; Min, S S

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to maternal separation (MS) during early life is an identified risk factor for emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression later in life. This study investigated the effects of neonatal MS on the behavior and long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as basic synaptic transmission at hippocampal CA3-CA1 and mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses in adolescent mice for 19days. When mice were adolescents, we measured depression, learning, memory, anxious and aggressive behavior using the forced swimming test (FST), Y-maze, Morris water maze (MWM), elevated plus maze (EPM), three consecutive days of the open field test, the social interaction test, the tube-dominance test and the resident-intruder test. The results showed that there was no difference in FST, Y-maze, and MWM performance. However, MS mice showed more anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test and aggressive-like behavior in the tube-dominance and resident-intruder tests. In addition, the magnitude of LTP and release probability in the MF-CA3 synapses was reduced in the MS group but not in the CA3-CA1 synapse. Our results indicate that early life stress due to MS may induce anxiety- and aggressive-like behavior during adolescence, and these effects are associated with synaptic plasticity at the hippocampal MF-CA3 synapses. PMID:26733385

  13. Viable RNaseH1 knockout mice show RNaseH1 is essential for R loop processing, mitochondrial and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Walt F.; Murray, Heather M.; Damle, Sagar S.; Hart, Christopher E.; Hung, Gene; De Hoyos, Cheryl Li; Liang, Xue-Hai; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Viable constitutive and tamoxifen inducible liver-specific RNase H1 knockout mice that expressed no RNase H1 activity in hepatocytes showed increased R-loop levels and reduced mitochondrial encoded DNA and mRNA levels, suggesting impaired mitochondrial R-loop processing, transcription and mitochondrial DNA replication. These changes resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction with marked changes in mitochondrial fusion, fission, morphology and transcriptional changes reflective of mitochondrial damage and stress. Liver degeneration ensued, as indicated by apoptosis, fibrosis and increased transaminase levels. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to serve as substrates for RNase H1 were inactive in the hepatocytes from the RNase H1 knockout mice and in vivo, demonstrating that RNase H1 is necessary for the activity of DNA-like ASOs. During liver regeneration, a clone of hepatocytes that expressed RNase H1 developed and partially restored mitochondrial and liver function. PMID:27131367

  14. Viable RNaseH1 knockout mice show RNaseH1 is essential for R loop processing, mitochondrial and liver function.

    PubMed

    Lima, Walt F; Murray, Heather M; Damle, Sagar S; Hart, Christopher E; Hung, Gene; De Hoyos, Cheryl Li; Liang, Xue-Hai; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-06-20

    Viable constitutive and tamoxifen inducible liver-specific RNase H1 knockout mice that expressed no RNase H1 activity in hepatocytes showed increased R-loop levels and reduced mitochondrial encoded DNA and mRNA levels, suggesting impaired mitochondrial R-loop processing, transcription and mitochondrial DNA replication. These changes resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction with marked changes in mitochondrial fusion, fission, morphology and transcriptional changes reflective of mitochondrial damage and stress. Liver degeneration ensued, as indicated by apoptosis, fibrosis and increased transaminase levels. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to serve as substrates for RNase H1 were inactive in the hepatocytes from the RNase H1 knockout mice and in vivo, demonstrating that RNase H1 is necessary for the activity of DNA-like ASOs. During liver regeneration, a clone of hepatocytes that expressed RNase H1 developed and partially restored mitochondrial and liver function. PMID:27131367

  15. Ttll9-/- mice sperm flagella show shortening of doublet 7, reduction of doublet 5 polyglutamylation and a stall in beating.

    PubMed

    Konno, Alu; Ikegami, Koji; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Yang, Hyun-Jeong; Abe, Manabu; Yamazaki, Maya; Sakimura, Kenji; Yao, Ikuko; Shiba, Kogiku; Inaba, Kazuo; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2016-07-15

    Nine outer doublet microtubules in axonemes of flagella and cilia are heterogeneous in structure and biochemical properties. In mammalian sperm flagella, one of the factors to generate the heterogeneity is tubulin polyglutamylation, although the importance of the heterogeneous modification is unclear. Here, we show that a tubulin polyglutamylase Ttll9 deficiency (Ttll9(-/-)) causes a unique set of phenotypes related to doublet heterogeneity. Ttll9(-/-) sperm axonemes had frequent loss of a doublet and reduced polyglutamylation. Intriguingly, the doublet loss selectively occurred at the distal region of doublet 7, and reduced polyglutamylation was observed preferentially on doublet 5. Ttll9(-/-) spermatozoa showed aberrant flagellar beating, characterized by frequent stalls after anti-hook bending. This abnormal motility could be attributed to the reduction of polyglutamylation on doublet 5, which probably occurred at a position involved in the switching of bending. These results indicate that mammalian Ttll9 plays essential roles in maintaining the normal structure and beating pattern of sperm flagella by establishing normal heterogeneous polyglutamylation patterns. PMID:27257088

  16. Disturbance of the glutamatergic system by glutaric acid in striatum and cerebral cortex of glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient knockout mice: possible implications for the neuropathology of glutaric acidemia type I.

    PubMed

    Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Fernandes, Carolina Gonçalves; Martell, Rafael Volter; Lobato, Vannessa Gonçalves Araujo; Goodman, Stephen; Woontner, Michael; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; Wajner, Moacir

    2014-11-15

    The role of excitotoxicity on the neuropathology of glutaric acidemia type I (GA I) is still under debate. Therefore, in the present work, we evaluated glutamate uptake by brain slices and glutamate binding to synaptic membranes, as well as glutamine synthetase activity in cerebral cortex and striatum from glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (Gcdh(-/-)) mice along development (7, 15, 30 and 60 days of life) in the hopes of clarifying this matter. We also tested the influence of glutaric acid (GA) added exogenously on these parameters. [(3)H]Glutamate uptake was not significantly altered in cerebral cortex and striatum from Gcdh(-/-) mice, as compared to WT mice. However, GA provoked a significant decrease of [(3)H]glutamate uptake in striatum from both WT and Gcdh(-/-) mice older than 7 days. This inhibitory effect was more pronounced in Gcdh(-/-), as compared to WT mice. The use of a competitive inhibitor of glutamate astrocytic transporters indicated that the decrease of [(3)H]glutamate uptake caused by GA was due to the competition between this organic acid and glutamate for the same astrocytic transporter site. We also found that Na(+)-dependent [(3)H]glutamate binding (binding to transporters) was increased in the striatum from Gcdh(-/-) mice and that GA significantly diminished this binding both in striatum and cerebral cortex from Gcdh(-/-), but not from WT mice. Finally, we observed that glutamine synthetase activity was not changed in brain cortex and striatum from Gcdh(-/-) and WT mice and that GA was not able to alter this activity. It is therefore presumed that a disturbance of the glutamatergic neurotransmission system caused by GA may potentially be involved in the neuropathology of GA I, particularly in the striatum. PMID:25241940

  17. YAC128 Huntington's disease transgenic mice show enhanced short-term hippocampal synaptic plasticity early in the course of the disease.

    PubMed

    Ghilan, Mohamed; Bostrom, Crystal A; Hryciw, Brett N; Simpson, Jessica M; Christie, Brian R; Gil-Mohapel, Joana

    2014-09-18

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the gene encoding the protein huntingtin. The disease progresses over decades, but often patients develop cognitive impairments that precede the onset of the classical motor symptoms. Similar to the disease progression in humans, the yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) 128 HD mouse model also exhibits cognitive dysfunction that precedes the onset of the neuropathological and motor impairments characteristic of HD. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether short- and long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, two related biological models of learning and memory processes, were altered in YAC128 mice in early stages of disease progression. We show that the YAC128 hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) displays marked reductions in paired-pulse depression both at 3 and 6 months of age. In addition, significantly enhanced post-tetanic and short-term potentiation are apparent in YAC128 mice after high-frequency stimulation at this time. Early and late forms of long-term plasticity were not altered at this stage. Together these findings indicate that there may be elevated neurotransmitter release in response to synaptic stimulation in YAC128 mice during the initial phase of disease progression. These abnormalities in short-term plasticity detected at this stage in YAC128 HD transgenic mice indicate that aberrant information processing at the level of the synapses may contribute, at least in part, to the early onset of cognitive deficits that are characteristic of this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:24949563

  18. 55P0110, a Novel Synthetic Compound Developed from a Plant Derived Backbone Structure, Shows Promising Anti-Hyperglycaemic Activity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Brunmair, Barbara; Lehner, Zsuzsanna; Stadlbauer, Karin; Adorjan, Immanuel; Frobel, Klaus; Scherer, Thomas; Luger, Anton; Bauer, Leonhardt; Fürnsinn, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Starting off with a structure derived from the natural compound multiflorine, a derivatisation program aimed at the discovery and initial characterisation of novel compounds with antidiabetic potential. Design and discovery of the structures was guided by oral bioactivities obtained in oral glucose tolerance tests in mice. 55P0110, one among several new compounds with distinct anti-hyperglycaemic activity, was further examined to characterise its pharmacology and mode of action. Whereas a single oral dose of 55P0110 did not affect basal glycaemia, it markedly improved the glucose tolerance of healthy and diabetic mice (peak blood glucose in glucose tolerance test, mmol/l: healthy mice with 90 mg/kg 55P0110, 17.0 ± 1.2 vs. 10.1 ± 1.1; diabetic mice with 180 mg/kg 55P0110, 23.1 ± 0.9 vs. 11.1 ± 1.4; p<0.001 each). Closer examination argued against retarded glucose resorption from the gut, increased glucose excretion in urine, acute insulin-like or insulin sensitising properties, and direct inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 as the cause of glucose lowering. Hence, 55P0110 seems to act via a target not exploited by any drug presently approved for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Whereas the insulinotropic sulfonylurea gliclazide (16 mg/kg) distinctly increased the circulating insulin-per-glucose ratio under basal conditions, 55P0110 (90 mg/kg) lacked such an effect (30 min. after dosing, nmol/mol: vehicle, 2.49 ± 0.27; 55P0110, 2.99 ± 0.35; gliclazide, 8.97 ± 0.49; p<0.001 each vs. gliclazide). Under an exogenous glucose challenge, however, 55P0110 increased this ratio to the same extent as gliclazide (20 min. after glucose feeding: vehicle, 2.53 ± 0.41; 55P0110, 3.80 ± 0.46; gliclazide, 3.99 ± 0.26; p<0.05 each vs. vehicle). By augmenting the glucose stimulated increase in plasma insulin, 55P0110 thus shows distinct anti-hyperglycaemic action in combination with low risk for fasting hypoglycaemia in mice. In summary, we have discovered a novel class of

  19. 55P0110, a Novel Synthetic Compound Developed from a Plant Derived Backbone Structure, Shows Promising Anti-Hyperglycaemic Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brunmair, Barbara; Lehner, Zsuzsanna; Stadlbauer, Karin; Adorjan, Immanuel; Frobel, Klaus; Scherer, Thomas; Luger, Anton; Bauer, Leonhardt; Fürnsinn, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Starting off with a structure derived from the natural compound multiflorine, a derivatisation program aimed at the discovery and initial characterisation of novel compounds with antidiabetic potential. Design and discovery of the structures was guided by oral bioactivities obtained in oral glucose tolerance tests in mice. 55P0110, one among several new compounds with distinct anti-hyperglycaemic activity, was further examined to characterise its pharmacology and mode of action. Whereas a single oral dose of 55P0110 did not affect basal glycaemia, it markedly improved the glucose tolerance of healthy and diabetic mice (peak blood glucose in glucose tolerance test, mmol/l: healthy mice with 90 mg/kg 55P0110, 17.0±1.2 vs. 10.1±1.1; diabetic mice with 180 mg/kg 55P0110, 23.1±0.9 vs. 11.1±1.4; p<0.001 each). Closer examination argued against retarded glucose resorption from the gut, increased glucose excretion in urine, acute insulin-like or insulin sensitising properties, and direct inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 as the cause of glucose lowering. Hence, 55P0110 seems to act via a target not exploited by any drug presently approved for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Whereas the insulinotropic sulfonylurea gliclazide (16 mg/kg) distinctly increased the circulating insulin-per-glucose ratio under basal conditions, 55P0110 (90 mg/kg) lacked such an effect (30 min. after dosing, nmol/mol: vehicle, 2.49±0.27; 55P0110, 2.99±0.35; gliclazide, 8.97±0.49; p<0.001 each vs. gliclazide). Under an exogenous glucose challenge, however, 55P0110 increased this ratio to the same extent as gliclazide (20 min. after glucose feeding: vehicle, 2.53±0.41; 55P0110, 3.80±0.46; gliclazide, 3.99±0.26; p<0.05 each vs. vehicle). By augmenting the glucose stimulated increase in plasma insulin, 55P0110 thus shows distinct anti-hyperglycaemic action in combination with low risk for fasting hypoglycaemia in mice. In summary, we have discovered a novel class of fully synthetic

  20. 7-NI and ODQ Disturbs Memory in the Elevated Plus Maze, Morris Water Maze, and Radial Arm Maze Tests in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Oguz; Akar, Furuzan; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Tanyeri, Pelin; Ulak, Guner; Erden, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an atypical neurotransmitter that causes changes in cognition. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitors have been shown to exert some effects on cognition in previous studies; however, the findings have been controversial. This study was aimed at understanding the effects of an NOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), and a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), on spatial memory in modified elevated plus maze (mEPM), Morris water maze (MWM), and radial arm maze (RAM) tests. Male Balb-c mice were treated via intraperitoneal injections with 7-NI (15 mg/kg), ODQ (3, 10 mg/kg), L-arginine (100 mg/kg) + 7-NI (15 mg/kg), or physiological saline. ODQ (3 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) significantly increased the second-day latency in the mEPM test. 7-NI (15 mg/kg) and ODQ (10 mg/kg) significantly increased the escape latency in second, third, and fourth sessions, decreased the time spent in the escape platform’s quadrant, and increased the mean distance to the platform in the probe trial of the MWM test. ODQ (3, 10 mg/kg) and 7-NI (15 mg/kg) significantly increased the number of errors, whereas only 7-NI increased the latency in the RAM test. The administration of L-arginine (100 mg/kg) prior to 7-NI inverted the effects of 7-NI, which supports the role of NO on cognition. Our study shows that the NO/cGMP/GS pathway can regulate spatial memory in mice. PMID:25788830

  1. Islets of Langerhans from prohormone convertase-2 knockout mice show α-cell hyperplasia and tumorigenesis with elevated α-cell neogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Huw B; Reens, Jaimini; Brocklehurst, Simon R; Betts, Catherine J; Bickerton, Sue; Bigley, Alison L; Jenkins, Richard P; Whalley, Nicky M; Morgan, Derrick; Smith, David M

    2014-01-01

    Antagonism of the effects of glucagon as an adjunct therapy with other glucose-lowering drugs in the chronic treatment of diabetes has been suggested to aggressively control blood glucose levels. Antagonism of glucagon effects, by targeting glucagon secretion or disabling the glucagon receptor, is associated with α-cell hyperplasia. We evaluated the influence of total glucagon withdrawal on islets of Langerhans using prohormone convertase-2 knockout mice (PC2-ko), in which α-cell hyperplasia is present from a young age and persists throughout life, in order to understand whether or not sustained glucagon deficit would lead to islet tumorigenesis. PC2-ko and wild-type (WT) mice were maintained drug-free, and cohorts of these groups sampled at 3, 12 and 18 months for plasma biochemical and morphological (histological, immunohistochemical, electron microscopical and image analytical) assessments. WT mice showed no islet tumours up to termination of the study, but PC2-ko animals displayed marked changes in islet morphology from α-cell hypertrophy/hyperplasia/atypical hyperplasia, to adenomas and carcinomas, these latter being first encountered at 6–8 months. Islet hyperplasias and tumours primarily consisted of α-cells associated to varying degrees with other islet endocrine cell types. In addition to substantial increases in islet neoplasia, increased α-cell neogenesis associated primarily with pancreatic duct(ule)s was present. We conclude that absolute blockade of the glucagon signal results in tumorigenesis and that the PC2-ko mouse represents a valuable model for investigation of islet tumours and pancreatic ductal neogenesis. PMID:24456331

  2. Targeting the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc: Col1a2-Cre(ER)T mice show specific activity of Cre recombinase in the outer annulus fibrosus.

    PubMed

    Bedore, Jake; Quesnel, Katherine; Quinonez, Diana; Séguin, Cheryle A; Leask, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is a major underlying contributor to back pain-the single leading cause of disability worldwide. However, we possess a limited understanding of the etiology underlying IVD degeneration. To date, there are a limited number of mouse models that have been used to target proteins in specific compartments of the IVD to explore their functions in disc development, homeostasis and disease. Furthermore, the majority of reports exploring the composition and function of the outer encapsulating annulus fibrosus (AF) of the IVD have considered it as one tissue, without considering the numerous structural and functional differences existing between the inner and outer AF. In addition, no mouse models have yet been reported that enable specific targeting of genes within the outer AF. In the current report, we discuss these issues and demonstrate the localized activity of Cre recombinase in the IVD of Col1a2-Cre(ER)T;ROSA26mTmG mice possessing a tamoxifen-dependent Cre recombinase driven by a Cola2 promoter and distal enhancer and the mTmG fluorescent reporter. Following tamoxifen injection of 3-week-old Col1a2-Cre(ER)T;ROSA26mTmG mice, we show Cre activity specifically in the outer AF of the IVD, as indicated by expression of the GFP reporter. Thus, Col1a2-Cre(ER)T;ROSA26mTmG mice may prove to be a valuable tool in delineating the function of proteins in this unique compartment of the IVD, and in further exploring the compositional differences between the inner and outer AF in disc homeostasis, aging and disease. PMID:27173473

  3. T-type calcium channel Cav3.2 deficient mice show elevated anxiety, impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Laffray, Sophie; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The fine-tuning of neuronal excitability relies on a tight control of Ca(2+) homeostasis. The low voltage-activated (LVA) T-type calcium channels (Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 isoforms) play a critical role in regulating these processes. Despite their wide expression throughout the central nervous system, the implication of T-type Cav3.2 isoform in brain functions is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigate the effect of genetic ablation of this isoform in affective disorders, including anxiety, cognitive functions as well as sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Using a wide range of behavioral assays we show that genetic ablation of the cacna1h gene results in an anxiety-like phenotype, whereas novelty-induced locomotor activity is unaffected. Deletion of the T-type channel Cav3.2 also triggers impairment of hippocampus-dependent recognition memories. Acute and sensitized hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and cocaine are dramatically reduced in T-type Cav3.2 deficient mice. In addition, the administration of the T-type blocker TTA-A2 prevented the expression of locomotor sensitization observed in wildtype mice. In conclusion, our data reveal that physiological activity of this specific Ca(2+) channel is required for affective and cognitive behaviors. Moreover, our work highlights the interest of T-type channel blockers as therapeutic strategies to reverse drug-associated alterations. PMID:24672455

  4. Artificial sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone showed antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis effects against paraquat-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2015-12-01

    The present study evaluated the protective effect of artificial sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) against paraquat (PQ)-induced acute liver injury in mice. A single dose of PQ (75mg/kg body weight, i.p.) induced acute liver toxicity with the evidences of increased liver damage biomarkers, aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) activities in serum. Consistently, PQ decreased the antioxidant capacity by reducing glutathione peroxidase (GP-X), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities, glutathione (GSH) level and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), as well as increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels. Histopathological examination revealed that PQ induced numerous changes in the liver tissues. Immunochemical staining assay indicated the upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expressions. However, NHDC ameliorates PQ-induced hepatic toxicity in mice by reversing these parameters. Additionally, NHDC significantly inhibited PQ-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) expression and mitochondrial-driven apoptotic signaling. TUNEL assay confirmed that PQ-induced apoptosis was relieved by NHDC. In conclusion, these findings suggested that NHDC showed potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects against PQ-induced acute liver damage. PMID:26362205

  5. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Male Ox1r−/− Mice Showed Implication of Orexin Receptor-1 in Mood, Anxiety, and Social Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Md. G.; Shoji, Hirotaka; Soya, Shingo; Hondo, Mari; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B, which are exclusively produced by neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, play an important role in the regulation of a wide range of behaviors and homeostatic processes, including regulation of sleep/wakefulness states and energy homeostasis. The orexin system has close anatomical and functional relationships with systems that regulate the autonomic nervous system, emotion, mood, the reward system, and sleep/wakefulness states. Recent pharmacological studies using selective antagonists have suggested that orexin receptor-1 (OX1R) is involved in physiological processes that regulate emotion, the reward system, and autonomic nervous system. Here, we examined Ox1r−/− mice with a comprehensive behavioral test battery to screen additional OX1R functions. Ox1r−/− mice showed increased anxiety-like behavior, altered depression-like behavior, slightly decreased spontaneous locomotor activity, reduced social interaction, increased startle response, and decreased prepulse inhibition. These results suggest that OX1R plays roles in social behavior and sensory motor gating in addition to roles in mood and anxiety. PMID:26696848

  6. T-type calcium channel Cav3.2 deficient mice show elevated anxiety, impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Laffray, Sophie; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The fine-tuning of neuronal excitability relies on a tight control of Ca2+ homeostasis. The low voltage-activated (LVA) T-type calcium channels (Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 isoforms) play a critical role in regulating these processes. Despite their wide expression throughout the central nervous system, the implication of T-type Cav3.2 isoform in brain functions is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigate the effect of genetic ablation of this isoform in affective disorders, including anxiety, cognitive functions as well as sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Using a wide range of behavioral assays we show that genetic ablation of the cacna1h gene results in an anxiety-like phenotype, whereas novelty-induced locomotor activity is unaffected. Deletion of the T-type channel Cav3.2 also triggers impairment of hippocampus-dependent recognition memories. Acute and sensitized hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and cocaine are dramatically reduced in T-type Cav3.2 deficient mice. In addition, the administration of the T-type blocker TTA-A2 prevented the expression of locomotor sensitization observed in wildtype mice. In conclusion, our data reveal that physiological activity of this specific Ca2+ channel is required for affective and cognitive behaviors. Moreover, our work highlights the interest of T-type channel blockers as therapeutic strategies to reverse drug-associated alterations. PMID:24672455

  7. Caveolin-3 null mice show a loss of caveolae, changes in the microdomain distribution of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, and t-tubule abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, F; Engelman, J A; Volonte, D; Zhang, X L; Minetti, C; Li, M; Hou, H; Kneitz, B; Edelmann, W; Lisanti, M P

    2001-06-15

    Caveolin-3, a muscle-specific caveolin-related protein, is the principal structural protein of caveolae membrane domains in striated muscle cells. Recently, we identified a novel autosomal dominant form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD-1C) in humans that is due to mutations within the coding sequence of the human caveolin-3 gene (3p25). These LGMD-1C mutations lead to an approximately 95% reduction in caveolin-3 protein expression, i.e. a caveolin-3 deficiency. Here, we created a caveolin-3 null (CAV3 -/-) mouse model, using standard homologous recombination techniques, to mimic a caveolin-3 deficiency. We show that these mice lack caveolin-3 protein expression and sarcolemmal caveolae membranes. In addition, analysis of skeletal muscle tissue from these caveolin-3 null mice reveals: (i) mild myopathic changes; (ii) an exclusion of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex from lipid raft domains; and (iii) abnormalities in the organization of the T-tubule system, with dilated and longitudinally oriented T-tubules. These results have clear mechanistic implications for understanding the pathogenesis of LGMD-1C at a molecular level. PMID:11259414

  8. Study of antidepressant drugs in GPR39 (zinc receptor⁻/⁻) knockout mice, showing no effect of conventional antidepressants, but effectiveness of NMDA antagonists.

    PubMed

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Gaweł, Magdalena; Nowak, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The monoamine-based antidepressants that are currently used generate many side effects, and more than 30% of depressed patients do not respond to this therapy. Glutamate-based antidepressants seem to play an important role in therapy for depression, but there is still an extensive search for safe drugs. An antagonist of the glutamatergic NMDA receptor - namely, zinc - plays a part in maintaining homeostasis between glutamate and GABA via the GPR39 receptor, which has been found to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. In this study we investigated the behavioral response resulting from chronic or acute treatment with monoamine-based antidepressants, such as imipramine, escitalopram or reboxetine, and from glutamate-based MK-801 or ketamine, as measured by the forced swim test (FST) in GPR39 knockout (GPR39 KO, -/-) mice versus wild-type (WT, +/+) controls. All the tested agents reduced the immobility time in the FST in the wild-type animals. However, only chronic or acute administration of MK-801 and ketamine (but not monoamine-based antidepressants) were active in the FST in GPR39 KO mice. Our results show for the first time that GPR39 is required for the antidepressant effect of monoamine-based antidepressants. PMID:25827929

  9. The environmental chemical tributyltin chloride (TBT) shows both estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice which might depend on the exposure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Penza, M.; Jeremic, M.; Marrazzo, E.; Maggi, A.; Ciana, P.; Rando, G.; Grigolato, P.G.; Di Lorenzo, D.

    2011-08-15

    Exposure during early development to chemicals with hormonal action may be associated with weight gain during adulthood because of altered body homeostasis. It is known that organotins affect adipose mass when exposure occurs during fetal development, although no knowledge of effects are available for exposures after birth. Here we show that the environmental organotin tributyltin chloride (TBT) exerts adipogenic action when peripubertal and sexually mature mice are exposed to the chemical. The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and on the dose of the compound, and the effects are relevant at doses close to the estimated human intake (0.5 {mu}g/kg). At higher doses (50-500 {mu}g/kg), TBT also activated estrogen receptors (ERs) in adipose cells in vitro and in vivo, based on results from acute and longitudinal studies in ERE/luciferase reporter mice. In 3T3-L1 cells (which have no ERs), transiently transfected with the ERE-dependent reporter plus or minus ER{alpha} or ER{beta}, TBT (in a dose range of 1-100 nM) directly targets each ER subtype in a receptor-specific manner through a direct mechanism mediated by ER{alpha} in undifferentiated preadipocytic cells and by ER{beta} in differentiating adipocytes. The ER antagonist ICI-182,780 inhibits this effect. In summary, the results of this work suggest that TBT is adipogenic at all ages and in both sexes and that it might be an ER activator in fat cells. These findings might help to resolve the apparent paradox of an adipogenic chemical being also an estrogen receptor activator by showing that the two apparently opposite actions are separated by the different doses to which the organism is exposed. - Research Highlights: > The environmental organotin tributyltin chloride shows dose-dependent estrogenic and adipogenic activities in mice. > The duration and extent of these effects depend on the sex and the dose of the compound. > The estrogenic and adipogenic effects of TBT occur at doses closed to

  10. Disturbance of rapid eye movement sleep in senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 mice is improved by retinoic acid receptor agonist Am80 (Tamibarotene).

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, K; Sano, A; Chikahisa, S; Yoshizaki, K; Séi, H

    2010-05-19

    Senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 (SAMP8) mice are known to exhibit age-related deterioration in sleep-wake architecture compared with senescence-accelerated mouse resistant/1 (SAMR1) mice. We investigated whether treatment with Am80 (Tamibarotene), a retinoic acid receptor agonist, would improve sleep in 9-10-month-old SAMP8 mice. One week of Am80 administration improved the decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep shown by SAMP8 mice. Real-time RT-PCR analysis demonstrated an impairment in the hippocampal retinoid cascade (retinoic acid receptor alpha and transthyretin) in SAMP8 in comparison to SAMR1 mice. Am80 treatment induced an increase in mRNA expression in the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the brainstem and transthyretin in the hippocampus. Furthermore, decreased cortical acetylcholine content in SAMP8 was improved by Am80 administration. Decreased non-REM sleep and delta oscillation were also observed in SAMP8 mice; however, this was not improved by Am80 administration. These results partially support the hypothesis that the effects of aging on sleep-wake architecture are improved by the activation of retinoic acid receptors. The improvement may be induced by the activation of the cholinergic pathway. PMID:20138974

  11. Myristoylation negative msbB-mutants of probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 retain tumor specific colonization properties but show less side effects in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Stritzker, Jochen; Hill, Philip J; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Szalay, Aladar A

    2010-01-01

    Specific colonization of solid tumors by bacteria opens the way to novel approaches in both tumor diagnosis and therapy. However, even non-pathogenic bacteria induce responses by the immune system, which could be devastating for a tumor bearing patient. As such effects are caused e.g., by the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide, a msbB-mutant of the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 strain was investigated. Bacteria of the mutant strain did not show any growth defects in culture media when compared to wild-type E. coli Nissle 1917 but were unable to myristoylate lipid A, had less toxic effects on immunocompetent BALB/c mice, and were still able to specifically colonize tumors. Therefore, the modification of lipid A could result in bacterial strains that might be better suited for diagnosis and therapy of tumors than the corresponding wild-type strains, even if those are not considered pathogenic or are of probiotic background. PMID:21326939

  12. Myristoylation negative msbB-mutants of probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 retain tumor specific colonization properties but show less side effects in immunocompetent mice

    PubMed Central

    Stritzker, Jochen; Hill, Philip J; Gentschev, Ivaylo

    2010-01-01

    Specific colonization of solid tumors by bacteria opens the way to novel approaches in both tumor diagnosis and therapy. However, even non-pathogenic bacteria induce responses by the immune system, which could be devastating for a tumor bearing patient. As such effects are caused e.g., by the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide, a msbB-mutant of the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 strain was investigated. Bacteria of the mutant strain did not show any growth defects in culture media when compared to wild-type E. coli Nissle 1917 but were unable to myristoylate lipid A, had less toxic effects on immunocompetent BALB/c mice, and were still able to specifically colonize tumors. Therefore, the modification of lipid A could result in bacterial strains that might be better suited for diagnosis and therapy of tumors than the corresponding wild-type strains, even if those are not considered pathogenic or are of probiotic background. PMID:21326939

  13. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action.

    PubMed

    Currie, Richard A; Peffer, Richard C; Goetz, Amber K; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Goodman, Jay I

    2014-07-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA. PMID:24675475

  14. Proteus mirabilis isolates of different origins do not show correlation with virulence attributes and can colonize the urinary tract of mice.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Vanessa; Schlapp, Geraldine; Zunino, Pablo

    2006-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis has been described as an aetiological agent in a wide range of infections, playing an important role in urinary tract infections (UTIs). In this study, a collection of P. mirabilis isolates obtained from clinical and non-clinical sources was analysed in order to determine a possible correlation between origin, virulence factors and in vivo infectivity. Isolates were characterized in vitro, assessing several virulence properties that had been previously associated with P. mirabilis uropathogenicity. Swarming motility, urease production, growth in urine, outer-membrane protein patterns, ability to grow in the presence of different iron sources, haemolysin and haemagglutinin production, and the presence and expression of diverse fimbrial genes, were analysed. In order to evaluate the infectivity of the different isolates, the experimental ascending UTI model in mice was used. Additionally, the Dienes test and the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR assay were performed to assess the genetic diversity of the isolates. The results of the present study did not show any correlation between distribution of the diverse potential urovirulence factors and isolate source. No significant correlation was observed between infectivity and the origin of the isolates, since they all similarly colonized the urinary tract of the challenged mice. Finally, all isolates showed unique ERIC-PCR patterns, indicating that the isolates were genetically diverse. The results obtained in this study suggest that the source of P. mirabilis strains cannot be correlated with pathogenic attributes, and that the distribution of virulence factors between isolates of different origins may correspond to the opportunistic nature of the organism. PMID:16804188

  15. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Richard A.; Peffer, Richard C.; Goetz, Amber K.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Goodman, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA. PMID:24675475

  16. Reduced inflammatory response and increased microcirculatory disturbances during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in steatotic livers of ob/ob mice

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Tadashi; Ito, Yoshiya; Wijeweera, Jayanthika; Liu, Jie; Malle, Ernst; Farhood, Anwar; McCuskey, Robert S.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Steatosis is a major risk factor for complications after liver surgery. Since neutrophil cytotoxicity is critical for ischemia-reperfusion injury in normal livers, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether an exaggerated inflammatory response could cause the increased injury in steatotic livers. In C57Bl/6 mice, 60 min of warm hepatic ischemia triggered a gradual increase in hepatic neutrophil accumulation during reperfusion with peak levels of 100-fold over baseline at 12 h of reperfusion. Neutrophil extravasation and a specific neutrophil-induced oxidant stress (immunostaining for hypochlorous acid-modified epitopes) started at 6 h of reperfusion and peaked at 12–24 h. Ob/ob mice, which had a severe macrovesicular steatosis, suffered significantly higher injury (alanine transaminase activity: 18,000 ± 2,100 U/l; 65% necrosis) compared with lean littermates (alanine transaminase activity: 4,900 ± 720 U/l; 24% necrosis) at 6 h of reperfusion. However, 62% fewer neutrophils accumulated in steatotic livers. This correlated with an attenuated increase in mRNA levels of several proinflammatory genes in ob/ob mice during reperfusion. In contrast, sham-operated ob/ob mice had a 50% reduction in liver blood flow and 35% fewer functional sinusoids compared with lean littermates. These deficiencies in liver blood flow and the microcirculation were further aggravated only in ob/ob mice during reperfusion. The attenuated inflammatory response and reduced neutrophil-induced oxidant stress observed in steatotic livers during reperfusion cannot be responsible for the dramatically increased injury in ob/ob mice. In contrast, the aggravated injury appears to be mediated by ischemic necrosis due to massive impairment of blood and oxygen supply in the steatotic livers. PMID:17307725

  17. Reduced inflammatory response and increased microcirculatory disturbances during hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in steatotic livers of ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tadashi; Ito, Yoshiya; Wijeweera, Jayanthika; Liu, Jie; Malle, Ernst; Farhood, Anwar; McCuskey, Robert S; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2007-05-01

    Steatosis is a major risk factor for complications after liver surgery. Since neutrophil cytotoxicity is critical for ischemia-reperfusion injury in normal livers, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether an exaggerated inflammatory response could cause the increased injury in steatotic livers. In C57Bl/6 mice, 60 min of warm hepatic ischemia triggered a gradual increase in hepatic neutrophil accumulation during reperfusion with peak levels of 100-fold over baseline at 12 h of reperfusion. Neutrophil extravasation and a specific neutrophil-induced oxidant stress (immunostaining for hypochlorous acid-modified epitopes) started at 6 h of reperfusion and peaked at 12-24 h. Ob/ob mice, which had a severe macrovesicular steatosis, suffered significantly higher injury (alanine transaminase activity: 18,000 +/- 2,100 U/l; 65% necrosis) compared with lean littermates (alanine transaminase activity: 4,900 +/- 720 U/l; 24% necrosis) at 6 h of reperfusion. However, 62% fewer neutrophils accumulated in steatotic livers. This correlated with an attenuated increase in mRNA levels of several proinflammatory genes in ob/ob mice during reperfusion. In contrast, sham-operated ob/ob mice had a 50% reduction in liver blood flow and 35% fewer functional sinusoids compared with lean littermates. These deficiencies in liver blood flow and the microcirculation were further aggravated only in ob/ob mice during reperfusion. The attenuated inflammatory response and reduced neutrophil-induced oxidant stress observed in steatotic livers during reperfusion cannot be responsible for the dramatically increased injury in ob/ob mice. In contrast, the aggravated injury appears to be mediated by ischemic necrosis due to massive impairment of blood and oxygen supply in the steatotic livers. PMID:17307725

  18. Loss of NCB5OR in the cerebellum disturbs iron pathways, potentiates behavioral abnormalities, and exacerbates harmaline-induced tremor in mice.

    PubMed

    Stroh, Matthew A; Winter, Michelle K; Swerdlow, Russell H; McCarson, Kenneth E; Zhu, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Iron dyshomeostasis has been implicated in many diseases, including a number of neurological conditions. Cytosolic NADH cytochrome b5 oxidoreductase (NCB5OR) is ubiquitously expressed in animal tissues and is capable of reducing ferric iron in vitro. We previously reported that global gene ablation of NCB5OR resulted in early-onset diabetes and altered iron homeostasis in mice. To further investigate the specific effects of NCB5OR deficiency on neural tissue without contributions from known phenotypes, we generated a conditional knockout (CKO) mouse that lacks NCB5OR only in the cerebellum and midbrain. Assessment of molecular markers in the cerebellum of CKO mice revealed changes in pathways associated with cellular and mitochondrial iron homeostasis. (59)Fe pulse-feeding experiments revealed cerebellum-specific increased or decreased uptake of iron by 7 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Additionally, we characterized behavioral changes associated with loss of NCB5OR in the cerebellum and midbrain in the context of dietary iron deprivation-evoked generalized iron deficiency. Locomotor activity was reduced and complex motor task execution was altered in CKO mice treated with an iron deficient diet. A sucrose preference test revealed that the reward response was intact in CKO mice, but that iron deficient diet consumption altered sucrose preference in all mice. Detailed gait analysis revealed locomotor changes in CKO mice associated with dysfunctional proprioception and locomotor activation independent of dietary iron deficiency. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NCB5OR in the cerebellum and midbrain exacerbated harmaline-induced tremor activity. Our findings suggest an essential role for NCB5OR in maintaining both iron homeostasis and the proper functioning of various locomotor pathways in the mouse cerebellum and midbrain. PMID:27188291

  19. Inducible Knock-Down of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor in Mice Disturbs Regulation of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System and Attenuates Heart Failure Induced by Pressure Overload

    PubMed Central

    Montes-Cobos, Elena; Li, Xiao; Fischer, Henrike J.; Sasse, André; Kügler, Sebastian; Didié, Michael; Toischer, Karl; Fassnacht, Martin; Dressel, Ralf; Reichardt, Holger M.

    2015-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) inactivation in mice results in early postnatal lethality. Therefore we generated mice in which MR expression can be silenced during adulthood by administration of doxycycline (Dox). Using a lentiviral approach, we obtained two lines of transgenic mice harboring a construct that allows for regulatable MR inactivation by RNAi and concomitant expression of eGFP. MR mRNA levels in heart and kidney of inducible MR knock-down mice were unaltered in the absence of Dox, confirming the tightness of the system. In contrast, two weeks after Dox administration MR expression was significantly diminished in a variety of tissues. In the kidney, this resulted in lower mRNA levels of selected target genes, which was accompanied by strongly increased serum aldosterone and plasma renin levels as well as by elevated sodium excretion. In the healthy heart, gene expression and the amount of collagen were unchanged despite MR levels being significantly reduced. After transverse aortic constriction, however, cardiac hypertrophy and progressive heart failure were attenuated by MR silencing, fibrosis was unaffected and mRNA levels of a subset of genes reduced. Taken together, we believe that this mouse model is a useful tool to investigate the role of the MR in pathophysiological processes. PMID:26605921

  20. Robustness of disturbance attenuation with respect to disturbance model uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Daniel Edward

    In contrast to the case of robustness with respect to plant model uncertainty, the control systems community has paid relatively little attention to the issue of robustness with respect to disturbance model uncertainty. However, disturbance model uncertainty is of significance in many practical problems, including, for example, aircraft control (where the disturbance is turbulence), ship control (where the disturbances are wind and waves), and active suspension problems (where the disturbance is road roughness). Motivated, in particular, by turbulence model uncertainty, this dissertation considers the analysis and design of linear time-invariant controllers that are robust with respect to uncertainty in the disturbance intensity and bandwidth, where disturbance attenuation is measured by the output variance. Five aspects of the robust disturbance attenuation problem are considered. First, an expression for the output variance in terms of the uncertain disturbance parameters is derived. This expression is written in terms of an operator called the V-transform. Second, the notions of disturbance gain margin and disturbance bandwidth margin are introduced as quantitative measures of robustness with respect to uncertainty in the disturbance gain and disturbance bandwidth, respectively. Third, lower bounds on the achievable output variance are found under constraints of practical importance, e.g., constraints on bandwidth and stability robustness. The lower bounds are used to show that, in almost every practical situation, there is a limitation on both the achievable nominal performance and the achievable robustness margins. Fourth, tradeoffs between nominal performance and robust performance are investigated. The main result is that good nominal and good robust performance are neither incompatible nor equivalent. Fifth, a design procedure to achieve a prespecified level of robustness is proposed; the principal idea is to reduce the robust performance design problem to

  1. Mice transgenic for a soluble form of murine CTLA-4 show enhanced expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and defective antibody production in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ronchese, F; Hausmann, B; Hubele, S; Lane, P

    1994-03-01

    CD4+ T cell responses were analyzed in transgenic mice expressing a soluble form of murine CTLA-4, mCTLA4-H gamma 1, which blocks the interaction of the T cell activation molecules CD28 and CTLA-4 with their costimulatory ligands. Consistent with previous reports (Linsley, P. S., P. M. Wallace, J. Johnson, M. G. Gibson, J. L. Greene, J. A. Ledbetter, C. Singh, and M. A. Tepper. 1992. Science (Wash. DC). 257:792), T cell-dependent antibody production was profoundly inhibited in mCTLA4-H gamma 1 transgenic mice immunized with a protein antigen. Surprisingly, however, transgenic mice could generate quantitatively and qualitatively normal primary T cell responses, as measured by limiting dilution assays and lymphokine production. In addition, in vivo expansion of antigen-specific T cells after secondary or tertiary immunization was enhanced in mCTLA4-H gamma 1 transgenics as compared with normal mice. Although unable to deliver cognate help to B cells in vivo, T cells from mCTLA4-H gamma 1 transgenic mice were not anergic as they could help B cells to produce specific antibodies when adoptively transferred into nude hosts. Taken together, these data suggest that the engagement of CD28 and/or CTLA-4 may not be required for the induction of T cell responses, as is currently understood, but rather for the expression of T cell effector function such as the delivery of T cell help to B cells. PMID:8113677

  2. Infection of mice with oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii by oral route showed differences of virulence from Brazilian RFLP genotypes BrI and BrIII.

    PubMed

    Chiebao, Daniela Pontes; Pena, Hilda Fátima de Jesus; Cabral, Aline Diniz; Rocca, Mayra Pereira; Lopes, Estela Gallucci; Valadas, Samantha Yuri Oshiro Branco; Keid, Lara Borges; Grisi Filho, José Henrique Hildebrand; Soares, Rodrigo Martins

    2016-08-01

    South American strains of Toxoplasma gondii present higher genetic diversity than classical European strains. We compared the virulence of two non-archetypal Brazilian genotypes of T. gondii to mice. Oocysts of four isolates, two genotype BrI (TgCatBr71 and TgShBr11) and two BrIII (TgCatBr74 and TgCatBr60) were obtained from cats fed experimentally infected mice. After sporulation, 5.0×10(1) and 1.0×10(2) oocysts were orally administrated to Swiss albine mice in Experiments #1 and #2, respectively (4-10 mice/group). Humoral response from dead and surviving mice was analyzed on days 9 to 35 post-infection. Microscopic observations of lungs and brains were performed for tachyzoites and cysts visualization in fresh preparations. Negative results were tested by PCR. Virulence after infection with oocysts is dose dependent for genotype BrIII isolates, but not for BrI. Differences in mortality were observed among isolates from genotype BrIII on Experiment #1. Intra-genotype phenotypic variation related to the parasite stage of infection was demonstrated and this characteristic should be further studied and may influence future work regarding the role of virulence amid hosts. PMID:27474004

  3. ILDR1 null mice, a model of human deafness DFNB42, show structural aberrations of tricellular tight junctions and degeneration of auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Morozko, Eva L.; Nishio, Ayako; Ingham, Neil J.; Chandra, Rashmi; Fitzgerald, Tracy; Martelletti, Elisa; Borck, Guntram; Wilson, Elizabeth; Riordan, Gavin P.; Wangemann, Philine; Forge, Andrew; Steel, Karen P.; Liddle, Rodger A.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Belyantseva, Inna A.

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian inner ear, bicellular and tricellular tight junctions (tTJs) seal the paracellular space between epithelial cells. Tricellulin and immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1, also referred to as angulin-2) localize to tTJs of the sensory and non-sensory epithelia in the organ of Corti and vestibular end organs. Recessive mutations of TRIC (DFNB49) encoding tricellulin and ILDR1 (DFNB42) cause human nonsyndromic deafness. However, the pathophysiology of DFNB42 deafness remains unknown. ILDR1 was recently reported to be a lipoprotein receptor mediating the secretion of the fat-stimulated cholecystokinin (CCK) hormone in the small intestine, while ILDR1 in EpH4 mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro was shown to recruit tricellulin to tTJs. Here we show that two different mouse Ildr1 mutant alleles have early-onset severe deafness associated with a rapid degeneration of cochlear hair cells (HCs) but have a normal endocochlear potential. ILDR1 is not required for recruitment of tricellulin to tTJs in the cochlea in vivo; however, tricellulin becomes mislocalized in the inner ear sensory epithelia of ILDR1 null mice after the first postnatal week. As revealed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy, ILDR1 contributes to the ultrastructure of inner ear tTJs. Taken together, our data provide insight into the pathophysiology of human DFNB42 deafness and demonstrate that ILDR1 is crucial for normal hearing by maintaining the structural and functional integrity of tTJs, which are critical for the survival of auditory neurosensory HCs. PMID:25217574

  4. ILDR1 null mice, a model of human deafness DFNB42, show structural aberrations of tricellular tight junctions and degeneration of auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Morozko, Eva L; Nishio, Ayako; Ingham, Neil J; Chandra, Rashmi; Fitzgerald, Tracy; Martelletti, Elisa; Borck, Guntram; Wilson, Elizabeth; Riordan, Gavin P; Wangemann, Philine; Forge, Andrew; Steel, Karen P; Liddle, Rodger A; Friedman, Thomas B; Belyantseva, Inna A

    2015-02-01

    In the mammalian inner ear, bicellular and tricellular tight junctions (tTJs) seal the paracellular space between epithelial cells. Tricellulin and immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1, also referred to as angulin-2) localize to tTJs of the sensory and non-sensory epithelia in the organ of Corti and vestibular end organs. Recessive mutations of TRIC (DFNB49) encoding tricellulin and ILDR1 (DFNB42) cause human nonsyndromic deafness. However, the pathophysiology of DFNB42 deafness remains unknown. ILDR1 was recently reported to be a lipoprotein receptor mediating the secretion of the fat-stimulated cholecystokinin (CCK) hormone in the small intestine, while ILDR1 in EpH4 mouse mammary epithelial cells in vitro was shown to recruit tricellulin to tTJs. Here we show that two different mouse Ildr1 mutant alleles have early-onset severe deafness associated with a rapid degeneration of cochlear hair cells (HCs) but have a normal endocochlear potential. ILDR1 is not required for recruitment of tricellulin to tTJs in the cochlea in vivo; however, tricellulin becomes mislocalized in the inner ear sensory epithelia of ILDR1 null mice after the first postnatal week. As revealed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy, ILDR1 contributes to the ultrastructure of inner ear tTJs. Taken together, our data provide insight into the pathophysiology of human DFNB42 deafness and demonstrate that ILDR1 is crucial for normal hearing by maintaining the structural and functional integrity of tTJs, which are critical for the survival of auditory neurosensory HCs. PMID:25217574

  5. A pseudotype baculovirus expressing the capsid protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus and a T-Cell immunogen shows enhanced immunogenicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of livestock which causes severe economic loss in cloven-hoofed animals. Vaccination is still a major strategy in developing countries to control FMD. Currently, inactivated vaccine of FMDV has been used in many countries with limited success and safety concerns. Development of a novel effective vaccine is must. Methods In the present study, two recombinant pseudotype baculoviruses, one expressing the capsid of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) under the control of a cytomegalovirus immediate early enhancer/promoter (CMV-IE), and the other the caspid plus a T-cell immunogen coding region under a CAG promoter were constructed, and their expression was characterized in mammalian cells. In addition, their immunogenicity in a mouse model was investigated. The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by pseudotype baculovirus were compared with those of inactivated vaccine. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and indirect sandwich-ELISA (IS-ELISA) showed both recombinant baculoviruses (with or without T-cell epitopes) were transduced efficiently and expressed target proteins in BHK-21 cells. In mice, intramuscular inoculation of recombinants with 1 × 109 or 1 × 1010 PFU/mouse induced the production of FMDV-specific neutralizing antibodies and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Furthermore, recombinant baculovirus with T-cell epitopes had better immunogenicity than the recombinant without T-cell epitopes as demonstrated by significantly enhanced IFN-γ production (P < 0.01) and higher neutralizing antibody titer (P < 0.05). Although the inactivated vaccine produced the highest titer of neutralizing antibodies, a lower IFN-γ expression was observed compared to the two recombinant pseudotype baculoviruses. Conclusions These results indicate that pseudotype baculovirus-mediated gene delivery could be a alternative strategy to develop a new generation of vaccines against FMDV infection

  6. PrP0\\0 mice show behavioral abnormalities that suggest PrPC has a role in maintaining the cytoskeleton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background/Introduction. PrPC is highly conserved among mammals, but its natural function is unclear. Prnp ablated mice (PrP0/0) appear to develop normally and are able to reproduce. These observations seem to indicate that the gene is not essential for viability, in spite of it being highly conse...

  7. On Chu's disturbance energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph George, K.; Sujith, R. I.

    2011-10-01

    Chu [On the energy transfer to small disturbances in fluid flow (part I), Acta Mechanica 1 (1965) 215-234] proposed a positive definite energy norm for characterizing the level of fluctuation in a disturbance. In the absence of heat transfer at the boundaries, work done by boundary or body forces, heat and material sources of energy, this norm is a monotone, non-increasing function of time. In this paper, we show that Chu's disturbance energy defines an inner product, with respect to which the conservation equations of fluid motion linearized about a uniform base flow are self-adjoint. This ensures that the eigenvectors of the linearized operator are orthogonal to each other, and the property that the energy norm is a non-increasing function of time in the absence of physical sources of energy follows as an immediate consequence. Examples from numerical simulations of Euler equations are presented to highlight the importance of choosing an energy norm that is consistent with the underlying physics. We demonstrate that the disturbance energy as measured by Chu's norm does not exhibit spurious transient growth in the absence of physical sources of energy and hence is suitable for analyzing thermoacoustic instability.

  8. RAG2−/−γc−/− Mice Transplanted with CD34+ Cells from Human Cord Blood Show Low Levels of Intestinal Engraftment and Are Resistant to Rectal Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Ursula; Baenziger, Stefan; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Schlaepfer, Erika; Gehre, Nadine; Regenass, Stephan; Brunner, Thomas; Speck, Roberto F.

    2008-01-01

    Rectal transmission is one of the main routes of infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To efficiently study transmission mechanisms and prevention strategies, a small animal model permissive for rectal transmission of HIV is mandatory. We tested the susceptibility of RAG2−/−γc−/− mice transplanted with human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to rectal infection with HIV. We rectally exposed these humanized mice to cell-free and cell-associated HIV. All mice remained HIV negative as assessed by plasma viral load. The same mice infected intraperitoneally showed high levels of HIV replication. In the gut-associated lymphatic tissue, we found disproportionately smaller numbers of human cells than in other lymphoid organs. This finding may explain the observed resistance to rectal transmission of HIV. To increase the numbers of local HIV target cells and the likelihood of HIV transmission, we treated mice with different proinflammatory stimuli: local application of interleukin-1β, addition of seminal plasma to the inoculum, or induction of colitis with dextran sodium sulfate. These procedures attracted some human leukocytes, but the transmission rate was still very low. The humanized mice showed low levels of human engraftment in the intestinal tract and seem to be resistant to rectal transmission of HIV, and thus they are an unsuitable model for this application. PMID:18842716

  9. Sterilizing Immunity Elicited by Neisseria meningitidis Carriage Shows Broader Protection than Predicted by Serum Antibody Cross-Reactivity in CEACAM1-Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    McCaw, Shannon E.; Strobel, Lea; Frosch, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis asymptomatically colonizes the human upper respiratory tract but is also the cause of meningitis and severe septicemia. Carriage or disease evokes an immune response against the infecting strain. Hitherto, we have known little about the breadth of immunity induced by natural carriage of a single strain or its implications for subsequent infectious challenge. In this study, we establish that transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM1 support nasal colonization by a variety of strains of different capsular types. Next, we nasally challenged these mice with either of the N. meningitidis strains H44/76 (serogroup B, ST-32) and 90/18311 (serogroup C, ST-11), while following the induction of strain-specific immunoglobulin. When these antisera were tested for reactivity with a diverse panel of N. meningitidis strains, very low levels of antibody were detected against all meningococcal strains, yet a mutually exclusive “fingerprint” of high-level cross-reactivity toward certain strains became apparent. To test the efficacy of these responses for protection against subsequent challenge, CEACAM1-humanized mice exposed to strain 90/18311 were then rechallenged with different N. meningitidis strains. As expected, the mice were immune to challenge with the same strain and with a closely related ST-11 strain, 38VI, while H44/76 (ST-32) could still colonize these animals. Notably, however, despite the paucity of detectable humoral response against strain 196/87 (ST-32), this strain was unable to colonize the 90/18311-exposed mice. Combined, our data suggest that current approaches may underestimate the actual breadth of mucosal protection gained through natural exposure to N. meningitidis strains. PMID:25368118

  10. In Utero and Lactational Exposure to PCBs in Mice: Adult Offspring Show Altered Learning and Memory Depending on Cyp1a2 and Ahr Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Christine P.; Genter, Mary Beth; Patel, Krishna V.; Schaefer, Tori L.; Skelton, Matthew R.; Williams, Michael T.; Vorhees, Charles V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Both coplanar and noncoplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exhibit neurotoxic effects in animal studies, but individual congeners do not always produce the same effects as PCB mixtures. Humans genetically have > 60-fold differences in hepatic cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2)-uninduced basal levels and > 12-fold variability in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)affinity; because CYP1A2 is known to sequester coplanar PCBs and because AHR ligands include coplanar PCBs, both genotypes can affect PCB response. Objectives: We aimed to develop a mouse paradigm with extremes in Cyp1a2 and Ahr genotypes to explore genetic susceptibility to PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity using an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs. Methods: We developed a mixture of eight PCBs to simulate human exposures based on their reported concentrations in human tissue, breast milk, and food supply. We previously characterized specific differences in PCB congener pharmacokinetics and toxicity, comparing high-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 wild-type [Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(+/+)], poor-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 wild-type [Ahrd_Cyp1a2(+/+)], and high-affinity–AHR Cyp1a2 knockout [Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(–/–)] mouse lines [Curran CP, Vorhees CV, Williams MT, Genter MB, Miller ML, Nebert DW. 2011. In utero and lactational exposure to a complex mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls: toxicity in pups dependent on the Cyp1a2 and Ahr genotypes. Toxicol Sci 119:189–208]. Dams received a mixture of three coplanar and five noncoplanar PCBs on gestational day 10.5 and postnatal day (PND) 5. In the present study we conducted behavioral phenotyping of exposed offspring at PND60, examining multiple measures of learning, memory, and other behaviors. Results: We observed the most significant deficits in response to PCB treatment in Ahrb1_Cyp1a2(–/–) mice, including impaired novel object recognition and increased failure rate in the Morris water maze. However, all PCB-treated genotypes showed significant differences on

  11. Swim-exercised mice show a decreased level of protein O-GlcNAcylation and expression of O-GlcNAc transferase in heart.

    PubMed

    Belke, Darrell D

    2011-07-01

    Swim-training exercise in mice leads to cardiac remodeling associated with an improvement in contractile function. Protein O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAcylation) is a posttranslational modification of serine and threonine residues capable of altering protein-protein interactions affecting gene transcription, cell signaling pathways, and general cell physiology. Increased levels of protein O-GlcNAcylation in the heart have been associated with pathological conditions such as diabetes, ischemia, and hypertrophic heart failure. In contrast, the impact of physiological exercise on protein O-GlcNAcylation in the heart is currently unknown. Swim-training exercise in mice was associated with the development of a physiological hypertrophy characterized by an improvement in contractile function relative to sedentary mice. General protein O-GlcNAcylation was significantly decreased in swim-exercised mice. This effect was mirrored in the level of O-GlcNAcylation of individual proteins such as SP1. The decrease in protein O-GlcNAcylation was associated with a decrease in the expression of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and glutamine-fructose amidotransferase (GFAT) 2 mRNA. O-GlcNAcase (OGA) activity was actually lower in swim-trained than sedentary hearts, suggesting that it did not contribute to the decreased protein O-GlcNAcylation. Thus it appears that exercise-induced physiological hypertrophy is associated with a decrease in protein O-GlcNAcylation, which could potentially contribute to changes in gene expression and other physiological changes associated with exercise. PMID:21493720

  12. Novel dual agonist peptide analogues derived from dogfish glucagon show promising in vitro insulin releasing actions and antihyperglycaemic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    O'Harte, F P M; Ng, M T; Lynch, A M; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R

    2016-08-15

    The antidiabetic potential of thirteen novel dogfish glucagon derived analogues were assessed in vitro and in acute in vivo studies. Stable peptide analogues enhanced insulin secretion from BRIN-BD11 β-cells (p < 0.001) and reduced acute glycaemic responses following intraperitoneal glucose (25 nmol/kg) in healthy NIH Swiss mice (p < 0.05-p<0.001). The in vitro insulinotropic actions of [S2a]dogfish glucagon, [S2a]dogfish glucagon-exendin-4(31-39) and [S2a]dogfish glucagon-Lys(30)-γ-glutamyl-PAL, were blocked (p < 0.05-p<0.001) by the specific GLP-1 and glucagon receptor antagonists, exendin-4(9-39) and (desHis(1)Pro(4)Glu(9))glucagon amide but not by (Pro(3))GIP, indicating lack of GIP receptor involvement. These analogues dose-dependently stimulated cAMP production in GLP-1 and glucagon (p < 0.05-p<0.001) but not GIP-receptor transfected cells. They improved acute glycaemic and insulinotropic responses in high-fat fed diabetic mice and in wild-type C57BL/6J and GIPR-KO mice (p < 0.05-p<0.001), but not GLP-1R-KO mice, confirming action on GLP-1 but not GIP receptors. Overall, dogfish glucagon analogues have potential for diabetes therapy, exerting beneficial metabolic effects via GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. PMID:27179756

  13. d-amino acid oxidase knockout (Dao(-/-) ) mice show enhanced short-term memory performance and heightened anxiety, but no sleep or circadian rhythm disruption.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, David; Hasan, Sibah; Tam, Shu K E; Engle, Sandra J; Brandon, Nicholas J; Sharp, Trevor; Foster, Russell G; Harrison, Paul J; Bannerman, David M; Peirson, Stuart N

    2015-05-01

    d-amino acid oxidase (DAO, DAAO) is an enzyme that degrades d-serine, the primary endogenous co-agonist of the synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor. Convergent evidence implicates DAO in the pathophysiology and potential treatment of schizophrenia. To better understand the functional role of DAO, we characterized the behaviour of the first genetically engineered Dao knockout (Dao(-/-) ) mouse. Our primary objective was to assess both spatial and non-spatial short-term memory performance. Relative to wildtype (Dao(+/+) ) littermate controls, Dao(-/-) mice demonstrated enhanced spatial recognition memory performance, improved odour recognition memory performance, and enhanced spontaneous alternation in the T-maze. In addition, Dao(-/-) mice displayed increased anxiety-like behaviour in five tests of approach/avoidance conflict: the open field test, elevated plus maze, successive alleys, light/dark box and novelty-suppressed feeding. Despite evidence of a reciprocal relationship between anxiety and sleep and circadian function in rodents, we found no evidence of sleep or circadian rhythm disruption in Dao(-/-) mice. Overall, our observations are consistent with, and extend, findings in the natural mutant ddY/Dao(-) line. These data add to a growing body of preclinical evidence linking the inhibition, inactivation or deletion of DAO with enhanced cognitive performance. Our results have implications for the development of DAO inhibitors as therapeutic agents. PMID:25816902

  14. Photoreceptor phagosome processing defects and disturbed autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium of Cln3Δex1-6 mice modelling juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease).

    PubMed

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T; Calvi, Alessandra A; Turmaine, Mark; Seabra, Miguel C; Cutler, Daniel F; Futter, Clare E; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2015-12-15

    Retinal degeneration and visual impairment are the first signs of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by CLN3 mutations, followed by inevitable progression to blindness. We investigated retinal degeneration in Cln3(Δex1-6) null mice, revealing classic 'fingerprint' lysosomal storage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), replicating the human disease. The lysosomes contain mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase subunit c along with undigested membranes, indicating a reduced degradative capacity. Mature autophagosomes and basal phagolysosomes, the terminal degradative compartments of autophagy and phagocytosis, are also increased in Cln3(Δex1) (-6) RPE, reflecting disruption to these key pathways that underpin the daily phagocytic turnover of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) required for maintenance of vision. The accumulated autophagosomes have post-lysosome fusion morphology, with undigested internal contents visible, while accumulated phagosomes are frequently docked to cathepsin D-positive lysosomes, without mixing of phagosomal and lysosomal contents. This suggests lysosome-processing defects affect both autophagy and phagocytosis, supported by evidence that phagosomes induced in Cln3(Δex1) (-) (6)-derived mouse embryonic fibroblasts have visibly disorganized membranes, unprocessed internal vesicles and membrane contents, in addition to reduced LAMP1 membrane recruitment. We propose that defective lysosomes in Cln3(Δex1) (-) (6) RPE have a reduced degradative capacity that impairs the final steps of the intimately connected autophagic and phagocytic pathways that are responsible for degradation of POS. A build-up of degradative organellar by-products and decreased recycling of cellular materials is likely to disrupt processes vital to maintenance of vision by the RPE. PMID:26450516

  15. Photoreceptor phagosome processing defects and disturbed autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium of Cln3Δex1-6 mice modelling juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease)

    PubMed Central

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T.; Calvi, Alessandra A.; Turmaine, Mark; Seabra, Miguel C.; Cutler, Daniel F.; Futter, Clare E.; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration and visual impairment are the first signs of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by CLN3 mutations, followed by inevitable progression to blindness. We investigated retinal degeneration in Cln3Δex1-6 null mice, revealing classic ‘fingerprint’ lysosomal storage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), replicating the human disease. The lysosomes contain mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase subunit c along with undigested membranes, indicating a reduced degradative capacity. Mature autophagosomes and basal phagolysosomes, the terminal degradative compartments of autophagy and phagocytosis, are also increased in Cln3Δex1-6 RPE, reflecting disruption to these key pathways that underpin the daily phagocytic turnover of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) required for maintenance of vision. The accumulated autophagosomes have post-lysosome fusion morphology, with undigested internal contents visible, while accumulated phagosomes are frequently docked to cathepsin D-positive lysosomes, without mixing of phagosomal and lysosomal contents. This suggests lysosome-processing defects affect both autophagy and phagocytosis, supported by evidence that phagosomes induced in Cln3Δex1-6-derived mouse embryonic fibroblasts have visibly disorganized membranes, unprocessed internal vesicles and membrane contents, in addition to reduced LAMP1 membrane recruitment. We propose that defective lysosomes in Cln3Δex1-6 RPE have a reduced degradative capacity that impairs the final steps of the intimately connected autophagic and phagocytic pathways that are responsible for degradation of POS. A build-up of degradative organellar by-products and decreased recycling of cellular materials is likely to disrupt processes vital to maintenance of vision by the RPE. PMID:26450516

  16. [Climacteric disturbances. 2. Therapy of climacteric disturbances].

    PubMed

    Döring, G K

    1976-07-01

    After defining the terms climacterium and menopause the causes of climacteric disturbances are explained. During the premenopausal stage disturbances of the cycle are prevailing, caused by an insufficiency of the corpus luteum. Of climacteric disturbances should be spoken only after menopause. They are divided into: vegetative disturbances, troubles of metabolism, cardiovascular dysregulation, psychic deviations, sexual troubles and changes of the skin. The therapy of disturbances during the premenopausal stage mainly consists of the substitution of progesterone or in a cycle-like estrogen-progesterone-therapy. In the premenopausal stage estrogens are the therapy of choice. Among orally efficient estrogens the conjugated estrogen and the estradiol-valerianat are preferred. Side-effects and contraindications are discussed in detail. Among gynecologists there exists no disagreement about the necessity of therapy of serious climacteric disturbances, the opinions about prophylactic estrogen-therapy in women differ. PMID:184019

  17. Cancer-Prone Mice Expressing the Ki-rasG12C Gene Show Increased Lung Carcinogenesis after CT Screening Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Munley, Michael T.; Moore, Joseph E.; Walb, Matthew C.; Isom, Scott P.; Olson, John D.; Zora, J. Gregory; Kock, Nancy D.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Miller, Mark Steven

    2011-01-01

    A >20-fold increase in X-ray computed tomography (CT) use during the last 30 years has caused considerable concern because of the potential carcinogenic risk from these CT exposures. Estimating the carcinogenic risk from high-energy, single high-dose exposures obtained from atomic bomb survivors and extrapolating these data to multiple low-energy, low-dose CT exposures using the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model may not give an accurate assessment of actual cancer risk. Recently, the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST) reported that annual CT scans of current and former heavy smokers reduced lung cancer mortality by 20%, highlighting the need to better define the carcinogenic risk associated with these annual CT screening exposures. In this study, we used the bitransgenic CCSP-rtTA/Ki-ras mouse model that conditionally expresses the human mutant Ki-rasG12C gene in a doxycycline-inducible and lung-specific manner to measure the carcinogenic risk of exposure to multiple whole-body CT doses that approximate the annual NLST screening protocol. Irradiated mice expressing the Ki-rasG12C gene in their lungs had a significant (P = 0.01) 43% increase in the number of tumors/mouse (24.1 ± 1.9) compared to unirradiated mice (16.8 ± 1.3). Irradiated females had significantly (P < 0.005) more excess tumors than irradiated males. No tumor size difference or dose response was observed over the total dose range of 80–160 mGy for either sex. Irradiated bitransgenic mice that did not express the Ki-rasG12C gene had a low tumor incidence (≤0.1/mouse) that was not affected by exposure to CT radiation. These results suggest that (i) estimating the carcinogenic risk of multiple CT exposures from high-dose carcinogenesis data using the LNT model may be inappropriate for current and former smokers and (ii) any increased carcinogenic risk after exposure to fractionated low-dose CT-radiation may be restricted to only those individuals expressing cancer susceptibility genes in

  18. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus in Chimeric Mice by Short Synthetic Hairpin RNAs: Sequence Analysis of Surviving Virus Shows Added Selective Pressure of Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, Anne; Ilves, Heini; Ma, Han; Chin, Daniel J.; MacLachlan, Ian; Klumpp, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have recently shown that a cocktail of two short synthetic hairpin RNAs (sshRNAs), targeting the internal ribosome entry site of hepatitis C virus (HCV) formulated with lipid nanoparticles, was able to suppress viral replication in chimeric mice infected with HCV GT1a by up to 2.5 log10 (H. Ma et al., Gastroenterology 146:63–66.e5, http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2013.09.049) Viral load remained about 1 log10 below pretreatment levels 21 days after the end of dosing. We have now sequenced the HCV viral RNA amplified from serum of treated mice after the 21-day follow-up period. Viral RNA from the HCV sshRNA-treated groups was altered in sequences complementary to the sshRNAs and nowhere else in the 500-nucleotide sequenced region, while the viruses from the control group that received an irrelevant sshRNA had no mutations in that region. The ability of the most commonly selected mutations to confer resistance to the sshRNAs was confirmed in vitro by introducing those mutations into HCV-luciferase reporters. The mutations most frequently selected by sshRNA treatment within the sshRNA target sequence occurred at the most polymorphic residues, as identified from an analysis of available clinical isolates. These results demonstrate a direct antiviral activity with effective HCV suppression, demonstrate the added selective pressure of combination therapy, and confirm an RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism of action. IMPORTANCE This study presents a detailed analysis of the impact of treating a hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected animal with synthetic hairpin-shaped RNAs that can degrade the virus's RNA genome. These RNAs can reduce the viral load in these animals by over 99% after 1 to 2 injections. The study results confirm that the viral rebound that often occurred a few weeks after treatment is due to emergence of a virus whose genome is mutated in the sequences targeted by the RNAs. The use of two RNA inhibitors, which is more effective than use of either

  19. [Oncogenesis in transgenic mice].

    PubMed

    Shvemberger, I N; Ermilov, A N

    1994-01-01

    Oncogenesis in transgenic mice is at present a model, most adequately reflecting the natural conditions of tumor development. One of more important traits of this model is that it allows to study malignant growth simultaneously at all the structure-function levels in the context of the whole organism. This paper is a review of results of a series of experiments in which the localization of tumors was dependent or independent on the tissue specificity of a promoter, as well as development of multiple tumors with the use of viral regulatory sequences in genetic constructions. It has been shown that although a transgene is expressed in most of the tissues, tumors develop in some particular tissues only. These observations are interpreted by some authors in favour of the concept of multistep cancerogenesis. In this view, of primary importance are the results of studies on oncogenesis in transgenic mice, which contradict this concept and are regarded by their authors as an evidence of the possibility of a one-step transformation of normal cell into malignant one. The analysis of the obtained material enabled us to put forward an assumption that the key role in oncogenesis is played not only by certain genetic disturbances, but also by multi-level homeostatic mechanisms. Apparently, it is just the transgenic mice with cellular or viral oncogenes in their genome that represent a more adequate model for the detection of certain molecular-biological mechanisms underlying these disturbances. Also, of much importance is abundant material accumulated by now on oncogenesis of transgenic mice which shows a possibility of the effective use of various genetic constructions with prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulatory sequences, a possibility to induce not only tumors of some particular tissues, but also multiple hyperplastic and neoplastic changes in one and the same mouse. Development of tumors in such transgenic mice can be regarded as a model of different types of cancer disease

  20. Implications of recurrent disturbance for genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Davies, Ian D; Cary, Geoffrey J; Landguth, Erin L; Lindenmayer, David B; Banks, Sam C

    2016-02-01

    Exploring interactions between ecological disturbance, species' abundances and community composition provides critical insights for ecological dynamics. While disturbance is also potentially an important driver of landscape genetic patterns, the mechanisms by which these patterns may arise by selective and neutral processes are not well-understood. We used simulation to evaluate the relative importance of disturbance regime components, and their interaction with demographic and dispersal processes, on the distribution of genetic diversity across landscapes. We investigated genetic impacts of variation in key components of disturbance regimes and spatial patterns that are likely to respond to climate change and land management, including disturbance size, frequency, and severity. The influence of disturbance was mediated by dispersal distance and, to a limited extent, by birth rate. Nevertheless, all three disturbance regime components strongly influenced spatial and temporal patterns of genetic diversity within subpopulations, and were associated with changes in genetic structure. Furthermore, disturbance-induced changes in temporal population dynamics and the spatial distribution of populations across the landscape resulted in disrupted isolation by distance patterns among populations. Our results show that forecast changes in disturbance regimes have the potential to cause major changes to the distribution of genetic diversity within and among populations. We highlight likely scenarios under which future changes to disturbance size, severity, or frequency will have the strongest impacts on population genetic patterns. In addition, our results have implications for the inference of biological processes from genetic data, because the effects of dispersal on genetic patterns were strongly mediated by disturbance regimes. PMID:26839689

  1. New Hippocampal Neurons Are Not Obligatory for Memory Formation; Cyclin D2 Knockout Mice with No Adult Brain Neurogenesis Show Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaholkowski, Piotr; Kiryk, Anna; Jedynak, Paulina; Abdallah, Nada M. Ben; Knapska, Ewelina; Kowalczyk, Anna; Piechal, Agnieszka; Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Figiel, Izabela; Lioudyno, Victoria; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M.; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Filipkowski, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    The role of adult brain neurogenesis (generating new neurons) in learning and memory appears to be quite firmly established in spite of some criticism and lack of understanding of what the new neurons serve the brain for. Also, the few experiments showing that blocking adult neurogenesis causes learning deficits used irradiation and various drugs…

  2. Soil disturbance by airbags

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Disturbance of the drift at the Pathfinder landing site reveals a shallow subsurface that is slightly darker but has similar spectral properties. The top set of images, in true color, shows the soils disturbed by the last bounce of the lander on its airbags before coming to rest and the marks created by retraction of the airbags. In the bottom set of images color differences have been enhanced. The mast at center is the Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package (ASI/MET). The ASI/MET is an engineering subsytem that acquired atmospheric data during Pathfinder's descent, and will continue to get more data through the entire landed mission. A shadow of the ASI/MET appears on a rock at left.

    Mars Pathfinder was developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  3. Regional boreal biodiversity peaks at intermediate human disturbance.

    PubMed

    Mayor, S J; Cahill, J F; He, F; Sólymos, P; Boutin, S

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide biodiversity crisis has intensified the need to better understand how biodiversity and human disturbance are related. The 'intermediate disturbance hypothesis' suggests that disturbance regimes generate predictable non-linear patterns in species richness. Evidence often contradicts intermediate disturbance hypothesis at small scales, and is generally lacking at large regional scales. Here, we present the largest extent study of human impacts on boreal plant biodiversity to date. Disturbance extent ranged from 0 to 100% disturbed in vascular plant communities, varying from intact forest to agricultural fields, forestry cut blocks and oil sands. We show for the first time that across a broad region species richness peaked in communities with intermediate anthropogenic disturbance, as predicted by intermediate disturbance hypothesis, even when accounting for many environmental covariates. Intermediate disturbance hypothesis was consistently supported across trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses, with temporary and perpetual disturbances. However, only native species fit this pattern; exotic species richness increased linearly with disturbance. PMID:23072810

  4. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  5. Fossil mice and rats show isotopic evidence of niche partitioning and change in dental ecomorphology related to dietary shift in Late Miocene of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuri; Jacobs, Louis L; Cerling, Thure E; Uno, Kevin T; Ferguson, Kurt M; Flynn, Lawrence J; Patnaik, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis in tooth enamel is a well-established approach to infer C3 and C4 dietary composition in fossil mammals. The bulk of past work has been conducted on large herbivorous mammals. One important finding is that their dietary habits of fossil large mammals track the late Miocene ecological shift from C3 forest and woodland to C4 savannah. However, few studies on carbon isotopes of fossil small mammals exist due to limitations imposed by the size of rodent teeth, and the isotopic ecological and dietary behaviors of small mammals to climate change remain unknown. Here we evaluate the impact of ecological change on small mammals by fine-scale comparisons of carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) with dental morphology of murine rodents, spanning 13.8 to ∼2.0 Ma, across the C3 to C4 vegetation shift in the Miocene Siwalik sequence of Pakistan. We applied in-situ laser ablation GC-IRMS to lower first molars and measured two grazing indices on upper first molars. Murine rodents yield a distinct, but related, record of past ecological conditions from large herbivorous mammals, reflecting available foods in their much smaller home ranges. In general, larger murine species show more positive δ(13)C values and have higher grazing indices than smaller species inhabiting the same area at any given age. Two clades of murine rodents experienced different rates of morphological change. In the faster-evolving clade, the timing and trend of morphological innovations are closely tied to consumption of C4 diet during the vegetation shift. This study provides quantitative evidence of linkages among diet, niche partitioning, and dental morphology at a more detailed level than previously possible. PMID:23936324

  6. Fossil Mice and Rats Show Isotopic Evidence of Niche Partitioning and Change in Dental Ecomorphology Related to Dietary Shift in Late Miocene of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuri; Jacobs, Louis L.; Cerling, Thure E.; Uno, Kevin T.; Ferguson, Kurt M.; Flynn, Lawrence J.; Patnaik, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis in tooth enamel is a well-established approach to infer C3 and C4 dietary composition in fossil mammals. The bulk of past work has been conducted on large herbivorous mammals. One important finding is that their dietary habits of fossil large mammals track the late Miocene ecological shift from C3 forest and woodland to C4 savannah. However, few studies on carbon isotopes of fossil small mammals exist due to limitations imposed by the size of rodent teeth, and the isotopic ecological and dietary behaviors of small mammals to climate change remain unknown. Here we evaluate the impact of ecological change on small mammals by fine-scale comparisons of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) with dental morphology of murine rodents, spanning 13.8 to ∼2.0 Ma, across the C3 to C4 vegetation shift in the Miocene Siwalik sequence of Pakistan. We applied in-situ laser ablation GC-IRMS to lower first molars and measured two grazing indices on upper first molars. Murine rodents yield a distinct, but related, record of past ecological conditions from large herbivorous mammals, reflecting available foods in their much smaller home ranges. In general, larger murine species show more positive δ13C values and have higher grazing indices than smaller species inhabiting the same area at any given age. Two clades of murine rodents experienced different rates of morphological change. In the faster-evolving clade, the timing and trend of morphological innovations are closely tied to consumption of C4 diet during the vegetation shift. This study provides quantitative evidence of linkages among diet, niche partitioning, and dental morphology at a more detailed level than previously possible. PMID:23936324

  7. Anthropogenic habitat disturbance and the dynamics of hantavirus using remote sensing, GIS, and a spatially explicit agent-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lina

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV), a strain of hantavirus, causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in humans, a deadly disease with high mortality rate (>50%). The primary virus host is deer mice, and greater deer mice abundance has been shown to increase the human risk of HPS. There is a great need in understanding the nature of the virus host, its temporal and spatial dynamics, and its relation to the human population with the purpose of predicting human risk of the disease. This research studies SNV dynamics in deer mice in the Great Basin Desert of central Utah, USA using multiyear field data and integrated geospatial approaches including remote sensing, Geographic Information System (GIS), and a spatially explicit agent-based model. The goal is to advance our understanding of the important ecological and demographic factors that affect the dynamics of deer mouse population and SNV prevalence. The primary research question is how climate, habitat disturbance, and deer mouse demographics affect deer mouse population density, its movement, and SNV prevalence in the sagebrush habitat. The results show that the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) can be good predictors of deer mouse density and the number of infected deer mice with a time lag of 1.0 to 1.3 years. This information can be very useful in predicting mouse abundance and SNV risk. The results also showed that climate, mouse density, sex, mass, and SNV infection had significant effects on deer mouse movement. The effect of habitat disturbance on mouse movement varies according to climate conditions with positive relationship in predrought condition and negative association in postdrought condition. The heavier infected deer mice moved the most. Season and disturbance alone had no significant effects. The spatial agent-based model (SABM) simulation results show that prevalence was negatively related to the disturbance levels and the sensitivity analysis showed that

  8. Success in Mice Shows Zika Vaccine 'Feasible'

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause a devastating birth defect known as microcephaly, where an infant is born with an abnormally ... thousands of babies have already been born with microcephaly, and health officials are scrambling to help prevent ...

  9. Success in Mice Shows Zika Vaccine 'Feasible'

    MedlinePlus

    ... aegypti mosquito. But, transmission of the virus through sex is more common than previously thought, World Health Organization officials have said. Women of child-bearing age who live in an active Zika ...

  10. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-song; Wei, Gui-xiang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Luo, Du-Qiang

    2015-05-15

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties. - Highlights: • Fumosorinone is a new PTP1B inhibitor isolated from insect pathogenic fungi. • Fumosorinone attenuated the insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone decreased the expression of PTP1B both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone activated the insulin signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Tropical disturbances in relation to general circulation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estoque, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The initial results of an evaluation of the performance of the Goddard Laboratory of Atmospheric Simulation general circulation model depicting the tropical atmosphere during the summer are presented. Because the results show the existence of tropical wave disturbances throughout the tropics, the characteristics of synoptic disturbances over Africa were studied and a synoptic case study of a selected disturbance in this area was conducted. It is shown that the model is able to reproduce wave type synoptic disturbances in the tropics. The findings show that, in one of the summers simulated, the disturbances are predominantly closed vortices; in another summer, the predominant disturbances are open waves.

  12. Mice trisomic for a bacterial artificial chromosome with the single-minded 2 gene (Sim2) show phenotypes similar to some of those present in the partial trisomy 16 mouse models of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chrast, R; Scott, H S; Madani, R; Huber, L; Wolfer, D P; Prinz, M; Aguzzi, A; Lipp, H P; Antonarakis, S E

    2000-07-22

    The Drosophila single-minded (sim) transcription factor, is a master regulator of fruitfly neurogenesis. Recently, we have cloned and mapped a human homolog of sim, SIM2, to chromosome 21 in the so-called 'Down syndrome chromosomal region'. Three copies of SIM2 may contribute to some Down syndrome (DS) phenotypes because of the mapping position function as transcriptional repressor, temporal and spatial expression pattern of mouse Sim2, and the potentially analogous role of human SIM2 to that of Drosophila sim during neurogenesis. In order to validate this hypothesis in vivo, we have created the first bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice overexpressing a gene possibly involved in DS with only one or two additional copies of mouse Sim2. The transgene was shown to be expressed in the same spatial pattern as the endogenous gene. The mice develop normally, are fertile and do not show detectable histopathological abnormalities. However, detailed analysis of their behavior revealed anxiety-related/reduced exploratory behaviour and sensitivity to pain, phenotypes similar to those also present in other partial trisomy 16 mouse models of DS. Our data therefore suggest that overexpression of SIM2 contributes to some of the complex DS phenotypes. PMID:10915774

  13. Multiple antigen peptide consisting of B- and T-cell epitopes of F1 antigen of Y. pestis showed enhanced humoral and mucosal immune response in different strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Riyasat; Kumar, Sudhir; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Sheikh, Ishfaq Ahmed; Rao, D N

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a causative agent of plague. F1 and V antigen based vaccines have shown remarkable protection in experimental animals. In order to develop epitope based immunogen, three B and one T-cell epitopes of F1 antigen with palmitate residue at amino terminal were assembled on a lysine backbone as multiple antigen peptide (MAP or F1-MAP). MAP was characterized by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot and immunoreactivity with anti F1 sera. MAP was entrapped in PLGA (polylactide-co-glycolide) microparticles and humoral, mucosal immune responses were studied after intranasal immunization with/without CpG ODN 1826 (CpG)/murabutide in different strains of mice. Serum and mucosal washes were measured for MAP specific IgG, IgA, sIgA and IgG subclasses in three strains of mice. F1-MAP showed high serum antibody and mucosal IgG and IgA peak antibody titers. MAP with CpG showed significantly high (p<0.001) peak antibody titer ranging from 102,400 to 204,800 for IgG and 6400 to 12,800 for IgA. High mucosal sIgA and its secretary component detection confirmed generation of mucosal response in intestinal and lung washes. MAP antisera also showed significant immunoreactivity with individual peptides. Moreover, antibody specific activity (IgG, IgA and sIgA) positively correlates with peak antibody titers. Predominantly IgG2a/IgG2b subclass was observed with CpG formulation but in other formulation a mixed IgG1 and IgG2a response was observed. The present study highlights the importance of multiple antigen peptide approach of F1-antigen with CpG as an alternative approach for subunit vaccine. PMID:23174507

  14. Hostility disturbs learning.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Yumi; Tujii, Takeo; Yanagisawa, Atsuo; Tajino, Kazuhiro; Kanda, Hiroko; Yamagami, Masako

    2003-04-01

    Many studies have shown that there is a strong correlation between hostility and coronary artery disease; however, the pathogenic mechanisms by which hostility causes coronary artery disease have not been identified. Several studies have shown that hostility is associated with increased cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress. Sloan and colleagues used mental arithmetic and the Stroop Color-Word Task as psychological stressors and suggested that hostility is associated with diminished cardiac vagal control. It is supposed that the diminished cardiac vagal control results in uncontrollability of increased heart rate under stressful conditions so performance on mental stress tasks is poor. However, performance was not analyzed on the Stroop Color-Word Task. If hostility influences the autonomic nervous system, the performance of this mental stress task may also differ according to extent of hostility. In the present study, whether hostility disturbed performance of a mental stress task and the practice on it was examined. Subjects completed the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale and were divided into three groups (High, Middle, and Low) by their total scores and three subscales (Cynicism, Hostile Affect, and Aggressive Responding). They also completed the Stroop Color-Word Task. Analysis showed practice by High and Middle scoring groups on Aggressive Responding had a significantly smaller effect than that by Low scoring groups. The pathogenic mechanisms by which hostility may underlie coronary artery disease were discussed. PMID:12776844

  15. Amphetamine withdrawal and sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gossop, M R; Bradley, B P; Brewis, R K

    1982-01-01

    Sleep duration and indices of disturbed sleep, such as night-time waking and day-time sleep, were investigated in amphetamine users following hospital admission and withdrawal from the drug. Compared to controls, the amphetamine group showed an initial period of oversleeping and, towards the end of the first week, they showed a considerable degree of reduced sleep which persisted for the 20 days of this study. There was greater variability in sleep duration within the amphetamine group on almost all nights, and the variability in sleep duration from one night to the next was also greater. More night-time sleep disturbance was evident among the amphetamine ex-users. These results are discussed with respect to previous work and the pattern is seen to be more complex than had been imagined. A tentative neurochemical model is suggested and clinical implications are considered. PMID:7166130

  16. A Mixture of Ethanol Extracts of Persimmon Leaf and Citrus junos Sieb Improves Blood Coagulation Parameters and Ameliorates Lipid Metabolism Disturbances Caused by Diet-Induced Obesity in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ae Hyang; Kim, Hye Jin; Ryu, Ri; Han, Hye Jin; Han, Young Ji; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Myung-Sook; Park, Yong Bok

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of a flavonoid-rich ethanol extract of persimmon leaf (PL), an ethanol extract of Citrus junos Sieb (CJS), and a PL-CJS mixture (MPC) on mice fed a highfat diet (HFD). We sought to elucidate the mechanisms of biological activity of these substances using measurements of blood coagulation indices and lipid metabolism parameters. C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD with PL (0.5% (w/w)), CJS (0.1% (w/w)), or MPC (PL 0.5%, CJS 0.1% (w/w)) for 10 weeks. In comparison with data obtained for mice in the untreated HFD group, consumption of MPC remarkably prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT), whereas exposure to PL prolonged aPTT only. Lower levels of plasma total cholesterol, hepatic cholesterol, and erythrocyte thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, and decreased SREBP-1c gene expression were observed in mice that received PL and MPC supplements compared with the respective values detected in the untreated HFD animals. Our results indicate that PL and MPC may have beneficial effects on blood circulation and lipid metabolism in obese mice. PMID:26699754

  17. Recovery of lotic macroinvertebrate communities from disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, J. Bruce

    1990-09-01

    Ecosystem disturbances produce changes in macrobenthic community structure (abundances, biomass, and production) that persist for a few weeks to many decades. Examples of disturbances with extremely long-term effects on benthic communities include contamination by persistent toxic agents, physical changes in habitats, and altered energy inputs. Stream size, retention, and local geomorphology may ameliorate the influence of disturbances on invertebrates. Disturbances can alter food webs and may select for favorable genotypes (e.g., insecticidal resistance). Introductions of pesticides into lotic ecosystems, which do not result in major physical changes within habitats, illustrate several factors that influence invertebrate recovery time from disturbance. These include: (1) magnitude of original contamination, toxicity, and extent of continued use; (2) spatial scale of the disturbance; (3) persistence of the pesticide; (4) timing of the contamination in relation to the life history stages of the organisms; (5) vagility of populations influenced by pesticides; and (6) position within the drainage network. The ability of macroinvertebrates to recolonize denuded stream habitats may vary greatly depending on regional life histories, dispersal abilities, and position within the stream network (e.g., headwaters vs larger rivers). Although downstream drift is the most frequently cited mechanism of invertebrate recolonization following disturbance in middle- and larger-order streams, evidence is presented that shows aerial recolonization to be potentially important in headwater streams. There is an apparent stochastic element operating for aerial recolonization, depending on the timing of disturbance and flight periods of various taxa. Available evidence indicates that recolonization of invertebrate taxa without an aerial adult stage requires longer periods of time than for those that possess winged, terrestrial adult stages (i.e., most insects). Innovative, manipulative

  18. Disturbance energy norms: A critical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, K. Joseph; Sujith, R. I.

    2012-03-01

    The question of which norm should be used to characterize the fluctuating disturbance energy in studies on thermoacoustic instabilities remains a topic of continued debate. In this paper we formulate a strategy for developing mathematically consistent norms that do not support spurious growth of disturbance energy in the absence of 'physical' sources of energy. A critical analysis of various disturbance energy norms existing in literature is conducted and important conclusions regarding positive definitiveness and susceptibility to exhibiting unphysical growth are drawn. It is shown that the energy norm proposed by Cantrell and Hart [Interaction between sound and flow in acoustic cavities: mass, momentum and energy considerations, Journal of Acoustical Society of America 36 (1964) 697-706] and Myers' first order disturbance energy norm [Transport of energy by disturbances in arbitrary steady flow, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 226 (1991) 383-400] are positive definite if M0<1 and M0<1/√{γ}, respectively, where M0 is the magnitude of the local mean flow Mach number, γ is the ratio of specific heats at constant pressure and volume and the stipulated conditions should be met at every point in the flow domain. Our analysis shows that the disturbance energy norm proposed by Chu [On the energy transfer to small disturbances in fluid flow (part I), Acta Mechanica 1 (1965) 215-234] does not exhibit unphysical growth. It is also shown that this property is not unique to Chu's disturbance energy norm and there exists a family of norms which satisfy this requirement. The analysis also leads to an interesting interpretation of the acoustic energy conservation principle of Cantrell and Hart. The potential held by various disturbance energy norms for exhibiting fictitious growth is quantified using tools from nonmodal stability theory. It is concluded that if the mean flow Mach number is small, Myers' norm is a suitable measure of the disturbance energy.

  19. Quantification of alcohol drinking patterns in mice.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, Manuela; Leixner, Sarah; Spanagel, Rainer; Bilbao, Ainhoa

    2015-11-01

    The use of mice in alcohol research provides an excellent model system for a better understanding of the genetics and neurobiology of alcohol addiction. Almost 60 years ago, alcohol researchers began to test strains of mice for alcohol preference and intake. In particular, various voluntary alcohol drinking paradigms in the home cage were developed. In mouse models of voluntary oral alcohol consumption, animals have concurrent access to water and either one or several concentrated alcohol solutions in their home cages. Although these models have high face validity, many experimental conditions require a more precise monitoring of alcohol consumption in mice in order to capture the role of specific strains or genes, or any other manipulation on alcohol drinking behavior. Therefore, we have developed a fully automated, highly precise monitoring system for alcohol drinking in mice in the home cage. This system is now commercially available. We show that this drinkometer system allows for detecting differences in drinking behavior (i) in transgenic mice, (ii) following alcohol deprivation, and (iii) following stress applications that are usually not detected by classical home-cage drinking paradigms. In conclusion, our drinkometer system allows disturbance-free and high resolution monitoring of alcohol drinking behavior. In particular, micro-drinking and circadian drinking patterns can be monitored in genetically modified and inbred strains of mice after environmental and pharmacological manipulation, and therefore this system represents an improvement in measuring behavioral features that are of relevance for the development of alcohol use disorders. PMID:26515884

  20. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOEpatents

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Nihei, Kurt T.; Myer, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  1. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black

  2. Atmospheric Disturbance Environment Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tank, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, the application of atmospheric disturbance data to airplane design problems has been the domain of the structures engineer. The primary concern in this case is the design of structural components sufficient to handle transient loads induced by the most severe atmospheric "gusts" that might be encountered. The concern has resulted in a considerable body of high altitude gust acceleration data obtained with VGH recorders (airplane velocity, V, vertical acceleration, G, altitude, H) on high-flying airplanes like the U-2 (Ehernberger and Love, 1975). However, the propulsion system designer is less concerned with the accelerations of the airplane than he is with the airflow entering the system's inlet. When the airplane encounters atmospheric turbulence it responds with transient fluctuations in pitch, yaw, and roll angles. These transients, together with fluctuations in the free-stream temperature and pressure will disrupt the total pressure, temperature, Mach number and angularity of the inlet flow. For the mixed compression inlet, the result is a disturbed throat Mach number and/or shock position, and in extreme cases an inlet unstart can occur (cf. Section 2.1). Interest in the effects of inlet unstart on the vehicle dynamics of large, supersonic airplanes is not new. Results published by NASA in 1962 of wind tunnel studies of the problem were used in support of the United States Supersonic Transport program (SST) (White, at aI, 1963). Such studies continued into the late 1970's. However, in spite of such interest, there never was developed an atmospheric disturbance database for inlet unstart analysis to compare with that available for the structures load analysis. Missing were data for the free-stream temperature and pressure disturbances that also contribute to the unStart problem.

  3. Vehicle Disturbance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Brian

    2001-07-01

    The Vehicle Disturbance Test {VDT} is used to characterize uncompensated environmental disturbances acting upon the HST during normal operation. The VDT is a passive test {not a forced-response test} used to obtain signatures for both externally induced {e.g. SA-3} and internally induced {e.g. NCC and ACS mechanisms} disturbances for comparison with past VDT results. The disturbances observed will be used as the nominal on-orbit disturbances in pointing control simulations until the next VDT is run. The test occurs after release, and most of the VDT can be run during the BEA period. The -V1 sunpoint portion of the VDT occurs after the BEA period is complete. The VDT shall consist of five separate tests that need not occur consecutively. The overall duration of the VDT tests is at least 17 orbits of spacecraft time including {1} at least 1 full orbit at +V3 sunpoint prior to NCS CPL turn-on while performing ACS mechanism motions simulating routine flight operations, {2} at least 5 full orbits at +V3 sunpoint prior to NCS CPL turn-on, {3} at least 1 full orbit at +V3 sunpoint during NCC startup, {4} at least 5 full orbits at +V3 sunpoint while NCC is operating at steady-state, and {5} at least 5 full orbits at -V1 sunpoint with the NCC operating at steady-state. Each test is initiated via SMS execution of stored program macros in the HST flight computer to switch the attitude control law gains to low-bandwidth maneuver gains, command the gyros into low mode, terminate Velocity aberration and parallax {VAP} processing, and modify flight computer diagnostic mnemonics to display the roll component of DVTHEP. The nominal attitude control law configuration will be restored at the end of each test via SMS execution of stored program macros. The stored program command macros are developed specifically for the VDT by the Flight Software and Pointing Control System groups.

  4. Disturbing Behavior Checklists" Technical Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algozzine, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Ecological theorists have suggested that "disturbance" may result from an interaction between a child's behavior and reactions to that behavior within ecosystems such as schools. In this context, behavior is viewed as "disturbing" rather than "disturbed" and equal emphasis is given to the child and to individuals with whom the child interacts when…

  5. Vehicle Disturbance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Brian

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of the VDT is to measure and characterize uncompensated environmental disturbances acting upon the HST during normal operation. The VDT is a passive test {not a forced-response test} used to obtain signatures for both externally induced {e.g. SCM, SA-3, SSM thermal gradients} and internally induced {e.g. HGA, RWA, COS and WFC3 mechanisms} disturbances affecting HST LOS pointing. The disturbances observed will be used as the nominal on-orbit disturbances in pointing control simulations until the next VDT is run.The test occurs after release, and most of the VDT can be run during the BEA period. The ?V1 sunpoint portion of the VDT usually occurs after the BEA period is complete. The VDT shall consist of two separate tests that need not occur consecutively. The overall duration of the VDT is at least 13 orbits of spacecraft time including {1} at least 8 orbits at +V3 sunpoint after achieving thermal equilibrium {at least 36-hours at +V3 sunpoint} and three out of 8-orbits have RWA Friction Compensation turned Off, and {2} at least 5 orbits at ?V1 sunpoint {all or part of this segment have RWA Friction Compensation turned Off}. At the beginning of each test, the attitude control law gains are switched to maneuver gains, and the gyros are commanded to low mode. The nominal attitude control law configuration will be restored at the end of each test.Each test is initiated via SMS execution of stored program macros in the HST flight computer to switch the attitude control law gains to low-bandwidth maneuver gains, command the gyros into low mode, terminate Velocity aberration and parallax {VAP} processing, and manage the status of on-board RWA Friction Compensation. The nominal attitude control law configuration will be restored at the end of each test via SMS execution of stored program macros. The stored program command macros are developed specifically for the VDT by the Flight Software and Pointing Control System groups.

  6. Sleep Disturbances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Shelton, Althea; Malow, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are extremely prevalent in children with neurodevelopmental disorders compared to typically developing children. The diagnostic criteria for many neurodevelopmental disorders include sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbance in this population is often multifactorial and caused by the interplay of genetic, neurobiological and environmental overlap. These disturbances often present either as insomnia or hypersomnia. Different sleep disorders present with these complaints and based on the clinical history and findings from diagnostic tests, an appropriate diagnosis can be made. This review aims to provide an overview of causes, diagnosis, and treatment of sleep disturbances in neurodevelopmental disorders that present primarily with symptoms of hypersomnia and/or insomnia. PMID:26719309

  7. A Pathogen-Selective Antibiotic Minimizes Disturbance to the Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Carter, Robert A; Vuagniaux, Grégoire; Barbier, Maryse; Rosch, Jason W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-07-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy decimates the gut microbiome, resulting in a variety of negative health consequences. Debio 1452 is a staphylococcus-selective enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) inhibitor under clinical development and was used to determine whether treatment with pathogen-selective antibiotics would minimize disturbance to the microbiome. The effect of oral Debio 1452 on the microbiota of mice was compared to the effects of four commonly used broad-spectrum oral antibiotics. During the 10 days of oral Debio 1452 treatment, there was minimal disturbance to the gut bacterial abundance and composition, with only the unclassified S24-7 taxon reduced at days 6 and 10. In comparison, broad-spectrum oral antibiotics caused ∼100- to 4,000-fold decreases in gut bacterial abundance and severely altered the microbial composition. The gut bacterial abundance and composition of Debio 1452-treated mice were indistinguishable from those of untreated mice 2 days after the antibiotic treatment was stopped. In contrast, the bacterial abundance in broad-spectrum-antibiotic-treated mice took up to 7 days to recover, and the gut composition of the broad-spectrum-antibiotic-treated mice remained different from that of the control group 20 days after the cessation of antibiotic treatment. These results illustrate that a pathogen-selective approach to antibiotic development will minimize disturbance to the gut microbiome. PMID:27161626

  8. Postoperative circadian disturbances.

    PubMed

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-12-01

    An increasing number of studies have shown that circadian variation in the excretion of hormones, the sleep wake circle, the core body temperature rhythm, the tone of the autonomic nervous system and the activity rhythm are important both in health and in disease processes. An increasing attention has also been directed towards the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms in relation to surgery. The attention has been directed to the question whether the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms can affect postoperative recovery, morbidity and mortality. Based on the lack of studies where these endogenous rhythms have been investigated in relation to surgery we performed a series of studies exploring different endogenous rhythms and factors affecting these rhythms. We also wanted to examine whether the disturbances in the postoperative circadian rhythms could be correlated to postoperative recovery parameters, and if pharmacological administration of chronobiotics could improve postoperative recovery. Circadian rhythm disturbances were found in all the examined endogenous rhythms. A delay was found in the endogenous rhythm of plasma melatonin and excretion of the metabolite of melatonin (AMT6s) in urine the first night after both minor and major surgery. This delay after major surgery was correlated to the duration of surgery. The amplitude in the melatonin rhythm was unchanged the first night but increased in the second night after major surgery. The amplitude in AMT6s was reduced the first night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with preoperatively. There was also a shift in the autonomic nervous balance after major surgery with a significantly increased number of myocardial ischaemic episodes during the nighttime period. The

  9. Genetics and early disturbances of breathing control.

    PubMed

    Gaultier, Claude; Amiel, Jeanne; Dauger, Stéphane; Trang, Ha; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Gallego, Jorge; Simonneau, Michel

    2004-05-01

    Early disturbances in breathing control, including apneas of prematurity and apparently life-threatening events, account for some cases of sudden infant death syndrome and for a rare disorder called congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS). Data suggesting a genetic basis for CCHS have been obtained. Recently, we found heterozygous de novo mutations of the PHOX2B gene in 18 of 29 individuals with CCHS. Most mutations consisted of five to nine alanine expansions within a 20-residue polyalanine tract, probably resulting from nonhomologous recombination. Other mutations, generally inherited from one of the parents, in the coding regions of genes involved in the endothelin and RET signaling pathways and in the brain-derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene have been found in a few CCHS patients. Interestingly, all these genes are involved in the development of neural crest cells. Targeted disruption of these genes in mice has provided information on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying CCHS. Despite the identification of these genes involved in breathing control, none of the genetically engineered mice developed to date replicate the full human CCHS respiratory phenotype. Recent insights into the genetic basis for CCHS may shed light on the genetics of other early disturbances in breathing control, such as apnea of prematurity and sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:14739359

  10. Disturbance trade-off principle for quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandayam, Prabha; Srinivas, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a fundamental principle of disturbance tradeoff for quantum measurements, along the lines of the celebrated uncertainty principle: The disturbances associated with measurements performed on distinct yet identically prepared ensembles of systems in a pure state cannot all be made arbitrarily small. Indeed, we show that the average of the disturbances associated with a set of projective measurements is strictly greater than zero whenever the associated observables do not have a common eigenvector. For such measurements, we show an equivalence between disturbance tradeoff measured in terms of fidelity and the entropic uncertainty tradeoff formulated in terms of the Tsallis entropy (T2). We also investigate the disturbances associated with the class of nonprojective measurements, where the difference between the disturbance tradeoff and the uncertainty tradeoff manifests quite clearly.

  11. Impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in ageing aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Biljes, Daniel; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Kadow, Stephanie; Diel, Patrick; Weigt, Carmen; Burkart, Volker; Esser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed homeostasis of glucose and lipid metabolism are dominant features of the so-called metabolic syndrome (MetS) and can increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a severe metabolic disease. T2D prevalence increases with age. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a sensor of small molecules including dietary components. AHR has been identified as potential regulator of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Epidemiologically, exposure to xenobiotic AHR ligands such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is linked to T2D. We assess here the potential role of the AHR in disturbances of glucose and lipid metabolism in young (age 2-5 months) and old (age > 1,5 years) AHR-deficient (AHR KO) mice. Fasted young wildtype (WT) and AHR-KO mice displayed similar blood glucose kinetics after challenge with intra-peritoneal glucose injection. However, old AHR-KO mice showed lower tolerance than WT to i.p. administered glucose, i.e. glucose levels rose higher and returned more slowly to normal levels. Old mice had overall higher insulin levels than young mice, and old AHR-KO had a somewhat disturbed insulin kinetic in the serum after glucose challenge. Surprisingly, young AHR-KO mice had significantly lower triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein values than WT, i.e., a dyslipidemic profile. With ageing, AHR-KO and WT mice did not differ in these lipid levels, except for slightly reduced levels of triglycerides and cholesterol. In conclusion, our findings in AHR KO mice suggest that AHR expression is relevant for the maintenance of glucose and lipid homeostasis in old mice. PMID:26664351

  12. Behavioral, cognitive and biochemical responses to different environmental conditions in male Ts65Dn mice, a model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cué, Carmen; Rueda, Noemí; García, Eva; Davisson, Muriel T; Schmidt, Cecilia; Flórez, Jesús

    2005-09-01

    Ts65Dn mouse is the most widely accepted model for Down syndrome. We previously showed that environmental enrichment improved spatial learning in female but deteriorated it in male Ts65Dn mice. This study analyzed the factors contributing to the disturbed cognition of male Ts65Dn mice after enriched housing, by allocating male control and Ts65Dn mice in four conditions after weaning: small (n = 2-3) and large group (n = 8-10) housing, and enriched housing in small (2-3) and large groups (8-10). Learning, aggressive behavior, anxiety-like behavior and biochemical correlates of stress were evaluated when Ts65Dn and control mice were 4-5 months old. Environmental enrichment in large mixed colonies of Ts65Dn and diploid littermates disturbed behavioral and learning skills of Ts65Dn mice in the Morris water maze. ACTH and testosterone levels were not modified in any group of mice. Ts65Dn and control mice subjected to enriched housing in large groups and Ts65Dn mice housed in large groups showed higher corticosterone levels. Aggressive behavior was evaluated by measuring the number of attacks performed in the presence of an intruder. Ts65Dn mice performed less attacks than controls in all conditions, especially after enriched housing, indicating subordination. In the plus maze, cognitive aspects (i.e. risk assessment) and motor components (open arm avoidance) of anxiety behavior were evaluated; no difference in any condition was found. It is suggested that an excess of social and/or physical stimulation in Ts65Dn mice may affect cognition by disturbing the emotional and behavioral components of the learning process. PMID:15941601

  13. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26928516

  14. Disturbance maintains alternative biome states.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Hirota, Marina; Oliveira, Rafael S; Pausas, Juli G

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the distribution of biomes remains a challenge. Although tropical biome distribution has traditionally been explained by climate and soil, contrasting vegetation types often occur as mosaics with sharp boundaries under very similar environmental conditions. While evidence suggests that these biomes are alternative states, empirical broad-scale support to this hypothesis is still lacking. Using community-level field data and a novel resource-niche overlap approach, we show that, for a wide range of environmental conditions, fire feedbacks maintain savannas and forests as alternative biome states in both the Neotropics and the Afrotropics. In addition, wooded grasslands and savannas occurred as alternative grassy states in the Afrotropics, depending on the relative importance of fire and herbivory feedbacks. These results are consistent with landscape scale evidence and suggest that disturbance is a general factor driving and maintaining alternative biome states and vegetation mosaics in the tropics. PMID:26493189

  15. Sudden ionospheric disturbances in solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmer, Volker; Bernert, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances in solar cycle 24 Within the framework of the UN International Space Weather Initiative, and building upon the achievements of the International Heliophysical Year, the German project SIMONE (Sun Ionosphere MOnitoring NEtwork) operates several SID monitors provided by the University of Stanford. Here we present an overview of sudden ionospheric disturbances recorded since 2006 at the high school Gymnasium Walsrode until to date. The continous measurements allow a detailed comparison of locally measured SIDs with the general trend of solar activity during the current solar maximum. We further show that the measurements reveal specific information on the variable response of the dayside ionosphere to solar flares.

  16. Nonunity gain minimal-disturbance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sabuncu, Metin; Andersen, Ulrik L.; Mista, Ladislav Jr.; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Filip, Radim; Leuchs, Gerd

    2007-09-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optimal nonunity gain Gaussian scheme for partial measurement of an unknown coherent state that causes minimal disturbance of the state. The information gain and the state disturbance are quantified by the noise added to the measurement outcomes and to the output state, respectively. We derive the optimal trade-off relation between the two noises and we show that the tradeoff is saturated by nonunity gain teleportation. Optimal partial measurement is demonstrated experimentally using a linear optics scheme with feedforward.

  17. [Impacts of Ochotona pallasi disturbance on alpine grassland community characteristics].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo-qin; Li, Guang-yong; Ma, Wen-hu; Zhao, Dian-zhi; Li, Xiao-yan

    2013-08-01

    Plateau pika is the main fossorial mammal in the alpine grassland in Qinghai Lake Watershed of Northwest China. Based on the field investigation data from 18 alpine grassland quadrats in the Watershed, and by using redundancy analysis (RDA) and the surface fitting offered by 'R-Vegan' , the disturbance intensity of plateau pika (Ochotona pallasi) was classified as four levels. In order to explore the impacts of plateau pika disturbance on the alpine grassland ecosystem and its grazing quality, the community characteristics under different disturbance intensities by plateau pika were analyzed, and a conceptual model about the alpine grassland community succession was proposed. The results showed that with the increase of the disturbance intensity, the dominant species changed from Juncus roemerianus to Poa pratensis and Laux maritima. When the disturbance was small, the community had high quantitative values of coverage, aboveground biomass, biodiversity, and species richness, but the proportion of weeds was also high. When the disturbance was large, the quantitative values were the lowest, while the proportion of weeds was the highest. When the disturbance was moderate, the community had relatively high quantitative values, and the proportion of grasses and sedges was the highest. It was concluded that the community' s characteristic values under low plateau pika disturbance intensity were high but the grazing quality was low, while high disturbance intensity resulted in the grassland degradation. Therefore, the disturbance intensity in the threshold could maintain the stability of alpine grassland ecosystem and improve its grazing quality. PMID:24380328

  18. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed. PMID:26600106

  19. The High-Risk (Disturbed and Disturbing) College Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Kathy R.; Dunkle, John H.; Douce, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The disturbed and disturbing college student causes the most vexing concerns for student affairs administrators. The Assessment-Intervention of Student Problems (AISP) model offers a useful and easily understood framework for dealing with the various challenges of this high-risk student population. This chapter focuses on changes that have…

  20. Disturbed mouse circadian rhythm before the Kobe EQ in 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Sayoko

    2013-04-01

    Legends of macro-anomalies before large earthquakes have been passed down for generations in Asia. Most of the statements on earthquake precursors are considered unreliable afterthoughts by traditional scientists. However, disturbed biological rhythms in mice were observed before the Kobe EQ in 1995 (Yokoi et al, 2003). The records of unusual mouse behavior before the earthquake were obtained to study biological clock at Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University. It is clarified that the disturbance was very rare phenomena statistically. Similar phenomenon was observed before the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008, too (Li et al, 2009). In the presentation, I will discuss the phenomena as one example of preseismic unusual animal behaviors.

  1. Immune System Disturbances in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Szatmár; Mirnics, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological, genetic, transcriptome, postmortem, peripheral biomarker, and therapeutic studies of schizophrenia all point to a dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems in the disease, and it is likely that these immune changes actively contribute to disease symptoms. Gene expression disturbances in the brain of subjects with schizophrenia show complex, region-specific changes with consistently replicated and potentially interdependent induction of serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A member 3 (SERPINA3) and interferon inducible transmembrane protein (IFITM) family transcripts in the prefrontal cortex. Recent data suggest that IFITM3 expression is a critical mediator of maternal immune activation. As the IFITM gene family is primarily expressed in the endothelial cells and meninges, and as the meninges play a critical role in interneuron development, we suggest that these two non-neuronal cell populations might play an important role in the disease pathophysiology. Finally, we propose that IFITM3 in particular might be a novel, appealing, knowledge-based drug target for treatment of schizophrenia. Gene*environment interactions play a critical role in the emergence of schizophrenia pathophysiology. Epidemiological, genetic, transcriptome, postmortem, peripheral biomarker, and therapeutic studies of schizophrenia all point to a dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems in the disease (1-3) and it is likely that these immune changes actively contribute to disease symptoms (1, 4, 5). Regardless of the abundance of data obtained to date, our understanding of the mechanism by which the immune system disturbances arise is limited: we do not have a good insight into the origin or sequence of events by which the immune dysregulation develops, and to date we have not taken full advantage of these changes as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23890736

  2. Subclassification of School Phobic Disturbances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Leslie; And Others

    The confusion surrounding all aspects of school refusal may rest partly on the misguided assumption that the disturbance represents a single syndrome. Five consistently emerging variables which may help distinguish among school phobic types were abstracted from the literature: extensiveness of disturbance, mode of onset, age, fear source, and…

  3. Western Disturbances: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimri, A. P.; Niyogi, D.; Barros, A. P.; Ridley, J.; Mohanty, U. C.; Yasunari, T.; Sikka, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Cyclonic storms associated with the midlatitude Subtropical Westerly Jet (SWJ), referred to as Western Disturbances (WDs), play a critical role in the meteorology of the Indian subcontinent. WDs embedded in the southward propagating SWJ produce extreme precipitation over northern India and are further enhanced over the Himalayas due to orographic land-atmosphere interactions. During December, January, and February, WD snowfall is the dominant precipitation input to establish and sustain regional snowpack, replenishing regional water resources. Spring melt is the major source of runoff to northern Indian rivers and can be linked to important hydrologic processes from aquifer recharge to flashfloods. Understanding the dynamical structure, evolution-decay, and interaction of WDs with the Himalayas is therefore necessary to improve knowledge which has wide ranging socioeconomic implications beyond short-term disaster response including cold season agricultural activities, management of water resources, and development of vulnerability-adaptive measures. In addition, WD wintertime precipitation provides critical mass input to existing glaciers and modulates the albedo characteristics of the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau, affecting large-scale circulation and the onset of the succeeding Indian Summer Monsoon. Assessing the impacts of climate variability and change on the Indian subcontinent requires fundamental understanding of the dynamics of WDs. In particular, projected changes in the structure of the SWJ will influence evolution-decay processes of the WDs and impact Himalayan regional water availability. This review synthesizes past research on WDs with a perspective to provide a comprehensive assessment of the state of knowledge to assist both researchers and policymakers, and context for future research.

  4. Solar Development on Contaminated and Disturbed Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, Jordan; Lee, Courtney; Mosey, Gail; Melius, Jenny

    2013-12-01

    Land classified as contaminated and disturbed across the United States has the potential to host developments of utility-scale solar power. This report examines the prospect of developing utility- and commercial-scale concentrated solar power (CSP) and solar photovoltaics (PV) technologies on degraded and environmentally contaminated lands. The potential for solar development on contaminated anddisturbed lands was assessed, and for the largest and highest solar resource sites, the economic impacts and feasibility were evaluated. Developing solar power on contaminated and disturbed lands can help create jobs and revitalize local and state economies, and selecting these sites over greenfield sites can potentially have permitting and environmental mitigation advantages. The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot goals call for 632 GW of PV and 83 GW of CSP to be deployed by 2050. Conservative land-use estimates of this study (10 acres per megawatt) show that there are disturbed and environmentally contaminated lands throughout the country that could be suitable for utility-scale solar power, and, that there is sufficient land area to meet SunShot solar deployment goals. The purpose of this assessment is to improve the understanding of these sites and facilitate solar developers' selection of contaminated and disturbed sites for development.

  5. Proof of Heisenberg's error-disturbance relation.

    PubMed

    Busch, Paul; Lahti, Pekka; Werner, Reinhard F

    2013-10-18

    While the slogan "no measurement without disturbance" has established itself under the name of the Heisenberg effect in the consciousness of the scientifically interested public, a precise statement of this fundamental feature of the quantum world has remained elusive, and serious attempts at rigorous formulations of it as a consequence of quantum theory have led to seemingly conflicting preliminary results. Here we show that despite recent claims to the contrary [L. Rozema et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 100404 (2012)], Heisenberg-type inequalities can be proven that describe a tradeoff between the precision of a position measurement and the necessary resulting disturbance of momentum (and vice versa). More generally, these inequalities are instances of an uncertainty relation for the imprecisions of any joint measurement of position and momentum. Measures of error and disturbance are here defined as figures of merit characteristic of measuring devices. As such they are state independent, each giving worst-case estimates across all states, in contrast to previous work that is concerned with the relationship between error and disturbance in an individual state. PMID:24182239

  6. Monitoring Mars for Electrostatic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, D.

    2011-01-01

    The DSN radio telescope DSS-13 was used to monitor Mars for electrostatic discharges from 17 February to 11 April, 2010, and from 19 April to 4 May, 2011, over a total of 72 sessions. Of these sessions, few showed noteworthy results and no outstanding electrostatic disturbances were observed on Mars from analyzing the kurtosis of radio emission from Mars. Electrostatic discharges on mars were originally detected in June of 2006 by Ruf et al. using DSS-13. he kurtosis (normalized fourth moment of the electrical field strength) is sensitive to non-thermal radiation. Two frequencies bands, either 2.4 and 8.4 GHz or 8.4 and 32 GHz were used. The non-thermal radiation spectrum should have peaks at the lowest three modes of the theoretical Schumann Resonances of Mars. The telescope was pointed away from Mars every 5 minutes for 45 seconds to confirm if Mars was indeed the sources of any events. It was shown that by including a down-link signal in one channel and by observing when the kurtosis changed as the telescope was pointed away from the source that the procedure can monitor Mars without the need of extra equipment monitoring a control source.

  7. Sleep disturbances and PTSD: a perpetual circle?

    PubMed Central

    van Liempt, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    subjective and objective sleep parameters. Only a few RCTs have been published. They show promising results for atypical antipsychotics and prazosin, the latter especially on nightmare reduction. Conclusions Disturbed sleep due to nightmares increases the risk for PTSD. PTSD in turn leads to increased sleep fragmentation, decreased GH secretion, and frequent nightmares, which may again compromise fear extinction, synaptic plasticity, and recovery. This suggests that disturbed sleep is a precipitating and perpetuating factor in PTSD symptomatology, creating a perpetual circle. This dissertation suggests that activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is involved in disturbed sleep in patients with PTSD. PMID:23050070

  8. Disturbance rejection of the WIYN telescope position control servosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellington, Scott

    1995-06-01

    The performance of a telescope position control servosystem depends on its ability to minimize changes in position due to wind and other disturbances. Modern, lightweight telescopes such as WIYN rely on feedback to achieve good disturbance rejection. While the simplicity of a direct, friction-drive system is attractive, the small drive ratio greatly diminishes the effectiveness of motor velocity control in reducing disturbance sensitivity. The WIYN servosystems use position feedback and motor torque control to achieve tracking accuracy and disturbance rejection. This type of control allows the use of larger position control bandwidth than is possible with motor velocity control. The factors affecting disturbance rejection are discussed. Motor velocity controlled and motor torque controlled servosystems are described and compared. The WIYN telescope is analyzed to show the expected performance of each type of system, and measured performance is presented.

  9. Chronic sleep disturbance impairs glucose homeostasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Barf, R Paulien; Meerlo, Peter; Scheurink, Anton J W

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between short or disrupted sleep and an increased risk for metabolic disorders. To assess a possible causal relationship, we examined the effects of experimental sleep disturbance on glucose regulation in Wistar rats under controlled laboratory conditions. Three groups of animals were used: a sleep restriction group (RS), a group subjected to moderate sleep disturbance without restriction of sleep time (DS), and a home cage control group. To establish changes in glucose regulation, animals were subjected to intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs) before and after 1 or 8 days of sleep restriction or disturbance. Data show that both RS and DS reduce body weight without affecting food intake and also lead to hyperglycemia and decreased insulin levels during an IVGTT. Acute sleep disturbance also caused hyperglycemia during an IVGTT, yet, without affecting the insulin response. In conclusion, both moderate and severe disturbances of sleep markedly affect glucose homeostasis and body weight control. PMID:20339560

  10. PID Gain Tuning for Disturbance Attenuation FRIT Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Shiro

    This review paper shows a PID gains tuning method from one-shot experimental data generated by test signal added at input signal in an off-line manner, so that the output signal could follow the prescribed reference model output. We call the method a “disturbance attenuation FRIT method” because the test signal added at input signal is a benchmark signal evaluating disturbance attenuation property. The experimental result for helicopter attitude control model is demonstrated to show the effectiveness of the disturbance attenuation FRIT method.

  11. Disturbance regime and disturbance interactions in Rocky Mountain subalpine forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veblen, Thomas T.; Hadley, Keith S.; Nel, Elizabeth M.; Kitzberger, Thomas; Reid, Marion; Villalba, Ricardo

    1994-01-01

    1 The spatial and temporal patterns of fire, snow avalanches and spruce beetle out-breaks were investigated in Marvine Lakes Valley in the Colorado Rocky Mountains in forests of Picea engelmannii, Abies lasiocarpa, Pseudotsuga menziesiiand Populus tremuloides. Dates and locations of disturbances were determined by dendrochronological techniques. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to calculate areas affected by the different disturbance agents and to examine the spatial relationships of the different disturbances. 2 In the Marvine Lakes Valley, major disturbance was caused by fire in the 1470s, the 1630s and the 1870s and by spruce beetle outbreak in c. 1716, 1827 and 1949. 3 Since c. 1633, 9% of the Marvine Lakes Valley has been affected by snow avalanches, 38.6% by spruce beetle outbreak and 59.1% by fire. At sites susceptible to avalanches, avalanches occur at a near-annual frequency. The mean return intervals for fire and spruce beetle outbreaks are 202 and 116.5 years, respectively. Turnover times for fire and spruce beetle outbreaks are 521 and 259 years, respectively. 4 Several types of disturbance interaction were identified. For example, large and severe snow avalanches influence the spread of fire. Similarly, following a stand-devastating fire or avalanche, Picea populations will not support a spruce beetle outbreak until individual trees reach a minimum diameter which represents at least 70 years' growth. Thus, recent fires and beetle outbreaks have nonoverlapping distributions.

  12. Response of Ionosphere to the Tropospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, A. K.; Dube, A.; Singh, R.; Cohen, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to find out response of the ionosphere to the various cases of tropical cyclones. The main process involved is suggested through Atmospheric Gravity waves (AGWs) originating from strong convective systems, propagating upward upto the ionospheric heights and perturbing ionospheric parameters (Bishop et al., 2006). We have used ground and satellite data to extract cyclone induced perturbations at different ionospheric heights along with the various parameters of AGWs during cyclones and associated thunderstorm. The initial results suggest that there is increase in total electron content of the ionosphere with wave like signatures in ionosphere. The satellite observation in optical band shows presence of concentric gravity wave pattern associated with troposphere disturbances with horizontal wavelength of ~50-200km and periods ranging from hours to days. The ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF) measurement shows fluctuations in VLF navigational transmitter signal passing over the region of disturbance. The lightning data from GLD360 lightning network shows intense activity associated with cyclones and increase in lightning peak current and energy during main phase of cyclones which seems to be sufficient enough to derive ionospheric disturbances in the ionosphere. This multi-instrument analysis provide detail information of the three dimensional structure of cyclone and their effect at different altitudes of the ionosphere in the Indian subcontinent.

  13. Low-disturbance wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckwith, I. E.; Applin, Z. T.; Stainback, P. C.; Maestrello, L.

    1986-01-01

    During the past years, there was an extensive program under way at the Langley Research Center to upgrade the flow quality in several of the large wind tunnels. This effort has resulted in significant improvements in flow quality in these tunnels and has also increased the understanding of how and where changes in existing and new wind tunnels are most likely to yield the desired improvements. As part of this ongoing program, flow disturbance levels and spectra were measured in several Langley tunnels before and after modifications were made to reduce acoustic and vorticity fluctuations. A brief description of these disturbance control features is given for the Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, the 4 x 7 Meter Tunnel, and the 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. To illustrate typical reductions in disturbance levels obtained in these tunnels, data from hot-wire or acoustic sensors are presented. A concept for a subsonic quiet tunnel designed to study boundary layer stability and transition is also presented. Techniques developed at Langley in recent years to eliminate the high intensity and high-frequency acoustic disturbances present in all previous supersonic wind tunnels are described. In conclusion, the low-disturbance levels present in atmospheric flight can now be simulated in wind tunnels over the speed range from low subsonic through high supersonic.

  14. Altered temporal patterns of anxiety in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedrosian, Tracy A.; Herring, Kamillya L.; Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2011-01-01

    Both normal aging and dementia are associated with dysregulation of the biological clock, which contributes to disrupted circadian organization of physiology and behavior. Diminished circadian organization in conjunction with the loss of cholinergic input to the cortex likely contributes to impaired cognition and behavior. One especially notable and relatively common circadian disturbance among the aged is “sundowning syndrome,” which is characterized by exacerbated anxiety, agitation, locomotor activity, and delirium during the hours before bedtime. Sundowning has been reported in both dementia patients and cognitively intact elderly individuals living in institutions; however, little is known about temporal patterns in anxiety and agitation, and the neurobiological basis of these rhythms remains unspecified. In the present study, we explored the diurnal pattern of anxiety-like behavior in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We then attempted to treat the observed behavioral disturbances in the aged mice using chronic nightly melatonin treatment. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that time-of-day differences in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase expression and general neuronal activation (i.e., c-Fos expression) coincide with the behavioral symptoms. Our results show a temporal pattern of anxiety-like behavior that emerges in elderly mice. This behavioral pattern coincides with elevated locomotor activity relative to adult mice near the end of the dark phase, and with time-dependent changes in basal forebrain acetylcholinesterase expression. Transgenic APP mice show a similar behavioral phenomenon that is not observed among age-matched wild-type mice. These results may have useful applications to the study and treatment of age- and dementia-related circadian behavioral disturbances, namely, sundowning syndrome. PMID:21709248

  15. Glial dysfunction in the mouse habenula causes depressive-like behaviors and sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wanpeng; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Michiko; Aida, Tomomi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Isomura, Yoshikazu; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Ozawa, Keiya; Tanaka, Kohichi; Aizawa, Hidenori

    2014-12-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) regulates the activity of monoaminergic neurons in the brainstem. This area has recently attracted a surge of interest in psychiatry because studies have reported the pathological activation of the habenula in patients with major depression and in animal models. The LHb plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of depression; however, how habenular neurons are activated to cause various depression symptoms, such as reduced motivation and sleep disturbance, remain unclear. We hypothesized that dysfunctional astrocytes may cause LHb hyperactivity due to the defective uptake activity of extracellular glutamate, which induces depressive-like behaviors. We examined the activity of neurons in habenular pathways and performed behavioral and sleep analyses in mice with pharmacological and genetic inhibition of the activity of the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1 in the LHb. The habenula-specific inhibition of GLT-1 increased the neuronal firing rate and the level of c-Fos expression in the LHb. Mice with reduced GLT-1 activity in the habenula exhibited a depressive-like phenotype in the tail suspension and novelty-suppressed feeding tests. These animals also displayed increased susceptibility to chronic stress, displaying more frequent avoidant behavior without affecting locomotor activity in the open-field test. Intriguingly, the mice showed disinhibition of rapid eye movement sleep, which is a characteristic sleep pattern in patients with depression. These results provide evidence that disrupting glutamate clearance in habenular astrocytes increases neuronal excitability and depressive-like phenotypes in behaviors and sleep. PMID:25471567

  16. Composite disturbance rejection control based on generalized extended state observer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Lu; Su, Jianbo

    2016-07-01

    Traditional extended state observer (ESO) design method does not focus on analysis of system reconstruction strategy. The prior information of the controlled system cannot be used for ESO implementation to improve the control accuracy. In this paper, composite disturbance rejection control strategy is proposed based on generalized ESO. First, the disturbance rejection performance of traditional ESO is analyzed to show the essence of the reconstruction strategy. Then, the system is reconstructed based on the equivalent disturbance model. The generalized ESO is proposed based on the reconstructed model, while convergence of the proposed ESO is analyzed along with the outer loop feedback controller. Simulation results on a second order mechanical system show that the proposed generalized ESO can deal with the external disturbance with known model successfully. Experiment of attitude tracking task on an aircraft is also carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27129764

  17. Delayed cutaneous wound closure in HO-2 deficient mice despite normal HO-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Lundvig, Ditte M S; Scharstuhl, Alwin; Cremers, Niels A J; Pennings, Sebastiaan W C; te Paske, Jeroen; van Rheden, René; van Run-van Breda, Coby; Regan, Raymond F; Russel, Frans G M; Carels, Carine E; Maltha, Jaap C; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing can lead to scarring, and aesthetical and functional problems. The cytoprotective haem oxygenase (HO) enzymes degrade haem into iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide. HO-1 deficient mice suffer from chronic inflammatory stress and delayed cutaneous wound healing, while corneal wound healing in HO-2 deficient mice is impaired with exorbitant inflammation and absence of HO-1 expression. This study addresses the role of HO-2 in cutaneous excisional wound healing using HO-2 knockout (KO) mice. Here, we show that HO-2 deficiency also delays cutaneous wound closure compared to WT controls. In addition, we detected reduced collagen deposition and vessel density in the wounds of HO-2 KO mice compared to WT controls. Surprisingly, wound closure in HO-2 KO mice was accompanied by an inflammatory response comparable to WT mice. HO-1 induction in HO-2 deficient skin was also similar to WT controls and may explain this protection against exaggerated cutaneous inflammation but not the delayed wound closure. Proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation were similar in both two genotypes. Next, we screened for candidate genes to explain the observed delayed wound closure, and detected delayed gene and protein expression profiles of the chemokine (C-X-C) ligand-11 (CXCL-11) in wounds of HO-2 KO mice. Abnormal regulation of CXCL-11 has been linked to delayed wound healing and disturbed angiogenesis. However, whether aberrant CXCL-11 expression in HO-2 KO mice is caused by or is causing delayed wound healing needs to be further investigated. PMID:25224969

  18. Managing Sleep Disturbances in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances, particularly daytime sleepiness and insomnia, are common problems reported by patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. Poor sleep negatively impacts patients' quality of life and cognitive functions and increases mortality. Although sleep disturbances can be an early sign of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), many patients without HE still complain of poor quality sleep. The pathophysiology of these disturbances is not fully understood but is believed to be linked to impaired hepatic melatonin metabolism. This paper provides an overview for the clinician of common comorbidities contributing to poor sleep in patients with liver disease, mainly restless leg syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea. It discusses nondrug and pharmacologic treatment options in these patients, such as the use of light therapy and histamine (H1) blockers. PMID:27242950

  19. Disturbed Sleep and Postpartum Depression.

    PubMed

    Okun, Michele L

    2016-07-01

    The perinatal period introduces a myriad of changes. One important but often overlooked change is an increased reporting of sleep disturbance. Although casually regarded as a consequence of pregnancy or postpartum, there is emerging evidence implicating significant sleep disturbance, characterized by insomnia symptoms and/or poor sleep quality, with adverse outcomes, such as an increase in depressive symptomatology or the development postpartum depression (PPD). Significant consequences may arise as a result including issues with maternal-infant bonding, effective care for the infant, and behavioral or emotional difficulties in the infant. This review discusses the relevant literature as to how disturbed sleep during pregnancy as well as in the postpartum may increase the risk for PPD. PMID:27222140

  20. Polar Disturbance Surrounding a Long Living Cyclone in Saturn's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Rio-Gaztelurrutia, T.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Antuñano, A.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; Rojas, J. F.; Wong, M. H.; Simon, A. A.; De Pater, I.; Gomez-Forrelad, J. M.; Legarreta, J.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014 and 2015 a large 'dark spot' about 6,000 km in length and located at planetocentric latitude +58.5º (+63º N planetographic) was tracked on the best ground-based amateur images of Saturn, revealing a long-lived feature, an uncommon phenomenon in Saturn's atmosphere. Images captured by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) onboard Cassini spacecraft showed the feature as a very contrasted dark spot in the MT3 filter, and barely visible in the deep sounding filters CB2 and CB3. On mid-May 2015 ground-based observations obtained by amateur astronomers operating small telescopes started to show a disturbance around this dark spot. Following the onset of this disturbance the drift of the dark spot remained unaltered and equal to the motion it had previously, but the disturbance evolved zonally in a complex manner, giving hints of a kind of large scale phenomena in Saturn's atmosphere of an unprecedented type. Unfortunately the orbital path of the Cassini spacecraft was not appropriate to see details of the disturbance at that time. Images by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 instrument obtained in director's time (DDT) allow us to describe the detailed dynamics of the disturbance, while the study of its long-term evolution is possible thanks to the efforts of the community of amateur astronomers. In this work we analyse the dynamics of the region before the start of the disturbance and the dynamics and evolution of the disturbance after its onset.

  1. Cosmic ray modulation by solar wind disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbović, M.; Vršnak, B.; Čalogović, J.; Karlica, M.

    2011-07-01

    Aims: We perform a systematic statistical study of the relationship between characteristics of solar wind disturbances, caused by interplanetary coronal mass ejections and corotating interaction regions, and properties of Forbush decreases (FDs). Since the mechanism of FDs is still being researched, this analysis should provide a firm empirical basis for physical interpretations of the FD phenomenon. Methods: The analysis is based on the ground-based neutron monitor data and the solar wind data recorded by the Advanced Composition Explorer, where the disturbances were identified as increases in proton speed, magnetic field, and magnetic field fluctuations. We focus on the relative timing of FDs, as well as on the correlations between various FD and solar wind parameters, paying special attention to the statistical significance of the results. Results: It was found that the onset, the minimum, and the end of FDs are delayed after the onset, the maximum, and the end of the magnetic field enhancement. The t-test shows that at the 95% significance level the average lags have to be longer than 3, 7, and 26 h, respectively. FD magnitude (| FD|) is correlated with the magnetic field strength (B), magnetic field fluctuations (δB), and speed (v), as well as with combined parameters, BtB, Bv, vtB, and BvtB, where tB is the duration of the magnetic field disturbance. In the |FD|(B) dependence, a "branching" effect was observed, i.e., two different trends exist. The analysis of the FD duration and recovery period reveals a correlation with the duration of the magnetic field enhancement. The strongest correlations are obtained for the dependence on combined solar wind parameters of the product of the FD duration and magnitude, implying that combined parameters are in fact true variables themselves, rather than just a product of variables. Conclusions: From the time lags we estimate that "the penetration depth" in the disturbance, at which FD onset becomes recognizable, is on

  2. Protecting coherence by reservoir engineering: intense bath disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zixian; Lü, Zhiguo; Zheng, Hang

    2016-08-01

    We put forward a scheme based on reservoir engineering to protect quantum coherence from leaking to bath, in which we intensely disturb the Lorentzian bath by N harmonic oscillators. We show that the intense disturbance changes the spectrum of the bath and reduces the qubit-bath interaction. Furthermore, we give the exact time evolution with the Lorentzian spectrum by a master equation and calculate the concurrence and survival probability of the qubits to demonstrate the effect of the intense bath disturbance on the protection of coherence. Meanwhile, we reveal the dynamic effects of counter-rotating interaction on the qubits as compared to the results of the rotating-wave approximation.

  3. Protecting coherence by reservoir engineering: intense bath disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zixian; Lü, Zhiguo; Zheng, Hang

    2016-05-01

    We put forward a scheme based on reservoir engineering to protect quantum coherence from leaking to bath, in which we intensely disturb the Lorentzian bath by N harmonic oscillators. We show that the intense disturbance changes the spectrum of the bath and reduces the qubit-bath interaction. Furthermore, we give the exact time evolution with the Lorentzian spectrum by a master equation and calculate the concurrence and survival probability of the qubits to demonstrate the effect of the intense bath disturbance on the protection of coherence. Meanwhile, we reveal the dynamic effects of counter-rotating interaction on the qubits as compared to the results of the rotating-wave approximation.

  4. [Psychic disturbances in students].

    PubMed

    Hell, D

    1978-01-01

    43 of 80 students, who came to the student psychiatry service in Basle, had mainly specific problems concerning their studies. Those are divided into three typical syndromes: 1st: a syndrome of examination-anxiety (in 52% of the patients), 2nd: a syndrome of ambivalency with current changes of faculties, with many cessations of study and with long-term study (in 30%), and 3rd: a syndrome of chronic learning disability (in 18%). A conflict of authority is found psychodynamically with examination-anxiety, because these students often had an authoritarian father, who never acknowledged them. An unsolved dependence on their parents (especially on their mother) is the main reason for a syndrome of ambivalency and of learning disability. Therefore, the step from the university to professional independency is impossible or the gradual, "modest" learning is prevented by the continuing infantile illusions of omnipotency. A provisional one-year catamnesis shows a good prognosis for examination-anxieties. Long-term students and students with chronic learning disabilities need a longer therapy because of their deeper anal and narcissistic problems. PMID:696006

  5. Overexpression of TSC-22 (transforming growth factor- β-stimulated clone-22) causes marked obesity, splenic abnormality and B cell lymphoma in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Daisuke; Kawamata, Hitoshi; Omotehara, Fumie; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horiuchi, Hideki; Furihata, Tadashi; Tachibana, Masatsugu; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2016-03-22

    In this study, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice, which overexpressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22), and investigate the functional role of TSC-22 on their development and pathogenesis. We obtained 13 Tg-founders (two mice from C57BL6/J and 11 mice from BDF1). Three of 13 Tg-founders were sterile, and the remaining Tg-founders also could generate only a limited number of the F1 generation. We obtained 32 Tg-F1 mice. Most of the Tg-mice showed marked obesity. Histopathological examination could be performed on 31 Tg-mice; seventeen mice died by some disease in their entire life and 14 mice were killed for examination. Most of the Tg-mice examined showed splenic abnormality, in which marked increase of the megakaryocytes, unclearness of the margin of the red pulp and the white pulp, and the enlargement of the white pulp was observed. B cell lymphoma was developed in 10 (71%) of 14 disease-died F1 mice. These results indicate that constitutive over-expression of TSC-22 might disturb the normal embryogenesis and the normal lipid metabolism, and induce the oncogenic differentiation of hematopoietic cells. PMID:26872059

  6. Overexpression of TSC-22 (transforming growth factor-β-stimulated clone-22) causes marked obesity, splenic abnormality and B cell lymphoma in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horiuchi, Hideki; Furihata, Tadashi; Tachibana, Masatsugu; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice, which overexpressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-β stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22), and investigate the functional role of TSC-22 on their development and pathogenesis. We obtained 13 Tg-founders (two mice from C57BL6/J and 11 mice from BDF1). Three of 13 Tg-founders were sterile, and the remaining Tg-founders also could generate only a limited number of the F1 generation. We obtained 32 Tg-F1 mice. Most of the Tg-mice showed marked obesity. Histopathological examination could be performed on 31 Tg-mice; seventeen mice died by some disease in their entire life and 14 mice were killed for examination. Most of the Tg-mice examined showed splenic abnormality, in which marked increase of the megakaryocytes, unclearness of the margin of the red pulp and the white pulp, and the enlargement of the white pulp was observed. B cell lymphoma was developed in 10 (71%) of 14 disease-died F1 mice. These results indicate that constitutive over-expression of TSC-22 might disturb the normal embryogenesis and the normal lipid metabolism, and induce the oncogenic differentiation of hematopoietic cells. PMID:26872059

  7. Proof of Heisenberg's Error-Disturbance Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Paul; Lahti, Pekka; Werner, Reinhard F.

    2013-10-01

    While the slogan “no measurement without disturbance” has established itself under the name of the Heisenberg effect in the consciousness of the scientifically interested public, a precise statement of this fundamental feature of the quantum world has remained elusive, and serious attempts at rigorous formulations of it as a consequence of quantum theory have led to seemingly conflicting preliminary results. Here we show that despite recent claims to the contrary [L. Rozema et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 100404 (2012)], Heisenberg-type inequalities can be proven that describe a tradeoff between the precision of a position measurement and the necessary resulting disturbance of momentum (and vice versa). More generally, these inequalities are instances of an uncertainty relation for the imprecisions of any joint measurement of position and momentum. Measures of error and disturbance are here defined as figures of merit characteristic of measuring devices. As such they are state independent, each giving worst-case estimates across all states, in contrast to previous work that is concerned with the relationship between error and disturbance in an individual state.

  8. [Environmental factors disturbing fertility of men].

    PubMed

    Stefankiewicz, Joanna; Kurzawa, Rafał; Drozdzik, Marek

    2006-02-01

    In the last 50 years a significant decrease in human fertility has been observed. The result of research indicate that 6% of men aged 15-44 years are infertile or their fertility is significantly compromised. It has also been stated that 15% of couples have fertility problems. Among infertile couples it is a man who is responsible for 50% cases of infertility. Test results show that hormonal disturbances and abnormalities in semen production belong to main causes of infertility, while anatomic anomalie can be responsible for infertility only in few cases. Various chemical substances which appear in the environment may disturb fertility of men. Polluted soil, water and air are the sources of constant exposure to xenobiotics. Substances disturbing hormonal balance (endocrine disruptors) such as pesticide, dioxins and organic solvents cause the highest danger. Improper work conditions such as too high temperature, radiation, exposure to harmful substances also have negative influence on reproductive abilities of men. In addition, it has been noticed that both, some drugs and past infections of reproductive system may have a negative impact on fertility. Studies carried out in recent years have proven that improper lifestyle such as inadequate diet, alcohol abuse, smoking and long-term stress exposure can be the reason for fertility distrurbances in men. The latest findings have stressed genetic factors which may influence reproductive abilities of men. PMID:16736976

  9. Landscape Disturbance History and Belowground Carbon Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Smith, A. P.; Atkinson, E. E.; Chaopricha, N. T.

    2014-12-01

    Earth system models vary in their predictions of carbon (C) uptake and release by the terrestrial biosphere, partly due to great uncertainties in the response of soils, one of the largest C reservoirs. The world's soils play a major role in the exchange of greenhouse gases with the atmosphere, in sustaining primary production, and in providing food security. Despite this, the sensitivity of soils to disturbance is highly uncertain. One reason for this is geographic variability in the importance of different mechanisms regulating soil C turnover. Most of our understanding of factors influencing soil organic C dynamics comes from research in temperate soils, despite the major role of tropical soils in the global C cycle. Even in the tropics, the diversity of soil environments is grossly underrepresented in the literature. This has important implications for predictions of soil C change across latitudes. We discuss results from the response of soil C pools and microbial communities to land use legacies on two contrasting tropical soil environments. Uncertainties in the response of soil C to disturbance also stem from a historic focus on shallow depths and the assumption that deep soil C is unreactive to landscape change. Growing evidence indicates that soil C pools in deep mineral horizons can be sensitive to changes in land cover and climate. This realization highlights the need to reassess the source of soil C at depth and the processes contributing to its stabilization. We discuss results from the interaction between multiple disturbances: drought, fire and erosion, on the accumulation of soil C at depths beyond those typically included in regional or global inventories. Our data show that deep soil C can be reactive and be a potential source of C if reconnected to the atmosphere. A deeper, mechanistic appreciation for a landscape's history of disturbance is critical for predicting feedbacks between the terrestrial biosphere and the climate system.

  10. Sleep Disturbances in Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Stuart J; St Louis, Erik K; Boeve, Bradley F

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disorders appear to be frequent comorbidities in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness commonly occur in patients with FTD and significantly contribute to caregiver burden and burnout. Sleep is severely fragmented in FTD patients, likely secondary to behavioral disturbances, other primary sleep disorders such as sleep disordered breathing and restless leg syndrome, and neurodegeneration of nuclei involved in sleep and wakefulness. Treatment of primary sleep disorders may improve excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep quality and may improve daytime cognitive functioning. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder is rare in FTD and may be confused with excessive nocturnal activity due to disturbed circadian rhythm. The relationship between FTD, sleep quality, and sleep disorders requires further study to better understand the contribution of disturbed sleep to daytime neurocognitive functioning and quality of life in FTD. Further, future studies should focus on comparing sleep disturbances between different FTD syndromes, especially behavioral variant FTD and primary progressive aphasia. Comorbid sleep disorders should be promptly sought and treated in patients with FTD to improve patient and caregiver quality of life. PMID:27485946

  11. Identifying, Assisting the Disturbed Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Patricia L.; Schaefer, William

    1986-01-01

    Educators are in an excellent position to identify seriously troubled young people. Major causes of adolescent problems are discussed, including drugs, parental failure, and biochemical disturbances. Educators can best intervene by becoming aware of support services within their own school and community. (TE)

  12. [Sleep Disturbances in the Elderly].

    PubMed

    Mahlberg, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in the elderly. Endogen regulation mechanisms are often unstable. Light treatment and melatonin are proved chronobiological interventions. Cataract surgery is effective to enhance the sleep-wake-rhythm.Mandibular advancement devices are a reliable alternative to continuous positive air pressure (CPAP) in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). PMID:27509339

  13. RESILIENCE OF ECOSYSTEMS TO DISTURBANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resilience, in an ecological context, is one of several terms that characterize the response of an ecosystem to disturbance. Other such terms include persistence, resistance and stability. Two definitions of resilience have become prominent in the literature, both of which derive...

  14. State Definitions of Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wery, Jessica J.; Cullinan, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    This article examines definitions state education agencies use to describe the federal education disability called "emotional disturbance." State definitions were collected so that various aspects of them could be analyzed and compared with results of similar studies completed in the 1970s and 1980s. Among results are that state definitions have…

  15. Induced Disturbances Cause Monomorium pharaonis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Nest Relocation.

    PubMed

    Tay, Jia-Wei; Lee, Chow-Yang

    2015-06-01

    Budding and relocation of nests are important characteristics of the Pharaoh ant, Monomorium pharaonis (L.), an important pest of artificial structures. Pharaoh ant colony movements induced by several types of disturbances were evaluated in the laboratory. The percentages of workers and brood in the source and new nest sites were determined at Days 0, 1, 3, and 5 following physical disturbance (temporal removal of nestmates), chemical disturbance (application of pyrethroid insecticide), invasion by heterospecific ants, food depletion, and moisture depletion in the laboratory. All disturbances were performed in the source nest, which was connected to an empty new nest site. Almost all workers moved and carried the entire brood to the new nest site when subjected to physical disturbance, chemical disturbance, and ant invasion on Day 1, whereas only <5% of workers were present in the new nest site in the undisturbed control. After these disturbances, the brood was never relocated back to the original nest site in this 5-d study. When subjected to food depletion, ∼60% of the brood were found in the new nest site and ∼40% of the brood remained in the original nest on Day 5, resulting in a polydomous population. In contrast, moisture depletion did not show any significant effect on colony movement. These results provide useful information about the causes of Pharaoh ant colony budding and guidance about how to develop effective control and prevention strategies. PMID:26470251

  16. Geomagnetic disturbance and the orientation of nocturnally migrating birds.

    PubMed

    Moore, F R

    1977-05-01

    Free-flying passerine migrants respond to natural fluctuations in the earth's magnetic field. The variability in flight directions of nocturnal migrants is significantly correlated with increasing geomagnetic disturbance as measured by both the K index and various components of the earth's magnetic field. The results indicate that such disturbances influence the orientation of free-flying migrants, but the evidence is not sufficient to show that geomagnetism is a cue in their orientation system. PMID:854743

  17. Rapid disturbances in Arctic permafrost regions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, G.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Arp, C. D.; Jones, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost thaw is often perceived as a slow process dominated by press disturbances such as gradual active layer thickening. However, various pulse disturbances such as thermokarst formation can substantially increase the rate of permafrost thaw and result in rapid landscape change on sub-decadal to decadal time scales. Other disturbances associated with permafrost thaw are even more dynamic and unfold on sub-annual timescales, such as catastrophic thermokarst lake drainage. The diversity of processes results in complex feedbacks with soil carbon pools, biogeochemical cycles, hydrology, and flora and fauna, and requires a differentiated approach when quantifying how these ecosystem componentsare affected,how vulnerablethey are to rapid change, and what regional to global scale impacts result. Here we show quantitative measurements for three examples of rapid pulse disturbances in permafrost regions as observed with remote sensing data time series: The formation of a mega thaw slump (>50 ha) in syngenetic permafrost in Siberia, the formation of new thermokarst ponds in ice-rich permafrost regions in Alaska and Siberia, and the drainage of thermokarst lakes along a gradient of permafrost extent in Western Alaska. The surprising setting and unabated growth of the mega thaw slump during the last 40 years indicates that limited information on panarctic ground ice distribution, abundance, and vulnerability remains a key gap for reliable projections of thermokarst and thermo-erosion impacts, and that the natural limits on the growth and size of thaw slumps are still poorly understood. Observed thermokarst pond formation and expansion in our study regions was closely tied to ice-rich permafrost terrain, such as syngenetic Yedoma uplands, but was also found in old drained thermokarst lake basins with epigenetic permafrost and shallow drained thermokarst lake basins whose ground ice had not been depleted by the prior lake phase. The very different substrates in which new

  18. Cadmium-induced neural tube defects and fetal growth restriction: Association with disturbance of placental folate transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-Bin; Wang, Hua; Hu, Jun; Guo, Min-Yin; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Yan; Yu, Zhen; Fu, Lin; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies found that maternal Cd exposure on gestational day (GD)9 caused forelimb ectrodactyly and tail deformity, the characteristic malformations. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether maternal Cd exposure on GD8 induces fetal neural tube defects (NTDs). Pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl2 (2.5 or 5.0mg/kg) on GD8. Neither forelimb ectrodactyly nor tail deformity was observed in mice injected with CdCl2 on GD8. Instead, maternal Cd exposure on GD8 resulted in the incidence of NTDs. Moreover, maternal Cd exposure on GD8 resulted in fetal growth restriction. In addition, maternal Cd exposure on GD8 reduced placental weight and diameter. The internal space of maternal and fetal blood vessels in the labyrinth layer was decreased in the placentas of mice treated with CdCl2. Additional experiment showed that placental PCFT protein and mRNA, a critical folate transporter, was persistently decreased when dams were injected with CdCl2 on GD8. Correspondingly, embryonic folate content was markedly decreased in mice injected with CdCl2 on GD8, whereas Cd had little effect on folate content in maternal serum. Taken together, these results suggest that maternal Cd exposure during organogenesis disturbs transport of folate from maternal circulation to the fetuses through down-regulating placental folate transporters. PMID:27417525

  19. Chronic Light Exposure in the Middle of the Night Disturbs the Circadian System and Emotional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Yan, Lily

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, the circadian system is composed of a principal circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and a number of subordinate oscillators in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral tissues/organs. However, how the time-keeping functions of this multiple oscillator circuit are affected by aberrant lighting environments remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic light exposure in the middle of the night on the circadian system by comparing the mice housed in a 12:4:4:4-h L:DLD condition with the controls in 12:12-h L:D condition. Daily rhythms in locomotor activity were analyzed and the expression patterns of protein products of clock genes Period1 and Period2 (PER1 and PER2) were examined in the SCN and extra-SCN brain regions, including the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Following 2 weeks of housing in the L:DLD condition, animals showed disturbed daily rhythms in locomotor activity and lacked daily rhythms of PER1 and PER2 in the SCN. In the extra-SCN brain regions, the PER1 and PER2 rhythms were affected in a region-specific pattern, such that they were relatively undisturbed in the striatum and hippocampus, phase-shifted in the BLA, and abolished in the PVN. In addition, mice in the L:DLD condition showed increased anxiety-like behaviors and reduced brain-derived neurotropic factor messenger RNA expression in the hippocampus, amygdala, and medial prefrontal cortex, which are brain regions that are involved in emotional regulation. These results indicate that nighttime light exposure leads to circadian disturbances not only by abolishing the circadian rhythms in the SCN but also by inducing misalignment among brain oscillators and negatively affects emotional processing. These observations serve to identify risks associated with decisions regarding lifestyle in our modern society. PMID:27075857

  20. Temporal and spatial evolution characteristics of disturbance wave in a hypersonic boundary layer due to single-frequency entropy disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing; Shi, Jianqiang

    2014-01-01

    By using a high-order accurate finite difference scheme, direct numerical simulation of hypersonic flow over an 8° half-wedge-angle blunt wedge under freestream single-frequency entropy disturbance is conducted; the generation and the temporal and spatial nonlinear evolution of boundary layer disturbance waves are investigated. Results show that, under the freestream single-frequency entropy disturbance, the entropy state of boundary layer is changed sharply and the disturbance waves within a certain frequency range are induced in the boundary layer. Furthermore, the amplitudes of disturbance waves in the period phase are larger than that in the response phase and ablation phase and the frequency range in the boundary layer in the period phase is narrower than that in these two phases. In addition, the mode competition, dominant mode transformation, and disturbance energy transfer exist among different modes both in temporal and in spatial evolution. The mode competition changes the characteristics of nonlinear evolution of the unstable waves in the boundary layer. The development of the most unstable mode along streamwise relies more on the motivation of disturbance waves in the upstream than that of other modes on this motivation. PMID:25143983

  1. Temporal and Spatial Evolution Characteristics of Disturbance Wave in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer due to Single-Frequency Entropy Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hongqing; Shi, Jianqiang

    2014-01-01

    By using a high-order accurate finite difference scheme, direct numerical simulation of hypersonic flow over an 8° half-wedge-angle blunt wedge under freestream single-frequency entropy disturbance is conducted; the generation and the temporal and spatial nonlinear evolution of boundary layer disturbance waves are investigated. Results show that, under the freestream single-frequency entropy disturbance, the entropy state of boundary layer is changed sharply and the disturbance waves within a certain frequency range are induced in the boundary layer. Furthermore, the amplitudes of disturbance waves in the period phase are larger than that in the response phase and ablation phase and the frequency range in the boundary layer in the period phase is narrower than that in these two phases. In addition, the mode competition, dominant mode transformation, and disturbance energy transfer exist among different modes both in temporal and in spatial evolution. The mode competition changes the characteristics of nonlinear evolution of the unstable waves in the boundary layer. The development of the most unstable mode along streamwise relies more on the motivation of disturbance waves in the upstream than that of other modes on this motivation. PMID:25143983

  2. Increased tolerance to humans among disturbed wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Samia, Diogo S. M.; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Nomura, Fausto; Rangel, Thiago F.; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Human disturbance drives the decline of many species, both directly and indirectly. Nonetheless, some species do particularly well around humans. One mechanism that may explain coexistence is the degree to which a species tolerates human disturbance. Here we provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of birds, mammals and lizards to investigate species tolerance of human disturbance and explore the drivers of this tolerance in birds. We find that, overall, disturbed populations of the three major taxa are more tolerant of human disturbance than less disturbed populations. The best predictors of the direction and magnitude of bird tolerance of human disturbance are the type of disturbed area (urbanized birds are more tolerant than rural or suburban populations) and body mass (large birds are more tolerant than small birds). By identifying specific features associated with tolerance, these results guide evidence-based conservation strategies to predict and manage the impacts of increasing human disturbance on birds. PMID:26568451

  3. Increased tolerance to humans among disturbed wildlife.

    PubMed

    Samia, Diogo S M; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Nomura, Fausto; Rangel, Thiago F; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2015-01-01

    Human disturbance drives the decline of many species, both directly and indirectly. Nonetheless, some species do particularly well around humans. One mechanism that may explain coexistence is the degree to which a species tolerates human disturbance. Here we provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of birds, mammals and lizards to investigate species tolerance of human disturbance and explore the drivers of this tolerance in birds. We find that, overall, disturbed populations of the three major taxa are more tolerant of human disturbance than less disturbed populations. The best predictors of the direction and magnitude of bird tolerance of human disturbance are the type of disturbed area (urbanized birds are more tolerant than rural or suburban populations) and body mass (large birds are more tolerant than small birds). By identifying specific features associated with tolerance, these results guide evidence-based conservation strategies to predict and manage the impacts of increasing human disturbance on birds. PMID:26568451

  4. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  5. Automated Detection and Annotation of Disturbance in Eastern Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. J.; Chen, G.; Hayes, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    areas as disturbed, overestimating disturbance and creating ambiguity in the neural network. Even so, total classification error in a neighboring testing region is 22%. Most error comes labeling disturbances that are unknown in the training data as a known disturbance type. Confusion within known disturbance types is low, with 7% misclassification error for southern pine beetle, and 11% misclassification error for fire, which is likely due to over-estimates of disturbance extent in ADS polygons. Additionally, we used the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to quantify the carbon flux associated with a subset of selected disturbances of different severity and type. Early results show that combined disturbances resulted in a net carbon source of 1.27 kg/m2 between 1981 and 2010, which is about 8% of the total carbon storage in forests. This carbon loss offset much of the carbon sink effects resulting from elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen deposition.

  6. Thermal structure and dynamics of Saturn's northern springtime disturbance.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Leigh N; Hesman, Brigette E; Irwin, Patrick G J; Baines, Kevin H; Momary, Thomas W; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Flasar, F Michael; Read, Peter L; Orton, Glenn S; Simon-Miller, Amy; Hueso, Ricardo; Bjoraker, Gordon L; Mamoutkine, Andrei; del Rio-Gaztelurrutia, Teresa; Gomez, Jose M; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger N; Nicholson, Philip D; Sotin, Christophe

    2011-06-17

    Saturn's slow seasonal evolution was disrupted in 2010-2011 by the eruption of a bright storm in its northern spring hemisphere. Thermal infrared spectroscopy showed that within a month, the resulting planetary-scale disturbance had generated intense perturbations of atmospheric temperatures, winds, and composition between 20° and 50°N over an entire hemisphere (140,000 kilometers). The tropospheric storm cell produced effects that penetrated hundreds of kilometers into Saturn's stratosphere (to the 1-millibar region). Stratospheric subsidence at the edges of the disturbance produced "beacons" of infrared emission and longitudinal temperature contrasts of 16 kelvin. The disturbance substantially altered atmospheric circulation, transporting material vertically over great distances, modifying stratospheric zonal jets, exciting wave activity and turbulence, and generating a new cold anticyclonic oval in the center of the disturbance at 41°N. PMID:21596955

  7. Thermal structure and dynamics of Saturn's northern springtime disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, L.N.; Hesman, B.E.; Irwin, P.G.J.; Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Flasar, F.M.; Read, P.L.; Orton, G.S.; Simon-Miller, A.; Hueso, R.; Bjoraker, G.L.; Mamoutkine, A.; Del, Rio-Gaztelurrutia; Gomez, J.M.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Saturn's slow seasonal evolution was disrupted in 2010-2011 by the eruption of a bright storm in its northern spring hemisphere. Thermal infrared spectroscopy showed that within a month, the resulting planetary-scale disturbance had generated intense perturbations of atmospheric temperatures, winds, and composition between 20?? and 50??N over an entire hemisphere (140,000 kilometers). The tropospheric storm cell produced effects that penetrated hundreds of kilometers into Saturn's stratosphere (to the 1-millibar region). Stratospheric subsidence at the edges of the disturbance produced "beacons" of infrared emission and longitudinal temperature contrasts of 16 kelvin. The disturbance substantially altered atmospheric circulation, transporting material vertically over great distances, modifying stratospheric zonal jets, exciting wave activity and turbulence, and generating a new cold anticyclonic oval in the center of the disturbance at 41??N.

  8. A succession of theories: purging redundancy from disturbance theory.

    PubMed

    Pulsford, Stephanie A; Lindenmayer, David B; Driscoll, Don A

    2016-02-01

    trait approach is likely to improve the predictive capacity of disturbance theory. Finally, we complement our discussion of theory with a case study which emphasises that many post-disturbance theories apply simultaneously to the same ecosystem. Using the well-studied mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans) forests of south-eastern Australia, we illustrate phenomena that align with six of the theories described in our model of rationalised disturbance theory. We encourage further work to improve our schematic model, increase coverage of disturbance-related theory, and to show how the model may link to, or integrate with, other domains of ecological theory. PMID:25428521

  9. Entropic error-disturbance relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Patrick; Furrer, Fabian

    2014-03-01

    We derive an entropic error-disturbance relation for a sequential measurement scenario as originally considered by Heisenberg, and we discuss how our relation could be tested using existing experimental setups. Our relation is valid for discrete observables, such as spin, as well as continuous observables, such as position and momentum. The novel aspect of our relation compared to earlier versions is its clear operational interpretation and the quantification of error and disturbance using entropic quantities. This directly relates the measurement uncertainty, a fundamental property of quantum mechanics, to information theoretical limitations and offers potential applications in for instance quantum cryptography. PC is funded by National Research Foundation Singapore and Ministry of Education Tier 3 Grant ``Random numbers from quantum processes'' (MOE2012-T3-1-009). FF is funded by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, KAKENHI grant No. 24-02793.

  10. [Locomotion disturbances in Huntington's disease].

    PubMed

    Delval, A; Krystkowiak, P

    2010-02-01

    In Huntington's disease (HD), perturbed locomotion occurs early in the course of the disease and presents numerous clinical features. The gait disorders in HD might best be defined as a timing disorder; however, hypokinesia (i.e. a decrease in stride length) also plays an important role in disturbed locomotion as HD progresses. Gait impairments are particularly important because they lead to an increased risk of falls. Falls risk factors and consequences depend on the stage of the disease. A satisfactory therapeutic strategy for gait impairments is a serious challenge: the use of a metronome during gait in HD patients does not effectively improve their gait. Attention deficits in HD may be a major determinant of this failure. The effect of antichoreic medications on gait is still controversial because of the absence of specific evaluation of these medications on gait disturbances. PMID:19604530

  11. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  12. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  13. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  14. Interplanetary Disturbances Affecting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The Sun somehow accelerates the solar wind, an incessant stream of plasma originating in coronal holes and some, as yet unidentified, regions. Occasionally, coronal, and possibly sub-photospheric structures, conspire to energize a spectacular eruption from the Sun which we call a coronal mass ejection (CME). These can leave the Sun at very high speeds and travel through the interplanetary medium, resulting in a large-scale disturbance of the ambient background plasma. These interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) can drive shocks which in turn accelerate particles, but also have a distinct intrinsic magnetic structure which is capable of disturbing the Earth's magnetic field and causing significant geomagnetic effects. They also affect other planets, so they can and do contribute to space weather throughout the heliosphere. This paper presents a historical review of early space weather studies, a modern-day example, and discusses space weather throughout the heliosphere.

  15. Natural and Human-induced Disturbances and Their Impacts on Forest Carbon Budgets in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Birdsey, R.; Chen, J. M.; McCullough, K.; Zhang, F.

    2014-12-01

    Natural and human-induced disturbances have profound impacts on forest carbon dynamics, and may cause the greatest uncertainty in estimating forest carbon budgets. In North America, three countries show very different forest disturbance patterns: Canadian forests are dominated by natural disturbances such as wildfires and insect outbreaks; forests of Mexico are more affected by human-induced land disturbances such as land-use change; while US forests are equally affected by human-induced and natural disturbances. As human-induced disturbances are closely linked to socioeconomic factors, natural disturbances are usually viewed as a natural process in forests and have equilibrium impacts on forests over the long run. However, with climate change and related changes in natural disturbance regimes in terms of frequency, intensity and scale, there are now fundamental changes in the nature of the impact of natural disturbances on forest carbon dynamics and even greater uncertainty about forest carbon budgets and feedbacks to the atmosphere and climate. In this study, we synthesize disturbance information for North America based on existing remote-sensing products, ground-based observations and modeling studies, evaluating impacts of disturbances on forest carbon budgets that are relevant to disturbance types, scales, frequency and intensity. The work represents the initial step of a more ambitious project tackling this research challenge for North America that crosses a broad climate gradient and diverse socioeconomic entities. The goal is to ultimately improve the estimates of forest carbon budgets and their potential for climate mitigation under changing environments.

  16. Biweekly disturbance capture and attribution: case study in western Alberta grizzly bear habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilker, Thomas; Coops, Nicholas C.; Gaulton, Rachel; Wulder, Michael A.; Cranston, Jerome; Stenhouse, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the impact of landscape disturbance on ecosystems. Satellite remote sensing can be used for mapping disturbances, and fusion techniques of sensors with complimentary characteristics can help to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of satellite-based mapping techniques. Classification of different disturbance types from satellite observations is difficult, yet important, especially in an ecological context as different disturbance types might have different impacts on vegetation recovery, wildlife habitats, and food resources. We demonstrate a possible approach for classifying common disturbance types by means of their spatial characteristics. First, landscape level change is characterized on a near biweekly basis through application of a data fusion model (spatial temporal adaptive algorithm for mapping reflectance change) and a number of spatial and temporal characteristics of the predicted disturbance patches are inferred. A regression tree approach is then used to classify disturbance events. Our results show that spatial and temporal disturbance characteristics can be used to classify disturbance events with an overall accuracy of 86% of the disturbed area observed. The date of disturbance was identified as the most powerful predictor of the disturbance type, together with the patch core area, patch size, and contiguity.

  17. Effects of Connectivity and Recurrent Local Disturbances on Community Structure and Population Density in Experimental Metacommunities

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Francesco; Rinaldo, Andrea; Holyoak, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Metacommunity theory poses that the occurrence and abundance of species is a product of local factors, including disturbance, and regional factors, like dispersal among patches. While metacommunity ideas have been broadly tested there is relatively little work on metacommunities subject to disturbance. We focused on how localized disturbance and dispersal interact to determine species composition in metacommunities. Experiments conducted in simple two-patch habitats containing eight protozoa and rotifer species tested how dispersal altered community composition in both communities that were disturbed and communities that connected to refuge communities not subject to disturbance. While disturbance lowered population densities, in disturbed patches connected to undisturbed patches this was ameliorated by immigration. Furthermore, species with high dispersal abilities or growth rates showed the fastest post-disturbance recovery in presence of immigration. Connectivity helped to counteract the negative effect of disturbances on local populations, allowing mass-effect-driven dispersal of individuals from undisturbed to disturbed patches. In undisturbed patches, however, local population sizes were not significantly reduced by emigration. The absence of a cost of dispersal for undisturbed source populations is consistent with a lack of complex demography in our system, such as age- or sex-specific emigration. Our approach provides an improved way to separate components of population growth from organisms' movement in post-disturbance recovery of (meta)communities. Further studies are required in a variety of ecosystems to investigate the transient dynamics resulting from disturbance and dispersal. PMID:21559336

  18. Immunotherapy toxic in obese mice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    New research shows immunotherapy can cause lethal inflammation in both young and aged mice that are obese. Restricting calories in aged mice protected them from toxicity, and giving young obese mice a drug for autoimmune disease prevented the fatal reactions. PMID:25583780

  19. A Genetic Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease Shows Involuntary Movements and Increased Postsynaptic Sensitivity to Apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Brehm, N; Bez, F; Carlsson, T; Kern, B; Gispert, S; Auburger, G; Cenci, M A

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-synuclein (SNCA) protein aggregation plays a causal role in Parkinson's disease (PD). The SNCA protein modulates neurotransmission via the SNAP receptor (SNARE) complex assembly and presynaptic vesicle trafficking. The striatal presynaptic dopamine deficit is alleviated by treatment with levodopa (L-DOPA), but postsynaptic plastic changes induced by this treatment lead to a development of involuntary movements (dyskinesia). While this process is currently modeled in rodents harboring neurotoxin-induced lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway, we have here explored the postsynaptic supersensitivity of dopamine receptor-mediated signaling in a genetic mouse model of early PD. To this end, we used mice with prion promoter-driven overexpression of A53T-SNCA in the nigrostriatal and corticostriatal projections. At a symptomatic age (18 months), mice were challenged with apomorphine (5 mg/kg s.c.) and examined using both behavioral and molecular assays. After the administration of apomorphine, A53T-transgenic mice showed more severe stereotypic and dystonic movements in comparison with wild-type controls. Molecular markers of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and Fos messenger RNA (mRNA), were examined in striatal tissue at 30 and 100 min after apomorphine injection. At 30 min, wild-type and transgenic mice showed a similar induction of phosphorylated ERK1/2, Dusp1, and Dusp6 mRNA (two MAPK phosphatases). At the same time point, Fos mRNA was induced more strongly in mutant mice than in wild-type controls. At 100 min after apomorphine treatment, the induction of both Fos, Dusp1, and Dusp6 mRNA was significantly larger in mutant mice than wild-type controls. At this time point, apomorphine caused a reduction in phospho-ERK1/2 levels specifically in the transgenic mice. Our results document for the first time a disturbance of ERK1/2 signaling regulation associated with apomorphine-induced involuntary movements

  20. The Wordpath Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, Alice

    The Intertribal Wordpath Society is a nonprofit educational corporation formed to promote the teaching, status, awareness, and use of Oklahoma Indian languages. The Society produces "Wordpath," a weekly 30-minute public access television show about Oklahoma Indian languages and the people who are teaching and preserving them. The show aims to…

  1. Visual Disturbances: Related to Migraine or Not?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Not? Print Email Visual Disturbances: Related to Migraine or Not? ACHE Newsletter Sign up for our ... e-mail address below. Visual Disturbances: Related to Migraine or Not? By: Deborah I. Friedman, MD, MPH ...

  2. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  3. Food restriction by intermittent fasting induces diabetes and obesity and aggravates spontaneous atherosclerosis development in hypercholesterolaemic mice.

    PubMed

    Dorighello, Gabriel G; Rovani, Juliana C; Luhman, Christopher J F; Paim, Bruno A; Raposo, Helena F; Vercesi, Anibal E; Oliveira, Helena C F

    2014-03-28

    Different regimens of food restriction have been associated with protection against obesity, diabetes and CVD. In the present study, we hypothesised that food restriction would bring benefits to atherosclerosis- and diabetes-prone hypercholesterolaemic LDL-receptor knockout mice. For this purpose, 2-month-old mice were submitted to an intermittent fasting (IF) regimen (fasting every other day) over a 3-month period, which resulted in an overall 20 % reduction in food intake. Contrary to our expectation, epididymal and carcass fat depots and adipocyte size were significantly enlarged by 15, 72 and 68 %, respectively, in the IF mice compared with the ad libitum-fed mice. Accordingly, plasma levels of leptin were 50 % higher in the IF mice than in the ad libitum-fed mice. In addition, the IF mice showed increased plasma levels of total cholesterol (37 %), VLDL-cholesterol (195 %) and LDL-cholesterol (50 %). As expected, in wild-type mice, the IF regimen decreased plasma cholesterol levels and epididymal fat mass. Glucose homeostasis was also disturbed by the IF regimen in LDL-receptor knockout mice. Elevated levels of glycaemia (40 %), insulinaemia (50 %), glucose intolerance and insulin resistance were observed in the IF mice. Systemic inflammatory markers, TNF-α and C-reactive protein, were significantly increased and spontaneous atherosclerosis development were markedly increased (3-fold) in the IF mice. In conclusion, the IF regimen induced obesity and diabetes and worsened the development of spontaneous atherosclerosis in LDL-receptor knockout mice. Although being efficient in a wild-type background, this type of food restriction is not beneficial in the context of genetic hypercholesterolaemia. PMID:24176004

  4. Disturbance regimes and ecological responses across sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disturbances affect ecosystems in almost limitless ways. The effects of disturbances extend beyond the initial impacts that are usually visible to the human eye. Therefore, for many disturbances long-term data are needed to unravel their effects. This chapter first presents characteristics of distu...

  5. 32 CFR 643.114 - Civil disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Civil disturbances. 643.114 Section 643.114... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.114 Civil disturbances. Without reference to higher... facilities during civil disturbance for not more than 30 days to the National Guard and to municipal,...

  6. 32 CFR 643.114 - Civil disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil disturbances. 643.114 Section 643.114... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.114 Civil disturbances. Without reference to higher... facilities during civil disturbance for not more than 30 days to the National Guard and to municipal,...

  7. 32 CFR 643.114 - Civil disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Civil disturbances. 643.114 Section 643.114... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.114 Civil disturbances. Without reference to higher... facilities during civil disturbance for not more than 30 days to the National Guard and to municipal,...

  8. 32 CFR 643.114 - Civil disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil disturbances. 643.114 Section 643.114... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.114 Civil disturbances. Without reference to higher... facilities during civil disturbance for not more than 30 days to the National Guard and to municipal,...

  9. 32 CFR 643.114 - Civil disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Civil disturbances. 643.114 Section 643.114... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.114 Civil disturbances. Without reference to higher... facilities during civil disturbance for not more than 30 days to the National Guard and to municipal,...

  10. Sleep disturbance and neuropsychological function in young children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Heather E; Lam, Janet C; Mahone, E Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbance, common among children with ADHD, can contribute to cognitive and behavioral dysfunction. It is therefore challenging to determine whether neurobehavioral dysfunction should be attributed to ADHD symptoms, sleep disturbance, or both. The present study examined parent-reported sleep problems (Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire) and their relationship to neuropsychological function in 64 children, aged 4-7 years, with and without ADHD. Compared to typically developing controls, children with ADHD were reported by parents to have significantly greater sleep disturbance--including sleep onset delay, sleep anxiety, night awakenings, and daytime sleepiness--(all p ≤ .01), and significantly poorer performance on tasks of attention, executive control, processing speed, and working memory (all p < .01). Within the ADHD group, total parent-reported sleep disturbance was significantly associated with deficits in attention and executive control skills (all p ≤ .01); however, significant group differences (relative to controls) on these measures remained (p < .01) even after controlling for total sleep disturbance. While sleep problems are common among young children with ADHD, these findings suggest that inattention and executive dysfunction appear to be attributable to symptoms of ADHD rather than to sleep disturbance. The relationships among sleep, ADHD symptoms, and neurobehavioral function in older children may show different patterns as a function of the chronicity of disordered sleep. PMID:25765292

  11. Discovery of novel peptides targeting pro-atherogenic endothelium in disturbed flow regions -Targeted siRNA delivery to pro-atherogenic endothelium in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jihwa; Shim, Hyunbo; Kim, Kwanchang; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Won Jong; Kang, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sang Won; Jo, Hanjoong; Kwon, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis occurs preferentially in arterial regions exposed to disturbed blood flow. Targeting these pro-atherogenic regions is a potential anti-atherogenic therapeutic approach, but it has been extremely challenging. Here, using in vivo phage display approach and the partial carotid ligation model of flow-induced atherosclerosis in mouse, we identified novel peptides that specifically bind to endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to disturbed flow condition in pro-atherogenic regions. Two peptides, CLIRRTSIC and CPRRSHPIC, selectively bound to arterial ECs exposed to disturbed flow not only in the partially ligated carotids but also in the lesser curvature and branching point of the aortic arch in mice as well as human pulmonary artery branches. Peptides were conjugated to branched polyethylenimine-polyethylene glycol polymer to generate polyplexes carrying siRNA targeting intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (siICAM-1). In mouse model, CLIRRTSIC polyplexes carrying si-ICAM-1 specifically bound to endothelium in disturbed flow regions, reducing endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that non-muscle myosin heavy chain II A (NMHC IIA) is a protein targeted by CLIRRTSIC peptide. Further studies showed that shear stress regulates NMHC IIA expression and localization in ECs. The CLIRRTSIC is a novel peptide that could be used for targeted delivery of therapeutics such as siRNAs to pro-atherogenic endothelium. PMID:27173134

  12. Gallic Acid Ameliorated Impaired Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis in High Fat Diet-Induced NAFLD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jung; Huo, Teh-Ia; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Qin, Xue-Mei; Hsieh, Ming-Tsuen; Pao, Li-Heng; Peng, Wen-Huang

    2014-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA), a naturally abundant plant phenolic compound in vegetables and fruits, has been shown to have potent anti-oxidative and anti-obesity activity. However, the effects of GA on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the beneficial effects of GA administration on nutritional hepatosteatosis model by a more “holistic view” approach, namely 1H NMR-based metabolomics, in order to prove efficacy and to obtain information that might lead to a better understanding of the mode of action of GA. Male C57BL/6 mice were placed for 16 weeks on either a normal chow diet, a high fat diet (HFD, 60%), or a high fat diet supplemented with GA (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, orally). Liver histopathology and serum biochemical examinations indicated that the daily administration of GA protects against hepatic steatosis, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and insulin resistance among the HFD-induced NAFLD mice. In addition, partial least squares discriminant analysis scores plots demonstrated that the cluster of HFD fed mice is clearly separated from the normal group mice plots, indicating that the metabolic characteristics of these two groups are distinctively different. Specifically, the GA-treated mice are located closer to the normal group of mice, indicating that the HFD-induced disturbances to the metabolic profile were partially reversed by GA treatment. Our results show that the hepatoprotective effect of GA occurs in part through a reversing of the HFD caused disturbances to a range of metabolic pathways, including lipid metabolism, glucose metabolism (glycolysis and gluconeogenesis), amino acids metabolism, choline metabolism and gut-microbiota-associated metabolism. Taken together, this study suggested that a 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach is a useful platform for natural product functional evaluation. The selected metabolites are potentially useful as preventive action biomarkers and could also be used to help

  13. Gravitational spurs and resonances - Effects of small mass disturbers in spiral galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, G. G.; Smith, B. F.; Miller, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    In the present simulations of a disturber in a complete stellar disk without the restrictive assumption, the disturber parameters of the NGC 206 cloud in M 31 were assumed as a realistic example. The resulting spur around the disturber was comparable in shape, size, and strength to Julian and Toomre's (1966) results. In addition, a complicated evolving pattern of strong density peaks appeared well inside and outside the disturber's orbit. Simulation with a ten-times-more-massive disturber showed a more clearly defined version of the same initial pattern, two spiral arms of density peaks rotating with the disturber in the stronger arm. The orbital radii of the density peaks correspond to those of epicyclic resonances with the orbiting disturber potential.

  14. Determination of travelling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degenhardt, W.; Hartmann, G. H.; Davies, K.

    1978-01-01

    A total of 35 days of Faraday rotation data was obtained from the ATS-6 radio beacon experiment operating with the closely spaced network of Elbert, Table Mountain, and Fort Morgan. The 140-MHz Faraday bandpass data are uncorrelated in the transmission range from 8 to 45 minutes. There are distinct, well correlated, and time-displaced maxima and minima that allow the calculation of the speed and direction of horizontal motions of plane fronts of disturbances in the ionosphere. For some selected events, velocities between 88 and 278 m/sec were obtained.

  15. [Esophageal motor disturbances in sclerodermia].

    PubMed

    Stanciu, C; Cijevschi, C; Dobrescu, A; Petrescu, Z

    1981-01-01

    By the manometric method the esophageal motility in 14 patients with sclerodermia was studied. All patients presented an esophageal motor dysfunction characterized by the decrease in amplitude of the spohageal contractions, presence of aperistaltic contractions, decrease of basal pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter and its incomplete relaxation at deglutition. These esophageal motor disturbances may appear in association or separately in the same patient. The pathogenesis of the esophageal motor dysfunction in sclerodermia is not yet fully understood. Besides the theoretical interest, the knowledge of the esophageal motor dysfunction in sclerodermia has also a practical value in respect of the tretment which is to be set up. PMID:25528800

  16. Show What You Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccleston, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Big things come in small packages. This saying came to the mind of the author after he created a simple math review activity for his fourth grade students. Though simple, it has proven to be extremely advantageous in reinforcing math concepts. He uses this activity, which he calls "Show What You Know," often. This activity provides the perfect…

  17. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  18. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  19. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  20. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  1. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  2. [Response of Sediment Micro Environment and Micro Interface to Physical Disturbance Intensity Under the Disturbance of Chironomus plumosus].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-dan; Li, Yong; Li, Da-peng; Wang, Ren; Deng, Meng; Huang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The response of sediment micro environment and micro intertace to physical disturbance intensity under the physical and Chironomus plumosus disturbance was investigated by means of sediment Rhizon samplers and Unisense micro sensor system. The sediment and overlying water were taken from Meiliang bay of Taihu Lake. The results showed that the OPD reached up to 12.1 mm under the high intensity (240 r · min(-1)), while it was higher than 3. 8. mm under low intensity (60 r · min(-1)). The TOE, the difference of TOE and DOE, OPD, ORP and the difference of DO spatial distribution were all positively correlated with the physical disturbance intensity. The increasing magnitude and range of pH as well as the decreasing magnitude and range of ferrous followed the same response tendency. Within the 0-6 cm sediment, the water content and porosity as well as the microbial activity at the same depth increased with the increase of physical disturbance intensity. In addition, the degree of response of the above parameters to the physical disturbance intensity was weakened with the increase of sediment depth. It was suggested that Chironomus plumosus dug more and deeper galleries under high intensity physical disturbance. Therefore, the sediment micro environment and micro interface were transformed in the vertical direction of the sediment. PMID:26314108

  3. Toward a National Early Warning System for Forest Disturbances Using Remotely Sensed Land-Surface Phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, W. W.; Spruce, J.

    2010-12-01

    A prototype National Early Warning System (EWS) for Forest Disturbances was established in 2010 by producing national maps showing potential forest disturbance across the conterminous United States at 231m resolution every 8 days. Each map is based on Land-Surface Phenology (LSP), calculated using temporally smoothed MODIS MOD13 imagery obtained over the preceding 24-day analysis window. Potential disturbance maps are generated by comparing a spatially and temporally specific historical expectation of normal NDVI "greenness" with NDVI "greenness" from a series of current satellite views. Three different disturbance products are produced using differing lengths of historical baseline periods to calculate the expected normal greenness. The short-term baseline products show only disturbances newer than one year ago, while the intermediate baseline products show disturbances since the prior three years, and the long-term baseline products show all disturbances over the MODIS historical period. A Forest Change Assessment Viewer website, http://ews.forestthreats.org/NPDE/NPDE.html, showcases the three most recent national disturbance maps in full spatial context. Although 2010 was a wet el Nino year without major forest problems, disturbances in 2010 in MI, NY, CO and LA will be highlighted. Forest disturbances caused by wildfire, hurricanes, tornadoes, hail, ice storms, and defoliating insects, including fall cankerworms, forest tent caterpillars, gypsy moths, baldcypress leafrollers and winter moths were successfully detected during the 2009 and 2010 field seasons. The EWS was used in 2010 to detect and alert Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) Aerial Disturbance Survey personnel to an otherwise-unknown outbreak of forest tent caterpillar and baldcypress leafroller in the Atchafalaya and Pearl River regions of southern Louisiana. A local FHM Program Coordinator verified these EWS-detected outbreaks. Many defoliator-induced disturbances were ephemeral, and were followed by

  4. Endogenous galectin-3 expression levels modulate immune responses in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aparna D; Gude, Rajiv P; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2015-12-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding mammalian lectin, is involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, there is an unmet need to identify the underlying mechanisms of cancer metastasis mediated by endogenous host galectin-3. Galectin-3 is also known to be an important regulator of immune responses. The present study was aimed at analysing how expression of endogenous galectin-3 regulates host immunity and lung metastasis in B16F10 murine melanoma model. Transgenic Gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and Gal-3(-/-) (null) mice exhibited decreased levels of Natural Killer (NK) cells and lower NK mediated cytotoxicity against YAC-1 tumor targets, compared to Gal-3(+/+) (wild-type) mice. On stimulation, Gal-3(+/-) and Gal-3(-/-) mice splenocytes showed increased T cell proliferation than Gal-3(+/+) mice. Intracellular calcium flux was found to be lower in activated T cells of Gal-3(-/-) mice as compared to T cells from Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice. In Gal-3(-/-) mice, serum Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine levels were found to be lowest, exhibiting dysregulation of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines balance. Marked decrease in serum IFN-γ levels and splenic IFN-γR1 (IFN-γ Receptor 1) expressing T and NK cell percentages were observed in Gal-3(-/-) mice. On recombinant IFN-γ treatment of splenocytes in vitro, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 protein expression was higher in Gal-3(-/-) mice compared to that in Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice; suggesting possible attenuation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) 1 mediated IFN-γ signaling in Gal-3(-/-) mice. The ability of B16F10 melanoma cells to form metastatic colonies in the lungs of Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(-/-) mice remained comparable, whereas it was found to be reduced in Gal-3(+/-) mice. Our data indicates that complete absence of endogenous host galectin-3 facilitates lung metastasis of B16F10 cells in mice, which may be contributed by dysregulated immune

  5. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two.

  6. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-10-28

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two. 12 figs.

  7. Street lighting disturbs commuting bats.

    PubMed

    Stone, Emma Louise; Jones, Gareth; Harris, Stephen

    2009-07-14

    Anthropogenic disturbance is a major cause of worldwide declines in biodiversity. Understanding the implications of this disturbance for species and populations is crucial for conservation biologists wishing to mitigate negative effects. Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasing global problem, affecting ecological interactions across a range of taxa and impacting negatively upon critical animal behaviors including foraging, reproduction, and communication (for review see). Almost all bats are nocturnal, making them ideal subjects for testing the effects of light pollution. Previous studies have shown that bat species adapted to foraging in open environments feed on insects attracted to mercury vapor lamps. Here, we use an experimental approach to provide the first evidence of a negative effect of artificial light pollution on the commuting behavior of a threatened bat species. We installed high-pressure sodium lights that mimic the intensity and light spectra of streetlights along commuting routes of lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros). Bat activity was reduced dramatically and the onset of commuting behavior was delayed in the presence of lighting, with no evidence of habituation. These results demonstrate that light pollution may have significant negative impacts upon the selection of flight routes by bats. PMID:19540116

  8. Transient Effects and Disturbed Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibberenz, G.; Le Roux, J. A.; Potgieter, M. S.; Bieber, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    In the present phase of the solar cycle no big transients leading to strong modulation had been observed after 1991. Apart from a few minor disturbances cosmic rays were still recovering to a new intensity maximum. It was suggested, therefore, that existing literature from previous cycles should be critically reviewed. The scene was set by the introductory papers on - phenomenology of cosmic ray modulation in successive solar cycles throughout the heliosphere, - the present state of models for long term modulation and their shortcomings, - the relation between cosmic ray variations and the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field (the CR-B-relation), - charge dependent effects. In the discussions, the study of propagating diffusive disturbances and the CR-B-relation played a central role. The difference was stressed between isolated transient disturbances in the inner solar system (Forbush decreases), and the long lasting, step-like decreases caused by merged interaction regions in the outer heliosphere. The recovery rates following the step-like decreases vary with the phase in the 22-year solar cycle. In some cases this requires a modification of existing drift models. In the outer heliosphere, the CR-B-relation leads to the result Κ alpha 1/Β between the diffusion coefficient Κ and the field magnitude Β. This simple result is a challenge for theoreticians to derive the perpendicular diffusion coefficient fromfirst principles. The three articles in this report essentially follow the list of open points and arguments just presented. The article "Observations and Simple Models" is organised around the model of a propagating diffusive barrier, its application to Forbush effects in the inner heliosphere and to decreases caused by merged interaction regions in the outer heliosphere. Acomparison of observed Forbush decreases with model predictions requires a careful separation of the two steps related to the turbulent region behind the shock front and the

  9. Functional visual disturbance due to hysteria.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hui-Chun; Lin, Ken-Kuo; Yang, Meng-Ling; Chen, Henry Shen-Lih

    2007-01-01

    A 23-year-old male complained of loss of peripheral visual field and everything having purple shadows in the afternoon. This had lasted for 3 years but he had paid little attention to the symptoms. Investigations, including visual acuity, intra-ocular pressure, pupil reflex, and anterior and posterior segment of the eyes, were normal. He denied ocular pain, history of head injury, epilepsy or related family history. The Goldmann perimeter and tangent screen examinations showed a bilateral constricted tubular visual field defect within the central 10 degrees and steep margins. Tracing his past social history, he had been in jail for 3 months. He also complained his work was hard and caused him tension. The visual symptoms were a functional disturbance, not an organic disorder. We diagnosed him with hysterical functional visual disturbance. Hysteria, or conversion disorder, has long been a puzzling and fascinating problem in psychology and ophthalmology. The mechanism and reasons for hysteria are still not clear. The tangent screen is useful in diagnosis. The constricted tubular, spiral or star-shaped visual fields with steep slopes are specific findings in hysteria. We suggest that ophthalmologists should treat patients with psychogenic symptoms, using suggestion, patience and reassurance. PMID:17477034

  10. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments. PMID:27249887

  11. Forest response and recovery following disturbance (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, K. V.; Clark, K. L.; Renninger, H. J.; Carlo, N.; Medvigy, D.

    2013-12-01

    Forest management and global climate change may modulate forest responses to disturbances such as drought, insect infestation or windthrow. Forest responses to drought and gypsy moth defoliation measured from 2005 to present in an oak/pine ecosystem in the Atlantic Coastal Plain (New Jersey Pinelands) show a relative conservatism of water use but longer lasting effects on carbon balance. While post-defoliation transpiration and evapotranspiration were similar to pre-defoliation levels, post-defoliation carbon fluxes have not returned to pre-disturbance levels even after five years of recovery due to a 25% reduction in basal area following tree mortality. Defoliation frequency also affects recovery with modeled carbon fluxes under various defoliation scenarios, showing pronounced reduction in productivity under frequent defoliation, but no effect if defoliation occurs at a rate of less than 15 years. Despite a relatively consistent seasonal water use through various disturbances, defoliation and drought affect water use differently. For example, canopy transpiration (EC) after defoliation and subsequent re-sprouting, was reduced by 25% compared to pre-defoliation levels, even though only half of the leaf area was replaced. However under severe drought conditions in 2006 and 2010, EC was only reduced by 8% and 18% respectively. Therefore, prolonged drought had a lesser effect on EC than reduced foliage or episodic defoliation, suggesting these trees have access to deeper soil moisture. These data also suggest that defoliation may make trees more sensitive to drought as evidenced by the higher reduction of Ec in 2010 compared to 2006 (pre-defoliation). Differential physiological responses of the various oak species as well as pitch pine may also create a species shift in an ecosystem that is also prone to fire. In this ecosystem, Quercus prinus showed consistently lower stomatal conductance, photosynthesis and maximum carboxylation rate compared to Quercus velutina

  12. Disturbed sleep in shift workers, day workers, and insomniacs.

    PubMed

    Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Ingre, Michael; Broman, Jan-Erik; Kecklund, Göran

    2008-04-01

    Very little is known about differences in sleep between day and shift workers in representative samples of the population. This study compared a national representative sample (N=3400) of shift (with night shifts) and day workers regarding the different types of sleep disturbances and also the level of sleep symptoms with that of insomnia patients. The results showed very few differences between shift and day workers; only "too little sleep" and "nodding off at work" were marginally higher among shift workers. The results also showed that the complaints of insomnia patients for most sleep disturbances corresponded to the 2nd-16th percentile of the shift workers' levels of complaints. The results suggest, at least with the present questionnaire methodology, that shift work does not appear to be a major source of sleep disturbances and that their complaint levels bear no resemblance to those seen in insomniac patients. PMID:18484368

  13. Medium term ecohydrological response of peatland bryophytes to canopy disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Rhoswen; Kettridge, Nick; Krause, Stefan; Devito, Kevin; Granath, Gustaf; Petrone, Richard; Mandoza, Carl; Waddington, James Micheal

    2016-04-01

    Canopy disturbance in northern forested peatlands is widespread. Canopy changes impact the ecohydrological function of moss and peat, which provide the principal carbon store within these carbon rich ecosystems. Different mosses have contrasting contributions to carbon and water fluxes (e.g. Sphagnum fuscum and Pleurozium schreberi) and are strongly influenced by canopy cover. As a result, changes in canopy cover lead to long-term shifts in species composition and associated ecohydrological function. Despite this, the medium-term response to such disturbance, the associated lag in this transition to a new ecohydrological and biogeochemical regime, is not understood. Here we investigate this medium term ecohydrological response to canopy removal using a randomised plot design within a north Albertan peatland. We show no significant ecohydrological change in treatment plots four years after canopy removal. Notably, Pleurozium schreberi and Sphagnum fuscum remained within respective plots post treatment and there was no significant difference in plot resistance to evapotranspiration or carbon exchange. Our results show that canopy removal alone has little impact on bryophyte ecohydrology in the short/medium term. This resistance to disturbance contrasts strongly with dramatic short-term changes observed within mineral soils suggesting that concurrent shifts in the large scale hydrology induced within such disturbances are necessary to cause rapid ecohydrological transitions. Understanding this lagged response is critical to determine the decadal response of carbon and water fluxes in response to disturbance and the rate at which important medium term ecohydrological feedbacks are invoked.

  14. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show. PMID:23631336

  15. A Bioenergetics Approach to Understanding the Population Consequences of Disturbance: Elephant Seals as a Model System.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel P; Schwarz, Lisa; Robinson, Patrick; Schick, Robert S; Morris, Patricia A; Condit, Richard; Crocker, Daniel E; Kilpatrick, A Marm

    2016-01-01

    Using long-term empirical data, we developed a complete population consequences of acoustic disturbance (PCAD) model and application for northern elephant seals. We assumed that the animals would not successfully forage while in a 100-km-diameter disturbance region within their foraging and transit paths. The decrease in lipid gain due to exposure was then translated to changes in birth rate and pup survival. Given their large foraging range, elephant seals were resilient to such a disturbance, showing no population-level effects. However, similar track analysis showed that given their more coastal nature, California sea lions were within a 25-km-diameter region of disturbance more often. PMID:26610956

  16. Breakup of capillary jets with different disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moallemi, Nima; Li, Ri; Mehravaran, Kian

    2016-01-01

    The disturbance on a capillary jet can be imposed by radius modulation, velocity modulation, or jet vibration. The objective of the study is to understand the equivalence between the three types of disturbances. Theoretical analysis based on the Bernoulli equation for unsteady flows is conducted. It is found that a radius-modulated disturbance is equivalent to a velocity-modulated disturbance with the same wave number if the non-dimensional amplitude of the radius disturbance is 1.5 times that of the velocity disturbance. This is validated by carrying out numerical simulation based on velocity modulation and comparing with the linear theory based on radius modulation. It is also revealed that disturbance generated by a vibrating nozzle with small amplitude is equivalent to velocity disturbance. The non-dimensional amplitude of the equivalent velocity disturbance is a function of non-dimensional vibration amplitude and vibration wave number. The wave number of the velocity disturbance is shown to be twice of the vibration wave number. Validated by experimental observation, if the vibration wave number is less than 0.5, each nozzle vibration cycle generates two droplets. If the vibration wave number is between 0.5 and 1, each vibration cycle generates one droplet.

  17. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre. PMID:25273491

  18. State Estimation of International Space Station Centrifuge Rotor With Incomplete Knowledge of Disturbance Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis develops a state estimation algorithm for the Centrifuge Rotor (CR) system where only relative measurements are available with limited knowledge of both rotor imbalance disturbances and International Space Station (ISS) thruster disturbances. A Kalman filter is applied to a plant model augmented with sinusoidal disturbance states used to model both the effect of the rotor imbalance and the 155 thrusters on the CR relative motion measurement. The sinusoidal disturbance states compensate for the lack of the availability of plant inputs for use in the Kalman filter. Testing confirms that complete disturbance modeling is necessary to ensure reliable estimation. Further testing goes on to show that increased estimator operational bandwidth can be achieved through the expansion of the disturbance model within the filter dynamics. In addition, Monte Carlo analysis shows the varying levels of robustness against defined plant/filter uncertainty variations.

  19. The application of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis to physical systems: a case study on floodplain soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayburg, Scott; Neave, Melissa; Thompson-Laing, Justin

    2010-05-01

    that floods, on average, once per year; an intermediate-inundation-frequency zone that floods once in five years; a low-inundation-frequency zone that floods, on average, once in ten years; and a never flooded zone which is above the active floodplain and hence does not flood even during extreme events. Thirty samples were collected from each flood frequency zone and the resulting physical and geochemical soil data were subjected to a range of univariate and multivariate statistical tests to determine whether the intermediately disturbed sites were more diverse (in terms of their soil properties) than the frequently and infrequently disturbed sites. The results of this study show that sites subject to an intermediate level of flood disturbance have a greater level of diversity in soil properties than those sites subject to frequent flood disturbances. Thus, the results of this study suggest that the intermediate disturbance hypothesis does apply to physical systems, at least where the disturbance mechanism is consistent between sites. Our understanding of what generates biodiversity in intermediately disturbed sites, therefore, may need to be expanded to include a more diverse physical template being present in intermediately disturbed sites creating a wider range of habitat types than those available in frequently or infrequently disturbed sites.

  20. Are old Mediterranean grasslands resilient to human disturbances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coiffait-Gombault, Clémentine; Buisson, Elise; Dutoit, Thierry

    2012-08-01

    Many dry herbaceous ecosystems suffer damage and are characterized by low resilience after disturbance. Among these forms of disturbance, soil excavation due to the construction of underground pipelines affects vegetation at plant community and landscape scales. Synchronic studies are the best approach for more rapid study of plant succession on ecosystems with low resilience. In order to better understand plant succession in a Mediterranean dry grassland, we compared the effect of a recent disturbance caused by the digging of a pipeline in 2006 with that of a pipeline created in 1972 in the same area. Surveys of floristic composition and richness were carried out along both pipelines in order to understand the succession after this single disturbance, one that does not drastically change soil chemical properties unlike former agricultural practices. Nevertheless, this type of disturbance still changes the floristic composition in the long term (>30 years). The first stage begins just after disturbance with the occurrence of many weed species. Another level between the first and the mature stage was characterized in our study, 30 years after the disturbance, by an assemblage of annual and perennial species but still lacking species typical of the reference steppe. The reference steppe is described as the mature level of the succession with an assemblage of typical grasses, forbs and a few small chamaephytes and, in particular, by the presence of Brachypodium retusum. This community corresponds to a very old Mediterranean grassland that has evolved under the Mediterranean climate and traditional sheep grazing management systems since the Neolithic Age. This study confirms the low resilience of this steppe community and shows the importance of pursuing research on this steppe and in particular on the biotic and abiotic processes involved in community assembly.

  1. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  2. Psychosomatic disturbances and cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Harth, Wolfgang; Hermes, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    Medical activity in recent years has experienced a marked expansion of possibilities for aesthetic surgery, usually requested by patients. Especially in dermatology, an increasing demand for and use of doctor/medical services by healthy individuals has resulted in a drastic change to cosmetic dermatology. The request for cosmetic surgery is emotionally or psychosocially motivated. Patients with psychological disturbances sometimes push aside possible risks and complications or deny side effects and interactions of the procedures. Subjective impairments of appearance, feelings of inferiority and social pho-bias may be in the background of somatizing disorders. These emotional disorders, such as body dysmorphic disorder, personality disorder or polysurgical addiction, often remain undiscovered but should be excluded in any patient receiving cosmetic procedures. PMID:17760893

  3. Relative impact of previous disturbance history on the likelihood of additional disturbance in the Northern United States Forest Service USFS Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Landsat archive is increasingly being used to detect trends in the occurrence of forest disturbance. Beyond information about the amount of area affected, forest managers need to know if and how disturbance regimes change. The National Forest System (NFS) has developed a comprehensive plan for carbon monitoring that requires a detailed temporal mapping of forest disturbances across 75 million hectares. A long-term annual time series that shows the timing, extent, and type of disturbance beginning in 1990 and ending in 2011 has been prepared for several USFS Regions, including the Northern Region. Our mapping starts with an automated detection of annual disturbances using a time series of historical Landsat imagery. Automated detections are meticulously inspected, corrected and labeled using various USFS ancillary datasets. The resulting maps of verified disturbance show the timing and types are fires, harvests, insect activity, disease, and abiotic (wind, drought, avalanche) damage. Also, the magnitude of each change event is modeled in terms of the proportion of canopy cover lost. The sequence of disturbances for every pixel since 1990 has been consistently mapped and is available across the entirety of NFS. Our datasets contain sufficient information to describe the frequency of stand replacement, as well as how often disturbance results in only a partial loss of canopy. This information provides empirical insight into how an initial disturbance may predispose a stand to further disturbance, and it also show a climatic signal in the occurrence of processes such as fire and insect epidemics. Thus, we have the information to model the likelihood of occurrence of certain disturbances after a given event (i.e. if we have a fire in the past what does that do to the likelihood of occurrence of insects in the future). Here, we explore if previous disturbance history is a reliable predictor of additional disturbance in the future and we present results of applying

  4. Biological control in a disturbed environment

    PubMed Central

    Gubbins, S.; Gilligan, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Most ecological and epidemiological models describe systems with continuous uninterrupted interactions between populations. Many systems, though, have ecological disturbances, such as those associated with planting and harvesting of a seasonal crop. In this paper, we introduce host–parasite–hyperparasite systems as models of biological control in a disturbed environment, where the host–parasite interactions are discontinuous. One model is a parasite–hyperparasite system designed to capture the essence of biological control and the other is a host–parasite–hyperparasite system that incorporates many more features of the population dynamics. Two types of discontinuity are included in the models. One corresponds to a pulse of new parasites at harvest and the other reflects the discontinuous presence of the host due to planting and harvesting. Such discontinuities are characteristic of many ecosystems involving parasitism or other interactions with an annual host. The models are tested against data from an experiment investigating the persistent biological control of the fungal plant parasite of lettuce Sclerotinia minor by the fungal hyperparasite Sporidesmium sclerotivorum, over successive crops. Using a combination of mathematical analysis, model fitting and parameter estimation, the factors that contribute the observed persistence of the parasite are examined. Analytical results show that repeated planting and harvesting of the host allows the parasite to persist by maintaining a quantity of host tissue in the system on which the parasite can reproduce. When the host dynamics are not included explicitly in the model, we demonstrate that homogeneous mixing fails to predict the persistence of the parasite population, while incorporating spatial heterogeneity by allowing for heterogeneous mixing prevents fade-out. Including the host's dynamics lessens the effect of heterogeneous mixing on persistence, though the predicted values for the parasite population

  5. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems. PMID:25727891

  6. Satellite monitoring of fire disturbed territories in the Transbaikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvetsov, Eugene; Kukavskaya, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades an increase of the number of forest fires and burned area is observed in the boreal forests of Siberia and North America. Currently in Russia thousands of forest fires are registered each year. Forests of Transbaikal region are characterized by the highest degree of fire disturbance in Russia. In this study MODIS 250-m NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and NBR (Normalized Burn Ratio) time series are used for the monitoring of fire-disturbed areas in Transbaikal region. Using satellite data the maps of fire disturbance degree were created. This study mainly focuses on the repeated fires in this region which can cause the conversion of forests to non-forest lands. A preliminary analysis of the dynamics of vegetation indices (NDVI and NBR) after the fire event showed significant differences for sites characterized by different degree of disturbance. The preliminary results of comparative analysis of disturbance degree and Fire Radiative Power (FRP) measurements will be also presented. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant 15-04-06567.

  7. Sleep Disturbance and Neuropsychological Function in Young Children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Heather E.; Lam, Janet C.; Mahone, E. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance, common among children with ADHD, can contribute to cognitive and behavioral dysfunction. It is therefore challenging to determine whether neurobehavioral dysfunction should be attributed to ADHD symptoms, sleep disturbance, or both. The present study examined parent-reported sleep problems (Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire) and their relationship to neuropsychological function in 64 children, ages 4-7 years, with and without ADHD. Compared to typically developing controls, children with ADHD were reported by parents to have significantly greater sleep disturbance—including sleep onset delay, sleep anxiety, night awakenings, and daytime sleepiness—(all p≤0.01), and significantly poorer performance on tasks of attention, executive control, processing speed, and working memory (all p<0.01). Within the ADHD group, total parent-reported sleep disturbance was significantly associated with deficits in attention and executive control skills (all p≤0.01); however, significant group differences (relative to controls) on these measures remained (p<0.01) even after controlling for total sleep disturbance. While sleep problems are common among young children with ADHD, these findings suggest that inattention and executive dysfunction appear to be attributable to symptoms of ADHD, rather than to sleep disturbance. The relationships among sleep, ADHD symptoms, and neurobehavioral function in older children may show different patterns as a function of the chronicity of disordered sleep. PMID:25765292

  8. Response of a hypersonic boundary layer to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter. PMID:24737993

  9. Response of a Hypersonic Boundary Layer to Freestream Pulse Acoustic Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter. PMID:24737993

  10. Recovery of an isolated coral reef system following severe disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, James P; Smith, Luke D; Heyward, Andrew J; Baird, Andrew H; Pratchett, Morgan S

    2013-04-01

    Coral reef recovery from major disturbance is hypothesized to depend on the arrival of propagules from nearby undisturbed reefs. Therefore, reefs isolated by distance or current patterns are thought to be highly vulnerable to catastrophic disturbance. We found that on an isolated reef system in north Western Australia, coral cover increased from 9% to 44% within 12 years of a coral bleaching event, despite a 94% reduction in larval supply for 6 years after the bleaching. The initial increase in coral cover was the result of high rates of growth and survival of remnant colonies, followed by a rapid increase in juvenile recruitment as colonies matured. We show that isolated reefs can recover from major disturbance, and that the benefits of their isolation from chronic anthropogenic pressures can outweigh the costs of limited connectivity. PMID:23559247

  11. Boundary Disturbances Revisited: An Application With an Apperception Test.

    PubMed

    Ritzler, Barry A

    2016-01-01

    A Rorschach study of boundary disturbance and thought disorder by Blatt and Ritzler ( 1974 ) was replicated using the newly developed Picture Projection Test (PPT), a modern alternative to the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT). Twenty-five individuals with pathological Rorschach records were compared to 25 individuals with nonpathological Rorschachs. A coding system for the PPT was devised using concepts from the Blatt and Ritzler study and Rorschach thought disorder variables from the Comprehensive System (Exner, 2003 ). The pathological group showed significantly more boundary disturbance on the PPT. Only one Contamination (the most severe manifestation of boundary disturbance and thought disorder) appeared in the pathological group. The nonpathological group had no Contamination responses. It is recommended that future researchers repeat the study with a psychotic group compared to a nonpsychotic group. PMID:26554628

  12. Increased sensitivity to climate change in disturbed ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Kröel-Dulay, György; Ransijn, Johannes; Schmidt, Inger Kappel; Beier, Claus; De Angelis, Paolo; de Dato, Giovanbattista; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Emmett, Bridget; Estiarte, Marc; Garadnai, János; Kongstad, Jane; Kovács-Láng, Edit; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Liberati, Dario; Ogaya, Romà; Riis-Nielsen, Torben; Smith, Andrew R; Sowerby, Alwyn; Tietema, Albert; Penuelas, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Human domination of the biosphere includes changes to disturbance regimes, which push many ecosystems towards early-successional states. Ecological theory predicts that early-successional ecosystems are more sensitive to perturbations than mature systems, but little evidence supports this relationship for the perturbation of climate change. Here we show that vegetation (abundance, species richness and species composition) across seven European shrublands is quite resistant to moderate experimental warming and drought, and responsiveness is associated with the dynamic state of the ecosystem, with recently disturbed sites responding to treatments. Furthermore, most of these responses are not rapid (2-5 years) but emerge over a longer term (7-14 years). These results suggest that successional state influences the sensitivity of ecosystems to climate change, and that ecosystems recovering from disturbances may be sensitive to even modest climatic changes. A research bias towards undisturbed ecosystems might thus lead to an underestimation of the impacts of climate change. PMID:25801187

  13. Disturbance to wintering western snowy plovers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, K.D.

    2001-01-01

    In order to better understand the nature of disturbances to wintering snowy plovers, I observed snowy plovers and activities that might disturb them at a beach near Devereux Slough in Santa Barbara, California, USA. Disturbance (activity that caused plovers to move or fly) to wintering populations of threatened western snowy plovers was 16 times higher at a public beach than at protected beaches. Wintering plovers reacted to disturbance at half the distance (???40 m) as has been reported for breeding snowy plovers (???80 m). Humans, dogs, crows and other birds were the main sources of disturbance on the public beach, and each snowy plover was disturbed, on average, once every 27 weekend min and once every 43 weekday min. Dogs off leash were a disproportionate source of disturbance. Plovers were more likely to fly from dogs, horses and crows than from humans and other shorebirds. Plovers were less abundant near trail heads. Over short time scales, plovers did not acclimate to or successfully find refuge from disturbance. Feeding rates declined with increased human activity. I used data from these observations to parameterize a model that predicted rates of disturbance given various management actions. The model found that prohibiting dogs and a 30 m buffer zone surrounding a 400 m stretch of beach provided the most protection for plovers for the least amount of impact to beach recreation.

  14. Ionosphere TEC disturbances before strong earthquakes: observations, physics, modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgaladze, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    the downward component decreases it, while horizontal components redistribute plasma in the horizontal plane around the source. The UAM calculations also show that the external electric currents of the seismic origin generate the small disturbances of the neutral atmosphere with the characteristics of the internal gravity waves but they don't influence noticeably on the relative pre-earthquake TEC disturbances.

  15. Trophic compensation reinforces resistance: herbivory absorbs the increasing effects of multiple disturbances.

    PubMed

    Ghedini, Giulia; Russell, Bayden D; Connell, Sean D

    2015-02-01

    Disturbance often results in small changes in community structure, but the probability of transitioning to contrasting states increases when multiple disturbances combine. Nevertheless, we have limited insights into the mechanisms that stabilise communities, particularly how perturbations can be absorbed without restructuring (i.e. resistance). Here, we expand the concept of compensatory dynamics to include countervailing mechanisms that absorb disturbances through trophic interactions. By definition, 'compensation' occurs if a specific disturbance stimulates a proportional countervailing response that eliminates its otherwise unchecked effect. We show that the compounding effects of disturbances from local to global scales (i.e. local canopy-loss, eutrophication, ocean acidification) increasingly promote the expansion of weedy species, but that this response is countered by a proportional increase in grazing. Finally, we explore the relatively unrecognised role of compensatory effects, which are likely to maintain the resistance of communities to disturbance more deeply than current thinking allows. PMID:25581377

  16. [Automated mapping of urban forests' disturbance and recovery in Nanjing, China].

    PubMed

    Lyu, Ying-ying; Zhuang, Yi-lin; Ren, Xin-yu; Li, Ming-shi; Xu, Wang-gu; Wang, Zhi

    2016-02-01

    Using Landsat TM/ETM dense time series observations spanning from 1987 to 2011, taking Laoshan forest farm and Purple Mountain as the research objects, the landsat ecosystem disturbance adaptive processing system (Ledaps) algorithm was used to generate surface reflectance datasets, which were fed to the vegetation change tracker model (VCT) model to derive urban forest disturbance and recovery products over Nanjing, followed by an intensive validation of the products. The results showed that there was a relatively high spatial agreement for forest disturbance products mapped by VCT, ranging from 65.4% to 95.0%. There was an apparent fluctuating forest disturbance and recovery rate over time, and the change trend of forest disturbance occurring at the two sites was roughly similar, but forest recovery was obviously different. Forest coverage in Purple Mountain was less than that in Laoshan forest farm, but the forest disturbance and recovery rates in Laoshan forest farm were larger than those in Purple Mountain. PMID:27396114

  17. The solar array-induced disturbance of the Hubble Space Telescope pointing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C. L.; Tinker, M. L.; Nurre, G. S.; Till, W. A.

    1995-05-01

    The investigation of the vibrational disturbances of the Hubble Space Telescope that were discovered soon after deployment in orbit is described in detail. It was found that the disturbances were particularly evident during orbital day-night crossings, and that the magnitudes of the disturbances were considerably larger than the design jitter requirements. This paper describes the process by which the vibrations were characterized and isolated to a particular mechanism. The analysis of the flight data and comparisons with computer simulation results showed that the source of the disturbances was the thermally driven deformation of the solar arrays in conjunction with frictional effects in the array mechanisms. The control system was successfully modified to attenuate the disturbances to tolerable levels pending mechanical and thermal redesign of the solar arrays. The new arrays were installed during the first space telescope servicing mission and, in combination with the enhanced control system algorithm, reduced the disturbances to satisfactory levels.

  18. Solar-array-induced disturbance of the Hubble space telescope pointing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Carlton L.; Tinker, Michael L.; Nurre, Gerald S.; Till, William A.

    1995-07-01

    The investigation of the vibrational disturbances of the Hubble Space Telescope that were discovered soon after deployment in orbit is described in detail. It was found that the disturbances were particularly evident during orbital day-night crossings, and that the magnitude of the disturbances was considerably larger than the design jitter requirement. This paper describes the process by which the vibrations were characterized and isolated to a particular mechanism. The analysis of the flight data and comparisons with computer simulation results showed that the source of the disturbances was the thermally driven deformation of the solar arrays in conjunction with frictional effects in the array mechanisms. The control system was successfully modified to attenuate the disturbances to tolerable levels pending mechanical and thermal redesign of the solar arrays. The new arrays were installed during the first Space Telescope servicing mission, and in combination with the enhanced control system algorithm reduced the disturbances to satisfactory levels.

  19. Solar-Array-Induced Disturbance of the Hubble Space Telescope Pointing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Carlton L.; Tinker, Michael L.; Nurre, Gerald S.; Till, William A.

    1995-01-01

    The investigation of the vibrational disturbances of the Hubble Space Telescope that were discovered soon after deployment in orbit is described in detail. It was found that the disturbances were particularly evident during orbital day-night crossings, and that the magnitude of the disturbances was considerably larger than the design jitter requirement. This paper describes the process by which the vibrations were characterized and isolated to a particular mechanism. The analysis of the flight data and comparisons with computer simulation results showed that the source of the disturbances was the thermally driven deformation of the solar arrays in conjunction with frictional effects in the array mechanisms. The control system was successfully modified to attenuate the disturbances to tolerable levels pending mechanical and thermal redesign of the solar arrays. The new arrays were installed during the first Space Telescope servicing mission, and in combination with the enhanced control system algorithm reduced the disturbances to satisfactory levels.

  20. The solar array-induced disturbance of the Hubble Space Telescope pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, C. L.; Tinker, M. L.; Nurre, G. S.; Till, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    The investigation of the vibrational disturbances of the Hubble Space Telescope that were discovered soon after deployment in orbit is described in detail. It was found that the disturbances were particularly evident during orbital day-night crossings, and that the magnitudes of the disturbances were considerably larger than the design jitter requirements. This paper describes the process by which the vibrations were characterized and isolated to a particular mechanism. The analysis of the flight data and comparisons with computer simulation results showed that the source of the disturbances was the thermally driven deformation of the solar arrays in conjunction with frictional effects in the array mechanisms. The control system was successfully modified to attenuate the disturbances to tolerable levels pending mechanical and thermal redesign of the solar arrays. The new arrays were installed during the first space telescope servicing mission and, in combination with the enhanced control system algorithm, reduced the disturbances to satisfactory levels.

  1. Network response to disturbances in large sand-bed braided rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuurman, F.; Kleinhans, M. G.; Middelkoop, H.

    2016-01-01

    The reach-scale effects of human-induced disturbances on the channel network in large braided rivers are a challenge to understand and to predict. In this study, we simulated different types of disturbances in a large braided river to get insight into the propagation of disturbances through a braided channel network. The results showed that the disturbances initiate an instability that propagates in the downstream direction by means of alteration of water and sediment division at bifurcations. These adjustments of the bifurcations change the migration and shape of bars, with a feedback to the upstream bifurcation and alteration of the approaching flow to the downstream bifurcation. This way, the morphological effect of a disturbance amplifies in the downstream direction. Thus, the interplay of bifurcation instability and asymmetrical reshaping of bars was found to be essential for propagation of the effects of a disturbance. The study also demonstrated that the large-scale bar statistics are hardly affected.

  2. Behavioral and EEG changes in male 5xFAD mice.

    PubMed

    Schneider, F; Baldauf, K; Wetzel, W; Reymann, K G

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are widely used to investigate mechanisms of pathophysiology and cognitive dysfunctions. A model with a very early development of parenchymal plaque load at the age of 2months is the 5xFAD mouse (Tg6799, Oakley et al. 2006). These 5xFAD mice over-express both human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and human presenilin 1 (PS1). Mice from this line have a high APP expression correlating with a high burden and an accelerated accumulation of the 42 amino acid species of amyloid-β (Aβ). The aim of this study was the behavioral and functional investigations of 5xFAD males because in most studies females of this strain were characterized. In comparison to literature of transgenic 5xFAD females, transgenic 5xFAD males showed decreased anxiety in the elevated plus maze, reduced locomotion and exploration in the open field and disturbances in learning performance in the Morris water maze starting at 9months of age. Electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings on 6month old transgenic mice revealed a decrease of delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands whereas the subdelta frequency was increased. EEG recordings during sleep showed a reduction of rapid eye movement sleep in relation to the amount of total sleep. Thus, 5xFAD males develop early functional disturbances and subsequently behavioral deficits and therefore they are a good mouse model for studying Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24907698

  3. A multi-pass pumping scheme for thin disk lasers with good anti-disturbance ability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhu, Xiao; Zhu, Guangzhi; Shang, Jianli; Wang, Hailin; Qi, Lijun; Zhu, Changhong; Guo, Fei

    2015-02-23

    A multi-pass pumping scheme for thin disk lasers consisting of dual parabolic mirrors with conjugated relationship is presented. The anti-disturbance ability of pumping is analyzed by ray tracing method under different kinds of disturbances. Both theoretical and experiment results show that disturbances in this system won't lead to a misalignment of each pumping spot, but only the position of superposed pumping spot on disk crystal will be changed. Compared with the multi-pass pumping scheme consisting of parabolic mirror and folding prisms, this pumping scheme has a better anti-disturbance ability. PMID:25836497

  4. [Sleep disturbance in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Mori, A

    1990-01-01

    Sleep structure is qualitatively and quantitatively changed by aging. The elderly usually go to bed in early evening and wake up in early morning, and they also take several naps in the day time. The polyphasic sleep is one of the typical sleep patterns found in the elderly. Comparing the sleep of the elderly with that of young adults by the method of polysomnography, the characteristics of the sleep of the elderly are in the prolongation of sleep latency, shortening of total sleep time, increase of Stage W and Stage 1, decrease of Stage 3 and 4, and also decrease of Stage REM and the advance of REM phase. Insomnia is a frequently observed symptom in the elderly. The so-called psychophysiological insomnia due to transient psychological or situational stress is common in the elderly. However, insomnia following the mental disturbance (depression), chronic use of drug or alcohol, dementia (vascular or Alzheimer type) are also important in the elderly. Sleep apnea syndrome is recently found as an important cause of insomnia. Concerning the treatment and prevention of insomnia, it is necessary to exclude the causes of insomnia, to improve the environmental conditions and to keep the regular rhythm of sleep-wake cycle. It is also important to carefully select and use the adequate hypnotics considering the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of the drugs in the elderly. PMID:2191161

  5. Identity disturbance in distant patients.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Irwin

    2013-04-01

    Chronically distant, emotionally isolated patients often present with identity disturbance. Identity, it is argued, develops as a thematic pattern of narcissism, shaped by the nature of the mother's early libidinal influences on the child's sense of self. Identity provides a form of self-definition that addresses the question, Who am I? In the treatment of these patients, resistances to narcissistic vulnerabilities (narcissistic resistances) provide an illusory sense of security and induce the analyst to avoid attention to a central pathological problem: primitive and frightening needs for, and unconscious fantasies of, dependence on, and functionality for, another. Patients' avoidance of material and therapeutic interactions that deal with their dependencies are aspects of a tacit contract with the analyst to foreclose examination of their considerable problems with inner stability. Among these problems are anxieties regarding intrusion and loss of separateness. As analysis proceeds, elements of such a patient's identity become clarified and are used to understand and organize the material for both analyst and patient. This can allow the patient to articulate a more embodied and vital experience of individuality. A case is presented to illustrate the analysis of a patient using this approach. PMID:23526544

  6. Potential of Pest and Host Phenological Data in the Attribution of Regional Forest Disturbance Detection Maps According to Causal Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph; Hargrove, William; Norman Steve; Christie, William

    2014-01-01

    Near real time forest disturbance detection maps from MODIS NDVI phenology data have been produced since 2010 for the conterminous U.S., as part of the on-line ForWarn national forest threat early warning system. The latter has been used by the forest health community to identify and track many regional forest disturbances caused by multiple biotic and abiotic damage agents. Attribution of causal agents for detected disturbances has been a goal since project initiation in 2006. Combined with detailed cover type maps, geospatial pest phenology data offer a potential means for narrowing the candidate causal agents responsible for a given biotic disturbance. U.S. Aerial Detection Surveys (ADS) employ such phenology data. Historic ADS products provide general locational data on recent insect-induced forest type specific disturbances that may help in determining candidate causal agents for MODIS-based disturbance maps, especially when combined with other historic geospatial disturbance data (e.g., wildfire burn scars and drought maps). Historic ADS disturbance detection polygons can show severe and extensive regional forest disturbances, though they also can show polygons with sparsely scattered or infrequent disturbances. Examples will be discussed that use various historic disturbance data to help determine potential causes of MODIS-detected regional forest disturbance anomalies.

  7. Disturbance, the uncertainty principle and quantum optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Hans; Demuynck, Willem M.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown how a disturbance-type uncertainty principle can be derived from an uncertainty principle for joint measurements. To achieve this, we first clarify the meaning of 'inaccuracy' and 'disturbance' in quantum mechanical measurements. The case of photon number and phase is treated as an example, and it is applied to a quantum non-demolition measurement using the optical Kerr effect.

  8. The Disturbing Child: A Validation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algozzine, Bob

    Two versions of the Disturbing Behavior Checklist (DBC), an indicator of the relative disturbingness of behaviors characteristic of mildly handicapped (emotionally disturbed and learning disabled) students were field tested with 250 and 150 university students, teachers, supervisors, and school psychologists. Both checklists were relatively…

  9. Monitoring response to disturbance in dynamic rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arid and semi-arid rangelands worldwide provide important ecosystem services and see a diversity of land uses. To maintain the health of these lands, it is necessary to monitor rangeland conditions in response to management and disturbance. Spatial patterns from disturbance are superimposed on patte...

  10. The Dimensionality of Body Image Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galgan, Richard J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined personality variables in 75 male and 75 female college students. Found two dimensions underlying body image disturbance variables, one loading on body image dissatisfaction and one loading on body image disturbance. Low negative correlation between two factors suggests that distortion and dissatisfaction are fairly distinct and that body…

  11. 36 CFR 1002.12 - Audio disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audio disturbances. 1002.12... RECREATION § 1002.12 Audio disturbances. (a) The following are prohibited: (1) Operating motorized equipment or machinery such as an electric generating plant, motor vehicle, motorized toy, or an audio...

  12. 4 CFR 25.6 - Disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disturbances. 25.6 Section 25.6 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES CONDUCT IN THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.6 Disturbances. Loitering, disorderly conduct, or other conduct in the GAO Building or on...

  13. Remote sensing analysis of forest disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asner, Gregory P. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides systems and methods to automatically analyze Landsat satellite data of forests. The present invention can easily be used to monitor any type of forest disturbance such as from selective logging, agriculture, cattle ranching, natural hazards (fire, wind events, storms), etc. The present invention provides a large-scale, high-resolution, automated remote sensing analysis of such disturbances.

  14. Remote Sensing Analysis of Forest Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asner, Gregory P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides systems and methods to automatically analyze Landsat satellite data of forests. The present invention can easily be used to monitor any type of forest disturbance such as from selective logging, agriculture, cattle ranching, natural hazards (fire, wind events, storms), etc. The present invention provides a large-scale, high-resolution, automated remote sensing analysis of such disturbances.

  15. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Circulatory...

  16. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Circulatory...

  17. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Circulatory...

  18. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Circulatory...

  19. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Circulatory...

  20. Severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency in mice results in behavioral anomalies with morphological and biochemical changes in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jadavji, Nafisa M; Deng, Liyuan; Leclerc, Daniel; Malysheva, Olga; Bedell, Barry J; Caudill, Marie A; Rozen, Rima

    2012-06-01

    The brain is particularly sensitive to folate metabolic disturbances, since methyl groups are critical for its functions. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) generates the primary circulatory form of folate required for homocysteine remethylation to methionine. Neurological disturbances have been described in homocystinuria caused by severe MTHFR deficiency. The goal of this study was to determine if behavioral anomalies are present in severe Mthfr-deficient (Mthfr(-/-)) mice and to identify neurobiological changes that could contribute to these anomalies. Adult male mice of 3 Mthfr genotypes (+/+, +/-, -/-) were tested on motor, anxiety, exploratory and cognitive tasks. Volumes (whole brain and hippocampus) and morphology, global DNA methylation, apoptosis, expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and concentrations of choline metabolites were assessed in hippocampus. Mthfr(-/-) mice had impairments in motor function and in short- and long-term memory, increased exploratory behavior and decreased anxiety. They showed decreased whole brain and hippocampal volumes, reduced thickness of the pyramidal cell layer of CA1 and CA3, and increased apoptosis in hippocampus. There was a disturbance in choline metabolism as manifested by differences in acetylcholine, betaine or glycerophosphocholine concentrations, and by increased ChAT levels. Mthfr(-/-) mice also had increased GR mRNA and protein. Our study has revealed significant anomalies in affective behavior and impairments in memory of Mthfr(-/-) mice. We identified structural changes, increased apoptosis, altered choline metabolism and GR dysregulation in hippocampus. These findings, as well as some similar observations in cerebellum, could contribute to the behavioral changes and suggest that choline is a critical metabolite in homocystinuria. PMID:22521626

  1. Association between wetland disturbance and biological attributes in floodplain wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, S.R.; Hubbard, D.E.; Werlin, K.B.; Haugerud, N.J.; Powell, K.A.; Thompson, John; Johnson, T.

    2006-01-01

    We quantified the influence of agricultural activities on environmental and biological conditions of floodplain wetlands in the upper Missouri River basin. Seasonally-flooded wetlands were characterized as low impact (non-disturbed) or high impact (disturbed) based on local land use. Biological data collected from these wetlands were used to develop a wetland condition index (WCI). Fourteen additional wetlands were sampled to evaluate the general condition of seasonally-flooded floodplain wetlands. Structural and functional attributes of macrophyte, algae, and macroinvertebrate communities were tested as candidate metrics for assessing biotic responses. The WCI we developed used six biological metrics to discriminate between disturbed and non-disturbed wetlands: 1) biomass of Culicidae larvae, 2) abundance of Chironomidae larvae, 3) macroinvertebrate diversity, 4) total number of plant species, 5) the proportion of exotic plant species, and 6) total number of sensitive diatom species. Disturbed wetlands had less taxa richness and species diversity and more exotic and nuisance (e.g., mosquitoes) species. Environmental differences between low and high impact wetlands included measures of total potassium, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, alkalinity, conductance, and sediment phosphorus concentration. Canonical analyses showed that WCI scores were weakly correlated (P = 0.057) with environmental variables in randomly selected wetlands. In addition, mean WCI score for random wetlands was higher than that for high impact wetlands, implying that floodplain wetlands were less impacted by the types of agricultural activities affecting high impact sites. Inter-year sampling of some wetlands revealed that WCI metrics were correlated in 2000 and 2001, implying that biological metrics provided useful indicators of disturbance in floodplain wetlands. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  2. Disturbance observer based control system design for inertially stabilized platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunnan; Lin, Zhe

    2012-09-01

    Inertially stabilized platform (ISP) is indispensable for various imaging systems to segregate the base angular movement and achieve high LOS (Line-Of-Sight) stability. The disturbance rejection ratio and command following performance are of primary concern in designing ISP control systems. In this paper, the redundant gimbals ISP system is considered and it is shown to experience complex disturbance and parameter variation during operation. To meet advanced LOS stabilization requirement, a disturbance observer based (DOB) dual-loop controller design for ISP is proposed of which the DOB is the internal-loop. Using a nominal plant model and a low-pass filter, the disturbance signal is estimated and used as a cancellation input added to the current command of torque motor. If the DOB works well, the disturbance torque and mismatch between nominal plant and actual plant will be compensated and the internal-loop will behave as nominal model parameters. On the other hand, the external-loop will be designed for nominal model parameters to meet stabilization requirements. This paper will mainly focus on the DOB design method. Since the low-pass filter of DOB determines the sensitivity and complementary sensitivity function as will be shown in this paper, designing the filter is the most important consideration. In this paper, an optimal low-pass filter design method is proposed. The method is intuitive, simple to implement and allows on-line tuning. Simulation results show the performance enhancement of our control structure in the presence of disturbance and measurement noise.

  3. Kinematic Disturbances in Rotation Curves among 89 Virgo Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, V. C.; Waterman, A. H.; Kenney, J. D. P.

    1999-05-01

    For 89 (mostly) spirals in the Virgo cluster, we have obtained optical long-slit spectra of the ionized gas. We find: (1) 50% of the Virgo galaxies we observed have regular rotation patterns; 50% exhibit kinematic disturbances ranging from mild to major. Velocity complexities are consistent with those resulting from tidal encounters or accretion. Since kinematic disturbances will to fade within ~ 1Gyr, many Virgo galaxies have experienced several significant kinematic disturbances during their lifetimes. (2) There is no strong correlation of rotation curve complexity with Hubble type, galaxy luminosity, local galaxy density, or HI deficiency. (3) There is a remarkable difference in the distribution of galaxy systemic velocity for galaxies in the two classes. Galaxies with regular rotation patterns show a flat distribution with velocities ranging from V = -300 km/sec to V = +2500 km/sec; galaxies with disturbed kinematics have a Gaussian distribution which peaks at V = +1172+/-100 km/sec, near the cluster mean velocity. This distribution is virtually identical to the distribution of systemic velocities for elliptical galaxies in Virgo. However, disturbed spirals are less centrally concentrated than the ellipticals and those near the periphery are more likely to have the mean cluster velocity. We suggest that spirals with disturbed kinematics are preferentially on radial orbits, which bring them to the denser core, where tidal interactions are strong and/or more common. However, because they spend most of their time near apocenter, we observe them near the periphery of the cluster. Some may be falling into the core for the first time. For a non-virialized cluster like Virgo, galaxies may encounter either local (nearby galaxies) or global (cluster related) interactions. These interactions may alter the galaxy morphology, and may play a role in driving the Virgo cluster toward dynamical equilibrium.

  4. How does ecological disturbance influence genetic diversity?

    PubMed

    Banks, Sam C; Cary, Geoffrey J; Smith, Annabel L; Davies, Ian D; Driscoll, Don A; Gill, A Malcolm; Lindenmayer, David B; Peakall, Rod

    2013-11-01

    Environmental disturbance underpins the dynamics and diversity of many of the ecosystems of the world, yet its influence on the patterns and distribution of genetic diversity is poorly appreciated. We argue here that disturbance history may be the major driver that shapes patterns of genetic diversity in many natural populations. We outline how disturbance influences genetic diversity through changes in both selective processes and demographically driven, selectively neutral processes. Our review highlights the opportunities and challenges presented by genetic approaches, such as landscape genomics, for better understanding and predicting the demographic and evolutionary responses of natural populations to disturbance. Developing this understanding is now critical because disturbance regimes are changing rapidly in a human-modified world. PMID:24054910

  5. Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of linear disturbances with a known probability distribution associated with the initial mode amplitudes are studied in boundary-layer flows through an analysis of the transport equations for the mean disturbance kinetic energy and disturbance energy dissipation rate. Effects of adverse and favorable pressure-gradients on the disturbance dynamics are also included in the analysis. Unlike the fully turbulent regime where nonlinear phase scrambling of the fluctuations affects the flow field in proximity to the wall, the laminar regime fluctuations studied here are influenced across the boundary layer by the solid boundary. In addition to the low Reynolds number, early stage transition regime, the dynamics of these disturbance fields can be related in some respects to the near-wall dynamics of the fully turbulent regime.

  6. GPR21 KO mice demonstrate no resistance to high fat diet induced obesity or improved glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghong; Pan, Zheng; Baribault, Helene; Chui, Danny; Gundel, Caroline; Véniant, Murielle

    2016-01-01

    Gpr21 KO mice generated with Gpr21 KO ES cells obtained from Deltagen showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity when fed a high fat diet. Further mRNA expression analysis revealed changes in Rabgap1 levels and raised the possibility that Rabgap1 gene may have been modified. To assess this hypothesis a new Gpr21 KO mouse line using TALENS technology was generated. Gpr21 gene deletion was confirmed by PCR and Gpr21 and Rabgap1 mRNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR. The newly generated Gpr21 KO mice when fed a normal or high fat diet chow did not maintain their improved metabolic phenotype. In conclusion, Rabgap1 disturbance mRNA expression levels may have contributed to the phenotype of the originally designed Gpr21 KO mice. PMID:27081476

  7. Congenital deafness and sinoatrial node dysfunction in mice lacking class D L-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Platzer, J; Engel, J; Schrott-Fischer, A; Stephan, K; Bova, S; Chen, H; Zheng, H; Striessnig, J

    2000-07-01

    Voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) containing a pore-forming alpha1D subunit (D-LTCCs) are expressed in neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Their relative contribution to total L-type Ca2+ currents and their physiological role and significance as a drug target remain unknown. Therefore, we generated D-LTCC deficient mice (alpha1D-/-) that were viable with no major disturbances of glucose metabolism. alpha1D-/-mice were deaf due to the complete absence of L-type currents in cochlear inner hair cells and degeneration of outer and inner hair cells. In wild-type controls, D-LTCC-mediated currents showed low activation thresholds and slow inactivation kinetics. Electrocardiogram recordings revealed sinoatrial node dysfunction (bradycardia and arrhythmia) in alpha1D-/- mice. We conclude that alpha1D can form LTCCs with negative activation thresholds essential for normal auditory function and control of cardiac pacemaker activity. PMID:10929716

  8. GPR21 KO mice demonstrate no resistance to high fat diet induced obesity or improved glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinghong; Pan, Zheng; Baribault, Helene; Chui, Danny; Gundel, Caroline; Véniant, Murielle

    2016-01-01

    Gpr21 KO mice generated with Gpr21 KO ES cells obtained from Deltagen showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity when fed a high fat diet. Further mRNA expression analysis revealed changes in Rabgap1 levels and raised the possibility that Rabgap1 gene may have been modified. To assess this hypothesis a new Gpr21 KO mouse line using TALENS technology was generated. Gpr21 gene deletion was confirmed by PCR and Gpr21 and Rabgap1 mRNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR. The newly generated Gpr21 KO mice when fed a normal or high fat diet chow did not maintain their improved metabolic phenotype. In conclusion, Rabgap1 disturbance mRNA expression levels may have contributed to the phenotype of the originally designed Gpr21 KO mice. PMID:27081476

  9. Relationship between Eating Disturbance and Dementia Severity in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Kyoko; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Amano, Koichiro; Tanaka, Hibiki; Fukuhara, Ryuji; Ikeda, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Background Eating is one of the most important daily activities in managing patients with dementia. Although various eating disturbance occur as dementia progresses, to our knowledge, most of the studies focused on a part of eating disturbance such as swallowing and appetite. There have been few comprehensive studies including eating habits and food preference in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The aims of this study were to investigate almost all eating disturbance and to examine the relationship of eating disturbance to dementia stage in AD. Methods A total of 220 patients with AD and 30 normal elderly (NE) subjects were recruited. Eating disturbance was assessed by a comprehensive questionnaire that had been previously validated. Potential relationships between the characteristics of eating disturbance and dementia stage as classified by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) were assessed. Results Overall, 81.4% of patients with AD showed some eating and swallowing disturbance, whereas only 26.7% of the NE subjects had such a disturbance. Even in an early stage, patients with AD had many types of eating disturbance; “Appetite change” was shown in nearly half of the mild AD patients (49.5%). In the moderate stage, the scores of “change of eating habits and food preference” were highest, and in the severe stage “swallowing disturbance” became critical. Conclusion In AD, the relationship of dementia stage to eating disturbance differs according to the type of eating disturbance. The relationships between various eating disturbance and the severity of dementia should be considered. PMID:26266531

  10. Statistics of ionospheric disturbances over the Antarctic Peninsula as derived from TEC measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galushko, V. G.; Paznukhov, V. V.; Sopin, A. A.; Yampolski, Y. M.

    2016-04-01

    Results of ionospheric disturbances observations using multisite total electron content (TEC) measurements over the Antarctic Peninsula for the period from 2009 to 2012 are presented. Diurnal dependencies of the disturbance occurrence frequency, velocity, and direction of motion are established. Parameters of the disturbances are calculated using dynamic approach to the problem of ionospheric disturbances diagnostics which has been extended to allow for an arbitrary waveform of TEC perturbations. Specific data quality constraints are introduced to determine the presence of wavelike disturbances in the TEC records and to satisfy the required accuracy of parameter reconstruction. Statistical treatment of the results shows that during the daytime disturbances propagate predominantly in the northern and northeastern directions. In the evening and nocturnal hours the northwestern direction is prevailing, with the characteristic disturbance velocities ranging from 10 to 250 m/s. The most probable velocities are tens of meters per second, while the mean values are equal to about 100-130 m/s. In the daytime the velocities of the ionospheric disturbances are even higher. During the Antarctic winter time disturbances are usually observed at local noon time, in sharp contrast with the summer time, when they are present during the nights and mornings.

  11. Simulation of the low latitude ionosphere response to disturbed winds and electric fields: Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas; Bailey, Graham; Bravo, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Modeling the ionosphere during disturbed periods is one of the most challenging tasks due to the complexity of the phenomena that affect the electric fields and the thermosphere environment as whole. It is well known that depending on the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field disturbance electric fields (undershielding or overshielding) can penetrate from high to low latitudes causing significant disturbances in the electron density distribution and in the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) development. Besides that, the large amount of energy deposited in the polar region during disturbed periods will be responsible for the generation of disturbed winds that will flow towards the equator where they produce a disturbance dynamo which also affects the EIA density distribution. The TIDs and TADs are also sources of disturbances that propagate at high velocity reaching the equator 2-3 hours after the beginning of the magnetic storm. In this work we use the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model at INPE (SUPIM-INPE), to simulate the drastic effects that were observed at the low latitude ionosphere in the Brazilian region during a very intense magnetic storm event. A few models are tested for the disturbed electric field and wind. The simulation results showed that the observations are better explained when considering a traveling waveform disturbance propagating from north to south at a velocity equal to 200 m/s.

  12. Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Communities of Red Pine (Pinus densiflora) Seedlings in Disturbed Sites and Undisturbed Old Forest Sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hwa; Eom, Ahn-Heum

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate differences in ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal communities between disturbed sites and undisturbed old forest sites. ECM root tips of Pinus densiflora were collected from 4 sites disturbed by human activities and 3 undisturbed old forest sites adjacent to the disturbed sites. Results in this study showed that the number of ECM root tips, species diversity, and number of species were significantly higher in the disturbed sites than in the undisturbed sites, suggesting that the ECM fungal community structure was affected by the degree of disturbance. PMID:23874129

  13. Disturbance rejection performance analyses of closed loop control systems by reference to disturbance ratio.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Baris Baykant; Deniz, Furkan Nur; Keles, Cemal; Tan, Nusret

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems by means of reference to disturbance ratio (RDR). The RDR analysis calculates the ratio of reference signal energy to disturbance signal energy at the system output and provides a quantitative evaluation of disturbance rejection performance of control systems on the bases of communication channel limitations. Essentially, RDR provides a straightforward analytical method for the comparison and improvement of implicit disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems. Theoretical analyses demonstrate us that RDR of the negative feedback closed loop control systems are determined by energy spectral density of controller transfer function. In this manner, authors derived design criteria for specifications of disturbance rejection performances of PID and fractional order PID (FOPID) controller structures. RDR spectra are calculated for investigation of frequency dependence of disturbance rejection capacity and spectral RDR analyses are carried out for PID and FOPID controllers. For the validation of theoretical results, simulation examples are presented. PMID:25311160

  14. US Forest Disturbance Rates Observed from Landsat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Goward, S. N.; Schleeweis, K.; Zhao, F.; Lindsey, M.; Masek, J.; Cohen, W. B.; Moisen, G. G.; Nemani, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    North American forests are thought to be a long-term sink for atmospheric carbon. However, great uncertainties exist in current understanding of the magnitude of this sink and its change in the foreseeable future, largely because forest disturbance and regrowth dynamics are not well characterized. A main goal of the North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) project is to quantify US forest disturbance and regrowth by integrating forest inventory data and historical Landsat observations. From a total of more than 100,000 Landsat images in the USGS Landsat archive, we have selected the best 20,000+ images to construct annual time series datasets for the entire the conterminous US (CONUS) for the years from 1984 to 2011. These images have been converted surface reflectance to produce spatially and temporally consistent radiometry, and are being analyzed using the vegetation change tracker (VCT) algorithm to produce annual forest disturbance products. These products will be validated using design-based accuracy assessment methods, and the causing factor of each mapped disturbance event will be identified. In this talk, we will first provide an overview of the key NAFD methods and then present the preliminary results derived through the NAFD disturbance mapping effort, including initial quality assessment of the derived disturbance products, as well as patterns and rates of forest disturbances at national and regional scales. Issues, lessons learned, and future NAFD work will be discussed at the end.

  15. Comparison of various isostatic marine gravity disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Robert; Bagherbandi, Mohammad; Sjöberg, Lars E.

    2015-08-01

    We present and compare four types of the isostatic gravity disturbances compiled at sea level over the world oceans and marginal seas. These isostatic gravity disturbances are computed by applying the Airy-Heiskanen (AH), Pratt-Hayford (PH) and Vening Meinesz-Moritz (VMM) isostatic models. In addition, we compute the complete crust-stripped (CCS) isostatic gravity disturbances which are defined based on a principle of minimizing their spatial correlation with the Moho geometry. We demonstrate that each applied compensation scheme yields a distinctive spatial pattern in the resulting isostatic marine gravity field. The AH isostatic gravity disturbances provide the smoothest gravity field (by means of their standard deviation). The AH and VMM isostatic gravity disturbances have very similar spatial patterns due to the fact that the same isostatic principle is applied in both these definitions expect for assuming a local (in the former) instead of a global (in the latter) compensation mechanism. The PH isostatic gravity disturbances are highly spatially correlated with the ocean-floor relief. The CCS isostatic gravity disturbances reveal a signature of the ocean-floor spreading characterized by an increasing density of the oceanic lithosphere with age.

  16. Gut microbiota-produced succinate promotes C. difficile infection after antibiotic treatment or motility disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra, Jessica A.; Wu, Katherine J.; Hryckowian, Andrew J.; Bouley, Donna M.; Weimer, Bart C.; Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The mechanisms underlying C. difficile expansion after microbiota disturbance are just emerging. We assessed the gene expression profile of C. difficile within the intestine of gnotobiotic mice to identify genes regulated in response to either dietary or microbiota compositional changes. In the presence of the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, C. difficile induces a pathway that metabolizes the microbiota fermentation end-product succinate to butyrate. The low concentration of succinate in the microbiota of conventional mice is transiently elevated upon antibiotic treatment or chemically-induced intestinal motility disturbance, and C. difficile exploits this succinate spike to expand in the perturbed intestine. A C. difficile mutant compromised in succinate utilization is at a competitive disadvantage during these perturbations. Understanding the metabolic mechanisms involved in microbiota-C. difficile interactions may help to identify approaches for the treatment and prevention of C. difficile-associated diseases. PMID:25498344

  17. Susceptibility of Nrf2-Null Mice to Steatohepatitis and Cirrhosis upon Consumption of a High-Fat Diet Is Associated with Oxidative Stress, Perturbation of the Unfolded Protein Response, and Disturbance in the Expression of Metabolic Enzymes but Not with Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Meakin, Paul J.; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Sharma, Ritu S.; Ashford, Fiona B.; Walsh, Shaun V.; McCrimmon, Rory J.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Dillon, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Mice lacking the transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) develop more severe nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), with cirrhosis, than wild-type (Nrf2+/+) mice when fed a high-fat (HF) diet for 24 weeks. Although NASH is usually associated with insulin resistance, HF-fed Nrf2−/− mice exhibited better insulin sensitivity than HF-fed Nrf2+/+ mice. In livers of HF-fed mice, loss of Nrf2 resulted in greater induction of lipogenic genes, lower expression of β-oxidation genes, greater reduction in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) levels, and diminished acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase phosphorylation than in the wild-type livers, which is consistent with greater fatty acid (FA) synthesis in Nrf2−/− livers. Moreover, primary Nrf2−/− hepatocytes displayed lower glucose and FA oxidation than Nrf2+/+ hepatocytes, with FA oxidation partially rescued by treatment with AMPK activators. The unfolded protein response (UPR) was perturbed in control regular-chow (RC)-fed Nrf2−/− mouse livers, and this was associated with constitutive activation of NF-κB and JNK, along with upregulation of inflammatory genes. The HF diet elicited an antioxidant response in Nrf2+/+ livers, and as this was compromised in Nrf2−/− livers, they suffered oxidative stress. Therefore, Nrf2 protects against NASH by suppressing lipogenesis, supporting mitochondrial function, increasing the threshold for the UPR and inflammation, and enabling adaptation to HF-diet-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24958099

  18. Hydrological disturbance diminishes predator control in wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Nathan J; Cook, Mark I

    2015-11-01

    Effects of predators on prey populations can be especially strong in aquatic ecosystems, but disturbances may mediate the strength of predator limitation and even allow outbreaks of some prey populations. In a two-year study we investigated the numerical responses of crayfish (Procambarus fallax) and small fishes (Poeciliidae and Fundulidae) to a brief hydrological disturbance in replicated freshwater wetlands with an experimental drying and large predatory fish reduction. The experiment and an in situ predation assay tested the component of the consumer stress model positing that disturbances release prey from predator limitation. In the disturbed wetlands, abundances of large predatory fish were seasonally reduced, similar to dynamics in the Everglades (southern Florida). Densities of small fish were unaffected by the disturbance, but crayfish densities, which were similar across all wetlands before drying, increased almost threefold in the year after the disturbance. Upon re-flooding, juvenile crayfish survival was inversely related to the abundance of large fish across wetlands, but we found no evidence for enhanced algal food quality. At a larger landscape scale (500 km2 of the Everglades), crayfish densities over eight years were positively correlated with the severity of local dry disturbances (up to 99 days dry) during the preceding dry season. In contrast, densities of small-bodied fishes in the same wetlands were seasonally depressed by dry disturbances. The results from our experimental wetland drought and the observations of crayfish densities in the Everglades represent a large-scale example of prey population release following a hydrological disturbance in a freshwater ecosystem. The conditions producing crayfish pulses in the Everglades appear consistent with the mechanics of the consumer stress model, and we suggest crayfish pulses may influence the number of nesting wading birds in the Everglades. PMID:27070017

  19. Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Chester E.

    1999-01-01

    In order to expand the predictive capability of single-point turbulence closure models to account for the early-stage transition regime, a methodology for the formulation and calibration of model equations for the ensemble-averaged disturbance kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate is presented. First the decay of laminar disturbances and turbulence in mean shear-free flows is studied. In laminar flows, such disturbances are linear superpositions of modes governed by the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. In turbulent flows, disturbances are described through transport equations for representative mean quantities. The link between a description based on a deterministic evolution equation and a probability based mean transport equation is established. Because an uncertainty in initial conditions exists in the laminar as well as the turbulent regime, a probability distribution must be defined even in the laminar case. Using this probability distribution, it is shown that the exponential decay of the linear modes in the laminar regime can be related to a power law decay of both the (ensemble) mean disturbance kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. The evolution of these mean disturbance quantities is then described by transport equations similar to those for the corresponding turbulent decaying flow. Second, homogeneous shear flow, where disturbances can be described by rapid distortion theory (RDT), is studied. The relationship between RDT and linear stability theory is exploited in order to obtain a closed set of modeled equations. The linear disturbance equations are solved directly so that the numerical simulation yields a database from which the closure coefficients in the ensemble-averaged disturbance equations can be determined.

  20. Mice Deficient in Transmembrane Prostatic Acid Phosphatase Display Increased GABAergic Transmission and Neurological Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Myöhänen, Timo T.; Voikar, Vootele; Mijatovic, Jelena; Segerstråle, Mikael; Herrala, Annakaisa M.; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Pulkka, Anitta E.; Kivinummi, Tanja; Abo-Ramadan, Usama; Taira, Tomi; Piepponen, T. Petteri; Rauvala, Heikki; Vihko, Pirkko

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), the first diagnostic marker and present therapeutic target for prostate cancer, modulates nociception at the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), but its function in the central nervous system has remained unknown. We studied expression and function of TMPAP (the transmembrane isoform of PAP) in the brain by utilizing mice deficient in TMPAP (PAP−/− mice). Here we report that TMPAP is expressed in a subpopulation of cerebral GABAergic neurons, and mice deficient in TMPAP show multiple behavioral and neurochemical features linked to hyperdopaminergic dysregulation and altered GABAergic transmission. In addition to increased anxiety, disturbed prepulse inhibition, increased synthesis of striatal dopamine, and augmented response to amphetamine, PAP-deficient mice have enlarged lateral ventricles, reduced diazepam-induced loss of righting reflex, and increased GABAergic tone in the hippocampus. TMPAP in the mouse brain is localized presynaptically, and colocalized with SNARE-associated protein snapin, a protein involved in synaptic vesicle docking and fusion, and PAP-deficient mice display altered subcellular distribution of snapin. We have previously shown TMPAP to reside in prostatic exosomes and we propose that TMPAP is involved in the control of GABAergic tone in the brain also through exocytosis, and that PAP deficiency produces a distinct neurological phenotype. PMID:24846136

  1. Mice heterozygous for cathepsin D deficiency exhibit mania-related behavior and stress-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Lu, Yi; Han, Yong; Li, Xia; Lou, Huifang; Zhu, Liya; Zhen, Xuechu; Duan, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in cathepsin D (CTSD), an aspartic protease in the endosomal-lysosomal system, underlie congenital neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (cNCL, also known as CLN10), a devastating neurodegenerative disease. CLN10 patients die within the first few days of life, and in the few patients who live into adulthood psychopathological symptoms have not been reported. Extensive neuropathology and altered neurotransmission have been reported in CTSD-deficient mice; however signs of neuropsychiatric behavior in these mice are not well characterized due to the severe movement disorder and premature death of the animal. In the present study, we show that heterozygous CTSD-deficient (CTSD HET) mice display an overall behavioral profile that is similar to human mania, including hyperlocomotion, d-amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, sleep-disturbance, and reduced anxiety-like behavior. However, under stressful conditions CTSD HET mice manifest depressive-like behavior, including anhedonia, behavioral despair, and enhanced learned helplessness. Chronic administration of lithium chloride or valproic acid, two clinically effective mood stabilizers, reverses the majority of these behavioral abnormalities. In addition, CTSD HET mice display stress-induced hypersecretion of corticosterone. These findings suggest an important role for CTSD in the regulation of mood stabilization. PMID:26092248

  2. The relative importance of disturbance and exotic-plant abundance in California coastal sage scrub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, G.M.; Diffendorfer, J.E.; Zedler, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Many ecosystems of conservation concern require some level of disturbance to sustain their species composition and ecological function. However, inappropriate disturbance regimes could favor invasion or expansion of exotic species. In southern California coastal sage scrub (CSS) fire is a natural disturbance, but because of human influence, frequencies may now be unnaturally high. Other anthropogenic disturbances such as grazing also occur in reserve areas. Managers charged with imposing or tolerating fire or other disturbance within their reserves are concerned that habitat quality may be degraded by an increasing abundance of exotic plants. We used vegetation monitoring data from Camp Pendleton, California, USA, to assess the correlation between past disturbances (frequent fire, agriculture, or grazing and mechanical disturbances) and current exotic species abundance in CSS. We found that disturbance history was only modestly related to exotic abundance overall, but fire frequency showed the strongest association. We also examined whether cover and richness of various native plant life forms (woody species, perennial herbs, and annual herbs) were more strongly influenced by disturbance history or by exotic-plant abundance. Native plant responses varied among life forms, but woody species and annual herbs were generally more strongly and negatively associated with exotic abundance than with disturbance. Effective CSS conservation will require developing means to curb the negative impacts of exotic plants, which may abound with or without severe or recent disturbance. Additionally, more focus should be given to understory herbs showing sensitivity to invasion. Though understudied, native herbs comprise the greatest portion of plant diversity in CSS and are critical to preservation of the community as a whole. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  3. Physiologic and metabolic safety of butyrylcholinesterase gene therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Vishakantha; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; White, Thomas A; Parks, Robin J; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2014-07-16

    In continuing efforts to develop gene transfer of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) as therapy for cocaine addiction, we conducted wide-ranging studies of physiological and metabolic safety. For that purpose, mice were given injections of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector or helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector encoding human or mouse BChE mutated for optimal cocaine hydrolysis. Age-matched controls received saline or AAV-luciferase control vector. At times when transduced BChE was abundant, physiologic and metabolic parameters in conscious animals were evaluated by non-invasive Echo-MRI and an automated "Comprehensive Laboratory Animal Monitoring System" (CLAMS). Despite high vector doses (up to 10(13) particles per mouse) and high levels of transgene protein in the plasma (∼1500-fold above baseline), the CLAMS apparatus revealed no adverse physiologic or metabolic effects. Likewise, body composition determined by Echo-MRI, and glucose tolerance remained normal. A CLAMS study of vector-treated mice given 40 mg/kg cocaine showed none of the physiologic and metabolic fluctuations exhibited in controls. We conclude that neither the tested vectors nor great excesses of circulating BChE affect general physiology directly, while they protect mice from disturbance by cocaine. Hence, viral gene transfer of BChE appears benign and worth exploring as a therapy for cocaine abuse and possibly other disorders as well. PMID:24892251

  4. Obesity impairs lactation performance in mice by inducing prolactin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Buonfiglio, Daniella C.; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M.; Freitas, Vanessa M.; Zampieri, Thais T.; Nagaishi, Vanessa S.; Magalhães, Magna; Cipolla-Neto, Jose; Cella, Nathalie; Donato Jr., Jose

    2016-01-01

    Obesity reduces breastfeeding success and lactation performance in women. However, the mechanisms involved are not entirely understood. In the present study, female C57BL/6 mice were chronically exposed to a high-fat diet to induce obesity and subsequently exhibited impaired offspring viability (only 15% survival rate), milk production (33% reduction), mammopoiesis (one-third of the glandular area compared to control animals) and postpartum maternal behaviors (higher latency to retrieving and grouping the pups). Reproductive experience attenuated these defects. Diet-induced obese mice exhibited high basal pSTAT5 levels in the mammary tissue and hypothalamus, and an acute prolactin stimulus was unable to further increase pSTAT5 levels above basal levels. In contrast, genetically obese leptin-deficient females showed normal prolactin responsiveness. Additionally, we identified the expression of leptin receptors specifically in basal/myoepithelial cells of the mouse mammary gland. Finally, high-fat diet females exhibited altered mRNA levels of ERBB4 and NRG1, suggesting that obesity may involve disturbances to mammary gland paracrine circuits that are critical in the control of luminal progenitor function and lactation. In summary, our findings indicate that high leptin levels are a possible cause of the peripheral and central prolactin resistance observed in obese mice which leads to impaired lactation performance. PMID:26926925

  5. Obesity impairs lactation performance in mice by inducing prolactin resistance.

    PubMed

    Buonfiglio, Daniella C; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M; Freitas, Vanessa M; Zampieri, Thais T; Nagaishi, Vanessa S; Magalhães, Magna; Cipolla-Neto, Jose; Cella, Nathalie; Donato, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Obesity reduces breastfeeding success and lactation performance in women. However, the mechanisms involved are not entirely understood. In the present study, female C57BL/6 mice were chronically exposed to a high-fat diet to induce obesity and subsequently exhibited impaired offspring viability (only 15% survival rate), milk production (33% reduction), mammopoiesis (one-third of the glandular area compared to control animals) and postpartum maternal behaviors (higher latency to retrieving and grouping the pups). Reproductive experience attenuated these defects. Diet-induced obese mice exhibited high basal pSTAT5 levels in the mammary tissue and hypothalamus, and an acute prolactin stimulus was unable to further increase pSTAT5 levels above basal levels. In contrast, genetically obese leptin-deficient females showed normal prolactin responsiveness. Additionally, we identified the expression of leptin receptors specifically in basal/myoepithelial cells of the mouse mammary gland. Finally, high-fat diet females exhibited altered mRNA levels of ERBB4 and NRG1, suggesting that obesity may involve disturbances to mammary gland paracrine circuits that are critical in the control of luminal progenitor function and lactation. In summary, our findings indicate that high leptin levels are a possible cause of the peripheral and central prolactin resistance observed in obese mice which leads to impaired lactation performance. PMID:26926925

  6. Vertical distribution of soil removed by four species of burrowing rodents in disturbed and undisturbed soils

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.D.; Laundre, J.W.

    1988-04-01

    Burrow volumes were determined in disturbed and undisturbed soils for four species of rodents in southeastern Idaho. Comparisons were made between soil types for the average volume and the proportion of the total volume of soil excavated from 10-cm increments for each species, and the relative number of burrows and proportion of total soil removed from beneath the minimum thickness of soil covers over buried low-level radioactive wastes. Burrows of montane voles (Microtus montanus) and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) rarely extended below 50 cm and neither volumes nor depths were influenced by soil disturbance. Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii) had the deepest and most voluminous burrows that, along with Ord's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii) burrows, were more prevalent beneath 50 cm in disturbed soils.

  7. Effect of disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora on the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A.

    PubMed

    Smith, G R; Thornton, E A

    1993-04-01

    Oral pretreatment of mice with either a mixture of kanamycin and erythromycin or metronidazole to modify the gut microflora greatly enhanced the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A given by mouth. This lends support to the suggestion that disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora in animals such as cattle, which often carry the organism in the rumen, may lead to intestinal multiplication and faecal excretion, thereby providing a source of infection that may lead to necrobacillosis of the body surface. PMID:8472777

  8. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Acoustic and Vortical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakamar, P.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Boundary layer receptivity to two-dimensional acoustic disturbances at different incidence angles and to vortical disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 6 flow over a 7deg half-angle sharp-tipped wedge and a cone. Higher order spatial and temporal schemes are employed to obtain the solution. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves as compared to the fast waves. It is found that the receptivity of the boundary layer on the windward side (with respect to the acoustic forcing) decreases when the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 30 degrees. However, the receptivity coefficient for the leeward side is found to vary relatively weakly with the incidence angle. The maximum receptivity is obtained when the wave incident angle is about 20 degrees. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that for the acoustic waves. Vortical disturbances first generate the fast acoustic modes and they switch to the slow mode near the continuous spectrum.

  9. Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Page, Y.; Hurtt, G.; Thomson, A. M.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Patel, P.; Wise, M.; Calvin, K.; Kyle, P.; Clarke, L.; Edmonds, J.; Janetos, A.

    2013-03-01

    The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon-efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of the potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and the global economy. An understanding of the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies.

  10. Ecological consequences of major hydrodynamic disturbances on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Madin, Joshua S; Connolly, Sean R

    2006-11-23

    A recent tsunami and an apparent increase in the frequency of severe tropical storms underscore the need to understand and predict the ecological consequences of major hydrodynamic disturbances. Reef corals provide the habitat structure that sustains the high biodiversity of tropical reefs, and thus provide the foundation for the ecosystem goods and services that are critical to many tropical societies. Here we integrate predictions from oceanographic models with engineering theory, to predict the dislodgement of benthic reef corals during hydrodynamic disturbances. This generalizes earlier work, by incorporating colonies of any shape and by explicitly examining the effects of hydrodynamic gradients on coral assemblage structure. A field test shows that this model accurately predicts changes in the mechanical vulnerability of coral colonies, and thus their size and shape, with distance from the reef crest. This work provides a general framework for understanding and predicting the effects of hydrodynamic disturbances on coral reef communities; such disturbances have a major role in determining species zonation and coexistence on coral reefs, and are critical determinants of how coral assemblages will respond to changes in the frequency and intensity of tropical storms associated with a changing climate. PMID:17122855

  11. Disturbance Rejection Control of an Electromagnetic Bearing Spindle

    SciTech Connect

    PETTEYS,REBECCA; PARKER,GORDON

    2000-08-31

    The force exerted on the rotor by an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is determined by the current flow in the magnet coils. This force can be controlled very precisely, making magnetic bearings a potential benefit for grinding, where cutting forces act as external disturbances on the shaft, resulting in degraded part finish. It is possible to achieve precise shaft positioning, reduce vibration of the shaft caused by external disturbances, and even damp out resonant modes. Adaptive control is an appealing approach for these systems because the controller can tune itself to account for an unknown periodic disturbance, such as cutting or grinding forces, injected into the system. In this paper the authors show how one adaptive control algorithm can be applied to an AMB system with a periodic disturbance applied to the rotor. An adaptive algorithm was developed and implemented in both simulation and hardware, yielding significant reductions in rotor displacement in the presence of an external excitation. Ultimately, this type of algorithm could be applied to a magnetic bearing grinder to reduce unwanted motion of the spindle which leads to poor part finish and chatter.

  12. Effects of chemical disturbances on intertidal benthic assemblages.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Pinto, Mariana; Ignacio, Barbara Lage

    2015-02-15

    Contamination is a particular harmful type of chemical disturbance and predicting their effects on natural systems is very complex. Effects of disturbances vary in space and time and depend, among other things, on the type and age of organisms, the habitat being studied and the complex interactions occurring in the systems. Most impact analyses of contaminants are however still done with limited number of selected organisms under laboratory conditions. Manipulative experiments done in situ are important to measure ecologically relevant responses of contaminant effects on marine systems. Ecological approaches on contamination studies, accounting for interactions among species and the environment are essential to understand how such disturbances affect systems. We evaluated the effects of bleach and permethrin, two common and pervasive contaminants, on intertidal benthic assemblages in two different successional stages, mature and young. There were no impacts on the overall structure of assemblages, regardless of their age. The lack of effects on the structure of assemblages might be due to the intrinsic characteristic of the habitat studied, which provide few sinks for contaminants, as well as the inherent features of the organisms themselves. Bleach did cause, however, a decrease in the abundance of limpets, which can have further consequences to these systems. This study shows the importance of studies on chemical disturbances done under relevant natural scenarios and that efficient management policies of natural systems will only achieve successful responses with properly designed experiments under natural conditions. PMID:25460934

  13. Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Hurtt, George; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-19

    The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon12 efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and on the global economy. Understanding the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies

  14. Mice with hepatocyte-specific FXR deficiency are resistant to spontaneous but susceptible to cholic acid-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Zhu, Yan; Li, Guodong; Williams, Jessica A; Buckley, Kyle; Tawfik, Ossama; Luyendyk, James P; Guo, Grace L

    2016-03-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily with its endogenous ligands bile acids. Mice with whole body FXR deficiency develop liver tumors spontaneously, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Moreover, it is unknown whether FXR deficiency in liver alone serves as a tumor initiator or promoter during liver carcinogenesis. This study aims to evaluate the effects of hepatocyte-specific FXR deficiency (FXR(hep-/-)) in liver tumor formation. The results showed that FXR(hep-/-) mice did not show spontaneous liver tumorigenesis with aging (up to 24 mo of age). Therefore FXR(hep-/-) mice were fed a bile acid (cholic acid)-containing diet alone or along with a liver tumor initiator, diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Thirty weeks later, no tumors were found in wild-type or FXR(hep-/-) mice without any treatment or with DEN only. However, with cholic acid, while only some wild-type mice developed tumors, all FXR(hep-/-) mice presented with severe liver injury and tumors. Interestingly, FXR(hep-/-) mouse livers increased basal expression of tumor suppressor p53 protein, apoptosis, and decreased basal cyclin D1 expression, which may prevent tumor development in FXR(hep-/-) mice. However, cholic acid feeding reversed these effects in FXR(hep-/-) mice, which is associated with an increased cyclin D1 and decreased cell cycle inhibitors. More in-depth analysis indicates that the increased in cell growth might result from disturbance of the MAPK and JAK/Stat3 signaling pathways. In conclusion, this study shows that hepatic FXR deficiency may only serve as a tumor initiator, and increased bile acids is required for tumor formation likely by promoting cell proliferation. PMID:26744468

  15. Effects of disturbance on small mammal community structure in the New Jersey Pinelands, USA.

    PubMed

    Shenko, Alicia N; Bien, Walter F; Spotila, James R; Avery, Harold W

    2012-03-01

    We compared small mammal community composition among undisturbed habitats and habitats disturbed by military operations on Warren Grove Gunnery Range (WGR) in the New Jersey Pinelands. WGR is one of the largest tracts of protected land within this globally rare ecosystem. Disturbance in the form of fire, mowing, soil disruption and logging has had a large effect on small mammal occurrence and distribution. Of the 14 small mammal species that occur in the Pinelands, 9 live on WGR, including large populations of the southern bog lemming (Synaptomys cooperi Baird, 1858) and meadow jumping mouse [Zapus hudsonius (Zimmermann, 1780)]. Simpson's Index of Diversity was 0 for most disturbed sites and was generally greater in wetlands than in uplands. White-footed mouse [Peromyscus leucopus (Rafinesque, 1818)] was the most common species on WGR and had a dominant effect on species diversity and community similarity indices. It dominated upland habitats and was the only species to occur in several disturbed habitats, whereas all 9 species occurred in wetlands. Principal components analysis indicated that most variation in species diversity was explained by disturbance and differences between upland and wetland habitats, due to presence of white-footed mice in disturbed and upland sites. Meadow jumping mice, southern bog lemmings and red-back voles [Myodes gapperi (Vigors, 1830)] were positively correlated with wetland habitats, and pine voles [Microtus pinetorum (Le Conte, 1830)], short-tail shrews [Blarina brevicauda (Say, 1823)] and eastern chipmunks [Tamias striatus (Linnaeus, 1758)] were associated with uplands. Habitat heterogeneity at WGR, including extensive undisturbed wetlands and uplands supported a rich diversity of small mammal species. PMID:22405445

  16. Evolution of disturbances in stagnation point flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, William O.; Jackson, Thomas L.; Lasseigne, D. Glenn

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of three-dimensional disturbances in an incompressible three-dimensional stagnation-point flow in an inviscid fluid is investigated. Since it is not possible to apply classical normal mode analysis to the disturbance equations for the fully three-dimensional stagnation-point flow to obtain solutions, an initial-value problem is solved instead. The evolution of the disturbances provide the necessary information to determine stability and indeed the complete transient as well. It is found that when considering the disturbance energy, the planar stagnation-point flow, which is independent of one of the transverse coordinates, represents a neutrally stable flow whereas the fully three-dimensional flow is either stable or unstable, depending on whether the flow is away from or towards the stagnation point in the transverse direction that is neglected in the planar stagnation point.

  17. Sleep disturbances associated with cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Joseph P H; Wang, Jiantong; Holiday, David B; Warren, Jessica Young; Paradoa, Marilyn; Balkhi, Amanda Marie; Fernandez-Baca, Jeannette; McCrae, Christina S

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances resulting in insufficient sleep have been linked to negative physical, cognitive, and public health outcomes. Despite this, there has yet a study that examines the impact of smoking on sleep in a US based national sample. The current study sought to observe sleep disturbances associated with smoking status. Sleep disturbances in adults aged 20 years and above, from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, were measured among current, former, and never smokers (NS). Current smokers (CS) reported significantly less total sleep time, longer sleep onset latency, increased difficulty falling asleep, maintaining sleep, and waking up earlier than desired when compared to NS. Former smokers reported disturbances similar to NS and CS experienced poorer sleep than nonsmokers. Our study is the first to observe sleep difficulty by smoking status in a large, population-based, nationally representative sample. Recommendations for smoking cessation programs are discussed. PMID:24040938

  18. Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    The Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS) project is creating a record of forest disturbance and regrowth for North America from the Landsat satellite record, in support of the carbon modeling activities. LEDAPS relies on the decadal Landsat GeoCover data set supplemented by dense image time series for selected locations. Imagery is first atmospherically corrected to surface reflectance, and then change detection algorithms are used to extract disturbance area, type, and frequency. Reuse of the MODIS Land processing system (MODAPS) architecture allows rapid throughput of over 2200 MSS, TM, and ETM+ scenes. Initial ("Beta") surface reflectance products are currently available for testing, and initial continental disturbance products will be available by the middle of 2006.

  19. Do I Dare Disturb the Universe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    L'Engle, Madeleine

    1983-01-01

    Argues the importance of teaching children to "disturb the universe"--take stands on important issues. Decries the world of the binary computer where all questions must be answered yes/no or either/or. (FL)

  20. Realization of a minimal disturbance quantum measurement.

    PubMed

    Sciarrino, F; Ricci, M; De Martini, F; Filip, R; Mista, L

    2006-01-20

    We report the first experimental realization of an "optimal" quantum device able to perform a minimal disturbance measurement on polarization encoded qubits saturating the theoretical boundary established between the classical knowledge acquired of any input state, i.e., a "classical guess," and the fidelity of the same state after disturbance due to measurement. The device has been physically realized by means of a linear optical qubit manipulation, postselection measurement, and a classical feed-forward process. PMID:16486551

  1. Guiding future research on terrestrial ecosystem disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-04-01

    With North American ecosystems responsible for drawing hundreds of teragrams of carbon from the atmosphere each year, the tenuous balance of the terrestrial carbon budget can be upset for decades by disturbances such as fires, storms, disease outbreaks, insect infestations, and logging. Research cataloging the effects of such disturbances on regional carbon cycling tends to be sporadic or of limited scope. Most research has focused on forests but is less extensive for other important ecosystems such as grasslands or permafrost peatlands.

  2. [Visual disturbances following right cerebral lesion: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Yasui, N; Suzuki, A; Kobayashi, T

    1984-07-01

    A 49-year-old right handed male, who showed three types of visual disturbance, e. g. hemianopsia, obscuration phenomena and unilateral visuospatial agnosia at different times, was reported. At first, he had hemiparesis, hemisensory disturbance and homonymous hemianopsia on the left side because of multiple stenoses of posterior branches of the right middle cerebral artery. His motor and visual field disturbances improved for several days after onset, but there appeared transient obscuration phenomena on the left visual field. CT scan revealed an abnormal low density area in the right temporo-parietal region. At about 4.5 years after the first attack, he again had hemiparesis and homonymous hemianopsia on the left side. Cerebral angiography showed an occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Since his paresis was progressive, STA-MCA anastomoses was performed. Hemiparesis was improved, but homonymous hemianopsia remained. Moreover, at about one year after the second attack, left visuospatial agnosia participated in his hemianopsia. Cerebral angiography showed an additional occlusion in the crural segment of the right posterior cerebral artery. CT scan showed a lesion in the right basal ganglia and temporo-parietal lobe. In most cases, unilateral visuospatial agnosia occurs with hemianopsia. But, in this case, these symptoms occurred at different times. This may indicate the differentiation between unilateral visuospatial agnosia and hemianopsia. PMID:6487433

  3. Pregabalin Versus Pramipexole: Effects on Sleep Disturbance in Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Patrick, Jeffrey; DuBrava, Sarah; Becker, Philip M.; Lankford, Alan; Chen, Crystal; Miceli, Jeffrey; Knapp, Lloyd; Allen, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare pregabalin versus placebo and pramipexole for reducing restless legs syndrome (RLS)-related sleep disturbance. Design: Randomized, double-blinded, crossover trial. Setting: Twenty-three US sleep centers. Participants: Eighty-five individuals with moderate to severe idiopathic RLS and associated sleep disturbance. Interventions: Participants were randomized across 6 treatment sequences comprising three 4-week periods on pregabalin 300 mg/day (n = 75), pramipexole 0.5 mg/day (n = 76), or placebo (n = 73). Measurements and Results: Polysomnography was conducted over 2 nights at the end of each period. Primary (wake after sleep onset [WASO], pregabalin vs placebo) and key secondary endpoints were analyzed for statistical significance, with descriptive statistics for other endpoints. Pregabalin improved sleep maintenance, demonstrated by reductions in WASO (-27.1 min vs placebo [P < 0.0001]; -26.9 vs pramipexole) and number of awakenings after sleep onset (-2.7 vs placebo; -7.9 vs pramipexole [P < 0.0001]) by polysomnography, and an increase in subjective total sleep time (30.8 min vs placebo [P < 0.0001]; 26.8 vs pramipexole). Pregabalin also increased slow wave sleep duration (20.9 min vs placebo; 32.1 vs pramipexole [P < 0.0001]). Reduction in periodic limb movement arousal index (PLMAI) with pregabalin was similar to pramipexole and greater than placebo (-3.7 PLMA/h [P < 0.0001]), although reduction in total PLM in sleep was less than for pramipexole. Conclusions: This study demonstrated improvements in objective and subjective measures of sleep maintenance and sleep architecture with pregabalin compared with placebo and pramipexole. Effects of pregabalin on periodic limb movement arousal index were comparable to pramipexole. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT00991276; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00991276 Citation: Garcia-Borreguero D; Patrick J; DuBrava S; Becker PM; Lankford A; Chen C; Miceli J; Knapp L; Allen

  4. Mapping surface disturbance from wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffendorfer, James E.

    2013-04-01

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing segments of the electricity market and this trend will likely continue as countries strive to reduce CO2 production while meeting growing energy demands. One impact of wind facilities is surface disturbance, including roads, that lead to habitat loss and fragmentation. Numerous studies of wind power utilize estimates of surface disturbance for GIS-based modeling or basic calculations of the land area required to generate energy using wind. However published estimates of the land use required for a MW of electricity from wind facilities vary by more than 10 times (0.83 to 250 MW/Km2). We report results from a geospatial analysis of 39 wind facilities in the United States that we fully digitized using high resolution photo-imagery. The selected sites and analyses were designed to elucidate the effects of turbine size, topography, and land use on the area requirements of wind facilities. The results indicate point estimates of average surface disturbance/MW have wide levels of variation, explained primarily by Landcover and Topography. Wind facilities in agricultural landscapes had smaller surface disturbance/ha than facilities in forests and shrublands, and facilities in relatively flat topography had smaller surface disturbance/ha than facilities on hills, ridges, or mesas. Land use, topography, and turbine size all influenced turbine spacing. The statistical models suggest we can predict geographic locations where new wind facilities could be placed with minimized surface disturbance.

  5. Optimal Free-Stream Vortical Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, M. J. Philipp

    2015-11-01

    In boundary layers exposed to moderate levels of free-stream disturbances, natural transition via the exponential amplification of Tollmien-Schlichting waves is bypassed by a more rapid breakdown process. The external disturbances interact with the mean shear and induce the growth of highly energetic streaks, which cause transition to turbulence by virtue of the growth of inviscid secondary instabilities. The relationship between external vortices and boundary-layer perturbations is, however, not entirely understood. The present study provides a rigorous link between the dynamics in the free-stream and inside the boundary layer by computing the optimal free-stream vortical disturbances, i.e. the external disturbances which maximize the energy content of the resulting boundary-layer perturbations. The mathematical framework is based on a semi-norm formulation of the adjoint linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinates and enables the global analysis of disturbance sensitivity as well as the computation of optimal disturbances in flows with variable density and miscellaneous geometries.

  6. Deficiencies in extrusion of the second polar body due to high calcium concentrations during in vitro fertilization in inbred C3H/He mice.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yuki; Nagao, Yoshikazu; Minami, Naojiro; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Kito, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    Successful in vitro fertilization (IVF) of all inbred strains of laboratory mice has not yet been accomplished. We have previously shown that a high calcium concentration improved IVF in various inbred mice. However, we also found that in cumulus-free ova of C3H/He mice such IVF conditions significantly increased the deficiency of extrusion of the second polar body (PBII) in a dose-dependent manner (2% at 1.71 mM and 29% at 6.84 mM, P < 0.05) and that PBII extrusion was affected by high calcium levels at 2-3 h post-insemination. While developmental competence of ova without PBII extrusion to blastocysts after 96 h culture was not affected, a significant reduction in the nuclear number of the inner cell mass was observed in blastocyst fertilized under high calcium condition. We also examined how high calcium concentration during IVF affects PBII extrusion in C3H/He mice. Cumulus cells cultured under high calcium conditions showed a significantly alleviated deficient PBII extrusion. This phenomenon is likely to be specific to C3H/He ova because deficient PBII extrusion in reciprocal fertilization between C3H and BDF1 gametes was observed only in C3H/He ova. Sperm factor(s) was still involved in deficient PBII extrusion due to high calcium concentrations, as this phenomenon was not observed in ova activated by ethanol. The cytoskeletal organization of ova without PBII extrusion showed disturbed spindle rotation, incomplete formation of contractile ring and disturbed localization of actin, suggesting that high calcium levels affect the anchoring machinery of the meiotic spindle. These results indicate that in C3H/He mice high calcium levels induce abnormal fertilization, i.e. deficient PBII extrusion by affecting the cytoskeletal organization, resulting in disturbed cytokinesis during the second meiotic division. Thus, use of high calcium media for IVF should be avoided for this strain. PMID:26503636

  7. [Distribution of Phosphorus Forms in the Overlying Water Under Disturbance with the Addition of Algae].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Li, Yong; Li, Da-peng; Huang, Yong; Zhu, Pei-ying

    2016-04-15

    Distribution of different phosphorus (P) forms in the overlying water and the contribution of different algae to the P disappearance were investigated under disturbance with the addition of algae (Microcystis aeruginosa and Selenastrum capricornutum, respectively). The sediments and overlying water were taken from Meiliang Bay in Taihu Lake. The results showed that the concentrations of total P (TP), dissolved total P (DTP), dissolved inorganic P (DIP) and biavailable P (BAP) decreased with and without disturbance. The uptake of DTP and DIP by Microcystis aeruginosa was better than that of Selenastrum capricornutum under the disturbance, but it was the opposite without the disturbance. The disappearance of P in the overlying water was attributed completely to the physico-chemical adsorption of the suspended solids and the uptake of algae. But the contribution of suspended solids and algae depended on the disturbance. The contribution of Microcystis aeruginosa and Selenastrum capricornutum to DTP and DIP absorption was about 60% without disturbance. However, the value was reduced to 40% (Microcystis aeruginosa) and 25% ( Selenastrum capricornutum) under the disturbance. Under the disturbance and the action of algae, the distribution of sedimentary P forms changed. NH4 Cl-P and Ca-P release and Fe/Al-P increase were observed with and without disturbance. The decrease of NH4 Cl-P and Ca-P and the increase of Fe/Al-P were more obvious with disturbance than without disturbance. Selenastrum capricornutum was favor of the release of Ca-P and the formation of Fe/Al-P. PMID:27548963

  8. Scales of Stream Disturbance Patterns and Population Structure in Bull Trout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, C. H.; Rieman, B. E.; Dunham, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    Ecological theory proposes that the geometry and dynamics of suitable habitats are important predictors for the persistence of a population or metapopulation. A key finding supporting a metapopulation-like conceptualization of extinction and colonization in fragmented salmonid populations is that individuals of particular species are more likely to be absent from small patches of suitable habitat than from large patches. Extinctions from small patches occur for a few reasons that can be roughly classed as physical catastrophic causes (e.g. a major channel reorganizing event) or as biological small-population effects related to genetics and demographics. One important question with implications for land management is how strong of a role physical disturbances play in determining presence and absence of a species within a patch. If disturbance plays a key role in structuring populations, then we would expect to observe two patterns. First the spatial scale of disturbance should be on the order of the size of patches that are commonly unoccupied. The second prediction would be that the spatial scale of genetic variability should show strong gene flow at scales smaller than the scale of disturbance. We examined aerial photography over the last 40 years in central Idaho to measure the scale of stream disturbance patches. The scale of stream disturbances was on the same order of magnitude as the divide between commonly occupied and unoccupied patches, and was smaller than scales of high gene flow among bull trout populations, failing to reject the possibility that disturbance plays an important role in structuring populations in this basin. Management for persistence of the species must consider both the likelihood of decreased habitat patch sizes and increased disturbance scales with global warming. Knowing disturbance patch scales and how disturbance operates to structure populations can be used to consider a disturbance based paradigm for management of sensitive

  9. Assessment of the physical disturbance of the northern European Continental shelf seabed by waves and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, J. N.; Parker, E. R.; Bricheno, L. M.; Green, S. L.; van der Molen, J.

    2015-10-01

    Natural seabed disturbance was quantified by estimating the number of days in a year that movement of the seabed occurred due to waves and currents. Disturbance over gravel substrates was based on the concept of a critical threshold for bed movement. For mud substrates disturbance was assessed on the basis of bed failure under extreme hydrodynamic stress. For sand beds the disturbance frequency was calculated by reference to the predicted occurrence of small scale bedforms using established relationships for estimating ripple and megaripple height. The method was applied to the northern European Continental Shelf (48°N to 58.5°N and 10°W to 10°E) using modelled annual wave and current forcing with a temporal resolution of one hour and spatial resolution of approximately 11 km. Highest levels of disturbance occurred in areas of high tidal stress where dune/megaripple type bedforms were predicted and in shallow regions exposed to waves with large fetch. However, the detailed distribution of disturbance showed a complex relationship between water depth, tidal stress, wave fetch and grain size. An assessment of the uncertainty in the results was made by use of a simple Monte Carlo approach. In most locations this indicated a large uncertainty in disturbance frequency values suggesting that present predictive relationships need improvement if assessments of natural disturbance are to be made with confidence. Nevertheless the results give a broad understanding of the location and intensity of natural physical bed disturbance and the ability to compare the relative intensity between different regions. This has applications to management of the seabed where human impacts have to be assessed in the context of the underlying natural disturbance. Recommendations are given for further research that might help decrease the uncertainty in natural disturbance prediction.

  10. [A Surgical Case of Tuberculoma with Visual Disturbance].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takashi; Otani, Naoki; Otsuka, Yohei; Matsumoto, Takashi; Tanoue, Shunsuke; Ueno, Hideaki; Tomura, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Arata; Toyooka, Terushige; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    We herein report a surgical case of multiple cerebral calculi located within the chiasmatic cistern resulting in visual disturbance. A 61-year-old man experienced homonymous lower right quadrantanopsia a few years prior. Non-enhanced head CT revealed multiple calcified lesions of about 7-mm within the basal cistern. MRI showed the lesion compressing the left optic tract. We could not remove the entire lesion because of severe adhesion to the optic tract. A pathological test showed calcified lesions with lymphocyte infiltration. We diagnosed tuberculoma caused by tuberculous meningitis with degeneration of the calcified lesion because of a history of tuberculosis at a fetal age. After the surgery, the patient was discharged without improvement of the visual disturbance. PMID:27506845

  11. Flow disturbances generated by feeding and swimming zooplankton

    PubMed Central

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Jiang, Houshuo; Gonçalves, Rodrigo Javier; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Wadhwa, Navish

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between planktonic organisms, such as detection of prey, predators, and mates, are often mediated by fluid signals. Consequently, many plankton predators perceive their prey from the fluid disturbances that it generates when it feeds and swims. Zooplankton should therefore seek to minimize the fluid disturbance that they produce. By means of particle image velocimetry, we describe the fluid disturbances produced by feeding and swimming in zooplankton with diverse propulsion mechanisms and ranging from 10-µm flagellates to greater than millimeter-sized copepods. We show that zooplankton, in which feeding and swimming are separate processes, produce flow disturbances during swimming with a much faster spatial attenuation (velocity u varies with distance r as u ∝ r−3 to r−4) than that produced by zooplankton for which feeding and propulsion are the same process (u ∝ r−1 to r−2). As a result, the spatial extension of the fluid disturbance produced by swimmers is an order of magnitude smaller than that produced by feeders at similar Reynolds numbers. The “quiet” propulsion of swimmers is achieved either through swimming erratically by short-lasting power strokes, generating viscous vortex rings, or by “breast-stroke swimming.” Both produce rapidly attenuating flows. The more “noisy” swimming of those that are constrained by a need to simultaneously feed is due to constantly beating flagella or appendages that are positioned either anteriorly or posteriorly on the (cell) body. These patterns transcend differences in size and taxonomy and have thus evolved multiple times, suggesting a strong selective pressure to minimize predation risk. PMID:25071196

  12. Flow disturbances generated by feeding and swimming zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Jiang, Houshuo; Gonçalves, Rodrigo Javier; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Wadhwa, Navish

    2014-08-12

    Interactions between planktonic organisms, such as detection of prey, predators, and mates, are often mediated by fluid signals. Consequently, many plankton predators perceive their prey from the fluid disturbances that it generates when it feeds and swims. Zooplankton should therefore seek to minimize the fluid disturbance that they produce. By means of particle image velocimetry, we describe the fluid disturbances produced by feeding and swimming in zooplankton with diverse propulsion mechanisms and ranging from 10-µm flagellates to greater than millimeter-sized copepods. We show that zooplankton, in which feeding and swimming are separate processes, produce flow disturbances during swimming with a much faster spatial attenuation (velocity u varies with distance r as u ∝ r(-3) to r(-4)) than that produced by zooplankton for which feeding and propulsion are the same process (u ∝ r(-1) to r(-2)). As a result, the spatial extension of the fluid disturbance produced by swimmers is an order of magnitude smaller than that produced by feeders at similar Reynolds numbers. The "quiet" propulsion of swimmers is achieved either through swimming erratically by short-lasting power strokes, generating viscous vortex rings, or by "breast-stroke swimming." Both produce rapidly attenuating flows. The more "noisy" swimming of those that are constrained by a need to simultaneously feed is due to constantly beating flagella or appendages that are positioned either anteriorly or posteriorly on the (cell) body. These patterns transcend differences in size and taxonomy and have thus evolved multiple times, suggesting a strong selective pressure to minimize predation risk. PMID:25071196

  13. The development of autoimmune features in aging mice is closely associated with alterations of the peripheral CD4⁺ T-cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Nusser, Anja; Nuber, Natko; Wirz, Oliver F; Rolink, Hannie; Andersson, Jan; Rolink, Antonius

    2014-10-01

    Some signs of potential autoimmunity, such as the appearance of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) become prevalent with age. In most cases, elderly people with ANAs remain healthy. Here, we investigated whether the same holds true for inbred strains of mice. Indeed, we show that most mice of the C57BL/6 (B6) strain spontaneously produced IgG ANA at 8-12 months of age, showed IgM deposition in kidneys and lymphocyte infiltrates in submandibular salivary glands. Despite all of this, the mice remained healthy. ANA production is likely CD4(+) T-cell dependent, since old (40-50 weeks of age) B6 mice deficient for MHC class II do not produce IgG ANAs. BM chimeras showed that ANA production was not determined by age-related changes in radiosensitive, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and that the CD4(+) T cells that promote ANA production were radioresistant. Thymectomy of B6 mice at 5 weeks of age led to premature alterations in T-cell homeostasis and ANA production, by 15 weeks of age, similar to that in old mice. Our findings suggest that a disturbed T-cell homeostasis may drive the onset of some autoimmune features. PMID:25044476

  14. Comparison of methods for determining the hydrologic recovery time after forest disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, T.; Green, M.; Ohte, N.; Urakawa, R.; Endo, I.; Scanlon, T. M.; Sebestyen, S. D.; McGuire, K. J.; Katsuyama, M.; Fukuzawa, K.; Tague, C.; Hiraoka, M.; Fukushima, K.; Giambelluca, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in forest hydrology changes after forest disturbance vary among catchments. Although studies have summarized the initial runoff changes following forest disturbance, the estimates of long-term recovery time are less frequently reported. To understand the mechanisms of long-term recovery processes and to predict the long-term changes in streamflow after forest disturbance, it is important to compare recovery times after disturbance. However, there is no clear consensus regarding the best methodology for such research, especially for watershed studies that were not designed as paired watersheds. We compared methods of determining the hydrologic recovery time to determine if there is a common method for sites in any hydroclimatic setting. We defined the hydrologic recovery time to be the time of disturbance to the time when hydrological factors first recovered to pre-disturbance levels. We acquired data on long-term rainfall and runoff at 16 sites in northeastern USA and Japan that had at least 10 years (and up to 50 years) of post disturbance data. The types of disturbance include harvesting, diseases and insect damages. We compared multiple indices of hydrological response including annual runoff, annual runoff ratio (annual runoff/annual rainfall), annual loss (annual rainfall-annual runoff), fiftieth-percentile annual flow, and seasonal water balance. The results showed that comparing annual runoff to a reference site was most robust at constraining the recovery time, followed by using pre-disturbance data as reference data and calculating the differences in annual runoff from pre-disturbance levels. However, in case of small disturbance at sites without reference data or long-term pre-disturbance data, the inter-annual variation of rainfall makes the effect of disturbance unclear. We found that annual loss had smaller inter-annual variation, and defining recovery time with annual loss was best in terms of matching the results from paired watersheds. The

  15. Implementation of a Compressor Face Boundary Condition Based on Small Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Paynter, Gerald C.

    2000-01-01

    A compressor-face boundary condition that models the unsteady interactions of acoustic and convective velocity disturbances with a compressor has been implemented into a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code. Locally one-dimensional characteristics along with a small-disturbance model are used to compute the acoustic response as a function of the local stagger angle and the strength and direction of the disturbance. Simulations of the inviscid flow in a straight duct, a duct coupled to a compressor, and a supersonic inlet demonstrate the behavior of the boundary condition in relation to existing boundary conditions. Comparisons with experimental data show a large improvement in accuracy over existing boundary conditions in the ability to predict the reflected disturbance from the interaction of an acoustic disturbance with a compressor.

  16. Information-disturbance tradeoff in estimating a unitary transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Chiribella, Giulio

    2010-12-15

    We address the problem of the information-disturbance tradeoff associated to the estimation of a quantum transformation and show how the extraction of information about a black box causes a perturbation of the corresponding input-output evolution. In the case of a black box performing a unitary transformation, randomly distributed according to the invariant measure, we give a complete solution of the problem, deriving the optimal tradeoff curve and presenting an explicit construction of the optimal quantum network.

  17. [Constructive disturbance and low-level perfusion in parietal areas in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dementia].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Masaki; Ohmichi, Takuma; Mukai, Mao; Fujinami, Jun; Nakagawa, Masanori; Mizuno, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with dementia (ALS-D) has been characterized by symptoms of fronto-temporal dysfunction, we report two patients with ALS-D who showed constructive disturbance and low-level perfusion in the parietal areas. The first was a 69-year-old woman (Case 1) who had been diagnosed with the bulbar type of ALS. She showed fronto-temporal dementia as well as low scores and disturbance on block construction and copying; however, she showed a better score on the imitation of finger postures. The second was a 73-year-old woman (Case 2) who had been diagnosed with the leg onset type of ALS. She showed mild impairment of the frontal function as well as mild disturbance on block construction and copying, but no problem on the imitation of finger postures. Case 1 showed more severe symptoms of dementia and constructive disturbance than Case 2, whereas Case 2 showed lower levels of cerebral perfusion over more extensive areas than Case 1. Cases 1 and 2 were compatible with definite ALS according to the El Escorial Criteria, and they showed constructive disturbance with characteristics reported previously, such as both left and right hemisphere damage and constructive disturbance similar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, they showed poorer scores on performing tasks requiring the use of objects (block construction and copying) rather than using their body (imitation of finger postures). PMID:26028194

  18. Robust Tracking Control of a Nonholonomic Mobile Robot in the Presence of Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Nobutaka; Saeki, Masami; Chen, Haijun

    In this paper, we consider the tracking control problem of a nonholonomic mobile robot in the presence of bounded disturbances. We propose a method for modifying the control law of Jiang et al. (1997) so that the resulting control law guarantees global stability and the tracking error converges to a neighborhood about zero that can be made arbitrary small in the presence of disturbances. Further, we show that the tracking error converge to zero in the absence of disturbances. A numerical example is provided to show effectiveness of the method.

  19. Effects of spatial disturbance on common loon nest site selection and territory success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, K.P.; DeStefano, S.

    2011-01-01

    The common loon (Gavia immer) breeds during the summer on northern lakes and water bodies that are also often desirable areas for aquatic recreation and human habitation. In northern New England, we assessed how the spatial nature of disturbance affects common loon nest site selection and territory success. We found through classification and regression analysis that distance to and density of disturbance factors can be used to classify observed nest site locations versus random points, suggesting that these factors affect loon nest site selection (model 1: Correct classification = 75%, null = 50%, K = 0.507, P < 0.001; model 2: Correct classification = 78%, null = 50%, K = 0.551, P < 0.001). However, in an exploratory analysis, we were unable to show a relation between spatial disturbance variables and breeding success (P = 0.595, R 2 = 0.436), possibly because breeding success was so low during the breeding seasons of 2007-2008. We suggest that by selecting nest site locations that avoid disturbance factors, loons thereby limit the effect that disturbance will have on their breeding success. Still, disturbance may force loons to use sub-optimal nesting habitat, limiting the available number of territories, and overall productivity. We advise that management efforts focus on limiting disturbance factors to allow breeding pairs access to the best nesting territories, relieving disturbance pressures that may force sub-optimal nest placement. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  20. CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β in relation to ER Stress, Inflammation, and Metabolic Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    van der Krieken, Sophie E.; Popeijus, Herman E.; Mensink, Ronald P.; Plat, Jogchum

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and underlying metabolic disturbances increase rapidly in developed countries. Various molecular targets are currently under investigation to unravel the molecular mechanisms that cause these disturbances. This is done in attempt to counter or prevent the negative health consequences of the metabolic disturbances. Here, we reviewed the current knowledge on the role of C/EBP-β in these metabolic disturbances. C/EBP-β deletion in mice resulted in downregulation of hepatic lipogenic genes and increased expression of β-oxidation genes in brown adipose tissue. Furthermore, C/EBP-β is important in the differentiation and maturation of adipocytes and is increased during ER stress and proinflammatory conditions. So far, studies were only conducted in animals and in cell systems. The results found that C/EBP-β is an important transcription factor within the metabolic disturbances of the metabolic system. Therefore, it is interesting to examine the potential role of C/EBP-β at molecular and physiological level in humans. PMID:25699273

  1. Tetrahydrobiopterin Deficiency and Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling Contribute to Atherosclerosis Induced by Disturbed Flow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chen, Wei; Rezvan, Amir; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a critical cofactor for Nitric Oxide (NO) synthesis by NO synthase (NOS). Recently, we demonstrated that disturbed flow produced by partial carotid ligation decreases BH4 levels in vivo. We therefore aimed to determine whether atherosclerosis induced by disturbed flow is due to BH4 deficiency and NOS uncoupling and whether increasing BH4 would prevent endothelial dysfunction, plaque inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We produced a region of disturbed flow in ApoE−/− mice using partial carotid ligation and fed these animals a high-fat diet. This caused eNOS uncoupling as characterized by increased vascular superoxide production, altered vascular reactivity and a change in eNOS migration on low-temperature gel. These perturbations were accompanied by severe atherosclerosis, infiltration of T cells and macrophages, and an increase in cytokine production. Treatment with BH4 recoupled NOS, decreased superoxide production, imporoved endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and virtually eliminated atherosclerosis. BH4 treatment also markedly reduced vascular inflammation and improved the cytokine milieu induced by disturbed flow. Conclusions Our results highlight a key role of BH4 deficiency and NOS uncoupling in atherosclerosis induced by disturbed flow, and provide insight into the effect of modulating vascular BH4 levels on atherosclerosis and inflammation at these sites of the circulation. PMID:21512164

  2. Increased neuronal death and disturbed axonal growth in the Polμ-deficient mouse embryonic retina

    PubMed Central

    Baleriola, Jimena; Álvarez-Lindo, Noemí; de la Villa, Pedro; Bernad, Antonio; Blanco, Luis; Suárez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Enrique J.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death occurs naturally at different stages of neural development, including neurogenesis. The functional role of this early phase of neural cell death, which affects recently differentiated neurons among other cell types, remains undefined. Some mouse models defective in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair present massive cell death during neural development, occasionally provoking embryonic lethality, while other organs and tissues remain unaffected. This suggests that DSBs occur frequently and selectively in the developing nervous system. We analyzed the embryonic retina of a mouse model deficient in the error-prone DNA polymerase μ (Polμ), a key component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair system. DNA DSBs were increased in the mutant mouse at embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), as well as the incidence of cell death that affected young neurons, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Polμ−/− mice also showed disturbed RGC axonal growth and navigation, and altered distribution of the axonal guidance molecules L1-CAM and Bravo (also known as Nr-CAM). These findings demonstrate that Polμ is necessary for proper retinal development, and support that the generation of DSBs and their repair via the NHEJ pathway are genuine processes involved in neural development. PMID:27172884

  3. Using Actiwatch to monitor circadian rhythm disturbance in Huntington' disease: A cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Townhill, Jenny; Hughes, Alis C; Thomas, Benny; Busse, Monica E; Price, Kathy; Dunnett, Stephen B; Hastings, Michael H; Rosser, Anne E

    2016-05-30

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that is well recognised as producing progressive deterioration of motor function, including dyskinetic movements, as well as deterioration of cognition and ability to carry out activities of daily living. However, individuals with HD commonly suffer from a wide range of additional symptoms, including weight loss and sleep disturbance, possibly due to disruption of circadian rhythmicity. Disrupted circadian rhythms have been reported in mice models of HD and in humans with HD. One way of assessing an individual's circadian rhythmicity in a community setting is to monitor their sleep/wake cycles, and a convenient method for recording periods of wakefulness and sleep is to use accelerometers to discriminate between varied activity levels (including sleep) during daily life. Here we used Actiwatch(®) Activity monitors alongside ambulatory EEG and sleep diaries to record wake/sleep patterns in people with HD and normal volunteers. We report that periods of wakefulness during the night, as detected by activity monitors, agreed poorly with EEG recordings in HD subjects, and unsurprisingly sleep diary findings showed poor agreement with both EEG recordings and activity monitor derived sleep periods. One explanation for this is the occurrence of 'break through' involuntary movements during sleep in the HD patients, which are incorrectly assessed as wakeful periods by the activity monitor algorithms. Thus, care needs to be taken when using activity monitors to assess circadian activity in individuals with movement disorders. PMID:26774754

  4. Disturbances in the murine hepatic circadian clock in alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Ross, Ruth A.; Pywell, Cameron M.; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Duffield, Giles E.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of the circadian clock in the development of alcohol-induced fatty liver disease we examined livers of mice chronically alcohol-fed over 4-weeks that resulted in steatosis. Here we show time-of-day specific changes in expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes, including those associated with lipid and bile acid regulation. Such changes were not observed following a 1-week alcohol treatment with no hepatic lipid accumulation. Real-time bioluminescence reporting of PERIOD2 protein expression suggests that these changes occur independently of the suprachiasmatic nucleus pacemaker. Further, we find profound time-of-day specific changes to the rhythmic synthesis/accumulation of triglycerides, cholesterol and bile acid, and the NAD/NADH ratio, processes that are under clock control. These results highlight not only that the circadian timekeeping system is disturbed in the alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis state, but also that the effects of alcohol upon the clock itself may actually contribute to the development of hepatic steatosis. PMID:24430730

  5. Using Actiwatch to monitor circadian rhythm disturbance in Huntington’ disease: A cautionary note

    PubMed Central

    Townhill, Jenny; Hughes, Alis C.; Thomas, Benny; Busse, Monica E.; Price, Kathy; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Hastings, Michael H.; Rosser, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that is well recognised as producing progressive deterioration of motor function, including dyskinetic movements, as well as deterioration of cognition and ability to carry out activities of daily living. However, individuals with HD commonly suffer from a wide range of additional symptoms, including weight loss and sleep disturbance, possibly due to disruption of circadian rhythmicity. Disrupted circadian rhythms have been reported in mice models of HD and in humans with HD. One way of assessing an individual's circadian rhythmicity in a community setting is to monitor their sleep/wake cycles, and a convenient method for recording periods of wakefulness and sleep is to use accelerometers to discriminate between varied activity levels (including sleep) during daily life. Here we used Actiwatch® Activity monitors alongside ambulatory EEG and sleep diaries to record wake/sleep patterns in people with HD and normal volunteers. We report that periods of wakefulness during the night, as detected by activity monitors, agreed poorly with EEG recordings in HD subjects, and unsurprisingly sleep diary findings showed poor agreement with both EEG recordings and activity monitor derived sleep periods. One explanation for this is the occurrence of ‘break through’ involuntary movements during sleep in the HD patients, which are incorrectly assessed as wakeful periods by the activity monitor algorithms. Thus, care needs to be taken when using activity monitors to assess circadian activity in individuals with movement disorders. PMID:26774754

  6. Increased neuronal death and disturbed axonal growth in the Polμ-deficient mouse embryonic retina.

    PubMed

    Baleriola, Jimena; Álvarez-Lindo, Noemí; de la Villa, Pedro; Bernad, Antonio; Blanco, Luis; Suárez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Enrique J

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death occurs naturally at different stages of neural development, including neurogenesis. The functional role of this early phase of neural cell death, which affects recently differentiated neurons among other cell types, remains undefined. Some mouse models defective in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair present massive cell death during neural development, occasionally provoking embryonic lethality, while other organs and tissues remain unaffected. This suggests that DSBs occur frequently and selectively in the developing nervous system. We analyzed the embryonic retina of a mouse model deficient in the error-prone DNA polymerase μ (Polμ), a key component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair system. DNA DSBs were increased in the mutant mouse at embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), as well as the incidence of cell death that affected young neurons, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Polμ(-/-) mice also showed disturbed RGC axonal growth and navigation, and altered distribution of the axonal guidance molecules L1-CAM and Bravo (also known as Nr-CAM). These findings demonstrate that Polμ is necessary for proper retinal development, and support that the generation of DSBs and their repair via the NHEJ pathway are genuine processes involved in neural development. PMID:27172884

  7. Tcf4 transgenic female mice display delayed adaptation in an auditory latent inhibition paradigm.

    PubMed

    Brzózka, M M; Rossner, M J; de Hoz, L

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a severe mental disorder affecting about 1 % of the human population. Patients show severe deficits in cognitive processing often characterized by an improper filtering of environmental stimuli. Independent genome-wide association studies confirmed a number of risk variants for SZ including several associated with the gene encoding the transcription factor 4 (TCF4). TCF4 is widely expressed in the central nervous system of mice and humans and seems to be important for brain development. Transgenic mice overexpressing murine Tcf4 (Tcf4tg) in the adult brain display cognitive impairments and sensorimotor gating disturbances. To address the question of whether increased Tcf4 gene dosage may affect cognitive flexibility in an auditory associative task, we tested latent inhibition (LI) in female Tcf4tg mice. LI is a widely accepted translational endophenotype of SZ and results from a maladaptive delay in switching a response to a previously unconditioned stimulus when this becomes conditioned. Using an Audiobox, we pre-exposed Tcf4tg mice and their wild-type littermates to either a 3- or a 12-kHz tone before conditioning them to a 12-kHz tone. Tcf4tg animals pre-exposed to a 12-kHz tone showed significantly delayed conditioning when the previously unconditioned tone became associated with an air puff. These results support findings that associate TCF4 dysfunction with cognitive inflexibility and improper filtering of sensory stimuli observed in SZ patients. PMID:26404636

  8. INFILTRATION THROUGH DISTURBED URBAN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior research by Pitt (1987) examined runoff losses from paved and roofed surfaces in urban areas and showed significant losses at these surfaces during the small and moderate sized events of most interest for water quality evaluations. However, Pitt and Durrans (1995) also exa...

  9. Sex education for emotionally disturbed adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schoenholtz, S W; Horowitz, H A; Shtarkshall, R

    1989-02-01

    Under investigation were effects of a course in sex education on a population of emotionally disturbed adolescents who were enrolled as day patients in a school program that is part of the Adolescent Treatment Program of the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital. Subjects included 7 females, and 8 males, aged 15-18, with severe socio-emotional and educational problems. Pre-and posttesting were used to measure changes. Measures included a short form questionnaire assessing sexual knowledge and attitudes, the Draw-a-Person test, and behavioral observations by teachers, faculty, and Adolescent Treatment Program staff. The results of the study indicated that patients responded age appropriately and gained knowledge and an increased openness about sexuality issues. On the knowledge section of the questionnaire areas addressed in class, such as contraception, were the areas that students showed improvement in student response. The attitudes section revealed an increase in uncertainty about their own values, or conversely, an increase in establishing their values more firmly. In the Draw-a-Person test there was a greater degree of openness and less defensiveness in the posttest drawings. Most postcourse drawings also included more sexual signs and showed nudity. Behavioral changes were noted in the student's increased class contributions and participation, as well as in a more frequent focus of issues relating to sexuality and maturation. In addition, there was no regression or dysfunction as a result of the materials presented, and therapeutic and educational processes were not disrupted by the patient's involvement in the course. It was concluded that a sex education course is clinically and educationally useful on many levels within a therapeutic setting. PMID:12342338

  10. Recurrence and Frequency of Disturbance have Cumulative Effect on Methanotrophic Activity, Abundance, and Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Adrian; van den Brink, Erik; Reim, Andreas; Krause, Sascha M. B.; Bodelier, Paul L. E.

    2016-01-01

    Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by methanotrophic bacteria. Although aerobic methanotrophs showed remarkable resilience to a suite of physical disturbances induced as a single event, their resilience to recurring disturbances is less known. Here, using a rice field soil in a microcosm study, we determined whether recurrence and frequency of desiccation-rewetting impose an accumulating effect on the methanotrophic activity. The response of key aerobic methanotroph subgroups (type Ia, Ib, and II) were monitored using qPCR assays, and was supported by a t-RFLP analysis. The methanotrophic activity was resilient to recurring desiccation-rewetting, but increasing the frequency of the disturbance by twofold significantly decreased methane uptake rate. Both the qPCR and t-RFLP analyses were congruent, showing the dominance of type Ia/Ib methanotrophs prior to disturbance, and after disturbance, the recovering community was predominantly comprised of type Ia (Methylobacter) methanotrophs. Both type Ib and type II (Methylosinus/Methylocystis) methanotrophs were adversely affected by the disturbance, but type II methanotrophs showed recovery over time, indicating relatively higher resilience to the disturbance. This revealed distinct, yet unrecognized traits among the methanotroph community members. Our results show that recurring desiccation-rewetting before a recovery in community abundance had an accumulated effect, compromising methanotrophic activity. While methanotrophs may recover well following sporadic disturbances, their resilience may reach a ‘tipping point’ where activity no longer recovered if disturbance persists and increase in frequency. PMID:26779148

  11. Recurrence and Frequency of Disturbance have Cumulative Effect on Methanotrophic Activity, Abundance, and Community Structure.

    PubMed

    Ho, Adrian; van den Brink, Erik; Reim, Andreas; Krause, Sascha M B; Bodelier, Paul L E

    2015-01-01

    Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by methanotrophic bacteria. Although aerobic methanotrophs showed remarkable resilience to a suite of physical disturbances induced as a single event, their resilience to recurring disturbances is less known. Here, using a rice field soil in a microcosm study, we determined whether recurrence and frequency of desiccation-rewetting impose an accumulating effect on the methanotrophic activity. The response of key aerobic methanotroph subgroups (type Ia, Ib, and II) were monitored using qPCR assays, and was supported by a t-RFLP analysis. The methanotrophic activity was resilient to recurring desiccation-rewetting, but increasing the frequency of the disturbance by twofold significantly decreased methane uptake rate. Both the qPCR and t-RFLP analyses were congruent, showing the dominance of type Ia/Ib methanotrophs prior to disturbance, and after disturbance, the recovering community was predominantly comprised of type Ia (Methylobacter) methanotrophs. Both type Ib and type II (Methylosinus/Methylocystis) methanotrophs were adversely affected by the disturbance, but type II methanotrophs showed recovery over time, indicating relatively higher resilience to the disturbance. This revealed distinct, yet unrecognized traits among the methanotroph community members. Our results show that recurring desiccation-rewetting before a recovery in community abundance had an accumulated effect, compromising methanotrophic activity. While methanotrophs may recover well following sporadic disturbances, their resilience may reach a 'tipping point' where activity no longer recovered if disturbance persists and increase in frequency. PMID:26779148

  12. Sleep disturbance in Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Evans, Elizabeth; Mowat, David; Wilson, Meredith; Einfeld, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome caused by a heterozygous mutation or deletion of the ZEB2 gene. It is characterized by a distinctive facial appearance in association with intellectual disability (ID) and variable other features including agenesis of the corpus callosum, seizures, congenital heart defects, microcephaly, short stature, hypotonia, and Hirschsprung disease. The current study investigated sleep disturbance in people with MWS. In a series of unstructured interviews focused on development and behaviors in MWS, family members frequently reported sleep disturbance, particularly early-morning waking and frequent night waking. The Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) was therefore administered to a sample of 35 individuals with MWS, along with the Developmental Behaviour Checklist (DBC) to measure behavioral and emotional disturbance. A high level of sleep disturbance was found in the MWS sample, with 53% scoring in the borderline range and 44% in the clinical disorder range for at least one subscale of the SDSC. Scores were highest for the Sleep-wake transition disorders subscale, with 91% of participants reaching at least the borderline disorder range. A significant positive association was found between total scores on the SDSC and the DBC Total Behaviour Problem Score. These results suggest that sleep disorders should be screened for in people with MWS, and where appropriate, referrals to sleep specialists made for management of sleep problems. PMID:26686679

  13. Defining sleep disturbance after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Clinchot, D M; Bogner, J; Mysiw, W J; Fugate, L; Corrigan, J

    1998-01-01

    Sleep disorders are a relatively common occurrence after brain injury. Sleep disturbances often result in a poor daytime performance and a poor individual sense of well-being. Unfortunately, there has been minimal attention paid to this common and often disabling sequela of brain injury. This study attempts to define and to correlate the incidence and type of sleep disturbances that occur after brain injury. Consecutive admissions to a rehabilitation unit were used to create a longitudinal database designed to predict long-term outcomes for individuals who suffered a brain injury. Fifty percent of subjects had difficulty sleeping. Sixty-four percent described waking up too early, 25% described sleeping more than usual, and 45% described problems falling asleep. Eighty percent of subjects reporting sleep problems also reported problems with fatigue. Logistic regression analysis revealed the following: the more severe the brain injury the less likely the subject would be to have a sleep disturbance; subjects who had sleep disturbances were more likely to have problems with fatigue; females were more likely to have trouble with sleep. This study demonstrates the substantial prevalence of sleep disturbances after brain injury. It underscores the relationship between sleep disorders and perception of fatigue. It also underscores the need for clinicians to strive for interventional studies to look at the treatment of sleep and fatigue problems after brain injury. PMID:9715917

  14. Pharmacology for sleep disturbance in PTSD.

    PubMed

    Lipinska, Gosia; Baldwin, David S; Thomas, Kevin G F

    2016-03-01

    Symptoms of sleep disturbance, particularly nightmares and insomnia, are a central feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emerging evidence suggests that specific treatment of PTSD-related sleep disturbance improves other symptoms of the disorder, which in turn suggests that such disturbance may be fundamental to development and maintenance of the disorder. This mini-review focuses on pharmacological treatment of sleep disturbance in adult PTSD (specifically, studies testing the efficacy of antidepressants, adrenergic inhibiting agents, antipsychotics and benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics). We conclude that only prazosin, an adrenergic inhibiting agent, has had its efficacy established by multiple randomised controlled trials. There is also high-level evidence supporting use of eszopiclone, as well as risperidone and olanzapine as adjunct therapy. Antidepressants such as sertraline, venlafaxine and mirtazapine, benzodiazepines such as alprazolam and clonazepam and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics such as zolpidem appear ineffective in treating PTSD-related sleep disturbance. Most studies that report reduced frequency of nightmares and insomnia also report decreases in overall symptom severity. Such findings suggest that (i) sleep disruption is central to PTSD; (ii) treating sleep disruption may be an effective way to address other symptoms of the disorder and (iii) PTSD symptoms tend to cluster together in predictable ways. PMID:26856810

  15. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I.

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Propagation of disturbances in degenerate quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, Nicholas; Haas, Stephan

    2011-07-01

    Disturbances in gapless quantum many-body models are known to travel an unlimited distance throughout the system. Here, we explore this phenomenon in finite clusters with degenerate ground states. The specific model studied here is the one-dimensional J1-J2 Heisenberg Hamiltonian at and close to the Majumdar-Ghosh point. Both open and periodic boundary conditions are considered. Quenches are performed using a local magnetic field. The degenerate Majumdar-Ghosh ground state allows disturbances which carry quantum entanglement to propagate throughout the system and thus dephase the entire system within the degenerate subspace. These disturbances can also carry polarization, but not energy, as all energy is stored locally. The local evolution of the part of the system where energy is stored drives the rest of the system through long-range entanglement. We also examine approximations for the ground state of this Hamiltonian in the strong field limit and study how couplings away from the Majumdar-Ghosh point affect the propagation of disturbances. We find that even in the case of approximate degeneracy, a disturbance can be propagated throughout a finite system.

  17. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Parker, V. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  18. Dispersal Mutualism Incorporated into Large-Scale, Infrequent Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Parker, V Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Because of their influence on succession and other community interactions, large-scale, infrequent natural disturbances also should play a major role in mutualistic interactions. Using field data and experiments, I test whether mutualisms have been incorporated into large-scale wildfire by whether the outcomes of a mutualism depend on disturbance. In this study a seed dispersal mutualism is shown to depend on infrequent, large-scale disturbances. A dominant shrubland plant (Arctostaphylos species) produces seeds that make up a persistent soil seed bank and requires fire to germinate. In post-fire stands, I show that seedlings emerging from rodent caches dominate sites experiencing higher fire intensity. Field experiments show that rodents (Perimyscus californicus, P. boylii) do cache Arctostaphylos fruit and bury most seed caches to a sufficient depth to survive a killing heat pulse that a fire might drive into the soil. While the rodent dispersal and caching behavior itself has not changed compared to other habitats, the environmental transformation caused by wildfire converts the caching burial of seed from a dispersal process to a plant fire adaptive trait, and provides the context for stimulating subsequent life history evolution in the plant host. PMID:26151560

  19. Wake characteristics of buildings in disturbed boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Chang, J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements relevant to the effect of buildings on the low level atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Field measurements of velocity and turbulence in the wake of a block building 3.2 m high and 26.8 m long are presented which show an apparent increase in momentum flow above the upwind value. Velocity-deficit and turbulence-excess decay characteristics of the disturbed or nonequilibrium layer are correlated with power law exponents and apparent roughness length at various distances downstream of the disturbance. Model wake profiles from the simulated building are compared at various stations for equilibrium and nonequilibrium upstream profiles. Empirical correlations relating building wake profiles to upstream nonequilibrium parameters are presented. The relationship of the data to the smooth-rough transition is discussed, and a flow model is presented.

  20. Speckle disturbance limit in laser-based cinema projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschaffelt, Guy; Roelandt, Stijn; Meuret, Youri; van den Broeck, Wendy; Kilpi, Katriina; Lievens, Bram; Jacobs, An; Janssens, Peter; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-09-01

    In a multi-disciplinary effort, we investigate the level of speckle that can be tolerated in a laser cinema projector based on a quality of experience experiment with movie clips shown to a test audience in a real-life movie theatre setting. We identify a speckle disturbance threshold by statistically analyzing the observers’ responses for different values of the amount of speckle, which was monitored using a well-defined speckle measurement method. The analysis shows that the speckle perception of a human observer is not only dependent on the objectively measured amount of speckle, but it is also strongly influenced by the image content. The speckle disturbance limit for movies turns out to be substantially larger than that for still images, and hence is easier to attain.

  1. Interaction of Strong Transient Interplanetary Disturbances with the Dayside Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, Jean

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was to gain an understanding of the complex response of the magnetosphere to strong transient interplanetary disturbances. Because the project was only funded for a year, the investigation focused on only one of the three topics proposed in the original three year proposal. We investigated the response of the dayside auroral region to strong transient interplanetary disturbances. The method of the investigation was to use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that employ measurements of the solar wind conditions upstream the bow shock to model actual events and then to compare the simulation results with observations from spacecraft located at downstream locations. We modeled an event that occurred on July 14,2000, for which both CLUSTER and IMAGE simultaneous observations were available. The event was marked by high solar wind dynamic pressure and a strong IMF By component. Comparisons showed a very good agreement between intensifications in the auroral emissions measured by IMAGE

  2. Dream-disturbed sleep in insomnia and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Bliwise, D L; Lebret-Bories, E; Guilleminault, C; Dement, W C

    1993-05-01

    Both patients with narcolepsy and insomnia frequently present clinically with nocturnal sleep disrupted by disturbing dreams. Polysomnographic correlates of these reports are unclear. In this study, 24 patients with psychophysiological insomnia and 16 patients with narcolepsy were compared on selected polysomnographic and self-reported typical dream characteristics. As a group, patients with narcolepsy showed more frightening, recurrent dreams and shorter rapid eye movement (REM) segments when compared with patients with insomnia. However, within the narcolepsy group, there were few correlations between typical dream characteristics and any measure of REM segment length or REM density. In the insomnia group, shorter REM segments and higher REM density were related to typically more vivid, frightening, and disrupted dreaming. We speculate that the mechanisms of disturbed dream recall may be different in insomnia and narcolepsy. PMID:8501449

  3. Speckle disturbance limit in laser-based cinema projection systems.

    PubMed

    Verschaffelt, Guy; Roelandt, Stijn; Meuret, Youri; Van den Broeck, Wendy; Kilpi, Katriina; Lievens, Bram; Jacobs, An; Janssens, Peter; Thienpont, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In a multi-disciplinary effort, we investigate the level of speckle that can be tolerated in a laser cinema projector based on a quality of experience experiment with movie clips shown to a test audience in a real-life movie theatre setting. We identify a speckle disturbance threshold by statistically analyzing the observers' responses for different values of the amount of speckle, which was monitored using a well-defined speckle measurement method. The analysis shows that the speckle perception of a human observer is not only dependent on the objectively measured amount of speckle, but it is also strongly influenced by the image content. The speckle disturbance limit for movies turns out to be substantially larger than that for still images, and hence is easier to attain. PMID:26370531

  4. Longitudinal Metabolomics Profiling of Parkinson’s Disease-Related α-Synuclein A53T Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Xie, Chengsong; Sun, Lixin; Ding, Jinhui; Cai, Huaibin

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is critical for all biological processes in the brain. The metabolites are considered the best indicators of cell states and their rapid fluxes are extremely sensitive to cellular changes. While there are a few studies on the metabolomics of Parkinson’s disease, it lacks longitudinal studies of the brain metabolic pathways affected by aging and the disease. Using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectroscopy (UPLC/MS), we generated the metabolomics profiling data from the brains of young and aged male PD-related α-synuclein A53T transgenic mice as well as the age- and gender-matched non-transgenic (nTg) controls. Principal component and unsupervised hierarchical clustering analyses identified distinctive metabolites influenced by aging and the A53T mutation. The following metabolite set enrichment classification revealed the alanine metabolism, redox and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis pathways were substantially disturbed in the aged mouse brains regardless of the genotypes, suggesting that aging plays a more prominent role in the alterations of brain metabolism. Further examination showed that the interaction effect of aging and genotype only disturbed the guanosine levels. The young A53T mice exhibited lower levels of guanosine compared to the age-matched nTg controls. The guanosine levels remained constant between the young and aged nTg mice, whereas the aged A53T mice showed substantially increased guanosine levels compared to the young mutant ones. In light of the neuroprotective function of guanosine, our findings suggest that the increase of guanosine metabolism in aged A53T mice likely represents a protective mechanism against neurodegeneration, while monitoring guanosine levels could be applicable to the early diagnosis of the disease. PMID:26317866

  5. Antinuclear antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Teague, P. O.; Friou, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Seven-week-old and 16-week-old A/Jax mice were injected with viable spleen cells or homogenates of spleen cells obtained from older syngeneic mice which either had autoimmune anti-deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) antibody in their sera or lacked this activity. None of the 7-week-old recipients developed detectable anti-DNP antibody. However, most of the animals in the 16-week-old group developed this autoantibody. The viability of the cells and the presence of or absence of anti-DNP antibody in the donor's sera did not appear to influence the autoimmune response of these recipients. When viable thymus cells which were obtained from young A/Jax mice were transferred to groups of older syngeneic animals that had developed anti-DNP antibody spontaneously, the anti-DNP decreased or disappeared from the sera of most recipients. Untreated controls did not show this variation. When 36-week-old A/Jax mice which lacked anti-DNP antibody were injected with thymus or spleen cells obtained from young donors, none of the recipients or untreated controls developed anti-DNP antibody. After specific immunization with DNP, however, the control animals began to produce autoimmune anti-DNP antibody while the animals treated with thymus or spleen cells remained unresponsive. These observations support the hypothesis that in A/Jax mice: (1) autoimmunity to DNP may result from failure of normal homeostasis mechanisms which allow proliferation of autoimmune cells; (2) the number of cells with autoimmune potential may increase during ageing; (3) the efficiency of the homeostasis system may decrease during ageing as the result of microbial or genetic factors; and (4) cells which participate in homeostasis are found in the thymus and spleen of young mice and may be the thymus dependent lymphocytes. PMID:5307745

  6. Using Land Surface Phenology as the Basis for a National Early Warning System for Forest Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, W. W.; Spruce, J.; Norman, S. P.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    The National Early Warning System (EWS) provides an 8-day coast-to-coast snapshot of potentially disturbed forests across the U.S.. A prototype system has produced national maps of potential forest disturbances every eight days since January 2010, identifying locations that may require further investigation. Through phenology, the system shows both early and delayed vegetation development and detects all types of unexpected forest disturbances, including insects, disease, wildfires, frost and ice damage, tornadoes, hurricanes, blowdowns, harvest, urbanization, landslides, drought, flood, and climate change. The USDA Forest Service Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center is collaborating with NASA Stennis Space Center and the Western Wildland Environmental Threat Assessment Center to develop the tool. The EWS uses differences in phenological responses between an expectation based on historical data and a current view to strategically identify potential forest disturbances and direct attention to locations where forest behavior seems unusual. Disturbance maps are available via the Forest Change Assessment Viewer (FCAV) (http://ews.forestthreats.org/gis), which allows resource managers and other users to see the most current national disturbance maps as soon as they are available. Phenology-based detections show not only vegetation disturbances in the classical sense, but all departures from normal seasonal vegetation behavior. In 2010, the EWS detected a repeated late-frost event at high elevations in North Carolina, USA, that resulted in delayed seasonal development, contrasting with an early spring development at lower elevations, all within close geographic proximity. Throughout 2011, there was a high degree of correspondence between the National Climatic Data Center's North American Drought Monitor maps and EWS maps of phenological drought disturbance in forests. Urban forests showed earlier and more severe phenological drought disturbance than

  7. Anthropogenic disturbance in tropical forests can double biodiversity loss from deforestation.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jos; Lennox, Gareth D; Ferreira, Joice; Berenguer, Erika; Lees, Alexander C; Mac Nally, Ralph; Thomson, James R; Ferraz, Silvio Frosini de Barros; Louzada, Julio; Oliveira, Victor Hugo Fonseca; Parry, Luke; Solar, Ricardo Ribeiro de Castro; Vieira, Ima C G; Aragão, Luiz E O C; Begotti, Rodrigo Anzolin; Braga, Rodrigo F; Cardoso, Thiago Moreira; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme; Souza, Carlos M; Moura, Nárgila G; Nunes, Sâmia Serra; Siqueira, João Victor; Pardini, Renata; Silveira, Juliana M; Vaz-de-Mello, Fernando Z; Veiga, Ruan Carlo Stulpen; Venturieri, Adriano; Gardner, Toby A

    2016-07-01

    Concerted political attention has focused on reducing deforestation, and this remains the cornerstone of most biodiversity conservation strategies. However, maintaining forest cover may not reduce anthropogenic forest disturbances, which are rarely considered in conservation programmes. These disturbances occur both within forests, including selective logging and wildfires, and at the landscape level, through edge, area and isolation effects. Until now, the combined effect of anthropogenic disturbance on the conservation value of remnant primary forests has remained unknown, making it impossible to assess the relative importance of forest disturbance and forest loss. Here we address these knowledge gaps using a large data set of plants, birds and dung beetles (1,538, 460 and 156 species, respectively) sampled in 36 catchments in the Brazilian state of Pará. Catchments retaining more than 69–80% forest cover lost more conservation value from disturbance than from forest loss. For example, a 20% loss of primary forest, the maximum level of deforestation allowed on Amazonian properties under Brazil’s Forest Code, resulted in a 39–54% loss of conservation value: 96–171% more than expected without considering disturbance effects. We extrapolated the disturbance-mediated loss of conservation value throughout Pará, which covers 25% of the Brazilian Amazon. Although disturbed forests retained considerable conservation value compared with deforested areas, the toll of disturbance outside Pará’s strictly protected areas is equivalent to the loss of 92,000–139,000 km2 of primary forest. Even this lowest estimate is greater than the area deforested across the entire Brazilian Amazon between 2006 and 2015 (ref. 10). Species distribution models showed that both landscape and within-forest disturbances contributed to biodiversity loss, with the greatest negative effects on species of high conservation and functional value. These results demonstrate an urgent need

  8. Small mammals as indicators of short-term and long-term disturbance in mixed prairie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leis, S.A.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Engle, David M.; Fehmi, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Disturbance by military maneuvers over short and long time scales may have differential effects on grassland communities. We assessed small mammals as indicators of disturbance by military maneuvers in a mixed prairie in southern Oklahoma USA. We examined sites on two soil series, Foard and Lawton, across a gradient of disturbance intensity. A MANOVA showed that abundance of small mammals was associated (p = 0.03) with short-term (cover of vehicle tracks) disturbance but was not associated (p = 0.12) with long-term (loss of soil organic carbon, SOC) disturbance intensity. At the individual species level, Sigmodon hispidus (cotton rat) and Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse) occurred across all levels of disturbance and in both soil types. Only P. maniculatus abundance changed (p < 0.01) with short-term disturbance and increased by about one individual per 5% of additional track-cover. Abundance of P. maniculatus also increased (p = 0.04) by about three individuals per 1% increase in soil carbon. Chaetodipus hispidus (hispid pocket mouse) and Reithrodontomys fulvescens (fulvous harvest mouse) only occurred in single soil types limiting their potential as more general indicators. Abundance of P. maniculatus was positively related to shifts in plant species composition and likely reflected changes in vegetation structure (i.e. litter depth) and forage availability resulting from disturbance. Peromyscus maniculatus may be a useful biological indicator of ecosystem change because it responded predictably to both long-term and short-term disturbance and, when coupled with soil, plant, and disturbance history variables, can reveal land condition trends. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  9. Towards the planning and design of disturbance patterns across scales to counter biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Zurlini, Giovanni; Petrosillo, Irene; Jones, Kenneth Bruce; Li, Bai-Lian; Riitters, Kurt Hans; Medagli, Pietro; Marchiori, Silvano; Zaccarelli, Nicola

    2013-10-15

    The way in which disturbances from human land use are patterned in space across scales can have important consequences for efforts to govern human/environment with regard to, but not only, invasive spread-dispersal processes. In this context, we explore the potential of disturbance patterns along a continuum of scales as proxies for identifying the geographical regions prone to spread of invasive plant species. To this end, we build on a previous framework of cross-scale disturbance patterns, exercising the approach for the Apulia region (South Italy). We first review procedures and results introducing disturbance maps and sliding windows to measure composition (amount) and configuration (contagion) of disturbance patterns both for real and simulated landscapes from random, multifractal and hierarchical neutral models. We introduce cross-scale disturbance profiles obtained by clustering locations from real and simulated landscapes, which are used as foils for comparison to the real landscapes on the same pattern transition space. Critical percolation thresholds derived from landscape observations and theoretical works are discussed in order to identify critical scale domains. With reference to the actual land use and invasive alien flora correlates of disturbance patterns, a cross-scale "invasibility" map of the Apulia region is derived, which shows sub-regions and scale domains with different potentials for the invasive spread of undesirable species. We discuss the potential effect of contagious and non-contagious disturbances like climate change and why multifractal-like disturbance patterns might be more desirable than others to counter biological invasions in a multi-scale and multi-level context of adaptive planning, design and management of disturbance. PMID:23747370

  10. Small mammals as indicators of short-term and long-term disturbance in mixed prairie.

    PubMed

    Leis, Sherry A; Leslie, David M; Engle, David M; Fehmi, Jeffrey S

    2008-02-01

    Disturbance by military maneuvers over short and long time scales may have differential effects on grassland communities. We assessed small mammals as indicators of disturbance by military maneuvers in a mixed prairie in southern Oklahoma USA. We examined sites on two soil series, Foard and Lawton, across a gradient of disturbance intensity. A MANOVA showed that abundance of small mammals was associated (p = 0.03) with short-term (cover of vehicle tracks) disturbance but was not associated (p = 0.12) with long-term (loss of soil organic carbon, SOC) disturbance intensity. At the individual species level, Sigmodon hispidus (cotton rat) and Peromyscus maniculatus (deer mouse) occurred across all levels of disturbance and in both soil types. Only P. maniculatus abundance changed (p < 0.01) with short-term disturbance and increased by about one individual per 5% of additional track-cover. Abundance of P. maniculatus also increased (p = 0.04) by about three individuals per 1% increase in soil carbon. Chaetodipus hispidus (hispid pocket mouse) and Reithrodontomys fulvescens (fulvous harvest mouse) only occurred in single soil types limiting their potential as more general indicators. Abundance of P. maniculatus was positively related to shifts in plant species composition and likely reflected changes in vegetation structure (i.e. litter depth) and forage availability resulting from disturbance. Peromyscus maniculatus may be a useful biological indicator of ecosystem change because it responded predictably to both long-term and short-term disturbance and, when coupled with soil, plant, and disturbance history variables, can reveal land condition trends. PMID:17458511

  11. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice

    SciTech Connect

    Minegishi, Yoshiki; Sakai, Yasuo; Yahara, Yasuhito; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hosokawa, Ko; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Retinoic acid and Cyp26b1 were oppositely localized in growth plate cartilage. • Cyp26b1 deletion in chondrocytes decreased bone growth in juvenile mice. • Cyp26b1 deletion reduced chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate height. • Vitamin A-depletion partially reversed growth plate abnormalities caused by Cyp26b1 deficiency. • Cyp26b1 regulates bone growth by controlling chondrocyte proliferation. - Abstract: Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1{sup Δchon} cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone.

  12. Self-reported sleep disturbances in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor sleep quality (SQ) and daytime sleepiness (DS) are common in renal transplant (RTx) recipients; however, related data are rare. This study describes the prevalence and frequency of self-reported sleep disturbances in RTx recipients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 249 RTx recipients transplanted at three Swiss transplant centers. All had reported poor SQ and / or DS in a previous study. With the Survey of Sleep (SOS) self-report questionnaire, we screened for sleep and health habits, sleep history, main sleep problems and sleep-related disturbances. To determine a basis for preliminary sleep diagnoses according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD), 164 subjects were interviewed (48 in person, 116 via telephone and 85 refused). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data and to determine the frequencies and prevalences of specific sleep disorders. Results The sample had a mean age of 59.1 ± 11.6 years (60.2% male); mean time since Tx was 11.1 ± 7.0 years. The most frequent sleep problem was difficulty staying asleep (49.4%), followed by problems falling asleep (32.1%). The most prevalent sleep disturbance was the need to urinate (62.9%), and 27% reported reduced daytime functionality. Interview data showed that most suffered from the first ICSD category: insomnias. Conclusion Though often disregarded in RTx recipients, sleep is an essential factor of wellbeing. Our findings show high prevalences and incidences of insomnias, with negative impacts on daytime functionality. This indicates a need for further research on the clinical consequences of sleep disturbances and the benefits of insomnia treatment in RTx recipients. PMID:24112372

  13. Using Landsat to Diagnose Trends in Disturbance Magnitude Across the National Forest System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, A. J.; Healey, S. P.; Stehman, S. V.; Ramsey, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Landsat archive is increasingly being used to detect trends in the occurrence of forest disturbance. Beyond information about the amount of area affected, forest managers need to know if and how disturbance severity is changing. For example, the United States National Forest System (NFS) has developed a comprehensive plan for carbon monitoring, which requires a detailed temporal mapping of forest disturbance magnitudes across 75 million hectares. To meet this need, we have prepared multitemporal models of percent canopy cover that were calibrated with extensive field data from the USFS Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (FIA). By applying these models to pre- and post-event Landsat images at the site of known disturbances, we develop maps showing first-order estimates of disturbance magnitude on the basis of cover removal. However, validation activities consistently show that these initial estimates under-estimate disturbance magnitude. We have developed an approach, which quantifies this under-prediction at the landscape level and uses empirical validation data to adjust change magnitude estimates derived from initial disturbance maps. In an assessment of adjusted magnitude trends of NFS' Northern Region from 1990 to the present, we observed significant declines since 1990 (p < .01) in harvest magnitude, likely related to known reduction of clearcutting practices in the region. Fire, conversely, did not show strongly significant trends in magnitude, despite an increase in the overall area affected. As Landsat is used to provide increasingly precise maps of the timing and location of historical forest disturbance, a logical next step is to use the archive to generate widely interpretable and objective estimates of disturbance magnitude.

  14. Posttranslational Modifications in Type I Collagen from Different Tissues Extracted from Wild Type and Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase 1 Null Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Pokidysheva, Elena; Zientek, Keith D.; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Mizuno, Kazunori; Vranka, Janice A.; Montgomery, Nathan T.; Keene, Douglas R.; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Okuyama, Kenji; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen extracted from tendon, skin, and bone of wild type and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) null mice shows distinct patterns of 3-hydroxylation and glycosylation of hydroxylysine residues. The A1 site (Pro-986) in the α1-chain of type I collagen is almost completely 3-hydroxylated in every tissue of the wild type mice. In contrast, no 3-hydroxylation of this proline residue was found in P3H1 null mice. Partial 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site (Pro-707) was present in tendon and bone, but absent in skin in both α-chains of the wild type animals. Type I collagen extracted from bone of P3H1 null mice shows a large reduction in 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site in both α-chains, whereas type I collagen extracted from tendon of P3H1 null mice shows little difference as compared with wild type. These results demonstrate that the A1 site in type I collagen is exclusively 3-hydroxylated by P3H1, and presumably, this enzyme is required for the 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site of both α-chains in bone but not in tendon. The increase in glycosylation of hydroxylysine in P3H1 null mice in bone was found to be due to an increased occupancy of normally glycosylated sites. Despite the severe disorganization of collagen fibrils in adult tissues, the D-period of the fibrils is unchanged. Tendon fibrils of newborn P3H1 null mice are well organized with only a slight increase in diameter. The absence of 3-hydroxyproline and/or the increased glycosylation of hydroxylysine in type I collagen disturbs the lateral growth of the fibrils. PMID:23861401

  15. Sleep disturbances in eating disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Cinosi, E; Di Iorio, G; Acciavatti, T; Cornelio, M; Vellante, F; De Risio, L; Martinotti, G

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are frequently associated with disturbances of sleep and circadian rhythms. This review focus on the relationship between sleep disturbances and eating disorders. In the first part are discussed the presence of sleep disorders among patients suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, the macrostructure and microstructure of theirs sleep, the differences between the various subtypes in ED patients, the dreams of eating disordered patients and their recurrent contents. In the second part, there are treated sleep disturbances in binge eating disorder and other eating disorders not otherwise specified, such as nocturnal (night) eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder. In the third part, there are presented data concerning the neurobiological and neuroendocrinological correlates between feeding, metabolism, weight restoration and the processes regulating sleep. In conclusion, possible future investigations are proposed. PMID:22262340

  16. MERCURY RELEASE FROM DISTURBED ANOXIC SOILS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroslav Solc; Bethany A. Bolles

    2001-07-16

    The primary objectives of experiments conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) were to provide information on the secondary release of mercury from contaminated anoxic sediments to an aqueous environment after disturbance/change of in situ physical conditions and to evaluate its migration and partitioning under controlled conditions, including implications of these processes for treatment of contaminated soils. Experimental work included (1) characterization of the mercury-contaminated sediment; (2) field bench-scale dredging simulation; (3) laboratory column study to evaluate a longer-term response to sediment disturbance; (4) mercury volatilization from sediment during controlled drying; (5) resaturation experiments to evaluate the potential for secondary release of residual mercury after disturbance, transport, drying, and resaturation, which simulate a typical scenario during soil excavation and transport to waste disposal facilities; and (6) mercury speciation and potential for methylation during column incubation experiments.

  17. [Using alternative therapies in treating sleep disturbance].

    PubMed

    Hung, Hsuan-Man; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2011-02-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common health problem among adults, and enhancing sleep quality is an issue of significant importance to healthcare providers. As sleep quality worsens into insomnia, individuals may seek assistance from medication. However, sedative hypnotic drugs pose potentially adverse effects. Also, most medical treatments (e.g., positive pressure assistant ventilators) represent invasive interventions that must be prescribed by physicians. Non-pharmacological alternative therapies are commonly recommended and adopted by community nurses. Alternative therapies for sleep disturbance included exercise, cognitive behavior therapy, multiple strategies, music, and acupressure. In general, moderately intensive walking exercise is the intervention most recommended by professionals to help patients deal with sleep disturbance. Therefore, it is suggested that future researchers devise sleep quality promotion strategies that are suitable for home practice in order to apply the findings and spirit of research already done in this area. PMID:21328208

  18. Geomagnetic Disturbances Caused by Internal Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneman, G.

    1984-01-01

    It is commonly believed that geomagnetic disturbances are caused by external influences connected with the solar wind. The 27-day recurrence of perturbations seems to be a strong hint for this interaction. But frequently geomagnetic disturbances occur without any relation to sunspot numbers or radiowave fluxes. This was one of the reasons for introducing hypothetical M-regions on the Sun and their relation to solar wind activities. Only one half of the variance of the geomagnetic AL-index could be related to the solar wind. Therefore it is concluded that internal processes of the magnetosphere were responsible for additional geomagnetic activity. Arguments, which might lead to the suggestion of geomagnetic disturbances as being caused by internal atmospheric dynamics are discussed and a rather preliminary scenario of those processes is proposed.

  19. How Disturbance Influences Community Composition at Hydrothermal Vents: a Theoretical Model of Macrofaunal Coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. D.; Hsing, P.; Roxburgh, S. H.; Shea, K.; Fisher, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Biological communities at spreading centers experience a continuum of disturbance regimes, with fast spreading ridges characterized by relatively frequent tectonic and magmatic events, and slow spreading ridges displaying more stable environmental conditions. We develop a theoretical model to show how disturbance (or lack thereof) can influence the composition of biological communities at hydrothermal vents. Our model assumptions are based on empirical data, which show that macrofaunal species of interest (Riftia pachyptila, Bathymodiolus thermophilus, Calyptogena magnifica) establish in distinct microhabitats, based on availability of vent fluids that nourish endosymbiotic chemoautotrophs. We focus on how these establishment strategies interact with species fecundity, and with disturbance frequency and intensity, to determine what types of strategies can coexist in the system. We find that species must adopt sufficiently different fecundity-establishment strategies to coexist in the community, though strict tradeoffs between fecundity and establishment ability are not required. Additionally, we describe how the strategies that lead to coexistence depend on habitat availability and disturbance regime. Though other coexistence mechanisms may also play a role, our findings suggest why communities within a single biogeographic province may vary with spreading rate (as from N to S along the East Pacific Rise), and what strategies will allow coexistence under different disturbance regimes. Understanding how changes to disturbance regimes influence community composition is very important, as commercial mining interests are rapidly developing plans to exploit the rich mineral resources associated with hydrothermal vents and their activities will change the disturbance regime.

  20. Increasing forest disturbances in Europe and their impact on carbon storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Rupert; Schelhaas, Mart-Jan; Rammer, Werner; Verkerk, Pieter Johannes

    2014-09-01

    Disturbances from wind, bark beetles and wildfires have increased in Europe's forests throughout the twentieth century. Climatic changes were identified as a key driver behind this increase, yet how the expected continuation of climate change will affect Europe's forest disturbance regime remains unresolved. Increasing disturbances could strongly impact the forest carbon budget, and are suggested to contribute to the recently observed carbon sink saturation in Europe's forests. Here we show that forest disturbance damage in Europe has continued to increase in the first decade of the twenty-first century. On the basis of an ensemble of climate change scenarios we find that damage from wind, bark beetles and forest fires is likely to increase further in coming decades, and estimate the rate of increase to be +0.91 × 106 m3 of timber per year until 2030. We show that this intensification can offset the effect of management strategies aiming to increase the forest carbon sink, and calculate the disturbance-related reduction of the carbon storage potential in Europe's forests to be 503.4 Tg C in 2021-2030. Our results highlight the considerable carbon cycle feedbacks of changing disturbance regimes, and underline that future forest policy and management will require a stronger focus on disturbance risk and resilience.

  1. Increasing forest disturbances in Europe and their impact on carbon storage

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Rupert; Schelhaas, Mart-Jan; Rammer, Werner; Verkerk, Pieter Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances from wind, bark beetles, and wildfires have increased in Europe’s forests throughout the 20th century 1. Climatic changes were identified as a main driver behind this increase 2, yet how the expected continuation of climate change will affect Europe’s forest disturbance regime remains unresolved. Increasing disturbances could strongly impact the forest carbon budget 3,4, and are hypothesized to contribute to the recently observed carbon sink saturation in Europe’s forests 5. Here we show that forest disturbance damage in Europe has continued to increase in the first decade of the 21st century. Based on an ensemble of climate change scenarios we find that damage from wind, bark beetles, and forest fires is likely to increase further in coming decades, and estimate the rate of increase to +0.91·106 m3 of timber per year until 2030. We show that this intensification can offset the effect of management strategies aiming to increase the forest carbon sink, and calculate the disturbance-related reduction of the carbon storage potential in Europe’s forests to be 503.4 Tg C in 2021-2030. Our results highlight the considerable carbon cycle feedbacks of changing disturbance regimes, and underline that future forest policy and management will require a stronger focus on disturbance risk and resilience. PMID:25737744

  2. An FRIT Method for Disturbance Attenuation Using Input-Output Data Generated from Disturbance Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Shiro; Takeda, Kyohei

    This paper considers controller parameters tuning method for regulator problems using FRIT method. The FRIT method for regulator problems tunes the control parameters so that the disturbance response follows the reference model output. The paper tries to give a method for estimating disturbances for an FRIT method using input-output data generated by disturbances. The proposed method assumes that the disturbance is an impulse-type signal, but its magnitude is unknown, and estimates the magnitude of the disturbance, while it obtains the control parameters simultaneously. Hence, the proposed method gives an FRIT method for regulator problems by only using one-shot input-output data for unknown impulse-type distrubances. The efficiency of the proposed method can be shown through a numerical example.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Disturbances in Jupiter's Highest Speed Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Melendo, E.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Dowling, T. E.

    2003-05-01

    In 1990 a disturbance developed in the strongest Jovian jet located at ˜ 24-N (Sanchez-Lavega et al., Icarus, Vol 94, 92-97, 1991). At the onset of the disturbance, two bright spots, most probably clouds of convective origin with an initial length scale ˜ 6000 km, appeared on the peak of the 24-N jet stream. Over the next weeks and to the west of these high albedo features, chains of low albedo spots developed showing a regular dark/light pattern, suggesting a trailing wave disturbance. After the dark spot outbreak seven anticyclonic vortices, located a few tenths of degree to the south of the 24 deg N jet, survived for a period of 10 years (Garcia-Melendo et al., Icarus, Vol 146, 514-524, 2000). In order to try to understand the origin and evolution of all the observed phenomena and morphology in that region of Jupiter, computer simulations were carried out using the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) model (Dowling, Icarus, Vol 132, 221-238, 1998). Different vertical temperature and wind profiles, down to the 6 bar altitude level, were tested in order to simulate the observed disturbance behavior. We found that when the jet has the highest speed of 180 m/s, slightly increasing in depth, a Gaussian heat pulse simulating the bright spot outbreak is able to generate, during the first four weeks, a low frequency wave disturbance which propagates in the upstream direction with respect to the jet stream peak velocity, as observed in the real 1990 disturbance, evolving finally into the observed chain of anticyclonic vortices. The low frequency of the resulting waves in our simulations implies these are Rossby waves. Results also indicate that the trailing chains of dark features progressively merge to form the long-lived vortices that have the observed size and aspect ratio, and move at the observed velocity This work was supported by the Spanish MCYT PNAYA 2000-0932, by Grupos UPV/EHU, and by the Esteve Duran Observatory Foundation in Seva. It also made

  4. Postnatal Hematopoiesis and Gut Microbiota in NOD Mice Deviate from C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Hasselby, Jane Preuss; Wiese, Maria; Lundsager, Mia; Buschard, Karsten Stig; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND) 1–4 in NOD mice. Furthermore, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface in NOD compared to C57BL/6 mice. PMID:26783537

  5. Owls and larks in mice.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Martina; Wicht, Helmut; von Gall, Charlotte; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Humans come in different chronotypes and, particularly, the late chronotype (the so-called owl) has been shown to be associated with several health risks. A number of studies show that laboratory mice also display various chronotypes. In mice as well as in humans, the chronotype shows correlations with the period length and rhythm stability. In addition, some mouse models for human diseases show alterations in their chronotypic behavior, which are comparable to those humans. Thus, analysis of the behavior of mice is a powerful tool to unravel the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. In this review, we summarize the correlation of chronotype with free-running period length and rhythm stability in inbred mouse strains, in mice with a compromised molecular clockwork, and in a mouse model for neurodegeneration. PMID:26029157

  6. Owls and Larks in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Martina; Wicht, Helmut; von Gall, Charlotte; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    Humans come in different chronotypes and, particularly, the late chronotype (the so-called owl) has been shown to be associated with several health risks. A number of studies show that laboratory mice also display various chronotypes. In mice as well as in humans, the chronotype shows correlations with the period length and rhythm stability. In addition, some mouse models for human diseases show alterations in their chronotypic behavior, which are comparable to those humans. Thus, analysis of the behavior of mice is a powerful tool to unravel the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. In this review, we summarize the correlation of chronotype with free-running period length and rhythm stability in inbred mouse strains, in mice with a compromised molecular clockwork, and in a mouse model for neurodegeneration. PMID:26029157

  7. Conterminous U.S. Forest Disturbance Dynamics Evaluated from Landsat Time Series Stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.; Goward, S. N.; Kennedy, R. E.; Huang, C.; Schleeweis, K.; Masek, J. G.; Cohen, W. B.; Moisen, G.

    2010-12-01

    Current substantial North America carbon emissions are partially offset by carbon uptake in growing forests. Much of this forest sink is attributed to either forest regrowth on abandoned agricultural lands or woody encroachment. However, the magnitude and persistence of forest carbon sequestration is uncertain, particularly because forest disturbance and regrowth dynamics are not well understood. Disturbance events, including harvest, fire, insect and storm damage, and disease, strongly impact carbon dynamics through biomass removal, decay of in situ dead biomass, and changes in growth rates. These disturbance/regrowth uncertainties make prediction of the future role of North American forests and woodlands in carbon sequestration difficult. Within the North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) project, a core activity of the North American Carbon Program (NACP), we are evaluating forest disturbance patterns by integrating U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) field observations with biennial time series Landsat imagery. The NAFD study has examined conterminous U.S. national forest dynamics from a statistical sample of 50 U.S. Landsat World Reference System locations for derivation of an unbiased estimate of U.S. national annual disturbance rates. For each location a biennial Landsat time series stack (LTSS) was compiled, processed and analyzed for disturbance events for the time period 1984-2005. Our results show significant inter-annual disturbance rate variations within and between sites primarily driven by regional and localized events. A large increase in western forest disturbance rates is observed from 1999-2002, with the greatest increase related to stacks located in the Interior West. Eastern forests show higher rates from 1997 to 2000 and lower disturbance rates in the early 1990’s and 2000s, with southern forests variations dominating the eastern variability. When considering the mean disturbance rates for the eastern and western U.S. as

  8. Automated recognition system for power quality disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelgalil, Tarek

    The application of deregulation policies in electric power systems has resulted in the necessity to quantify the quality of electric power. This fact highlights the need for a new monitoring strategy which is capable of tracking, detecting, classifying power quality disturbances, and then identifying the source of the disturbance. The objective of this work is to design an efficient and reliable power quality monitoring strategy that uses the advances in signal processing and pattern recognition to overcome the deficiencies that exist in power quality monitoring devices. The purposed monitoring strategy has two stages. The first stage is to detect, track, and classify any power quality violation by the use of on-line measurements. In the second stage, the source of the classified power quality disturbance must be identified. In the first stage, an adaptive linear combiner is used to detect power quality disturbances. Then, the Teager Energy Operator and Hilbert Transform are utilized for power quality event tracking. After the Fourier, Wavelet, and Walsh Transforms are employed for the feature extraction, two approaches are then exploited to classify the different power quality disturbances. The first approach depends on comparing the disturbance to be classified with a stored set of signatures for different power quality disturbances. The comparison is developed by using Hidden Markov Models and Dynamic Time Warping. The second approach depends on employing an inductive inference to generate the classification rules directly from the data. In the second stage of the new monitoring strategy, only the problem of identifying the location of the switched capacitor which initiates the transients is investigated. The Total Least Square-Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Technique is adopted to estimate the amplitudes and frequencies of the various modes contained in the voltage signal measured at the facility entrance. After extracting the

  9. Phase-OFDR for distributed disturbance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liehr, Sascha; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) technique based on intensity modulation frequency sweep measurement for distributed disturbance measurement in optical fibres. By evaluating interferometric Rayleigh scattering changes along the fibre, strain and temperature changes are detected with 100 n(epsilon) sensitivity and 10 mK resolution. The vibration frequencies for low frequencies and up to the kHz-range can be obtained from power change evaluation in the spatial domain. This novel OFDR approach is a low-cost alternative for distributed disturbance measurement up to distances of several kilometres.

  10. Human disturbances of waterfowl: an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahlgren, R.B.; Korschgen, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The expansion of outdoor recreation greatly increased the interaction between the public, waterfowl, and waterfowl habitat. The effects of these interactions on waterfowl habitats are visible and obvious, whereas the effects of interactions that disrupt the normal behavior of waterfowl are subtle and often overlooked, but perhaps no less harmful than destruction of habitat. Resource managers and administrators require information on the types, magnitude, and effects of disturbances from human contact with wildlife. This bibliography contains annotations for 211 articles with information about effects of human disturbances on waterfowl. Indexes are provided by subject or key words, geographic locations, species of waterfowl, and authors.

  11. Human disturbances of waterfowl: An annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahlgren, R.B.; Korschgen, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The expansion of outdoor recreation greatly increased the interaction between the public, waterfowl, and waterfowl habitat. The effects of these interactions on waterfowl habitats are visible and obvious, whereas the effects of interactions that disrupt the normal behavior of waterfowl are subtle and often overlooked, but perhaps no less harmful than destruction of habitat. Resource managers and administrators require information on the types, magnitude, and effect of disturbances from human contact with wildlife. This bibliography contains annotations for 211 articles with information about effects of human disturbances on waterfowl. Indexes are provided by subject or key words, geographic locations, species of waterfowl, and authors.

  12. From one to one million: How does community structure track disturbance across time and space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    ) result in more extensive faunal turnover, thereby reducing the utility of ordinations that require at least some faunal similarity. Rank-abundance curves can be applied even in intervals of complete taxonomic turnover; curve shape is quantified by kurtosis, a statistical measure of whether a distribution is more (>3) or less (<3) peaked than a Gaussian distribution (kurtosis = 3). Rank-abundance curve kurtosis values are always greater than 3 for disturbed communities (n=20), and pre-disturbance and recovered communities generally range from 0 to 4. The average kurtosis for a pre-disturbance or recovered community is unique for each type of community (taxonomically or environmentally defined), requiring the establishment of a baseline for rank-abundance curve analysis. In each dataset, both rank-abundance curves and ordinations show a similar pattern of change in community structure during a disturbance. The rate and pattern of recovery varies relative to the spatial and temporal extent of the disturbance. The results of this study reveal that community structure is a useful measure of the impact of a disturbance, both in terms of the severity of the disturbance and in measuring the subsequent recovery. The methods and results of this research are applicable to multiple fields, from conservation biology to ecosystem health to paleoceanography and paleobiology.

  13. Free-stream disturbances, continuous eigenfunctions, boundary-layer instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salwen, H.

    1980-01-01

    A rational foundation is provided for the application of the linear stability theory of parallel shear flows to transition prediction. An explicit method is given for carrying out the necessary calculations. The expansions are shown to be complete. Sample calculations show that a typical boundary layer is very sensitive to vorticity disturbance in the inner boundary layer near the critical layer. Vorticity disturbances three or four boundary layer thicknesses above the boundary are nearly uncoupled from the boundary layer, in that the amplitudes of the discrete Tollmein-Schlichting waves are an extremely small fraction of the amplitude of the disturbance.

  14. Free-stream disturbance, continuous Eigenfunctions, boundary-layer instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    A rational foundation is presented for the application of the linear shear flows to transition prediction, and an explicit method is given for carrying out the necessary calculations. The expansions used are shown to be complete. Sample calculations show that a typical boundary layer is very sensitive to vorticity disturbances in the inner boundary layer, near the critical layer. Vorticity disturbances three or four boundary layer thicknesses above the boundary are nearly uncoupled from the boundary layer in that the amplitudes of the discrete Tollmien-Schlicting waves are an extremely small fraction of the amplitude of the disturbance.

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Upset-Inducing Disturbances for Digital Systems in an Electromagnetic Reverberation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a modeling and simulation approach for disturbance patterns representative of the environment experienced by a digital system in an electromagnetic reverberation chamber. The disturbance is modeled by a multi-variate statistical distribution based on empirical observations. Extended versions of the Rejection Samping and Inverse Transform Sampling techniques are developed to generate multi-variate random samples of the disturbance. The results show that Inverse Transform Sampling returns samples with higher fidelity relative to the empirical distribution. This work is part of an ongoing effort to develop a resilience assessment methodology for complex safety-critical distributed systems.

  16. The Feasibility of the Disturbance Accommodating Controller for Precision Antenna Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gresham, L. L.; Lansing, F. L.; Guiar, C. N.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a pointing (position loop) controller for the NASA-JPL Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas using the Disturbance Accommodating Control (DAC) theory. A model that includes state dependent disturbances was developed, and an example demonstrating the noise estimator is presented as an initial phase in the controller design. The goal is to improve pointing accuracy by the removal of the systematic errors caused by the antenna misalignment as well as sensor noise and random wind and thermal disturbances. Preliminary simulation results show that the DAC technique is successful in both cancelling the imposed errors and maintaining an optimal control policy.

  17. Anthropogenic disturbances are key to maintaining the biodiversity of grasslands.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Z Y; Jiao, F; Li, Y H; Kallenbach, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Although anthropogenic disturbances are often perceived as detrimental to plant biodiversity, the relationship between biodiversity and disturbance remains unclear. Opinions diverge on how natural diversity is generated and maintained. We conducted a large-scale investigation of a temperate grassland system in Inner Mongolia and assessed the richness-disturbance relationship using grazing intensity, the primary anthropogenic disturbance in the region. Vascular plant-species richness peaked at an intermediate level of anthropogenic disturbance. Our results support the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis, which provides a valid and useful measure of biodiversity at a metacommunity scale, indicating that anthropogenic disturbances are necessary to conserve the biodiversity of grassland systems. PMID:26903041

  18. Anthropogenic disturbances are key to maintaining the biodiversity of grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Z. Y.; Jiao, F.; Li, Y. H.; Kallenbach, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Although anthropogenic disturbances are often perceived as detrimental to plant biodiversity, the relationship between biodiversity and disturbance remains unclear. Opinions diverge on how natural diversity is generated and maintained. We conducted a large-scale investigation of a temperate grassland system in Inner Mongolia and assessed the richness-disturbance relationship using grazing intensity, the primary anthropogenic disturbance in the region. Vascular plant-species richness peaked at an intermediate level of anthropogenic disturbance. Our results support the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis, which provides a valid and useful measure of biodiversity at a metacommunity scale, indicating that anthropogenic disturbances are necessary to conserve the biodiversity of grassland systems. PMID:26903041

  19. Hemorheological abnormalities in lipoprotein lipase deficient mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Tieqiang; Guo Jun; Li Hui; Huang Wei; Xian Xunde; Ross, Colin J.D.; Hayden, Michael R.; Wen Zongyao . E-mail: rheol@bjmu.edu.cn; Liu George . E-mail: vangeorgeliu@gmail.com

    2006-03-24

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a metabolic disturbance often seen in clinical practice. It is known to induce life-threatening acute pancreatitis, but its role in atherogenesis remains elusive. Hemorheological abnormality was thought to play an important role in pathogenesis of both pancreatitis and atherosclerosis. However, hemorheology in severe HTG was not well investigated. Recently, we established a severe HTG mouse model deficient in lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in which severe HTG was observed to cause a significant increase in plasma viscosity. Disturbances of erythrocytes were also documented, including decreased deformability, electrophoresis rate, and membrane fluidity, and increased osmotic fragility. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that most erythrocytes of LPL deficient mice deformed with protrusions, irregular appearances or indistinct concaves. Analysis of erythrocyte membrane lipids showed decreased cholesterol (Ch) and phospholipid (PL) contents but unaltered Ch/PL ratio. The changes of membrane lipids may be partially responsible for the hemorheological and morphologic abnormalities of erythrocytes. This study indicated that severe HTG could lead to significant impairment of hemorheology and this model may be useful in delineating the role of severe HTG in the pathogenesis of hyperlipidemic pancreatitis and atherosclerosis.

  20. VIEW SHOWING WEST ELEVATION, EAST SIDE OF MEYER AVENUE. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SHOWING WEST ELEVATION, EAST SIDE OF MEYER AVENUE. SHOWS 499-501, MUNOZ HOUSE (AZ-73-37) ON FAR RIGHT - Antonio Bustamente House, 485-489 South Meyer Avenue & 186 West Kennedy Street, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  1. mRNA Levels of ACh-Related Enzymes in the Hippocampus of THY-Tau22 Mouse: A Model of Human Tauopathy with No Signs of Motor Disturbance.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Beatriz E; Fernández-Gómez, Francisco J; Muñoz-Delgado, Encarnación; Buée, Luc; Blum, David; Vidal, Cecilio J

    2016-04-01

    The microtubule-associated protein Tau tends to form aggregates in neurodegenerative disorders referred to as tauopathies. The tauopathy model transgenic (Tg) THY-Tau22 (Tau22) mouse shows disturbed septo-hippocampal transmission, memory deficits and no signs of motor dysfunction. The reports showing a hippocampal downregulation of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in SAMP8 mice, a model of aging, and an upregulation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in Tg-VLW mice, a model of FTDP17 tauopathy, may lead to think that the supply of ACh to the hippocampus can be threatened as aging or Tau pathology progress. The above was tested by comparing the mRNA levels for ACh-related enzymes in hippocampi of wild-type (wt) and Tau22 mice at ages when the neuropathological signs are debuting (3-4 months), moderate (6-7 months) and extensive (>9 months). Age-matched Tau22 and wt mice hippocampi displayed similar ChAT, AChE-T, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and a proline-rich membrane anchor (PRiMA) mRNA levels, any change most likely arising from ACh homeostasis. The unchanged hippocampal levels of AChE-T mRNA and enzyme activity observed in Tau22 mice, expressing G272V-P301S hTau, differed from the increase in AChE-T mRNA and activity observed in Tg-VLW mice, expressing G272V-P301L-R406W hTau. The difference supports the idea that AChE upregulation may proceed or not depending on the particular Tau mutation, which would dictate Tau folding, the accessibility/affinity to kinases and phosphatases, and P-Tau aggregation with itself and protein partners, transcription factors included. PMID:26697857

  2. 15. Detail showing lower chord pinconnected to vertical member, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Sur