Sample records for micelle-based drug delivery

  1. Biodegradable stereocomplex micelles based on dextran-block-polylactide as efficient drug deliveries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Li; Cao, Yue; He, Chaoliang; Chen, Xuesi

    2013-10-22

    Biodegradable stereocomplex micelles (SCMs) based on amphiphilic dextran-block-polylactide (Dex-b-PLA) were designed and used for efficient intracellular drug deliveries. The Dex-b-PLA copolymers were successfully synthesized by click reaction. The structures of the resultant copolymers were verified by (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectra. The formation of stable micelles through self-assembly driven by the stereocomplexation between enantiomeric l- and d-PLA blocks was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic laser scattering (DLS), and fluorescence techniques. It was interesting to observe that the SCMs showed lower critical micelle concentration values (CMCs) because of the stereocomplex interaction between PLLA and PDLA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis provided information on the thermal and crystal properties of the copolymers and SCMs. The improved stability of SCMs should be attractive for intracellular drug delivery. Thus, a model anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded into micelles, and the in vitro drug release in was also studied. The release kinetics of DOX showed DOX-loaded SCMs exhibited slower DOX release. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry studies also showed that the DOX-loaded SCMs exhibited a slower drug release behavior. Meanwhile, the MTT assay demonstrated that DOX-loaded SCMs show lower cellular proliferation inhibition against HepG2. In sum, the micelles through self-assembly driven by stereocomplex interaction would have great potential to be used as stable delivery vehicles for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:24112037

  2. Hydrotropic polymeric mixed micelles based on functional hyperbranched polyglycerol copolymers as hepatoma-targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Xinge; Yu, Peien; Han, Yucai; Li, Yangguang; Li, Chaoxing

    2013-01-01

    Mixed copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) self-assembled from ?-cyclodextrin-grafted hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-g-CD) and lactobionic acid (LA)-grafted hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-g-LA) were applied as carriers for a hydrophobic antitumor drug, paclitaxel (PTX), achieving hepatocellular carcinoma-targeted delivery. The resulting NPs exhibited high drug loading capacity and substantial stability in aqueous solution. In vitro drug release studies demonstrated a controlled drug release profile with increased release at acidic pH. Remarkably, tumor proliferation assays showed that PTX-loaded mixed copolymer NPs inhibited asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor positive HepG2 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner in comparison with ASGP receptor negative BGC-823 cells. Moreover, the competition assay demonstrated that the small molecular LA inhibited the cellular uptake of the PTX-loaded mixed copolymer NPs, indicating the ASGP receptor-mediated endocytosis in HepG2 cells. In addition, the intracellular uptake tests by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the mixed copolymer NPs were more efficiently taken up by HepG2 cells compared with HPG-g-CD NPs. These results suggest a feasible application of the mixed copolymer NPs as nanocarriers for hepatoma-targeted delivery of potent antitumor drugs. PMID:23132353

  3. Micelles based on amphiphilic PCL-PEO triblock and star-shaped diblock copolymers: Potential in drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Quaglia, Fabiana; Ostacolo, Luisanna; Nese, Giuseppe; Canciello, Mariarosaria; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Ungaro, Francesca; Palumbo, Rosario; La Rotonda, Maria Immacolata; Maglio, Giovanni

    2008-12-01

    In this work, the potential in drug nanodelivery of micelles made from poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly (ethyleneoxide) (PEO) copolymers with triblock and star-diblock architectures was explored. Linear and 4-arm star-shaped PCL macromers with two or four --OH end groups were prepared by ring-opening polymerization of CL and condensed with alpha-methoxy-omega-carboxy-PEO. The resulting amphiphilic copolymers were characterized by (1)H NMR, size exclusion chromatography, and differential scanning calorimetry. Separate PCL and PEO crystalline phases were observed for both copolymers. Copolymers self-assembled in water giving critical association concentrations in the range 0.010-0.023 mg/mL. Micelles with a size of 32-45 nm were prepared by dialysis and characterized for hydrodynamic diameter and surface charge. Their potential as nanocarriers in drug delivery applications was evaluated too. Micelles were nontoxic to both Red blood cells and HeLa cells. Complement activation experiments indicated that micelles can escape the reticuloendothelial system once intravenously injected. Finally, a different uptake on HeLa cells was found for micelles obtained from triblock and star-shaped copolymers. PMID:18186051

  4. Micelles based on methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-cholesterol conjugate for controlled and targeted drug delivery of a poorly water soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Li, Junming; He, Zhiyao; Yu, Shui; Li, Shuangzhi; Ma, Qing; Yu, Yiyi; Zhang, Jialin; Li, Rui; Zheng, Yu; He, Gu; Song, Xiangrong

    2012-10-01

    In this study, quercetin (QC) with cancer chemoprevention effect and anticancer potential was loaded into polymeric micelles of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-cholesterol conjugate (mPEG-Chol) in order to increase its water solubility. MPEG-Chol with lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) value (4.0 x 10(-7) M - 13 x 10(-7) M) was firstly synthesized involving two steps of chemical modification on cholesterol by esterification, and then QC was incorporated into mPEG-Chol micelles by self-assembly method. After the process parameters were optimized, QC-loaded micelles had higher drug loading (3.66%) and entrapment efficiency (93.51%) and nano-sized diameter (116 nm). DSC analysis demonstrated that QC had been incorporated non-covalently into the micelles and existed as an amorphous state or a solid solution in the polymeric matrix. The freeze-dried formulation with addition of 1% (w/v) mannitol as cryoprotectant was successfully developed for the long-term storage of QC-loaded micelles. Compared to free QC, QC-loaded micelles could release QC more slowly. Moreover, the release of QC from micelles was slightly faster in PBS at pH 5 than that in PBS at pH 7.4, which implied that QC-loaded micelles might be pH-sensitive and thereby selectively deliver QC to tumor tissue with unwanted side effects. Therefore, mPEG-Chol was a promising micellar vector for the controlled and targeted drug delivery of QC to tumor and QC-loaded micelles were also worth being further investigated as a potential formulation for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. PMID:22888752

  5. Self-assembled micelles based on pH-sensitive PAE-g-MPEG-cholesterol block copolymer for anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Can Yang; Xiong, Di; Sun, Yao; Zhao, Bin; Lin, Wen Jing; Zhang, Li Juan

    2014-01-01

    A novel amphiphilic triblock pH-sensitive poly(?-amino ester)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether-cholesterol (PAE-g-MPEG-Chol) was designed and synthesized via the Michael-type step polymerization and esterification condensation method. The synthesized copolymer was determined with proton nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatography. The grafting percentages of MPEG and cholesterol were determined as 10.93% and 62.02%, calculated from the area of the characteristic peaks, respectively. The amphiphilic copolymer was confirmed to self-assemble into core/shell micelles in aqueous solution at low concentrations. The critical micelle concentrations were 6.92 and 15.14 mg/L at pH of 7.4 and 6.0, respectively, obviously influenced by the changes of pH values. The solubility of pH-responsive PAE segment could be transformed depending on the different values of pH because of protonation–deprotonation of the amino groups, resulting in pH sensitivity of the copolymer. The average particle size of micelles increased from 125 nm to 165 nm with the pH decreasing, and the zeta potential was also significantly changed. Doxorubicin (DOX) was entrapped into the polymeric micelles with a high drug loading level. The in vitro DOX release from the micelles was distinctly enhanced with the pH decreasing from 7.4 to 6.0. Toxicity testing proved that the DOX-loaded micelles exhibited high cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells, whereas the copolymer showed low toxicity. The results demonstrated how pH-sensitive PAE-g-MPEG-Chol micelles were proved to be a potential vector in hydrophobic drug delivery for tumor therapy. PMID:25364250

  6. Reduction-responsive core-shell-corona micelles based on triblock copolymers: novel synthetic strategy, characterization, and application as a tumor microenvironment-responsive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xubo; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-14

    A facile and effective approach was established for fabricating core-shell-corona micelles by self-assembly of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(acrylic acid-co-tert-butyl acrylate)-poly(?-caprolactone) (PEG43-b-P(AA30-co-tBA18)-b-PCL53) triblock copolymer, synthesized via a combination of ring-opening polymerization (ROP), atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), click chemistry, and hydrolyzation. The prenanovehicles with three different hydrolysis degrees from PEG43-b-PtBA48-b-PCL53 were developed to evaluate the drug loading capacity (DLC) and drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE). After cross-linking with a disulfide bond to regulate the drug release kinetics, the spherical core-shell-corona micelles with average diameter of 52 ± 4 nm were obtained in aqueous solution. The reduction-responsive cross-linked micelles showed a slow sustained release in normal physiological conditions and a rapid release upon exposure to simulated tumor intracellular conditions. In addition, the cytotoxic analysis and HepG2 cell growth inhibition assays demonstrated their remarkable biocompatibility and similar excellent anticancer activity as the free doxorubicin (DOX), which has also been revealed by the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) analysis. So the reduction-sensitive core-shell-corona micelles are expected to be promising tumor microenvironment-responsive nanovehicles for hydrophobic drugs by glutathione (GSH) triggering. PMID:25394962

  7. Theranostic Unimolecular Micelles Based on Brush-Shaped Amphiphilic Block Copolymers for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery and Positron Emission Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Brush-shaped amphiphilic block copolymers were conjugated with a monoclonal antibody against CD105 (i.e., TRC105) and a macrocyclic chelator for 64Cu-labeling to generate multifunctional theranostic unimolecular micelles. The backbone of the brush-shaped amphiphilic block copolymer was poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and the side chains were poly(l-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLLA-PEG). The doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded unimolecular micelles showed a pH-dependent drug release profile and a uniform size distribution. A significantly higher cellular uptake of TRC105-conjugated micelles was observed in CD105-positive human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) than nontargeted micelles due to CD105-mediated endocytosis. In contrast, similar and extremely low cellular uptake of both targeted and nontargeted micelles was observed in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (CD105-negative). The difference between the in vivo tumor accumulation of 64Cu-labeled TRC105-conjugated micelles and that of nontargeted micelles was studied in 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice, by serial positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and validated by biodistribution studies. These multifunctional unimolecular micelles offer pH-responsive drug release, noninvasive PET imaging capability, together with both passive and active tumor-targeting abilities, thus making them a desirable nanoplatform for cancer theranostics. PMID:24628452

  8. Theranostic unimolecular micelles based on brush-shaped amphiphilic block copolymers for tumor-targeted drug delivery and positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jintang; Hong, Hao; Chen, Guojun; Shi, Sixiang; Nayak, Tapas R; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo; Gong, Shaoqin

    2014-12-24

    Brush-shaped amphiphilic block copolymers were conjugated with a monoclonal antibody against CD105 (i.e., TRC105) and a macrocyclic chelator for (64)Cu-labeling to generate multifunctional theranostic unimolecular micelles. The backbone of the brush-shaped amphiphilic block copolymer was poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and the side chains were poly(L-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLLA-PEG). The doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded unimolecular micelles showed a pH-dependent drug release profile and a uniform size distribution. A significantly higher cellular uptake of TRC105-conjugated micelles was observed in CD105-positive human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) than nontargeted micelles due to CD105-mediated endocytosis. In contrast, similar and extremely low cellular uptake of both targeted and nontargeted micelles was observed in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (CD105-negative). The difference between the in vivo tumor accumulation of (64)Cu-labeled TRC105-conjugated micelles and that of nontargeted micelles was studied in 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice, by serial positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and validated by biodistribution studies. These multifunctional unimolecular micelles offer pH-responsive drug release, noninvasive PET imaging capability, together with both passive and active tumor-targeting abilities, thus making them a desirable nanoplatform for cancer theranostics. PMID:24628452

  9. Micelles Based on Acid Degradable Poly(acetal urethane): Preparation, pH-Sensitivity, and Triggered Intracellular Drug Release.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fushi; Cheng, Ru; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, Chao; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-07-13

    Polyurethanes are a unique class of biomaterials that are widely used in medical devices. In spite of their easy synthesis and excellent biocompatibility, polyurethanes are less explored for controlled drug delivery due to their slow or lack of degradation. In this paper, we report the design and development of novel acid degradable poly(acetal urethane) (PAU) and corresponding triblock copolymer micelles for pH-triggered intracellular delivery of a model lipophilic anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX). PAU with Mn ranging from 4.3 to 12.3 kg/mol was conveniently prepared from polycondensation reaction of lysine diisocyanate (LDI) and a novel diacetal-containing diol, terephthalilidene-bis(trimethylolethane) (TPABTME) using dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTDL) as a catalyst in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The thiol-ene click reaction of Allyl-PAU-Allyl with thiolated PEG (Mn = 5.0 kg/mol) afforded PEG-PAU-PEG triblock copolymers that readily formed micelles with average sizes of about 90-120 nm in water. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements revealed fast swelling and disruption of micelles under acidic pH. UV/vis spectroscopy corroborated that acetal degradation was accelerated at pH 4.0 and 5.0. The in vitro release studies showed that doxorubicin (DOX) was released in a controlled and pH-dependent manner, in which ca. 96%, 73%, and 30% of drug was released within 48 h at pH 4.0, 5.0, and 7.4, respectively. Notably, MTT assays displayed that DOX-loaded PEG-PAU-PEG micelles had a high in vitro antitumor activity in both RAW 264.7 and drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. The confocal microscopy and flow cytometry experiments demonstrated that PEG-PAU-PEG micelles mediated efficient cytoplasmic delivery of DOX. Importantly, blank PEG-PAU-PEG micelles were shown to be nontoxic to RAW 264.7 and MCF-7/ADR cells even at a high concentration of 1.5 mg/mL. Hence, micelles based on poly(acetal urethane) have appeared as a new class of biocompatible and acid-degradable nanocarriers for efficient intracellular drug delivery. PMID:26110553

  10. Thermosensitive polymeric micelles based on poly( N-isopropylacrylamide) as drug carriers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hua Wei; Si-Xue Cheng; Xian-Zheng Zhang; Ren-Xi Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    Amphiphilic copolymers are well developed as precursors for the preparation of micellar drug carriers. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) is one of the most extensively studied thermo-sensitive polymers that exhibits a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) at around 33°C in aqueous solution. Over the past decade, considerable efforts have been devoted to design and preparation of PNIPAAm-based thermo-sensitive polymeric micelles as delivery vehicles

  11. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases. PMID:20437123

  12. Doxorubicin loaded singlet-oxygen producible polymeric micelle based on chlorine e6 conjugated pluronic F127 for overcoming drug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung; Park, Wooram; Na, Kun

    2014-09-01

    Drug resistance remains one of the primary obstacles to the success of cancer chemotherapy. In this work, we demonstrate a singlet-oxygen producible polymeric (SOPP) micelle based on photosensitizer (PS, chlorin e6 (Ce6)) conjugated amphiphilic copolymer (pluronic F127(®), PF127) for overcoming drug resistance in cancer by applying photochemical internalization (PCI). The doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded SOPP micelles were self-assembled from Ce6-PF127 conjugates, which have a spherical shape with a uniform size of ?30 nm. Compared with free Ce6, enhanced singlet-oxygen generation efficiency in the DOX-loaded SOPP micelles have been demonstrated in aqueous environments due to their increased water-dispersibility. Under low dose of laser power and anti-cancer drug (DOX) conditions, in vitro and in vivo studies on drug-resistant cancer cells demonstrated that singlet-oxygen-mediated cellular membrane damage (caused by lipid peroxidation) significantly increased the cellular uptake of drug (DOX), which led to overcoming the drug resistance in cancer cells without undesirable side effects. We believe this approach could represent a promising platform for drug-resistant cancer treatment. PMID:24934645

  13. Drug delivery Combinatorial Drug Conjugation Enables Nanoparticle

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Liangfang

    Drug delivery Combinatorial Drug Conjugation Enables Nanoparticle Dual-Drug Delivery Santosh Aryal, Che-Ming Jack Hu, and Liangfang Zhang* A new approach to loading multiple drugs onto the same drug through hydrolyzable linkers to form drug conjugates, is reported. In contrast to loading individual types

  14. Organogels in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2005-05-01

    In the last decade, interest in physical organogels has grown rapidly with the discovery and synthesis of a very large number of diverse molecules, which can gel organic solvents at low concentrations. The gelator molecules immobilise large volumes of liquid following their self-assembly into a variety of aggregates such as rods, tubules, fibres and platelets. The many interesting properties of these gels, such as their thermoreversibility, have led to much excitement over their industrial applications. However, only a few organogels are currently being studied as drug/vaccine delivery vehicles as most of the existing organogels are composed of pharmaceutically unacceptable organic liquids and/or unacceptable/untested gelators. In this paper a brief overview of organogels is presented, followed by a more in-depth review of the gels that have been investigated for drug and/or vaccine delivery. These include microemulsion-based gels and lecithin gels (studied for transdermal delivery), sorbitan monostearate organogels and amphiphilogels (studied as vaccine adjuvants and for oral and transdermal drug delivery, respectively), gels composed of alanine derivatives (investigated as in situ forming gels) and Eudragit organogels (studied as a matrix for suppositories). Finally, pluronic lecithin organogels, descendents of lecithin gels but which are not really organogels, are briefly discussed for their interesting history, their root and the wide interest in these systems. PMID:16296770

  15. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  16. New Methods of Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Langer

    1990-01-01

    Conventional forms of drug administration generally rely on pills, eye drops, ointments, and intravenous solutions. Recently, a number of novel drug delivery approaches have been developed. These approaches include drug modification by chemical means, drug entrapment in small vesicles that are injected into the bloodstream, and drug entrapment within pumps or polymeric materials that are placed in desired bodily compartments

  17. Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Chow, Gan-Moog

    Nanoparticles were synthesized and modified for target drug delivery. The research involved the aqueous synthesis of near infrared (NIR) sensitive Au-Au2S nanoparticles. An anti-cancer drug (cis-platin) ...

  18. Nanosuspension Technology for Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiraporn CHINGUNPITUK

    The poor water solubility of drugs is major problem for drug formulation. To date, nanoscale systems for drug delivery have gained much interest as a way to improve the solubility problems. The reduction of drug particles into the sub-micron range leads to a significant increase in the dissolution rate and therefore enhances bioavailability. Nanosuspensions are promising candidates that can be

  19. Bioresponsive matrices in drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin-Oh You; Dariela Almeda; George JC Ye; Debra T Auguste

    2010-01-01

    For years, the field of drug delivery has focused on (1) controlling the release of a therapeutic and (2) targeting the therapeutic to a specific cell type. These research endeavors have concentrated mainly on the development of new degradable polymers and molecule-labeled drug delivery vehicles. Recent interest in biomaterials that respond to their environment have opened new methods to trigger

  20. Nanoprecipitation of polymeric nanoparticle micelles based on 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) with 2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DPA), for intracellular delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Salvage, Jonathan P; Thom, Christopher; Lewis, Andrew L; Phillips, Gary J; Lloyd, Andrew W

    2015-03-01

    Biodistribution of nanoparticle-based intracellular delivery systems is mediated primarily by particle size and physicochemical properties. As such, overcoming the rapid removal of these by the reticuloendothelial system remains a significant challenge. To date, a number of copolymer nanoparticle systems based on 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) with 2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DPA), displaying biomimetic and pH responsive properties, have been published, however these have been predominately polymersome based, whilst micelle systems have remained relatively unexplored. This study utilised nanoprecipitation to investigate the effects of solvent and buffer choice upon micelle size and polydispersity, and found using methanol produced monodisperse micelles of circa 70 nm diameter, whilst ethanol produced polydisperse systems with nanoparticles of circa 128 nm diameter. The choice of aqueous buffer, dialysis of the systems, extended storage, and exposure to a wide temperature range (5-70 °C) had no significant effect on micelle size, and the systems were highly resistant to dilution, indicating excellent colloidal stability. Optimisation of the nanoprecipitation process, post precipitation, was investigated, and model drugs successfully loaded whilst maintaining system stability. Subsequent in vitro studies suggested that the micelles were of negligible cellular toxicity, and an apparent cellular uptake was observed via confocal laser scanning microscopy. This paper presents the first report of an optimised nanoprecipitation methodology for the formation of MPC-DPA nanoparticle micelles, and in doing so achieved monodisperse systems with the size and physicochemical characteristics seen as desirable for long circulating therapeutic delivery vehicles. PMID:25773229

  1. Liposomes for Pulmonary Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janani Swaminathan; Carsten Ehrhardt

    \\u000a Liposomes have been widely used in pulmonary drug delivery for ­multiple applications including solubilization, sustained\\u000a release, cellular and intracellular ­targeting, minimization of toxicity, and facilitation of absorption. In this chapter,\\u000a formulation aspects, aerosolization, and an extensive overview of the use of pulmonary drug delivery of liposomes for disease\\u000a and drug classes are provided. Specifically, this chapter examines liposomes from in

  2. Microelectronic control of drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin Dong; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2012-07-01

    Microelectronic control of drug delivery devices enables precise management of drug delivery profiles. Iontophoresis patches offer microelectronic control over delivery in a noninvasive manner, but these are limited to the administration of relatively small molecules at small doses. Infusion pumps are widely used for delivery of insulin and other drugs; however, they require an invasive catheter that many patients find inconvenient and can be a site of infection. Implanted pumps avoid these problems, but they require long-term commitment associated with surgical implantation. An alternative is an implanted microchip containing many protected reservoirs filled with drug powder that is selectively released under microelectronic control. This device offers the promise of long-term drug stability in the solid state and precise digital drug dosing. Building on more than 10 years of preclinical studies, this wirelessly controlled microchip technology recently underwent a first-in-human clinical study. The microchip was implanted subcutaneously in the abdomen of eight female patients with osteoporosis. A remote operator was able to establish a wireless link with the microchip to program the schedule of human parathyroid hormone dosing from the device. This study showed that the wireless microchips produced pharmacokinetics similar to those from subcutaneous injections of the drug and produced less variable drug levels in the blood. There were also no toxic or adverse events due to the microchip or drug. This study represents an important step towards more widespread use of microelectronic control of drug delivery to improve pharmaceutical therapies. PMID:22905837

  3. Bioresponsive matrices in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    For years, the field of drug delivery has focused on (1) controlling the release of a therapeutic and (2) targeting the therapeutic to a specific cell type. These research endeavors have concentrated mainly on the development of new degradable polymers and molecule-labeled drug delivery vehicles. Recent interest in biomaterials that respond to their environment have opened new methods to trigger the release of drugs and localize the therapeutic within a particular site. These novel biomaterials, usually termed "smart" or "intelligent", are able to deliver a therapeutic agent based on either environmental cues or a remote stimulus. Stimuli-responsive materials could potentially elicit a therapeutically effective dose without adverse side effects. Polymers responding to different stimuli, such as pH, light, temperature, ultrasound, magnetism, or biomolecules have been investigated as potential drug delivery vehicles. This review describes the most recent advances in "smart" drug delivery systems that respond to one or multiple stimuli. PMID:21114841

  4. Nanotechnology and Drug Delivery Part 2: Nanostructures for Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nelson A Ochekpe; Patrick O Olorunfemi; Ndidi C

    2009-01-01

    This is the second part of a review on nanotechnology in general and particularly as it pertains to drug deliver. In the earlier paper (Part 1), nanotechnology in nature, its history as well as design and methods were discussed. Its applications, benefits and risks were also outlined. In this paper (Part 2), various nanostructures employed in drug delivery, their methods

  5. Macromolecules in drug delivery Macromolecular targeting agents, carriers, and drugs

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    Macromolecules in drug delivery Macromolecular targeting agents, carriers, and drugs 1gauthier@emt.inrs.ca #12;Why macromolecules in drug delivery? 2gauthier@emt.inrs.ca Classic chemotherapy Drug delivery? Targeting A carrier for small drugs A release mechanism (if necessary) Protection of drug cargo #12;How? 3

  6. Proniosomes in transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Yahya; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Proniosomes are liquid crystalline-compact niosomal hybrid that can be hydrated to form niosomal dispersion instantly before use. It is a promising drug carrier with better physical and chemical stability than niosomes. Proniosomes have the potential to be scaled up for industrial purposes. They have been remarkably considered for transdermal drug delivery because of their competences, including the penetration enhancing ability of surfactants and their non-toxic characteristics. This review offers current approaches in the research and development of proniosomal formulations for the transdermal delivery of drugs with a focus on therapeutic applications. PMID:25925111

  7. Nanosuspensions in drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barrett E. Rabinow

    2004-01-01

    A surprisingly large proportion of new drug candidates emerging from drug discovery programmes are water insoluble, and therefore poorly bioavailable, leading to abandoned development efforts. These so-called 'brickdust' candidates can now be rescued by formulating them into crystalline nanosuspensions. In the process of overcoming issues involving solubility, additional pharmacokinetic benefits of the drugs so formulated have come to be appreciated.

  8. Packaging for a drug delivery microelectromechanical system

    E-print Network

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2005-01-01

    Local drug delivery is a fast expanding field, and has been a center of attention for researchers in medicine in the last decade. Its advantages over systemic drug delivery are clear in cancer therapy, with localized tumors. ...

  9. CCMR: Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lin, Joyce

    2005-08-17

    Safe and nontoxic drug delivery is an ongoing area of research. Some current methods of drug delivery include the use of nanoparticles, hydrogels, dendrimers, and micelles. Nanoparticles can be used as vehicles in which to transport certain drugs to cancerous cells. A certain class of nanoparticles called clays is especially useful in synthesizing these drug delivery vehicles. Layered Double Hydroxides (LDHs) are a type of hydrotalcite clay with a structure similar to smectite clays. They have a general structure that consists of layers of metal hydroxides connected to a layer of another metal hydroxide by hydrogen bonding. LDHs are made up of layers of a trivalent and a divalently charged cation coordinated by six oxygen atoms. The resulting structure consists of two-dimensional sheets with positively charged faces and negatively charged edges that are stacked together via hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups on adjacent sheets. These sheets generally have a very high aspect ratio, resulting in a large surface area. The positively charged layers are balanced by the presence of anions between them. A wide variety of LDHs can be synthesized depending on the various cations and interlayer anions used. Characterization of the LDHs themselves as well as LDHs intercalated with the drugs was performed using X-ray diffraction and TEM and SEM microscopy.

  10. Gelatin Used for Drug Delivery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    University of Southern Mississippi

    2003-01-01

    In this activity, learners discover how gelatin can be used as a medium for drug delivery. Learners create colored gelatin and then cut out pieces of the gelatin to simulate medicine (pills). Learners then put their simulated pills in a pan of hot water. Since gelatin is a thermoreversible or cold-setting polymer, gelatin will convert back to a liquid if put in a hot environment. As the gelatin returns to its liquid form, it releases its embedded dye. The dye eventually diffuses completely out of the gelatin which simulates the slow release of a drug from a pill. From this activity, learners learn more about diffusion and drug delivery. Adult supervision recommended.

  11. Nanocarriers and Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Svetlana Gelperina

    Nanoparticles may serve, among other techniques, as a useful tool for achieving the main objective of regional cancer therapy:\\u000a they can deliver a higher concentration of the agent to the tumor and expose the tumor to active drug for longer periods than\\u000a safely possible with conventional formulations. These carriers combine many advantages, such as a potential for selective\\u000a targeting and

  12. Spinal drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodore S. Grabow; David Derdzinski; Peter S. Staats

    2001-01-01

    Clinicians currently base decisions regarding the use of intrathecal drug therapy for chronic pain on reports from uncontrolled\\u000a and retrospective studies that fail to rely on standardized outcome measures. In this article, we summarize what is known\\u000a about currently administered intrathecal therapies, including opioids, gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists, alpha-2 adrenoreceptor\\u000a agonists, local anesthetics (sodium channel antagonists), calcium channel antagonists, miscellaneous agents,

  13. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  14. Drug delivery Preparation of Monodisperse Biodegradable Polymer

    E-print Network

    Prentiss, Mara

    Drug delivery Preparation of Monodisperse Biodegradable Polymer Microparticles Using a Microfluidic Flow-Focusing Device for Controlled Drug Delivery Qiaobing Xu, Michinao Hashimoto, Tram T. Dang, Todd microparticles have broad utility as vehicles for drug delivery and form the basis of several therapies approved

  15. Peptide and protein delivery using new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Jain, Aviral; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnological research sorts protein drug delivery systems by importance based on their various therapeutic applications. The effective and potent action of the proteins/peptides makes them the drugs of choice for the treatment of numerous diseases. Major research issues in protein delivery include the stabilization of proteins in delivery devices and the design of appropriate target-specific protein carriers. Many efforts have been made for effective delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs through various routes of administrations for successful therapeutic effects. Nanoparticles made of biodegradable polymers such as poly lactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), the poly(fumaric-co-sebacic) anhydride chitosan, and modified chitosan, as well as solid lipids, have shown great potential in the delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs. Moreover, scientists also have used liposomes, PEGylated liposomes, niosomes, and aquasomes, among others, for peptidal drug delivery. They also have developed hydrogels and transdermal drug delivery systems for peptidal drug delivery. A receptor-mediated delivery system is another attractive strategy to overcome the limitation in drug absorption that enables the transcytosis of the protein across the epithelial barrier. Modification such as PEGnology is applied to various proteins and peptides of the desired protein and peptides also increases the circulating life, solubility and stability, pharmacokinetic properties, and antigenicity of protein. This review focuses on various approaches for effective protein/peptidal drug delivery, with special emphasis on insulin delivery. PMID:23662604

  16. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  17. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems. Ultrasound parameters are optimized to achieve maximum cell internalization of molecules and increased nanoparticle delivery to a cell layer on a coverslip. In-vivo studies demonstrate the possibility of using a lower dose of paclitaxel to slow tumor growth rates, increase doxorubicin concentration in tumor tissue, and enhance tumor delivery of fluorescent molecules through treatments that combine nanoparticles with ultrasound and microbubbles.

  18. Self-assembly of pH-sensitive mixed micelles based on linear and star copolymers for drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiujuan Huang; Yan Xiao; Meidong Lang

    2011-01-01

    Comicellization of a star block copolymer poly(?-caprolactone)-block-poly(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (S(PCL-b-PDEAEMA)) and a linear block copolymer methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(?-caprolactone) (mPEG-b-PCL) was developed to enhance the stability and lower the cytotoxicity of the micelles. The two copolymers self-assembled into the mixed micelles with a common PCL core surrounded by a mixed PDEAEMA\\/mPEG shell in aqueous solution. This core–shell structure was transformed to the

  19. Opportunities in respiratory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N; Giles, Rachael D

    2014-12-01

    A wide range of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease products are soon to be released onto the inhaled therapies market and differentiation between these devices will help them to gain market share over their competitors. Current legislation is directing healthcare towards being more efficient and cost-effective in order to continually provide quality care despite the challenges of aging populations and fewer resources. Devices and drugs that can be differentiated by producing improved patient outcomes would, therefore, be likely to win market share. In this perspective article, the current and potential opportunities for the successful delivery and differentiation of new inhaled drug products are discussed. PMID:25531928

  20. Drug delivery across the skin.

    PubMed

    Touitou, Elka

    2002-10-01

    For more than two decades, researchers have attempted to find a way to use the skin as a portal of entry for drugs in order to overcome problems associated with traditional modes of drug administration. This has been a complicated task due to the highly effective barrier properties of the skin. In order to deliver drugs through the skin, most compounds require various degrees of permeation enhancement. Classic enhancement methods focused primarily on chemical enhancement or modulation of interactions between the drug and the vehicle. More recent research makes use of innovative vesicular carriers, electrically assisted delivery and various microinvasive methods, some incorporating technologies from other fields. These new and exciting methods for drug delivery are already increasing the number and quality of dermal and transdermal therapies. This review discusses the different types of permeation enhancement, both classic and innovative, and summarises the current strengths and shortcomings in the field with an emphasis on those that have led to products on the market or in the pipeline. PMID:12387671

  1. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments. Also, recent developments with other ocular drug delivery strategies employing in situ gels, implants, contact lens and microneedles have been discussed. PMID:25590022

  2. Microspheres for controlled release drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Varde, Neelesh K; Pack, Daniel W

    2004-01-01

    Controlled release drug delivery employs drug-encapsulating devices from which therapeutic agents may be released at controlled rates for long periods of time, ranging from days to months. Such systems offer numerous advantages over traditional methods of drug delivery, including tailoring of drug release rates, protection of fragile drugs and increased patient comfort and compliance. Polymeric microspheres are ideal vehicles for many controlled delivery applications due to their ability to encapsulate a variety of drugs, biocompatibility, high bioavailability and sustained drug release characteristics. Research discussed in this review is focused on improving large-scale manufacturing, maintaining drug stability and enhancing control of drug release rates. This paper describes methods of microparticle fabrication and the major factors controlling the release rates of encapsulated drugs. Furthermore, recent advances in the use of polymer microsphere-based systems for delivery of single-shot vaccines, plasmid DNA and therapeutic proteins are discussed, as well as some future directions of microsphere research. PMID:14680467

  3. Nanoparticle mediated non-covalent drug delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Doane, Tennyson; Burda, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) for enhanced drug delivery has been heavily explored during the last decade. Within the field, it is has become increasingly apparent that the physical properties of the particles themselves dictate their efficacy, and the relevant non-covalent chemistry at the NP interface also influences how drugs are immobilized and delivered. In this review, we reflect on the physical chemistry of NP mediated drug delivery (and more specifically, non-covalent drug delivery) at the three main experimental stages of drug loading, NP–drug conjugate transport, and the resulting cellular drug delivery. Through a critical evaluation of advances in drug delivery within the last decade, an outlook for biomedical applications of nanoscale transport vectors will be presented. PMID:22664231

  4. The rise and rise of drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Howard Rosen; Thierry Abribat

    2005-01-01

    Drug delivery has typically focused on optimizing marketed compounds, improving their effectiveness or tolerability, and simplifying their administration. This role now includes the first biopharmaceuticals as well as more conventional drugs. As drug-delivery technologies come into play earlier in the development cycle, however, they can also enhance the screening and evaluation of new compounds and 'rescue' failed compounds, such as

  5. Physically facilitating drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Devora, Jorge I; Ambure, Sunny; Shi, Zhi-Dong; Yuan, Yuyu; Sun, Wei; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Facilitated/modulated drug-delivery systems have emerged as a possible solution for delivery of drugs of interest to pre-allocated sites at predetermined doses for predefined periods of time. Over the past decade, the use of different physical methods and mechanisms to mediate drug release and delivery has grown significantly. This emerging area of research has important implications for development of new therapeutic drugs for efficient treatments. This review aims to introduce and describe different modalities of physically facilitating drug-delivery systems that are currently in use for cancer and other diseases therapy. In particular, delivery methods based on ultrasound, electrical, magnetic and photo modulations are highlighted. Current uses and areas of improvement for these different physically facilitating drug-delivery systems are discussed. Furthermore, the main advantages and drawbacks of these technologies reviewed are compared. The review ends with a speculative viewpoint of how research is expected to evolve in the upcoming years. PMID:22485192

  6. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  7. CCMR: Controlled Drug Delivery From New Biomaterials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rhodes, Steven D.

    2005-08-17

    The development of controlled release systems for drug delivery is an area that has generated considerable research interest over the past decade. Biodegradable polymers, which degrade naturally via hydrolysis or enzymatic digestion, have demonstrated great potential for use in the preparation of controlled drug delivery systems. Biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems hold several distinct advantages over more conventional oral and inhalation routes, including enhanced site specificity of drug delivery, reduced side effects, improved patient compliance, and greater overall efficacy. The primary objective of this work was to synthesize biodegradable polyesters based on a locked dimer of dihydroxyacetone (DHA).

  8. Drug delivery systems: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Sriwastawa, Birendra; Bhati, L; Pandey, S; Pandey, P; Bannerjee, Saurabh K

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. For the treatment of human diseases, nasal and pulmonary routes of drug delivery are gaining increasing importance. These routes provide promising alternatives to parenteral drug delivery particularly for peptide and protein therapeutics. For this purpose, several drug delivery systems have been formulated and are being investigated for nasal and pulmonary delivery. These include liposomes, proliposomes, microspheres, gels, prodrugs, cyclodextrins, among others. Nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers show assurance in fulfilling the stringent requirements placed on these delivery systems, such as ability to be transferred into an aerosol, stability against forces generated during aerosolization, biocompatibility, targeting of specific sites or cell populations in the lung, release of the drug in a predetermined manner, and degradation within an acceptable period of time. PMID:23071954

  9. Nanoparticulate systems for brain delivery of drugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jörg Kreuter

    2001-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) represents an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of drugs, including antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, and a variety of central nervous system (CNS)-active drugs, especially neuropeptides. One of the possibilities to overcome this barrier is a drug delivery to the brain using nanoparticles. Drugs that have successfully been transported into the brain using this carrier include the

  10. pH-responsive micelles based on (PCL)2(PDEA-b-PPEGMA)2 miktoarm polymer: controlled synthesis, characterization, and application as anticancer drug carrier

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amphiphilic A2(BC)2 miktoarm star polymers [poly(?-caprolactone)]2-[poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-b- poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)]2 [(PCL)2(PDEA-b-PPEGMA)2] were developed by a combination of ring opening polymerization (ROP) and continuous activators regenerated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET ATRP). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) values were extremely low (0.0024 to 0.0043 mg/mL), depending on the architecture of the polymers. The self-assembled empty and doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles were spherical in morphologies, and the average sizes were about 63 and 110 nm. The release of DOX at pH 5.0 was much faster than that at pH 6.5 and pH 7.4. Moreover, DOX-loaded micelles could effectively inhibit the growth of cancer cells HepG2 with IC50 of 2.0 ?g/mL. Intracellular uptake demonstrated that DOX was delivered into the cells effectively after the cells were incubated with DOX-loaded micelles. Therefore, the pH-sensitive (PCL)2(PDEA-b-PPEGMA)2 micelles could be a prospective candidate as anticancer drug carrier for hydrophobic drugs with sustained release behavior. PMID:24936159

  11. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  12. Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems: Strategy for Improving Oral Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing-ling Tang; Jin Sun; Zhong-Gui He

    2007-01-01

    Drugs are most often administered by the oral route. However, more than 40% of new chemical entities exhibit poor aqueous solubility, resulting in unsatisfactory oral drug delivery. Recently, much attention has been focused on self- emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly aqueous soluble drugs. SEDDS are isotropic mixtures of oil, surfactants, solvents and co-solvents\\/surfactants.

  13. Intravenous drug delivery in neonates: lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Medlicott, Natalie J; Reith, David M; Broadbent, Roland S

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous drug administration presents a series of challenges that relate to the pathophysiology of the neonate and intravenous infusion systems in neonates. These challenges arise from slow intravenous flow rates, small drug volume, dead space volume and limitations on the flush volume in neonates. While there is a reasonable understanding of newborn pharmacokinetics, an appreciation of the substantial delay and variability in the rate of drug delivery from the intravenous line is often lacking. This can lead to difficulties in accurately determining the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of drugs in the smallest patients. The physical variables that affect the passage of drugs through neonatal lines need to be further explored in order to improve our understanding of their impact on the delivery of drugs by this route in neonates. Through careful investigation, the underlying causes of delayed drug delivery may be identified and administration protocols can then be modified to ensure predictable, appropriate drug input kinetics. PMID:24482352

  14. Colloidal microgels in drug delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal microgels have recently received attention as environmentally responsive systems and now are increasingly used in applications as carriers for therapeutic drugs and diagnostic agents. Synthetic microgels consist of a crosslinked polymer network that provides a depot for loaded drugs, protection against environmental hazards and template for post-synthetic modification or vectorization of the drug carriers. The aim of this manuscript is to review recent attempts to develop new microgel formulations for oral drug delivery, to design metal-containing microgels for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and to advance approaches including the systemic administration of microgels. Novel nanogel drug delivery systems developed in the authors’ laboratory are discussed in details including aspects of their synthesis, vectorization and recent applications for encapsulation of low molecular weight drugs or formulation of biological macromolecules. The findings reviewed here are encouraging for further development of the nanogels as intelligent drug carriers with such features as targeted delivery and triggered drug release. PMID:17168773

  15. Nanomedicine and drug delivery: a mini review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Agha Zeeshan; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    The field of nanotechnology now has pivotal roles in electronics, biology and medicine. Its application can be appraised, as it involves the materials to be designed at atomic and molecular level. Due to the advantage of their size, nanospheres have been shown to be robust drug delivery systems and may be useful for encapsulating drugs and enabling more precise targeting with a controlled release. In this review specifically, we highlight the recent advances of this technology for medicine and drug delivery systems.

  16. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Sarabjeet Singh; Fenniri, Hicham; Singh, Baljit

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles hold tremendous potential as an effective drug delivery system. In this review we discussed recent developments in nanotechnology for drug delivery. To overcome the problems of gene and drug delivery, nanotechnology has gained interest in recent years. Nanosystems with different compositions and biological properties have been extensively investigated for drug and gene delivery applications. To achieve efficient drug delivery it is important to understand the interactions of nanomaterials with the biological environment, targeting cell-surface receptors, drug release, multiple drug administration, stability of therapeutic agents and molecular mechanisms of cell signalling involved in pathobiology of the disease under consideration. Several anti-cancer drugs including paclitaxel, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and dexamethasone have been successfully formulated using nanomaterials. Quantom dots, chitosan, Polylactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) and PLGA-based nanoparticles have also been used for in vitro RNAi delivery. Brain cancer is one of the most difficult malignancies to detect and treat mainly because of the difficulty in getting imaging and therapeutic agents past the blood-brain barrier and into the brain. Anti-cancer drugs such as loperamide and doxorubicin bound to nanomaterials have been shown to cross the intact blood-brain barrier and released at therapeutic concentrations in the brain. The use of nanomaterials including peptide-based nanotubes to target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor and cell adhesion molecules like integrins, cadherins and selectins, is a new approach to control disease progression. PMID:18053152

  17. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Abuhano?lu, Gürhan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (?) and beta (?) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by ? irradiation. PMID:24936306

  18. PLGA: a unique polymer for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Deepak N; Bhatia, Amit; Kaur, Ripandeep; Sharma, Ruchi; Kaur, Gurvinder; Dhawan, Sanju

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers have played an important role in the delivery of drugs in a controlled and targeted manner. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) is one of the extensively researched synthetic biodegradable polymers due to its favorable properties. It is also known as a 'Smart Polymer' due to its stimuli sensitive behavior. A wide range of PLGA-based drug delivery systems have been reported for the treatment or diagnosis of various diseases and disorders. The present review provides an overview of the chemistry, physicochemical properties, biodegradation behavior, evaluation parameters and applications of PLGA in drug delivery. Different drug-polymer combinations developed into drug delivery or carrier systems are enumerated and discussed. PMID:25565440

  19. Development of Controlled Release Drug Delivery Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming Li

    2002-01-01

    The newly emerged biotechnology of liposome-based drug delivery has drawn great interest in research and pharmaceuticals. Lipsomes are potential candidates to carry highly toxic drugs to target cells in order to minimize the damage to normal cells and side effects. In the past two decades, extensive work has improved the stability of phospholipid lipsomes in physiological fluids as drug carriers.

  20. Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles as drug delivery devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kumaresh S Soppimath; Tejraj M Aminabhavi; Anandrao R Kulkarni; Walter E Rudzinski

    2001-01-01

    This review presents the most outstanding contributions in the field of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles used as drug delivery systems. Methods of preparation, drug loading and drug release are covered. The most important findings on surface modification methods as well as surface characterization are covered from 1990 through mid-2000.

  1. Electrospun nanofibers in oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ignatious, Francis; Sun, Linghong; Lee, Chao-Pin; Baldoni, John

    2010-04-01

    In order to enhance the delivery of drugs with limited absorption due to poor solubility/dissolution, approaches are being developed to improve the dissolution rates and solubility of drug molecules. These approaches include identification of water-soluble salts of parent drugs, preparation of stable amorphous drug formulations, inclusion of solubility-enhancing agents in the dosage form, and particle size reduction. Technologies to reduce drug particle size to sub-micrometer range are being applied to product development more frequently. Electrospinning is being considered as one of the technologies which can produce nanosized drugs incorporated in polymeric nanofibers. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that the release rates of drugs from these nanofiber formulations are enhanced compared to those from original drug substance. This technology has the potential to be used for enhancing the oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs. PMID:20143253

  2. Lipid nanoparticles for dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kakadia, Pratibha G; Conway, Barbara R

    2015-01-01

    Lipid based drug delivery systems have been widely studied and reported over the past decade and offer a useful alternative to other colloidal drug delivery systems. Skin is a popular route of drug delivery for locally and systemically acting drugs and nanoparticles are reported as a potential formulation strategy for dermal delivery. Although the skin acts as a natural physical barrier against penetration of foreign materials, including particulates, opportunities exist for the delivery of therapeutic nanoparticles, especially in diseased and damaged skin and via appendageal routes such as the openings of hair follicles. The extent and ability of nanoparticles to penetrate into the underlying viable tissue is still the subject of debate although recent studies have identified the follicular route as the most likely route of entry; this influences the potential applications of these dosage forms as a drug delivery strategy. This paper reviews present state of art of lipid-based nanocarriers focussing on solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers and nanoemulsions, their production methods, potential advantages and applications in dermal drug delivery. PMID:25925115

  3. Recent advances in ophthalmic drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kompella, Uday B; Kadam, Rajendra S; Lee, Vincent HL

    2011-01-01

    Topical ocular drug bioavailability is notoriously poor, in the order of 5% or less. This is a consequence of effective multiple barriers to drug entry, comprising nasolacrimal drainage, epithelial drug transport barriers and clearance from the vasculature in the conjunctiva. While sustained drug delivery to the back of the eye is now feasible with intravitreal implants such as Vitrasert™ (~6 months), Retisert™ (~3 years) and Iluvien™ (~3 years), currently there are no marketed delivery systems for long-term drug delivery to the anterior segment of the eye. The purpose of this article is to summarize the resurgence in interest to prolong and improve drug entry from topical administration. These approaches include mucoadhesives, viscous polymer vehicles, transporter-targeted prodrug design, receptor-targeted functionalized nanoparticles, iontophoresis, punctal plug and contact lens delivery systems. A few of these delivery systems might be useful in treating diseases affecting the back of the eye. Their effectiveness will be compared against intravitreal implants (upper bound of effectiveness) and trans-scleral systems (lower bound of effectiveness). Refining the animal model by incorporating the latest advances in microdialysis and imaging technology is key to expanding the knowledge central to the design, testing and evaluation of the next generation of innovative ocular drug delivery systems. PMID:21399724

  4. Chitosan Microspheres in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Analava; Dey, Baishakhi

    2011-01-01

    The main aim in the drug therapy of any disease is to attain the desired therapeutic concentration of the drug in plasma or at the site of action and maintain it for the entire duration of treatment. A drug on being used in conventional dosage forms leads to unavoidable fluctuations in the drug concentration leading to under medication or overmedication and increased frequency of dose administration as well as poor patient compliance. To minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase drug bioavailability various drug delivery and drug targeting systems are currently under development. Handling the treatment of severe disease conditions has necessitated the development of innovative ideas to modify drug delivery techniques. Drug targeting means delivery of the drug-loaded system to the site of interest. Drug carrier systems include polymers, micelles, microcapsules, liposomes and lipoproteins to name some. Different polymer carriers exert different effects on drug delivery. Synthetic polymers are usually non-biocompatible, non-biodegradable and expensive. Natural polymers such as chitin and chitosan are devoid of such problems. Chitosan comes from the deacetylation of chitin, a natural biopolymer originating from crustacean shells. Chitosan is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic natural polymer with excellent film-forming ability. Being of cationic character, chitosan is able to react with polyanions giving rise to polyelectrolyte complexes. Hence chitosan has become a promising natural polymer for the preparation of microspheres/nanospheres and microcapsules. The techniques employed to microencapsulate with chitosan include ionotropic gelation, spray drying, emulsion phase separation, simple and complex coacervation. This review focuses on the preparation, characterization of chitosan microspheres and their role in novel drug delivery systems. PMID:22707817

  5. Synthetic micro/nanomotors in drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Nanomachines offer considerable promise for the treatment of diseases. The ability of man-made nanomotors to rapidly deliver therapeutic payloads to their target destination represents a novel nanomedicine approach. Synthetic nanomotors, based on a multitude of propulsion mechanisms, have been developed over the past decade toward diverse biomedical applications. In this review article, we journey from the use of chemically powered drug-delivery nanovehicles to externally actuated (fuel-free) drug-delivery nanomachine platforms, and conclude with future prospects and challenges for such practical propelling drug-delivery systems. As future micro/nanomachines become more powerful and functional, these tiny devices are expected to perform more demanding biomedical tasks and benefit different drug delivery applications.

  6. Fabrication of drug delivery MEMS devices

    E-print Network

    Lei, Wang S

    2007-01-01

    There is considerable amount of interest in the immediate treatment of personnel involved in high risk situations on the battlefield. A novel approach to drug delivery on the battlefield based on MEMS technology is discussed. ...

  7. Synthetic micro/nanomotors in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Joseph

    2014-09-21

    Nanomachines offer considerable promise for the treatment of diseases. The ability of man-made nanomotors to rapidly deliver therapeutic payloads to their target destination represents a novel nanomedicine approach. Synthetic nanomotors, based on a multitude of propulsion mechanisms, have been developed over the past decade toward diverse biomedical applications. In this review article, we journey from the use of chemically powered drug-delivery nanovehicles to externally actuated (fuel-free) drug-delivery nanomachine platforms, and conclude with future prospects and challenges for such practical propelling drug-delivery systems. As future micro/nanomachines become more powerful and functional, these tiny devices are expected to perform more demanding biomedical tasks and benefit different drug delivery applications. PMID:25096021

  8. [Progression of drug delivery system for glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Lyu, Liu

    2014-12-01

    Reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) by drugs is a major treatment for glaucoma. Clinically, diverse antiglaucoma drugs take effect to decrease the IOP through different mechanisms.However, due to limitations of traditional form of eye drops, the bioavailability of the drug and the patient compliance is lowered, the clinical efficacy is not good and also some toxic and side-effects come out.Otherwise, traditional medication is not suitable for neuroprotective drugs to work on both retina and optic nerve. Drug delivery system has the potential to improve the bioavailability of the drug, prolong the time of drug action, decrease the dosage and frequency of drugs, reduce the side-effects, and improve the patient compliance and efficacy.It is one of the most important studies in glaucoma medication development because it is valuable for patients' neuroprotection.Nowadays, several novel delivery systems have been designed. This review will focus on the progressions of some of the sustained-release antiglaucoma eye drops, polymeric gels, colloidal systems, membrane-controlled drug delivery system, ocular implants, and transscleral drug delivery systems. PMID:25619186

  9. Transdermal drug delivery system: patent reviews.

    PubMed

    Samad, Abdus; Ullah, Zabih; Alam, Mohammad I; Wais, Mohd; Shams, Mohammad Shabaz

    2009-06-01

    Transdermal drug delivery represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of novel drug delivery. Although the concept of transdermal drug delivery has been known since 1924, it took until 1979, as FDA approved the transdermal delivery of scopolamine, that transdermal delivery systems [TDDS] received broad attention as novel tool for controlled release. These drug delivery systems are designed for controlled release of drug through the skin into systemic circulation maintaining consistent efficacy and reducing dose of the drug and its related side effects. More than 200 patents have been granted by the United State patent alone, of which more than 35 TDD products have now been approved for sale in the US, and approximately 16 active ingredients have been approved for use globally. Statistics reveal a market of $ 12.7 billion in the year 2005 which is expected to increase by $ 21.5 billion in the year 2010 and $ 31.5 billion in the year 2015. Almost all major and minor pharmaceutical companies are developing TDDS. There is not a single review article which describes patents on different types of TDDS. Thus this review is designed for patents on the different type of TDDS which would be helpful for the researcher in the field of TDDS. PMID:19519574

  10. Microneedles for drug and vaccine delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Microneedles were first conceptualized for drug delivery many decades ago, but only became the subject of significant research starting in the mid-1990’s when microfabrication technology enabled their manufacture as (i) solid microneedles for skin pretreatment to increase skin permeability, (ii) microneedles coated with drug that dissolves off in the skin, (iii) polymer microneedles that encapsulate drug and fully dissolve in the skin and (iv) hollow microneedles for drug infusion into the skin. As shown in more than 350 papers now published in the field, microneedles have been used to deliver a broad range of different low molecular weight drugs, biotherapeutics and vaccines, including published human studies with a number of small-molecule and protein drugs and vaccines. Influenza vaccination using a hollow microneedle is in widespread clinical use and a number of solid microneedle products are sold for cosmetic purposes. In addition to applications in the skin, microneedles have also been adapted for delivery of bioactives into the eye and into cells. Successful application of microneedles depends on device function that facilitates microneedle insertion and possible infusion into skin, skin recovery after microneedle removal, and drug stability during manufacturing, storage and delivery, and on patient outcomes, including lack of pain, skin irritation and skin infection, in addition to drug efficacy and safety. Building off a strong technology base and multiple demonstrations of successful drug delivery, microneedles are poised to advance further into clinical practice to enable better pharmaceutical therapies, vaccination and other applications. PMID:22575858

  11. Progress in antiretroviral drug delivery using nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mallipeddi, Rama; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2010-01-01

    There are currently a number of antiretroviral drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). More recently, antiretrovirals are being evaluated in the clinic for prevention of HIV infection. Due to the challenging nature of treatment and prevention of this disease, the use of nanocarriers to achieve more efficient delivery of antiretroviral drugs has been studied. Various forms of nanocarriers, such as nanoparticles (polymeric, inorganic, and solid lipid), liposomes, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, cyclodextrins, and cell-based nanoformulations have been studied for delivery of drugs intended for HIV prevention or therapy. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the application of nanocarrier systems to the delivery of anti-HIV drugs, specifically antiretrovirals. For anti-HIV drugs to be effective, adequate distribution to specific sites in the body must be achieved, and effective drug concentrations must be maintained at those sites for the required period of time. Nanocarriers provide a means to overcome cellular and anatomical barriers to drug delivery. Their application in the area of HIV prevention and therapy may lead to the development of more effective drug products for combating this pandemic disease. PMID:20957115

  12. Capillary Physiology and Drug Delivery in Central

    E-print Network

    Timmer, Jens

    Capillary Physiology and Drug Delivery in Central Nervous System Lymphomas Peter C. Warnke, MD,1 permeability surface product was found to be significantly increased in central nervous system lym- phomas- and lipid-soluble drugs in primary central nervous system lymphomas. Ann Neurol 2005;57:136­139 Primary

  13. Refilling drug delivery depots through the blood

    PubMed Central

    Brudno, Yevgeny; Silva, Eduardo A.; Kearney, Cathal J.; Lewin, Sarah A.; Miller, Alex; Martinick, Kathleen D.; Aizenberg, Michael; Mooney, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Local drug delivery depots have significant clinical utility, but there is currently no noninvasive technique to refill these systems once their payload is exhausted. Inspired by the ability of nanotherapeutics to target specific tissues, we hypothesized that blood-borne drug payloads could be modified to home to and refill hydrogel drug delivery systems. To address this possibility, hydrogels were modified with oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that provide a target for drug payloads in the form of free alginate strands carrying complementary ODNs. Coupling ODNs to alginate strands led to specific binding to complementary-ODN–carrying alginate gels in vitro and to injected gels in vivo. When coupled to a drug payload, sequence-targeted refilling of a delivery depot consisting of intratumor hydrogels completely abrogated tumor growth. These results suggest a new paradigm for nanotherapeutic drug delivery, and this concept is expected to have applications in refilling drug depots in cancer therapy, wound healing, and drug-eluting vascular grafts and stents. PMID:25139997

  14. A wireless actuating drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Won-Jun; Baek, Seung-Ki; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2015-04-01

    A wireless actuating drug delivery system was devised. The system is based on induction heating for drug delivery. In this study, thermally generated nitrogen gas produced by induction heating of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) was utilized for pressure-driven release of the drug. The delivery device consists of an actuator chamber, a drug reservoir, and a microchannel. A semicircular copper disc (5 and 6?mm in diameter and 100?µm thick), and thermal conductive tape were integrated as the heating element in the actuator chamber. The final device was 2.7?mm thick. 28?µl of drug solution were placed in the reservoir and the device released the drug quickly at the rate of 6?µl?s?1 by induction heating at 160?µT of magnetic intensity. The entire drug solution was released and dispersed after subcutaneous implantation under identical experimental condition. This study demonstrates that the device was simply prepared and drug delivery could be achieved by wireless actuation of a thin, pressure-driven actuator.

  15. Polymethacrylate Microparticles Gel for Topical Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hagar Ibrahim Labouta; Labiba K. El-Khordagui

    2010-01-01

    Purpose  Evaluating the potentials of particulate delivery systems in topical drug delivery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Polymethacrylate microparticles (MPs) incorporating verapamil hydrochloride (VRP) as a model hydrophilic drug with potential\\u000a topical clinical uses, using Eudragit RS100 and Eudragit L100 were prepared for the formulation of a composite topical gel.\\u000a The effect of initial drug loading, polymer composition, particularly the proportion of Eudragit L100 as an

  16. Drug Formulation / Drug Delivery Raj Suryanarayanan (Sury)

    E-print Network

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    of rodents Disease induction in animal models (e.g. cancer) #12;1. Drug solubilization through engineering of biophysical properties ofp y p p endogenous macromolecules and their transport across the cellular barriers soluble drugs AntiAnti angiogenic therapy for ovarian cancerangiogenic therapy for ovarian cancer

  17. Oral drug delivery research in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mrsny, Randall J

    2012-07-20

    The oral delivery of drugs is considered by decision-makers in the pharmaceutical industry to be the most appealing route of administration. This belief has led to the identification of many very successful drugs, but also to the downfall of some promising therapeutics that failed to meet criteria required for sufficient oral bioavailability. Efforts to correct these deficiencies have led to a plethora of creative strategies to overcome the physical, chemical, and biological barriers that limit the efficient and consistent delivery of drugs that are not readily absorbed following oral administration. The goal of this perspective is to describe these barriers to oral drug delivery in relation to some of the work currently being undertaken by the community of European scientists. This perspective is not intended to be inclusive and the author apologizes in advance to the many scientists working in Europe whose recent work was not included. PMID:22342473

  18. Nanoparticles for drug delivery to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jean C; Pulliam, Brian L; Edwards, David A

    2007-12-01

    The lungs are an attractive route for non-invasive drug delivery with advantages for both systemic and local applications. Incorporating therapeutics with polymeric nanoparticles offers additional degrees of manipulation for delivery systems, providing sustained release and the ability to target specific cells and organs. However, nanoparticle delivery to the lungs has many challenges including formulation instability due to particle-particle interactions and poor delivery efficiency due to exhalation of low-inertia nanoparticles. Thus, novel methods formulating nanoparticles into the form of micron-scale dry powders have been developed. These carrier particles exhibit improved handling and delivery, while releasing nanoparticles upon deposition in the lungs. This review covers the development of nanoparticle formulations for pulmonary delivery as both individual nanoparticles and encapsulated within carrier particles. PMID:17997181

  19. Advances in Biodegradable Ocular Drug Delivery Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan S. Lee; Patrick Hughes; Aron D. Ross; Michael R. Robinson

    \\u000a The limitations of existing medical therapies for ocular disorders include low drug bioavailability, nonspecificity, side\\u000a effects, and poor treatment adherence to therapy. These limitations may be overcome through the use of sustained-release intraocular\\u000a drug delivery systems. Critical to the development of such systems has been the introduction of biocompatible polymers (biodegradable\\u000a and nonbiodegradable) that allow for drug release kinetics to

  20. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  1. Ultrasonic Drug Delivery – A General Review

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, William G.; Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Staples, Bryant J.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has an ever-increasing role in the delivery of therapeutic agents including genetic material, proteins, and chemotherapeutic agents. Cavitating gas bodies such as microbubbles are the mediators through which the energy of relatively non-interactive pressure waves is concentrated to produce forces that permeabilize cell membranes and disrupt the vesicles that carry drugs. Thus the presence of microbubbles enormously enhances delivery of genetic material, proteins and smaller chemical agents. Delivery of genetic material is greatly enhanced by ultrasound in the presence of microbubbles. Attaching the DNA directly to the microbubbles or to gas-containing liposomes enhances gene uptake even further. US-enhanced gene delivery has been studied in various tissues including cardiac, vascular, skeletal muscle, tumor and even fetal tissue. US-enhanced delivery of proteins has found most application in transdermal delivery of insulin. Cavitation events reversibly disrupt the structure of the stratus corneum to allow transport of these large molecules. Other hormones and small proteins could also be delivered transdermally. Small chemotherapeutic molecules are delivered in research settings from micelles and liposomes exposed to ultrasound. Cavitation appears to play two roles: it disrupts the structure of the carrier vesicle and releases the drug; it also makes the cell membranes and capillaries more permeable to drugs. There remains a need to better understand the physics of cavitation of microbubbles and the impact that such cavitation has upon cells and drug-carrying vesicles. PMID:16296719

  2. Nanoliposomal minocycline for ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, James M.; Imai, Hisanori; Haakenson, Jeremy K.; Brucklacher, Robert M.; Fox, Todd E.; Shanmugavelandy, Sriram S.; Unrath, Kellee A.; Pedersen, Michelle M.; Dai, Pingqi; Freeman, Willard M.; Bronson, Sarah K.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Kester, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Nanoliposomal technology is a promising drug delivery system that could be employed to improve the pharmacokinetic properties of clearance and distribution in ocular drug delivery to the retina. We developed a nanoscale version of an anionic, cholesterol-fusing liposome that can encapsulate therapeutic levels of minocycline capable of drug delivery. We demonstrate that size extrusion followed by size-exclusion chromatography can form a stable 80-nm liposome that encapsulates minocycline at a concentration of 450 ± 30 ?M, which is 2% to 3% of loading material. More importantly, these nontoxic nanoliposomes can then deliver 40% of encapsulated minocycline to the retina after a subconjunctival injection in the STZ model of diabetes. Efficacy of therapeutic drug delivery was assessed via transcriptomic and proteomic biomarker panels. For both the free minocycline and encapsulated minocycline treatments, proinflammatory markers of diabetes were downregulated at both the messenger RNA and protein levels, validating the utility of biomarker panels for the assessment of ocular drug delivery vehicles. PMID:22465498

  3. Engineered Polymers for Advanced Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungwon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Jeon, Oju; Kwon, Ick Chan; Park, Kinam

    2009-01-01

    Engineered polymers have been utilized for developing advanced drug delivery systems. The development of such polymers has caused advances in polymer chemistry, which, in turn, has resulted in smart polymers that can respond to changes in environmental condition, such as temperature, pH, and biomolecules. The responses vary widely from swelling/deswelling to degradation. Drug-polymer conjugates and drug-containing nano/micro-particles have been used for drug targeting. Engineered polymers and polymeric systems have also been used in new areas, such as molecular imaging as well as in nanotechnology. This review examines the engineered polymers that have been used as traditional drug delivery and as more recent applications in nanotechnology. PMID:18977434

  4. Genetically engineered nanocarriers for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Pu; Gustafson, Joshua A; MacKay, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxicity, low water solubility, rapid clearance from circulation, and off-target side-effects are common drawbacks of conventional small-molecule drugs. To overcome these shortcomings, many multifunctional nanocarriers have been proposed to enhance drug delivery. In concept, multifunctional nanoparticles might carry multiple agents, control release rate, biodegrade, and utilize target-mediated drug delivery; however, the design of these particles presents many challenges at the stage of pharmaceutical development. An emerging solution to improve control over these particles is to turn to genetic engineering. Genetically engineered nanocarriers are precisely controlled in size and structure and can provide specific control over sites for chemical attachment of drugs. Genetically engineered drug carriers that assemble nanostructures including nanoparticles and nanofibers can be polymeric or non-polymeric. This review summarizes the recent development of applications in drug and gene delivery utilizing nanostructures of polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polypeptides, and silk-elastin-like protein polymers, and non-polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as vault proteins and viral proteins. PMID:24741309

  5. Nanoparticles in the ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yan; Hao, Ji-Long; Wang, Shuang; Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Wen-Song

    2013-01-01

    Ocular drug transport barriers pose a challenge for drug delivery comprising the ocular surface epithelium, the tear film and internal barriers of the blood-aqueous and blood-retina barriers. Ocular drug delivery efficiency depends on the barriers and the clearance from the choroidal, conjunctival vessels and lymphatic. Traditional drug administration reduces the clinical efficacy especially for poor water soluble molecules and for the posterior segment of the eye. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been designed to overcome the barriers, increase the drug penetration at the target site and prolong the drug levels by few internals of drug administrations in lower doses without any toxicity compared to the conventional eye drops. With the aid of high specificity and multifunctionality, DNA NPs can be resulted in higher transfection efficiency for gene therapy. NPs could target at cornea, retina and choroid by surficial applications and intravitreal injection. This review is concerned with recent findings and applications of NPs drug delivery systems for the treatment of different eye diseases. PMID:23826539

  6. Functional Cyclodextrin Polyrotaxanes for Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Nobuhiko; Katoono, Ryo; Yamashita, Atsushi

    The mobility of cyclodextrins (CDs) threaded onto a linear polymeric chain and the dethreading of the CDs from the chain are the most fascinating features seen in polyrotaxanes. These structural characteristics are very promising for their possible applications in drug delivery. Enhanced multivalent interaction between ligand-receptor systems by using ligand-conjugated polyrotaxanes would be just one of the excellent properties related to the CD mobility. Gene delivery using cytocleavable polyrotaxanes is a more practical but highly crucial issue in drug delivery. Complexation of the polyrotaxanes with DNA and its intracellular DNA release ingeniously utilizes both CD mobility and polyrotaxane dissociation to achieve effective gene delivery. Such a supramolecular approach using CD-containing polyrotaxanes is expected to exploit a new paradigm of biomaterials.

  7. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, Marcel R; Klibanov, Alexander L; Tiemann, Klaus; Hall, Christopher S; Gruell, Holger; Steinbach, Oliver C

    2009-05-01

    The integration of therapeutic interventions with diagnostic imaging has been recognized as one of the next technological developments that will have a major impact on medical treatments. Important advances in this field are based on a combination of progress in guiding and monitoring ultrasound energy, novel drug classes becoming available, the development of smart delivery vehicles, and more in depth understanding of the mechanisms of the cellular and molecular basis of diseases. Recent research demonstrates that both pressure sensitive and temperature sensitive delivery systems hold promise for local treatment. The use of ultrasound for the delivery of drugs has been demonstrated in particular the field of cardiology and oncology for a variety of therapeutics ranging from small drug molecules to biologics and nucleic acids. PMID:19272727

  8. Light induced drug delivery into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Adar, Lily; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2011-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargoes, including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. However, the cationic nature of all CPP sequences, and thus lack of cell specificity, limits their in vivo use for drug delivery applications. Here, we have devised and tested a strategy for site-specific delivery of dyes and drugs into cancer cells by using polymers bearing a light activated caged CPP (cCPP). The positive charge of Lys residues on the minimum sequence of the CPP penetratin ((52)RRMKWKK(58)) was masked with photo-cleavable groups to minimize non-specific adsorption and cellular uptake. Once illuminated by UV light, these protecting groups were cleaved, the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the polymer-dye or polymer-drug conjugates into cancer cells. We have found that a 10-min light illumination time was sufficient to enhance the penetration of the polymer-CPP conjugates bearing the proapoptotic peptide, (D)(KLAKLAK)(2), into 80% of the target cells, and to promote a 'switch' like cytotoxic activity resulting a shift from 100% to 10% in cell viability after 2 h. This report provides an example for tumor targeting by means of light activation of cell-penetrating peptides for intracellular drug delivery. PMID:21074848

  9. Plasmon resonant liposomes for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knights-Mitchell, Shellie S.; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Nanotechnology use in drug delivery promotes a reduction in systemic toxicity, improved pharmacokinetics, and better drug bioavailability. Liposomes continue to be extensively researched as drug delivery systems (DDS) with formulations such as Doxil® and Ambisome® approved by FDA and successfully marketed in the United States. However, the limited ability to precisely control release of active ingredients from these vesicles continues to challenge the broad implementation of this technology. Moreover, the full potential of the carrier to sequester drugs until it can reach its intended target has yet to be realized. Here, we describe a liposomal DDS that releases therapeutic doses of an anticancer drug in response to external stimulus. Earlier, we introduced degradable plasmon resonant liposomes. These constructs, obtained by reducing gold on the liposome surface, facilitate spatial and temporal release of drugs upon laser light illumination that ultimately induces an increase in temperature. In this work, plasmon resonant liposomes have been developed to stably encapsulate and retain doxorubicin at physiological conditions represented by isotonic saline at 37o C and pH 7.4. Subsequently, they are stimulated to release contents either by a 5o C increase in temperature or by laser illumination (760 nm and 88 mW/cm2 power density). Successful development of degradable plasmon resonant liposomes responsive to near-infrared light or moderate hyperthermia can provide a new delivery method for multiple lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs with pharmacokinetic profiles that limit clinical utility.

  10. Nanofibrillar cellulose films for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Peltonen, Leena; Laukkanen, Antti; Hirvonen, Jouni; Laaksonen, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) (also referred to as cellulose nanofibers, nanocellulose, microfibrillated, or nanofibrillated cellulose) has gotten recent and wide attention in various research areas. Here, we report the application of nanofibrillar cellulose as a matrix-former material for long-lasting (up to three months) sustained drug delivery. Film-like matrix systems with drug loadings between 20% and 40% were produced by a filtration method. This simple production method had an entrapment efficacy>90% and offers a possibility for the film thickness adjustment as well as applicability in the incorporation of heat sensitive compounds. The films had excellent mechanical properties suitable for easy handling and shape tailoring of the drug release systems. They were characterized in terms of the internal morphology, and the physical state of the encapsulated drug. The drug release was assessed by dissolution tests, and suitable mathematical models were used to explain the releasing kinetics. The drug release was sustained for a three month period with very close to zero-order kinetics. It is assumed that the nanofibrillar cellulose film sustains the drug release by forming a tight fiber network around the incorporated drug entities. The results indicate that the nanofibrillar cellulose is a highly promising new material for sustained release drug delivery applications. PMID:22750440

  11. Thermosensitive polymeric hydrogels as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Gong, C; Qi, T; Wei, X; Qu, Y; Wu, Q; Luo, F; Qian, Z

    2013-01-01

    Thermosensitive hydrogels are very important biomaterials used in drug delivery systems (DDSs), which gained increasing attention of researchers. Thermosensitive hydrogels have great potential in various applications, such as drug delivery, cell encapsulation, tissue engineering, and etc. Especially, injectable thermosensitive hydrogels with lower sol-gel transition temperature around physiological temperature have been extensively studied. By in vivo injection, the hydrogels formed non-flowing gel at body temperature. Upon incorporation of pharmaceutical agents, the hydrogel systems could act as sustained drug release depot in situ. Injectable thermosensitive hydrogel systems have a number of advantages, including simplicity of drug formulation, protective environment for drugs, prolonged and localized drug delivery, and ease of application. The objective of this review is to summarize fundamentals, applications, and recent advances of injectable thermosensitive hydrogel as DDSs, including chitosan and related derivatives, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based (PNIPAAM) copolymers, poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide) (PEO/PPO) copolymers and its derivatives, and poly(ethylene glycol)/ biodegradable polyester copolymers. PMID:23092130

  12. ENDOCYTIC MECHANISMS FOR TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Bareford, Lisa M.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the delivery of targeted drug systems have evolved to enable highly regulated site specific localization to subcellular organelles. Targeting therapeutics to individual intracellular compartments has resulted in benefits to therapies associated with these unique organelles. Endocytosis, a mechanism common to all cells in the body, internalizes macromolecules and retains them in transport vesicles which traffic along the endolysosomal scaffold. An array of vesicular internalization mechanisms exist, therefore understanding the key players specific to each pathway has allowed researchers to bioengineer macromolecular complexes for highly specialized delivery. Membrane specific receptors most frequently enter the cell through endocytosis following the binding of a high affinity ligand. High affinity ligands interact with membrane receptors, internalize in membrane bound vesicles, and traffic through cells in different manners to allow for accumulation in early endosomal fractions or lysosomally associated fractions. Although most drug delivery complexes aim to avoid lysosomal degradation, more recent studies have shown the clinical utility in directed protein delivery to this environment for the enzymatic release of therapeutics. Targeting nanomedicine complexes to the endolysosomal pathway have serious potential for improving drug delivery for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease. Although several issues remain for receptor specific targeting, current work is investigating a synthetic receptor approach for high affinity binding of targeted macromolecules. PMID:17659804

  13. Dendrimeric Drug Delivery Agents Interacting with Membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Almut Mecke; Mark Banszak Holl; Bradford Orr; Anil K. Patri; Inhan Lee; James Baker Jr.

    2002-01-01

    New initiatives in cancer treatment try to improve chemotherapy by developing smart drug delivery vehicles. The goal is to specifically target a tumor and deliver a therapeutic to kill it without causing damage to healthy tissue. A promising class of nanomaterials that can serve as a platform for this purpose is dendritic polymers, or dendrimers. In order to reach a

  14. Micromechanical devices for intravascular drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Reed; Clarence Wu; James Kneller; Simon Watkins; David A. Vorp; Ahmed Nadeem; Lee E. Weiss; Keith Rebello; Mark Mescher; A. J. Conrad Smith; Warren Rosenblum; Marc D. Feldman

    1998-01-01

    Microfabrication technology, more commonly applied to the manufacture of integrated circuits, can be used to build devices useful for mechanical delivery of drugs and genes. Microprobes fabricated using silicon micromachining have been used to deliver DNA into cells as an alternative to bombardment and microinjection. This idea can be extended to intravascular stents with integrated microprobes capable of piercing compressed

  15. Targeted drug delivery via the folate receptor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Sudimack; Robert J Lee

    2000-01-01

    The folate receptor is a highly selective tumor marker overexpressed in greater than 90% of ovarian carcinomas. Two general strategies have been developed for the targeted delivery of drugs to folate receptor-positive tumor cells: by coupling to a monoclonal antibody against the receptor and by coupling to a high affinity ligand, folic acid. First, antibodies against the folate receptor, including

  16. Ocular drug delivery in veterinary medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent Baeyens; Christine Percicot; Monia Zignani; Arati A Deshpande; Vassilios Kaltsatos; Robert Gurny

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the various approaches currently used in the development of ocular drug delivery systems for the treatment of ocular diseases in animals. It is obvious from the literature that most of the products that are currently available are derived from human medicine without consideration given to the differences which exist between the anatomy and

  17. Optically generated ultrasound for enhanced drug delivery

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Campbell, Heather L. (Baltimore, MD); Da Silva, Luiz (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01

    High frequency acoustic waves, analogous to ultrasound, can enhance the delivery of therapeutic compounds into cells. The compounds delivered may be chemotherapeutic drugs, antibiotics, photodynamic drugs or gene therapies. The therapeutic compounds are administered systemically, or preferably locally to the targeted site. Local delivery can be accomplished through a needle, cannula, or through a variety of vascular catheters, depending on the location of routes of access. To enhance the systemic or local delivery of the therapeutic compounds, high frequency acoustic waves are generated locally near the target site, and preferably near the site of compound administration. The acoustic waves are produced via laser radiation interaction with an absorbing media and can be produced via thermoelastic expansion, thermodynamic vaporization, material ablation, or plasma formation. Acoustic waves have the effect of temporarily permeabilizing the membranes of local cells, increasing the diffusion of the therapeutic compound into the cells, allowing for decreased total body dosages, decreased side effects, and enabling new therapies.

  18. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  19. Multifunctional High Drug Loading Nanocarriers for Cancer Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Erlei

    2011-12-01

    Most anticancer drugs have poor water-solubility, rapid blood clearance, low tumor-selectivity and severe systemic toxicity to healthy tissues. Thus, polymeric nanocarriers have been widely explored for anticancer drugs to solve these problems. However, polymer nanocarriers developed to date still suffer drawbacks including low drug loading contents, premature drug release, slow cellular internalization, slow intracellular drug release and thereby low therapeutic efficiency in cancer thermotherapy. Accordingly, in this dissertation, functional nanocapsules and nanoparticles including high drug loading liposome-like nanocapsules, high drug loading phospholipid-mimic nanocapsules with fast intracellular drug release, high drug loading charge-reversal nanocapsules, TAT based long blood circulation nanoparticles and charge-reversal nuclear targeted nanoparticles are designed and synthesized. These functional carriers have advantages such as high drug loading contents without premature drug release, fast cellular internalization and intracellular drug release, nuclear targeted delivery and long blood circulation. As a result, all these drug carriers show much higher in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activities.

  20. Microneedle delivery for improved efficacy of antiretroviral and antibiotic drugs

    E-print Network

    Stauber, Zachary Jason

    2012-01-01

    Two classes of drugs, antiretrovirals and antibiotics, could benefit greatly from delivery through microneedles. Microneedles (MN) offer an increase in efficacy for these drugs by providing delivery to the lymphatic system ...

  1. Structural DNA nanotechnology for intelligent drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Liu, Huajie; Su, Shao; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-11-01

    Drug delivery carriers have been popularly employed to improve solubility, stability, and efficacy of chemical and biomolecular drugs. Despite the rapid progress in this field, it remains a great challenge to develop an ideal carrier with minimal cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and intelligence for targeted controlled release. The emergence of DNA nanotechnology offers unprecedented opportunities in this regard. Due to the unparalleled self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, it is possible to create numerous artificial DNA nanostructures with well-defined structures and DNA nanodevices with precisely controlled motions. More importantly, recent studies have proven that DNA nanostructures possess greater permeability to the membrane barrier of cells, which pave the way to developing new drug delivery carriers with nucleic acids, are summarized. In this Concept, recent advances on the design and fabrication of both static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and the use of these nanostructures for the delivery of various types of drugs, are highlighted. It is also demonstrated that dynamic DNA nanostructures provide the required intelligence to realize logically controlled drug release. PMID:24955859

  2. Advanced materials and nanotechnology for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Wenjun; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-08-20

    Many biological barriers are of great importance. For example, stratum corneum, the outmost layer of skin, effectively protects people from being invaded by external microorganisms such as bacteria and viruses. Cell membranes help organisms maintain homeostasis by controlling substances to enter and leave cells. However, on the other hand, these biological barriers seriously restrict drug delivery. For instance, stratum corneum has a very dense structure and only allows very small molecules with a molecular weight of below 500 Da to permeate whereas most drug molecules are much larger than that. A wide variety of drugs including genes needs to enter cells for proper functioning but cell membranes are not permeable to them. To overcome these biological barriers, many drug-delivery routes are being actively researched and developed. In this research news, we will focus on two advanced materials and nanotechnology approaches for delivering vaccines through the skin for painless and efficient immunization and transporting drug molecules to cross cell membranes for high-throughput intracellular delivery. PMID:24449177

  3. Pharmaceutical plasticizers for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Nashwa A

    2012-03-01

    In the field of pharmaceutical science and drug development, there are important and particular challenges related to the selection of suitable and compatible ingredients as well as the design of successful formulations. As plasticization is a phenomenon widely exploited in all formulation fields, plasticizers should be recognized as a critical aspect for drug delivery. The choice of an appropriate plasticizer requires a wide background of information. This is because they are incorporated into drug delivery systems containing an assortment of ingredients which may have different reactions to the presence of plasticizers. Concurrently, there are numerous pharmaceutical plasticizers and various environmental issues dictating favored solutions. To address these encumbrances, an extensive information concerning plasticizers; their types, properties, pharmaceutical roles, etc. is discussed. Additionally, the specific objective of this review is to substantiate the safety and performance of newly discovered plasticizers. PMID:22283652

  4. Drug delivery to brain tumors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaishri Blakeley

    2008-01-01

    A prerequisite for the efficacy of any cancer drug is that it reaches the tumor in therapeutic concentrations. This is difficult\\u000a to accomplish in most systemic solid tumors because of factors such as variable hypoxia, intratumoral pressure gradients,\\u000a and abnormal vasculature within the tumors. In brain cancer, the situation is complicated by the blood-brain barrier (BBB)\\u000a and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier,

  5. Organic–Inorganic Composites for Bone Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chidambaram Soundrapandian; Biswanath Sa; Someswar Datta

    2009-01-01

    This review paper attempts to provide an overview in the fabrication and application of organic–inorganic based composites\\u000a in the field of local drug delivery for bone. The concept of local drug delivery exists for a few decades. However, local\\u000a drug delivery in bone and specially application of composites for delivery of drugs to bone is an area for potential research

  6. Intracarotid Delivery of Drugs: The Potential and the Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shailendra; Meyers, Phillip M.; Ornstein, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    The major efforts to selectively deliver drugs to the brain in the last decade have relied on smart molecular techniques to penetrate the blood brain barrier while intraarterial drug delivery has drawn relatively little attention. In the last decade there have been rapid advances in endovascular techniques. Modern endovascular procedures can permit highly targeted drug delivery by intracarotid route. Intracarotid drug delivery can be the primary route of drug delivery or it could be used to facilitate the delivery of smart-neuropharmaceuticals. There have been few attempts to systematically understand the kinetics of intracarotid drugs. Anecdotal data suggests that intracarotid drug delivery is effective in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm, thromboembolic strokes, and neoplasms. Neuroanesthesiologists are frequently involved in the care of such high-risk patients. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the applications of intracarotid drug delivery and the unusual kinetics of intracarotid drugs. PMID:18719453

  7. Nanoparticles: a boon to drug delivery, therapeutics, diagnostics and imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suphiya Parveen; Ranjita Misra; Sanjeeb K. Sahoo

    Drug delivery is an interdisciplinary and independent field of research and is gaining the attention of pharmaceutical researchers, medical doctors and industry. A safe and targeted drug delivery could improve the performance of some classic medicines already on the market, and moreover, will have implications for the development and success of new therapeutic strategies such as anticancer drug delivery, peptide

  8. Protein-Based Nanomedicine Platforms for Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Ham, Aihui; Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-08-03

    Drug delivery systems have been developed for many years, however some limitations still hurdle the pace of going to clinical phase, for example, poor biodistribution, drug molecule cytotoxicity, tissue damage, quick clearance from the circulation system, solubility and stability of drug molecules. To overcome the limitations of drug delivery, biomaterials have to be developed and applied to drug delivery to protect the drug molecules and to enhance the drug’s efficacy. Protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery are platforms comprised of naturally self-assembled protein subunits of the same protein or a combination of proteins making up a complete system. They are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability coupled with low toxicity. A variety of proteins have been used and characterized for drug delivery systems including the ferritin/apoferritin protein cage, plant derived viral capsids, the small Heat shock protein (sHsp) cage, albumin, soy and whey protein, collagen, and gelatin. There are many different types and shapes that have been prepared to deliver drug molecules using protein-based platforms including the various protein cages, microspheres, nanoparticles, hydrogels, films, minirods and minipellets. There are over 30 therapeutic compounds that have been investigated with protein-based drug delivery platforms for the potential treatment of various cancers, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, autoimmune diseases. In protein-based drug delivery platforms, protein cage is the most newly developed biomaterials for drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Their uniform sizes, multifunctions, and biodegradability push them to the frontier for drug delivery. In this review, the recent strategic development of drug delivery has been discussed with a special emphasis upon the polymer based, especially protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery. The advantages and disadvantages are also discussed for each type of protein based drug delivery system.

  9. Drug delivery nanoparticles in skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, Chiara; Zara, Gian Paolo; Maina, Giovanni; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Rossi, Federica; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Ciamporcero, Eric Stefano; Daga, Martina; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves the engineering of functional systems at nanoscale, thus being attractive for disciplines ranging from materials science to biomedicine. One of the most active research areas of the nanotechnology is nanomedicine, which applies nanotechnology to highly specific medical interventions for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases, including cancer disease. Over the past two decades, the rapid developments in nanotechnology have allowed the incorporation of multiple therapeutic, sensing, and targeting agents into nanoparticles, for detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer diseases. Nanoparticles offer many advantages as drug carrier systems since they can improve the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs, modify pharmacokinetics, increase drug half-life by reducing immunogenicity, improve bioavailability, and diminish drug metabolism. They can also enable a tunable release of therapeutic compounds and the simultaneous delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the use of different types of nanoparticles for systemic and topical drug delivery in the treatment of skin cancer. In particular, the progress in the treatment with nanocarriers of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma has been reported. PMID:25101298

  10. Zwitterionic drug nanocarriers: a biomimetic strategy for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiao; Chen, Yangjun; Wang, Yin; Ji, Jian

    2014-12-01

    Nanomaterials self-assembled from amphiphilic functional copolymers have emerged as safe and efficient nanocarriers for delivery of therapeutics. Surface engineering of the nanocarriers is extremely important for the design of drug delivery systems. Bioinspired zwitterions are considered as novel nonfouling materials to construct biocompatible and bioinert nanocarriers. As an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), zwitterions exhibit some unique properties that PEG do not have. In this review, we highlight recent progress of the design of drug nanocarriers using a zwitterionic strategy. The possible mechanism of stealth properties of zwitterions was proposed. The advantages of zwitterionic drug nanocarriers deriving from phosphorylcholine (PC), carboxybetaine (CB), and sulfobetaine (SB) are also discussed. PMID:25092584

  11. Intratumoral Drug Delivery with Nanoparticulate Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Holback, Hillary

    2011-01-01

    Stiff extracellular matrix, elevated interstitial fluid pressure, and the affinity for the tumor cells in the peripheral region of a solid tumor mass have long been recognized as significant barriers to diffusion of small-molecular-weight drugs and antibodies. However, their impacts on nanoparticle-based drug delivery have begun to receive due attention only recently. This article reviews biological features of many solid tumors that influence transport of drugs and nanoparticles and properties of nanoparticles relevant to their intratumoral transport, studied in various tumor models. We also discuss several experimental approaches employed to date for enhancement of intratumoral nanoparticle penetration. The impact of nanoparticle distribution on the effectiveness of chemotherapy remains to be investigated and should be considered in the design of new nanoparticulate drug carriers. PMID:21213021

  12. Diatomite silica nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Immacolata; Terracciano, Monica; Martucci, Nicola M.; De Stefano, Luca; Migliaccio, Nunzia; Tatè, Rosarita; Rendina, Ivo; Arcari, Paolo; Lamberti, Annalisa; Rea, Ilaria

    2014-07-01

    Diatomite is a natural fossil material of sedimentary origin, constituted by fragments of diatom siliceous skeletons. In this preliminary work, the properties of diatomite nanoparticles as potential system for the delivery of drugs in cancer cells were exploited. A purification procedure, based on thermal treatments in strong acid solutions, was used to remove inorganic and organic impurities from diatomite and to make them a safe material for medical applications. The micrometric diatomite powder was reduced in nanoparticles by mechanical crushing, sonication, and filtering. Morphological analysis performed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy reveals a particles size included between 100 and 300 nm. Diatomite nanoparticles were functionalized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and labeled by tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate. Different concentrations of chemically modified nanoparticles were incubated with cancer cells and confocal microscopy was performed. Imaging analysis showed an efficient cellular uptake and homogeneous distribution of nanoparticles in cytoplasm and nucleus, thus suggesting their potentiality as nanocarriers for drug delivery.

  13. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mariam; Verma, Rahul; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided. PMID:25709510

  14. Nanotechnology Approaches for Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingguo; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2013-01-01

    Blindness is a major health concern worldwide that has a powerful impact on afflicted individuals and their families, and is associated with enormous socio-economical consequences. The Middle East is heavily impacted by blindness, and the problem there is augmented by an increasing incidence of diabetes in the population. An appropriate drug/gene delivery system that can sustain and deliver therapeutics to the target tissues and cells is a key need for ocular therapies. The application of nanotechnology in medicine is undergoing rapid progress, and the recent developments in nanomedicine-based therapeutic approaches may bring significant benefits to address the leading causes of blindness associated with cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal degeneration. In this brief review, we highlight some promising nanomedicine-based therapeutic approaches for drug and gene delivery to the anterior and posterior segments. PMID:23580849

  15. Polysaccharide-Based Micelles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Wardwell, Patricia R.; Bader, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of hydrophobic molecules and proteins has been an issue due to poor bioavailability following administration. Thus, micelle carrier systems are being investigated to improve drug solubility and stability. Due to problems with toxicity and immunogenicity, natural polysaccharides are being explored as substitutes for synthetic polymers in the development of new micelle systems. By grafting hydrophobic moieties to the polysaccharide backbone, self-assembled micelles can be readily formed in aqueous solution. Many polysaccharides also possess inherent bioactivity that can facilitate mucoadhesion, enhanced targeting of specific tissues, and a reduction in the inflammatory response. Furthermore, the hydrophilic nature of some polysaccharides can be exploited to enhance circulatory stability. This review will highlight the advantages of polysaccharide use in the development of drug delivery systems and will provide an overview of the polysaccharide-based micelles that have been developed to date. PMID:24300453

  16. Nanoparticulate systems for brain delivery of drugs.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, J

    2001-03-23

    The blood--brain barrier (BBB) represents an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of drugs, including antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, and a variety of central nervous system (CNS)-active drugs, especially neuropeptides. One of the possibilities to overcome this barrier is a drug delivery to the brain using nanoparticles. Drugs that have successfully been transported into the brain using this carrier include the hexapeptide dalargin, the dipeptide kytorphin, loperamide, tubocurarine, the NMDA receptor antagonist MRZ 2/576, and doxorubicin. The nanoparticles may be especially helpful for the treatment of the disseminated and very aggressive brain tumors. Intravenously injected doxorubicin-loaded polysorbate 80-coated nanoparticles were able to lead to a 40% cure in rats with intracranially transplanted glioblastomas 101/8. The mechanism of the nanoparticle-mediated transport of the drugs across the blood-brain barrier at present is not fully elucidated. The most likely mechanism is endocytosis by the endothelial cells lining the brain blood capillaries. Nanoparticle-mediated drug transport to the brain depends on the overcoating of the particles with polysorbates, especially polysorbate 80. Overcoating with these materials seems to lead to the adsorption of apolipoprotein E from blood plasma onto the nanoparticle surface. The particles then seem to mimic low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and could interact with the LDL receptor leading to their uptake by the endothelial cells. After this the drug may be released in these cells and diffuse into the brain interior or the particles may be transcytosed. Other processes such as tight junction modulation or P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibition also may occur. Moreover, these mechanisms may run in parallel or may be cooperative thus enabling a drug delivery to the brain. PMID:11251246

  17. Drug Delivery Systems Based On Mucoadhesive Polymers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maya Davidovich-Pinhas; Havazelet Bianco-Peled

    \\u000a Transmucosal delivery of therapeutic agents is a non-invasive approach that utilizes human entry paths such as the nasal,\\u000a buccal, rectal and vaginal routs. Mucoadhesive polymers have the ability to adhere to the mucus layer covering those surfaces\\u000a and by that promote drug release, targeting and absorption. Mucoadhesive polymers commonly interact with mucus through non-covalent\\u000a bonds such as hydrogen bonds, ionic

  18. Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: Oral Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V.

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery. PMID:20046732

  19. Mucoadhesive Microparticles Engineered for Ophthalmic Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bin Choy, Young; Park, Jung-Hwan; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Although topical drug delivery is a convenient route of administration to treat various eye diseases, it has serious limitations due to rapid clearance of the formulation from the surface of the eye. In this study, we engineered microparticles for both sustained drug delivery and prolonged residence time on the extraocular surface. Microparticles were fabricated by emulsification using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLG) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as the core material and mucoadhesion promoter, respectively. The particle size was controlled to be less than 10 µm to avoid eye irritation and for eventual clearance through the lacrimal canals. In vitro mucoadhesion tests showed that PLG microparticles with PEG adhered better to the mucous membrane under the conditions employed in this study compared to the microparticles without PEG. When an aqueous suspension of microparticles with PEG was administered topically to the rabbit eye in vivo, microparticles were seen for up to 30 min on the ocular surface in the cul-de-sac, which was a dramatic increase in residence time as compared to conventional eye drop formulations. We conclude that mucoadhesive microparticles are promising vehicles for ophthalmic drug delivery. PMID:20657721

  20. pH-Responsive Poly(ethylene glycol)/Poly(l-lactide) Supramolecular Micelles Based on Host-Guest Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Lv, Qiang; Gao, Xiaoye; Chen, Li; Cao, Yue; Yu, Shuangjiang; He, Chaoliang; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-04-29

    pH-responsive supramolecular amphiphilic micelles based on benzimidazole-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-BM) and ?-cyclodextrin-modified poly(l-lactide) (CD-PLLA) were developed by exploiting the host-guest interaction between benzimidazole (BM) and ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD). The dissociation of the supramolecular micelles was triggered in acidic environments. An antineoplastic drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was loaded into the supramolecular micelles as a model drug. The release of DOX from the supramolecular micelles was clearly accelerated as the pH was reduced from 7.4 to 5.5. The DOX-loaded PEG-BM/CD-PLLA supramolecular micelles displayed an enhanced intracellular drug-release rate in HepG2 cells compared to the pH-insensitive DOX-loaded PEG-b-PLLA counterpart. After intravenous injection into nude mice bearing HepG2 xenografts by the tail vein, the DOX-loaded supramolecular micelles exhibited significantly higher tumor inhibition efficacy and reduced systemic toxicity compared to free DOX. Furthermore, the DOX-loaded supramolecular micelles showed a blood clearance rate markedly lower than that of free DOX and comparable to that of the DOX-loaded PEG-b-PLLA micelles after intravenous injection into rats. Therefore, the pH-responsive PEG-BM/CD-PLLA supramolecular micelles hold potential as a smart nanocarrier for anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25856564

  1. Micro- and nano-fabricated implantable drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ellis; Hoang, Tuan

    2013-01-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems provide new means for achieving therapeutic drug concentrations over entire treatment durations in order to optimize drug action. This article focuses on new drug administration modalities achieved using implantable drug-delivery systems that are enabled by micro- and nano-fabrication technologies, and microfluidics. Recent advances in drug administration technologies are discussed and remaining challenges are highlighted. PMID:23323562

  2. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E.; du Toit, Lisa C.; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  3. Nanostructures for drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Martin-Banderas, L; Holgado, M A; Venero, J L; Alvarez-Fuentes, J; Fernández-Arévalo, M

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to summarize present approaches employed in delivering drugs to the central nervous system. Changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) function have been reported in several neurological disorders. A brief description of the blood brain barrier and the main pathologies related to this barrier disfunction are described. Treatments for these disorders are based on several available strategies for delivering drugs into the brain, through circumvention of the BBB, as disruption of the BBB, prodrugs, molecular Trojan horses, among others. Particular attention will be placed on nanocarriers and more specifically on polymeric nanoparticles, which are presented as the most promising strategy for CNS delivery, helping drugs to be targeted more efficiently to the brain. This also allows attacking previously untreatable disorders such as brain tumors and other neurodegenerative diseases. New strategies and technologies commercialized by different pharmaceutical companies are also included. PMID:22087827

  4. Ultrasound triggered, image guided, local drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Roel; Moonen, Chrit T W

    2010-11-20

    Ultrasound allows the deposition of thermal and mechanical energies deep inside the human body in a non-invasive way. Ultrasound can be focused within a region with a diameter of about 1mm. The bio-effects of ultrasound can lead to local tissue heating, cavitation, and radiation force, which can be used for 1) local drug release from nanocarriers circulating in the blood, 2) increased extravasation of drugs and/or carriers, and 3) enhanced diffusivity of drugs. When using nanocarriers sensitive to mechanical forces (the oscillating ultrasound pressure waves) and/or sensitive to temperature, the content of the nanocarriers can be released locally. Thermo-sensitive liposomes have been suggested for local drug release in combination with local hyperthermia more than 25 years ago. Microbubbles may be designed specifically to enhance cavitation effects. Real-time imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance, optical and ultrasound imaging have led to novel insights and methods for ultrasound triggered drug delivery. Image guidance of ultrasound can be used for: 1) target identification and characterization; 2) spatio-temporal guidance of actions to release or activate the drugs and/or permeabilize membranes; 3) evaluation of bio-distribution, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; and 4) physiological read-outs to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20709123

  5. Silk fibroin nanoparticle as a novel drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2015-05-28

    Design and synthesis of efficient drug delivery systems are of vital importance for medicine and healthcare. Nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems, in particular nanoparticles, have generated great excitement in the field of drug delivery since they provide new opportunities to overcome the limitations of conventional delivery methods with regards to the drugs. Silk fibroin (SF) is a naturally occurring protein polymer with several unique properties that make it a suitable material for incorporation into a variety of drug delivery vehicles capable of delivering a range of therapeutic agents. SF matrices have been shown to successfully deliver anticancer drugs, small molecules, and biomolecules. This review will provide an in-depth discussion of the development of SF nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. PMID:25797561

  6. Advanced drug delivery systems for antithrombotic agents.

    PubMed

    Greineder, Colin F; Howard, Melissa D; Carnemolla, Ronald; Cines, Douglas B; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2013-08-29

    Despite continued achievements in antithrombotic pharmacotherapy, difficulties remain in managing patients at high risk for both thrombosis and hemorrhage. Utility of antithrombotic agents (ATAs) in these settings is restricted by inadequate pharmacokinetics and narrow therapeutic indices. Use of advanced drug delivery systems (ADDSs) may help to circumvent these problems. Various nanocarriers, affinity ligands, and polymer coatings provide ADDSs that have the potential to help optimize ATA pharmacokinetics, target drug delivery to sites of thrombosis, and sense pathologic changes in the vascular microenvironment, such as altered hemodynamic forces, expression of inflammatory markers, and structural differences between mature hemostatic and growing pathological clots. Delivery of ATAs using biomimetic synthetic carriers, host blood cells, and recombinant fusion proteins that are activated preferentially at sites of thrombus development has shown promising outcomes in preclinical models. Further development and translation of ADDSs that spare hemostatic fibrin clots hold promise for extending the utility of ATAs in the management of acute thrombotic disorders through rapid, transient, and targeted thromboprophylaxis. If the potential benefit of this technology is to be realized, a systematic and concerted effort is required to develop clinical trials and translate the use of ADDSs to the clinical arena. PMID:23798715

  7. Topical Drug Delivery for Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jonathan; Lane, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis is a multifactorial disorder that may be heterogeneous in presentation and clinical course. While the introduction of endoscopic sinus surgery revolutionized surgical management and has led to significantly improved patient outcomes, medical therapy remains the foundation of long-term care of chronic rhinosinusitis, particularly in surgically recalcitrant cases. A variety of devices and pharmaceutical agents have been developed to apply topical medical therapy to the sinuses, taking advantage of the access provided by endoscopic surgery. The goal of topical therapy is to address the inflammation, infection, and mucociliary dysfunction that underlies the disease. Major factors that impact success include the patient’s sinus anatomy and the dynamics of the delivery device. Despite a growing number of topical treatment options, the evidence-based literature to support their use is limited. In this article, we comprehensively review current delivery methods and the available topical agents. We also discuss biotechnological advances that promise enhanced delivery in the future, and evolving pharmacotherapeutical compounds that may be added to rhinologist’s armamentarium. A complete understand of topical drug delivery is increasingly essential to the management of chronic rhinosinusitis when traditional forms of medical therapy and surgery have failed. PMID:23525506

  8. Importance of novel drug delivery systems in herbal medicines

    PubMed Central

    Devi, V. Kusum; Jain, Nimisha; Valli, Kusum S.

    2010-01-01

    Novel drug delivery system is a novel approach to drug delivery that addresses the limitations of the traditional drug delivery systems. Our country has a vast knowledge base of Ayurveda whose potential is only being realized in the recent years. However, the drug delivery system used for administering the herbal medicine to the patient is traditional and out-of-date, resulting in reduced efficacy of the drug. If the novel drug delivery technology is applied in herbal medicine, it may help in increasing the efficacy and reducing the side effects of various herbal compounds and herbs. This is the basic idea behind incorporating novel method of drug delivery in herbal medicines. Thus it is important to integrate novel drug delivery system and Indian Ayurvedic medicines to combat more serious diseases. For a long time herbal medicines were not considered for development as novel formulations owing to lack of scientific justification and processing difficulties, such as standardization, extraction and identification of individual drug components in complex polyherbal systems. However, modern phytopharmaceutical research can solve the scientific needs (such as determination of pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, site of action, accurate dose required etc.) of herbal medicines to be incorporated in novel drug delivery system, such as nanoparticles, microemulsions, matrix systems, solid dispersions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and so on. This article summarizes various drug delivery technologies, which can be used for herbal actives together with some examples. PMID:22228938

  9. Adenovirus Dodecahedron, as a Drug Delivery Vector

    PubMed Central

    Zochowska, Monika; Paca, Agnieszka; Schoehn, Guy; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Chroboczek, Jadwiga; Dublet, Bernard; Szolajska, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    Background Bleomycin (BLM) is an anticancer antibiotic used in many cancer regimens. Its utility is limited by systemic toxicity and dose-dependent pneumonitis able to progress to lung fibrosis. The latter can affect up to nearly 50% of the total patient population, out of which 3% will die. We propose to improve BLM delivery by tethering it to an efficient delivery vector. Adenovirus (Ad) dodecahedron base (DB) is a particulate vector composed of 12 copies of a pentameric viral protein responsible for virus penetration. The vector efficiently penetrates the plasma membrane, is liberated in the cytoplasm and has a propensity to concentrate around the nucleus; up to 300000 particles can be observed in one cell in vitro. Principal Findings Dodecahedron (Dd) structure is preserved at up to about 50°C at pH 7–8 and during dialysis, freezing and drying in the speed-vac in the presence of 150 mM ammonium sulfate, as well as during lyophilization in the presence of cryoprotectants. The vector is also stable in human serum for 2 h at 37°C. We prepared a Dd-BLM conjugate which upon penetration induced death of transformed cells. Similarly to free bleomycin, Dd-BLM caused dsDNA breaks. Significantly, effective cytotoxic concentration of BLM delivered with Dd was 100 times lower than that of free bleomycin. Conclusions/Significance Stability studies show that Dds can be conveniently stored and transported, and can potentially be used for therapeutic purposes under various climates. Successful BLM delivery by Ad Dds demonstrates that the use of virus like particle (VLP) results in significantly improved drug bioavailability. These experiments open new vistas for delivery of non-permeant labile drugs. PMID:19440379

  10. Non-viral drug delivery systems for immune modulation

    E-print Network

    Fuller, Jason E., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer particles have diverse applications in drug delivery. The main objective of this thesis was to apply these delivery systems to modulating the immune system. We optimized particle formulations for the ...

  11. Development and Characterization of Controlled Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Chen

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop new controlled drug delivery systems using nanomeric particles and characterize the delivery of drugs into cells in real time by digital fluorescence imaging microscopy techniques. The project is based on the idea that it could be possible to improve efficacy of drug molecules when encapsulated in nanometer-sized particles. Due to their small

  12. Provesicles as novel drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Zerrin S; Yuksel, Nilufer

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular systems exhibit many attractive properties such as controlled drug release, ability to carry both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, targetability and good biocompatibility. With these unique properties they can provide improved drug bioavailability and reduced side effects. Until now, many vesicular formulations have been studied in clinical and preclinical stages. Nevertheless, the major concern about these systems is their low physicochemical stability and high manufacturing expenses. The stability problems (fusion, aggregation, sedimentation, swelling, and drug leakage during storage) associated with the aqueous nature of vesicular systems hinders their effective usage. The advances on improving the stability of vesicular systems led to the emergence of provesicular systems, which are commonly described as dry, free flowing preformulations of vesicular drug delivery systems. Provesicles form vesicular systems upon hydratation with water and exhibit the advantages of vesicular systems with improved stability. The present article briefly reviews vesicular systems (particularly liposomes and niosomes) and enlightens about the innovations in the field. Overall investigations are reviewed and the provesicle approach is explained by giving detailed information on the composition, preparation, administration and characterization methods of provesicular systems (proliposomes and proniosomes). The scope of this article is expected to give insight to the researchers and industrialists to perform further research in this area. PMID:25658383

  13. CCMR: Controlled Drug Delivery from New Biomaterials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pelet, Jeisa

    2005-08-17

    Fabrication of new biomaterials for drug delivery has a great impact on today’s industries and developments. The improvement of efficiency and control of this process can benefit every human being, thus requires a complete understanding of all behavior related to these processes. Our main objective was to synthesize biodegradable polyesters based on dihydroxyacetone dimer and sebacic acid. It was also of our concern to characterize this polymer through different methods such as 1H-NMR and GPC to establish the material properties. Optimization of this synthesis was based on variations of different parameters in order to obtain the most desirable properties for the material.

  14. Pulmonary drug delivery by powder aerosols.

    PubMed

    Yang, Michael Yifei; Chan, John Gar Yan; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-11-10

    The efficacy of pharmaceutical aerosols relates to its deposition in the clinically relevant regions of the lungs, which can be assessed by in vivo lung deposition studies. Dry powder formulations are popular as devices are portable and aerosolisation does not require a propellant. Over the years, key advancements in dry powder formulation, device design and our understanding on the mechanics of inhaled pharmaceutical aerosol have opened up new opportunities in treatment of diseases through pulmonary drug delivery. This review covers these advancements and future directions for inhaled dry powder aerosols. PMID:24818765

  15. Experimental strategies for investigating passive and ultrasound-enhanced transdermal drug delivery

    E-print Network

    Seto, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers many advantages over traditional drug delivery methods. However, the natural resistance of the skin to drug permeation represents a major challenge that transdermal drug delivery needs to ...

  16. Ultrasonic nebulization system for respiratory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, T S; Ravichandran, A

    2001-01-01

    An ultrasonic spray system was tested for the production of aerosols for ultimate use in the respiratory delivery of drug to animals. A Sono-Tek ultrasonic spray system was mounted on top of a baffle to entrain aerosol particles within the carrier gas. Solvent was removed from the aerosol cloud by passing the droplets through drying columns composed of either charcoal or silica. The efficiency of removing ethanol and water were determined by measuring the outflow concentrations. Sodium fluorescein and sodium cromolyn dissolved in water were tested, and the effect of the liquid flow rate and drug concentration entering the atomizer on the output, and particle size distribution, were determined by the filter capture method, and by cascade impactor, respectively. Similar studies were conducted with budesonide and indomethacin dissolved in ethanol. The theoretical count median size distribution was calculated and compared with the experimental values calculated from the observed mass median aerodynamic diameter. The output rate expressed as the mass of aerosol collected in unit time increased nearly proportionately with the liquid flow rate (0.18-0.7 ml/min) and with the concentration of drug (0.19-12 mg/ml) entering the nebulizer. The mean particle size increased with solute concentration, but not by liquid flow rate. The calculated count median diameters were dependent on the type of solvent, but were independent of solute. At the high dose of cromolyn, there was very good agreement between the theoretical and observed. At lower doses, the observed size was larger than predicted, which was also true for the ethanol soluble solutes. The system has the potential of providing a wide range of dose levels for testing of drug delivery to animals including high doses with a controlled and relatively narrow particle size distribution. PMID:11247278

  17. Design of a Smart Transdermal Insulin Drug Delivery System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenqing Hou; Chenghong Lin; Qiqing Zhang

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a micro-needle array combined with transdermal delivery, as well as the detection of micro-sensors intelligent transdermal insulin delivery systems was designed with characteristics of pain-free, smart, timing, positioning, quantitative drug delivery. Transdermal delivery of the requirements for the design of the transdermal delivery of the microneedle array structure, and UV-LIGA process for the production of polymer micro-needle

  18. Pairwise polymer blends for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Marks, Joyann A; Wegiel, Lindsay A; Taylor, Lynne S; Edgar, Kevin J

    2014-09-01

    Blends of polymers with complementary properties hold promise for addressing the diverse, demanding polymer performance requirements in amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs), but we lack comprehensive property understanding for blends of important ASD polymers. Herein, we prepare pairwise blends of commercially available polymers polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), the cationic acrylate copolymer Eudragit 100 (E100), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS), carboxymethyl cellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), and the new derivative cellulose acetate adipate propionate (CAAdP). This study identifies miscible binary blends that may find use, for example, in ASDs for solubility and bioavailability enhancement of poorly water-soluble drugs. Differential scanning calorimetry, FTIR spectroscopy, and film clarity were used to determine blend miscibility. Several polymer combinations including HPMCAS/PVP, HPMC/CMCAB, and PVP/HPMC appear to be miscible in all proportions. In contrast, blends of E100/PVP and E100/HPMC showed a miscibility gap. Combinations of water-soluble and hydrophobic polymers like these may permit effective balancing of ASD performance criteria such as release rate and polymer-drug interaction to prevent nucleation and crystal growth of poorly soluble drugs. Miscible polymer combinations described herein will enable further study of their drug delivery capabilities, and provide a potentially valuable set of ASD formulation tools. PMID:24823790

  19. Diatomite silica nanoparticles for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Diatomite is a natural fossil material of sedimentary origin, constituted by fragments of diatom siliceous skeletons. In this preliminary work, the properties of diatomite nanoparticles as potential system for the delivery of drugs in cancer cells were exploited. A purification procedure, based on thermal treatments in strong acid solutions, was used to remove inorganic and organic impurities from diatomite and to make them a safe material for medical applications. The micrometric diatomite powder was reduced in nanoparticles by mechanical crushing, sonication, and filtering. Morphological analysis performed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy reveals a particles size included between 100 and 300 nm. Diatomite nanoparticles were functionalized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and labeled by tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate. Different concentrations of chemically modified nanoparticles were incubated with cancer cells and confocal microscopy was performed. Imaging analysis showed an efficient cellular uptake and homogeneous distribution of nanoparticles in cytoplasm and nucleus, thus suggesting their potentiality as nanocarriers for drug delivery. PACS 87.85.J81.05.Rm; 61.46. + w PMID:25024689

  20. Adapalene microemulsion for transfollicular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Zhou, Yingcong; Banga, Ajay K

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a microemulsion formulation of adapalene for transfollicular delivery. A pseudoternary phase diagram was developed for microemulsion consisting of oleic acid as oil phase, tween 20 as surfactant, Transcutol® as cosurfactant, and deionized water. Differential tape stripping and confocal laser scanning microscopy were performed to determine the penetration of microemulsion through hair follicles. Transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, polarizing light microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to characterize the microstructures of microemulsion. The pH and viscosity of the microemulsions were also determined. Permeation studies were carried out in vitro on porcine ear skin over a period of 24 h using Franz diffusion cells. The drug penetration in the hair follicles increased from 0.109 ± 0.03 to 0.292 ± 0.094 ?g, as the microstructure of microemulsion shifted from oil-in-water to bi-continuous, with increase in water content of microemulsion. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images suggested that hair follicles provided the path for transfollicular permeation of adapalene microemulsion. These results suggest that microemulsion penetrated through hair follicles and are promising for transfollicular drug delivery. PMID:23728912

  1. A microneedle roller for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Seong-O; Seo, Soonmin; Choy, Young Bin; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-10-01

    Microneedle rollers have been used to treat large areas of skin for cosmetic purposes and to increase skin permeability for drug delivery. In this study, we introduce a polymer microneedle roller fabricated by inclined rotational UV lithography, replicated by micromolding hydrophobic polylactic acid and hydrophilic carboxy-methyl-cellulose. These microneedles created micron-scale holes in human and porcine cadaver skin that permitted entry of acetylsalicylic acid, Trypan blue and nanoparticles measuring 50nm and 200nm in diameter. The amount of acetylsalicylic acid delivered increased with the number of holes made in the skin and was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than in untreated skin. Lateral diffusion in the skin between holes made by microneedles followed expected diffusional kinetics, with effective diffusivity values that were 23-160 times smaller than in water. Compared to inserting microneedles on a flat patch, the sequential insertion of microneedles row by row on a roller required less insertion force in full-thickness porcine skin. Overall, polymer microneedle rollers, prepared from replicated polymer films, offer a simple way to increase skin permeability for drug delivery. PMID:20624460

  2. Male erectile dysfunction: therapy and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chattaraj, S

    2001-06-01

    Finding an ideal chemical agent or a user-friendly delivery system for the treatment of male erectile dysfunction (MED) has been the goal of several research groups. The most suitable therapy for erectile dysfunction (ED) in man would involve a chemical that acts directly or indirectly on the penis and assures erection without any side effects. The understanding of ED has grown tremendously over the last decade and has been accompanied by an impressive proliferation of new therapies, ranging from traditional therapeutic agents to novel agents and drug delivery systems. Before Viagra, the most effective therapies involved injecting drugs directly into the base of the penis and inserting suppositories into the urethra, but these were too invasive to achieve great popularity. Although ED was not an area of pharmaceutical research that many companies were focused on, the success of Viagra has shown that there is a huge market opportunity for this indication. Financial analysts project a worldwide market of approximately $2 billion for oral ED treatments. This review presents a general overview of the present state as well as the future directions of research to treat MED. PMID:16001313

  3. Emergency delivery of Vasopressin from an implantable MEMS rapid drug delivery device

    E-print Network

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    An implantable rapid drug delivery device based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology was designed, fabricated and validated for the in vivo rapid delivery of vasopressin in a rabbit model. In vitro ...

  4. Microneedle-iontophoresis combinations for enhanced transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Ryan F; Garland, Martin J; Alkilani, Ahlam Zaid

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the combination of skin barrier impairment using microneedles (MNs) coupled with iontophoresis (ITP) may broaden the range of drugs suitable for transdermal delivery as well as enabling the rate of delivery to be achieved with precise electronic control. However, few reports exist on the combination of ITP with in situ drug-loaded polymeric MN delivery systems. Our in vitro permeation studies revealed that MN enhances transdermal drug delivery. The combination of dissolving MN and ITP did not further enhance the extent of delivery of the low molecular weight drug ibuprofen sodium after short application periods. However, the extent of peptide/protein delivery was significantly enhanced when ITP was used in combination with hydrogel-forming MN arrays. As such, hydrogel-forming MN arrays show promise for the electrically controlled transdermal delivery of biomacromolecules in a simple, one-step approach, though further technical developments will be necessary before patient benefit is realized. PMID:24567135

  5. Nanoscale coordination polymers for anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rachel Huxford

    This dissertation reports the synthesis and characterization of nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs) for anticancer drug delivery. Nanoparticles have been explored in order to address the limitations of small molecule chemotherapeutics. NCPs have been investigated as drug delivery vehicles as they can exhibit the same beneficial properties as the bulk metal-organic frameworks as well as interesting characteristics that are unique to nanomaterials. Gd-MTX (MTX = methotrexate) NCPs with a MTX loading of 71.6 wt% were synthesized and stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid bilayer containing anisamide (AA), a small molecule that targets sigma receptors which are overexpressed in many cancer tissues. Functionalization with AA allows for targeted delivery and controlled release to cancer cells, as shown by enhanced efficacy against leukemia cells. The NCPs were doped with Ru(bpy)32+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), and this formulation was utilized as an optical imaging agent by confocal microscopy. NCPs containing the chemotherapeutic pemetrexed (PMX) were synthesized using different binding metals. Zr-based materials could not be stabilized by encapsulation with a lipid bilayer, and Gd-based materials showed that PMX had degraded during synthesis. However, Hf-based NCPs containing 19.7 wt% PMX were stabilized by a lipid coating and showed in vitro efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Enhanced efficacy was observed for formulations containing AA. Additionally, NCP formulations containing the cisplatin prodrug disuccinatocisplatin were prepared; one of these formulations could be stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid layer. Coating with a lipid layer doped with AA rendered this formulation an active targeting agent. The resulting formulation proved more potent than free cisplatin in NSCLC cell lines. Improved NCP uptake was demonstrated by confocal microscopy and competitive binding assays. Finally, a Pt(IV) oxaliplatin prodrug was synthesized and incorporated in different NCPs using various binding metals. A moderate drug loading of 44.9 wt% was determined for Zr-based NCPs. This drug loading, along with a diameter less than 200 nm, make these particles promising candidates for further stabilization via lipid encapsulation.

  6. Nanomicellar formulations for sustained drug delivery: strategies and underlying principles

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Ruchit; Kompella, Uday B

    2010-01-01

    Micellar delivery systems smaller than 100 nm can be readily prepared. While micelles allow a great depth of tissue penetration for targeted drug delivery, they usually disintegrate rapidly in the body. Thus, sustained drug delivery from micellar nanocarriers is a challenge. This article summarizes various key strategies and underlying principles for sustained drug delivery using micellar nanocarriers. Comparisons are made with other competing delivery systems such as polymeric microparticles and nanoparticles. Amphiphilic molecules self-assemble in appropriate liquid media to form nanoscale micelles. Strategies for sustained release nanomicellar carriers include use of prodrugs, drug polymer conjugates, novel polymers with low critical micellar concentration or of a reverse thermoresponsive nature, reverse micelles, multi-layer micelles with layer by layer assembly, polymeric films capable of forming micelles in vivo and micelle coats on a solid support. These new micellar systems are promising for sustained drug delivery. PMID:20394539

  7. Amphiphilic linear-dendritic block copolymers for drug delivery

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Phuong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    Polymeric drug delivery systems have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. Such systems can solubilize and sequester hydrophobic drugs from degradation, thereby increasing circulation half-life and efficacy. ...

  8. Enzyme-responsive nanomaterials for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Quanyin; Katti, Prateek S.; Gu, Zhen

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes underpin physiological function and exhibit dysregulation in many disease-associated microenvironments and aberrant cell processes. Exploiting altered enzyme activity and expression for diagnostics, drug targeting, and drug release is tremendously promising. When combined with booming research in nanobiotechnology, enzyme-responsive nanomaterials used for controlled drug release have achieved significant development and have been studied as an important class of drug delivery strategies in nanomedicine. In this review, we describe enzymes such as proteases, phospholipases and oxidoreductases that serve as delivery triggers. Subsequently, we explore recently developed enzyme-responsive nanomaterials with versatile applications for extracellular and intracellular drug delivery. We conclude by discussing future opportunities and challenges in this area.

  9. Novel Drug Delivery Systems for Posterior Segment Ocular Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather Sheardown; W. Mark Saltzman

    Delivery of drugs to the eye, particularly for the treatment of posterior segment diseases, is a challenging task that requires\\u000a drug transport across barriers in the eye, which are present for the purpose of limiting the entry of drugs and xenobiotics.\\u000a The common methods of drug delivery to the eye—eyedrops, direct injection, and systemic administration—all have problems that\\u000a limit their

  10. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Forrest, M. Laird

    2011-01-01

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on the use of various nanoparticulate and polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed. PMID:21718728

  11. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  12. Polymeric Microgels as Potential Drug Delivery Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Ryan; Streletzky, Kiril; Bayachou, Mekki; Peiris, Pubudu

    2010-03-01

    The temperature dependent volume phase change of cross-linked amphiphilic molecules (microgels) suggests their use as drug delivery vesicles. Drug particles aggregate in the slightly hydrophobic microgel interior. They are stored in equilibrium until the critical temperature (Tv) is reached where the volume phase change limits available space, thus expelling the drugs. This loading property of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) microgels was tested using amperometric analytical techniques. Small molecules inside microgels do not approach the electrode surface, which decreases current signal. A room temperature (Troom) flow amperometric measurement comparing microgel/paracetamol solution with control paracetamol samples yielded about 20 percent concentration reduction in the microgel sample. Results from the steady-state electrochemical experiment confirm the 20 percent concentration drop in the microgel sample compared to the control sample at Troom. Using the steady-state experiment with a cyclic temperature ramp from Troom to beyond Tv showed that the paracetamol concentration change between the temperature extremes was greater for the microgels than for the controls. An evolving aspect of the study is the characterization of microgel shrinkage from in situ, temperature controlled liquid AFM images as compared to previously completed DLS characterization of the same microgel sample.

  13. 76 FR 51038 - Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0246] Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems; Availability AGENCY: Food...

  14. Enhanced drug delivery capabilities from stents coated with absorbable polymer and crystalline drug

    E-print Network

    Carlyle, Wenda C.

    Current drug eluting stent (DES) technology is not optimized with regard to the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery. A novel, absorbable-coating sirolimus-eluting stent (AC-SES) was evaluated for its capacity to deliver drug ...

  15. Oral Drug Delivery with Polymeric Nanoparticles: The Gastrointestinal Mucus Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Laura M.; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery is the most common method for drug administration. However, poor solubility, stability, and bioavailability of many drugs make achieving therapeutic levels via the gastrointestinal (GI) tract challenging. Drug delivery must overcome numerous hurdles, including the acidic gastric environment and the continuous secretion of mucus that protects the GI tract. Nanoparticle drug carriers that can shield drugs from degradation and deliver them to intended sites within the GI tract may enable more efficient and sustained drug delivery. However, the rapid secretion and shedding of GI tract mucus can significantly limit the effectiveness of nanoparticle drug delivery systems. Many types of nanoparticles are efficiently trapped in and rapidly removed by mucus, making controlled release in the GI tract difficult. This review addresses the protective barrier properties of mucus secretions, how mucus affects the fate of orally administered nanoparticles, and recent developments in nanoparticles engineered to penetrate the mucus barrier. PMID:22212900

  16. Nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Goldberg; Robert Langer; Xinqiao Jia

    2007-01-01

    Research in the areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering has witnessed tremendous progress in recent years due to their unlimited potential to improve human health. Meanwhile, the development of nanotechnology provides opportunities to characterize, manipulate and organize matter systematically at the nanometer scale. Biomaterials with nano-scale organizations have been used as controlled release reservoirs for drug delivery and artificial

  17. Polymeric Micelles - The Future of Oral Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isaac Godfroy

    This work examines current advancements in polymeric micelles as a method for oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. The oral route presents several barriers to drug delivery that the chosen vesicle must overcome. Polymeric micelles have several physical properties, including molecular weight and copolymer block composition, which can be tailored to alter the vesicle structure and overcome these barriers. Examination

  18. Synthetic tumor networks for screening drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B; Garson, Charles J; Mills, Ivy R; Matar, Majed M; Fewell, Jason G; Pant, Kapil

    2015-03-10

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle's physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of "leaky vessels". Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  19. Polymer Platforms for Drug Delivery and Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zheng-Rong; Ye, Furong; Vaidya, Anagha

    2009-01-01

    Biocompatible synthetic polymers have demonstrated advantageous pharmacokinetic properties as compared to small molecular agents. Incorporation of low molecular weight therapeutics and imaging agents into biocompatible polymers can optimize their pharmacokinetic properties with improved efficacy of therapy and diagnostic imaging, respectively. We have applied the concept of drug delivery to design safe and effective contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and used biomedical imaging in non-invasive evaluation of drug delivery and image-guided therapy. We summarize here the recent progress in our research on biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents, non-invasive visualization of in vivo drug delivery of polymeric conjugates with contrast enhanced MRI, and contrast enhanced MRI guided photodynamic therapy. The preliminary results have shown that biocompatible polymers can be used as an effective platform for drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Safe and effective imaging agents can be designed by using the concept of polymeric drug delivery. Biomedical imaging can be used as a non-invasive method for the evaluation of in vivo drug delivery of polymeric drug delivery systems. The combination of drug delivery and biomedical imaging can result in image-guided therapies, which include tumor detection, therapy and non-invasive evaluation of therapeutic responses. PMID:17662500

  20. Small-scale systems for in vivo drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A LaVan; Terry McGuire; Robert Langer

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in the application of micro- and nanosystems for drug administration include a diverse range of new materials and methods. New approaches include the on-demand activation of molecular interactions, novel diffusion-controlled delivery devices, nanostructured 'smart' surfaces and materials, and prospects for coupling drug delivery to sensors and implants. Micro- and nanotechnologies are enabling the design of novel methods such

  1. Nano- and microfabrication for overcoming drug delivery challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Kimberly R.

    2013-01-01

    This highlight article describes current nano- and microfabrication techniques for creating drug delivery devices. We first review the main physiological barriers to delivering therapeutic agents. Then, we describe how novel fabrication methods can be utilized to combine many features into a single physiologically relevant device to overcome drug delivery challenges. PMID:23730504

  2. Biocompatibility and biofouling of MEMS drug delivery devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriela Voskerician; Matthew S. Shive; Rebecca S. Shawgo; Horst von Recum; James M. Anderson; Michael J. Cima; Robert Langer

    2003-01-01

    The biocompatibility and biofouling of the microfabrication materials for a MEMS drug delivery device have been evaluated. The in vivo inflammatory and wound healing response of MEMS drug delivery component materials, metallic gold, silicon nitride, silicon dioxide, silicon, and SU-8TM photoresist, were evaluated using the cage implant system. Materials, placed into stainless-steel cages, were implanted subcutaneously in a rodent model.

  3. Dendrimeric Drug Delivery Agents Interacting with Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecke, Almut; Banszak Holl, Mark; Orr, Bradford; Patri, Anil K.; Lee, Inhan; Baker, James, Jr.

    2002-03-01

    New initiatives in cancer treatment try to improve chemotherapy by developing smart drug delivery vehicles. The goal is to specifically target a tumor and deliver a therapeutic to kill it without causing damage to healthy tissue. A promising class of nanomaterials that can serve as a platform for this purpose is dendritic polymers, or dendrimers. In order to reach a high degree of specificity it is crucial to understand the details of the uptake of the polymer through the cell membrane. For this study the interactions of PAMAM dendrimers with model membranes consisting of DMPC bilayers are observed in real time using AFM. We compare dendrimers with various functional groups, sizes and architectures and show how these factors influence their effect on the lipid bilayer.

  4. Electrically Controlled Drug Delivery from Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Films

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    On-demand, local delivery of drug molecules to target tissues provides a means for effective drug dosing while reducing the adverse effects of systemic drug delivery. This work explores an electrically controlled drug delivery nanocomposite composed of graphene oxide (GO) deposited inside a conducting polymer scaffold. The nanocomposite is loaded with an anti-inflammatory molecule, dexamethasone, and exhibits favorable electrical properties. In response to voltage stimulation, the nanocomposite releases drug with a linear release profile and a dosage that can be adjusted by altering the magnitude of stimulation. No drug passively diffuses from the composite in the absence of stimulation. In vitro cell culture experiments demonstrate that the released drug retains its bioactivity and that no toxic byproducts leach from the film during electrical stimulation. Decreasing the size and thickness of the GO nanosheets, by means of ultrasonication treatment prior to deposition into the nanocomposite, alters the film morphology, drug load, and release profile, creating an opportunity to fine-tune the properties of the drug delivery system to meet a variety of therapeutic needs. The high level of temporal control and dosage flexibility provided by the electrically controlled GO nanocomposite drug delivery platform make it an exciting candidate for on-demand drug delivery. PMID:24428340

  5. Targeting strategies for delivery of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Ramana, Lakshmi Narashimhan; Anand, Appakkudal R; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2014-10-28

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection remains a significant cause of mortality globally. Though antiretroviral therapy has significantly reduced AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, there are several drawbacks in the current therapy, including toxicity, drug-drug interactions, development of drug resistance, necessity for long-term drug therapy, poor bio-availability and lack of access to tissues and reservoirs. To circumvent these problems, recent anti-HIV therapeutic research has focused on improving drug delivery systems through drug delivery targeted specifically to host cells infected with HIV or could potentially get infected with HIV. In this regard, several surface molecules of both viral and host cell origin have been described in recent years, that would enable targeted drug delivery in HIV infection. In the present review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the need for novel drug delivery systems, and the successes and challenges in the identification of novel viral and host-cell molecules for the targeted drug delivery of anti-HIV drugs. Such targeted anti-retroviral drug delivery approaches could pave the way for effective treatment and eradication of HIV from the body. PMID:25119469

  6. Issues in drug delivery: concepts and practice.

    PubMed

    Martonen, Ted B; Smyth, Hugh D; Isaacs, Kristin K; Burton, Ray T

    2005-09-01

    Understanding the transport and deposition of inhaled aerosols is of fundamental importance to inhalation therapy. Herein we address issues that affect drug delivery from experimental and theoretical perspectives. Accordingly, we shall limit our comments to a focused review of laboratory work (ie, an in vitro perspective) and the development of a computer-based 3-dimensional (3D) oral morphology with related computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and particle deposition studies (ie, an "in silico" perspective). To describe the oral region, morphometric data from the literature were employed. With Maya Unlimited, a third-party animation software package, coronal images were used to create initial spline curves, which served as the foundation of a nonuniform rational B-spline surface, representing a 3D morphology. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first medical application of Maya Unlimited. We have demonstrated that the code can be employed to construct 3D biological structures and perform 3D CFD simulations of aerosols from dry powder inhalers and metered-dose inhalers. A study was also conducted using Fluent, a commercially available software package that has been used extensively in our laboratory for 3D CFD computations. The Maya Unlimited software can generate physiologically realistic oral structures; it has great potential for use in the medical arena, because it requires neither advance technical training nor substantial peripheral ( eg, hardware) support, it allows for the introduction of medical devices ( eg, dry powder inhalers) into simulations, and it predicts 3D CFDpatterns consistent with experimental observations and results of more rigorous software ( Fluent). In the in vitro perspective we considered numerous salient topics, including the performances of dry powder inhalers and metered-dose inhalers, their respective operating characteristics, and relevance to in vivo data. We advocate that 3D CFD software be employed in a complementary manner, in real time, with aerosol therapy protocols in the medical arena, to promote the targeted delivery of inhaled drugs and thereby enhance their efficacies. PMID:16163810

  7. Development of a Microfluidics-Based Intracochlear Drug Delivery Device

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William F. Sewell; Jeffrey T. Borenstein; Zhiqiang Chen; Jason Fiering; Ophir Handzel; Maria Holmboe; Ernest S. Kim; Sharon G. Kujawa; Michael J. McKenna; Mark M. Mescher; Brian Murphy; Erin E. Leary Swan; Marcello Peppi; Sarah Tao

    2009-01-01

    Background: Direct delivery of drugs and other agents into the inner ear will be important for many emerging therapies, including the treatment of degenerative disorders and guiding regeneration. Methods: We have taken a microfluidics\\/MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) technology approach to develop a fully implantable reciprocating inner-ear drug-delivery system capable of timed and sequenced delivery of agents directly into perilymph of the

  8. Application of Plant Viruses as Nano Drug Delivery Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yupeng Ren; Sek Man Wong; Lee Yong Lim

    2010-01-01

    Nano-sized drug delivery systems based on virus-derived platforms have promising delivery and targeting efficiencies. To date,\\u000a much of our understanding of these systems is obtained from studies of animal viruses. Application of plant viruses for drug\\u000a delivery is in the nascent stage, but it is becoming apparent that plant viral particles can be engineered to possess novel\\u000a properties to meet

  9. Microemulsion: New Insights into the Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Rahul Rama; Verma, Anurag; Ghosh, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of drugs into eyes using conventional drug delivery systems, such as solutions, is a considerable challenge to the treatment of ocular diseases. Drug loss from the ocular surface by lachrymal fluid secretion, lachrymal fluid-eye barriers, and blood-ocular barriers are main obstacles. A number of ophthalmic drug delivery carriers have been made to improve the bioavailability and to prolong the residence time of drugs applied topically onto the eye. The potential use of microemulsions as an ocular drug delivery carrier offers several favorable pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical properties such as their excellent thermodynamic stability, phase transition to liquid-crystal state, very low surface tension, and small droplet size, which may result in improved ocular drug retention, extended duration of action, high ocular absorption, and permeation of loaded drugs. Further, both lipophilic and hydrophilic characteristics are present in microemulsions, so that the loaded drugs can diffuse passively as well get significantly partitioned in the variable lipophilic-hydrophilic corneal barrier. This review will provide an insight into previous studies on microemulsions for ocular delivery of drugs using various nonionic surfactants, cosurfactants, and associated irritation potential on the ocular surface. The reported in vivo experiments have shown a delayed effect of drug incorporated in microemulsion and an increase in the corneal permeation of the drug. PMID:23936681

  10. Nanofibers based antibacterial drug design, delivery and applications.

    PubMed

    Ulubayram, Kezban; Calamak, Semih; Shahbazi, Reza; Eroglu, Ipek

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by microorganisms like bacteria, fungi, etc. are the main obstacle in healing processes. Conventional antibacterial administration routes can be listed as oral, intravenous/intramuscular, topical and inhalation. These kinds of drug administrations are faced with critical vital issues such as; more rapid delivery of the drug than intended which can result in bacterial resistance, dose related systemic toxicity, tissue irritation and finally delayed healing process that need to be tackled. Recently, studies have been focused on new drug delivery systems, overcoming resistance and toxicological problems and finally localizing the molecules at the site of action in a proper dose. In this regard, many nanotechnological approaches such as nanoparticulate therapeutic systems have been developed to address accompanying problems mentioned above. Among them, drug loaded electrospun nanofibers propose main advantages like controlled drug delivery, high drug loading capacity, high encapsulation efficiency, simultaneous delivery of multiple drugs, ease of production and cost effectiveness for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Therefore, some particular attention has been devoted to the design of electrospun nanofibers as promising antibacterial drug carrier systems. A variety of antibacterials e.g., biocides, antibiotics, quaternary ammonium salts, triclosan, metallic nanoparticles (silver, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide) and antibacterial polymers (chitosan, polyethyleneimine, etc.) have been impregnated by various techniques into nanofibers that exhibit strong antibacterial activity in standard assays. This review highlights the design and delivery of antibacterial drug loaded nanofibers with particular focus on their function in the fields of drug delivery, wound healing, tissue engineering, cosmetics and other biomedical applications. PMID:25732666

  11. Novel Approaches in Formulation and Drug Delivery using Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kishan; Nair, Anroop B; Kumar, Ashok; Kumria, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    The success of ocular delivery relies on the potential to enhance the drug bioavailability by controlled and extended release of drug on the eye surface. Several new approaches have been attempted to augment the competence and diminish the intrinsic side effects of existing ocular drug delivery systems. In this contest, progress has been made to develop drug-eluting contact lens using different techniques, which have the potential to control and sustain the delivery of drug. Further, the availability of novel polymers have facilitated and promoted the utility of contact lenses in ocular drug delivery. Several research groups have already explored the feasibility and potential of contact lens using conventional drugs for the treatment of periocular and intraocular diseases. Contact lenses formulated using modern technology exhibits high loading, controlled drug release, apposite thickness, water content, superior mechanical and optical properties as compared to commercial lenses. In general, this review discus various factors and approaches designed and explored for the successful delivery of ophthalmic drugs using contact lenses as drug delivery device PMID:24826007

  12. Mitochondrial biology, targets, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Milane, Lara; Trivedi, Malav; Singh, Amit; Talekar, Meghna; Amiji, Mansoor

    2015-06-10

    In recent years, mitochondrial medicine has emerged as a new discipline resting at the intersection of mitochondrial biology, pathology, and pharmaceutics. The central role of mitochondria in critical cellular processes such as metabolism and apoptosis has placed mitochondria at the forefront of cell science. Advances in mitochondrial biology have revealed that these organelles continually undergo fusion and fission while functioning independently and in complex cellular networks, establishing direct membrane contacts with each other and with other organelles. Understanding the diverse cellular functions of mitochondria has contributed to understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in disease states. Polyplasmy and heteroplasmy contribute to mitochondrial phenotypes and associated dysfunction. Residing at the center of cell biology, cellular functions, and disease pathology and being laden with receptors and targets, mitochondria are beacons for pharmaceutical modification. This review presents the current state of mitochondrial medicine with a focus on mitochondrial function, dysfunction, and common disease; mitochondrial receptors, targets, and substrates; and mitochondrial drug design and drug delivery with a focus on the application of nanotechnology to mitochondrial medicine. Mitochondrial medicine is at the precipice of clinical translation; the objective of this review is to aid in the advancement of mitochondrial medicine from infancy to application. PMID:25841699

  13. Facing the Truth about Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kinam

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology in drug delivery has been manifested into nanoparticles that can have unique properties both in vitro and in vivo, especially in targeted drug delivery to tumors. Numerous nanoparticle formulations have been designed and tested to great effect in small animal models, but the translation of the small animal results to clinical success has been limited. Successful translation requires revisiting the meaning of nanotechnology in drug delivery, understanding the limitations of nanoparticles, identifying the misconceptions pervasive in the field, and facing inconvenient truths. Nanoparticle approaches can have real impact in improving drug delivery by focusing on the problems at hand, such as enhancing their drug loading capacity, affinity to target cells, and spatiotemporal control of drug release. PMID:24490875

  14. In Vivo Studies Demonstrating Feasibility and Biocompatibilitya of a MEMS Ocular Drug Delivery System

    E-print Network

    Meng, Ellis

    these limitations with a polymer-based MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) intraocular drug delivery deviceIn Vivo Studies Demonstrating Feasibility and Biocompatibilitya of a MEMS Ocular Drug Delivery

  15. Reservoir-Based Drug Delivery Systems Utilizing Microtechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Cynthia L.; Santini, John T.; Langer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This review covers reservoir-based drug delivery systems that incorporate microtechnology, with an emphasis on oral, dermal, and implantable systems. Key features of each technology are highlighted such as working principles, fabrication methods, dimensional constraints, and performance criteria. Reservoir-based systems include a subset of microfabricated drug delivery systems and provide unique advantages. Reservoirs, whether external to the body or implanted, provide a well-controlled environment for a drug formulation, allowing increased drug stability and prolonged delivery times. Reservoir systems have the flexibility to accommodate various delivery schemes, including zero order, pulsatile, and on demand dosing, as opposed to a standard sustained release profile. Furthermore, the development of reservoir-based systems for targeted delivery for difficult to treat applications (e.g., ocular) has resulted in potential platforms for patient therapy. PMID:22465783

  16. Polymer nanogels: a versatile nanoscopic drug delivery platform

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Reuben T.; Ventura, Judy; Zhuang, Jiaming; Thayumanavan, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this review we put the spotlight on crosslinked polymer nanogels, a promising platform that has the characteristics of an “ideal” drug delivery vehicle. Some of the key aspects of drug delivery vehicle design like stability, response to biologically relevant stimuli, passive targeting, active targeting, toxicity and ease of synthesis are discussed. We discuss several delivery systems in this light and highlight some examples of systems, which satisfy some or all of these design requirements. In particular, we point to the advantages that crosslinked polymeric systems bring to drug delivery. We review some of the synthetic methods of nanogel synthesis and conclude with the diverse applications in drug delivery where nanogels have been fruitfully employed. PMID:22342438

  17. Cavitation-enhanced extravasation for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Rifai, Bassel; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin C

    2011-11-01

    A flow-through tissue-mimicking phantom composed of a biocompatible hydro-gel with embedded tumour cells was used to assess and optimize the role of ultrasound-induced cavitation on the extravasation of a macromolecular compound from a channel mimicking vessel in the gel, namely a non-replicating luciferase-expressing adenovirus (Ad-Luc). Using a 500 KHz therapeutic ultrasound transducer confocally aligned with a focussed passive cavitation detector, different exposure conditions and burst mode timings were selected by performing time and frequency domain analysis of passively recorded acoustic emissions, in the absence and in the presence of ultrasound contrast agents acting as cavitation nuclei. In the presence of Sonovue, maximum ultraharmonic emissions were detected for peak rarefactional pressures of 360 kPa, and maximum broadband emissions occurred at 1250 kPa. The energy of the recorded acoustic emissions was used to optimise the pulse repetition frequency and duty cycle in order to maximize either ultraharmonic or broadband emissions while keeping the acoustic energy delivered to the focus constant. Cell viability measurements indicated that none of the insonation conditions investigated induces cell death in the absence of a therapeutic agent (i.e. virus). Phase contrast images of the tissue-mimicking phantom showed that short range vessel disruption can occur when ultra-harmonic emissions (nf0/2) are maximised whereas formation of a micro-channel perpendicular to the flow can be obtained in the presence of broadband acoustic emissions. Following Ad-Luc delivery, luciferase expression measurements showed that a 60-fold increase in its bioavailability can be achieved when broadband noise emissions are present during insonation, even for modest contrast agent concentrations. The findings of the present study suggest that drug delivery systems based on acoustic cavitation may help enhance the extravasation of anticancer agents, thus increasing their penetration distance to hypoxic regions and poorly vascularised tumour regions. PMID:21963037

  18. Layered Double Hydroxide-Based Nanocarriers for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xue; Zhang, Hui; Dou, Liguang

    2014-01-01

    Biocompatible clay materials have attracted particular attention as the efficient drug delivery systems (DDS). In this article, we review developments in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) for controlled drug release and delivery. We show how advances in the ability to synthesize intercalated structures have a significant influence on the development of new applications of these materials. We also show how modification and/or functionalization can lead to new biotechnological and biomedical applications. This review highlights the most recent progresses in research on LDH-based controlled drug delivery systems, focusing mainly on: (i) DDS with cardiovascular drugs as guests; (ii) DDS with anti-inflammatory drugs as guests; and (iii) DDS with anti-cancer drugs as guests. Finally, future prospects for LDH-based drug carriers are also discussed. PMID:24940733

  19. Microneedle technologies for (trans)dermal drug and vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    van der Maaden, Koen; Jiskoot, Wim; Bouwstra, Joke

    2012-07-20

    Microneedles have been used for the dermal and transdermal delivery of a broad range of drugs, such as small molecular weight drugs, oligonucleotides, DNA, peptides, proteins and inactivated viruses. However, until now there are no microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery systems on the market. In the past decade various types of microneedles have been developed by a number of production processes. Numerous geometries of microneedles have been designed from various materials. These microneedles have been used for different approaches of microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery. Following a brief introduction about dermal and transdermal drug delivery, this review describes different production methods for solid and hollow microneedles as well as conditions that influence skin penetration. Besides, the four microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery approaches are discussed: "poke and flow", "poke and patch", "poke and release", and "coat and poke". A separate section of this review is devoted to the use of microneedles for the delivery of therapeutic proteins and vaccines. Finally, we give our view on research and development that is needed to render microneedle-based (trans)dermal drug delivery technologies clinically useful in the near future. PMID:22342643

  20. Bioavailability of phytochemicals and its enhancement by drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Aqil, Farrukh; Munagala, Radha; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Vadhanam, Manicka V.

    2013-01-01

    Issues of poor oral bioavailability of cancer chemopreventives have hindered progress in cancer prevention. Novel delivery systems that modulate the pharmacokinetics of existing drugs, such as nanoparticles, cyclodextrins, niosomes, liposomes and implants, could be used to enhance the delivery of chemopreventive agents to target sites. The development of new approaches in prevention and treatment of cancer could encompass new delivery systems for approved and newly investigated compounds. In this review, we discuss some of the delivery approaches that have already made an impact by either delivering a drug to target tissue or increasing its bioavailability by many fold. PMID:23435377

  1. An approach to drug delivery using novel carbohydrates to carry drugs

    E-print Network

    Davis, Ben G.

    An approach to drug delivery using novel carbohydrates to carry drugs has recently been described of the cancer drug doxorubicin targeted to hepatocytes in a mouse liver tumour model. Known as the LEAPT step involves administering the rhamnose-capped pro-drug; the drug is activated in the target cell once

  2. Radiation-mediated control of drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Qu, S; Geng, L; Cmelak, A; Chakravarthy, A; Martin, W; Scarfone, C; Giorgio, T

    2001-10-01

    Clinical trials of radiotherapy to control drug delivery were initiated in 1999 at Vanderbilt University. The initial studies exploited the findings that platelets are activated in tumor blood vessels after high-dose irradiation as used in radiosurgery and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Platelets labeled with 111In showed binding in tumor blood vessels. However, the platelet labeling process caused platelets to also accumulate in the spleen. That clinical trial was closed, and subsequent clinical trials targeted protein activation in irradiated tumor blood vessels. Preclinical studies showed that peptide libraries that bind within irradiated tumor blood vessels contained the peptide sequence Arg-Gln-Asp (RGD). RGD binds to integrin receptors (e.g., receptors for fibrinogen, fibronectin, and vitronectin). We found that the fibrinogen receptor (GPIIb/IIIa, alpha2bbeta3) is activated within irradiated tumor blood vessels. RGD peptidemimetics currently in clinical trials include GPIIb/IIIa antagonists and the platelet-imaging agent biapcitide. Biapcitide is an RGD mimetic that is labeled with 99Tc to allow gamma camera imaging of the biodistribution of the GPIIb/IIIa receptor in neoplasms of patients treated with radiosurgery. This study has shown that the schedule of administration of the RGD mimetic is crucial. The peptide mimetic must be administered immediately before irradiation, whereas the natural ligands to the receptor compete for biapcitide binding if biapcitide is administered after irradiation. The authors currently are conducting a dose deescalation study to determine the threshold dosage required for RGD mimetic binding to radiation activated receptor. Radiation-guided clinical trials have been initiated by use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. In a separate trial, the pharmacokinetics of radiation-inducible gene therapy are being investigated. In this trial, the radiation-activated promoter Egr-1 regulates expression of the tumor necrosis factor alpha gene, which is administered by use of the attenuated adenovirus vector. The Ad.Egr-TNF (ADGV) gene is administered by intratumoral injection of vector followed by irradiation in patients with soft-tissue sarcomas. This review highlights recent findings in these phase I pharmacokinetic studies of radiation-controlled drug delivery systems. PMID:11586099

  3. Smart drug delivery injector microsystem based on pyrotechnic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manel Puig-Vidal; Jaime Lopez; Pere Miribel; Josep Samitier-Marti; Carole Rossi; Axel Berthold

    2003-01-01

    A smart drug delivery injector microsystem is presented based on small pyrotechnics to impulse drugs to be injected to a human being. The proposal refers to a feasibility demonstration of the technology for pharmaceutical chips. These chips would be around some cm2 in section and will be able to inject a drug into de subject skin responding to an electrical

  4. Smart-drug delivery system employing molecular motors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Vashist; R. Tewari; I. Kaur; R. P. Bajpai; L. M. Bharadwaj

    2005-01-01

    A drug delivery system has been envisioned employing actinmyosin molecular motors, liposomes, microcantilevers and a specific track formed by microfilaments. Molecular motors can pull on giant liposomes enclosing the drug to be delivered at the target site. An array of microcantilevers whose deflection in nanometers would cause the opening of the valves responsible for delivering the drug, would be implanted

  5. A Controlled Drug-Delivery Experiment Using Alginate Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Stephanie; Vernengo, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, cost-effective experiment which introduces students to drug delivery and modeling using alginate beads. Students produce calcium alginate beads loaded with drug and measure the rate of release from the beads for systems having different stir rates, geometries, extents of cross-linking, and drug molecular weight.…

  6. Osmotic drug delivery using swellable-core technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Thombre; L. E. Appel; M. B. Chidlaw; P. D. Daugherity; F. Dumont; L. A. F. Evans; S. C. Sutton

    2004-01-01

    Swellable-core technology (SCT) formulations that used osmotic pressure and polymer swelling to deliver drugs to the GI tract in a reliable and reproducible manner were studied. The SCT formulations consisted of a core tablet containing the drug and a water-swellable component, and one or more delivery ports. The in vitro and in vivo performance of two model drugs, tenidap and

  7. An oral-controlled release drug delivery system for liquid and semisolid drug formulations.

    PubMed

    Haznar-Garbacz, Dorota; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Eisenächer, Friederike; Klein, Sandra; Weitschies, Werner

    2011-12-01

    A novel oral drug delivery system for the controlled release of liquid drugs, drug solutions, and semisolid drug preparations is presented that is utilizing the constant vapor pressure of liquefied gas. The system is equipped with a capillary as an element determining the drug delivery rate and contains a liquefied propellant with a suitable boiling point below human body temperature. In the dissolution studies, polyacrylate gels of different viscosities containing paracetamol as model drug were used. Zero-order release kinetics was obtained. The release rates were dependent on the gel viscosity. Besides, by gel viscosity, the drug release rates could also be modified by changing the propellant type and the capillary parameters such as length or diameter. Accordingly, the new system enables a wide range of drug delivery kinetics which can be modified in a case-by-case basis in order to match the desired drug delivery characteristics. PMID:21918919

  8. Dendrimeric Systems and Their Applications in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Burçin; Bozda? Pehlivan, Sibel; Ünlü, Nur?en

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug's water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye's unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed. PMID:24396306

  9. Dendrimeric systems and their applications in ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Burçin; Pehlivan, Sibel Bozda?; Unlü, Nur?en

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug's water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye's unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed. PMID:24396306

  10. Auto-associative amphiphilic polysaccharides as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Leila N; Hendra, Frédéric; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2012-06-01

    Self-assembly of amphiphilic polysaccharides provides a positive outlook for drug delivery systems without the need for solvents or surfactants. Various polymeric amphiphilic polysaccharides undergo intramolecular or intermolecular associations in water. This type of association, promoted by hydrophobic segments, led to the formation of various drug delivery systems such as micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes and hydrogels. Here, we review a selection of the most important amphiphilic polysaccharides used as drug delivery systems and their pharmaceutical applications. Attention focuses on amphiphilic chitosan owing to its unique properties such as excellent biocompatibility, non-toxicity and antimicrobial and bioadhesive properties. PMID:22305936

  11. Inorganic Nanoporous Membranes for Immunoisolated Cell-Based Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Adam; Desai, Tejal

    2014-01-01

    Materials advances enabled by nanotechnology have brought about promising approaches to improve the encapsulation mechanism for immunoisolated cell-based drug delivery. Cell-based drug delivery is a promising treatment for many diseases but has thus far achieved only limited clinical success. Treatment of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) by transplantation of pancreatic ?-cells represents the most anticipated application of cell-based drug delivery technology. This review outlines the challenges involved with maintaining transplanted cell viability and discusses how inorganic nanoporous membranes may be useful in achieving clinical success. PMID:20384222

  12. Microneedles for Drug Delivery via the Gastrointestinal Tract

    E-print Network

    Schroeder, Avi

    Both patients and physicians prefer the oral route of drug delivery. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract, though, limits the bioavailability of certain therapeutics because of its protease and bacteria-rich environment as well ...

  13. Noninvasive quantification of drug delivery from an implantable MEMS device

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Audrey M., 1976-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) sensors in vivo in real time and corroborated by scintillation of urine samples. The goal of monitoring drug delivery from an implant in vivo, in real time and without disturbing the tissue environment, was ...

  14. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-01

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials.Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02324f

  15. Carbon nanotubes for delivery of small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bin Sheng; Yoong, Sia Lee; Jagusiak, Anna; Panczyk, Tomasz; Ho, Han Kiat; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2013-12-01

    In the realm of drug delivery, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have gained tremendous attention as promising nanocarriers, owing to their distinct characteristics, such as high surface area, enhanced cellular uptake and the possibility to be easily conjugated with many therapeutics, including both small molecules and biologics, displaying superior efficacy, enhanced specificity and diminished side effects. While most CNT-based drug delivery system (DDS) had been engineered to combat cancers, there are also emerging reports that employ CNTs as either the main carrier or adjunct material for the delivery of various non-anticancer drugs. In this review, the delivery of small molecule drugs is expounded, with special attention paid to the current progress of in vitro and in vivo research involving CNT-based DDSs, before finally concluding with some consideration on inevitable complications that hamper successful disease intervention with CNTs. PMID:23954402

  16. Photoswitchable Nanoparticles for Triggered Tissue Penetration and Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Tong, Rong

    We report a novel nanoparticulate drug delivery system that undergoes reversible volume change from 150 to 40 nm upon phototriggering with UV light. The volume change of these monodisperse nanoparticles comprising spiropyran, ...

  17. Nanoparticle hardness controls the internalization pathway for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Xianren; Cao, Dapeng

    2015-02-14

    Nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems offer fundamental advantages over current therapeutic agents that commonly display a longer circulation time, lower toxicity, specific targeted release, and greater bioavailability. For successful NP-based drug delivery it is essential that the drug-carrying nanocarriers can be internalized by the target cells and transported to specific sites, and the inefficient internalization of nanocarriers is often one of the major sources for drug resistance. In this work, we use the dissipative particle dynamics simulation to investigate the effect of NP hardness on their internalization efficiency. Three simplified models of NP platforms for drug delivery, including polymeric NP, liposome and solid NP, are designed here to represent increasing nanocarrier hardness. Simulation results indicate that NP hardness controls the internalization pathway for drug delivery. Rigid NPs can enter the cell by a pathway of endocytosis, whereas for soft NPs the endocytosis process can be inhibited or frustrated due to wrapping-induced shape deformation and non-uniform ligand distribution. Instead, soft NPs tend to find one of three penetration pathways to enter the cell membrane via rearranging their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. Finally, we show that the interaction between nanocarriers and drug molecules is also essential for effective drug delivery. PMID:25585060

  18. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-07-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world's population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:25071326

  19. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:25071326

  20. IMPLANTABLE MEMS DRUG DELIVERY DEVICE FOR CANCER RADIATION REDUCTION

    E-print Network

    Meng, Ellis

    but remains a medical challenge. Cancer treatment often involves radiation therapy which results in severeIMPLANTABLE MEMS DRUG DELIVERY DEVICE FOR CANCER RADIATION REDUCTION Heidi Gensler1 , Roya Sheybani of agents for cancer radiation reduction was demonstrated. In vivo chronic delivery of radiation sensitizing

  1. Novel Approaches for Retinal Drug and Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The ARVO 2014 minisymposium on “Novel Approaches for Retinal Drug and Gene Delivery” was held on May 6, 2014 in Orlando, FL. The main intent of the symposium was to review recent advances in retinal drug and gene delivery with specific emphasis on novel approaches that address current limitations and have the potential to translate into clinical practice. The symposium was sponsored by Translational Vision Science and Technology. PMID:25346872

  2. Drug Delivery Into the Eye With the Use of Ultrasound

    E-print Network

    Clark, John

    Drug Delivery Into the Eye With the Use of Ultrasound Vesna Zderic, PhD, John I. Clark, PhD, Shahram Vaezy, PhD Objective. To evaluate ultrasound enhancement of drug delivery through the cornea to ultrasound at a frequency of 880 kHz and intensities of 0.19 to 0.56 W/cm2 (continuous mode) with an exposure

  3. Multifunctional inverse opal particles for drug delivery and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Huan; Ye, Baofen; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-06-28

    Particle-based delivery systems have a demonstrated value for drug discovery and development. Here, we report a new type of particle-based delivery system that has controllable release and is self-monitoring. The particles were composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) hydrogel with an inverse opal structure. The presence of macropores in the particles provides channels for active drug loading and release from the materials. PMID:26035621

  4. Drug delivery systems for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Dong Yun; Lee, Minhyung

    2013-10-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Reduced cerebral blood flow causes acute damage to the brain due to excitotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and ischemia. Currently, the main treatment for stroke is to revive the blood flow by using thrombolytic agents. Reviving blood flow also causes ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) damage. I/R damage results from inflammation and apoptosis and can persist for days to weeks, increasing the infarct size. Drugs can be applied to stroke to intervene in the sub-acute and chronic phases. Chemical, peptide, and genetic therapies have been evaluated to reduce delayed damage to the brain. These drugs have different characteristics, requiring that delivery carriers be developed based on these characteristics. The delivery route is another important factor affecting the efficiency of drug delivery. Various delivery routes have been developed, such as intravenous injection, intranasal administration, and local direct injection to overcome the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). In this review, the delivery carriers and delivery routes for peptide and gene therapies are discussed and examples are provided. Combined with new drugs, drug delivery systems will eventually provide useful treatments for ischemic stroke. PMID:23307348

  5. Stimuli sensitive hydrogels for ophthalmic drug delivery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Swatantra KS; Saxena, Prachi; Rai, AK

    2012-01-01

    Amongst the various routes of drug delivery, the field of ocular drug delivery is one of the most interesting and challenging endeavors facing the pharmaceutical scientist for past 10-20 years. As an isolated organ, eye is very difficult to study from a drug delivery point of view. Despite this limitation, improvements have been made with the objective of maintaining the drug in the biophase for an extended period. A major problem in ocular therapeutics is the attainment of an optimal drug concentration at the site of action. To achieve effective ophthalmic therapy, an adequate amount of active ingredient must be delivered and maintained within the eye. The most frequently used dosage forms, i.e., eye solution, eye ointments, eye gels, and eye suspensions are compromised in their effectiveness by several limitations leading to poor ocular bioavailability. Ophthalmic use of viscosity-enhancing agents, penetration enhancers, cyclodextrins, prodrug approaches, and ocular inserts, and the ready existing drug carrier systems along with their application to ophthalmic drug delivery are common to improve ocular bioavailability. Amongst these hydrogel (stimuli sensitive) systems are important, which undergo reversible volume and/or sol-gel phase transitions in response to physiological (temperature, pH and present of ions in organism fluids, enzyme substrate) or other external (electric current, light) stimuli. They help to increase in precorneal residence time of drug to a sufficient extent that an ocularly delivered drug can exhibit its maximum biological action. The concept of this innovative ophthalmic delivery approach is to decrease the systemic side effects and to create a more pronounced effect with lower doses of the drug. The present article describes the advantages and use stimuli sensitive of hydrogel systems in ophthalmic drug delivery. PMID:23119233

  6. Novel and current treatment concepts using pulmonary drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Hohenegger, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The novel technologies in pulmonary drug delivery propelled the development of new strategies for pharmacological intervention in human diseases. In particular, this review will focus on pulmonary parameters which influence the delivery of inhaled therapeutics and summarize novel applications and recent innovations. The central issues of pulmonary drug application are optimal effectiveness under conditions of greatest safety. They not only depend on the properties of the drug but also feature the application vehicle and drug formulation. The optimization of the whole system (drug, formulation and vehicle) is therefore a necessary prerequisite for reliable inhaling medicines. Depending on the desired locus of drug action, the inhaled medicine has to be adjusted to particle size, concentration and chemical composition to guarantee a local or systemic drug action. Local asthma therapy represents the established concept for inhalation therapy. Due to the disease status, deposition of drugs is therefore often seen in central rather than peripheral airways. Recent developments in ultrafine therapeutic particles should therefore provide enough drug deposition even in the deeper airways. Recent approvals and interesting new therapy concepts will be discussed. Beside a pulmonary drug action there is an accumulating number of applications also for systemic drug action after pulmonary drug delivery. These involve among others inhaled insulin, glucagon-like-peptide 1 or growth hormone. But also novel therapeutic systems for gene therapy and vaccination are currently under investigation. Successful feasibility of these novel concepts will be expected in the near future. PMID:20509845

  7. Microneedle-based drug delivery systems: Microfabrication, drug delivery, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Woolfson, A. David

    2010-01-01

    Many promising therapeutic agents are limited by their inability to reach the systemic circulation, due to the excellent barrier properties of biological membranes, such as the stratum corneum (SC) of the skin or the sclera/cornea of the eye and others. The outermost layer of the skin, the SC, is the principal barrier to topically-applied medications. The intact SC thus provides the main barrier to exogenous substances, including drugs. Only drugs with very specific physicochemical properties (molecular weight < 500 Da, adequate lipophilicity, and low melting point) can be successfully administered transdermally. Transdermal delivery of hydrophilic drugs and macromolecular agents of interest, including peptides, DNA, and small interfering RNA is problematic. Therefore, facilitation of drug penetration through the SC may involve by-pass or reversible disruption of SC molecular architecture. Microneedles (MNs), when used to puncture skin, will by-pass the SC and create transient aqueous transport pathways of micron dimensions and enhance the transdermal permeability. These micropores are orders of magnitude larger than molecular dimensions, and, therefore, should readily permit the transport of hydrophilic macromolecules. Various strategies have been employed by many research groups and pharmaceutical companies worldwide, for the fabrication of MNs. This review details various types of MNs, fabrication methods and, importantly, investigations of clinical safety of MN. PMID:20297904

  8. Nasal Drug Delivery in Traditional Persian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi; Zargaran, Arman; Müller, Johannes; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-01-01

    Background Over one hundred different pharmaceutical dosage forms have been recorded in literatures of Traditional Persian Medicine among which nasal forms are considerable. Objectives This study designed to derive the most often applied nasal dosage forms together with those brief clinical administrations. Materials and Methods In the current study remaining pharmaceutical manuscripts of Persia during 9th to 18th century AD have been studied and different dosage forms related to nasal application of herbal medicines and their therapeutic effects were derived. Results By searching through pharmaceutical manuscripts of medieval Persia, different nasal dosage forms involving eleven types related to three main groups are found. These types could be derived from powder, solution or liquid and gaseous forms. Gaseous form were classified into fumigation (Bakhoor), vapor bath (Enkebab), inhalation (Lakhlakheh), aroma agents (Ghalieh) and olfaction or smell (Shomoom). Nasal solutions were as drops (Ghatoor), nasal snuffing drops (Saoot) and liquid snuff formulations (Noshoogh). Powders were as nasal insufflation or snorting agents (Nofookh) and errhine or sternutator medicine (Otoos). Nasal forms were not applied only for local purposes. Rather systemic disorders and specially CNS complications were said to be a target for these dosage forms. Discussion While this novel type of drug delivery is known as a suitable substitute for oral and parenteral administration, it was well accepted and extensively mentioned in Persian medical and pharmaceutical manuscripts and other traditional systems of medicine as well. Accordingly, medieval pharmaceutical standpoints on nasal dosage forms could still be an interesting subject of study. Therefore, the current work can briefly show the pharmaceutical knowledge on nasal formulations in medieval Persia and clarify a part of history of traditional Persian pharmacy. PMID:24624204

  9. Mobile Drug-Delivery for Ambient Assisted Living: Implantable and Extracorporeal Devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Haeberle; R. Gronmaier; T. Goettsche; M Vosseler; A. Kain; M. Reiterer; D. Hradetzky; C. Mueller; S. Messner; R. Zengerle

    Miniaturized smart drug delivery devices pave the way for a personalized treatment of many diseases by un- skilled persons outside the hospital. Many therapies require a repetitive delivery of a defined amount of drug in well defined time slots. Innovative drug delivery systems constitute an important prerequisite for ambient as- sisted living: The reliable delivery of drugs, in time and

  10. Electrohydrodynamics: A facile technique to fabricate drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Syandan; Liao, I-Chien; Adler, Andrew; Leong, Kam W.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning and electrospraying are facile electrohydrodynamic fabrication methods that can generate drug delivery systems (DDS) through a one-step process. The nano-structured fiber and particle morphologies produced by these techniques offer tunable release kinetics applicable to diverse biomedical applications. Coaxial-electrospinning/electrospraying, a relatively new technique of fabricating core-shell fibers/particles have added to the versatility of these DDS by affording a near zero-order drug release kinetics, dampening of burst release, and applicability to a wider range of bioactive agents. Controllable electrospinning/spraying of fibers and particles and subsequent drug release from these chiefly polymeric vehicles depends on well-defined solution and process parameters. The additional drug delivery capability from electrospun fibers can further enhance the material’s functionality in tissue engineering applications. This review discusses the state-of-the-art of using electrohydrodynamic technique to generate nano-fiber/particles as drug delivery devices. PMID:19651167

  11. A Review on Composite Liposomal Technologies for Specialized Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mufamadi, Maluta S.; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E.; Du Toit, Lisa C.; Modi, Girish; Naidoo, Dinesh; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.

    2011-01-01

    The combination of liposomes with polymeric scaffolds could revolutionize the current state of drug delivery technology. Although liposomes have been extensively studied as a promising drug delivery model for bioactive compounds, there still remain major drawbacks for widespread pharmaceutical application. Two approaches for overcoming the factors related to the suboptimal efficacy of liposomes in drug delivery have been suggested. The first entails modifying the liposome surface with functional moieties, while the second involves integration of pre-encapsulated drug-loaded liposomes within depot polymeric scaffolds. This attempts to provide ingenious solutions to the limitations of conventional liposomes such as short plasma half-lives, toxicity, stability, and poor control of drug release over prolonged periods. This review delineates the key advances in composite technologies that merge the concepts of depot polymeric scaffolds with liposome technology to overcome the limitations of conventional liposomes for pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21490759

  12. 3-dimensional (3D) fabricated polymer based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Simon E; Wallace, Gordon G

    2014-11-10

    Drug delivery from 3-dimensional (3D) structures is a rapidly growing area of research. It is essential to achieve structures wherein drug stability is ensured, the drug loading capacity is appropriate and the desired controlled release profile can be attained. Attention must also be paid to the development of appropriate fabrication machinery that allows 3D drug delivery systems (DDS) to be produced in a simple, reliable and reproducible manner. The range of fabrication methods currently being used to form 3D DDSs include electrospinning (solution and melt), wet-spinning and printing (3-dimensional). The use of these techniques enables production of DDSs from the macro-scale down to the nano-scale. This article reviews progress in these fabrication techniques to form DDSs that possess desirable drug delivery kinetics for a wide range of applications. PMID:25020039

  13. Mathematical modeling of drug delivery from autocatalytically degradable PLGA microspheres --A review

    E-print Network

    Braatz, Richard D.

    Review Mathematical modeling of drug delivery from autocatalytically degradable PLGA microspheres delivery PLGA Autocatalysis Bulk degradation Degradable polymer PLGA microspheres are widely studied for controlled release drug delivery applications, and many models have been proposed to describe PLGA

  14. pH-responsive drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Feng

    2015-02-01

    In many biomedical applications, drugs need to be delivered in response to the pH value in the body. In fact, it is desirable if the drugs can be administered in a controlled manner that precisely matches physiological needs at targeted sites and at predetermined release rates for predefined periods of time. Different organs, tissues, and cellular compartments have different pH values, which makes the pH value a suitable stimulus for controlled drug release. pH-Responsive drug-delivery systems have attracted more and more interest as "smart" drug-delivery systems for overcoming the shortcomings of conventional drug formulations because they are able to deliver drugs in a controlled manner at a specific site and time, which results in high therapeutic efficacy. This focus review is not intended to offer a comprehensive review on the research devoted to pH-responsive drug-delivery systems; instead, it presents some recent progress obtained for pH-responsive drug-delivery systems and future perspectives. There are a large number of publications available on this topic, but only a selection of examples will be discussed. PMID:25303435

  15. Therapeutic applications of electrospun nanofibers for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Ju; Kim, Woo Jin; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2014-01-01

    Electrospun nanofiber drug delivery systems have been studied using various techniques. Herein, we describe the fabrication of a drug-incorporating nanofiber. Drugs, such as proteins, peptide, antibodies, and small molecule drugs, can be loaded within or on the surface of nanofibers according to their properties. Hydrophobic drugs are directly dissolved with a polymer in an organic solvent before electrospinning. However, it is preferred to surface-immobilize bioactive molecules on nanofibers by physical absorption or chemical conjugation. Especially, chemically surface-immobilized proteins on a nanofiber mesh stimulate cell differentiation and proliferation. Using a dual electrospinning nozzle to create nanofiber sheet layers, which are stacked on top of one another, the initial burst release is reduced compared with solid nanofibers because of the layers. Furthermore, hybridization of electrospun nanofibers with nanoparticles, microspheres, and hydrogels is indirect drug loading method into the nanofibers. It is also possible to produce multi-drug delivery systems with timed programmed release. PMID:24234913

  16. Drug delivery systems, CNS protection, and the blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  17. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations failed to reach. However, hypotonic formulations caused free drugs to be drawn through the epithelium, reducing vaginal retention. In contrast, hypotonic formulations caused MPP to accumulate rapidly and uniformly on vaginal surfaces, ideally positioned for sustained drug delivery. Using a mouse model of vaginal genital herpes (HSV-2) infection, we found that hypotonic delivery of free drug led to improved immediate protection, but diminished longer-term protection. Minimally hypotonic formulations provided rapid and uniform delivery of MPP to the entire vaginal surface, thus enabling formulations with minimal risk of epithelial toxicity. We then describe an ex vivo method for characterizing particle transport on freshly excised mucosal tissues. By directly observing MPP transport on vaginal, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tissue, we were able to determine an innate difference in mucus mesh size at different anatomical locations. In addition, we were able to optimize particle size for gastrointestinal delivery in mice. As described here, there are numerous barriers to effective drug delivery in the gastrointestinal tract, including the mucus barrier. We go on to demonstrate that MPP can improve delivery in the gastrointestinal tract, both by rectal and oral administration. Finally, we describe the use of MPP for improving vaginal drug delivery. Incomplete drug coverage and short duration of action limit the effectiveness of vaginally administered drugs, including microbicides for preventing sexually transmitted infections. We show that MPP provide uniform distribution over the vaginal epithelium, whereas CP are aggregated by mouse vaginal mucus, leading to poor distribution. By penetrating into the deepest mucus layers in the rugae, more MPP were retained in the vaginal tract compared to CP. After 24 h, when delivered in a conventional vaginal gel, patches of a model drug remained on the vaginal epithelium, whereas the epithelium was coated with drug delivered by MPP. We then demonstrate that when administered 30 min prior to inoculum, anti-HSV-2 MPP protected

  18. Adenovirus Dodecahedron, as a Drug Delivery Vector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monika Zochowska; Agnieszka Paca; Guy Schoehn; Jean-Pierre Andrieu; Jadwiga Chroboczek; Bernard Dublet; Ewa Szolajska; Ganesh Chandra Jagetia

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundBleomycin (BLM) is an anticancer antibiotic used in many cancer regimens. Its utility is limited by systemic toxicity and dose-dependent pneumonitis able to progress to lung fibrosis. The latter can affect up to nearly 50% of the total patient population, out of which 3% will die. We propose to improve BLM delivery by tethering it to an efficient delivery vector.

  19. Microsystems technologies for drug delivery to the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Pararas, Erin E Leary; Borkholder, David A; Borenstein, Jeffrey T

    2012-11-01

    The inner ear represents one of the most technologically challenging targets for local drug delivery, but its clinical significance is rapidly increasing. The prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss and other auditory diseases, along with balance disorders and tinnitus, has spurred broad efforts to develop therapeutic compounds and regenerative approaches to treat these conditions, necessitating advances in systems capable of targeted and sustained drug delivery. The delicate nature of hearing structures combined with the relative inaccessibility of the cochlea by means of conventional delivery routes together necessitate significant advancements in both the precision and miniaturization of delivery systems, and the nature of the molecular and cellular targets for these therapies suggests that multiple compounds may need to be delivered in a time-sequenced fashion over an extended duration. Here we address the various approaches being developed for inner ear drug delivery, including micropump-based devices, reciprocating systems, and cochlear prosthesis-mediated delivery, concluding with an analysis of emerging challenges and opportunities for the first generation of technologies suitable for human clinical use. These developments represent exciting advances that have the potential to repair and regenerate hearing structures in millions of patients for whom no currently available medical treatments exist, a situation that requires them to function with electronic hearing augmentation devices or to live with severely impaired auditory function. These advances also have the potential for broader clinical applications that share similar requirements and challenges with the inner ear, such as drug delivery to the central nervous system. PMID:22386561

  20. Ultrasonic-Activated Micellar Drug Delivery for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Pitt, William G.

    2008-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles and ultrasound in medicine continues to evolve. Great strides have been made in the areas of producing micelles, nanoemulsions and solid nanoparticles that can be used in drug delivery. An effective nanocarrier allows for the delivery of a high concentration of potent medications to targeted tissue while minimizing the side effect of the agent to the rest of the body. Polymeric micelles have been shown to encapsulate therapeutic agents and maintain their structural integrity at lower concentrations. Ultrasound is currently being used in drug delivery as well as diagnostics, and has many advantages that elevate its importance in drug delivery. The technique is non-invasive, thus no surgery is needed; the ultrasonic waves can be easily controlled by advanced electronic technology so that they can be focused on the desired target volume. Additionally, the physics of ultrasound are widely used and well understood; thus ultrasonic application can be tailored towards a particular drug delivery system. In this article, we review the recent progress made in research that utilizes both polymeric micelles and ultrasonic power in drug delivery. PMID:18506804

  1. Micro-scale devices for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Arora, Anubhav; Prausnitz, Mark R; Mitragotri, Samir

    2008-12-01

    Skin makes an excellent site for drug and vaccine delivery due to easy accessibility, immuno-surveillance functions, avoidance of macromolecular degradation in the gastrointestinal tract and possibility of self-administration. However, macromolecular drug delivery across the skin is primarily accomplished using hypodermic needles, which have several disadvantages including accidental needle-sticks, pain and needle phobia. These limitations have led to extensive research and development of alternative methods for drug and vaccine delivery across the skin. This review focuses on the recent trends and developments in this field of micro-scale devices for transdermal macromolecular delivery. These include liquid jet injectors, powder injectors, microneedles and thermal microablation. The historical perspective, mechanisms of action, important design parameters, applications and challenges are discussed for each method. PMID:18805472

  2. Capillary physiology and drug delivery in central nervous system lymphomas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter C. Warnke; Jens Timmer; Christoph B. Ostertag; Klaus Kopitzki

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate whether the chemosensitivity of primary cen- tral nervous system lymphomas to water-soluble drugs could result from improved drug delivery, we quantita- tively assessed pharmacokinetic factors in seven patients. The capillary permeability surface product was found to be significantly increased in central nervous system lym- phomas compared with glioblastoma multiforme, medul- loblastomas, and metastases. Tumoral blood flow was sig-

  3. Liposomes in topical ophthalmic drug delivery: an update.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Renu; Iezhitsa, Igor; Agarwal, Puneet; Abdul Nasir, Nurul Alimah; Razali, Norhafiza; Alyautdin, Renad; Ismail, Nafeeza Mohd

    2014-08-12

    Abstract Topical route of administration is the most commonly used method for the treatment of ophthalmic diseases. However, presence of several layers of permeation barriers starting from the tear film till the inner layers of cornea make it difficult to achieve the therapeutic concentrations in the target tissue within the eye. In order to circumvent these barriers and to provide sustained and targeted drug delivery, tremendous advances have been made in developing efficient and safe drug delivery systems. Liposomes due to their unique structure prove to be extremely beneficial drug carriers as they can entrap both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. The conventional liposomes had several drawbacks particularly their tendency to aggregate, the instability and leakage of entrapped drug and susceptibility to phagocytosis. Due to this reason, for a long time, liposomes as drug delivery systems did not attract much attention of researchers and clinicians. However, over recent years development of new generation liposomes has opened up new approaches for targeted and sustained drug delivery using liposomes and has rejuvenated the interest of researchers in this field. In this review we present a summary of current literature to understand the anatomical and physiological limitation in achieving adequate ocular bioavailability of topically applied drugs and utility of liposomes in overcoming these limitations. The recent developments related to new generation liposomes are discussed. PMID:25116511

  4. Nanoparticles for tumor-specific intracellular drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoon Yeo; Peisheng Xu

    2009-01-01

    While intraperitoneal (IP) therapy of ovarian cancer is a theoretically promising treatment option, it is not clinically well accepted due to the several challenges in IP drug delivery. Nanoparticles are promising drug carriers, which may alleviate the difficulties in IP chemotherapy. However, currently available nanoparticles need to be further improved to fulfill the following requirements: (i) they must remain non-interactive

  5. Porous Carriers for Controlled/Modulated Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, G.; Pathak, K.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable research efforts have been directed in recent years towards the development of porous carriers as controlled drug delivery matrices because of possessing several features such as stable uniform porous structure, high surface area, tunable pore size and well-defined surface properties. Owing to wide range of useful properties porous carriers have been used in pharmaceuticals for many purposes including development of floating drug delivery systems, sustained drug delivery systems. Various types of pores like open, closed, transport and blind pores in the porous solid allow them to adsorb drugs and release them in a more reproducible and predictable manner. Pharmaceutically exploited porous adsorbents includes, silica (mesoporous), ethylene vinyl acetate (macroporous), polypropylene foam powder (microporous), titanium dioxide (nanoporous). When porous polymeric drug delivery system is placed in contact with appropriate dissolution medium, release of drug to medium must be preceded by the drug dissolution in the water filled pores or from surface and by diffusion through the water filled channels. The porous carriers are used to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs, to increase the dissolution of relatively insoluble powders and conversion of crystalline state to amorphous state. PMID:20376211

  6. Cooperative Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Photothermally Triggered Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    Cooperative Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Photothermally Triggered Drug Delivery By Ji nanoparticles and drug molecules can be co- encapsulated in liposomes to simultaneously perform multiple and luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles to overcome such problems,[5,6] although these more complicated

  7. Phase inversion dynamics of PLGA solutions related to drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. D. Graham; K. J. Brodbeck; A. J. McHugh

    1999-01-01

    Dark ground optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) have been used to quantify the effects of formulation changes on the phase inversion dynamics and in vitro drug release properties of a PLGA-based drug delivery system. Gel growth rates and water influx rates are determined from plots of the square of the respective front motion with time.

  8. Nerve guidance channels as drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Alexandra; Shoichet, Molly S

    2006-03-01

    Nerve guidance channels (NGCs) have been shown to facilitate regeneration after transection injury to the peripheral nerve or spinal cord. Various therapeutic molecules, including neurotrophic factors, have improved regeneration and functional recovery after injury when combined with NGCs; however, their impact has not been maximized partly due to the lack of an appropriate drug delivery system. To address this limitation, nerve growth factor (NGF) was incorporated into NGCs of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate), P(HEMA-co-MMA). The NGCs were synthesized by a liquid-liquid centrifugal casting process and three different methods of protein incorporation were compared in terms of protein distribution and NGF release profile: (1) NGF was encapsulated (with BSA) in biodegradable poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) 85/15 microspheres, which were combined with a PHEMA polymerization formulation and coated on the inside of pre-formed NGCs by a second liquid-liquid centrifugal casting technique; (2) pre-formed NGCs were imbibed with a solution of NGF/BSA and (3) NGF/BSA alone was combined with a PHEMA formulation and coated on the inside of pre-formed NGCs by a second liquid-liquid centrifugal casting technique. Using a fluorescently labelled model protein, the distribution of proteins in NGCs prepared with a coating of either protein-loaded microspheres or protein alone was found to be confined to the inner PHEMA layer. Sustained release of NGF was achieved from NGCs with either NGF-loaded microspheres or NGF alone incorporated into the inner layer, but not from channels imbibed with NGF. By day 28, NGCs with microspheres released a total of 220 pg NGF/cm of channel whereas those NGCs imbibed with NGF released 1040 pg/cm and those NGCs with NGF incorporated directly in a PHEMA layer released 8624 pg/cm. The release of NGF from NGCs with microspheres was limited by a slow-degrading microsphere formulation and by the maximum amount of microspheres that could be incorporated into the NGCs structure. Notwithstanding, the liquid-liquid centrifugal casting process is promising for localized and controlled release of multiple factors that are key to tissue regeneration. PMID:16239029

  9. Hydrogel-Forming Microneedle Arrays for Enhanced Transdermal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Garland, Martin J; Migalska, Katarzyna; Majithiya, Rita; McCrudden, Cian M; Kole, Prashant Laxman; Mahmood, Tuan Mazlelaa Tuan; McCarthy, Helen O; Woolfson, A David

    2012-01-01

    Unique microneedle arrays prepared from crosslinked polymers, which contain no drug themselves, are described. They rapidly take up skin interstitial fluid upon skin insertion to form continuous, unblockable, hydrogel conduits from attached patch-type drug reservoirs to the dermal microcirculation. Importantly, such microneedles, which can be fabricated in a wide range of patch sizes and microneedle geometries, can be easily sterilized, resist hole closure while in place, and are removed completely intact from the skin. Delivery of macromolecules is no longer limited to what can be loaded into the microneedles themselves and transdermal drug delivery is now controlled by the crosslink density of the hydrogel system rather than the stratum corneum, while electrically modulated delivery is also a unique feature. This technology has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional microneedle designs and greatly increase the range of the type of drug that is deliverable transdermally, with ensuing benefits for industry, healthcare providers and, ultimately, patients. PMID:23606824

  10. Pulsatile Drug Delivery System Based on Electrohydrodynamic Method

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yi; Hu, Junqiang; Gao, Wenle

    2012-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) generation, a commonly used method in BioMEMS, plays a significant role in the pulsatile drug delivery system for a decade. In this paper, an EHD based drug delivery system is well designed, which can be used to generate a single drug droplet as small as 2.83 nL in 8.5 ms with a total device of 2\\times2\\times3 mm^3, and an external supplied voltage of 1500 V. Theoretically, we derive the expressions for the size and the formation time of a droplet generated by EHD method, while taking into account the drug supply rate, properties of liquid, gap between two electrodes, nozzle size, and charged droplet neutralization. This work proves a repeatable, stable and controllable droplet generation and delivery system based on EHD method experimentally as well as theoretically.

  11. Biodegradation-tunable mesoporous silica nanorods for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Bum; Joo, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyunryung; Ryu, WonHyoung; Park, Yong-il

    2015-05-01

    Mesoporous silica in the forms of micro- or nanoparticles showed great potentials in the field of controlled drug delivery. However, for precision control of drug release from mesoporous silica-based delivery systems, it is critical to control the rate of biodegradation. Thus, in this study, we demonstrate a simple and robust method to fabricate "biodegradation-tunable" mesoporous silica nanorods based on capillary wetting of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template with an aqueous alkoxide precursor solution. The porosity and nanostructure of silica nanorods were conveniently controlled by adjusting the water/alkoxide molar ratio of precursor solutions, heat-treatment temperature, and Na addition. The porosity and biodegradation kinetics of the fabricated mesoporous nanorods were analyzed using N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm, TGA, DTA, and XRD. Finally, the performance of the mesoporous silica nanorods as drug delivery carrier was demonstrated with initial burst and subsequent "zero-order" release of anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin. PMID:25746247

  12. Silk Fibroin-Based Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zheng; Li, Yi; Xie, Mao-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) is a protein-based biomacromolecule with excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity. The development of SF-based nanoparticles for drug delivery have received considerable attention due to high binding capacity for various drugs, controlled drug release properties and mild preparation conditions. By adjusting the particle size, the chemical structure and properties, the modified or recombinant SF-based nanoparticles can be designed to improve the therapeutic efficiency of drugs encapsulated into these nanoparticles. Therefore, they can be used to deliver small molecule drugs (e.g., anti-cancer drugs), protein and growth factor drugs, gene drugs, etc. This paper reviews recent progress on SF-based nanoparticles, including chemical structure, properties, and preparation methods. In addition, the applications of SF-based nanoparticles as carriers for therapeutic drugs are also reviewed. PMID:25749470

  13. Silk fibroin-based nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zheng; Li, Yi; Xie, Mao-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) is a protein-based biomacromolecule with excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability and low immunogenicity. The development of SF-based nanoparticles for drug delivery have received considerable attention due to high binding capacity for various drugs, controlled drug release properties and mild preparation conditions. By adjusting the particle size, the chemical structure and properties, the modified or recombinant SF-based nanoparticles can be designed to improve the therapeutic efficiency of drugs encapsulated into these nanoparticles. Therefore, they can be used to deliver small molecule drugs (e.g., anti-cancer drugs), protein and growth factor drugs, gene drugs, etc. This paper reviews recent progress on SF-based nanoparticles, including chemical structure, properties, and preparation methods. In addition, the applications of SF-based nanoparticles as carriers for therapeutic drugs are also reviewed. PMID:25749470

  14. Basics and recent advances in peptide and protein drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Benjamin J; Miller, Geoffrey D; Lim, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    While the peptide and protein therapeutic market has developed significantly in the past decades, delivery has limited their use. Although oral delivery is preferred, most are currently delivered intravenously or subcutaneously due to degradation and limited absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, absorption enhancers, enzyme inhibitors, carrier systems and stability enhancers are being studied to facilitate oral peptide delivery. Additionally, transdermal peptide delivery avoids the issues of the gastrointestinal tract, but also faces absorption limitations. Due to proteases, opsonization and agglutination, free peptides are not systemically stable without modifications. This review discusses oral and transdermal peptide drug delivery, focusing on barriers and solutions to absorption and stability issues. Methods to increase systemic stability and site-specific delivery are also discussed. PMID:24228993

  15. Polymeric micelles: nanocarriers for cancer-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifei; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-08-01

    Polymeric micelles represent an effective delivery system for poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs. With small size (10-100 nm) and hydrophilic shell of PEG, polymeric micelles exhibit prolonged circulation time in the blood and enhanced tumor accumulation. In this review, the importance of rational design was highlighted by summarizing the recent progress on the development of micellar formulations. Emphasis is placed on the new strategies to enhance the drug/carrier interaction for improved drug-loading capacity. In addition, the micelle-forming drug-polymer conjugates are also discussed which have both drug-loading function and antitumor activity. PMID:24700296

  16. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  17. Insights into drug delivery across the nail plate barrier.

    PubMed

    Saner, Manish V; Kulkarni, Abhijeet D; Pardeshi, Chandrakantsing V

    2014-11-01

    Topical therapy is at the forefront in treating nail ailments (especially onychomycosis and nail psoriasis) due to its local effects, which circumvents systemic adverse events, improves patient compliance and reduces treatment cost. However, the success of topical therapy has been hindered due to poor penetration of topical therapeutics across densely keratinized nail plate barrier. For effective topical therapy across nail plate, ungual drug permeation must be enhanced. Present review is designed to provide an insight into prime aspects of transungual drug delivery viz. nail structure and physiology, various onychopathies, techniques of nail permeation enhancement and in vitro models for trans-nail drug permeation studies. Updated list of drug molecules studied across the nail plate and key commercial products have been furnished with sufficient depth. Patents pertinent to, and current clinical status of transungual drug delivery have also been comprehensively reviewed. This is the first systematic critique encompassing the detailed aspects of transungual drug delivery. In our opinion, transungual drug delivery is a promising avenue for researchers to develop novel formulations, augmenting pharmaceutical industries to commercialize the products for nail disorders. PMID:24964054

  18. Using DNA nanotechnology to produce a drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyen La, Thi; Thu Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Phuc Pham, Van; Huyen Nguyen, Thi Minh; Huan Le, Quang

    2013-03-01

    Drug delivery to cancer cells in chemotherapy is one of the most advanced research topics. The effectiveness of the current cancer treatment drugs is limited because they are not capable of distinguishing between cancer cells and normal cells so that they kill not only cancer cells but also normal ones. To overcome this disadvantage by profiting from the differences in physical and chemical properties between cancer and normal cells, nanoparticles (NPs) delivering a drug are designed in a specific manner such that they can distinguish the cancer cells from the normal ones and are targeted only to the cancer cells. Currently, there are various drug delivery systems with many advantages, but sharing some common disadvantages such as difficulty with controlling the size, low encapsulation capacity and low stability. With the development and success of DNA nanotechnology, DNA strands are used to create effective drug delivery NPs with precisely controlled size and structure, safety and high stability. This article presents our study on drug encapsulation in DNA nanostructure which loaded docetaxel and curcumin in a desire to create a new and effective drug delivery system with high biological compatibility. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October–2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  19. Pulmonary drug delivery: a role for polymeric nanoparticles?

    PubMed

    d'Angelo, Ivana; Conte, Claudia; Miro, Agnese; Quaglia, Fabiana; Ungaro, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary drug delivery represents the best way of treating lung diseases, since it allows direct delivery of the drug to the site of action, with few systemic effects. Meanwhile, the lungs may be used as a portal of entry to the body, allowing systemic delivery of drugs via the airway surfaces into the bloodstream. In both cases, the therapeutic effect of the inhaled drug can be optimized by embedding it in appropriately engineered inhalable carriers, which can protect the drug against lung defense mechanisms and promote drug transport across the extracellular and cellular barriers. To this purpose, the attention has been very recently focused on polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). The aim of this review is to offer an overview on the recent advances in NPs for pulmonary drug delivery. After a description of the main challenges encountered in developing novel inhaled products, the design rules to engineer polymeric NPs for inhalation, and in so doing to overcome barriers imposed by the lungs anatomy and physiology, are described. Then, the state-of-art on inhalable biocompatible polymeric NPs based on enzymatically-degradable natural polymers and biodegradable poly(ester)s is presented, with a special focus on NP-based dry powders for inhalation. Finally, the in vitro/in vivo models useful to address the never-ending toxicological debate related to the use of NPs for inhalation are described. PMID:25579350

  20. Targeted Cellular Drug Delivery using Tailored Dendritic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kolhe, Parag; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2002-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers possess highly branched architectures, with a large number of controllable, tailorble, ‘peripheral’ functionalities. Since the surface chemistry of these materials can be modified with relative ease, these materials have tremendous potential in targeted drug and gene delivery. The large number of end groups can also be tailored to create special affinity to targeted cells, and can also encapsulate drugs and deliver them in a controlled manner. We are developing tailor-modified dendritic systems for drug delivery. Synthesis, in-vitro drug loading, in-vitro drug delivery, and the targeting efficiency to the cell are being studied systematically using a wide variety of experimental tools. Polyamidoamine and Polyol dendrimers, with different generations and end-groups are studied, with drugs such as Ibuprofen and Methotrexate. Our results indicate that a large number of drug molecules can be encapsulated/attached to the dendrimers, depending on the end groups. The drug-encapsulated dendrimer is able to enter the cells rapidly and deliver the drug. Targeting strategies being explored

  1. Development of a Microfluidics-Based Intracochlear Drug Delivery Device

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, William F.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Fiering, Jason; Handzel, Ophir; Holmboe, Maria; Kim, Ernest S.; Kujawa, Sharon G.; McKenna, Michael J.; Mescher, Mark M.; Murphy, Brian; Leary Swan, Erin E.; Peppi, Marcello; Tao, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Background Direct delivery of drugs and other agents into the inner ear will be important for many emerging therapies, including the treatment of degenerative disorders and guiding regeneration. Methods We have taken a microfluidics/MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) technology approach to develop a fully implantable reciprocating inner-ear drug-delivery system capable of timed and sequenced delivery of agents directly into perilymph of the cochlea. Iterations of the device were tested in guinea pigs to determine the flow characteristics required for safe and effective delivery. For these tests, we used the glutamate receptor blocker DNQX, which alters auditory nerve responses but not cochlear distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Results We have demonstrated safe and effective delivery of agents into the scala tympani. Equilibration of the drug in the basal turn occurs rapidly (within tens of minutes) and is dependent on reciprocating flow parameters. Conclusion We have described a prototype system for the direct delivery of drugs to the inner ear that has the potential to be a fully implantable means for safe and effective treatment of hearing loss and other diseases. PMID:19923811

  2. Which drug or drug delivery system can change clinical practice for brain tumor therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Tali

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment outcome for primary brain tumors have remained unchanged despite advances in anticancer drug discovery and development. In clinical trials, the majority of promising experimental agents for brain tumors have had limited impact on survival or time to recurrence. These disappointing results are partially explained by the inadequacy of effective drug delivery to the CNS. The impediments posed by the various specialized physiological barriers and active efflux mechanisms lead to drug failure because of inability to reach the desired target at a sufficient concentration. This perspective reviews the leading strategies that aim to improve drug delivery to brain tumors and their likelihood to change clinical practice. The English literature was searched for defined search items. Strategies that use systemic delivery and those that use local delivery are critically reviewed. In addition, challenges posed for drug delivery by combined treatment with anti-angiogenic therapy are outlined. To impact clinical practice and to achieve more than just a limited local control, new drugs and delivery systems must adhere to basic clinical expectations. These include, in addition to an antitumor effect, a verified favorable adverse effects profile, easy introduction into clinical practice, feasibility of repeated or continuous administration, and compatibility of the drug or delivery system with any tumor size and brain location. PMID:23502426

  3. Multifunctional, stimuli-sensitive nanoparticulate systems for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticulate pharmaceutical drug delivery systems (NDDSs) to enhance the in vivo effectiveness of drugs is now well established. The development of multifunctional and stimulus-sensitive NDDSs is an active area of current research. Such NDDSs can have long circulation times, target the site of the disease and enhance the intracellular delivery of a drug. This type of NDDS can also respond to local stimuli that are characteristic of the pathological site by, for example, releasing an entrapped drug or shedding a protective coating, thus facilitating the interaction between drug-loaded nanocarriers and target cells or tissues. In addition, imaging contrast moieties can be attached to these carriers to track their real-time biodistribution and accumulation in target cells or tissues. Here, I highlight recent developments with multifunctional and stimuli-sensitive NDDSs and their therapeutic potential for diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. PMID:25287120

  4. P-glycoprotein Inhibition for Optimal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Md. Lutful

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux membrane transporter, is widely distributed throughout the body and is responsible for limiting cellular uptake and the distribution of xenobiotics and toxic substances. Hundreds of structurally diverse therapeutic agents are substrates to it and it impedes the absorption, permeability, and retention of the drugs, extruding them out of the cells. It is overexpressed in cancer cells and accountable for obstructing cell internalization of chemotherapeutic agents and for developing transporter mediated resistance by cancer cells during anti-tumor treatments. As it jeopardizes the success of drug delivery and cancer targeting, strategies are being developed to overcome P-gp mediated drug transport. This concise review represents a brief discussion on P-gp mediated drug transport and how it hinders the success of various therapies. Its main focus is on various strategies used to tackle this curb in the field of drug delivery and targeting. PMID:24023511

  5. Medical nanoparticles for next generation drug delivery to the lungs.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Sabine H; Bein, Thomas; Meiners, Silke

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory diseases are an increasing burden for the ageing population. Although our understanding of these diseases has improved significantly over the past decades, diagnostic and therapeutic options for treating lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer, remain limited. Multidisciplinary approaches that bridge the gap between medicinal and materials sciences will likely contribute to promising new therapeutic and diagnostic solutions. One such multidisciplinary approach is the use of nanoparticles as carriers for the delivery of drugs. The advantages of using nanoparticles to deliver drugs include: increased drug concentration at the disease site; minimised drug degradation and loss; ease of creating inhalable formulations; and the possibility of specific cell targeting. This article gives a brief overview on the emerging field of nanocarriers as drug delivery vehicles for the treatment of lung diseases. PMID:24791828

  6. Nanostructured materials for selective recognition and targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrotsiou, O.; Kotti, K.; Dini, E.; Kammona, O.; Kiparissides, C.

    2005-01-01

    Selective recognition requires the introduction of a molecular memory into a polymer matrix in order to make it capable of rebinding an analyte with a very high specificity. In addition, targeted drug delivery requires drug-loaded vesicles which preferentially localize to the sites of injury and avoid uptake into uninvolved tissues. The rapid evolution of nanotechnology is aiming to fulfill the goal of selective recognition and optimal drug delivery through the development of molecularly imprinted polymeric (MIP) nanoparticles, tailor-made for a diverse range of analytes (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides, amino acids, etc.) and of nanostructured targeted drug carriers (e.g., liposomes and micelles) with increased circulation lifetimes. In the present study, PLGA microparticles containing multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), and MIP nanoparticles were synthesized to be employed as drug carriers and synthetic receptors respectively.

  7. Enema ion compositions for enhancing colorectal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Katharina; Chattopadhyay, Sumon; Moench, Thomas; Hendrix, Craig; Cone, Richard; Ensign, Laura M; Hanes, Justin

    2015-07-10

    Delivering drugs to the colorectum by enema has advantages for treating or preventing both local and systemic diseases. However, the properties of the enema itself are not typically exploited for improving drug delivery. Sodium ions are actively pumped out of the lumen of the colon, which is followed by osmotically-driven water absorption, so we hypothesized that this natural mechanism could be exploited to drive nanoparticles and drugs to the colorectal tissue surface. Here, we report that sodium-based, absorption-inducing (hypotonic) enemas rapidly transport hydrophilic drugs and non-mucoadhesive, mucus penetrating nanoparticles (MPP), deep into the colorectal folds to reach virtually the entire colorectal epithelial surface. In contrast, isotonic and secretion-inducing (hypertonic) vehicles led to non-uniform, poor surface coverage. Sodium-based enemas induced rapid fluid absorption even when moderately hyper-osmolal (~350mOsm) compared to blood (~300mOsm), which suggests that active sodium absorption plays a key role in osmosis-driven fluid uptake. We then used tenofovir, an antiretroviral drug in clinical trials for preventing HIV, to test the effects of enema composition on local and systemic drug delivery. We found that strongly hypotonic and hypertonic enemas caused rapid systemic drug uptake, whereas moderately hypotonic enemas with ion compositions similar to feces resulted in high local tissue levels with minimal systemic drug exposure. Similarly, moderately hypotonic enemas provided improved local drug retention in colorectal tissue, whereas hypertonic and isotonic enemas provided markedly reduced drug retention in colorectal tissue. Lastly, we found that moderately hypotonic enema formulations caused little to no detectable epithelial damage, while hypertonic solutions caused significant damage, including epithelial sloughing; the epithelial damage caused increased systemic drug absorption and penetration of MPP into colorectal tissue, a potential advantage in certain drug delivery applications. In summary, we illustrate that enema composition can be adjusted to maximize local versus systemic drug delivery, and that mildly hypotonic, sodium-based vehicles can provide uniform drug and MPP delivery in the colon that maximizes local drug concentrations. PMID:25937321

  8. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Alyautdin, Renad; Khalin, Igor; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail; Haron, Muhammad Huzaimi; Kuznetsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The protective properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) in the brain’s vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS). As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual’s age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review comprehensively discusses the functional morphology of the BBB and the challenges that must be overcome by drug-delivery systems and elaborates on the potential targets, mechanisms, and formulations to improve drug delivery to the CNS. PMID:24550672

  9. NanoClusters Enhance Drug Delivery in Mechanical Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pornputtapitak, Warangkana

    The overall goal of this thesis was to develop a dry powder delivery system for patients on mechanical ventilation. The studies were divided into two parts: the formulation development and the device design. The pulmonary system is an attractive route for drug delivery since the lungs have a large accessible surface area for treatment or drug absorption. For ventilated patients, inhaled drugs have to successfully navigate ventilator tubing and an endotracheal tube. Agglomerates of drug nanoparticles (also known as 'NanoClusters') are fine dry powder aerosols that were hypothesized to enable drug delivery through ventilator circuits. This Thesis systematically investigated formulations of NanoClusters and their aerosol performance in a conventional inhaler and a device designed for use during mechanical ventilation. These engineered powders of budesonide (NC-Bud) were delivered via a MonodoseRTM inhaler or a novel device through commercial endotracheal tubes, and analyzed by cascade impaction. NC-Bud had a higher efficiency of aerosol delivery compared to micronized stock budesonide. The delivery efficiency was independent of ventilator parameters such as inspiration patterns, inspiration volumes, and inspiration flow rates. A novel device designed to fit directly to the ventilator and endotracheal tubing connections and the MonodoseRTM inhaler showed the same efficiency of drug delivery. The new device combined with NanoCluster formulation technology, therefore, allowed convenient and efficient drug delivery through endotracheal tubes. Furthermore, itraconazole (ITZ), a triazole antifungal agent, was formulated as a NanoCluster powder via milling (top-down process) or precipitation (bottom-up process) without using any excipients. ITZ NanoClusters prepared by wet milling showed better aerosol performance compared to micronized stock ITZ and ITZ NanoClusters prepared by precipitation. ITZ NanoClusters prepared by precipitation methods also showed an amorphous state while milled ITZ NanoClusters maintained the crystalline character. Overall, NanoClusters prepared by various processes represent a potential engineered drug particle approach for inhalation therapy since they provide effective aerosol properties and stability due to the crystalline state of the drug powders. Future work will continue to explore formulation and delivery performance in vitro and in vivo..

  10. Ocular Drug Delivery; Impact of in vitro Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Asadi, Masoud; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2009-01-01

    Normal vision depends on the optimal function of ocular barriers and intact membranes that selectively regulate the environment of ocular tissues. Novel pharmacotherapeutic modalities have aimed to overcome such biological barriers which impede efficient ocular drug delivery. To determine the impact of ocular barriers on research related to ophthalmic drug delivery and targeting, herein we provide a review of the literature on isolated primary or immortalized cell culture models which can be used for evaluation of ocular barriers. In vitro cell cultures are valuable tools which serve investigations on ocular barriers such as corneal and conjunctival epithelium, retinal pigment epithelium and retinal capillary endothelium, and can provide platforms for further investigations. Ocular barrier-based cell culture systems can be simply set up and used for drug delivery and targeting purposes as well as for pathological and toxicological research. PMID:23198080

  11. Synthesis of the KMB-Drug Delivery Carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xu, Mei; Zhu, Yu-peng; Zhang, Wei-hua; Gong, Yuan-yuan; Li, Dong-sheng

    Purified konjac glucomannan(KGM) was blended with Xanthan gum to prepared gel, which was valued by its viscosity and tenacity. The konjac micro-balls(KMBs) were prepared in drying and wetting method respectively. The diameter of the KMBs was analyzed with laser particle size analyzer. To a carrier of drug deliver, the delivery characteristics of the NMP, which embedded in KMB, was discussed. The results showed that KMB was well dispersed in DMSO, and its diameter was 4.08 ?m. In paraffin, KMB was homogeneous disperse with diameter(2.23 ?m). In the behavior of drug delivery, the characteristics of drug sustained-release were obvious, and the delivery time was more than 24 h.

  12. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rostami, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems’ researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We’ve reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmented through years. The advantages and therapeutic benefits of chewing gum support its development as we can see new formulations with new drugs contained have been produced from past and are going to find a place in market by formulation of new medicated chewing gums. Potential applications of medicated chewing gums are highly widespread as they will be recognized in future. Nowadays standards for qualifying chewing gums are the same as tablets. Patient-centered studies include medicated chewing gums as a delivery system too which creates compliance for patients.

  13. Novel Drug Delivery Systems for Retinal Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan S. Lee; Michael R. Robinson

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Retinal diseases, such as macular edema from diabetic retinopathy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration, are important causes of visual impairment. Pharmacologic intervention has been employed, since laser can have limited success with improving vision. Topical eye drops and systemic therapy deliver low drug levels to the retina and the potential for systemic drug absorption and the accompanying side effects

  14. Nanocrystal technology, drug delivery and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Junghanns, Jens-Uwe A H; Müller, Rainer H

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology will affect our lives tremendously over the next decade in very different fields, including medicine and pharmacy. Transfer of materials into the nanodimension changes their physical properties which were used in pharmaceutics to develop a new innovative formulation principle for poorly soluble drugs: the drug nanocrystals. The drug nanocrystals do not belong to the future; the first products are already on the market. The industrially relevant production technologies, pearl milling and high pressure homogenization, are reviewed. The physics behind the drug nanocrystals and changes of their physical properties are discussed. The marketed products are presented and the special physical effects of nanocrystals explained which are utilized in each market product. Examples of products in the development pipelines (clinical phases) are presented and the benefits for in vivo administration of drug nanocrystals are summarized in an overview. PMID:18990939

  15. Targeting and delivery of platinum-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Guo, Zijian

    2013-01-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs occupy a crucial role in the treatment of various malignant tumours. However, the efficacy and applicability of platinum drugs are heavily restricted by severe systemic toxicities and drug resistance. Different drug targeting and delivery (DTD) strategies have been developed to prevent the shortcomings of platinum-based chemotherapy. These approaches can be roughly categorized into two groups; namely, active and passive tactics. Active DTD is realized through specific molecular interactions between the drugs and cell or tissue elements, while passive DTD is achieved by exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention effect in tumour tissues. The principal methods for active DTD include conjugation of platinum drugs with selective targeting moieties or encapsulation of platinum drugs in host molecules. Bioactive substances such as hormones, carbohydrates, bisphosphonates, peptides and proteins are commonly used in active DTD. Passive DTD generally involves the fabrication of functionalized polymers or nanoparticles and the subsequent conjugation of platinum drugs with such entities. Polymeric micelles, liposomes, nanotubes and nanoparticles are frequently used in passive DTD. In some cases, both active and passive mechanisms are involved in one DTD system. This review concentrates on various targeting and delivery techniques for improving the efficacy and reducing the side effects of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The content covers most of the related literatures published since 2006. These innovative tactics represent current state-of-the-art developments in platinum-based anticancer drugs. PMID:23042411

  16. Pouch drug delivery systems for dermal and transdermal administration.

    PubMed

    Zailer, Jana; Touitou, Elka

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we have designed and investigated a new carrier for dermal and transdermal drug delivery. The delivery system is composed of high (>60 %) ethanol concentration, phospholipid, polymer, and water. The system forms a structured matrix following non-occluded application on the skin. We call these structured carriers as pouch drug delivery systems (PDDS). The pouch-structured matrix was characterized by electron microscopy, (31)P-NMR and FTIR. The new delivery system exhibits a number of properties adequate for the design of improved dermal and transdermal drug administration for various treatments. Lidocaine PDDS dry faster and has an enhanced dermal drug delivery when compared to a clinical-used product. These proprieties are important for the prevention of premature ejaculation. Results obtained in pharmacodynamics test carried out with brotizolam PDDS in a mice-sleeping model and with ibuprofen PDDS in fevered rats indicated a prolonged hypnotic and antipyretic effect, respectively. The carrier was found nonirritant in tests carried out on EpiDerm(TM) skin model. PMID:25787204

  17. Localized Cell and Drug Delivery for Auditory Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Jeffrey L.; Chikar, Jennifer A.; Crumling, Mark A.; Raphael, Yehoash; Martin, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Localized cell and drug delivery to the cochlea and central auditory pathway can improve the safety and performance of implanted auditory prostheses (APs). While generally successful, these devices have a number of limitations and adverse effects including limited tonal and dynamic ranges, channel interactions, unwanted stimulation of non-auditory nerves, immune rejection, and infections including meningitis. Many of these limitations are associated with the tissue reactions to implanted auditory prosthetic devices and the gradual degeneration of the auditory system following deafness. Strategies to reduce the insertion trauma, degeneration of target neurons, fibrous and bony tissue encapsulation, and immune activation can improve the viability of tissue required for AP function as well as improve the resolution of stimulation for reduced channel interaction and improved place-pitch and level discrimination. Many pharmaceutical compounds have been identified that promote the viability of auditory tissue and prevent inflammation and infection. Cell delivery and gene therapy have provided promising results for treating hearing loss and reversing degeneration. Currently, many clinical and experimental methods can produce extremely localized and sustained drug delivery to address AP limitations. These methods provide better control over drug concentrations while eliminating the adverse effects of systemic delivery. Many of these drug delivery techniques can be integrated into modern auditory prosthetic devices to optimize the tissue response to the implanted device and reduce the risk of infection or rejection. Together, these methods and pharmaceutical agents can be used to optimize the tissue-device interface for improved AP safety and effectiveness. PMID:18573323

  18. Pressure Waves in Medicine: From Tissue Injury to Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Apostolos G.

    2004-07-01

    Pressure waves have the potential to cause injury to cells and tissue or enable novel therapeutic modalities, such as fragmentation of kidney stones and drug delivery. Research on the biological effects of pressure waves have shown that the biological response on depends the pressure-wave characteristics. One of the most prominent effects induced by pressure waves is the permeabilization of a number of barrier structures (cell plasma membrane, skin and microbial biofilms) and facilitate the delivery of macromolecules. The permeabilization of the barrier structure is transient and the barrier function recovers. Thus, pressure waves can induce delivery of molecular species that would not normally cross the barrier structure.

  19. Programmable nanomedicine: synergistic and sequential drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacardo, Dennis B.; Ligler, Frances S.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in nanomedicine for the cancer therapy have enabled programmable delivery of therapeutics by exploiting the stimuli-responsive properties of nanocarriers. These therapeutic systems were designed with the relevant chemical and physical properties that respond to different triggers for enhanced anticancer efficacy, including the reduced development of drug-resistance, lower therapeutic dose, site-specific transport, and spatiotemporally controlled release. This minireview discusses the current advances in programmable nanocarriers for cancer therapy with particular emphasis on synergistic and sequential drug delivery systems.

  20. Application of liposomes in medicine and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Daraee, Hadis; Etemadi, Ali; Kouhi, Mohammad; Alimirzalu, Samira; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2014-09-15

    Liposomes provide an established basis for the sustainable development of different commercial products for treatment of medical diseases by the smart delivery of drugs. The industrial applications include the use of liposomes as drug delivery vehicles in medicine, adjuvants in vaccination, signal enhancers/carriers in medical diagnostics and analytical biochemistry, solubilizers for various ingredients as well as support matrices for various ingredients and penetration enhancers in cosmetics. In this review, we summarize the main applications and liposome-based commercial products that are currently used in the medical field. PMID:25222036

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Hybrid Hydrogels in Drug Delivery: A Perspective Review

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Silke; Spizzirri, Umile Gianfranco; Parisi, Ortensia Ilaria; Picci, Nevio; Iemma, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The use of biologics, polymers, silicon materials, carbon materials, and metals has been proposed for the preparation of innovative drug delivery devices. One of the most promising materials in this field are the carbon-nanotubes composites and hybrid materials coupling the advantages of polymers (biocompatibility and biodegradability) with those of carbon nanotubes (cellular uptake, stability, electromagnatic, and magnetic behavior). The applicability of polymer-carbon nanotubes composites in drug delivery, with particular attention to the controlled release by composites hydrogel, is being extensively investigated in the present review. PMID:24587993

  2. Polymer-based biodegradable drug delivery systems in pain management.

    PubMed

    Al Malyan, Mohamed; Becchi, Chiara; Nikkola, Lila; Viitanen, Petrus; Boncinelli, Sergio; Chiellini, Federica; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2006-03-01

    Pain is an unpleasant sensory experience commonly produced by damage to bodily tissues and it is one of the most significant public health problems, because 21.5% of the world population is estimated to suffer from pain. It results in a total loss of more than 165 billion US dollars each year in the United States alone. Pain reflects a mixture of various pathophysiologic, psychologic, and genetic contributions. When undertreated, pain usually results in serious immune and metabolic upset. Therefore, it requires wide understanding and intensive effort for a better management. Currently, pain control is limited by the modest efficiency of the used drugs, the serious side effects of these drugs, and the inefficacy of conventional drug administration. By the introduction of the technology of biodegradable controlled-release devices into clinical practice, pain control not only benefits from these novel methods for a better delivery of various drugs, but the side effects of the drugs are reduced because use of the devices improves patient compliance. Biodegradable controlled-release devices are polymer-based devices that are designed to deliver drugs locally in a predesigned manner. Recently, there was a high interest in developing these devices for the delivery of different drugs used for pain control. This paper first highlights the dimensions and basics of the problem of pain. Then, it presents an overview of the biodegradable polymers that are used in drug delivery systems and summarizes the studies carried out on these systems in the field of pain management. We refer to our experience in developing a device for multimodal drug delivery, including the use of nanotechnology. Future perspectives are also presented. PMID:16633180

  3. Iontophoresis for modulation of cardiac drug delivery in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Labhasetwar, V; Underwood, T; Schwendeman, S P; Levy, R J

    1995-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a frequent cause of death and morbidity. Conventional antiarrhythmia therapy involving oral or intravenous medication is often ineffective and complicated by drug-associated side effects. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated the advantages of cardiac drug-polymer implants for enhanced efficacy for cardiac arrhythmia therapy compared with conventional administration. However, these studies were based on systems that deliver drugs at a fixed release rate. Modulation of the drug delivery rate has the advantage of regulating the amount of the drug delivered depending upon the disease state of the patient. We hypothesized that iontophoresis could be used to modulate cardiac drug delivery. In this study, we report our investigations of a cardiac drug implant in dogs that is capable of iontophoretic modulation of the administration of the antiarrhythmic agent sotalol. We used a heterogeneous cation-exchange membrane (HCM) as an electrically sensitive and highly efficient rate-limiting barrier on the cardiac-contacting surface of the implant. Thus, electric current is passed only through the HCM and not the myocardium. The iontophoretic cardiac implant demonstrated in vitro drug release rates that were responsive to current modulation. In vivo results in dogs have confirmed that iontophoresis resulted in regional coronary enhancement of sotalol levels with current-responsive increases in drug concentrations. We also observed acute current-dependent changes in ventricular effective refractory periods reflecting sotalol-induced refractoriness due to regional drug administration. In 30-day dog experiments, iontophoretic cardiac implants demonstrated robust sustained function and reproducible modulation of drug delivery kinetics. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7708693

  4. Status of novel drug delivery technology for phytotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Musthaba, S Mohamed; Baboota, Sanjula; Ahmed, Sayeed; Ahuja, Alka; Ali, Javed

    2009-06-01

    Herbal medicines have been widely used all over the world since ancient times and have been recognized by physicians and patients for their better therapeutic value as they have fewer adverse effects as compared with modern medicines. However, phytotherapeutics needs a scientific approach to deliver the components in a sustained manner to increase patient compliance and avoid repeated administration. This can be achieved by designing novel drug delivery systems for herbal constituents. Novel drug delivery systems not only reduce the repeated administration to overcome non-compliance, but also help to increase the therapeutic value by reducing toxicity and increasing the bioavailability, and so on. Recently, pharmaceutical scientists have shifted their focus to designing a drug delivery system for herbal medicines using a scientific approach. For a long time herbal medicines were not considered for development as novel formulations owing to lack of scientific justification and processing difficulties, such as standardization, extraction and identification of individual drug components in complex polyherbal systems. However, modern phytopharmaceutical research solves the scientific needs for herbal medicines as in modern medicine, which gives way for developing novel formulations such as nanoparticles, microemulsions, matrix systems, solid dispersions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and so on. This article summarizes various drug delivery technologies for herbal actives, which are gaining more attention for better therapeutic response. PMID:19505192

  5. Computational model of local intravascular drug delivery

    E-print Network

    Balakrishnan, Brinda

    2007-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES) virtually eradicate the clinical phenomena of vessel restenosis; yet, they also increase the short and long term risks for stent thrombosis. To improve their safety and efficacy, it is critical ...

  6. Transdermal drug delivery by localized intervention

    E-print Network

    Weaver, James C.

    Both field-confined skin electroporation and microscissioning offer minimally invasive methods for delivering drugs across skin and nail with minimal sensation. Both methods create high permeability pathways in a pain-free ...

  7. Intelligent drug delivery systems obtained by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martellini, Flavia; Higa, Olga Z.; Takacs, Erzsebet; Safranj, Agneza; Yoshida, Masaru; Katakai, Ryoichi; Carenza, Mario

    1998-06-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization of acryloyl-L-proline methyl ester, an ?-aminoacid-containing monomer, in the presence of a crosslinking agent and a hydrophilic monomer gave rise to polymer hydrogels whose water content at equilibrium was found to decrease as the swelling temperature increased. Some hydrogel samples were obtained with entrapped acetaminophen, an analgesic and antipyretic drug. It was ascertained that the release of the drug was controlled by both the hydrophilicity of the polymer matrices and the environmental temperature.

  8. Pulmonary Drug Delivery: Medicines for Inhalation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Henning; Stephanie Hein; Marc Schneider; Michael Bur; Claus-Michael Lehr

    \\u000a Mankind has inhaled substances for medical and other reasons for thousands of years, notably resulting in the cultural manifestations\\u000a of tobacco and opium smoking. Over the course of time concepts of pulmonary application, including inhalation devices and\\u000a drug formulations, have been and still are being continuously developed. State of the art instruments even allow for individualized\\u000a drug application by adaption

  9. Microchip for sustained drug delivery by diffusion through microchannels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Ho; Park, Min; Park, Chun Gwon; Lee, Ji Eun; Prausnitz, Mark R; Choy, Young Bin

    2012-03-01

    To enable sustained drug delivery, we prepared microchips of simple structure for drug release based on diffusion through microchannels. The microchips were fabricated with poly(methyl methacrylate), embedded with one or more microwells and microchannels of controlled length. The channels were filled with biocompatible polymer, poly(ethylene glycol), to serve as a drug diffusion barrier. The wells served as drug reservoirs and were filled with a fine powder of a model compound, fluorescein. Three different drug delivery microchip designs were prepared, each equipped with a channel of 1, 4, or 8 mm length. Drug release from these devices all exhibited a delay followed by sustained release over time. As the channel length increased from 1 to 8 mm, the onset time and duration of drug release also increased from 0.5 to 7 day and from 11 days to 28, respectively. We also prepared microchips equipped with multiple microwells, each connected to a channel of different length. In this way, a chip with channels of 1, 4, and 8 mm length exhibited a continuous drug release from 0.5 to 35 days. A future study is in progress to develop the microchips made of biodegradable materials. Therefore, we conclude that a microchip embedded with multiple sets of microwells and microchannels of different length can be designed to enable sustained drug release for controlled and prolonged periods of time. PMID:22215292

  10. Dendritic polymer-based nanodevices for targeted drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, R. M.; Kolhe, Parag; Gurdag, Sezen; Khandare, Jayant; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2004-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers are unimolecular micellar nanostructures, characterized by globular shape ( ˜ 20 nm) and large density of functional groups at periphery. The tailorable end groups make them ideal for conjugation with drugs, ligands, and imagining agents, making them an attractive molecular nanodevices for drug delivery. Compared to linear polymers and nanoparticles, these nanodevices enter cells rapidly, carrying drugs and delivering them inside cells. Performance of nanodevices prepared for asthma and cancer drug delivery will be discussed. Our conjugation procedure produced very high drug payloads. Dendritic polymer-drug conjugates were very effective in transporting methotrexate (a chemotherapy drug) into both sensitive (CCRF-CEM cell line) and resistant cell line (CEM-MTX). The conjugate nanodevice was 3 times more effective than free drug in the sensitive line, and 9 times more effective in the resistant cell line (based on IC50). The physics of cell entry and drug release from these nanodevices are being investigated. The conjugates appear to enter cells through endocytosis, with the rate of entry dependent on end-group, molecular weight, the pH of the medium, and the cancerous nature of the cells.

  11. Trojan-Horse Nanotube On-Command Intracellular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Hsuan; Cao, Cong; Kim, Jin Ho; Hsu, Chih-Hsun; Wanebo, Harold J.; Bowen, Wayne D.; Xu, Jimmy; Marshall, John

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge to nanomaterial-based medicine is the ability to release drugs on-command. Here, we describe an innovative drug delivery system based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which compounds can be released inside cells from within the nanotube “on-command” by inductive heating with an external alternating current or pulsed magnetic field. Without inductive heating the drug remains safely inside the CNTs, showing no toxicity in cell viability tests. Similar to the “Trojan-Horse” in function, we demonstrate the delivery of a combination of chemotherapeutic agents with low aqueous solubility, paclitaxel (Taxol), and C6-ceramide, to multidrug resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Nanotube encapsulation permitted the drugs to be used at a 100-fold lower concentration compared to exogenous treatment yet achieve a comparable ?70% cancer kill rate. PMID:23030797

  12. Inhaled formulations and pulmonary drug delivery systems for respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Tang, Patricia; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Loh, Zhi Hui; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-10-24

    Respiratory infections represent a major global health problem. They are often treated by parenteral administrations of antimicrobials. Unfortunately, systemic therapies of high-dose antimicrobials can lead to severe adverse effects and this calls for a need to develop inhaled formulations that enable targeted drug delivery to the airways with minimal systemic drug exposure. Recent technological advances facilitate the development of inhaled anti-microbial therapies. The newer mesh nebulisers have achieved minimal drug residue, higher aerosolisation efficiencies and rapid administration compared to traditional jet nebulisers. Novel particle engineering and intelligent device design also make dry powder inhalers appealing for the delivery of high-dose antibiotics. In view of the fact that no new antibiotic entities against multi-drug resistant bacteria have come close to commercialisation, advanced formulation strategies are in high demand for combating respiratory 'super bugs'. PMID:25451137

  13. Trojan-horse nanotube on-command intracellular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Hsuan; Cao, Cong; Kim, Jin Ho; Hsu, Chih-Hsun; Wanebo, Harold J; Bowen, Wayne D; Xu, Jimmy; Marshall, John

    2012-11-14

    A major challenge to nanomaterial-based medicine is the ability to release drugs on-command. Here, we describe an innovative drug delivery system based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which compounds can be released inside cells from within the nanotube "on-command" by inductive heating with an external alternating current or pulsed magnetic field. Without inductive heating the drug remains safely inside the CNTs, showing no toxicity in cell viability tests. Similar to the "Trojan-Horse" in function, we demonstrate the delivery of a combination of chemotherapeutic agents with low aqueous solubility, paclitaxel (Taxol), and C6-ceramide, to multidrug resistant pancreatic cancer cells. Nanotube encapsulation permitted the drugs to be used at a 100-fold lower concentration compared to exogenous treatment yet achieve a comparable ~70% cancer kill rate. PMID:23030797

  14. Effective use of transdermal drug delivery in children.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H

    2014-06-01

    Transdermal administration offers a non-invasive and convenient method for paediatric drug delivery. The competent skin barrier function in term infants and older children limits both water loss and the percutaneous entry of chemicals including drugs; but the smaller doses required by children eases the attainment of therapeutic concentrations. Transdermal patches used in paediatrics include fentanyl, buprenorphine, clonidine, scopolamine, methylphenidate, oestrogens, nicotine and tulobuterol. Some patches have paediatric labelling supported by clinical trials whereas others are used unlicensed. Innovative drug delivery methods, such as microneedles and sonophoresis are being tested for their safety and efficacy; needleless injectors are primarily used to administer growth hormone; and two iontophoretic devices were approved for paediatrics. In contrast, the immature and rapidly evolving skin barrier function in premature neonates represents a significant formulation challenge. Unfortunately, this population group suffers from an absence of approved transdermal formulations, a shortcoming exacerbated by the significant risk of excessive drug exposure via the incompletely formed skin barrier. PMID:24333231

  15. System-based approach for an advanced drug delivery platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulinsky, Lawrence; Xu, Han; Tsai, Han-Kuan A.; Madou, Marc

    2006-03-01

    Present study is looking at the problem of integrating drug delivery microcapsule, a bio-sensor, and a control mechanism into a biomedical drug delivery system. A wide range of medical practices from cancer therapy to gastroenterological treatments can benefit from such novel bio-system. Drug release in our drug delivery system is achieved by electrochemically actuating an array of polymeric valves on a set of drug reservoirs. The valves are bi-layer structures, made in the shape of a flap hinged on one side to a valve seat, and consisting of thin films of evaporated gold and electrochemically deposited polypyrrole (PPy). These thin PPy(DBS) bi-layer flaps cover access holes of underlying chambers micromachined in a silicon substrate. Chromium and polyimide layers are applied to implement "differential adhesion" to obtain a voltage induced deflection of the bilayer away from the drug reservoir. The Cr is an adhesion-promoting layer, which is used to strongly bind the gold layer down to the substrate, whereas the gold adheres weakly to polyimide. Drug actives (dry or wet) were pre-stored in the chambers and their release is achieved upon the application of a small bias (~ 1V). Negative voltage causes cation adsorption and volume change in PPy film. This translates into the bending of the PPy/Au bi-layer actuator and release of the drug from reservoirs. This design of the drug delivery module is miniaturized to the dimensions of 200?m valve diameter. Galvanostatic and potentiostatic PPy deposition methods were compared, and potentiostatic deposition method yields film of more uniform thickness. PPy deposition experiments with various pyrrole and NaDBS concentrations were also performed. Glucose biosensor based on glucose oxidase (GOx) embedded in the PPy matrix during elechtrochemical deposition was manufactured and successfully tested. Multiple-drug pulsatile release and continuous linear release patterns can be implemented by controlling the operation of an array of valves. Varying amounts of drugs, together with more complex controlling strategies would allow creation of more complex drug delivery patterns.

  16. Progress toward a Colon Targeting Nanoparticle Based Drug Delivery System 

    E-print Network

    Yu, Xiao

    2012-07-16

    ......................................................... 11 2.2.1 Colon targeting oral drug delivery ....................................................... 11 2.2.2 Polysaccharide based pH sensitive and biodegradable hydrogels ....... 12 2.3 In vitro drug release models... of particles? size and surface charges .................... 20 3.3.1.2 Encapsulation efficiency and stability of PAX NPs in different pH of the aqueous solutions ........................................................ 22 3.3.2 LbL self...

  17. Untethered magnetic millirobot for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, Veronica; Lucarini, Gioia; Ricotti, Leonardo; Dario, Paolo; Dupont, Pierre E; Menciassi, Arianna

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports the design and development of a novel millimeter-sized robotic system for targeted therapy. The proposed medical robot is conceived to perform therapy in relatively small diameter body canals (spine, urinary system, ovary, etc.), and to release several kinds of therapeutics, depending on the pathology to be treated. The robot is a nearly-buoyant bi-component system consisting of a carrier, in which the therapeutic agent is embedded, and a piston. The piston, by exploiting magnetic effects, docks with the carrier and compresses a drug-loaded hydrogel, thus activating the release mechanism. External magnetic fields are exploited to propel the robot towards the target region, while intermagnetic forces are exploited to trigger drug release. After designing and fabricating the robot, the system has been tested in vitro with an anticancer drug (doxorubicin) embedded in the carrier. The efficiency of the drug release mechanism has been demonstrated by both quantifying the amount of drug released and by assessing the efficacy of this therapeutic procedure on human bladder cancer cells. PMID:26009273

  18. Chitosan electrodeposition for microrobotic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Stefano; Chatzipirpiridis, George; Sivaraman, Kartik M; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Nelson, Bradley J; Pané, Salvador

    2013-07-01

    A method to functionalize steerable magnetic microdevices through the co-electrodeposition of drug loaded chitosan hydrogels is presented. The characteristics of the polymer matrix have been investigated in terms of fabrication, morphology, drug release and response to different environmental conditions. Modifications of the matrix behavior could be achieved by simple chemical post processing. The system is able to load and deliver 40-80 ?g cm(-2) of a model drug (Brilliant Green) in a sustained manner with different profiles. Chitosan allows a pH responsive behavior with faster and more efficient release under slightly acidic conditions as can be present in tumor or inflamed tissue. A prototype of a microrobot functionalized with the hydrogel is presented and proposed for the treatment of posterior eye diseases. PMID:23355508

  19. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drug release from microspheres: Implications to drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Arifin, Davis Yohanes; Lee, Lai Yeng; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2006-11-30

    This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of existing mathematical models and simulations of drug release from polymeric microspheres and of drug transport in adjacent tissues. In drug delivery systems, mathematical modeling plays an important role in elucidating the important drug release mechanisms, thus facilitating the development of new pharmaceutical products by a systematic, rather than trial-and-error, approach. The mathematical models correspond to the known release mechanisms, which are classified as diffusion-, swelling-, and erosion-controlled systems. Various practical applications of these models which explain experimental data are illustrated. The effect of gamma-irradiation sterilization on drug release mechanism from erosion-controlled systems will be discussed. The application of existing models to nanoscale drug delivery systems specifically for hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules is evaluated. The current development of drug transport modeling in tissues utilizing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will also be described. PMID:17097189

  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Nanomedicine drug delivery system could improve chemotherapy

    E-print Network

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Nanomedicine drug delivery system could improve chemotherapy Chemotherapy is still the backbone of today's cancer treatment. This is exemplified by acute myeloid leukemia (AML generation anti-leukemia treatments. The results have been published in the Journal of Advanced Healthcare

  1. PEG-based degradable networks for drug delivery applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jamie L. Ostroha

    2006-01-01

    The controlled delivery of therapeutic agents by biodegradable hydrogels has become a popular mechanism for drug administration in recent years. Hydrogels are three-dimensional networks of polymer chains held together by crosslinks. Although the changes which the hydrogel undergoes in solution are important to a wide range of experimental studies, they have not been investigated systematically and the factors which influence

  2. Layered double hydroxide nanoparticles in gene and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ladewig, Katharina; Xu, Zhi Ping; Lu, Gao Qing Max

    2009-09-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) have been known for many decades as catalyst and ceramic precursors, traps for anionic pollutants, catalysts and additives for polymers, but their successful synthesis on the nanometer scale a few years ago opened up a whole new field for their application in nanomedicine. The delivery of drugs and other therapeutic/bioactive molecules (e.g., peptides, proteins, nucleic acids) to mammalian cells is an area of research that is of tremendous importance to medicine and provides manifold applications for any new developments in the area of nanotechnology. Among the many different nanoparticles that have been shown to facilitate gene and/or drug delivery, LDH nanoparticles have attracted particular attention owing to their many desirable properties. This review aims to report recent progress in gene and drug delivery using LDH nanoparticles. It summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of using LDH nanoparticles as carriers for nucleic acids and drugs against the general background of bottlenecks that are encountered by cellular delivery systems. It describes further the models that have been proposed for the internalization of LDH nanoparticles into cells so far and discusses the intracellular fate of the particles and their cargo. The authors offer some remarks on how this field of research will progress in the near future and which challenges need to be overcome before LDH nanoparticles can be used in a clinical setting. PMID:19686052

  3. Bio-inspired, bioengineered and biomimetic drug delivery carriers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin-Wook Yoo; Darrell J. Irvine; Dennis E. Discher; Samir Mitragotri

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic carriers such as polymer and lipid particles often struggle to meet clinical expectations. Natural particulates — that range from pathogens to mammalian cells — are therefore worth examining in more depth, as they are highly optimized for their specific functions in vivo and possess features that are often desired in drug delivery carriers. With a better understanding of these

  4. Targeted Therapeutics and Nanodevices for Vascular Drug Delivery: Quo Vadis?

    PubMed Central

    Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This issue of the journal is dedicated to targeted delivery of therapeutics in the vasculature, an approach that holds promise to optimize treatment of diverse pathological conditions ranging from ischemia and tumor growth to metabolic and genetic diseases. From the standpoint of drug delivery, circulation system represents the natural route to the targets, whereas its components (blood and vascular cells) represent targets, carriers or barriers for drug delivery. Diverse nanodevices and targeted therapeutic agents that are designed and tested in animal and early clinical studies to achieve optimal and precise spatiotemporal control of the pharmacokinetics, destination, metabolism and effect of pharmacological agents will be discussed in this introductory essay and subsequent critical reviews in this series. PMID:21721101

  5. Chitosan-based hydrogels for controlled, localized drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Narayan; Gunn, Jonathan; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-31

    Hydrogels are high-water content materials prepared from cross-linked polymers that are able to provide sustained, local delivery of a variety of therapeutic agents. Use of the natural polymer, chitosan, as the scaffold material in hydrogels has been highly pursued thanks to the polymer's biocompatibility, low toxicity, and biodegradability. The advanced development of chitosan hydrogels has led to new drug delivery systems that release their payloads under varying environmental stimuli. In addition, thermosensitive hydrogel variants have been developed to form a chitosan hydrogel in situ, precluding the need for surgical implantation. The development of these intelligent drug delivery devices requires a foundation in the chemical and physical characteristics of chitosan-based hydrogels, as well as the therapeutics to be delivered. In this review, we investigate the newest developments in chitosan hydrogel preparation and define the design parameters in the development of physically and chemically cross-linked hydrogels. PMID:19799949

  6. Polymeric Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Toral; Zhou, Jiangbing; Piepmeier, Joseph M.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2012-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) poses a unique challenge for drug delivery. The blood-brain barrier significantly hinders the passage of systemically-delivered therapeutics and the brain extracellular matrix limits the distribution and longevity of locally-delivered agents. Polymeric nanoparticles represent a promising solution to these problems. Over the past 40 years, substantial research efforts have demonstrated that polymeric nanoparticles can be engineered for effective systemic and local delivery of therapeutics to the CNS. Moreover, many of the polymers used in nanoparticle fabrication are both biodegradable and biocompatible, thereby increasing the clinical utility of this strategy. Here, we review the major advances in the development of polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery to the CNS. PMID:22210134

  7. Development and characterization of chronomodulated drug delivery system of captopril

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Archana S; Dandagi, Panchaxari M; Masthiholimath, Vinayak S; Gadad, Anand P; Najwade, Basavaraj K

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypertension shows circadian rhythm that there is a rise in pressure from the time of waking or before (about 4 to 8 a.m.), in most people. Conventional drug delivery system of captopril is inappropriate for the delivery of drug, as they cannot be administered just before the symptoms are worsened, because during this time the patients are asleep, bedtime dosing of captopril will not provide a therapeutic plasma drug concentration at the early hours of morning because of poor pharmacokinetic profile and shorter half-life of 1.9 hours. Thus, this study attempts to design and evaluate a chronomodulated pulsatile drug delivery system of captopril which was aimed to release the drug after a lag time of 6 hours. Materials and Methods: Present delivery system was prepared by rupturable coating method. The core containing captopril as a bioactive compound were prepared by direct compression method and then coated sequentially with an inner swelling layer containing hydrocolloid HPMC E5 and an outer rupturable layer consisted of Eudragit RL/RS (1 : 1). Total 12 formulations with different levels of inner swelling layer and outer polymeric layer were prepared and subjected to various processing and formulative parameters like the effect of core composition, level of swelling layer, and rupturable coating on lag time was investigated. In vitro drug release and rupture tests were performed using United States Pharmacopoeia paddle method at 50 rpm in 0.1N HCl and phosphate buffer of pH 6.8. Results: The results showed that as the amount of inner swelling layer increases, the lag time decreases and as the Eudragit coating level increases, the lag time increases and percent water uptake of time-dependent pulsatile release system decreases. The presence of an osmotic agent and effervescent agent helped in shortening of lag time. Conclusion: The system was found to be satisfactory in terms of release of the drug after the lag time of 6 hours. PMID:23071948

  8. Current therapies and technological advances in aqueous aerosol drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Watts, Alan B; McConville, Jason T; Williams, Robert O

    2008-09-01

    Recent advances in aerosolization technology have led to renewed interest in pulmonary delivery of a variety of drugs. Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) and dry powder inhalers (DPIs) have experienced success in recent years; however, many limitations are presented by formulation difficulties, inefficient delivery, and complex device designs. Simplification of the formulation process as well as adaptability of new devices has led many in the pharmaceutical industry to reconsider aerosolization in an aqueous carrier. In the acute care setting, breath-enhanced air-jet nebulizers are controlling and minimizing the amount of wasted medication, while producing a high percentage of respirable droplets. Vibrating mesh nebulizers offer advantages in higher respirable fractions (RFs) and slower velocity aerosols when compared with air-jet nebulizers. Vibrating mesh nebulizers incorporating formulation and patient adaptive components provide improvements to continuous nebulization technology by generating aerosol only when it is most likely to reach the deep lung. Novel innovations in generation of liquid aerosols are now being adapted for propellant-free pulmonary drug delivery to achieve unprecedented control over dose delivered and are leading the way for the adaptation of systemic drugs for delivery via the pulmonary route. Devices designed for the metered dose delivery of insulin, morphine, sildenafil, triptans, and various peptides are all currently under investigation for pulmonary delivery to treat nonrespiratory diseases. Although these devices are currently still in clinical testing (with the exception of the Respimat), metered dose liquid inhalers (MDLIs) have already shown superior outcomes to current pulmonary and systemic delivery methods. PMID:18663654

  9. Advanced Materials and Processing for Drug Delivery: The Past and the Future

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Chan, Hon Fai; Leong, Kam W.

    2012-01-01

    Design and synthesis of efficient drug delivery systems are of vital importance for medicine and healthcare. Materials innovation and nanotechnology have synergistically fueled the advancement of drug delivery. Innovation in material chemistry allows the generation of biodegradable, biocompatible, environment-responsive, and targeted delivery systems. Nanotechnology enables control over size, shape and multi-functionality of particulate drug delivery systems. In this review, we focus on the materials innovation and processing of drug delivery systems and how these advances have shaped the past and may influence the future of drug delivery. PMID:23088863

  10. Novel Drug Delivery System Shows Early Promise for Treating Lupus in Mice

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Drug Delivery System Shows Early Promise for Treating Lupus in Mice A drug delivery system using nanoparticle ... cells can potentially improve treatment approaches for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to research partially funded by ...

  11. Electrospinning of polymeric nanofibers for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiuli; Liu, Shi; Zhou, Guangyuan; Huang, Yubin; Xie, Zhigang; Jing, Xiabin

    2014-07-10

    Electrospinning has been recognized as a simple and versatile method for fabrication of polymer nanofibers. Various polymers that include synthetic, natural, and hybrid materials have been successfully electrospun into ultrafine fibers. The inherently high surface to volume ratio of electrospun fibers can enhance cell attachment, drug loading, and mass transfer properties. Drugs ranging from antibiotics and anticancer agents to proteins, DNA, RNA, living cells, and various growth factors have been incorporated into electrospun fibers. This article presents an overview of electrospinning techniques and their application in drug delivery. PMID:24768792

  12. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  13. Optimization of Drug Delivery by Drug-Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Bozsak, Franz; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sternberger, Zachary; Belitz, Paul; Bewley, Thomas; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents (DES), which release anti-proliferative drugs into the arterial wall in a controlled manner, have drastically reduced the rate of in-stent restenosis and revolutionized the treatment of atherosclerosis. However, late stent thrombosis remains a safety concern in DES, mainly due to delayed healing of the endothelial wound inflicted during DES implantation. We present a framework to optimize DES design such that restenosis is inhibited without affecting the endothelial healing process. To this end, we have developed a computational model of fluid flow and drug transport in stented arteries and have used this model to establish a metric for quantifying DES performance. The model takes into account the multi-layered structure of the arterial wall and incorporates a reversible binding model to describe drug interaction with the cells of the arterial wall. The model is coupled to a novel optimization algorithm that allows identification of optimal DES designs. We show that optimizing the period of drug release from DES and the initial drug concentration within the coating has a drastic effect on DES performance. Paclitaxel-eluting stents perform optimally by releasing their drug either very rapidly (within a few hours) or very slowly (over periods of several months up to one year) at concentrations considerably lower than current DES. In contrast, sirolimus-eluting stents perform optimally only when drug release is slow. The results offer explanations for recent trends in the development of DES and demonstrate the potential for large improvements in DES design relative to the current state of commercial devices. PMID:26083626

  14. Design and in vitro development of resorbable urologic drug delivery device

    E-print Network

    Tobias, Irene S. (Irene Sophie)

    2008-01-01

    Implantable, controlled release drug delivery devices offer several advantages over systemic oral administration routes and immediate drug release treatments including direct therapy to target organ, more continuous ...

  15. Nanoparticle-Mediated Pulmonary Drug Delivery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Paranjpe, Mukta; Müller-Goymann, Christel C.

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated as drug carriers for the application of different drugs via different routes of administration. Systems, such as solid lipid nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, have been investigated for a long time for the treatment of various lung diseases. The pulmonary route, owing to a noninvasive method of drug administration, for both local and systemic delivery of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) forms an ideal environment for APIs acting on pulmonary diseases and disorders. Additionally, this route offers many advantages, such as a high surface area with rapid absorption due to high vascularization and circumvention of the first pass effect. Aerosolization or inhalation of colloidal systems is currently being extensively studied and has huge potential for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of various diseases. Furthermore, the surfactant-associated proteins present at the interface enhance the effect of these formulations by decreasing the surface tension and allowing the maximum effect. The most challenging part of developing a colloidal system for nebulization is to maintain the critical physicochemical parameters for successful inhalation. The following review focuses on the current status of different colloidal systems available for the treatment of various lung disorders along with their characterization. Additionally, different in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo cell models developed for the testing of these systems with studies involving cell culture analysis are also discussed. PMID:24717409

  16. Soft-Template-Synthesized Mesoporous Carbon for Oral Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dipendu [ORNL] [ORNL; Warren, Kaitlyn E [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Template-synthesized mesoporous carbons were successfully used in in vitro investigations of controlled delivery of three model drugs, captopril, furosemide, and ranitidine hydrochloride. Captopril and furosemide exhibited desorption kinetics over 30 40 h, and ranitidine HCl had a complete release time of 5 10 h. As evident from the slow release kinetics, we contend that our mesoporous carbon is an improved drug-delivery medium compared to state-of-the-art porous silica-based substrates. The mesoporous carbons, synthesized from phloroglucinol and lignin, a synthetic and a sustainable precursor, respectively, exhibit BET surface area of 200 400 m2 g-1 and pore volume of 0.2 0.6 cm3 g-1. The phloroglucinol-based carbon has narrower pore widths and higher pore volume than the lignin-derived counterpart and maintains a longer release time. Numerical modeling of the release kinetics data reveals that the diffusivities of all the drugs from lignin-based carbon media are of equivalent magnitude (10-22 to 10-24 m2 s-1). However, a tailored reduction of pore width in the sorbent reduces the diffusivity of smaller drug molecules (captopril) by an order of magnitude. Thus, engineered pore morphology in our synthesized carbon sorbent, along with its potential to tailor the chemistry of its interaction with sorbet, can be exploited for optimal delivery system of a preferred drug within its therapeutic level and below the level of toxicity.

  17. Imaging Drug Delivery to Skin with Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saar, Brian G.; Contreras-Rojas, L. Rodrigo; Xie, X. Sunney; Guy, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient drug delivery to the skin is essential for the treatment of major dermatologic diseases, such as eczema, psoriasis and acne. However, many compounds penetrate the skin barrier poorly and require optimized formulations to ensure their bioavailability. Here, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a recently-developed, label-free chemical imaging tool, is used to acquire high resolution images of multiple chemical components of a topical formulation as it penetrates into mammalian skin. This technique uniquely provides label-free, non-destructive, three-dimensional images with high spatiotemporal resolution. It reveals novel features of (trans)dermal drug delivery in the tissue environment: different rates of drug penetration via hair follicles as compared to the intercellular pathway across the stratum corneum are directly observed, and the precipitation of drug crystals on the skin surface is visualized after the percutaneous penetration of the co-solvent excipient in the formulation. The high speed three-dimensional imaging capability of SRS thus reveals features that cannot be seen with other techniques, providing both kinetic information and mechanistic insight into the (trans)dermal drug delivery process. PMID:21548600

  18. Asymmetric biodegradable microdevices for cell-borne drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junfei; Wang, Zhibin; Huang, Danting; Yan, Yuanwei; Li, Yan; Guan, Jingjiao

    2015-03-25

    Use of live cells as carriers for drug-laden particulate structures possesses unique advantages for drug delivery. In this work, we report on the development of a novel type of particulate structures called microdevices for cell-borne drug delivery. The microdevices were fabricated by soft lithography with a disklike shape. Each microdevice was composed of a layer of biodegradable thermoplastic such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid). One face of the thermoplastic layer was covalently grafted with a cell-adhesive polyelectrolyte such as poly-l-lysine. This asymmetric structure allowed the microdevices to bind to live cells through bulk mixing without causing cell aggregation. Moreover, the cell-microdevice complexes were largely stable, and the viability and proliferation ability of the cells were not affected by the microdevices over a week. In addition, sustained release of a mock drug from the microdevices was demonstrated. This type of microdevice promises to be clinically useful for sustained intravascular drug delivery. PMID:25751094

  19. Smart drug delivery injector microsystem based on pyrotechnical actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig-Vidal, Manel; Lopez, Jaime; Miribel, Pere; Samitier-Marti, Josep; Rossi, Carole; Berthold, Axel

    2003-04-01

    A smart drug delivery injector microsystem is presented based on small pyrotechnics to impulse drugs to be injected to a human being. The proposal refers to a feasibility demonstration of the technology for pharmaceutical chips. These chips would be around some cm2 in section and will be able to inject a drug into de subject skin responding to an electrical signal. The product derived from this activity will be useful for astronaut's health, being able to administrate emergency doses of products (for instance cardio-tonic or hypoallegic drugs) enough to survive an emergency situation (as it can be a heart attack during EVA). The system can also be used for easy administration of drugs needed for physiological research. The usefulness of the device in terrestrial applications has no doubt, allowing remote administration of drugs to patients whose biomedical parameters are remotely monitored. The concept proposed here is new in combining the idea of pharmaceutical chip with the ultrasonic droplet technology and the use of pyrotechnics to provide energy to the drug to be injected. The proposed Drug Injector Microsystem is based on 2 main blocks:- Micropyrotechnic system: defines the ignition part based on pyrotechnic.- Microfluidic system: defines the drug injection part. This part is also divided in different critical parts: Expansion chamber, membrane or piston, drug reservoir and a needle. Different sensors are placed on the expansion chamber of microfluidic system and on the micropyrotechnic system. A complete electronic module is implemented with a PC interface to define flexible and user friendly experiences showing the smart drug delivery injector microsystem principle.

  20. Drug delivery to the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Andrew K.; Gillespie, Lisa N.

    2012-12-01

    Bionic devices electrically activate neural populations to partially restore lost function. Of fundamental importance is the functional integrity of the targeted neurons. However, in many conditions the ongoing pathology can lead to continued neural degeneration and death that may compromise the effectiveness of the device and limit future strategies to improve performance. The use of drugs that can prevent nerve cell degeneration and promote their regeneration may improve clinical outcomes. In this paper we focus on strategies of delivering neuroprotective drugs to the auditory system in a way that is safe and clinically relevant for use in combination with a cochlear implant. The aim of this approach is to prevent neural degeneration and promote nerve regrowth in order to improve outcomes for cochlear implant recipients using techniques that can be translated to the clinic.

  1. Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Andrew K; Gillespie, Lisa N

    2012-01-01

    Bionic devices electrically activate neural populations to partially restore lost function. Of fundamental importance is the functional integrity of the targeted neurons. However, in many conditions the ongoing pathology can lead to continued neural degeneration and death that may compromise the effectiveness of the device and limit future strategies to improve performance. The use of drugs that can prevent nerve cell degeneration and promote their regeneration may improve clinical outcomes. In this paper we focus on strategies of delivering neuroprotective drugs to the auditory system in a way that is safe and clinically relevant for use in combination with a cochlear implant. The aim of this approach is to prevent neural degeneration and promote nerve regrowth in order to improve outcomes for cochlear implant recipients using techniques that can be translated to the clinic. PMID:23186937

  2. Porous silicon in drug delivery devices and materials?

    PubMed Central

    Anglin, Emily J.; Cheng, Lingyun; Freeman, William R.; Sailor, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Porous Si exhibits a number of properties that make it an attractive material for controlled drug delivery applications: The electrochemical synthesis allows construction of tailored pore sizes and volumes that are controllable from the scale of microns to nanometers; a number of convenient chemistries exist for the modification of porous Si surfaces that can be used to control the amount, identity, and in vivo release rate of drug payloads and the resorption rate of the porous host matrix; the material can be used as a template for organic and biopolymers, to prepare composites with a designed nanostructure; and finally, the optical properties of photonic structures prepared from this material provide a self-reporting feature that can be monitored in vivo. This paper reviews the preparation, chemistry, and properties of electrochemically prepared porous Si or SiO2 hosts relevant to drug delivery applications. PMID:18508154

  3. Transdermal Delivery of Drugs with Microneedles-Potential and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Ita, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers a number of advantages including improved patient compliance, sustained release, avoidance of gastric irritation, as well as elimination of pre-systemic first-pass effect. However, only few medications can be delivered through the transdermal route in therapeutic amounts. Microneedles can be used to enhance transdermal drug delivery. In this review, different types of microneedles are described and their methods of fabrication highlighted. Microneedles can be fabricated in different forms: hollow, solid, and dissolving. There are also hydrogel-forming microneedles. A special attention is paid to hydrogel-forming microneedles. These are innovative microneedles which do not contain drugs but imbibe interstitial fluid to form continuous conduits between dermal microcirculation and an attached patch-type reservoir. Several microneedles approved by regulatory authorities for clinical use are also examined. The last part of this review discusses concerns and challenges regarding microneedle use. PMID:26131647

  4. Magnetic nanoparticle drug delivery systems for targeting tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Vicky V.; Cox, Arthur; Shah, Samit; Singh, Ajay; Bevins, Wesley; Parihar, Harish

    2014-04-01

    Tumor hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a result of disordered vasculature that lead to distinctive hypoxic microenvironments not found in normal tissues. Many traditional anti-cancer agents are not able to penetrate into these hypoxic zones, whereas, conventional cancer therapies that work by blocking cell division are not effective to treat tumors within hypoxic zones. Under these circumstances the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivering agent system under the influence of external magnetic field has received much attention, based on their simplicity, ease of preparation, and ability to tailor their properties for specific biological applications. Hence in this review article we have reviewed current magnetic drug delivery systems, along with their application and clinical status in the field of magnetic drug delivery.

  5. Polymeric micelles: authoritative aspects for drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sushant S. Kulthe; Yogesh M. Choudhari; Nazma N. Inamdar; Vishnukant Mourya

    2012-01-01

    The generation of supramolecular architectures with well-defined structures and functionalities is recently garnering attraction. Self-assemblage of amphiphilic polymers leads to the formation of polymeric micelles that demonstrate unique set of characteristics such as excellent biocompatibility, low toxicity, enhanced blood circulation time, and solubilization of poorly water-soluble drugs. In this article, we provide an up-to-date review on important aspects of polymeric

  6. Protein Drug Delivery and Formulation Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rinku Baid; Puneet Tyagi; Shelley A. Durazo; Uday B. Kompella

    \\u000a Several therapeutic agents including low and high molecular weight drugs intended for treating back of the eye disorders are\\u000a routinely administered as intravitreal injections. Intravitreal injection of Lucentis®, a therapeutic protein, was approved in 2006 for treating the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. This chapter\\u000a summarizes the challenges and opportunities in delivering therapeutic proteins to the eye. Specifically, barriers

  7. [Transcorneal drug delivery: prospects for the use of liposomes].

    PubMed

    Aliautdin, R N; Iezhitsa, I N; Agarval, R

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological ocular surface barriers are responsible for low bioavailability of topical ophthalmic drugs. The unique structure of the cornea, epithelial cells and hydrophilic stroma in particular, impedes permeation of hydro- and lipophilic drugs via common routs of administration. The tear film with its proteins and enzymes also acts as a barrier. Despite several corneal transporters that take part in permeation of some drugs, increasing bioavailability of ophthalmic drugs in general remains a question of current importance. Liposomes are an option. These vesicular structures consist of the outer lipid bilayer and the inner aqueous compartment, which can be filled with a medication solution. This peculiarity of liposomes ensures their penetration through both hydro- and lipophilic mediums of the eye, including the barriers of the anterior and posterior segments. Liposomes are effective means of vectored drug delivery into the anterior chamber. This paper presents a review of the current knowledge on the interaction of drugs and ocular surface barriers as well as the prospects for the use of liposomes for transcorneal drug delivery. PMID:25306734

  8. Floating drug delivery of nevirapine as a gastroretentive system.

    PubMed

    Vedha, Hari Bn; Brahma, Reddy A; Samyuktha, Rani B

    2010-10-01

    A multiple-unit floating drug delivery system based on gas formation technique was developed, in order to prolong the gastric residence time and to increase the overall bioavailability of the dosage form. The floating bead formulations were prepared by dispersing nevirapine together with calcium carbonate in a mixture of sodium alginate and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solution and then dripping the dispersion into an acidified solution of calcium chloride. Calcium alginate beads were formed, as the alginate underwent ionotropic gelation by calcium ions, and carbon dioxide developed from the reaction of carbonate salts with acid. The obtained beads were able to float due to CO(2)-gas formation and the gas entrapment by the polymeric membrane. The prepared beads were evaluated for percent drug loading, drug entrapment efficiency, morphology, surface topography, buoyancy, in-vitro release, and release kinetics. The formulations were optimized for different weight ratios of the gas-forming agent and sodium alginate. The beads containing higher amounts of calcium carbonate demonstrated an instantaneous, complete, and excellent floating ability over a period of 24 hours. The increased amount of the gas forming agent did not affect the time to float, but increased the drug release from the floating beads, while increasing the coating level of the gas-entrapped membrane, increased the time to float, and slightly retarded the drug release. Good floating properties and sustained drug release were achieved. Finally, these floating beads seemed to be a promising gastroretentive drug delivery system. PMID:21264092

  9. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel loaded microbubbles for ultrasound triggered drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Michael C.; Eisenbrey, John; Ouma, Richard O.; Soulen, Michael; Wheatley, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    A polymer ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) developed in our lab has been shown to greatly reduce in size when exposed to ultrasound, resulting in nanoparticles less than 400 nm in diameter capable of escaping the leaky vasculature of a tumor to provide a sustained release of drug. Previous studies with the hydrophilic drug doxorubicin (DOX) demonstrated enhanced drug delivery to tumors when triggered with ultrasound. However the therapeutic potential has been limited due to the relatively low payload of DOX. This study compares the effects of loading the hydrophobic drug paclitaxel (PTX) on the agent’s acoustic properties, drug payload, tumoricidal activity, and the ability to deliver drugs through 400 nm pores. A maximum payload of 129.46 ± 1.80 ?g PTX/mg UCA (encapsulation efficiency 71.92 ± 0.99 %) was achieved, 20 times greater than the maximum payload of DOX (6.2 ?g/mg), while maintaining the acoustic properties. In vitro, the tumoricidal activity of paclitaxel loaded UCA exposed to ultrasound was significantly greater than controls not exposed to ultrasound (p<0.0016). This study has shown that PTX loaded UCA triggered with focused ultrasound have the potential to provide a targeted and sustained delivery of drug to tumors. PMID:21609756

  10. 75 FR 45640 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0246] Draft Guidance for Industry on Residual Drug in Transdermal and Related Drug Delivery Systems; Availability AGENCY: Food...

  11. Photosensitizer Drug Delivery via an Optical Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Zamadar, Matibur; Ghosh, Goutam; Mahendran, Adaickapillai; Minnis, Mihaela; Kruft, Bonnie I.; Ghogare, Ashwini; Aebisher, David; Greer, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    An optical fiber has been developed with a maneuverable mini-probe tip that sparges O2 gas and photo-detaches pheophorbide (sensitizer) molecules. Singlet oxygen is produced at the probe tip surface which reacts with an alkene spacer group releasing sensitizer upon fragmentation of a dioxetane intermediate. Optimal sensitizer photorelease occurred when the probe tip was loaded with 60 nmol sensitizer, where crowding of the pheophorbide molecules and self-quenching were kept to a minimum. The fiber optic tip delivered pheophorbide molecules and singlet oxygen to discrete locations. 60 nmol sensitizer was delivered into petrolatum; however, sensitizer release was less efficient in toluene-d8 (3.6 nmol) where most had remained adsorbed on the probe tip, even after the covalent alkene spacer bond had been broken. The results open the door to a new area of fiber optic-guided sensitizer delivery for the potential photodynamic therapy of hypoxic structures requiring cytotoxic control. PMID:21539365

  12. Biopolymeric alginate-chitosan nanoparticles as drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhunchu, S; Rojsitthisak, P

    2014-08-01

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems enhance cancer treatment by direct entry of nanometer particles into the fenestration in the vasculature of cancer cells. Nanoparticles for encapsulation of anticancer drugs are preferably prepared using natural polymers as carriers, with polysaccharides being particularly favorable. Alginate and chitosan polysaccharides have been widely used in nanoparticulate drug delivery systems because of their biodegradable, biocompatible, non-toxic and bioadhesive properties. In this review, we present an overview of drug delivery systems for cancer treatment, describe the use of biopolymeric alginate-chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery, and discuss the important characteristics of these nanoparticles for use in drug delivery. PMID:25158565

  13. Novel biodegradable polyesteramide microspheres for controlled drug delivery in Ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Guerrero, Vanessa; Zong, Mengmeng; Ramsay, Eva; Rojas, Blanca; Sarkhel, Sanjay; Gallego, Beatriz; de Hoz, Rosa; Ramírez, Ana I; Salazar, Juan José; Triviño, Alberto; Ramírez, José M; Del Amo, Eva M; Cameron, Neil; de-Las-Heras, Beatriz; Urtti, Arto; Mihov, George; Dias, Aylvin; Herrero-Vanrell, Rocío

    2015-08-10

    Most of the posterior segment diseases are chronic and multifactorial and require long-term intraocular medication. Conventional treatments of these pathologies consist of successive intraocular injections, which are associated with adverse effects. Successful therapy requires the development of new drug delivery systems able to release the active substance for a long term with a single administration. The present work involves the description of a new generation of microspheres based on poly(ester amide)s (PEA), which are novel polymers with improved biodegradability, processability and good thermal and mechanical properties. We report on the preparation of the PEA polymer, PEA microspheres (PEA Ms) and their characterization. PEA Ms (~15?m) were loaded with a lipophilic drug (dexamethasone) (181.0±2.4?g DX/mg Ms). The in vitro release profile of the drug showed a constant delivery for at least 90days. Based on the data from a performed in vitro release study, a kinetic ocular model to predict in vivo drug concentrations in a rabbit vitreous was built. According to the pharmacokinetic simulations, intravitreal injection of dexamethasone loaded PEA microspheres would provide release of the drug in rabbit eyes up to 3months. Cytotoxicity studies in macrophages and retinal pigment epithelial cells revealed a good in vitro tolerance of the microsystems. After sterilization, PEA Ms were administered in vivo by subtenon and intravitreal injections in male Sprague-Dawley rats and the location of the microspheres in rat eyes was monitored. We conclude that PEA Ms provide an alternative delivery system for controlling the delivery of drugs to the eye, allowing a novel generation of microsphere design. PMID:26003040

  14. MAPLE deposited polymeric blends coatings for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Ion, Valentin; Moldovan, Antoniu; Dinescu, Maria

    2012-07-01

    We report on the use of Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) for producing coatings of polymer blends for controlled drug delivery. The coatings consisting of blends of polyethylene glycol: poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PEG: PLGA blends) are compared with those consisting of individual polymers (PEG, PLGA) in terms of chemical composition, morphology, hydrophilicity and optical constants. The release kinetics of an anti-inflammatory drug (indomethacin) through the polymeric coatings is monitored and possible mechanisms of the drug release are discussed. Furthermore, the compatibility of the polymeric coatings with blood constituents is investigated. Finally, the perspectives for employing MAPLE for producing coatings of polymer blends to be used in implants that deliver drugs in a controlled manner, along with the routes to be followed for elucidating the mechanism of drug release, are revealed.

  15. Alendronate functionalized mesoporous hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongdong, E-mail: lidongchem@sina.cn [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhu, Yuntao; Liang, Zhiqiang [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? The synthesized mesoporous hydroxyapatite has nanostructure and bioactivity. ? The materials have high surface area and amino group. ? The materials show higher drug loading and slower release rate than pure HAP. - Abstract: Mesoporous nanosized hydroxyapatite (HAP) functionalized by alendronate (ALN) was synthesized using cationic surfactant CTAB as template. The structural, morphological and textural properties were fully characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption. Then the obtained materials were performed as drug delivery carriers using ibuprofen (IBU) as a model drug to investigate their drug storage/release properties in simulated body fluid (SBF). The materials showed relatively slower release rate compared with HAP due to the ionic interaction between -NH{sub 3}{sup +} on the matrix and -COO{sup ?}belongs to IBU. The system provides a new concept for improving the drug loading or slowing down the release rate.

  16. Nanostructured porous Si-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Herranz, Barbara; Santos, Hélder A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the backbones in nanomedicine is to deliver drugs specifically to unhealthy cells. Drug nanocarriers can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, which after proper surface biofunctionalization can enhance cell specificity for cancer therapy. Recent developments have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica (PSiO2) and silicon (PSi) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. In this review, we outline and discuss the most recent advances on the applications and developments of cancer therapies by means of PSiO2 and PSi nanomaterials. Bio-engineering and fine tuning of anti-cancer drug vehicles, high flexibility and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for “smart” cancer therapies. As a result of their physicochemical properties they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting. The main emphasis of this review will be on the in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:23507894

  17. Polymeric micelles as drug delivery systems: a reactive polymeric micelle carrying aldehyde groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carmen Scholz; Michihiro Iijima; Yukio Nagasaki; Kazunori Kataoka

    1998-01-01

    WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW Nanospheric particles as drug delivery systems are gaining increasing interest in the biomedical field. Nanospheres have been proven as efficient drug delivery systems for intravenous administration because of their comparatively long bloodstream circulation. A novel approach in the field of polymeric drug delivery systems was introduced by the formation of polymeric micelles and subsequently by functionalized

  18. Carbon Nanotube Micro-Needles for Rapid Transdermal Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Bradley; Aria, Adrianus Indrat; Gat, Amir; Cosse, Julia; Montemayor, Lauren; Beizaie, Masoud; Gharib, Morteza

    2012-11-01

    By catalyst patterning, bundles of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be assembled to create 2D arrays of hollow micro-needles with feature size as small as a few microns. For transdermal drug delivery, the most challenging mechanical requirement is to make the CNT micro-needle small enough so that delivery is painless yet large enough so that the micro-needle can achieve skin penetration. By taking advantage of capillary action and the nanoporosity of CNT bundles, we can wick high strength polymer into the inter-spacing between nanotubes to augment the stiffness of our micro-needles. For low viscous polymers, the large ratio between the micron sized center hole of the micro-needle and the nanopores of the surrounding CNT allow us to wick polymer through the nanotubes while maintaining an open central hole for drug transport. For a transdermal patch prototype with a delivery area less than 1cm x 1cm square, we can fabricate 50 CNT micro-needles that produces a total flow rate up to 100 uL/s with actuation pressure provided by a mere finger tap. From in vitro experiments, we will demonstrate that CNT micro-needles provide a much faster convective delivery of drugs than conventional topical diffusion based patches. We acknowledge Zcube s.r.l for their support of this work.

  19. Formulation and evaluation of floating drug delivery system of famotidine.

    PubMed

    Satishbabu, B K; Sandeep, V R; Ravi, R B; Shrutinag, R

    2010-11-01

    A multiple unit oral floating drug delivery system of famotidine was developed to prolong gastric residence time, target stomach mucosa and increase drug bioavailability. Drug and polymer compatibility was studied by subjecting physical mixtures of drug and polymers to differential scanning calorimetry. Cod liver oil entrapped calcium alginate beads containing famotidine, capable of floating in the gastric condition were formulated and evaluated. The gel beads were prepared by emulsion gelation method by employing sodium alginate alone and mixture of sodium alginate and hydrophilic copolymers such as carbopol 934P and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K15M grade in three different ratios. The effect of selected factors, such as percentage of oil and amount of copolymers on floating properties was investigated. The beads were evaluated for percent drug loading, drug entrapment efficiency, buoyancy and in vitro drug release. The in vitro drug release study of the beads was carried out in simulated gastric media employing a modified Rosette-Rice test apparatus. Wherein, the apparatus was further modified by incorporating a water jacket to the apparatus to circulate hot water to maintain 37±2° for throughout the release study. All the oil entrapped calcium alginate beads floated if a sufficient amount of oil was used. Beads formulated employing sodium alginate alone could not sustain the drug release up to 8 h, whereas beads formulated with mixture of sodium alginate and copolymers demonstrated sustained release of famotidine up to 8 h. The results suggested that cod liver oil entrapped calcium alginate beads were promising as a carrier for intragastric floating drug delivery of famotidine. PMID:21969746

  20. Synthetic Polymers as Drug-Delivery Vehicles in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Neuse, Eberhard W.

    2008-01-01

    Cancerous diseases present a formidable health problem worldwide. While the chemotherapy of cancer, in conjunction with other treatment modalities, has reached a significant level of maturity, efficacious use of such agents is still restricted by numerous pharmacological deficiencies, such as poor water solubility, short serum circulation lifetimes, and low bioavailability resulting from lack of affinity to cancer tissue and inadequate mechanisms of cell entry. More critically still, most drugs suffer from toxic side effects and a risk of drug resistance. The class of platinum anticancer drugs, although outstandingly potent, is particularly notorious in that respect. Among the countless methods developed in recent years in an effort to overcome these deficiencies, the technology of polymer-drug conjugation stands out as a particularly advanced treatment modality. The strategy involves the bioreversible binding, conjugating, of a medicinal agent to a water-soluble macromolecular carrier. Following pharmacokinetic pathways distinctly different from those of the common, nonpolymeric drugs, the conjugate so obtained will act as a prodrug providing safe transport of the bioactive agent to and into the affected, that is, cancerous cell for its ultimate cell-killing activity. The present treatise will acquaint us with the pharmacological fundamentals of this drug delivery approach, applied here specifically to the metalorganic platinum-type drug systems and the organometallic ferrocene drug model. We will see just how this technology leads to conjugates distinctly superior in antiproliferative activity to cisplatin, a clinically used antitumor agent used here as a standard. Polymer-drug conjugation involving metal-based and other medicinal agents has unquestionably matured to a practical tool to the pharmaceutical scientist, and all indications point to an illustrious career for this nascent drug delivery approach in the fight against cancer and other human maladies. PMID:18497867

  1. CNS drug delivery by using polymeric nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Costantino; L. Bondioli; G. Tosi; B. Ruozi; F. Forni; M. A. Vandelli

    Summary Polymeric nanoparticles (Np) are nanosized carriers (10-200 nm) made of a polymer in which a drug can be included. In the present research we showed that Np made of the biocompatible polyester poly(D,L- lactide-coglycolide), carrying on their surface the peptide R-HN-Gly-L-Phe-D-Thr-Gly-L-Phe-L-Leu-L- Ser(O-?-D-glucose)-CONH2 (1) are able to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) and are able to deliver a great

  2. Substituted amylose matrices for oral drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, S. H.; Wang, H. W.; Saddar El-Leithy, E.; Chebli, C.; Cartilier, L.

    2007-03-01

    High amylose corn starch was used to obtain substituted amylose (SA) polymers by chemically modifying hydroxyl groups by an etherification process using 1,2-epoxypropanol. Tablets for drug-controlled release were prepared by direct compression and their release properties assessed by an in vitro dissolution test (USP XXIII no 2). The polymer swelling was characterized by measuring gravimetrically the water uptake ability of polymer tablets. SA hydrophilic matrix tablets present sequentially a burst effect, typical of hydrophilic matrices, and a near constant release, typical of reservoir systems. After the burst effect, surface pores disappear progressively by molecular association of amylose chains; this allows the creation of a polymer layer acting as a diffusion barrier and explains the peculiar behaviour of SA polymers. Several formulation parameters such as compression force, drug loading, tablet weight and insoluble diluent concentration were investigated. On the other hand, tablet thickness, scanning electron microscope analysis and mercury intrusion porosimetry showed that the high crushing strength values observed for SA tablets were due to an unusual melting process occurring during tabletting although the tablet external layer went only through densification, deformation and partial melting. In contrast, HPMC tablets did not show any traces of a melting process.

  3. Nanoparticle-based targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh; Lillard, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology could be defined as the technology that has allowed for the control, manipulation, study, and manufacture of structures and devices in the “nanometer” size range. These nano-sized objects, e.g., “nanoparticles”, take on novel properties and functions that differ markedly from those seen from items made of identical materials. The small size, customized surface, improved solubility, and multi-functionality of nanoparticles will continue to open many doors and create new biomedical applications. Indeed, the novel properties of nanoparticles offer the ability to interact with complex cellular functions in new ways. This rapidly growing field requires cross-disciplinary research and provides opportunities to design and develop multifunctional devices that can target, diagnose, and treat devastating diseases such as cancer. This article presents an overview of nanotechnology for the biologist and discusses the attributes of our novel XPclad© nanoparticle formulation that has shown efficacy in treating solid tumors, for single dose vaccination, and oral delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19186176

  4. Expand classical drug administration ways by emerging routes using dendrimer drug delivery systems: a concise overview.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Serge; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Bousmina, Mosto; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Drugs are introduced into the body by numerous routes such as enteral (oral, sublingual and rectum administration), parenteral (intravascular, intramuscular, subcutaneous and inhalation administration), or topical (skin and mucosal membranes). Each route has specific purposes, advantages and disadvantages. Today, the oral route remains the preferred one for different reasons such as ease and compliance by patients. Several nanoformulated drugs have been already approved by the FDA, such as Abelcet®, Doxil®, Abraxane® or Vivagel®(Starpharma) which is an anionic G4-poly(L-lysine)-type dendrimer showing potent topical vaginal microbicide activity. Numerous biochemical studies, as well as biological and pharmacological applications of both dendrimer based products (dendrimers as therapeutic compounds per se, like Vivagel®) and dendrimers as drug carriers (covalent conjugation or noncovalent encapsulation of drugs) were described. It is widely known that due to their outstanding physical and chemical properties, dendrimers afforded improvement of corresponding carried-drugs as dendrimer-drug complexes or conjugates (versus plain drug) such as biodistribution and pharmacokinetic behaviors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the recent progresses of dendrimers as nanoscale drug delivery systems for the delivery of drugs using enteral, parenteral and topical routes. In particular, we focus our attention on the emerging and promising routes such as oral, transdermal, ocular and transmucosal routes using dendrimers as delivery systems. PMID:23415951

  5. Physical energy for drug delivery; poration, concentration and activation.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Shanmugamurthy; Gupta, Gaurav K; Avci, Pinar; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Sadasivam, Magesh; Jorge, Ana Elisa Serafim; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-05-01

    Techniques for controlling the rate and duration of drug delivery, while targeting specific locations of the body for treatment, to deliver the cargo (drugs or DNA) to particular parts of the body by what are becoming called "smart drug carriers" have gained increased attention during recent years. Using such smart carriers, researchers have also been investigating a number of physical energy forces including: magnetic fields, ultrasound, electric fields, temperature gradients, photoactivation or photorelease mechanisms, and mechanical forces to enhance drug delivery within the targeted cells or tissues and also to activate the drugs using a similar or a different type of external trigger. This review aims to cover a number of such physical energy modalities. Various advanced techniques such as magnetoporation, electroporation, iontophoresis, sonoporation/mechnoporation, phonophoresis, optoporation and thermoporation will be covered in the review. Special emphasis will be placed on photodynamic therapy owing to the experience of the authors' laboratory in this area, but other types of drug cargo and DNA vectors will also be covered. Photothermal therapy and theranostics will also be discussed. PMID:23751778

  6. Covalently-crosslinked mucin biopolymer hydrogels for sustained drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Connor V; David, Laurent; Crouzier, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The sustained delivery of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs from hydrogels has remained a challenge requiring the design and scalable production of complex multifunctional synthetic polymers. Here, we demonstrate that mucin glycoproteins, the gel-forming constituents of native mucus, are suitable for assembly into robust hydrogels capable of facilitating the sustained release of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs. Covalently-crosslinked mucin hydrogels were generated via exposure of methacrylated mucin to ultraviolet light in the presence of a free radical photoinitiator. The hydrogels exhibited an elastic modulus similar to that of soft mammalian tissue and were sensitive to proteolytic degradation by pronase. Paclitaxel, a hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, and polymyxin B, a positively-charged hydrophilic antibacterial drug, were retained in the hydrogels and released linearly with time over seven days. After four weeks of drug release, the hydrogels continued to release sufficient amounts of active paclitaxel to reduce HeLa cell viability and sufficient amounts of active polymyxin B to prevent bacterial proliferation. Along with previously-established anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and hydrocarbon-solubilizing properties of mucin, the results of this study establish mucin as a readily-available, chemically-versatile, naturally-biocompatible alternative to complex multifunctional synthetic polymers as building blocks in the design of biomaterials for sustained drug delivery. PMID:25818947

  7. Crosslinked Multilamellar Liposomes for Controlled Delivery of Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kye-Il; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Shuanglong; Liu, Yarong; Lee, Chi-Lin; Conti, Peter S.; Wong, Michael K.; Li, Zibo; Wang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes constitute one of the most popular nanocarriers for the delivery of cancer therapeutics. However, since their potency is limited by incomplete drug release and inherent instability in the presence of serum components, their poor delivery occurs in certain circumstances. In this study, we address these shortcomings and demonstrate an alternative liposomal formulation, termed crosslinked multilamellar liposome (CML). With its properties of improved sustainable drug release kinetics and enhanced vesicle stability, CML can achieve controlled delivery of cancer therapeutics. CML stably encapsulated the anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) in the vesicle and exhibited a remarkably controlled rate of release compared to that of the unilamellar liposome (UL) with the same lipid composition or Doxil-like liposome (DLL). Our imaging study demonstrated that the CMLs were mainly internalized through a caveolin-dependent pathway and were further trafficked through the endosome-lysosome compartments. Furthermore, in vivo experiments showed that the CML-Dox formulation reduced systemic toxicity and significantly improved therapeutic activity in inhibiting tumor growth compared to that of UL-Dox or DLL-Dox. This drug packaging technology may therefore provide a new treatment option to better manage cancer and other diseases. PMID:23375392

  8. Advances in drug delivery via electrospun and electrosprayed nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Maedeh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2013-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques refer to procedures that utilize electrostatic forces to fabricate fibers or particles of different shapes with sizes in the nano-range to a few microns through electrically charged fluid jet. Employing different techniques, such as blending, surface modification, and coaxial process, there is a great possibility of incorporating bioactive such molecules as drugs, DNA, and growth factors into the nanostructures fabricated via EHD techniques. By careful selection of materials and processing conditions, desired encapsulation efficiency as well as preserved bioactivity of the therapeutic agents can be achieved. The drug-loaded nanostructures produced can be applied via different routes, such as implantation, injection, and topical or oral administration for a wide range of disease treatment. Taking advantage of the recent developments in EHD techniques like the coaxial process or multilayered structures, individually controlled delivery of multiple drugs is achievable, which is of great demand in cancer therapy and growth-factor delivery. This review summarizes the most recent techniques and postmodification methods to fabricate electrospun nanofibers and electrosprayed particles for drug-delivery applications. PMID:23976851

  9. A Novel Multilayered Multidisk Oral Tablet for Chronotherapeutic Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zaheeda; Choonara, Yahya E.; du Toit, Lisa C.; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.; Pillay, Viness

    2013-01-01

    A Multilayered Multidisk Tablet (MLMDT) comprising two drug-loaded disks enveloped by three drug-free barrier layers was developed for use in chronotherapeutic disorders, employing two model drugs, theophylline and diltiazem HCl. The MLMDT was designed to achieve two pulses of drug release separated by a lag phase. The polymer disk comprised hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) and ethylcellulose (EC) granulated using an aqueous dispersion of EC. The polymeric barrier layers constituted a combination of pectin/Avicel (PBL) (1st barrier layer) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) (HBL1 and HBL2) as the 2nd and 3rd barrier layers, respectively. Sodium bicarbonate was incorporated into the diltiazem-containing formulation for delayed drug release. Erosion and swelling studies confirmed the manner in which the drug was released with theophylline formulations exhibiting a maximum swelling of 97% and diltiazem containing formulations with a maximum swelling of 119%. FTIR spectra displayed no interactions between drugs and polymers. Molecular mechanics simulations were undertaken to predict the possible orientation of the polymer morphologies most likely affecting the MLMDT performance. The MLMDT provided two pulses of drug release, separated by a lag phase, and additionally it displayed desirable friability, hardness, and uniformity of mass indicating a stable formulation that may be a desirable candidate for chronotherapeutic drug delivery. PMID:24024200

  10. Colon-specific drug delivery for mebeverine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Omar, Samia; Aldosari, Basmah; Refai, Hanan; Gohary, Omaimah Al

    2007-12-01

    Mebeverine Hydrochloride (MB-HCl), an effective spasmolytic drug, was formulated as CODES. A colon-specific drug delivery technology CODES was designed to avoid the inherent problems associated with pH- or time-dependent systems. To achieve more protection and control of drug release, MB-HCl was prepared as microspheres and compressed as core tablets of CODES (modified CODES). The core tablets contained the drug either in free form [Formula 1 (F(1))], or as microspheres with 2 different polymer:drug:lactulose ratios (1:1:0.5 [Formula 2 (F(2))] and 2:1:0.5 [Formula 3 (F(3))]. The release profiles of the coated CODES systems were compared with uncoated compressed tablets. The uncoated tablet showed a drug release of 94% after 1 h in simulated gastric condition (pH = 1.2). The release characteristics of the coated systems revealed that the enteric coating (Eudragit L(100)) prevented any drug release in simulated gastric or duodenal conditions in the first 3 h (pH 1.2-6.1), after which drug was slightly liberated in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.4) {Phase 1 (P1)}. After 4 h the pH was adjusted to 7 and beta-glucose-oxidase was added, which is an enzyme produced by enterobacteria present in the colon. The acid-soluble coat (Eudragit)E(100)) dissolved and the drug release suddenly increased to reach 95, 72 and 60.4% for F(1)-F(3), respectively. IR spectrum study showed a covalent bond between the drug and the polymer in the formulae F(2) and F(3) resulting in the sustained drug release from the microspheres with a significant difference (p>0.05) to F(1). The findings were confirmed by in vivo investigation using X-ray images for Guinea pigs ingested tablets containing barium sulphate (F(4)), where the tablet began to disintegrate after 10 h of tablet intake. The results of the study indicated that MB-HCl CODES colon-specific drug delivery can act as a successful trigger for drug targeting in the colon. Furthermore, a sustained release of the drug can be achieved from modified CODES containing the drug in the form of microspheres. PMID:18041637

  11. Advances in the Applications of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Nanoparticles for Novel Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastav, Anupama; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Young-Rok

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery technology is emerging as an interdisciplinary science aimed at improving human health. The controlled delivery of pharmacologically active agents to the specific site of action at the therapeutically optimal rate and dose regimen has been a major goal in designing drug delivery systems. Over the past few decades, there has been considerable interest in developing biodegradable drug carriers as effective drug delivery systems. Polymeric materials from natural sources play an important role in controlled release of drug at a particular site. Polyhydroxyalkanoates, due to their origin from natural sources, are given attention as candidates for drug delivery materials. Biodegradable and biocompatible polyhydroxyalkanoates are linear polyesters produced by microorganisms under unbalanced growth conditions, which have emerged as potential polymers for use as biomedical materials for drug delivery due to their unique physiochemical and mechanical properties. This review summarizes many of the key findings in the applications of polyhydroxyalkanoates and polyhydroxyalkanoate nanoparticles for drug delivery system. PMID:23984383

  12. Catheter systems for intrathecal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Penn, R D; York, M M; Paice, J A

    1995-08-01

    A prospective study of intrathecal catheter reliability was performed at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center. All 102 patients who had baclofen administered chronically for spasticity via an implanted drug pump were included. Sixty percent of the patients had no catheter complications; the remaining patients had one to five complications over their course of treatment. Survival analysis demonstrated a steady rate of malfunction up to 80 months, with the mean time to first failure recorded at 20 months. Kinks, holes, breaks, dislodgments, and disconnections were the most common complications. On the basis of their research the authors conclude that the thin-walled silastic catheter does not perform well and that larger, thick-walled catheters should be used. PMID:7616263

  13. Nanoparticles: Emerging carriers for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mudshinge, Sagar R.; Deore, Amol B.; Patil, Sachin; Bhalgat, Chetan M.

    2011-01-01

    The core objective of nanoparticles is to control and manipulate biomacromolecular constructs and supramolecular assemblies that are critical to living cells in order to improve the quality of human health. By definition, these constructs and assemblies are nanoscale and include entities such as drugs, proteins, DNA/RNA, viruses, cellular lipid bilayers, cellular receptor sites and antibody variable regions critical for immunology and are involved in events of nanoscale proportions. The emergence of such nanotherapeutics/diagnostics will allow a deeper understanding of human longevity and human ills that include cancer, cardiovascular disease and genetic disorders. A technology platform that provides a wide range of synthetic nanostructures that may be controlled as a function of size, shape and surface chemistry and scale to these nanotechnical dimensions will be a critical first step in developing appropriate tools and a scientific basis for understanding nanoparticles. PMID:23960751

  14. Light induced cytosolic drug delivery from liposomes with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Tatu; Viitala, Lauri; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Laaksonen, Timo; Liang, Huamin; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina; Viitala, Tapani; Le Guével, Xavier; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2015-04-10

    Externally triggered drug release at defined targets allows site- and time-controlled drug treatment regimens. We have developed liposomal drug carriers with encapsulated gold nanoparticles for triggered drug release. Light energy is converted to heat in the gold nanoparticles and released to the lipid bilayers. Localized temperature increase renders liposomal bilayers to be leaky and triggers drug release. The aim of this study was to develop a drug releasing system capable of releasing its cargo to cell cytosol upon triggering with visible and near infrared light signals. The liposomes were formulated using either heat-sensitive or heat- and pH-sensitive lipid compositions with star or rod shaped gold nanoparticles. Encapsulated fluorescent probe, calcein, was released from the liposomes after exposure to the light. In addition, the pH-sensitive formulations showed a faster drug release in acidic conditions than in neutral conditions. The liposomes were internalized into human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and did not show any cellular toxicity. The light induced cytosolic delivery of calcein from the gold nanoparticle containing liposomes was shown, whereas no cytosolic release was seen without light induction or without gold nanoparticles in the liposomes. The light activated liposome formulations showed a controlled content release to the cellular cytosol at a specific location and time. Triggering with visual and near infrared light allows good tissue penetration and safety, and the pH-sensitive liposomes may enable selective drug release in the intracellular acidic compartments (endosomes, lysosomes). Thus, light activated liposomes with gold nanoparticles are an attractive option for time- and site-specific drug delivery into the target cells. PMID:25701610

  15. Multistage Nanovectors Enhance the Delivery of Free and Encapsulated Drugs.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jonathan O; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Bhavane, Rohan; Acciardo, Stefania; Salvatore, Francesco; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2014-10-15

    Nanoparticles have considerable potential for cancer imaging and therapy due to their small size and prolonged circulation. However, biological barriers can impede the delivery of a sufficient dose of a drug to the target site, thereby also resulting in the accumulation of toxic compounds within healthy tissues, and systemic toxicity. Multistage nanovectors (MSV) preferentially accumulate on inflamed endothelium, and can thus serve as carriers for drugs and nanoparticles. Herein, we describe the loading of free (i.e., melittin) and nano-encapsulated (i.e., doxorubicin-loaded micelles) drugs into MSV, and report the impact of surface charge and pore size on drug loading. For both drug formulations, negatively charged MSV (i.e., oxidized) with larger pores were shown to retain higher concentrations of payloads compared to positively charged (i.e., APTES-modified) MSV with small pores. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with melittin-loaded MSV (MEL@MSV) resulted in an 80% reduction in cell viability after 3 days. Furthermore, MEL@MSV conjugated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) antibodies displayed preferential targeting and delivery of MEL to activated HUVEC expressing VEGFR2. Treatment of HUVEC and MCF7 cells with doxorubicin-loaded micelles (DOXNP@MSV) resulted in a 23% and 47% reduction in cell viability, respectively. Taken together, these results demonstrate increased loading of a payload in oxidized, large pore MSV, and effective delivery of free and nano-encapsulated drugs to endothelial and cancer cells. PMID:25316273

  16. Biologically erodable microspheres as potential oral drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Mathiowitz, E; Jacob, J S; Jong, Y S; Carino, G P; Chickering, D E; Chaturvedi, P; Santos, C A; Vijayaraghavan, K; Montgomery, S; Bassett, M; Morrell, C

    1997-03-27

    Biologically adhesive delivery systems offer important advantages over conventional drug delivery systems. Here we show that engineered polymer microspheres made of biologically erodable polymers, which display strong adhesive interactions with gastrointestinal mucus and cellular linings, can traverse both the mucosal absorptive epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium covering the lymphoid tissue of Peyer's patches. The polymers maintain contact with intestinal epithelium for extended periods of time and actually penetrate it, through and between cells. Thus, once loaded with compounds of pharmacological interest, the microspheres could be developed as delivery systems to transfer biologically active molecules to the circulation. We show that these microspheres increase the absorption of three model substances of widely different molecular size: dicumarol, insulin and plasmid DNA. PMID:9121559

  17. Microneedles for drug delivery via the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Traverso, Giovanni; Schoellhammer, Carl M; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Polat, Baris E; Anderson, Daniel G; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Both patients and physicians prefer the oral route of drug delivery. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract, though, limits the bioavailability of certain therapeutics because of its protease and bacteria-rich environment as well as general pH variability from pH 1 to 7. These extreme environments make oral delivery particularly challenging for the biologic class of therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate proof-of-concept experiments in swine that microneedle-based delivery has the capacity for improved bioavailability of a biologically active macromolecule. Moreover, we show that microneedle-containing devices can be passed and excreted from the GI tract safely. These findings strongly support the success of implementation of microneedle technology for use in the GI tract. PMID:25250829

  18. Fundamental study for development magnetic drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Y.; Akiyama, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2009-10-01

    Side-effects and lowering effects by diffusion of drugs such as anticancer agents is one of the serious issues in medication. To solve this problem, it is necessary to control the drugs quantitatively, spatially and temporally within the human body. Magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) is one of the technologies to make it possible, in which the ferromagnetic drug injected into the blood vessel is conducted to diseased part by external magnetic force. As a fundamental experiment, the accumulation experiment using ferromagnetic particles were performed with simulated capillary vessels composed of glass beads channels in this work. Additionally, accumulation calculation of ferromagnetic particles was conducted to check the validity of accumulation experiment. From these result, the 2D distribution of particle accumulation in the experiment corresponded with that of particle accumulation in the calculation. It was suggested that the proper position of magnet should be changed according to the depth of diseased part.

  19. Application of Ultrasound Energy as a New Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Katsuro; Tachibana, Shunro

    1999-05-01

    Ultrasound has been in use for the last three decades as amodality for diagnostic imaging in medicine. Recently, there have beennumerous reports on the application of nonthermal ultrasound energyfor targeting or controlling drug release. This new concept oftherapeutic ultrasound combined with drugs has led to much excitementin various medical fields. Ultrasound energy can enhance the effectsof thrombolytic agents such as urokinase. Therapeutic ultrasoundcatheters are currently being developed for treatment ofcardiovascular diseases. Devices with ultrasound transducers implantedin transdermal drug patches are also being evaluated for possibledelivery of insulin through the skin. Chemical activation of drugs byultrasound energy for treatment of cancers is another new fieldrecently termed “Sonodynamic Therapy”. Various examples of ultrasoundapplication are under investigation which could lead to revolutionarydrug delivery systems in the future.

  20. Engineering of nanoemulsions for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Dipak K

    2005-10-01

    Nanoemulsions, usually spherical, are a group of dispersed particles used for pharmaceutical and biomedical aids and vehicles that show great promise for the future of cosmetics, diagnostics, drug therapies and biotechnologies. They exist in a wide variety of forms that are dictated by the particle components. Nanoemulsions are generally considered to be in the size range of less than and around 100 nm in diameter. The particles can exist as water-in-oil and oil-in-water forms, where the core of the particle is either water or oil, respectively. More complex variations also exist but these are often larger. The longer-term properties of the particle are dependent on the composition of the adsorbed material lying at the dispersed droplet interface with the dispersion medium. This has an impact on the partitioning and extraction of droplet contents. Thermodynamically stable particles are characterized by having a very low surface tension and this produces a very large surface area. Nanoemulsions can also include small meta-stable very small-scale emulsions; here the surface properties and chemistry can strongly influence behaviour. Processing, storage and formulation composition can also have an impact on the longevity of a pharmaceutical preparation. Some revolutionary new nanoemulsion droplets based on fluorinated compounds are finding a number of widespread biomedical roles and applications. Developments in nanoemulsion technology are likely to lead to a much greater use of this medium in future pharmaceuticals. PMID:16305433

  1. SWCNT-Polymer Nanocomplexes for Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withey, Paul; Momin, Zoya; Bommoju, Anvesh; Hoang, Trung; Rashid, Bazlur

    2015-03-01

    Utilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as more effective drug-delivery agents are being considered due to their ability to easily cross cell membranes, while their high aspect ratio and large surface area provide multiple attachment sites for biocompatible drug complexes. However, excessive bundling of pristine SWCNTs caused by strong attractive Van der Walls forces between CNT sidewalls is a major obstacle. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs with both polyvinyl alcohol and Pluronic biocompatible polymers, and attached anti-cancer drugs Camptothecin (CPT) and Doxorubicin to form non-covalent CNT-polymer-drug conjugates in aqueous solution. Polymeric dispersion of SWCNTs by both polymers is confirmed by clearly identifiable near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence emission peaks of individual (7,5) and (7,6) nanotubes, and drug attachment to form complete complexes verified by UV-Vis spectroscopy. These complexes, with varying SWCNT and drug concentrations, were tested for effectiveness by exposing them to a line of human embryonic kidney cancer cells and analyzed for cell viability. Preliminary results indicate significant improvement in drug effectiveness on the cancer cells, with more successful internalization due to unaltered SWCNTs as the drug carriers. Supported by the UHCL Faculty Research Support Fund.

  2. Biocompatible polymeric implants for controlled drug delivery produced by MAPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Moldovan, Antoniu; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo; Dinescu, Maria

    2011-10-01

    Implants consisting of drug cores coated with polymeric films were developed for delivering drugs in a controlled manner. The polymeric films were produced using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and consist of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), used individually as well as blended with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Indomethacin (INC) was used as model drug. The implants were tested in vitro (i.e. in conditions similar with those encountered inside the body), for predicting their behavior after implantation at the site of action. To this end, they were immersed in physiological media (i.e. phosphate buffered saline PBS pH 7.4 and blood). At various intervals of PBS immersion (and respectively in blood), the polymeric films coating the drug cores were studied in terms of morphology, chemistry, wettability and blood compatibility. PEG:PLGA film exhibited superior properties as compared to PLGA film, the corresponding implant being thus more suitable for internal use in the human body. In addition, the implant containing PEG:PLGA film provided an efficient and sustained release of the drug. The kinetics of the drug release was consistent with a diffusion mediated mechanism (as revealed by fitting the data with Higuchi's model); the drug was gradually released through the pores formed during PBS immersion. In contrast, the implant containing PLGA film showed poor drug delivery rates and mechanical failure. In this case, fitting the data with Hixson-Crowell model indicated a release mechanism dominated by polymer erosion.

  3. Polymeric microdevices for transdermal and subcutaneous drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Manuel; Mousoulis, Charilaos; Ziaie, Babak

    2012-11-01

    Low cost manufacturing of polymeric microdevices for transdermal and subcutaneous drug delivery is slated to have a major impact on next generation devices for administration of biopharmaceuticals and other emerging new formulations. These devices range in complexity from simple microneedle arrays to more complicated systems incorporating micropumps, micro-reservoirs, on-board sensors, and electronic intelligence. In this paper, we review devices currently in the market and those in the earlier stages of research and development. We also present two examples of the research in our laboratory towards using phase change liquids in polymeric structures to create disposable micropumps and the development of an elastomeric reservoir for MEMS-based transdermal drug delivery systems. PMID:23000744

  4. Porous Hydroxyapatite Bioceramic Scaffolds for Drug Delivery and Bone Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loca, Dagnija; Locs, Janis; Salma, Kristine; Gulbis, Juris; Salma, Ilze; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2011-10-01

    The conventional methods of supplying a patient with pharmacologic active substances suffer from being very poorly selective, so that damage can occurs to the healthy tissues and organs, different from the intended target. In addition, high drug doses can be required to achieve the desired effect. An alternative approach is based on the use of implantable delivery tools, able to release the active substance in a controlled way. In the current research local drug delivery devices containing 8mg of gentamicin sulphate were prepared using custom developed vacuum impregnation technique. In vitro dissolution tests showed that gentamicin release was sustained for 12h. In order to decrease gentamicin release rate, biopolymer coatings were applied and coating structure investigated. The results showed that gentamicin release can be sustained for more than 70h for poly(epsilon-caprolactone) coated calcium phosphate scaffolds. From poly lactic acid and polyvinyl alcohol coated scaffolds gentamicin was released within 20h and 50h, respectively.

  5. Non-destructively shattered mesoporous silica for protein drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chenghong; Chen, Baowei; Li, Xiaolin; Qi, Wen; Liu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas have been extensively used for entrapping small chemical molecules and biomacromolecules for drug delivery. We hypothesize that the loading density of biomacromlecules such as proteins in mesoporous silicas could be limited due to disordering in the pore structure and long diffusion time in the pore channels. We shattered mesoporous silicas non-destructively resulting in improved intramesoporous structures and reduced particle sizes in aqueous solutions by a powerful sonication, where the mesoporous structures were still well maintained. The sonication-shattered mesoporous silica can increase the protein loading density to nearly 2.7 times as high as that of the non-shattered one, demonstrating that significantly more mesopore space of the silica could be accessible by the protein molecules, which may result in more sustained protein drug delivery. PMID:23687455

  6. Analysis of a simulation algorithm for direct brain drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbluth, Kathryn Hammond; Eschermann, Jan Felix; Mittermeyer, Gabriele; Thomson, Rowena; Mittermeyer, Stephan; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2011-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) achieves targeted delivery of drugs with a pressure-driven infusion through a cannula placed stereotactically in the brain. This technique bypasses the blood brain barrier and gives precise distributions of drugs, minimizing off-target effects of compounds such as viral vectors for gene therapy or toxic chemotherapy agents. The exact distribution is affected by the cannula positioning, flow rate and underlying tissue structure. This study presents an analysis of a simulation algorithm for predicting the distribution using baseline MRI images acquired prior to inserting the cannula. The MRI images included diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to estimate the tissue properties. The algorithm was adapted for the devices and protocols identified for upcoming trials and validated with direct MRI visualization of Gadolinium in 20 infusions in non-human primates. We found strong agreement between the size and location of the simulated and gadolinium volumes, demonstrating the clinical utility of this surgical planning algorithm. PMID:21945468

  7. Transfollicular drug delivery--is it a reality?

    PubMed

    Meidan, Victor M; Bonner, Michael C; Michniak, Bozena B

    2005-12-01

    Once regarded as merely evolutionary remnants, the hair follicles and sebaceous glands are increasingly recognised as potentially significant elements in the percutaneous drug delivery paradigm. Interest in pilosebaceous units has been directed towards their use as depots for localised therapy, particularly for the treatment of follicle-related disorders such as acne or the alopecias. Furthermore, considerable attention has also been focused on exploiting the follicles as transport shunts for systemic drug delivery. This paper reviews various key facets of this field including; relevant aspects of pilosebaceous anatomy and physiology, the design and efficacy of follicle-targeting formulations and the emergence of quantitative modeling systems. Several novel developments in this area promise to greatly expand our understanding of this field in the near future. PMID:16260102

  8. Molecular diagnosis using multi drug delivery network and stability.

    PubMed

    Jalil, M A; Innate, K; Suwanpayak, N; Yupapin, P P; Ali, J

    2011-12-01

    By using a pair of tweezers to generate the intense optical vortices within the PANDA ring resonator, the required molecules (drug volumes) can be trapped and moved dynamically within the molecular bus networks, in which the required diagnosis or drug delivery targets can be performed within the network. The advantage of the proposed system is that the proposed diagnostic method can perform within the tiny system (thin film device or circuit), which can be available for a human embedded device for diagnostic use. The channel spacing of the trapped volumes (molecules) within the bus molecular networks can be provided. PMID:21999106

  9. Localized drugs delivery hydroxyapatite microspheres for osteoporosis therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Ko, I. H.; Jeon, S.-H.; Chae, J. H.; Lee, E. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2011-10-01

    This study describes the preparation of hydroxyapatite microspheres for local drugs delivery. The formation of the hydroxyapatite microspheres was initiated by enzymatic decomposition of urea and accomplished by emulsification process (water-in-oil). The microspheres obtained were sintered at 500°C. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicated that the microspheres have various porous with random size, which maximizes the surface area. Cytotoxicity was not observed after sintering. Osteoporosis drugs, alendronate and BMP-2, were loaded into HAp microspheres and the releases of both molecules showed sustained releasing profiles.

  10. Multifunctional inorganic nanoparticles for imaging, targeting, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Liong, Monty; Lu, Jie; Kovochich, Michael; Xia, Tian; Ruehm, Stefan G; Nel, Andre E; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2008-05-01

    Drug delivery, magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, magnetic manipulation, and cell targeting are simultaneously possible using a multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticle. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals were encapsulated inside mesostructured silica spheres that were labeled with fluorescent dye molecules and coated with hydrophilic groups to prevent aggregation. Water-insoluble anticancer drugs were delivered into human cancer cells; surface conjugation with cancer-specific targeting agents increased the uptake into cancer cells relative to that in non-cancerous fibroblasts. The highly versatile multifunctional nanoparticles could potentially be used for simultaneous imaging and therapeutic applications. PMID:19206485

  11. Engineered spider silk protein-based composites for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Hardy, John G; Leal-Egaña, Aldo; Scheibel, Thomas R

    2013-10-01

    Silk protein-based materials are promising materials for the delivery of drugs and other active ingredients, due to their processability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. The preparation of films composed of an engineered spider silk protein (eADF4(C16)) in combination with either a polyester (polycaprolactone) or a polyurethane (pellethane), and their physical properties are described. The release profiles are affected by both the film composition and the presence of enzymes, and release can be observed over a period of several weeks. Such silk-based composites have potential as drug eluting biocompatible coatings or implantable devices. PMID:23881554

  12. An Efficient Targeted Drug Delivery through Apotransferrin Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Golla; Kondapi, Anand Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. Methodology/Principal Findings Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano) have diameters of 25–50 ?m, which increase to 60–80 ?m upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano), and showed further increase in dimension (75–95 ?m) in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano). The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a) localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus) (b) pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c) the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in regression of hepatocellular carcinoma with negligible toxicity to kidney and liver. Conclusions The present study thus demonstrates that the direct-nano is highly efficacious in delivery of drug in a target specific manner with lower toxicity to heart, liver and kidney. PMID:19806207

  13. Gastrointestinal transit of Oros drug delivery systems in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    John, V. A.; Shotton, P. A.; Moppert, J.; Theobald, W.

    1985-01-01

    1 Transit times for oxprenolol and metoprolol Oros drug delivery systems through the gastrointestinal tract have been measured in 35 individuals in six separate studies. 2 A total of 45 systems were recovered in a median time of 27.4 h; individual transit times varied from 5.1 to 58.3 h. 3 The residual amount of drug in recovered systems was inversely related to transit time and corresponded closely with the amount estimated from in vitro dissolution profiles. PMID:4005123

  14. Nanostructured drug delivery for better management of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Indu Pal; Singh, Harinder

    2014-06-28

    With almost 30% of the world population suffering from tuberculosis (TB) including its resurgence in the developed world, better management of this global threat is highly desired. The emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) against first-line drugs and extensively drug resistant TB (XDR-TB) due to misuse of second-line antitubercular drugs (ATDs) is a further concern. Recommended treatment involves long term and multiple drug therapy with severe side effects. In this context, nanostructured systems efficiently encapsulating considerable amounts of ATDs, eliciting controlled, sustained and more profound effect to overcome the need to administer ATDs at high and frequent doses, would assist in improving patient compliance and circumvent hepatotoxicity and/or nephrotoxicity/ocular toxicity/ototoxicity associated with the prevalent first-line chemotherapy. Nanostructured delivery systems constitute a wide range of systems varying from liposomes, micelles, micro- and nanoemulsions, to polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). Improved bioavailability, solubility, stability and biocompatibility make them an ideal choice for delivery of ATDs. Present review comprehensively covers research carried out on first-line antitubercular drug therapy using these nanostructured systems. PMID:24732260

  15. ALTERNATE ROUTES FOR DRUG DELIVERY TO THE CELL INTERIOR

    PubMed Central

    Tarragó-Trani, Maria Teresa; Storrie, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The targeted delivery of drugs to the cell interior can be accomplished by taking advantage of the various receptor-mediated endocytic pathways operating in a particular cell. Among these pathways, the retrograde trafficking pathway from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus, and endoplasmic reticulum is of special importance since it provides a route to deliver drugs bypassing the acid pH, hydrolytic environment of the lysosome. The existence of pathways for drug or antigen delivery to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus has been to a large extent an outcome of research on the trafficking of A/B type-bacterial or plant toxins such as Shiga toxin within the cell. The targeting properties of these toxins reside in their B subunit. In this article we present an overview of the multiplicity of pathways to deliver drugs intracellularly. We highlight the retrograde trafficking pathway illustrated by Shiga toxin and Shiga-like toxin, and the potential role of the B subunit of these toxins as carriers of drugs, antigens and imaging agents. PMID:17669543

  16. MEMS-based micropumps in drug delivery and biomedical applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Nisar; Nitin Afzulpurkar; Banchong Mahaisavariya; Adisorn Tuantranont

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly overviews progress on the development of MEMS-based micropumps and their applications in drug delivery and other biomedical applications such as micrototal analysis systems (?TAS) or lab-on-a-chip and point of care testing systems (POCT). The focus of the review is to present key features of micropumps such as actuation methods, working principles, construction, fabrication methods, performance parameters and

  17. Programmable Drug Delivery from an Erodible Association Polymer System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xin Xu; Ping I. Lee

    1993-01-01

    An erodible association polymer system based on blends of cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) and Pluronic F127, a block copolymer of poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), has been investigated for its applicability to rate-programmed drug delivery. The compatibility and thermal properties were characterized by DSC and FTIR. Results from the thermal analysis indicate that the blends are compatible above 50% CAP,

  18. Mechanistic Analysis of Chemical Permeation Enhancers for Oral Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn Whitehead; Samir Mitragotri

    2008-01-01

    Purpose  Traditionally, the oral route cannot be employed for the delivery of macromolecular drugs such as proteins and peptides due,\\u000a in large part, to limited transport across the epithelial membrane. This particular challenge can potentially be addressed\\u000a through the use of chemical permeation enhancers, which affect transcellular and\\/or paracellular transport routes. Although\\u000a certain permeation enhancers have been proposed for use in

  19. Nanofabricated biomimetic structures for smart targeting and drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alma Dudia; Johannes S. Kanger; Vinod Subramaniam

    2005-01-01

    We present a new approach to hybrid artificial cells (AC) designed for specific targeting and active drug delivery by combining\\u000a an impermeable non-biological scaffold with an artificial bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) that supports the functioning bio-molecules\\u000a required to provide AC functionality. We report on the fabrication of the scaffold using nanotechnology, as well as on loading\\u000a of the scaffold and

  20. Novel biomimetic polymersomes as polymer therapeutics for drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian-Ping Xu; Jian Ji; Wei-Dong Chen; Jia-Cong Shen

    2005-01-01

    Novel amphiphilic diblock copolymers, cholesterol-end-capped poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (CMPC), which have poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (poly(MPC)) as hydrophilic segment and cholesterol as hydrophobic segment, was specially designed as drug delivery systems. Fluorescence probe technique and transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterizations indicated that this novel amphiphilic copolymer formed micelles structure in water and the critical micelle concentration (CMC) was determined to be 1.57×10?7 mol\\/l.

  1. Principles of Retinal Drug Delivery from Within the Vitreous

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clive G. Wilson; Lay Ean Tan; Jenifer Mains

    \\u000a In recent years, vitreous humour, a connective tissue at the centre of the eye, emerged as a preferred reservoir for back\\u000a of the eye drug delivery. Although vitreous humour is largely composed of water (>99%), its physical form can range from a\\u000a firm gel in the youth to a collapsed gel in the elderly. These changes in the physical form

  2. STOMACH SPECIFIC FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A REVIEW

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Technological attempts have been made in the research and development of rate-controll ed oral drug delivery systems to overcome physiological adversities, such as short gastric residence times (GRT) and unpredictable gastric emptying times (GET). It is known that differences in gastric physiology, such as, gastric pH, and motility exhibit both intra-as well as inter-subject variability demonstrating significant impact on gastric

  3. Development and characterization of a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system for potential application in oral delivery of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongwu; Liu, Kaiyun; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wenxiu; Guo, Chunliang; Tang, Bin; Gu, Jiang; Zhang, Jinyong; Li, Haibo; Mao, Xuhu; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Background: The stability of protein drugs remains one of the key hurdles to their success in the market. The aim of the present study was to design a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system (NEDDS) that would encapsulate a standard-model protein drug – bovine serum albumin (BSA) – to improve drug stability. Methods: The BSA NEDDS was prepared using a phase-inversion method and pseudoternary phase diagrams. The following characteristics were studied: morphology, size, zeta potential, drug loading, and encapsulation efficiency. We also investigated the stability of the BSA NEDDS, bioactivity of BSA encapsulated within the NEDDS, the integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and specificity. Results: The BSA NEDDS consisted of Cremophor EL-35, propylene glycol, isopropyl myristate, and normal saline. The average particle diameter of the BSA NEDDS was about 21.8 nm, and the system showed a high encapsulation efficiency (>90%) and an adequate drug-loading capacity (45 mg/mL). The thermodynamic stability of the system was investigated at different temperatures and pH levels and in room-temperature conditions for 180 days. BSA NEDDS showed good structural integrity and specificity for the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and good bioactivity of the loaded BSA. Conclusions: BSA NEDDS showed the properties of a good nanoemulsion-delivery system. NEDDS can greatly enhance the stability of the protein drug BSA while maintaining high levels of drug bioactivity, good specificity, and integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary protein structures. These findings indicate that the nanoemulsion is a potential formulation for oral administration of protein drugs. PMID:23118537

  4. Dissolving and biodegradable microneedle technologies for transdermal sustained delivery of drug and vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xiaoyun; Wei, Liangming; Wu, Fei; Wu, Zaozhan; Chen, Lizhu; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2013-01-01

    Microneedles were first conceptualized for drug delivery many decades ago, overcoming the shortages and preserving the advantages of hypodermic needle and conventional transdermal drug-delivery systems to some extent. Dissolving and biodegradable microneedle technologies have been used for transdermal sustained deliveries of different drugs and vaccines. This review describes microneedle geometry and the representative dissolving and biodegradable microneedle delivery methods via the skin, followed by the fabricating methods. Finally, this review puts forward some perspectives that require further investigation. PMID:24039404

  5. Nanocluster budesonide formulations enhance drug delivery through endotracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Pornputtapitak, Warangkana; El-Gendy, Nashwa; Berkland, Cory

    2012-03-01

    The pulmonary system is an attractive route for drug delivery because the lungs have a large accessible surface area for treatment. For ventilated patients, an endotracheal tube is required for delivering drugs into the lungs. Such tubes are generally poor conduits for delivering traditional aerosol formulations. Both the formulation and the properties of the endotracheal tube are important effectors of delivery efficiency. In this study, agglomerates of budesonide nanoparticles (NanoClusters) were formulated with or without l-leucine or lactose. Teflon tubing was compared with commercial endotracheal tubes as a conduit for delivering budesonide powders into a cascade impactor. The effects of volumetric flow rate, tube size, and humidity were also investigated. NanoCluster budesonide (NC-Bud) formulations had a considerably higher emitted dose and fine particle fraction compared with stock budesonide and the commercial Flexhaler powder when applied through endotracheal tubes. Tubing material did not significantly affect powder performance, but decreasing tubing diameter or increasing volumetric flow rates yielded a smaller mass median aerodynamic diameter for NC-Bud. Engineered NC-Bud powders may dramatically improve drug delivery through endotracheal tubes when using proper ventilator settings. PMID:22095757

  6. Polyphosphazenes: Multifunctional, Biodegradable Vehicles for Drug and Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Teasdale, Ian; Brüggemann, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Poly[(organo)phosphazenes] are a unique class of extremely versatile polymers with a range of applications including tissue engineering and drug delivery, as hydrogels, shape memory polymers and as stimuli responsive materials. This review aims to divulge the basic principles of designing polyphosphazenes for drug and gene delivery and portray the huge potential of these extremely versatile materials for such applications. Polyphosphazenes offer a number of distinct advantages as carriers for bioconjugates; alongside their completely degradable backbone, to non-toxic degradation products, they possess an inherently and uniquely high functionality and, thanks to recent advances in their polymer chemistry, can be prepared with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities, as well as self-assembled supra-molecular structures. Importantly, the rate of degradation/hydrolysis of the polymers can be carefully tuned to suit the desired application. In this review we detail the recent developments in the chemistry of polyphosphazenes, relevant to drug and gene delivery and describe recent investigations into their application in this field. PMID:24729871

  7. Project #15: Ravi Bellamkonda and Hongbin Han: Comparison of therapeutic efficacy of neuroprotective drugs between liposomal delivery and stereotactic simple diffusion delivery (SDD) via brain extracellular

    E-print Network

    Weber, Rodney

    of neuroprotective drugs between liposomal delivery and stereotactic simple diffusion delivery (SDD) via brain extracellular space in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease Limited delivery of neuroprotective drugs into the central nervous system (CNS) by systemic administration has led to poor treatment efficacy. Drug delivery

  8. Commercial potential for thermal & magnetic sensitive polymer in drug delivery applications

    E-print Network

    Edward, Jonathan M. (Jonathan Mark)

    2008-01-01

    Thermal and magnetically sensitive polymers are a new class of materials with unique properties suitable for applications in drug delivery. Specifically, these polymers can be combined with a drug reservoir to make a drug ...

  9. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and without any attached support. As composites of aligned nanofibers, yarns potentially combine the inherent advantages of nanofibers with the strength and pliability of larger sized fibers. As such, we became interested in exploring the potential of nanofiber yarns as drug carriers. Our study evolved to accommodate comparative studies between the behavior of traditional nonwoven mats and nanofiber yarns. Throughout the process, we sought to answer the bigger question: Can guar galactomannan nanofibers be used as a new biodegradable platform for drug delivery?

  10. Doxorubicin-chitin-poly(caprolactone) composite nanogel for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Arunraj, T R; Sanoj Rejinold, N; Ashwin Kumar, N; Jayakumar, R

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we developed a pH responsive chitin-poly(caprolactone) composite nanogels (chitin-PCL CNGs) system for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A hydrophilic drug, doxorubicin (Dox) was loaded in Chitin-PCL CNGs (Dox-chitin-PCL CNGs). Both control and drug loaded systems were analyzed by DLS, SEM, FTIR and TG/DTA. The size ranges of the control composite nanogels and their drug loaded counterparts were found to be 70 ± 20 and 240 ± 20 nm, respectively. The control chitin-PCL CNGs and Dox-chitin-PCL CNGs showed higher swelling and degradation in acidic pH. Drug entrapment efficiency and in-vitro drug release studies were carried out and showed a higher drug release at acidic pH compared to neutral pH. Cellular internalization of the nanogel systems was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy. Dox-Chitin-PCL CNGs showed dose dependent cytotoxicity toward A549 (adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cells) cancer cells. Furthermore, the results of in-vitro hemolytic assay and coagulation assay substantiate the blood compatibility of the system. These results indicate that chitin-PCL CNGs is a novel carrier for delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:23973498

  11. The applications of Vitamin E TPGS in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Luo, Jun; Tan, Songwei; Otieno, Ben Oketch; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-05-13

    D-?-Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (simply TPGS or Vitamin E TPGS) is formed by the esterification of Vitamin E succinate with polyethylene glycol 1000. As novel nonionic surfactant, it exhibits amphipathic properties and can form stable micelles in aqueous vehicles at concentration as low as 0.02 wt%. It has been widely investigated for its emulsifying, dispersing, gelling, and solubilizing effects on poorly water-soluble drugs. It can also act as a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor and has been served as an excipient for overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) and for increasing the oral bioavailability of many anticancer drugs. Since TPGS has been approved by FDA as a safe pharmaceutic adjuvant, many TPGS-based drug delivery systems (DDS) have been developed. In this review, we discuss TPGS properties as a P-gp inhibitor, solubilizer/absorption and permeation enhancer in drug delivery and TPGS-related formulations such as nanocrystals, nanosuspensions, tablets/solid dispersions, adjuvant in vaccine systems, nutrition supplement, plasticizer of film, anticancer reagent and so on. This review will greatly impact and bring out new insights in the use of TPGS in DDS. PMID:23485439

  12. Bionanocomposites containing magnetic graphite as potential systems for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lígia N M; Alcântara, Ana C S; Darder, Margarita; Aranda, Pilar; Herrmann, Paulo S P; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M; García-Hernández, Mar; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2014-12-30

    New magnetic bio-hybrid matrices for potential application in drug delivery are developed from the assembly of the biopolymer alginate and magnetic graphite nanoparticles. Ibuprofen (IBU) intercalated in a Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was chosen as a model drug delivery system (DDS) to be incorporated as third component of the magnetic bionanocomposite DDS. For comparative purposes DDS based on the incorporation of pure IBU in the magnetic bio-hybrid matrices were also studied. All the resulting magnetic bionanocomposites were processed as beads and films and characterized by different techniques with the aim to elucidate the role of the magnetic graphite on the systems, as well as that of the inorganic brucite-like layers in the drug-loaded LDH. In this way, the influence of both inorganic components on the mechanical properties, the water uptake ability, and the kinetics of the drug release from these magnetic systems were determined. In addition, the possibility of modulating the levels of IBU release by stimulating the bionanocomposites with an external magnetic field was also evaluated in in vitro assays. PMID:25455784

  13. Drug delivery by tattooing to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Shio, Marina Temi; Paquet, Marilene; Martel, Caroline; Bosschaerts, Tom; Stienstra, Stef; Olivier, Martin; Fortin, Anny

    2014-01-01

    This study establishes a proof-of-concept that a tattoo device can target intra-dermal drug delivery against cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). The selected drug is oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) formulated as liposomes, particles known to be prone to macrophage ingestion. We first show that treatment of cultured Leishmania-infected macrophages with OlPC-liposomes results in a direct dose-dependent killing of intracellular parasites. Based on this, in vivo efficacy is demonstrated using a 10 day tattooing-mediated treatment in mice infected with L. major and L. mexicana. In both models this regimen results in rapid clinical recovery with complete regression of skin lesions by Day 28. Parasite counts and histopathology examination confirm high treatment efficacy at the parasitic level. Low amount of drug required for tattooing combined with fast clinical recovery may have a positive impact on CL patient management. This first example of tattoo-mediated drug delivery could open to new therapeutic interventions in the treatment of skin diseases. PMID:24561704

  14. Controllable coating of microneedles for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianmin; Qiu, Yuqin; Zhang, Suohui; Yang, Guozhong; Gao, Yunhua

    2015-03-01

    Coated microneedles have been paid much attention recently, and several coating strategies have been developed to address the problems during coating process. However, there are still some unresolved issues, such as, precise control requirements, microneedle substrate contamination and high processing temperature. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple and controllable method to make uniform coatings on microneedles at room temperature. This novel method avoids the contamination of microneedle substrate by providing both the adsorption force of thickener and micro-scale coating film produced by a newly design device. Thickeners were screened to enhance the mass of coatings. The parameters that influence the coatings were tested systematically, which made coating process controllable. Finally, three model drugs were coated onto microneedles to prove the method is applicable more broadly. In addition, insertion experiments were carried out to test the drug delivery feasibility of the coated microneedles. In conclusion, this study presents a simple and controllable method to coat microneedles with small molecular chemical drugs or large proteins for rapid skin drug delivery. PMID:24378200

  15. Intercellular pH-responsive histidine modified dextran-g-cholesterol micelle for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuemei; Chen, Li; Chen, Xiaofei; He, Chaoliang; Zheng, Hui; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-09-01

    Herein, the micelles based on histidine modified dextran-g-cholesterol (HDC) were successfully prepared which exhibited excellent pH-responsive behavior in acidic aqueous solution (pH<6, within the range of malignant cellular endosome). Taking advantage of this pH-sensitivity in acidic conditions, doxorubicin (DOX), a model anticancer drug, was effectively loaded into the micelles via hydrophobic interactions. The DOX release from all DOX-loaded micelles was accelerated in acid conditions mimicking the endosomal/lysosomal compartments. The enhanced intracellular DOX release was also observed in MCF-7 cells. DOX-loaded pH-sensitive micelles showed higher cellular proliferation inhibition toward MCF-7 cells than that of pH-insensitive micelles. These features suggested that the micelles could efficiently load and deliver DOX into tumor cells, which can enhance the inhibition of cellular proliferation in vitro, providing a powerful mean for delivering and releasing cargoes at the tumor sites. PMID:24929531

  16. MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound as a New Method of Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Thanou, M.; Gedroyc, W.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery under the guidance of an imaging modality can improve drug disposition and achieve site-specific drug delivery. The term focal drug delivery has been introduced to describe the focal targeting of drugs in tissues with the help of imaging and focused ultrasound. Focal drug delivery aims to improve the therapeutic profile of drugs by improving their specificity and their permeation in defined areas. Focused-ultrasound- (FUS-) mediated drug delivery has been applied with various molecules to improve their local distribution in tissues. FUS is applied with the aid of microbubbles to enhance the permeability of bioactive molecules across BBB and improve drug distribution in the brain. Recently, FUS has been utilised in combination with MRI-labelled liposomes that respond to temperature increase. This strategy aims to “activate” nanoparticles to release their cargo locally when triggered by hyperthermia induced by FUS. MRI-guided FUS drug delivery provides the opportunity to improve drug bioavailability locally and therefore improve the therapeutic profiles of drugs. This drug delivery strategy can be directly translated to clinic as MRg FUS is a promising clinically therapeutic approach. However, more basic research is required to understand the physiological mechanism of FUS-enhanced drug delivery. PMID:23738076

  17. Oil-filled polymeric ultrasound contrast agent as local drug delivery system for lipophilic drugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Klazina Kooiman; Marcel R. Böhmer; Marcia Emmer; Hendrik J. Vos; Ceciel Chlon; William T. Shi; Christopher S. Hall; S. H. P. M. de Winter; K. Schroen; M. Versluis; N. de Jong; A. van Wamel

    2008-01-01

    Novel polymeric microcapsules, filled with a mixture of gas and oil, were produced and their potential as ultrasound contrast agent-based drug delivery system for lipophilic drugs was investigated. Microcapsules were synthesized that contained either no oil, were almost half-filled with oil, or were almost completely filled with oil. Mean number weighted diameters were between 1.22 and 1.31 mum. At a

  18. Precise control of the drug kinetics by means of non-invasive magnetic drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuzawa, M.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2013-01-01

    In order to solve the problems of the side effects and medical lowering, has been advanced a study on the drug delivery system (DDS) to accumulate the drugs locally in the body with minimum dosage. The DDS is a system that controls the drug kinetics in the body precisely and accumulates the drug locally at the target part, keeping the drugs at high density. Among the DDS, the magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) is the one that we studied. This is a technique to accumulate drugs by using the magnetic force as the physical driving force. Our previous researches showed the possibility of the technique of MDDS to accumulate the drugs with higher accumulation rate and locality than the traditional methods. It is necessary to apply a strong external magnetic field and a high magnetic gradient to accumulate the ferromagnetic drugs at a deep diseased part non-invasively. However, by applying a static magnetic field from one direction, the drug accumulates only at the surface of the body locates near the magnet. In this study, we tried to change the magnetic field applied by a superconducting bulk magnet with time, in order to make a constant and strong magnetic field applied in the center of the body and to accumulate the ferromagnetic drugs at the deep target part in the body. First of all, the effect of the surface treatment of the ferromagnetic drugs to prevent its absorption in the normal tissue was examined. Then, to increase the accumulation rate of the ferromagnetic drugs at the target part, the distribution of magnetic field was changed, and the optimum spatial and temporal conditions of magnetic field were examined.

  19. Application of artificial neural networks in the design of controlled release drug delivery systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yichun Sun; Yingxu Peng; Yixin Chen; Atul J Shukla

    2003-01-01

    Controlled release drug delivery systems offer great advantages over the conventional dosage forms. However, there are great challenges to efficiently develop controlled release drug delivery systems due to the complexity of these delivery systems. Traditional statistic response surface methodology (RSM) is one of the techniques that has been employed to develop and formulate controlled release dosage forms. However, there are

  20. Silk Fibroin as an Organic Polymer for Controlled Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann,S.; Wong Po Foo, C.; Rossetti, F.; Textor, M.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.; Kaplan, D.; Merkle, H.; Meinel, L.

    2006-01-01

    The pharmaceutical utility of silk fibroin (SF) materials for drug delivery was investigated. SF films were prepared from aqueous solutions of the fibroin protein polymer and crystallinity was induced and controlled by methanol treatment. Dextrans of different molecular weights, as well as proteins, were physically entrapped into the drug delivery device during processing into films. Drug release kinetics were evaluated as a function of dextran molecular weight, and film crystallinity. Treatment with methanol resulted in an increase in {beta}-sheet structure, an increase in crystallinity and an increase in film surface hydrophobicity determined by FTIR, X-ray and contact angle techniques, respectively. The increase in crystallinity resulted in the sustained release of dextrans of molecular weights ranging from 4 to 40 kDa, whereas for less crystalline films sustained release was confined to the 40 kDa dextran. Protein release from the films was studied with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and lysozyme (Lys) as model compounds. Enzyme release from the less crystalline films resulted in a biphasic release pattern, characterized by an initial release within the first 36 h, followed by a lag phase and continuous release between days 3 and 11. No initial burst was observed for films with higher crystallinity and subsequent release patterns followed linear kinetics for HRP, or no substantial release for Lys. In conclusion, SF is an interesting polymer for drug delivery of polysaccharides and bioactive proteins due to the controllable level of crystallinity and the ability to process the biomaterial in biocompatible fashion under ambient conditions to avoid damage to labile compounds to be delivered.

  1. Electrospun fibers for vaginal anti-HIV drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Blakney, Anna K; Ball, Cameron; Krogstad, Emily A; Woodrow, Kim A

    2013-12-01

    Diversity of microbicide delivery systems is essential for future success in the prevention and treatment of HIV in order to account for the varied populations of women all over the world that may benefit from use of these products. Recently, a novel dosage form for intravaginal drug delivery has been developed using drug-eluting fibers fabricated by electrospinning. There is a strong rationale to support the idea that drug-eluting fibers can be designed to realize multiple design constraints in a single product for topical HIV prevention: fibers are able to deliver a wide range of agents, incorporate multiple agents via composites, and facilitate controlled release over relevant time frames for pericoital and sustained (coitally-independent) use. It is also technologically feasible to scale-up production of fiber-based microbicides. Electrospun fibers may allow for prioritization of physical attributes that affect user perceptions without compromising biological efficacy. Challenges with using fibers as a microbicide include issues related to vehicle deployment, spreading and retention in the vaginal vault. In addition, studies will need to address the interaction of the fibers with the mucosal environment, including unknown safety and toxicity. Sustained release fiber microbicides capable of delivering multiple antiretroviral drugs while simultaneously exhibiting tunable degradation or dissolution of the fibers is also a challenge. However, electrospun fibers are a promising new platform for vaginal delivery of anti-HIV agents and future research will inform their place in the field. This article is based on a presentation at the "Product Development Workshop 2013: HIV and Multipurpose Prevention Technologies", held in Arlington, Virginia on February 20-21, 2013. It forms part of a special supplement to Antiviral Research. PMID:24188701

  2. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

  3. Automated Modular Synthesis of Aptamer–Drug Conjugates for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aptamer–drug conjugates (ApDCs) are promising targeted drug delivery systems for reducing toxicity while increasing the efficacy of chemotherapy. However, current ApDC technologies suffer from problems caused by the complicated preparation and low controllability of drug–aptamer conjugation. To solve such problems, we have designed and synthesized a therapeutic module for solid phase synthesis, which is a phosphoramdite containing an anticancer drug moiety and a photocleavable linker. Using this module, we have realized automated and modular synthesis of ApDCs, and multiple drugs were efficiently incorporated into ApDCs at predesigned positions. The ApDCs not only recognize target cancer cells specifically, but also release drugs in a photocontrollable manner. We demonstrated the potential of automated and modular ApDC technology for applications in targeted cancer therapy. PMID:24483627

  4. Lipid and polymer nanoparticles for drug delivery to bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Forier, Katrien; Raemdonck, Koen; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Demeester, Jo; Coenye, Tom; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2014-09-28

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed communities of bacteria that show increased antibiotic resistance and the capability to evade the immune system. They can cause recalcitrant infections which cannot be cured with classical antibiotic therapy. Drug delivery by lipid or polymer nanoparticles is considered a promising strategy for overcoming biofilm resistance. These particles are able to improve the delivery of antibiotics to the bacterial cells, thereby increasing the efficacy of the treatment. In this review we give an overview of the types of polymer and lipid nanoparticles that have been developed for this purpose. The antimicrobial activity of nanoparticle encapsulated antibiotics compared to the activity of the free antibiotic is discussed in detail. In addition, targeting and triggered drug release strategies to further improve the antimicrobial activity are reviewed. Finally, ample attention is given to advanced microscopy methods that shed light on the behavior of nanoparticles inside biofilms, allowing further optimization of the nanoformulations. Lipid and polymer nanoparticles were found to increase the antimicrobial efficacy in many cases. Strategies such as the use of fusogenic liposomes, targeting of the nanoparticles and triggered release of the antimicrobial agent ensured the delivery of the antimicrobial agent in close proximity of the bacterial cells, maximizing the exposure of the biofilm to the antimicrobial agent. The majority of the discussed papers still present data on the in vitro anti-biofilm activity of nanoformulations, indicating that there is an urgent need for more in vivo studies in this field. PMID:24794896

  5. Nanocapsules: The Weapons for Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kothamasu, Pavankumar; Kanumur, Hemanth; Ravur, Niranjan; Maddu, Chiranjeevi; Parasuramrajam, Radhika; Thangavel, Sivakumar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nanocapsules, existing in miniscule size, range from 10 nm to 1000 nm. They consist of a liquid/solid core in which the drug is placed into a cavity, which is surrounded by a distinctive polymer membrane made up of natural or synthetic polymers. They have attracted great interest, because of the protective coating, which are usually pyrophoric and easily oxidized and delay the release of active ingredients. Methods Various technical approaches are utilized for obtaining the nanocapsules; however, the methods of interfacial polymerization for monomer and the nano-deposition for preformed polymer are chiefly preferred. Most important characteristics in their preparation is particle size and size distribution which can be evaluated by using various techniques like X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolu¬tion transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device, multi angle laser light scattering and other spectroscopic techniques. Results Nanocapsules possessing extremely high reproducibility have a broad range of life science applications. They may be applied in agrochemicals, genetic engineering, cosmetics, cleansing products, wastewater treatments, adhesive component applications, strategic delivery of the drug in tumors, nanocapsule bandages to fight infec¬tion, in radiotherapy and as liposomal nanocapsules in food science and agriculture. In addition, they can act as self-healing materials. Conclusion The enhanced delivery of bio¬active molecules through the targeted delivery by means of a nanocapsule opens numerous challenges and opportunities for the research and future development of novel improved therapies. PMID:23678444

  6. Targeted drug delivery by novel polymer-drug conjugates containing linkers cleavable by disease-associated enzymes

    E-print Network

    Chau, Ying

    2005-01-01

    We have conceptualized a new class of polymer-linker-drug conjugates to achieve targeted drug delivery for the systemic treatment of cancer and other inflammatory diseases. The physiochemical properties of the polymer allow ...

  7. Nanostructured Surfaces for Drug Delivery and Anti-Fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Kimberly Renee

    Effective and cost-efficient healthcare is at the forefront of public discussion; on both personal and policy levels, technologies that improve therapeutic efficacy without the use of painful hypodermic needle injections or the use of harsh chemicals would prove beneficial to patients. Nanostructured surfaces as structure-mediated permeability enhancers introduce a potentially revolutionary approach to the field of drug delivery. Parental administration routes have been the mainstay technologies for delivering biologics because these therapeutics are too large to permeate epithelial barriers. However, there is a significant patient dislike for hypodermic needles resulting in reduced patient compliance and poor therapeutic results. We present an alternative strategy to harness the body's naturally occurring biological processes and transport mechanisms to enhance the drug transport of biologics across the epithelium. Our strategy offers a paradigm shift from traditional biochemical drug delivery vehicles by using nanotopography to loosen the epithelial barrier. Herein, we demonstrate that nanotopographical cues can be used to enable biologics > 66 kDa to be transported across epithelial monolayers by increasing paracellular transport. When placed in contact with epithelial cells, nanostructured films significantly increase the transport of albumin, IgG, and a model therapeutic, etanercept. Our work highlights the potential to use drug delivery systems which incorporate nanotopographical cues to increase the transport of biologics across epithelial tissue. Furthermore, we describe current advancements in nano- and microfabrication for applications in anti-fibrosis and wound healing. Influencing cellular responses to biomaterials is crucial in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Since cells are surrounded by extracellular matrix features that are on the nanoscale, identifying nanostructures for imparting desirable cellular function could greatly impact the field. Due to the rise in micro and nanofabrication techniques borrowed from the advances in the microelectronics industry, previously unattainable nanostructured surfaces on a variety of biomaterials can be generated. We investigated how nanostructured surfaces with varying nanofeature aspect ratios can influence fibrosis. Thus, nanostructured surfaces show substantial progress for therapeutic applications in drug delivery and wound healing.

  8. Composite microparticle drug delivery systems based on chitosan, alginate and pectin with improved pH-sensitive drug release property

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cui-Yun Yu; Bo-Cheng Yin; Wei Zhang; Si-Xue Cheng; Xian-Zheng Zhang; Ren-Xi Zhuo

    2009-01-01

    Composite microparticle drug delivery systems based on chitosan, alginate and pectin with improved pH sensitivity were developed for oral delivery of protein drugs, using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model drug. The composite drug-loaded microparticles with a mean particle size less than 200?m were prepared by a convenient shredding method. Since the microparticles were formed by tripolyphosphate cross-linking, electrostatic

  9. Recent patents survey on self emulsifying drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Jethara, Sahilhusen I; Patel, Alpesh D; Patel, Mukesh R

    2014-01-01

    Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery System is a unique feasible approach to overcome low oral bioavailability problem which is associated with the hydrophobic drugs due to their unparalleled potential as a drug delivery with the broad range of application. The estimated 40% of active pharmaceuticals are poorly water soluble. Now recently, formulation containing oral SEDDS has received much interest as it solve problems related to oral bioavailability, intra and inter-subject variability and lack of dose proportionality of hydrophobic drugs. Now a days, it is the first way to investigate the development of any kind of innovative dosage forms. Many important in-vitro characteristics such as surfactant concentration, oil/surfactant ratio, emulsion polarity, droplet size and zeta potential play an important role in oral absorption of drug from SEEDS. It can be orally administered in the form of SGC or HGC and also enhances bioavailability of drugs to increase solubility and minimizes the gastric irritation. After administration the drug remains entrapped in the oily droplets (inside the droplet or in the surfactant`s film at the interface) of the emulsion that are formed in the GIT upon self-emulsification process. It is also a bit problematic to say that the drug is being released from SMEDDS, it would be more precise to say that it diffuses out of oily droplets into the GIT media resulting in the formation of an equilibrium between the drug dissolved in oily droplets and the outer dispersed media (e.g. GIT fluids). Many of the application and preparation methods of SEDDS are reported by research articles and patents in different countries. We present an exhaustive and updated account of numerous literature reports and more than 150 patents published on SEDDS in the recent period. This current patent review is useful in knowledge of SEDDS for its preparations and patents in different countries with emphasis on their formulation, characterization and systematic optimization strategies, thus paving the way for accelerated progress into the SEDDS application in pharmaceutical research as well as patents on SEDDS methods. PMID:25146965

  10. Challenges in the delivery of peptide drugs: an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Andrew L; Richard, Joël

    2015-02-01

    Due mainly to their poor stability and short plasma half-life, peptides are usually administered by injection, often several times daily. Injectable sustained-release formulations of peptides based on biodegradable polymer microparticles or implants early demonstrated the power of drug delivery technologies to enhance patient adherence and convenience, and increase safety and efficacy. Injectable sustained-release formulations are likely to remain a significant part of new peptide products. However, a new generation of technologies that enable solvent-free formulations and manufacturing processes, injection through narrow gauge needles and ready-to-use presentations will be increasingly used. In addition, the tremendous developments in noninvasive routes of delivery are likely to result in more and more peptides being delivered by the oral, transdermal, nasal or inhalation routes. PMID:25690084

  11. Smart drug delivery through DNA/magnetic nanoparticle gates.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hernández, Eduardo; Baeza, Alejandro; Vallet-Regí, María

    2011-02-22

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles can be modified to perform on-demand stimuli-responsive dosing of therapeutic molecules. The silica network was loaded with iron oxide superparamagnetic nanocrystals, providing the potential to perform targeting and magnetic resonance imaging. Single-stranded DNA was immobilized onto the material surface. The complementary DNA sequence was then attached to magnetic nanoparticles. The present work demonstrates that DNA/magnetic nanoparticle conjugates are able to cap the pores of the magnetic silica particles upon hybridization of both DNA strands. Progressive double-stranded DNA melting as a result of temperature increase gave rise to uncapping and the subsequent release of a mesopore-filled model drug, fluorescein. The reversibility of DNA linkage results in an "on-off" release mechanism. Moreover, the magnetic component of the whole system allows reaching hyperthermic temperatures (42-47 °C) under an alternating magnetic field. This feature leaves open the possibility of a remotely triggered drug delivery. Furthermore, due to its capacity to increase the temperature of the surrounding media, this multifunctional device could play an important role in the development of advanced drug delivery systems for thermochemotherapy against cancer. PMID:21250653

  12. Towards Engineering Hormone-Binding Globulins as Drug Delivery Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wee Lee; Zhou, Aiwu; Read, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of many diseases such as cancer requires the use of drugs that can cause severe side effects. Off-target toxicity can often be reduced simply by directing the drugs specifically to sites of diseases. Amidst increasingly sophisticated methods of targeted drug delivery, we observed that Nature has already evolved elegant means of sending biological molecules to where they are needed. One such example is corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the major carrier of the anti-inflammatory hormone, cortisol. Targeted release of cortisol is triggered by cleavage of CBG's reactive centre loop by elastase, a protease released by neutrophils in inflamed tissues. This work aimed to establish the feasibility of exploiting this mechanism to carry therapeutic agents to defined locations. The reactive centre loop of CBG was altered with site-directed mutagenesis to favour cleavage by other proteases, to alter the sites at which it would release its cargo. Mutagenesis succeeded in making CBG a substrate for either prostate specific antigen (PSA), a prostate-specific serine protease, or thrombin, a key protease in the blood coagulation cascade. PSA is conspicuously overproduced in prostatic hyperplasia and is, therefore, a good way of targeting hyperplastic prostate tissues. Thrombin is released during clotting and consequently is ideal for conferring specificity to thrombotic sites. Using fluorescence-based titration assays, we also showed that CBG can be engineered to bind a new compound, thyroxine-6-carboxyfluorescein, instead of its physiological ligand, cortisol, thereby demonstrating that it is possible to tailor the hormone binding site to deliver a therapeutic drug. In addition, we proved that the efficiency with which CBG releases bound ligand can be increased by introducing some well-placed mutations. This proof-of-concept study has raised the prospect of a novel means of targeted drug delivery, using the serpin conformational change to combat the problem of off-target effects in the treatment of diseases. PMID:25426859

  13. Progress in Psoriasis Therapy via Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Nitha; Ramya, Devi D; Vedha, Hari BN

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a lifelong condition which is caused by the negative signals produced by immune system, which leads to hyper proliferation and other inflammatory reactions on the skin. In this case, keratinocytes which are the outermost layer of skin possess shortened life cycle and results in the alteration of desquamation process where the cytokines will come out through lesions of affected patients and as a result, scaling marks appears on the skin. These conditions may negatively affect the patient’s quality of life and lead to psychosocial stress. Psoriasis can be categorized as mild, moderate and severe conditions. Mild psoriasis leads to the formation of rashes, and when it becomes moderate, the skin turns into scaly. In severe conditions, red patches may be present on skin surface and becomes itchy. Topical therapy continues to be one of the pillars for psoriasis management. Drug molecules with target effect on the skin tissues and other inflammations should be selected for the treatment of psoriasis. Most of the existing drugs lead to systemic intoxication and dryness when applied in higher dose. Different scientific approaches for topical delivery are being explored by researches including emollient, modified gelling system, transdermal delivery, spray, nanogels, hydrogels, micro/nano emulsion, liposomes, nano capsules etc. These topical dosage forms are evaluated for various physico chemical properties such as drug content, viscosity, pH, extrudability, spreadability, toxicity, irritancy, permeability and drug release mechanism. This review paper focus attention to the impact of these formulation approaches on various anti-psoriasis drugs for their successful treatment. PMID:25386329

  14. Towards engineering hormone-binding globulins as drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wee Lee; Zhou, Aiwu; Read, Randy J

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of many diseases such as cancer requires the use of drugs that can cause severe side effects. Off-target toxicity can often be reduced simply by directing the drugs specifically to sites of diseases. Amidst increasingly sophisticated methods of targeted drug delivery, we observed that Nature has already evolved elegant means of sending biological molecules to where they are needed. One such example is corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the major carrier of the anti-inflammatory hormone, cortisol. Targeted release of cortisol is triggered by cleavage of CBG's reactive centre loop by elastase, a protease released by neutrophils in inflamed tissues. This work aimed to establish the feasibility of exploiting this mechanism to carry therapeutic agents to defined locations. The reactive centre loop of CBG was altered with site-directed mutagenesis to favour cleavage by other proteases, to alter the sites at which it would release its cargo. Mutagenesis succeeded in making CBG a substrate for either prostate specific antigen (PSA), a prostate-specific serine protease, or thrombin, a key protease in the blood coagulation cascade. PSA is conspicuously overproduced in prostatic hyperplasia and is, therefore, a good way of targeting hyperplastic prostate tissues. Thrombin is released during clotting and consequently is ideal for conferring specificity to thrombotic sites. Using fluorescence-based titration assays, we also showed that CBG can be engineered to bind a new compound, thyroxine-6-carboxyfluorescein, instead of its physiological ligand, cortisol, thereby demonstrating that it is possible to tailor the hormone binding site to deliver a therapeutic drug. In addition, we proved that the efficiency with which CBG releases bound ligand can be increased by introducing some well-placed mutations. This proof-of-concept study has raised the prospect of a novel means of targeted drug delivery, using the serpin conformational change to combat the problem of off-target effects in the treatment of diseases. PMID:25426859

  15. Chitosan-Derivative Based Hydrogels as Drug Delivery Platforms: Applications in Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marta Roldo; Dimitrios G. Fatouros

    \\u000a Chitosan is a biodegradable, biocompatible and non-irritant polymer that exhibits good mechanical strength and adhesion. These\\u000a characteristics make it suitable for applications in controlled delivery systems and tissue engineering. Chitosan gels may\\u000a be easily obtained by a cross-linking reaction. These hydrogels exhibit good swelling properties and are widely used as a\\u000a temporary extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

  16. Round Window Membrane Intracochlear Drug Delivery Enhanced by Induced Advection

    PubMed Central

    Borkholder, David A.; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic compounds to the inner ear via absorption through the round window membrane (RWM) has advantages over direct intracochlear infusions; specifically, minimizing impact upon functional hearing measures. However, previous reports show that significant basal-to-apical concentration gradients occur, with the potential to impact treatment efficacy. Here we present a new approach to inner ear drug delivery with induced advection aiding distribution of compounds throughout the inner ear in the murine cochlea. Polyimide microtubing was placed near the RWM niche through a bullaostomy into the middle ear cavity allowing directed delivery of compounds to the RWM. We hypothesized that a posterior semicircular canalostomy would induce apical flow from the patent cochlear aqueduct to the canalostomy due to influx of cerebral spinal fluid. To test this hypothesis, young adult CBA/CaJ mice were divided into two groups: bullaostomy approach only (BA) and bullaostomy + canalostomy (B+C). Cochlear function was evaluated by distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds during and after middle ear infusion of salicylate in artificial perilymph (AP), applied near the RWM. The mice recovered for 1 week, and were re-tested. The results demonstrate there was no significant impact on auditory function utilizing the RWM surgical procedure with or without the canalostomy, and DPOAE thresholds were elevated reversibly during the salicylate infusion. Comparing the threshold shifts for both methods, the B+C approach had more of a physiological effect than the BA approach, including at lower frequencies representing more apical cochlear locations. Unlike mouse cochleostomies, there was no deleterious auditory functional impact after 1 week recovery from surgery. The B+C approach had more drug efficacy at lower frequencies, underscoring potential benefits for more precise control of delivery of inner ear therapeutic compounds. PMID:24291333

  17. Round window membrane intracochlear drug delivery enhanced by induced advection.

    PubMed

    Borkholder, David A; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D

    2014-01-28

    Delivery of therapeutic compounds to the inner ear via absorption through the round window membrane (RWM) has advantages over direct intracochlear infusions; specifically, minimizing impact upon functional hearing measures. However, previous reports show that significant basal-to-apical concentration gradients occur, with the potential to impact treatment efficacy. Here we present a new approach to inner ear drug delivery with induced advection aiding distribution of compounds throughout the inner ear in the murine cochlea. Polyimide microtubing was placed near the RWM niche through a bullaostomy into the middle ear cavity allowing directed delivery of compounds to the RWM. We hypothesized that a posterior semicircular canalostomy would induce apical flow from the patent cochlear aqueduct to the canalostomy due to influx of cerebral spinal fluid. To test this hypothesis, young adult CBA/CaJ mice were divided into two groups: bullaostomy approach only (BA) and bullaostomy+canalostomy (B+C). Cochlear function was evaluated by distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds during and after middle ear infusion of salicylate in artificial perilymph (AP), applied near the RWM. The mice recovered for 1week, and were re-tested. The results demonstrate there was no significant impact on auditory function utilizing the RWM surgical procedure with or without the canalostomy, and DPOAE thresholds were elevated reversibly during the salicylate infusion. Comparing the threshold shifts for both methods, the B+C approach had more of a physiological effect than the BA approach, including at lower frequencies representing more apical cochlear locations. Unlike mouse cochleostomies, there was no deleterious auditory functional impact after 1week recovery from surgery. The B+C approach had more drug efficacy at lower frequencies, underscoring potential benefits for more precise control of delivery of inner ear therapeutic compounds. PMID:24291333

  18. Low-Frequency Sonophoresis: Application to the Transdermal Delivery of Macromolecules and Hydrophilic Drugs

    E-print Network

    Polat, Baris E.

    Importance of the field: Transdermal delivery of macromolecules provides an attractive alternative route of drug administration when compared to oral delivery and hypodermic injection because of its ability to bypass the ...

  19. Design and development of a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for telmisartan for oral drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaydeep; Kevin, Garala; Patel, Anjali; Raval, Mihir; Sheth, Navin

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Telmisartan (TEL) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) antihypertensive agent. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) to enhance the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble TEL. Materials and Methods: The solubility of TEL in various oils was determined to identify the oil phase of a SNEDDS. Various surfactants and co-surfactants were screened for their ability to emulsify the selected oil. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the efficient self-emulsifying region. A SNEDDS was further evaluated for its percentage transmittance, emulsification time, drug content, phase separation, dilution, droplet size, zeta potential, pH, refractive index, and viscosity. Results: The developed SNEDDS formulation contained TEL (20 mg), Tween® 20 (43.33%w/w), Carbitol® (21.67%w/w), and Acrysol® EL 135 (32%w/w). The optimized formulation of the TEL-loaded SNEDDS exhibited a complete in vitro drug release in 15 min as compared with the plain drug, which had a limited dissolution rate. It was also compared with the pure drug suspension by oral administration in male Wister rats. The in vivo study exhibited a 7.5-fold increase in the oral bioavailability of TEL from the SNEDDS compared with the pure drug suspension. Conclusions: These results suggest the potential use of the SNEDDS to improve the dissolution and oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble TEL. PMID:23071930

  20. Development and in vitro evaluation of chitosan-based transdermal drug delivery systems for the controlled delivery of propranolol hydrochloride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Thacharodi; K. Panduranga Rao

    1995-01-01

    Membrane permeation-controlled transdermal drug delivery systems were prepared using the natural polymer, chitosan. An adhesive sealing technique was used to construct the devices. Propranolol hydrochloride was selected as the model drug for the present study. Chitosan membranes with different permeability to propranolol hydrochloride obtained by controlled cross-linking with glutaraldehyde were used to regulate the drug release in the devices. Chitosan

  1. Application of nanoparticles for the delivery of drugs to the brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jörg Kreuter

    2005-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) represents an insurmountable obstacle for the delivery of a large number of drugs to the central nervous system (CNS). One of the possibilities to overcome this barrier is drug delivery to the brain using nanoparticles. Drugs that have been transported into the brain and led to significant pharmacological effects after intravenous injection using this carrier include

  2. Chemically modified and nanostructured porous silicon as a drug delivery material and device

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily Jessica Anglin

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes the fabrication, chemical modification, drug release, and toxicity studies of nanostructured porous silicon for the purposes of developing a smart drug delivery device. The first chapter is an introductory chapter, presenting the chemical and physical properties of porous silicon, the concepts and issues of current drug delivery devices and materials, and how porous silicon can address the

  3. Gastroretentive floating sterculia–alginate beads for use in antiulcer drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Baljit Singh; Vikrant Sharma; Dimpal Chauhan

    2010-01-01

    To improve the bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of the drugs used for the diseases associated with the stomach, the retention of drug delivery systems in the stomach for longer time is requred. Therefore, in the present study, an attempt has been made to synthesize gastro-retentive floating drug delivery system by simultaneously ionotropic gelation of alginate and sterculia gum by using

  4. Hyperthermia-induced drug delivery from thermosensitive liposomes encapsulated in an injectable hydrogel for local chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    López-Noriega, Adolfo; Hastings, Conn L; Ozbakir, Burcin; O'Donnell, Kathleen E; O'Brien, Fergal J; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E; Duffy, Garry P; Ruiz-Hernández, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    A novel drug delivery system, enabling an in situ, thermally triggered drug release is described, consisting of an injectable thermoresponsive chitosan hydrogel containing doxorubicin-loaded thermosensitive liposomes. The design, fabrication, characterization, and an assessment of in vitro bioactivity of this formulation is detailed. Combining on-demand drug delivery with in situ gelation results in a promising candidate for local chemotherapy. PMID:24436226

  5. Aerosol Drug Delivery to the Lung Periphery Using Nano-scale Technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thor M. Wilbanks; Jeffrey A. Schuster

    2005-01-01

    Two applications of nanotechnoiogy to the AERx® drug delivery system are presented. Improved delivery performance is demonstrated using nanoscale nozzles. This gives higher emitted doses with reduced aerosol particle sizes, leading to deeper penetration of the drug into the lung periphery. Expanded capabilities are demonstrated using n a nanosuspensions. For example, drugs that are otherwise poorly soluble can be delivered

  6. Advanced drug delivery devices via self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette Rösler; Guido W. M Vandermeulen; Harm-Anton Klok

    2001-01-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymers are well established as building blocks for the preparation of micellar drug carriers. Over the past decade, the effectiveness of such self-assembled drug delivery devices has been demonstrated numerous times. This review will discuss two approaches that can be used to further improve the effectiveness of amphiphilic block copolymer-based drug delivery systems. The first approach involves the

  7. Nanomedicines for Back of the Eye Drug Delivery, Gene Delivery, and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kompella, Uday B.; Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Ravi, Rashmi Pacha; Durazo, Shelley A.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment and management of diseases of the posterior segment of the eye such as diabetic retinopathy, retinoblastoma, retinitis pigmentosa, and choroidal neovascularization is a challenging task due to the anatomy and physiology of ocular barriers. For instance, traditional routes of drug delivery for therapeutic treatment are hindered by poor intraocular penetration and/or rapid ocular elimination. One possible approach to improve ocular therapy is to employ nanotechnology. Nanomedicines, products of nanotechnology, having at least one dimension in the nanoscale include nanoparticles, micelles, nanotubes, and dendrimers, with and without targeting ligands, are making a significant impact in the fields of ocular drug delivery, gene delivery, and imaging, the focus of this review. Key applications of nanotechnology discussed in this review include a) bioadhesive nanomedicines; b) functionalized nanomedicines that enhance target recognition and/or cell entry; c) nanomedicines capable of controlled release of the payload; d) nanomedicines capable of enhancing gene transfection and duration of transfection; f) nanomedicines responsive to stimuli including light, heat, ultrasound, electrical signals, pH, and oxidative stress; g) diversely sized and colored nanoparticles for imaging, and h) nanowires for retinal prostheses. Additionally, nanofabricated delivery systems including implants, films, microparticles, and nanoparticles are described. Although the above nanomedicines may be administered by various routes including topical, intravitreal, intravenous, transscleral, suprachoroidal, and subretinal routes, each nanomedicine should be tailored for the disease, drug, and site of administration. In addition to the nature of materials used in nanomedicine design, depending on the site of nanomedicine administration, clearance and toxicity are expected to differ. PMID:23603534

  8. Influence of Drug Lipophilicity on Drug Release from Sclera After Iontophoretic Delivery of Mixed Micellar Carrier System to Human Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Poonam; Hao, Jinsong; Li, S. Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Mixed micelles prepared using sodium taurocholate (TA) and egg lecithin (LE) were previously found to be an effective carrier for sustained release of a poorly water-soluble drug in transscleral iontophoretic delivery. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effects of drug lipophilicity upon micellar carrier solubilization potential and drug release profiles from the sclera after iontophoretic delivery of model lipophilic drugs dexamethasone (DEX), triamcinolone acetonide (TRIAM), and ?-estradiol (E2?) with a mixed micellar carrier system of TA–LE (1:1 mole ratio). In this study, the micellar carrier system was characterized for drug solubilization. The micelles encapsulating these drugs were evaluated for transscleral passive and 2-mA iontophoretic delivery (both cathodal and anodal) and drug release from excised human sclera in vitro. The results show that drug solubility enhancement of the micellar carrier system increased with increasing drug lipophilicity. The more lipophilic drugs E2? and TRIAM displayed slower drug release from the sclera compared with the less lipophilic drug DEX after iontophoretic drug delivery with the mixed micelles. These results suggest that the combination of transscleral iontophoresis and micellar carriers is more effective in sustaining transscleral delivery of the more lipophilic drugs studied in this investigation. PMID:23150488

  9. Role of monocarboxylate transporters in drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Nisha; Morris, Marilyn E

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are known to mediate the transport of short chain monocarboxylates such as lactate, pyruvate and butyrate. Currently, fourteen members of this transporter family have been identified by sequence homology, of which only the first four members (MCT1- MCT4) have been shown to mediate the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates. Another transporter family involved in the transport of endogenous monocarboxylates is the sodium coupled MCTs (SMCTs). These act as a symporter and are dependent on a sodium gradient for their functional activity. MCT1 is the predominant transporter among the MCT isoforms and is present in almost all tissues including kidney, intestine, liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain. The various isoforms differ in terms of their substrate specificity and tissue localization. Due to the expression of these transporters in the kidney, intestine, and brain, they may play an important role in influencing drug disposition. Apart from endogenous short chain monocarboxylates, they also mediate the transport of exogenous drugs such as salicylic acid, valproic acid, and simvastatin acid. The influence of MCTs on drug pharmacokinetics has been extensively studied for ?-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) including distribution of this drug of abuse into the brain and the results will be summarized in this review. The physiological role of these transporters in the brain and their specific cellular localization within the brain will also be discussed. This review will also focus on utilization of MCTs as potential targets for drug delivery into the brain including their role in the treatment of malignant brain tumors. PMID:23789956

  10. Role of Monocarboxylate Transporters in Drug Delivery to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Nisha; Morris, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are known to mediate the transport of short chain monocarboxylates such as lactate, pyruvate and butyrate. Currently, fourteen members of this transporter family have been identified by sequence homology, of which only the first four members (MCT1- MCT4) have been shown to mediate the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates. Another transporter family involved in the transport of endogenous monocarboxylates is the sodium coupled MCTs (SMCTs). These act as a symporter and are dependent on a sodium gradient for their functional activity. MCT1 is the predominant transporter among the MCT isoforms and is present in almost all tissues including kidney, intestine, liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain. The various isoforms differ in terms of their substrate specificity and tissue localization. Due to the expression of these transporters in the kidney, intestine, and brain, they may play an important role in influencing drug disposition. Apart from endogenous short chain monocarboxylates, they also mediate the transport of exogenous drugs such as salicylic acid, valproic acid, and simvastatin acid. The influence of MCTs on drug pharmacokinetics has been extensively studied for ?-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) including distribution of this drug of abuse into the brain and the results will be summarized in this review. The physiological role of these transporters in the brain and their specific cellular localization within the brain will also be discussed. This review will also focus on utilization of MCTs as potential targets for drug delivery into the brain including their role in the treatment of malignant brain tumors. PMID:23789956

  11. Coupling of drug containing liposomes to microbubbles improves ultrasound triggered drug delivery in mice.

    PubMed

    Cool, Steven K; Geers, Bart; Roels, Stefan; Stremersch, Stephan; Vanderperren, Katrien; Saunders, Jimmy H; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Demeester, Joseph; Sanders, Niek N

    2013-12-28

    Local extravasation and triggered drug delivery by use of ultrasound and microbubbles is a promising strategy to target drugs to their sites of action. In the past we have developed drug loaded microbubbles by coupling drug containing liposomes to the surface of microbubbles. Until now the advantages of this drug loading strategy have only been demonstrated in vitro. Therefore, in this paper, microbubbles with indocyanine green (ICG) containing liposomes at their surface or a mixture of ICG-liposomes and microbubbles was injected intravenously in mice. Immediately after injection the left hind leg was exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound and the ICG deposition was monitored 1, 4 and 7 days post-treatment by in vivo fluorescence imaging. In mice that received the ICG-liposome loaded microbubbles the local ICG deposition was, at each time point, about 2-fold higher than in mice that received ICG-liposomes mixed with microbubbles. We also showed that the perforations in the blood vessels allow the passage of ICG-liposomes up to 5h after microbubble and ultrasound treatment. An increase in tissue temperature to 41°C was observed in all ultrasound treated mice. However, ultrasound tissue heating was excluded to cause the local ICG deposition. We concluded that coupling of drug containing liposomes to microbubbles may increase ultrasound mediated drug delivery in vivo. PMID:24075924

  12. Polymersome-based drug-delivery strategies for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Anajafi, Tayebeh; Mallik, Sanku

    2015-04-01

    Polymersomes are stable vesicles prepared from amphiphilic polymers and are more stable compared with liposomes. Although these nanovesicles have many attractive properties for in vitro/in vivo applications, liposome-based drug delivery systems are still prevalent in the market. In order to expedite the translational potential and to provide medically valuable formulations, the polymersomes need to be biocompatible and biodegradable. In this review, recent developments for biocompatible and biodegradable polymersomes, including the design of intelligent, targeted, and stimuli-responsive vesicles are summarized. PMID:25996048

  13. Microemulsion Microstructure Influences the Skin Delivery of an Hydrophilic Drug

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wafa Naoui; Marie-Alexandrine Bolzinger; Bernard Fenet; Jocelyne Pelletier; Jean-Pierre Valour; Rafik Kalfat; Yves Chevalier

    2011-01-01

    Purpose  We aimed to investigate the influence of microemulsion nanoscale organization as either oil-in-water droplets, water-in-oil\\u000a droplets, or bicontinuous structures on skin delivery of drugs assisted by microemulsions.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Three microemulsions of different microstructure, o\\/w, w\\/o, and bicontinuous at the skin temperature (32°C), having the same\\u000a oil and water contents and containing the same ingredients were selected using the Kahlweit fish phase

  14. Processing of Polymer Nanofibers Through Electrospinning as Drug Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenawy, E.; Abdel-Hay, F. I.; El-Newehy, M. H.; Wnek, G. E.

    The use of electrospun fibers as drug carriers could be promising in the future for biomedical applications, especially postoperative local chemotherapy. In this research, electrospun fibers were developed as a new system for the delivery of ketoprofen as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). The fibers were made either from polycaprolactone (PCL) as a biodegradable polymer or polyurethane (PU) as a non-biodegradable polymer, or from the blends of the two. The release of the ketoprofen was followed by UV—VIS spectroscopy in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4 at 37°C and 20°C. The results showed that the release rates from the polycaprolactone, polyurethane and their blend were similar. However, the blend of the polycaprolactone with polyurethane improved its visual mechanical properties. Release profiles from the electrospun mats were compared to cast films of the various formulations.

  15. Evaluation of metal nanoparticles for drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemi, Oluyomi S; Sulaiman, Faoziyat A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diminazene aceturate is a trypanocide with unwanted toxicity and limited efficacy. It was reasoned that conjugating diminazene aceturate to functionalized nanoparticle would lower untoward toxicity while improving selectivity and therapeutic efficacy. Silver and gold nanoparticles were evaluated for their capacities to serve as carriers for diminazene aceturate. The silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized, functionalized and coupled to diminazene aceturate following established protocols. The nanoparticle conjugates were characterized. The free diminazene aceturate and drug conjugated nanoparticles were subsequently evaluated for cytotoxicity in vitro. The characterizations by transmission electron microscopy or UV/Vis spectroscopy revealed that conjugation of diminazene aceturate to silver or gold nanoparticles was successful. Evaluation for cytotoxic actions in vitro demonstrated no significance difference between free diminazene aceturate and the conjugates. Our data suggest that surface modified metal nanoparticles could be optimized for drug delivery systems. PMID:25859270

  16. Antibiotic-containing polymers for localized, sustained drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, Nicholas D; Ouimet, Michelle A; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2014-11-30

    Many currently used antibiotics suffer from issues such as systemic toxicity, short half-life, and increased susceptibility to bacterial resistance. Although most antibiotic classes are administered systemically through oral or intravenous routes, a more efficient delivery system is needed. This review discusses the chemical conjugation of antibiotics to polymers, achieved by forming covalent bonds between antibiotics and a pre-existing polymer or by developing novel antibiotic-containing polymers. Through conjugating antibiotics to polymers, unique polymer properties can be taken advantage of. These polymeric antibiotics display controlled, sustained drug release and vary in antibiotic class type, synthetic method, polymer composition, bond lability, and antibacterial activity. The polymer synthesis, characterization, drug release, and antibacterial activities, if applicable, will be presented to offer a detailed overview of each system. PMID:24751888

  17. Enhanced anticancer efficacy by ATP-mediated liposomal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Gu, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    A liposome-based co-delivery system composed of a fusogenic liposome encapsulating ATP-responsive elements with chemotherapeutics and a liposome containing ATP was developed for ATP-mediated drug release triggered by liposomal fusion. The fusogenic liposome had a protein-DNA complex core containing an ATP-responsive DNA scaffold with doxorubicin (DOX) and could release DOX through a conformational change from the duplex to the aptamer/ATP complex in the presence of ATP. A cell-penetrating peptide-modified fusogenic liposomal membrane was coated on the core, which had an acid-triggered fusogenic potential with the ATP-loaded liposomes or endosomes/lysosomes. Directly delivering extrinsic liposomal ATP promoted the drug release from the fusogenic liposome in the acidic intracellular compartments upon a pH-sensitive membrane fusion and anticancer efficacy was enhanced both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24764317

  18. 5-fluorouracil loaded fibrinogen nanoparticles for cancer drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Muthunarayanan, M; Chennazhi, K P; Nair, S V; Jayakumar, R

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 5-flurouracil loaded fibrinogen nanoparticles (5-FU-FNPs) were prepared by two step coacervation method using calcium chloride as cross-linker. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using DLS, SEM, AFM, FT-IR, TG/DTA and XRD studies. Particle size of 5-FU-FNPs was found to be 150-200 nm. The loading efficiency (LE) and in vitro drug release was studied using UV spectrophotometer. The LE of FNPs was found to be ?90%. The cytotoxicity studies showed 5-FU-FNPs were toxic to MCF7, PC3 and KB cells while they are comparatively non toxic to L929 cells. Cellular uptake of Rhodamine 123 conjugated 5-FU-FNPs was also studied. Cell uptake studies demonstrated that the nanoparticles are inside the cells. These results indicated that FNPs could be useful for cancer drug delivery. PMID:20951162

  19. Cell or Cell Membrane-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Songwei; Wu, Tingting; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Natural cells have been explored as drug carriers for a long period. They have received growing interest as a promising drug delivery system (DDS) until recently along with the development of biology and medical science. The synthetic materials, either organic or inorganic, are found to be with more or less immunogenicity and/or toxicity. The cells and extracellular vesicles (EVs), are endogenous and thought to be much safer and friendlier. Furthermore, in view of their host attributes, they may achieve different biological effects and/or targeting specificity, which can meet the needs of personalized medicine as the next generation of DDS. In this review, we summarized the recent progress in cell or cell membrane-based DDS and their fabrication processes, unique properties and applications, including the whole cells, EVs and cell membrane coated nanoparticles. We expect the continuing development of this cell or cell membrane-based DDS will promote their clinic applications. PMID:26000058

  20. Harnessing the potential of bacterial ghost for the effective delivery of drugs and biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Ganeshpurkar, Ankit; Pandey, Vikas; Agnihotri, Abhishek; Bansal, Divya; Dubey, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    It seems to be a necessary need to develop an effective drug carrier system for targeted delivery of pharmaceuticals. Bacterial ghosts are emerging drug delivery platform that are capable of delivery of proteins, antigens, nucleic acids, and pharmaceuticals. Bacterial ghosts are generally produced by lysis of gram-negative bacteria. Pharmaceutically, these ghosts could be utilized to deliver proteins peptides, vaccines, drugs effectively. However, this technology is at initial stage and systematic studies are required to implement such system over humans. PMID:24678455

  1. Evaluation of Aerosol Delivery of Nanosuspension for Pre-clinical Pulmonary Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Alsup, Jason W.; Lai, Yurong; Hu, Yiding; Heyde, Bruce R.; Tung, David

    2009-03-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are pulmonary diseases that are characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine production, and airway hyper-reactivity. Most of the effector cells responsible for these pathologies reside in the lungs. One of the most direct ways to deliver drugs to the target cells is via the trachea. In a pre-clinical setting, this can be achieved via intratracheal (IT), intranasal (IN), or aerosol delivery in the desired animal model. In this study, we pioneered the aerosol delivery of a nanosuspension formulation in a rodent model. The efficiency of different dosing techniques and formulations to target the lungs were compared, and fluticasone was used as the model compound. For the aerosol particle size determination, a ten-stage cascade impactor was used. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) was calculated based on the percent cumulative accumulation at each stage. Formulations with different particle size of fluticasone were made for evaluation. The compatibility of regular fluticasone suspension and nanosuspension for aerosol delivery was also investigated. The in vivo studies were conducted on mice with optimized setting. It was found that the aerosol delivery of fluticasone with nanosuspension was as efficient as intranasal (IN) dosing, and was able to achieve dose dependent lung deposition.

  2. Molecular Communication Modeling of Antibody-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Koucheryavy, Yevgeni

    2015-07-01

    Antibody-mediated Drug Delivery Systems (ADDS) are emerging as one of the most encouraging therapeutic solutions for treating several diseases such as human cancers. ADDS use small molecules (antibodies) that propagate in the body and bind selectively to their corresponding receptors (antigens) expressed at the surface of the diseased cells. In this paper, the Molecular Communication (MC) paradigm, where information is conveyed through the concentration of molecules, is advocated for the engineering of ADDS and modeling their complex behavior, to provide a realistic model without the over-complication of system biology models, and the limitations of experimental approaches. The peculiarities of antibodies, including their anisotropic transport and complex electrochemical structure, are taken into account to develop an analytical model of the ADDS transport and antigen-binding kinetics. The end-to-end response of ADDS, from the drug injection to the drug absorption, is mathematically derived based on the geometry of the antibody molecule, the electrochemical structure of the antibody-antigen complex, and the physiology of the patient. The accuracy of the MC model is validated by finite-element (COMSOL) simulations. The implications of the complex interplay between the transport and kinetics parameters on the performance of ADDS are effectively captured by the proposed MC model. The MC model of ADDS will enable the discovery and optimization of drugs in a versatile, cost-efficient, and reliable manner. PMID:25675450

  3. Biogenic gold nano-triangles: cargos for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Dharmatti, Roopa; Phadke, Chinmay; Mewada, Ashmi; Thakur, Mukeshchand; Pandey, Sunil; Sharon, Madhuri

    2014-11-01

    We present synthesis of biogenic gold nano triangles (GNTs) using Azadirachta indica leaf extract at inherent pH (5.89) and its application in efficient drug delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) (anticancer drug). The main idea was to take advantage of large surface area of GNTs which has 3 dimensions and use the plant peptides coated on these triangles as natural linkers for the attachment of DOX. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation (SDGC) and dialysis methods were used for separation of the GNT from mixture of GNPs. Flocculation parameter (FP) was used to check stability of GNT which was found to be exceptionally high (0-0.75) due to the biological capping agents. DOX attachment to GNT was verified using Fourier transformed infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. The complex thus formed was found to be less toxic to normal cells (MDCK cells) and significantly toxic for the cancerous cells (HeLa cells). Drug loading efficiency was found to be 99.81% and DOX release followed first order release kinetics. Percentage drug release was found to be more than 4.5% in both acidic (5.8) as well as physiological pH (7.2) which is suitable for tumor targeting. PMID:25280684

  4. Folate conjugated silk fibroin nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Subia, Bano; Chandra, Sourov; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Kundu, Subhas C

    2014-02-01

    Disease treatment processes mainly focus on the development of nontoxic, biodegradable, non-immunogenic, biocompatible materials capable of controlled and long-term release of biomolecules. In this work silk protein fibroin from non-mulberry tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta, is used to prepare nanoparticles as a drug delivery system. Folate is a vitamin, which is brought into healthy and cancerous cells by folate receptors. The efficiency of silk fibroin-folate nanoparticles loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin was evaluated by analysing the cell viability, proliferation and endocytosis. Consequently the effects of pro-inflammatory responses by cytokines such as TNF-?, IL-1? and nitric oxide were checked by stimulating the macrophages with folate conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticles. The fibroin-folate nanocarriers are nontoxic, easily taken up by cells and capable of sustained drug release. Nanoparticles loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin target cancer cells. The results show that silk fibroin-folate nanoparticles may serve as promising nanocarriers for different biomedical and nanotechnology applications in cancer research. PMID:24345855

  5. Drug delivery vehicles on a nano-engineering perspective.

    PubMed

    Felice, Betiana; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Rodríguez, Andrea P; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-08-01

    Nanoengineered drug delivery systems (nDDS) have been successfully used as clinical tools for not only modulation of pharmacological drug release profile but also specific targeting of diseased tissues. Until now, encapsulation of anti-cancer molecules such as paclitaxel, vincristin and doxorubicin has been the main target of nDDS, whereby liposomes and polymer-drug conjugates remained as the most popular group of nDDS used for this purpose. The success reached by these nanocarriers can be imitated by careful selection and optimization of the different factors that affect drug release profile (i.e. type of biomaterial, size, system architecture, and biodegradability mechanisms) along with the selection of an appropriate manufacture technique that does not compromise the desired release profile, while it also offers possibilities to scale up for future industrialization. This review focuses from an engineering perspective on the different parameters that should be considered before and during the design of new nDDS, and the different manufacturing techniques available, in such a way to ensure success in clinical application. PMID:24907751

  6. Stable cerasomes for simultaneous drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhong; Zhu, Wenjian; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Chunyang; Xu, Ming; Liu, Jie; Feng, Shi-Ting; Jiang, Qing; Xie, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic liposomes have been frequently used as nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging in recent years. Despite great potentials, their morphological/structural instability in the physiological environment still remains an intractable challenge for clinical applications. In this study, stable hybrid liposomal cerasomes (ie, liposomes partially coated with silica) which can co-encapsulate Fe3O4 nanoparticles and the anticancer drug paclitaxel were developed using thin film hydration method. Compared with the drug loaded liposomes, the paclitaxel-loaded magnetic cerasomes (PLMCs) exhibited much higher storage stability and better sustained release behavior. Cellular uptake study showed that the utilization of an external magnetic field significantly facilitated the internalization of PLMCs into cancer cells, resulting in potentiated drug efficacy of killing tumor cells. The T2 relaxivity (r2) of our PLMCs was much higher than that of free Fe3O4 nanoparticles, suggesting increased sensitivity in T2-weighted imaging. Given its excellent biocompatibility also shown in the study, such dual functional PLMC is potentially a promising nanosystem for effective cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25395848

  7. Bioadhesive Mini-Tablets for Vaginal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hiorth, Marianne; Nilsen, Susanne; Tho, Ingunn

    2014-01-01

    Different non-ionic cellulose ethers (methyl cellulose, MC; hydroxyethyl cellulose, HEC; hydroxypropyl cellulose, HPC; hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, HPMC) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) were investigated as matrix formers for preparation of mini-tablets targeting vaginal drug delivery. Hexyl aminolevulinat hydrochloridum (HAL) was used as a model drug. The mini-tablets were characterized with respect to their mechanical strength, bioadhesion towards cow vaginal tissue in two independent tests (rotating cylinder test, detachment test using texture analyzer), and dissolution rate in two media mimicking the pH levels of fertile, healthy and post-menopausal women (vaginal fluid simulant pH 4.5, phosphate buffer pH 6.8). Mini-tablets with a matrix of either HPMC or HPC were found to possess adequate mechanical strength, superior bioadhesive behavior towards vaginal tissue, and pH independent controlled release of the model drug, suggesting that both systems would be suited for the treatment of women regardless of age, i.e., respective of their vaginal pH levels. Bioadhesive mini-tablets offer a potential for improved residence time in the vaginal cavity targeting contact with mucosal tissue and prolonged release of the drug. PMID:25166286

  8. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 ?m and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  9. Liposomal nanoparticles as a drug delivery vehicle against osteosarcoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhule, Santosh Subhashrao

    The delivery of curcumin, a broad-spectrum anticancer drug, has been explored in the form of liposomal nanoparticles to treat osteosarcoma (OS). Curcumin is water insoluble and an effective delivery route is through encapsulation in cyclodextrins followed by a second encapsulation in liposomes. Liposomal curcumin's potential was evaluated against cancer models of mesenchymal (OS) and epithelial origin (breast cancer). The resulting 2-Hydroxypropyl-gamma-cyclodextrin/curcumin - liposome complex shows promising anticancer potential both in vitro and in vivo against KHOS OS cell line and MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. An interesting aspect is that liposomal curcumin initiates the caspase cascade that leads to apoptotic cell death in vitro in comparison with DMSO-curcumin induced autophagic cell death. In addition, the efficiency of the liposomal curcumin formulation was confirmed in vivo using a xenograft OS model. Curcumin-loaded gamma-cyclodextrin liposomes indicate significant potential as delivery vehicles for the treatment of cancers of different tissue origin. The second part of this study examines the anti-tumor potential of curcumin and C6 ceramide (C6) against osteosarcoma cell lines when both are encapsulated in the bilayer of liposomal nanoparticles. Curcumin in combination with C6 showed 1.5 times enhanced cytotoxic effect in the case of MG-63 and KHOS OS cell lines, in comparison with systems with curcumin alone. Interestingly, C6-curcumin liposomes were found to be less toxic on untransformed human cells in comparison to OS cell lines. In addition, cell cycle assays on a KHOS cell line after treatment revealed that curcumin only liposomes induced G 2/M arrest by upregulation of cyclin B1, while C6 only liposomes induced G1 arrest by downregulation of cyclin D1. C6-curcumin liposomes induced G2/M arrest and showed a combined effect in the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. Using pegylated liposomes to increase the plasma half-life and tagging with folate for targeted delivery in vivo, a significant reduction in tumor size was observed with C6-curcumin-folate liposomes. The encapsulation of two water insoluble drugs, curcumin and C6, in the lipid bilayer of liposomes enhances the cytotoxic effect and validates the potential of combined drug therapy.

  10. Heparosan based negatively charged nanocarrier for rapid intracellular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Xiao; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Miao; Chen, Jing-Hua

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a heparosan-DOX conjugate (HDC) was designed and prepared by covalently linking heparosan with anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) via "Schiff" base. Due to the amphiphilic nature, the HDC could self-assemble into nanoparticles in aqueous solution of pH 7.4. In spite of the surface charge of HDC nanoparticles was negative, HDC could achieve intracellular delivery of DOX efficiently. Cellular uptake study revealed the endocytosis pathway of heparosan based nanocarrier includes clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis, and the process of endocytosis is energy dependent. This meant the HDC would reach endosomes and behave pH-sensitive DOX release profile due to the inherent property of "Schiff" base. The cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated the cellular uptake of HDC was faster than that of free DOX, showing improved efficacy within short co-incubation period. Furthermore, the HDC nanoparticles were stable in culture medium containing 10% FBS, indicating promising application for drug delivery. PMID:25089505

  11. Liposomal Conjugates for Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Frieder; Fricker, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Treatments of central nervous system (CNS) diseases often fail due to the blood–brain barrier. Circumvention of this obstacle is crucial for any systemic treatment of such diseases to be effective. One approach to transfer drugs into the brain is the use of colloidal carrier systems—amongst others, liposomes. A prerequisite for successful drug delivery by colloidal carriers to the brain is the modification of their surface, making them invisible to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) and to target them to specific surface epitopes at the blood–brain barrier. This study characterizes liposomes conjugated with cationized bovine serum albumin (cBSA) as transport vectors in vitro in porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCEC) and in vivo in rats using fluorescently labelled liposomes. Experiments with PBCEC showed that sterically stabilized (PEGylated) liposomes without protein as well as liposomes conjugated to native bovine serum albumin (BSA) were not taken up. In contrast, cBSA-liposomes were taken up and appeared to be concentrated in intracellular vesicles. Uptake occurred in a concentration and time dependent manner. Free BSA and free cBSA inhibited uptake. After intravenous application of cBSA-liposomes, confocal fluorescence microscopy of brain cryosections from male Wistar rats showed fluorescence associated with liposomes in brain capillary surrounding tissue after 3, 6 and 24 h, for liposomes with a diameter between 120 and 150 nm, suggesting successful brain delivery of cationized-albumin coupled liposomes. PMID:25835091

  12. Drug-Induced Morphology Switch in Drug Delivery Systems Based on Poly(2-oxazoline)s

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Defined aggregates of polymers such as polymeric micelles are of great importance in the development of pharmaceutical formulations. The amount of drug that can be formulated by a drug delivery system is an important issue, and most drug delivery systems suffer from their relatively low drug-loading capacity. However, as the loading capacities increase, i.e., promoted by good drug–polymer interactions, the drug may affect the morphology and stability of the micellar system. We investigated this effect in a prominent system with very high capacity for hydrophobic drugs and found extraordinary stability as well as a profound morphology change upon incorporation of paclitaxel into micelles of amphiphilic ABA poly(2-oxazoline) triblock copolymers. The hydrophilic blocks A comprised poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline), while the middle blocks B were either just barely hydrophobic poly(2-n-butyl-2-oxazoline) or highly hydrophobic poly(2-n-nonyl-2-oxazoline). The aggregation behavior of both polymers and their formulations with varying paclitaxel contents were investigated by means of dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, (cryogenic) transmission electron microscopy, and small-angle neutron scattering. While without drug, wormlike micelles were present, after incorporation of small amounts of drugs only spherical morphologies remained. Furthermore, the much more hydrophobic poly(2-n-nonyl-2-oxazoline)-containing triblock copolymer exhibited only half the capacity for paclitaxel than the poly(2-n-butyl-2-oxazoline)-containing copolymer along with a lower stability. In the latter, contents of paclitaxel of 8 wt % or higher resulted in a raspberry-like micellar core. PMID:24548260

  13. Drug-induced morphology switch in drug delivery systems based on poly(2-oxazoline)s.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Anita; Jaksch, Sebastian; Schubel, Rene; Wegener, Erik; Di, Zhenyu; Han, Yingchao; Meister, Annette; Kressler, Jörg; Kabanov, Alexander V; Luxenhofer, Robert; Papadakis, Christine M; Jordan, Rainer

    2014-03-25

    Defined aggregates of polymers such as polymeric micelles are of great importance in the development of pharmaceutical formulations. The amount of drug that can be formulated by a drug delivery system is an important issue, and most drug delivery systems suffer from their relatively low drug-loading capacity. However, as the loading capacities increase, i.e., promoted by good drug-polymer interactions, the drug may affect the morphology and stability of the micellar system. We investigated this effect in a prominent system with very high capacity for hydrophobic drugs and found extraordinary stability as well as a profound morphology change upon incorporation of paclitaxel into micelles of amphiphilic ABA poly(2-oxazoline) triblock copolymers. The hydrophilic blocks A comprised poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline), while the middle blocks B were either just barely hydrophobic poly(2-n-butyl-2-oxazoline) or highly hydrophobic poly(2-n-nonyl-2-oxazoline). The aggregation behavior of both polymers and their formulations with varying paclitaxel contents were investigated by means of dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, (cryogenic) transmission electron microscopy, and small-angle neutron scattering. While without drug, wormlike micelles were present, after incorporation of small amounts of drugs only spherical morphologies remained. Furthermore, the much more hydrophobic poly(2-n-nonyl-2-oxazoline)-containing triblock copolymer exhibited only half the capacity for paclitaxel than the poly(2-n-butyl-2-oxazoline)-containing copolymer along with a lower stability. In the latter, contents of paclitaxel of 8 wt % or higher resulted in a raspberry-like micellar core. PMID:24548260

  14. Laser plasma jet driven microparticles for DNA/drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Viren; Mathew, Yohan; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Kanno, Akira; Hosseini, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a microparticle delivery device that generates a plasma jet through laser ablation of a thin metal foil and uses the jet to accomplish particle delivery into soft living targets for transferring biological agents. Pure gold microparticles of 1 µm size were coated with a plasmid DNA, pIG121Hm, and were deposited as a thin layer on one surface of an aluminum foil. The laser (Nd:YAG, 1064 nm wavelength) ablation of the foil generated a plasma jet that carried the DNA coated particles into the living onion cells. The particles could effectively penetrate the target cells and disseminate the DNA, effecting the transfection of the cells. Generation of the plasma jet on laser ablation of the foil and its role as a carrier of microparticles was visualized using a high-speed video camera, Shimadzu HPV-1, at a frame rate of 500 kfps (2 µs interframe interval) in a shadowgraph optical set-up. The particle speed could be measured from the visualized images, which was about 770 m/s initially, increased to a magnitude of 1320 m/s, and after a quasi-steady state over a distance of 10 mm with an average magnitude of 1100 m/s, started declining, which typically is the trend of a high-speed, pulsed, compressible jet. Aluminum launch pad (for the particles) was used in the present study to make the procedure cost-effective, whereas the guided, biocompatible launch pads made of gold, silver or titanium can be used in the device during the actual clinical operations. The particle delivery device has a potential to have a miniature form and can be an effective, hand-held drug/DNA delivery device for biological applications. PMID:23226394

  15. A survey on the applications of implantable micropump systems in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahnama, Ali; Nourbakhsh, Ahmad; Ghorbaniasl, Ghader

    2014-01-01

    Systemic drug delivery is the most prevalent form of the drug administration; but it is not possible to extend this approach to all of diseases. In the traditional approaches of drug delivery, the drug spreads through whole of body and this could cause severe side effects in the healthy parts. In addition, in some parts of our body like the eye, ear and brain, there are biological barriers against drug penetration which made drug delivery to these organs as a challenging work. Micropumps are one of the MEMS based devices with great capabilities in controlled drug administration. The most prevalent application of micropumps in drug delivery is known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for diabetic patients; but our study showed that there are some other ongoing investigations to extend application of micropumps in new treatment methods for some incurred diseases. PMID:24533725

  16. Microprocessor in controlled transdermal drug delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, N S; Shobha Rani, R H

    2009-12-01

    Microprocessor controlled transdermal delivery of anticancer drugs 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) was developed and in vitro evaluation was done. Drugs were loaded based on the pharmacokinetics parameters. In vitro diffusion studies were carried at different current density (0.0, 0.1, 0.22, 0.50 mA/cm2). The patches were evaluated for the drug content, thickness, weight, folding endurance, flatness, thumb tack test and adhesive properties all were well with in the specification of transdermal patches with elegant and transparent in appearance. In vitro permeation studies through human cadaver skin showed, passive delivery (0.0 mA/cm2) of 6-MP was low. As the current density was progressively increased, the flux also increased. the flux also increased with 0.1 mA/cm2 for 15-20 min, but it was less than desired flux, 0.2 mA/cm2 for 30 min showed better flux than 0.1 mA/cm2 current, but lag time was more than 4 h, 0.5 mA/cm2 current for more than 1 h, flux was >159 microg/cm2 h which was desired flux for 6-MP. 5-FU flux reached the minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 54 microg/cm2 h with 0.5 mA/cm2 current for 30-45 min, drug concentration were within the therapeutic window in post-current phase. We concluded from Ohm's Law that as the resistance decreases, current increases. Skin resistance decrease with increase in time and current, increase in the drug permeation. Interestingly, for all investigated current densities, as soon as the current was switched off, 5-FU and 6-MP flux decreased fairly, but the controlled drug delivery can be achieved by switching the current for required period of time. PMID:18592348

  17. Multifunctional nanoparticles for drug/gene delivery in nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seale, Mary-Margaret; Zemlyanov, Dimitry; Cooper, Christy L.; Haglund, Emily; Prow, Tarl W.; Reece, Lisa M.; Leary, James F.

    2007-02-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles hold great promise for drug/gene delivery. Multilayered nanoparticles can act as nanomedical systems with on-board "molecular programming" to accomplish complex multi-step tasks. For example, the targeting process has only begun when the nanosystem has found the correct diseased cell of interest. Then it must pass the cell membrane and avoid enzymatic destruction within the endosomes of the cell. Since the nanosystem is only about one millionth the volume of a human cell, for it to have therapeutic efficacy with its contained package, it must deliver that drug or gene to the appropriate site within the living cell. The successive de-layering of these nanosystems in a controlled fashion allows the system to accomplish operations that would be difficult or impossible to do with even complex single molecules. In addition, portions of the nanosystem may be protected from premature degradation or mistargeting to non-diseased cells. All of these problems remain major obstacles to successful drug delivery with a minimum of deleterious side effects to the patient. This paper describes some of the many components involved in the design of a general platform technology for nanomedical systems. The feasibility of most of these components has been demonstrated by our group and others. But the integration of these interacting sub-components remains a challenge. We highlight four components of this process as examples. Each subcomponent has its own sublevels of complexity. But good nanomedical systems have to be designed/engineered as a full nanomedical system, recognizing the need for the other components.

  18. A patchless dissolving microneedle delivery system enabling rapid and efficient transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lahiji, Shayan F; Dangol, Manita; Jung, Hyungil

    2015-01-01

    Dissolving microneedles (DMNs) are polymeric, microscopic needles that deliver encapsulated drugs in a minimally invasive manner. Currently, DMN arrays are superimposed onto patches that facilitate their insertion into skin. However, due to wide variations in skin elasticity and the amount of hair on the skin, the arrays fabricated on the patch are often not completely inserted and large amount of loaded materials are not delivered. Here, we report "Microlancer", a novel micropillar based system by which patients can self-administer DMNs and which would also be capable of achieving 97 ± 2% delivery efficiency of the loaded drugs regardless of skin type or the amount of hair on the skin in less than a second. PMID:25604728

  19. A patchless dissolving microneedle delivery system enabling rapid and efficient transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lahiji, Shayan F.; Dangol, Manita; Jung, Hyungil

    2015-01-01

    Dissolving microneedles (DMNs) are polymeric, microscopic needles that deliver encapsulated drugs in a minimally invasive manner. Currently, DMN arrays are superimposed onto patches that facilitate their insertion into skin. However, due to wide variations in skin elasticity and the amount of hair on the skin, the arrays fabricated on the patch are often not completely inserted and large amount of loaded materials are not delivered. Here, we report “Microlancer”, a novel micropillar based system by which patients can self-administer DMNs and which would also be capable of achieving 97 ± 2% delivery efficiency of the loaded drugs regardless of skin type or the amount of hair on the skin in less than a second. PMID:25604728

  20. Two cholesterol derivative-based PEGylated liposomes as drug delivery system, study on pharmacokinetics and drug delivery to retina.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shengyong; Yang, Bin; Wang, Guowu; Qin, Geng; Wada, Satoshi; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2014-07-11

    In this study, two cholesterol derivatives, (4-cholesterocarbonyl-4'-(N,N,N-triethylamine butyloxyl bromide) azobenzene (CAB) and 4-cholesterocarbonyl-4'-(N,N-diethylamine butyloxyl) azobenzene (ACB), one of which is positively charged while the other is neutral, were synthesized and incorporated with phospholipids and cholesterol to form doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposomes. PEGylation was achieved by including 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatiylethanol-amine-N-[methoxy-(polyethylene glycol)-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Our results showed that PEGylated liposomes displayed significantly improved stability and the drug leakage was decreased compared to the non-PEGylated ones in vitro. The in vivo study with rats also revealed that the pharmacokinetics and circulation half-life of DOX were significantly improved when liposomes were PEGylated (p < 0.05). In particular, the neutral cholesterol derivative ACB played some role in improving liposomes' stability in systemic circulation compared to the conventional PC liposome and the positively charged CAB liposome, with or without PEGylation. In addition, in the case of local drug delivery, the positively charged PEG-liposome not only delivered much more of the drug into the rats' retinas (p < 0.001), but also maintained much longer drug retention time compared to the neutral PEGylated liposomes. PMID:24960297

  1. Recent advances on chitosan-based micro- and nanoparticles in drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunil A. Agnihotri; Nadagouda N. Mallikarjuna; Tejraj M. Aminabhavi

    2004-01-01

    Considerable research efforts have been directed towards developing safe and efficient chitosan-based particulate drug delivery systems. The present review outlines the major new findings on the pharmaceutical applications of chitosan-based micro\\/nanoparticulate drug delivery systems published over the past decade. Methods of their preparation, drug loading, release characteristics, and applications are covered. Chemically modified chitosan or its derivatives used in drug

  2. Magnetic and fluorescent multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles as a smart drug delivery system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linlin Li; Dong Chen; Yanqi Zhang; Zhengtao Deng; Xiangling Ren; Xianwei Meng; Fangqiong Tang; Jun Ren; Lin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    An innovative drug delivery system based on magnetic and fluorescent multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles was developed, which combined magnetic targeting, fluorescent imaging and stimulus-responsive drug release properties into one drug delivery system. Water-soluble superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and pharmaceutical drugs were simultaneously incorporated into chitosan nanoparticles; cross-linking the composite particles with glutaraldehyde tailored their size, morphology, surface properties

  3. Smart Packaging: A Novel Technique For Localized Drug Delivery For Ovarian Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Christabel Williams

    2012-01-01

    Localized drug delivery is emerging as an effective technique due to its ability to administer therapeutic concentrations and controlled release of drugs to cancer sites in the body. It also prevents the contact of harsh chemotherapy drugs to healthy regions in the body that otherwise would become exposed to current treatments.\\u000aThis study reports on a model chemotherapy drug delivery

  4. Nanostructure-based platforms-current prospective in ophthalmic drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Yassin, Alaa Eldeen B

    2014-01-01

    The topically applied drugs as drops are washed off from the eye in very short period, resulting in low ocular bioavailability of drugs. Number of approaches have been attempted to increase the bioavailability and the duration of action of ocular drugs. This review provides an insight into various novel approaches; hydrophilic nanogels, solid lipid nanoparticles, and nanosponges applied very recently in the delivery of insoluble drugs, prolonging the ocular residence time, minimize pre-corneal drug loss and, therefore, bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of the drugs. Despite various scientific approaches, efficient ocular drug delivery remains a challenge for pharmaceutical scientists. PMID:25116766

  5. A composite polyelectrolytic matrix for controlled oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bawa, Priya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya Essop; du Toit, Lisa Claire; Ndesendo, Valence Methaius Kessy; Kumar, Pradeep

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate drug-loaded polyelectrolyte matrices constituting blends of pectin, chitosan (CHT) and hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAAm) for controlling the premature solvation of the polymers and modulating drug release. The model drug employed was the highly water-soluble antihistamine, diphenhydramine HCl (DPH). Polyelectrolyte complex formation was validated by infrared spectroscopy. Matrices were characterized by textural profiling, porositometry and SEM. Drug release studies were performed under simulated gastrointestinal conditions using USP apparatus 3. FTIR spectra revealed distinctive peaks indicating the presence of -COO(-) symmetrical stretching (1,425-1,390 cm(-1)) and -NH (3) (+) deformation (1,535 cm(-1)) with evidence of electrostatic interaction between the cationic CHT and anionic HPAAm corroborated by molecular mechanics simulations of the complexes. Pectin-HPAAm matrices showed electrostatic attraction due to residual -NH(2) and -COO(-) groups of HPAAm and pectin, respectively. Textural profiling demonstrated that CHT-HPAAm matrices were most resilient at 6.1% and pectin-CHT-HPAAm matrices were the least (3.9%). Matrix hardness and deformation energy followed similar behavior. Pectin-CHT-HPAAm and CHT-HPAAm matrices produced type IV isotherms with H3 hysteresis and mesopores (22.46 nm) while pectin-HPAAm matrices were atypical with hysteresis at a low P/P(0) and pore sizes of 5.15 nm and a large surface area. At t (2 h), no DPH was released from CHT-HPAAm matrices, whereas 28.2% and 82.2% was released from pectin-HPAAm and pectin-CHT-HPAAm matrices, respectively. At t (4 h), complete DPH release was achieved from pectin-CHT-HPAAm matrices in contrast to only 35% from CHT-HPAAm matrices. This revealed the release-modulating capability of each matrix signifying their applicability in controlled oral drug delivery applications. PMID:21225384

  6. Role of Components in the Formation of Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, A. K.; Deshpande, P. B.; Kar, S. S.; Nayak, Usha Y.; Udupa, N.; Reddy, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical research is focused in designing novel drug delivery systems to improve the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems, one among the lipid-based dosage forms were proven to be promising in improving the oral bioavailability of such drugs by enhancing solubility, permeability and avoiding first-pass metabolism via enhanced lymphatic transport. Further, they have been successful in avoiding both inter and intra individual variations as well as the dose disproportionality. Aqueous insoluble drugs, in general, show greater solubility in lipid based excipients, and hence they are formulated as lipid based drug delivery systems. The extent of solubility of a hydrophobic drug in lipid excipients i.e. oil, surfactant and co-surfactant (components of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems) greatly affects the drug loading and in producing stable self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems. The present review highlighted the influence of physicochemical factors and structural features of the hydrophobic drug on its solubility in lipid excipients and an attempt was made to explore the role of each component of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems in the formation of stable microemulsion upon dilution. PMID:26180269

  7. Synthesis and characterization of amphiphilic lipopolymers for micellar drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Danquah, Michael; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-10-11

    The objective of this study was to design lipopolymers for hydrophobic drug delivery. Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(2-methyl-2-carboxyl-propylene carbonate-graft-dodecanol) (PEG-PCD) lipopolymers were synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, FT-IR, GPC, and DSC. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of PEG-PCD micelles was around 10(-8) M and decreased with increasing length of hydrophobic block. PEG-PCD micelles could efficiently load a model drug embelin into its hydrophobic core and significantly improve its solubility. The loading capacity was dependent on the polymer core structure, but the length of hydrophobic core had little effect. PEG-PCD formed both spherical and cylindrical micelles, which were dependent on the copolymer structure and composition. PEG-PCD lipopolymers with various hydrophobic core lengths showed similar drug release profiles, which were slower than that of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(2-methyl-2-benzoxycarbonyl-propylene carbonate) (PEG-PBC) micelles. Embelin loaded PEG-PCD micelles showed significant inhibition of C4-2 prostate cancer cell proliferation, while no obvious cellular toxicity was observed for blank micelles. PMID:20804201

  8. Conatumumab (AMG 655) coated nanoparticles for targeted pro-apoptotic drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francois Fay; Kirsty M. McLaughlin; Donna M. Small; Dean A. Fennell; Patrick G. Johnston; Daniel B. Longley; Christopher J. Scott

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal nanoparticle drug delivery systems have attracted much interest for their ability to enable effective formulation and delivery of therapeutic agents. The selective delivery of these nanoparticles to the disease site can be enhanced by coating the surface of the nanoparticles with targeting moieties, such as antibodies. In this current work, we demonstrate that antibodies on the surface of the

  9. Self-emulsifying drug delivery system and the applications in herbal drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Lanying; Zhang, Manhong; Pang, Yue; Li, Zhaoming; Zhao, Aili; Feng, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Herbal drugs have been used for thousands of years in the east and have had a recent resurgence in popularity among consumers in the west. However, most of herbal drug are poorly soluble and have hydrophobic properties and poor distribution, leading to reduced bioavailability and hence decreased treatment efficacy, requiring repeated administration or increased dose. In the past few decades, considerable attention has been focused on the development of self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) for herbal drugs. SEDDS is isotropic and thermodynamically stable solutions consisting of oil, surfactant, co-surfactant and drug that can spontaneously form oil-in-water micro/nanoemulsion when mixed with water under gentle stirring. The formulation can be a viable alternative to classical formulations to take advantage of their lipophilic nature and to solve their problems of poor solubility, poor bioavailability, low oral absorption and instability. The mechanism of self-emulsification, solubility studies, construction of phase diagram, optimization and characterization of herbal drugs-loaded SEDDS formulation and in situ absorption evaluation of herbal drugs in rat intestine are presented in our article. PMID:24321014

  10. On the suitability of nanocrystalline ferrites as a magnetic carrier for drug delivery: Functionalization, conjugation and drug release kinetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Rana; A. Gallo; R. S. Srivastava; R. D. K. Misra

    2007-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nickel ferrite nanoparticles functionalized with polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene oxide and polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) polymers and subsequently conjugated with doxorubicin anti-cancer drug are studied for their use as a magnetic carrier for drug delivery. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy enabled examination of the ability of the nanoparticles to be functionalized with polymers and conjugated with doxorubicin drug. The functionalized polymer-coated nanocrystalline

  11. Crucial factors and emerging concepts in ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Geers, Bart; Dewitte, Heleen; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Lentacker, Ine

    2012-12-28

    Time and space controlled drug delivery still remains a huge challenge in medicine. A novel approach that could offer a solution is ultrasound guided drug delivery. “Ultrasonic drug delivery” is often based on the use of small gas bubbles (so-called microbubbles) that oscillate and cavitate upon exposure to ultrasound waves. Some microbubbles are FDA approved contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and are nowadays widely investigated as promising drug carriers. Indeed, it has been observed that upon exposure to ultrasound waves, microbubbles may (a) release the encapsulated drugs and (b) simultaneously change the structure of the cell membranes in contact with the microbubbles which may facilitate drug entrance into cells. This review aims to highlight (a) major factors known so far which affect ultrasonic drug delivery (like the structure of the microbubbles, acoustic settings, etc.) and (b) summarizes the recent preclinical progress in this field together with a number of promising new concepts and applications. PMID:23320295

  12. Development of vertical SU-8 microneedles for transdermal drug delivery by double drawing lithography technology

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhuolin; Wang, Hao; Pant, Aakanksha; Pastorin, Giorgia; Lee, Chengkuo

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-based microneedles have drawn much attention in transdermal drug delivery resulting from their flexibility and biocompatibility. Traditional fabrication approaches are usually time-consuming and expensive. In this study, we developed a new double drawing lithography technology to make biocompatible SU-8 microneedles for transdermal drug delivery applications. These microneedles are strong enough to stand force from both vertical direction and planar direction during penetration. They can be used to penetrate into the skin easily and deliver drugs to the tissues under it. By controlling the delivery speed lower than 2??l/min per single microneedle, the delivery rate can be as high as 71%. PMID:24396551

  13. Drug Delivery--Select Biosciences Inaugural Summit. 2-4 September 2009, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Schiffelers, Raymond

    2009-11-01

    The Drug Delivery - Select Biosciences Inaugural Summit, held in London, included topics covering recent advances in delivery systems for the controlled release of small-molecule drugs and larger biologicals, particularly nucleic acids, peptides and proteins. This conference report highlights selected presentations on image-guided drug delivery; the delivery of nucleic acids, peptoids, peptides and proteins; and formulation and solubility research. Technological approaches discussed include polymeric nanomedicines, nucleic acid-based therapeutics, the solid-dose injector Glide SDA, polyamino acid-based nanocarriers, polylactide glycolic acid microspheres, and enhanced biopharmaceutical products such as CriticalMix and CriticalSorb, PolyPEG, microspheres and cell-penetrating peptides. PMID:19844850

  14. Multifunctional magnetic silica nanotubes for MR imaging and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Su, Wu

    2015-03-01

    A multifunctional drug delivery vehicle consisting of a tubular shaped silica host, a compact superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layer and a hyaluronic acid surface coating was developed as a theranostic platform, for in vivo MR imaging and magnetically guided/cancer targeted drug delivery. PMID:25656155

  15. Molecular Analysis of Drug Delivery Systems Controlled by Dissolution of the Polymer Carrier

    E-print Network

    Peppas, Nicholas A.

    -controlled drug delivery systems are characterized by a phase erosion of the polymer carrier that is associated swelling of the polymer carrier that is associated with simultaneous or subsequent dissolutionMolecular Analysis of Drug Delivery Systems Controlled by Dissolution of the Polymer Carrier BALAJI

  16. Future Directions in the Management of Pain by Intraspinal Drug Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary Bennett; Tim Deer; Stuart Du Pen; Richard Rauck; Tony Yaksh; Samuel J Hassenbusch

    2000-01-01

    Management of pain by intraspinal delivery of drugs enables physicians to target specific sites of action. While this novel approach is gaining increasing use, well-designed studies are needed. A major limitation is the lack of published information on existing drugs used for intrathecal delivery. (The strengths and weaknesses of this information are reviewed in the accompanying literature review article.) Promising

  17. Carbon nanotubes as functional excipients for nanomedicines: II. Drug delivery and biocompatibility issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marianna Foldvari; Mukasa Bagonluri

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have potential novel application in nanomedicine as biocompatible and supportive substrates, and as pharmaceutical excipients for creating versatile drug delivery systems. In the second part of this two-part review we focus on the application of CNTs as potential drug delivery systems via chemical functionalization of CNTs for exterior binding of therapeutic and biologically relevant molecules, and via

  18. Medical applications of membranes: Drug delivery, artificial organs and tissue engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimitrios F. Stamatialis; Bernke J. Papenburg; Miriam Gironés; Saiful Saiful; Srivatsa N. M. Bettahalli; Stephanie Schmitmeier; Matthias Wessling

    2008-01-01

    This paper covers the main medical applications of artificial membranes. Specific attention is given to drug delivery systems, artificial organs and tissue engineering which seem to dominate the interest of the membrane community this period. In all cases, the materials, methods and the current state of the art are evaluated and future prospects are discussed.Concerning drug delivery systems, attention is

  19. Further characterization of theobroma oil–beeswax admixtures as lipid matrices for improved drug delivery systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Attama; B. C. Schicke; C. C. Müller-Goymann

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in lipid based drug delivery systems due to factors such as better characterization of lipidic excipients and formulation versatility and the choice of different drug delivery systems. It is important to know the thermal characteristics, crystal habit, texture, and appearance of a new lipid matrix when determining its suitability for use in certain pharmaceutical application.

  20. Bioadhesive polymeric drug delivery systems for tumor targeting and tissue repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zohreh Amoozgar

    2011-01-01

    A drug delivery system refers to a dosage form that is able to control or modify the availability of the active ingredient to the body due to its construction as well as temporal or spatial arrangement. An efficient drug delivery system should localize treatment to diseased cells or the site of injury. This can be achieved by increasing the adhesion

  1. Role of nanotechnology in targeted drug delivery and imaging: a concise review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Otilia M. Koo; Israel Rubinstein; Hayat Onyuksel

    2005-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology in drug delivery and imaging in vivo is a rapidly expanding field. The emphases of this review are on biophysical attributes of the drug delivery and imaging platforms as well as the biological aspects that enable targeting of these platforms to injured and diseased tissues and cells. The principles of passive and active targeting of nanosized

  2. Nanovector-mediated drug delivery for spinal cord injury treatment.

    PubMed

    Caron, Ilaria; Papa, Simonetta; Rossi, Filippo; Forloni, Gianluigi; Veglianese, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the result of a traumatic primary event followed by a so-called secondary injury, which is characterized by a large spectrum of biochemical cellular pathways able to spread the lesion, worsening neurologic recovery. A growing number of potential therapeutic interventions to counteract different neurodegenerative mechanisms of SCI have been proposed, but they did not show relevant efficacy when translated as clinical treatments. Different reasons could explain these disappointing results: on one side the multifactorial evolution of SCI after the primary injury that limits the beneficial effect of just one targeted treatment and, on the other, the restricted access of pharmacological therapies to the spinal cord. For these reasons, recently, a growing interest has been shown in the development of alternative delivery strategies to administer drugs and/or biological/cellular therapies into the spine (hydrogel and nanoparticles). PMID:24845580

  3. A skin-contact-actuated micropump for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mousoulis, Charilaos; Ochoa, Manuel; Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Ziaie, Babak

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, a skin-contact-actuated dispenser/micropump for transdermal drug delivery applications is presented. The micropump consists of stacked polydimethylsiloxane layers mounted on a silicon substrate and operates based on the evaporation and condensation of a low-boiling-point liquid. Therefore, there is no need for a heater and a power source, since only the thermal energy provided by skin contact is required for the actuation. A prototype device with overall dimensions of 14 mm × 14 mm × 8 mm is fabricated and characterized. For a perfluoro compound working fluid (3M FC-3284), a flow rate of 28.8 ? L/min and a maximum back pressure of 28.9 kPa is measured. PMID:21317070

  4. Biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles in drug delivery for infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Landriscina, Angelo; Rosen, Jamie; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-05-01

    Increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance have left a significant gap in the standard antimicrobial armament. Nanotechnology holds promise as a new approach to combating resistant microbes. Chitosan, a form of deacetylated chitin, has been used extensively in medicine, agriculture and industry due to its ease of production, biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity. Chitosan has been studied extensively as a main structural component and additive for nanomaterials. Specifically, numerous studies have demonstrated its potent microbicidal activity and its efficacy as an adjuvant to vaccines, including mucosally administered vaccines. In this review, we present fundamental information about chitosan and chitosan nanoparticles as well as the most recent data about their antimicrobial mechanism and efficacy as a nanotechnology-based drug delivery system. PMID:26008195

  5. Therapeutic Ultrasound Enhancement of Drug Delivery to Soft Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, George; Wang, Peng; Lewis, George; Olbricht, William

    2009-04-01

    Effects of exposure to 1.58 MHz focused ultrasound on transport of Evans Blue Dye (EBD) in soft tissues are investigated when an external pressure gradient is applied to induce convective flow through the tissue. The magnitude of the external pressure gradient is chosen to simulate conditions in brain parenchyma during convection-enhanced drug delivery (CED) to the brain. EBD uptake and transport are measured in equine brain, avian muscle and agarose brain-mimicking phantoms. Results show that ultrasound enhances EBD uptake and transport, and the greatest enhancement occurs when the external pressure gradient is applied. The results suggest that exposure of the brain parenchyma to ultrasound could enhance penetration of material infused into the brain during CED therapy.

  6. pH-triggered drug release from biodegradable microwells for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Nagstrup, Johan; Gordon, Sarah; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Østergaard, Jesper; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette; Boisen, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Microwells fabricated from poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were evaluated for their application as an oral drug delivery system using the amorphous sodium salt of furosemide (ASSF) as a model drug. Hot embossing of PLLA resulted in fabrication of microwells with an inner diameter of 240 ?m and a height of 100 ?m. The microwells were filled with ASSF using a modified screen printing technique, followed by coating of the microwell cavities with a gastro-resistant lid of Eudragit® L100. The release behavior of ASSF from the coated microwells was investigated using a ?-Diss profiler and a UV imaging system, and under conditions simulating the changing environment of the gastrointestinal tract. Biorelevant gastric medium (pH 1.6) was employed, after which a change to biorelevant intestinal release medium (pH 6.5) was carried out. Both ?-Diss profiler and UV imaging release experiments showed that sealing of microwell cavities with an Eudragit® layer prevented drug release in biorelevant gastric medium. An immediate release of the ASSF from coated microwells was observed in the intestinal medium. This pH-triggered release behavior demonstrates the future potential of PLLA microwells as a site-specific oral drug delivery system. PMID:25981751

  7. Photoacoustic drug delivery: the effect of laser parameters on the spatial distribution of delivered drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, HanQun; Casperson, Lee W.; Shearin, Alan; Gregory, Kenton W.; Prahl, Scott A.

    1995-05-01

    Photoacoustic drug delivery is a technique for delivering drugs to localized areas by timing laser-induced pressure transients to coincide with a bolus of drug. This study explores the effects of target material, laser energy, absorption coefficient, fiber size, repetition rate, and number of pulses on the spatial distribution of delivered drug. A microsecond flash-lamp pumped dye laser delivered 30-100 mJ pulses through optical fibers with diameters of 300-1000 micrometers . Vapor bubbles were created 1-5 mm above clear gelatin targets submerged in mineral oil containing a hydrophobic dye (D&C Red#17). The absorption coefficient of the oil-dye solution was varied from 50-300 cm-1. Spatially unconfined geometry was investigated. We have found that while the dye can be driven a few millimeters into the gels in both the axial and radial directions, the penetration was less than 500 micrometers when the gel surface remained macroscopically undamaged. Increasing the distance between the fiber tip and target, or decreasing the pulse energy reduced the extend of the delivery.

  8. Advanced drug delivery systems of curcumin for cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Shyam S; Goel, Mehak; Aqil, Farrukh; Vadhanam, Manicka V; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-08-01

    Since ancient times, chemopreventive agents have been used to treat/prevent several diseases including cancer. They are found to elicit a spectrum of potent responses including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative, anticarcinogenic, and antiangiogenic activity in various cell cultures and some animal studies. Research over the past 4 decades has shown that chemopreventives affect a number of proteins involved in various molecular pathways that regulate inflammatory and carcinogenic responses in a cell. Various enzymes, transcription factors, receptors, and adhesion proteins are also affected by chemopreventives. Although, these natural compounds have shown significant efficacy in cell culture studies, they elicited limited efficacy in various clinical studies. Their introduction into the clinical setting is hindered largely by their poor solubility, rapid metabolism, or a combination of both, ultimately resulting in poor bioavailability upon oral administration. Therefore, to circumvent these limitations and to ease their transition to clinics, alternate strategies should be explored. Drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microemulsions, and polymeric implantable devices are emerging as one of the viable alternatives that have been shown to deliver therapeutic concentrations of various potent chemopreventives such as curcumin, ellagic acid, green tea polyphenols, and resveratrol into the systemic circulation. In this review article, we have attempted to provide a comprehensive outlook for these delivery approaches, using curcumin as a model agent, and discussed future strategies to enable the introduction of these highly potent chemopreventives into a physician's armamentarium. PMID:21546540

  9. Molecular vehicles for mitochondrial chemical biology and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rin Jean, Sae; Tulumello, David V; Wisnovsky, Simon P; Lei, Eric K; Pereira, Mark P; Kelley, Shana O

    2014-02-21

    The mitochondria within human cells play a major role in a variety of critical processes involved in cell survival and death. An understanding of mitochondrial involvement in various human diseases has generated an appreciable amount of interest in exploring this organelle as a potential drug target. As a result, a number of strategies to probe and combat mitochondria-associated diseases have emerged. Access to mitochondria-specific delivery vectors has allowed the study of biological processes within this intracellular compartment with a heightened level of specificity. In this review, we summarize the features of existing delivery vectors developed for targeting probes and therapeutics to this highly impermeable organelle. We also discuss the major applications of mitochondrial targeting of bioactive molecules, which include the detection and treatment of oxidative damage, combating bacterial infections, and the development of new therapeutic approaches for cancer. Future directions include the assessment of the therapeutic benefit achieved by mitochondrial targeting for treatment of disease in vivo. In addition, the availability of mitochondria-specific chemical probes will allow the elucidation of the details of biological processes that occur within this cellular compartment. PMID:24410267

  10. Advanced Drug-Delivery Systems of Curcumin for Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shyam S.; Goel, Mehak; Aqil, Farrukh; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2011-01-01

    From ancient times, chemopreventive agents have been used to treat/prevent several diseases, including cancer. They are found to elicit a spectrum of potent responses including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-angiogenic activity in various cell culture and some animal studies. Research over the past four decades has shown that chemopreventives affect a number of proteins involved in various molecular pathways that regulate inflammatory and carcinogenic responses in a cell. Various enzymes, transcription factors, receptors, and adhesion proteins are also affected by chemopreventives. Although, these natural compounds have shown significant efficacy in cell-culture studies, they elicited limited efficacy in various clinical studies. Their introduction into the clinical setting is hindered largely by their poor solubility, rapid metabolism, or a combination of both, ultimately resulting in poor bioavailability upon oral administration. Therefore, to circumvent these limitations and to ease their transition to clinics, alternate strategies should be explored. Drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microemulsions, and polymeric implantable devices are emerging as one of the viable alternatives that have been demonstrated to deliver therapeutic concentrations of various potent chemopreventives such as curcumin, ellagic acid, green tea polyphenols, and resveratrol into the systemic circulation. In this review article, we have attempted to provide a comprehensive outlook for these delivery approaches, using curcumin as a model agent, and discussed future strategies to enable the introduction of these highly potent chemopreventives into a physician’s armamentarium. PMID:21546540

  11. Nanoparticulate drug delivery platforms for advancing bone infection therapies

    PubMed Central

    Uskokovi?, Vuk; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The ongoing surge of resistance of bacterial pathogens to antibiotic therapies and the consistently aging median member of the human race signal an impending increase in the incidence of chronic bone infection. Nanotechnological platforms for local and sustained delivery of therapeutics hold the greatest potential for providing minimally invasive and maximally regenerative therapies for this rare but persistent condition. Areas covered Shortcomings of the clinically available treatment options, including poly(methyl methacrylate) beads and calcium sulfate cements, are discussed and their transcending using calcium-phosphate/polymeric nanoparticulate composites is foreseen. Bone is a composite wherein the weakness of each component alone is compensated for by the strength of its complement and an ideal bone substitute should be fundamentally the same. Expert opinion Discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo bioactivity assessments is highlighted, alongside the inherent imperfectness of the former. Challenges entailing the cross-disciplinary nature of engineering a new generation of drug delivery vehicles are delineated and it is concluded that the future for the nanoparticulate therapeutic carriers belongs to multifunctional, synergistic and theranostic composites capable of simultaneously targeting, monitoring and treating internal organismic disturbances in a smart, feedback fashion and in direct response to the demands of the local environment. PMID:25109804

  12. Symmetrical diamidate prodrugs of nucleotide analogues for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pertusati, Fabrizio; McGuigan, Christopher; Serpi, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    The use of pronucleotides to circumvent the well-known drawbacks of nucleotide analogs has played a significant role in the area of antiviral and anticancer drug delivery. Several motifs have been designed to mask the negative charges on the phosphorus moiety of either nucleoside monophosphates or nucleoside phosphonates, in order to increase their hydrophobicity and allow entry of the compound into the cell. Among them the bis-amidate analogs, having two identical amino acids as masking groups through a P-N bond, represent a more recent approach for the delivery of nucleotide analogs, endowed with antiviral or anticancer activity. Different synthetic strategies are commonly used for preparing phosphorodiamidates of nucleosides. In this protocol, we would like to focus on the description of the synthetic methodology that in our hand gave the best results using 2'-3'-didehydro-2'-3'-dideoxythymidine (d4T, Stavudine) as model nucleoside. A second strategy for preparing diamidates of nucleoside phosphonates will be reported using {[2-(6-amino-9 H-purin-9-yl)ethoxy]methyl}phosphonic acid (PMEA, adefovir) as model substrate. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:25754890

  13. Polyelectrolyte Nanogels Decorated with Monoclonal Antibody for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nukolova, Nataliya V.; Yang, Zigang; Kim, Jong Oh; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2010-01-01

    Novel surface-functionalized cross-linked nanogels were developed as a platform to allow conjugation of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for targeted drug delivery. Well-defined diblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEG-b-PMA) with PEG terminal aldehyde functionality were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and characterized by GPC and 1H NMR. These copolymers were used to prepare nanogels via condensation of PEG-b-PMA with Ca2+ ions into micelle-like aggregates, cross-linking of the PMA/Ca2+ cores and removal of Ca2+ ions. The resulting nanogels represent highly swollen spherical polyelectrolyte particles with free terminal aldehyde functionalities at the nonionic PEG chains. A reductive amination reaction between aldehyde groups and amino groups of mAb resulted in effective conjugation to the nanogels of mAb CC49 against tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG-72). The mAb retained the binding affinity to bovine submaxillary mucin after conjugation as shown by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Therefore, aldehyde functionalized nanogels can be linked to mAb using a simple, one-step approach. They may have potential for targeted delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to tumors. PMID:21503276

  14. Two Photon Polymerization of Microneedles for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gittard, Shaun D.; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Chichkov, Boris N.; Doraiswamy, Anand; Narayan, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Microneedles are small-scale devices that are finding use for transdermal delivery of protein-based pharmacologic agents and nucleic acid-based pharmacologic agents; however, microneedles prepared using conventional microelectronics-based technologies have several shortcomings, which have limited translation of these devices into widespread clinical use. Areas covered in this review Two photon polymerization is a laser-based rapid prototyping technique that has been recently used for direct fabrication of hollow microneedles with a wide variety of geometries. In addition, an indirect rapid prototyping method that involves two photon polymerization and polydimethyl siloxane micromolding has been used for fabrication of solid microneedles with exceptional mechanical properties. What the reader will gain In this review, the use of two photon polymerization for fabricating in-plane and out-of-plane hollow microneedle arrays is described. The use of two photon polymerization-micromolding for fabrication of solid microneedles is also reviewed. In addition, fabrication of microneedles with antimicrobial properties is discussed; antimicrobial microneedles may reduce the risk of infection associated with formation of channels through the stratum corneum. Take home message It is anticipated that the use of two photon polymerization as well as two photon polymerization-micromolding for fabrication of microneedles and other microstructured drug delivery devices will increase over the coming years. PMID:20205601

  15. An update on the application of physical technologies to enhance intradermal and transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Herwadkar, Anushree; Banga, Ajay K

    2012-03-01

    A large number of biopharmaceuticals and other macromolecules are being developed for therapeutic applications. Conventional oral delivery is not always possible due to first-pass metabolism and degradation in the GI tract. Parenteral delivery is invasive and has poor patient compliance. Transdermal delivery provides one attractive route of administration. Transdermal administration can achieve the continuous and non-invasive delivery of drugs. However, passive transdermal delivery is restricted to small lipophilic molecules. Active physical-enhancement technologies are being investigated to increase the scope of transdermal delivery to hydrophilic molecules and macromolecules. Recent developments in transdermal technologies, such as microporation, iontophoresis and sonophoresis can enable therapeutic delivery of many drug molecules, biopharmaceuticals, cosmeceuticals and vaccines. This review provides an update of recent developments in transdermal delivery focusing on physical-enhancement technologies. PMID:22833994

  16. Surface-functionalized diatom microcapsules for drug delivery of water-insoluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Aw, Moom Sinn; Bariana, Manpreet; Yu, Yang; Addai-Mensah, Jonas; Losic, Dusan

    2013-08-01

    Naturally available and biocompatible materials are potential substitutes for synthetic mesoporous materials as suitable drug carriers for the development of cost-effective drug delivery systems. This work investigates the application of a porous silica material derived from diatoms, also known as diatomaceous earth. The aim is to explore the surface functionalization of diatom microcapsules and their impact on the drug loading and release characteristics of water-insoluble drugs. Indomethacin was used as the model for poorly soluble drug. The surface modification on diatoms was performed with two organosilanes; 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane and N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl) ethylene diamine and phosphonic acids (2-carboxyethyl-phosphonic acid and 16-phosphono-hexadecanoic acid) providing organic surface hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties. Extensive characterizations using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry was performed to confirm covalent grafting of monolayer aminosilane and phosphonic acid on the diatom surfaces. Differences in loading capacity of diatoms (15-24%) and release time (6-15 days) were observed which is due to the presence of different functional groups on the surface. It was found that 2-carboxyethyl-phosphonic acid, 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane and N-(3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl) ethylene diamine render diatom surfaces hydrophilic, due to polar carboxyl functional group (COOH) and active amine species (NH and NH2) that favor drug adsorption; better encapsulation efficiency and prolonged release of drugs, over the hydrophobic surface created by 16-phosphono-hexadecanoic acid. This work demonstrates diatom porous silica as a promising drug carrier, with possibility to further improve their performances by tailoring their surface functionalities to achieve the required drug loading and release characteristics for different therapeutic conditions. PMID:22457043

  17. Drug delivery systems--2. Site-specific drug delivery utilizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ranade, V V

    1989-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are purified antibodies produced by a single clone of cells. They are engineered to recognize and bind to a single specific antigen. Accordingly, when administered, MAbs home in on a particular circulating protein or on cells that bear the correct antigenic signature on their surfaces. It is the specificity of MAbs that has made them valuable tools for health professions. Following the discovery of Kohler and Milstein regarding the method of somatic cell hybridization, a number of investigators have successfully adopted this technique to obtain T-lymphocyte hybrid cell lines by fusion of activated T (thymus derived) lymphocytes with a T lymphoma cell line leading to an immortalization of a specific differentiated function. The hybrids thus obtained were subsequently shown to produce homogeneous effector molecules with a wide variety of immune functions such as enhancement or suppression of antibody responses, generation of helper T cells, suppressor T cells and cytotoxic T cells. Study of these regulatory molecules has been further shown to provide a greater insight into the genetic, biochemical and molecular mechanisms responsible for cellular development, and the interaction and triggering of various cell types. The successful application of hybridoma technology has now resulted into several advances in the understanding the mechanism and treatment of diseases, especially cancer and development of vaccines, promotion of organ transplantation and therapy against parasites as well. Since monoclonal antibodies could be made in unlimited supply, they have been used in genetic studies such as mRNA and gene isolation, chromosomal isolation of specific genes, immunoglobulin structure, detection of new or rare immunoglobulin gene products, structural studies of enzymes and other proteins and structural and population studies of protein polymorphisms. In some instances, the monoclonal antibodies have been found to replace conventional antisera for studies of chromosome structure and function, gene mapping, embryogenesis, characterization and biosynthesis of developmental and differentiation antigens. These antigens are those that are specific for various cell types and tissues, species specific antigen, antigens involved in chemotaxis, immunogenetics and clinical genetics including genetically inherited disorders, chromosome aberrations and transplantation antigens. Besides these monoclonal antibodies, their complexes have recently been investigated as exquisitely sensitive probes to be guided to target cells or organs. They have been used to deliver cytotoxic drugs to malignant cells or enzymes to specific cell types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2687335

  18. Assembling nanoparticle coatings to improve the drug delivery performance of lipid based colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Barnes, Timothy J.; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A.

    2012-02-01

    Lipid based colloids (e.g. emulsions and liposomes) are widely used as drug delivery systems, but often suffer from physical instabilities and non-ideal drug encapsulation and delivery performance. We review the application of engineered nanoparticle layers at the interface of lipid colloids to improve their performance as drug delivery systems. In addition we focus on the creation of novel hybrid nanomaterials from nanoparticle-lipid colloid assemblies and their drug delivery applications. Specifically, nanoparticle layers can be engineered to enhance the physical stability of submicron lipid emulsions and liposomes, satbilise encapsulated active ingredients against chemical degradation, control molecular transport and improve the dermal and oral delivery characteristics, i.e. increase absorption, bioavailability and facilitate targeted delivery. It is feasible that hybrid nanomaterials composed of nanoparticles and colloidal lipids are effective encapsulation and delivery systems for both poorly soluble drugs and biological drugs and may form the basis for the next generation of medicines. Additional pre-clinical research including specific animal model studies are required to advance the peptide/protein delivery systems, whereas the silica lipid hybrid systems have now entered human clinical trials for poorly soluble drugs.

  19. Functionalized nanoparticles for AMF-induced gene and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Souvik

    The properties and broad applications of nano-magnetic colloids have generated much interest in recent years. Specially, Fe3O4 nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention since their magnetic properties can be used for hyperthermia treatment or drug targeting. For example, enhanced levels of intracellular gene delivery can be achieved using Fe3O4 nano-vectors in the presence of an external magnetic field, a process known as 'magnetofection'. The low cytotoxicity, tunable particle size, ease of surface functionalization, and ability to generate thermal energy using an external alternating magnetic field (AMF) are properties have propelled Fe3O4 research to the forefront of nanoparticle research. The strategy of nanoparticle-mediated, AMF-induced heat generation has been used to effect intracellular hyperthermia. One application of this 'magnetic hyperthermia' is heat activated local delivery of a therapeutic effector (e.g.; drug or polynucleotide). This thesis describes the development of a magnetic nano-vector for AMF-induced, heat-activated pDNA and small molecule delivery. The use of heat-inducible vectors, such as heat shock protein ( hsp) genes, is a promising mode of gene therapy that would restrict gene expression to a local region by focusing a heat stimulus only at a target region. We thus aimed to design an Fe3O4 nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer vehicle for AMF-induced localized gene expression. We opted to use 'click' oximation techniques to assemble the magnetic gene transfer vector. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis, characterization, and transfection studies of the oxime ether lipid-based nano-magnetic vectors MLP and dMLP. The synthesis and characterization of a novel series of quaternary ammonium aminooxy reagents (2.1--2.4) is described. These cationic aminooxy compounds were loaded onto nanoparticles for ligation with carbonyl groups and also to impart a net positive charge on the nanoparticle surface. Our studies indicated that the non-toxic magnetoplexes (magnetic nanoparticle + pDNA complex) derived from dMLP deliver pDNA into mammalian cells even without external magnetic assistance. To date, dMLP is the only polymer-free magnetic gene delivery system that can deliver pDNA without any magnetic assistance. Chapter 3 of this thesis outlines the synthesis and characterization of other oxime ether lipids and details studies using derived-lipoplexes. These lipids were evaluated in pDNA and siRNA transfection studies in various mammalian cell lines. This work constitutes the first use of an oxime ether as the linking domain in cationic transfection lipids. These biocompatible oxime ether lipids can be readily assembled by click chemistry through ligation of hydrophobic aldehydes with quaternary ammonium aminooxy salts. Our studies showed that the oxime ether lipids transfected pDNA and siRNA efficiently in MCF-7, H 1792, and in PAR C10 cells comparable to and in some cases better than commercial transfection lipids. Chapter 4 describes the design and characterization of a nano-magnetic delivery system for AMF-induced drug (doxorubicin) release. In efforts to develop a magnetic formulation free from thermosensitive materials, such as hydrogels, we synthesized three nanoparticle-based doxorubicin formulations using charge interactions as the key associative force. To do so, we synthesized and characterized a novel cationic oxime ether conjugate at C-13 of doxorubicin. Our investigation indicated that the positive charge of the oxime ether drug conjugate tended to bind better to the negatively charged nanoparticle than did the other formulations prepared in stepwise manner. Our findings show that the nano-magnetic formulations remained essestially inactive at body temperature (37.5 °C) and released a majority of the cargo only when exposed to an external AMF. Our designed magnetic drug delivery platform is the first example of an AMF-inducible system that does not depend on the inclusion of thermosensitive materials. Finally, we have developed a bioanalytical application of the highly chemosele

  20. Magnetic and fluorescent multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles as a smart drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linlin; Chen, Dong; Zhang, Yanqi; Deng, Zhengtao; Ren, Xiangling; Meng, Xianwei; Tang, Fangqiong; Ren, Jun; Zhang, Lin

    2007-10-01

    An innovative drug delivery system based on magnetic and fluorescent multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles was developed, which combined magnetic targeting, fluorescent imaging and stimulus-responsive drug release properties into one drug delivery system. Water-soluble superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and pharmaceutical drugs were simultaneously incorporated into chitosan nanoparticles; cross-linking the composite particles with glutaraldehyde tailored their size, morphology, surface properties and drug release behaviors. The system showed superparamagnetic and strong fluorescent properties, and was used as a controlled drug release vehicle, which showed pH-sensitive drug release over a long time. The composite magnetic and fluorescent chitosan nanoparticles are potential candidates as a smart drug delivery system.

  1. Experimentation of electrostatically actuated monochip micropump for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilhan, Monique; Tasselli, Josiane; Esteve, Daniel; Temple-Boyer, Pierre; Camon, Henri; Anduze, Marc; Colin, Stephane

    1999-03-01

    The objective of the MICROMED CNRS project is the design of a complete microsystem usable in the treatment in vivo of hypertensives. The microsystem which corresponds with this objective includes different elements such as pressure sensors, a drug reservoir, a monitoring chip and a drug delivery system that necessitates the use of a dosing micropump able to deliver daily does of few microliters in several shots. We will focus here on the micropump:microfabrication technology, assembly and test. The fact that the fluid actuating membrane, the input and output fluid gates, and the two passive microvalues are together on a single silicon chip of 1 cm3 area makes this pump original. The fabrication technology combines the techniques of microelectronics and MEMS: micromachining for the square membrane and the fluid gates, sacrificial oxide layers and LPCVD polysilicon deposition for the microvalves. The assembly of the different parts is based on existing techniques like anodic bonding, gluing with adhesive films...we have investigated the fabrication of the micro pump with an electrostatic actuation. Tests are in progress for the first prototypes on a specific experimentation set- up in order to: (i) study the flowing of different fluids into the pump, (ii) study the directionality of the valves by plotting the flow rate/pressure (Phi) (P) diagram, (iii) study the pump functionality.

  2. Drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye for pharmacologic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shalin S; Denham, Lori Vidal; Elison, Jasmine R; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Clement, Christian; Huq, Tashfin; Hill, James M

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of diseases of the posterior segment of the eye, such as age-related macular degeneration, cytomegalovirus retinitis, diabetic retinopathy, posterior uveitis and retinitis pigmentosa, requires novel drug delivery systems that can overcome the many barriers for efficacious delivery of therapeutic drug concentrations. This challenge has prompted the development of biodegradable and nonbiodegradable sustained-release systems for injection or transplantation into the vitreous as well as drug-loaded nanoparticles, microspheres and liposomes. These drug delivery systems utilize topical, systemic, subconjunctival, intravitreal, transscleral and iontophoretic routes of administration. The focus of research has been the development of methods that will increase the efficacy of spatiotemporal drug application, resulting in more successful therapy for patients with posterior segment diseases. This article summarizes recent advances in the research and development of drug delivery methods of the posterior chamber of the eye, with an emphasis on the use of implantable devices as well as micro- and nanoparticles. PMID:20305803

  3. Biodegradable thermoresponsive polymeric magnetic nanoparticles: a new drug delivery platform for doxorubicin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nidhi Andhariya; Bhupendra Chudasama; R. V. Mehta; R. V. Upadhyay

    2011-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles as drug delivery systems for anticancer therapeutics has great potential to revolutionize the future\\u000a of cancer therapy. The aim of this study is to construct a novel drug delivery platform comprising a magnetic core and biodegradable\\u000a thermoresponsive shell of tri-block-copolymer. Oleic acid-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles and hydrophilic anticancer drug “doxorubicin” are encapsulated with PEO–PLGA–PEO (polyethylene oxide–poly d,

  4. Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems for Enhanced Drug Penetration into Solid Tumors: Current Progress and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Carolyn L.; Roth, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Poor penetration of anticancer drugs into solid tumors significantly limits their efficacy. This phenomenon has long been observed for small-molecule chemotherapeutics, and it can be even more pronounced for nanoscale therapies. Nanoparticles have enormous potential for the treatment of cancer due to their wide applicability as drug delivery and imaging vehicles and their size-dependent accumulation into solid tumors by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Further, synthetic nanoparticles can be engineered to overcome barriers to drug delivery. Despite their promise for the treatment of cancer, relatively little work has been done to study and improve their ability to diffuse into solid tumors following passive accumulation in the tumor vasculature. In this review, we present the complex issues governing efficient penetration of nanoscale therapies into solid tumors. The current methods available to researchers to study nanoparticle penetration into malignant tumors are described, and the most recent works studying the penetration of nanoscale materials into solid tumors are summarized. We conclude with an overview of the important nanoparticle design parameters governing their tumor penetration, as well as by highlighting critical directions in this field. PMID:22428797

  5. Applications of mesoporous materials as excipients for innovative drug delivery and formulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shou-Cang; Ng, Wai Kiong; Chia, Leonard Sze Onn; Dong, Yuan-Cai; Tan, Reginald Beng Hee

    2013-01-01

    Due to uniquely ordered nanoporous structure and high surface area as well as large pore volume, mesoporous materials have exhibited excellent performance in both controlled drug delivery with sustained release profiles and formulation of poorly aqueoussoluble drugs with enhanced bioavailability. Compared with other bulk excipients, mesoporous materials could achieve a higher loading of active ingredients and a tunable drug release profile, as the high surface density of surface hydroxyl groups offered versatility to be functionalized. With drug molecules stored in nano sized channels, the pore openings could be modified using functional polymers or nano-valves performing as stimuli-responsive release devices and the drug release could be triggered by environmental changes or other external effects. In particular, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted much attention for application in functional target drug delivery to the cancer cell. The smart nano-vehicles for drug delivery have showed obvious improvements in the therapeutic efficacy for tumor suppression as compared with conventional sustained release systems, although further progress is still needed for eventual clinical applications. Alternatively, unmodified mesoporous silica also exhibited feasible application for direct formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs to enhance dissolution rate, solubility and thus increase the bioavailability after administration. In summary, mesoporous materials offer great versatility that can be used both for on-demand oral and local drug delivery, and scientists are making great efforts to design and fabricate innovative drug delivery systems based on mesoporous drug carriers. PMID:23470004

  6. The Benefits and Challenges Associated with the Use of Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cukierman, Edna; Khan, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Drug Delivery Systems as nanocarriers for chemotherapeutic agents can improve the pharmacological properties of drugs by altering drug pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Among the many drug delivery systems available, both micelles and liposomes have gained the most attention in recent years due to their clinical success. There are several formulations of these nanocarrier systems in various stages of clinical trials, as well as currently clinically approved liposomal-based drugs. In this review, we discuss these drug carrier systems, as well as current efforts that are being made in order to further improve their delivery efficacy through the incorporation of targeting ligands. In addition, this review discusses aspects of drug resistance attributed to the remodeling of the extracellular matrix that occurs during tumor development and progression, as well as to the acidic, hypoxic, and glucose deprived tumor microenvironment. Finally, we address future prospective approaches to overcoming drug resistance by further modifications made to these drug delivery systems, as well as the possibility of coencapsulation/coadministration of various drugs aimed to surmount some of these microenvironmental-influenced obstacles for efficacious drug delivery in chemotherapy. PMID:20417189

  7. Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: The Importance of Drug, Delivery, and Therapeutic Outcome.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Robert L

    2012-02-22

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in the treatment of pain associated with a variety of indications, including arthritic conditions, but their usefulness is often limited by dose-dependent adverse events (AEs), such as gastrointestinal disturbances, cardiovascular events, and renal toxicity. The risk of such effects could be reduced by the use of topical formulations, which offer the potential to deliver analgesic concentrations locally, at the site of inflammation, while minimizing systemic concentrations. The topical preparations currently approved in the United States are diclofenac sodium 1.5% topical solution (containing dimethyl sulfoxide as a penetration enhancer), diclofenac sodium gel 1%, and a diclofenac hydroxyethylpyrrolidine 1.3% patch. Each of these topical NSAIDs provide drug delivery to subcutaneous tissues for the management of pain associated with osteoarthritis or soft-tissue injuries. Furthermore, these formulations are not significantly associated with the systemic AEs associated with oral NSAIDs; the most common AEs associated with topical formulations are local skin reactions, which are usually mild and self-limiting. Other topical NSAID preparations approved in the European Union include ibuprofen creams and gels, ketoprofen gel, felbinac gel and cutaneous foam, and piroxicam gel. Meta-analyses have confirmed the efficacy and safety of these preparations. However, it is important to recognize that pharmacokinetic absorption from topical formulations can vary markedly, even between different formulations of the same drug, depending on the agent, the underlying disorder, and the site of application. It is therefore essential to consider the patient, the drug, and the drug delivery mechanism when selecting a topical NSAID preparation. PMID:22367354

  8. Novel nanocarriers for topical drug delivery: investigating delivery efficiency and distribution in skin using two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirejev, Vladimir; Guldbrand, Stina; Bauer, Brigitte; Smedh, Maria; Ericson, Marica B.

    2011-03-01

    The complex structure of skin represents an effective barrier against external environmental factors, as for example, different chemical and biochemical compounds, yeast, bacterial and viral infections. However, this impermeability prevents efficient transdermal drug delivery which limits the number of drugs that are able to penetrate the skin efficiently. Current trends in drug application through skin focus on the design and use of nanocarriers for transport of active compounds. The transport systems applied so far have several drawbacks, as they often have low payload, high toxicity, a limited variability of inclusion molecules, or long degradation times. The aim of these current studies is to investigate novel topical drug delivery systems, e.g. nanocarriers based on cyclic oligosaccharides - cyclodextrins (CD) or iron (III)-based metal-organic frameworks (MOF). Earlier studies on cell cultures imply that these drug nanocarriers show promising characteristics compared to other drug delivery systems. In our studies, we use two-photon microscopy to investigate the ability of the nanocarriers to deliver compounds through ex-vivo skin samples. Using near infrared light for excitation in the so called optical window of skin allows deep-tissue visualization of drug distribution and localization. In addition, it is possible to employ two-photon based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of drug distribution and concentrations in different cell layers.

  9. Bioadhesive polymers as platforms for oral controlled drug delivery III: oral delivery of chlorothiazide using a bioadhesive polymer.

    PubMed

    Longer, M A; Ch'ng, H S; Robinson, J R

    1985-04-01

    Bioadhesive polymers that bind to the gastric mucin or epithelial cell surface are useful in drug delivery for the purposes of (a) retaining a dosage from in the GI tract and (b) increasing the intimacy and duration of contact of drug with the absorbing membrane. Polycarbophil has previously been shown to have bioadhesive properties in the rat stomach and small intestine and was employed in the present study with a sustained-release delivery system to demonstrate improved drug delivery. Using chlorothiazide as the model drug, drug containing albumin beads were prepared and used as the sustained-release system. The beads were physically mixed with equally sized particles of polycarbophil and placed in a capsule to produce a bioadhesive dosage form. When the dosage form contacts the stomach, the gelatin capsule dissolves, exposing the polycarbophil to the bathing fluid. The bioadhesive polymer rapidly hydrates, retaining the albumin beads and attaching to the mucin coating of the stomach. Plasma drug levels in rats showed a longer duration of action and greater bioavailability for the bioadhesive dosage form than for either albumin beads or drug powder alone. The results suggest that the principle of bioadhesion can significantly improve therapy, due to a reduced rate of gastric emptying, an increase in contact time, and the intimacy of contact of the drug with the absorbing membrane. PMID:3999000

  10. Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimer-Drug Conjugates with Disulfide Linkages for Intracellular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoglu, Yunus E.; Navath, Raghavendra S.; Wang, Bing; Kannan, Sujatha; Romero, Robert; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding and improving drug release kinetics from dendrimer-drug conjugates is a key step to improving their in vivo efficacy. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is an anti-inflammatory agent with significant potential for clinical use in the treatment of neuroinflammation, stroke and cerebral palsy. There is a need for delivery of NAC which can enhance its efficacy, reduce dosage and prevent it from binding plasma proteins. For this purpose, a poly(amidoamine) dendrimer-NAC conjugate that contains a disulfide linkage was synthesized and evaluated for its release kinetics in the presence of glutathione (GSH), Cysteine (Cys), and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at both physiological and lysosomal pH. The results indicate that the prepared conjugate can deliver ~60% of its NAC payload within 1 hour at intracellular GSH concentrations at physiological pH, whereas the conjugate did not release any drug at plasma GSH levels. The stability of the conjugate in the presence of bovine serum albumin at plasma concentrations was also demonstrated. The efficacy of the dendrimer-NAC conjugate was measured in activated microglial cells (target cells in vivo) using the reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay. The conjugates showed an order of magnitude increase in anti-oxidant activity compared to free drug. When combined with intrinsic and ligand-based targeting with dendrimers, these types of GSH sensitive nanodevices can lead to improved drug release profiles and in vivo efficacy. PMID:19171376

  11. Polymeric micelles with water-insoluble drug as hydrophobic moiety for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolin; Liu, Jinyao; Pang, Yan; Wang, Ruibin; Mao, Limin; Yan, Deyue; Zhu, Xinyuan; Sun, Jian

    2011-06-13

    The hydrophobic block of polymeric micelles formed by amphiphilic copolymers has no direct therapeutical effect, and the metabolites of these hydrophobic segments might lead to some unexpected side effects. Here the hydrophobic core of polymeric micelles is replaced by highly water-insoluble drugs themselves, forming a new micellar drug delivery system. By grafting hydrophobic drugs of paclitaxel (PTX) onto the surface of hydrophilic hyperbranched poly(ether-ester) (HPEE), we constructed an amphiphilic copolymer (HPEE-PTX). HPEE-PTX could self-assemble into micellar nanoparticles in aqueous solution with tunable drug contents from 4.1 to 10.7%. Moreover, the hydrolysis of HPEE-PTX in serum resulted in the cumulative release of PTX. In vivo evaluation indicated that the dosage toleration of PTX in mice had been improved greatly and HPEE-PTX micellar nanoparticles could be used as an efficient prodrug with satisfactory therapeutical effect. We believe that most of the lipophilic drugs could improve their characters through this strategy. PMID:21568262

  12. Drug Delivery Innovations for Enhancing the Anticancer Potential of Vitamin E Isoforms and Their Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Neophytou, Christiana M.; Constantinou, Andreas I.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin E isoforms have been extensively studied for their anticancer properties. Novel drug delivery systems (DDS) that include liposomes, nanoparticles, and micelles are actively being developed to improve Vitamin E delivery. Furthermore, several drug delivery systems that incorporate Vitamin E isoforms have been synthesized in order to increase the bioavailability of chemotherapeutic agents or to provide a synergistic effect. D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (Vitamin E TPGS or TPGS) is a synthetic derivative of natural alpha-tocopherol which is gaining increasing interest in the development of drug delivery systems and has also shown promising anticancer effect as a single agent. This review provides a summary of the properties and anticancer effects of the most potent Vitamin E isoforms and an overview of the various formulations developed to improve their efficacy, with an emphasis on the use of TPGS in drug delivery approaches. PMID:26137487

  13. In vitro assessment of drug delivery through an endotracheal tube using a dry powder inhaler delivery system.

    PubMed Central

    Everard, M. L.; Devadason, S. G.; Le Souëf, P. N.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Jet nubulisers and metered dose inhalers are widely used to deliver aerosolised drugs to the lungs of intubated patients in adult intensive care units. Drug delivery using these systems has been shown to be inefficient and both forms of delivery have the potential to induce paradoxical bronchoconstriction in patients with reactive airways disease. METHODS: Experiments were carried out to determine whether it was possible to deliver drug from a dry powder delivery system through an endotracheal tube. A 200 micrograms budesonide Turbohaler was enclosed in a chamber which allowed it to be inserted into a ventilator circuit. Experiments were performed with a multistage liquid impinger in which drug was drawn through the Turbohaler and endotracheal tube at 60 l/min providing an index of the maximum drug delivery achievable via this route. A second series of experiments was performed in which the Turbohaler was placed in a ventilator circuit using a Servo 900C volume cycled ventilator. Drug delivered from the Turbohaler during the inspiratory phase was collected on a filter placed between the end of a 9 mm endotracheal tube and a model lung. A tidal volume of 500 ml and inspiratory time of 0.5 seconds was used. Budesonide was assayed using an ultraviolet spectrophotometric assay. RESULTS: Thirty percent of the nominal dose passed through the endotracheal tube and was collected in the multistage liquid impinger. Mean drug delivery to the filter in the ventilator circuit was 20%. CONCLUSIONS: This in vitro study indicates that drugs from dry powder inhalers (in this case the Turbohaler) can be satisfactorily delivered through endotracheal tubes and that clinical evaluation of this technique is now indicated. Images PMID:8658374

  14. Design and characterization of a silk-fibroin-based drug delivery platform using naproxen as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Dyakonov, Tatyana; Yang, Chue Hue; Bush, Derek; Gosangari, Saujanya; Majuru, Shingai; Fatmi, Aqeel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to develop a platform for controlled drug delivery based on silk fibroin (SF) and to explore the feasibility of using SF in oral drug delivery. The SF-containing matrixes were prepared via spray-drying and film casting, and the release profile of the model drug naproxen sodium was evaluated. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to observe conformational changes in SF- and drug-containing compositions. SF-based films, spray-dried microparticles, and matrixes loaded with naproxen were prepared. Both FTIR spectra and in vitro dissolution data demonstrated that SF ?-sheet conformation regulates the release profile of naproxen. The controlled release characteristics of the SF-containing compositions were evaluated as a function of SF concentration, temperature, and exposure to dehydrating solvents. The results suggest that SF may be an attractive polymer for use in controlled drug delivery systems. PMID:22506122

  15. Macromolecular prodrugs based on synthetic polyaminoacids: drug delivery and drug targeting in antitumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Gennara; Pitarresi, Giovanna; Giammona, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    In the last twenty years a depth study on potential pharmaceutical applications of synthetic polymers at proteinlike structure as carrier for macromolecular prodrug production has been performed in academia and in industry. In particular ?,?-poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl)-DL-aspartamide (PHEA), ?,?-polyaspartylhydrazide (PAHy), poly(glutamic acid) (PGA), poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) and polylysine (PLL) have been extensively studied in this field. In the present review, the use of PHEA, PAHy, PGA as starting materials to prepare macromolecular prodrugs is reported and drug delivery and targeting aspects have been considered. PMID:21671863

  16. Development of bioadhesive chitosan superporous hydrogel composite particles based intestinal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Chavda, Hitesh; Modhia, Ishan; Mehta, Anant; Patel, Rupal; Patel, Chhagan

    2013-01-01

    Bioadhesive superporous hydrogel composite (SPHC) particles were developed for an intestinal delivery of metoprolol succinate and characterized for density, porosity, swelling, morphology, and bioadhesion studies. Chitosan and HPMC were used as bioadhesive and release retardant polymers, respectively. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to optimize the concentration of chitosan and HPMC. The drug loaded bioadhesive SPHC particles were filled in capsule, and the capsule was coated with cellulose acetate phthalate and evaluated for drug content, in vitro drug release, and stability studies. To ascertain the drug release kinetics, the drug release profiles were fitted for mathematical models. The prepared system remains bioadhesive up to eight hours in intestine and showed Hixson-Crowell release with anomalous nonfickian type of drug transport. The application of SPHC polymer particles as a biomaterial carrier opens a new insight into bioadhesive drug delivery system and could be a future platform for other molecules for intestinal delivery. PMID:23984380

  17. Development of Bioadhesive Chitosan Superporous Hydrogel Composite Particles Based Intestinal Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Modhia, Ishan; Mehta, Anant; Patel, Rupal; Patel, Chhagan

    2013-01-01

    Bioadhesive superporous hydrogel composite (SPHC) particles were developed for an intestinal delivery of metoprolol succinate and characterized for density, porosity, swelling, morphology, and bioadhesion studies. Chitosan and HPMC were used as bioadhesive and release retardant polymers, respectively. A 32 full factorial design was applied to optimize the concentration of chitosan and HPMC. The drug loaded bioadhesive SPHC particles were filled in capsule, and the capsule was coated with cellulose acetate phthalate and evaluated for drug content, in vitro drug release, and stability studies. To ascertain the drug release kinetics, the drug release profiles were fitted for mathematical models. The prepared system remains bioadhesive up to eight hours in intestine and showed Hixson-Crowell release with anomalous nonfickian type of drug transport. The application of SPHC polymer particles as a biomaterial carrier opens a new insight into bioadhesive drug delivery system and could be a future platform for other molecules for intestinal delivery. PMID:23984380

  18. The Role of Oral Controlled Release Matrix Tablets in Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nokhodchi, Ali; Raja, Shaista; Patel, Pryia; Asare-Addo, Kofi

    2012-01-01

    Formulations that are able to control the release of drug have become an integral part of the pharmaceutical industry. In particular oral drug delivery has been the focus of pharmaceutical research for many years. This type of drug delivery has been at the centre of research due to its many benefits over conventional dosage. The focus of this review is on matrix tablets due to their widely use and simplicity of the formulation. This includes the discussion of various types of matrix tablets and factors affecting the drug release from these formulations. The mechanism of drug release from HPMC matrices is also discussed. PMID:23678458

  19. "AND" logic gate regulated pH and reduction dual-responsive prodrug nanoparticles for efficient intracellular anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lan; Wang, Xiao-hui; Song, Fei; Wang, Xiu-li; Wang, Yu-zhong

    2015-01-01

    A dual-responsive drug delivery system simulating an AND logic gate is developed by core-cross-linking of a disulfide-containing anticancer prodrug with Cu(2+) for safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs. These prodrug nanoparticles are stable and exhibit nearly no premature drug release, and allow a fast drug release under simulated intracellular conditions, realizing a precise drug delivery towards cell nuclei. PMID:25383506

  20. Development of a Gas Empowered Drug Delivery system for peptide delivery in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, A M M; Avadi, M R; Ejtemaimehr, Sh; Abashzadeh, Sh; Partoazar, A; Dorkoosh, F; Faghihi, M; Rafiee-Tehrani, M; Junginger, H E

    2009-02-20

    The aim of this investigation was to design a novel Gas Empowered Drug Delivery (GEDD) system for CO(2) forced transport of peptide drugs together with mucoadhesive polymers to the surface of the small intestine. The GEDD effect of the core tablet was achieved using CO(2) gas to push insulin together with the mucoadhesive excipients poly(ethyleneoxide) (PEO) and the permeation enhancer trimethyl chitosan (TMC) to the surface of the small intestine. The in-vitro insulin release showed that almost 100% of the insulin was released from enterically coated tablets within 30 min at pH 6.8. The designed GEDD system was shown to increase the insulin transport by approximately 7 times in comparison with the free insulin across sheep's intestine ex-vivo. Three different peroral formulations were administered to male rabbits: F1 containing no TMC or PEO, F2 containing PEO but no TMC and F3 containing both PEO and TMC. The administrations of insulin using the formulation F1 resulted in a low FR value of 0.2%+/-0.1%, while the formulations F2 and F3 resulted in a much higher FR values of 0.6+/-0.2% and 1.1%+/-0.4%, respectively. Hence, the insulin permeation achieved by the GEDD system is primarily due to the enhancing effect of TMC and the mucoadhesive properties of PEO both of which synergistically increase the bioavailability of insulin. PMID:19014985