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Sample records for micro vapor cells

  1. Precision micro drilling with copper vapor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.J.; Martinez, M.W.; Warner, B.E.; Dragon, E.P.; Huete, G.; Solarski, M.E.

    1994-09-02

    The authors have developed a copper vapor laser based micro machining system using advanced beam quality control and precision wavefront tilting technologies. Micro drilling has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratio up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled on a variety of metals with good quality. For precision trepanned holes, the hole-to-hole size variation is typically within 1% of its diameter. Hole entrance and exit are both well defined with dimension error less than a few microns. Materialography of sectioned holes shows little (sub-micron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone with surface roughness within 1--2 microns.

  2. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Mark L. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Nakamura, Barbara J. (Inventor); Oconnor, Dennis E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  3. Vapor diffusion electrode improves fuel cell operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. O.

    1966-01-01

    Vapor diffusion type fuel cell electrode presents a nonwetting barrier to the liquid feedstocks so they may contact the electrolyte only in the vapor state. Thus, it effects feedstock mixing with the electrolyte at the electrolyte/catalyst interface but prevents feedstock decomposition and catalyst poisoning from liquid mingling.

  4. Improved cell for water-vapor electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aylward, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous-flow electrolytic cells decompose water vapor in steam and room air into hydrogen and oxygen. Sintered iridium oxide catalytic anode coating yields dissociation rates hundredfold greater than those obtained using platinum black. Cell consists of two mirror-image cells, with dual cathode sandwiched between two anodes. Gas traverses serpentine channels within cell and is dissociated at anode. Oxygen mingles with gas stream, while hydrogen migrates through porous matrix and is liberated as gas at cathode.

  5. Integrating Sphere Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Ben-Kish, Amit; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2010-03-01

    An integrating sphere is an optical multi-pass cavity that uses diffuse reflection to increase the optical path length. Typically applied in photometry and radiometry, integrating spheres have previously been used to detect trace gases and to cool and trap alkali-metal atoms. Here, we investigate the potential for integrating spheres to enhance optical absorption in optically thin alkali-metal vapor cells. In particular, we consider the importance of dielectric effects due to a glass container for the alkali-metal vapor. Potential applications include miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers, where multi-passing could reduce the operating temperature and power consumption.

  6. Micro-Tubular Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Michael C.; Anderson, Everett B.; Jayne, Karen D.; Woodman, Alan S.

    2004-01-01

    Micro-tubular fuel cells that would operate at power levels on the order of hundreds of watts or less are under development as alternatives to batteries in numerous products - portable power tools, cellular telephones, laptop computers, portable television receivers, and small robotic vehicles, to name a few examples. Micro-tubular fuel cells exploit advances in the art of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells. The main advantage of the micro-tubular fuel cells over the plate-and-frame fuel cells would be higher power densities: Whereas the mass and volume power densities of low-pressure hydrogen-and-oxygen-fuel plate-and-frame fuel cells designed to operate in the targeted power range are typically less than 0.1 W/g and 0.1 kW/L, micro-tubular fuel cells are expected to reach power densities much greater than 1 W/g and 1 kW/L. Because of their higher power densities, micro-tubular fuel cells would be better for powering portable equipment, and would be better suited to applications in which there are requirements for modularity to simplify maintenance or to facilitate scaling to higher power levels. The development of PEMFCs has conventionally focused on producing large stacks of cells that operate at typical power levels >5 kW. The usual approach taken to developing lower-power PEMFCs for applications like those listed above has been to simply shrink the basic plate-and-frame configuration to smaller dimensions. A conventional plate-and-frame fuel cell contains a membrane/electrode assembly in the form of a flat membrane with electrodes of the same active area bonded to both faces. In order to provide reactants to both electrodes, bipolar plates that contain flow passages are placed on both electrodes. The mass and volume overhead of the bipolar plates amounts to about 75 percent of the total mass and volume of a fuel-cell stack. Removing these bipolar plates in the micro-tubular fuel cell significantly increases the power density.

  7. Micro fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Hockaday, R.

    1998-12-31

    An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

  8. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude. PMID:17902946

  9. Micro-ablation with high power pulsed copper vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Knowles, M

    2000-07-17

    Visible and UV lasers with nanosecond pulse durations, diffraction-limited beam quality and high pulse repetition rates have demonstrated micro-ablation in a wide variety of materials with sub-micron precision and sub-micron-sized heat-affected zones. The copper vapour laser (CVL) is one of the important industrial lasers for micro-ablation applications. Manufacturing applications for the CVL include orifice drilling in fuel injection components and inkjet printers, micro-milling of micromoulds, via hole drilling in printed circuit boards and silicon machining. Recent advances in higher power (100W visible, 5W UV), diffraction-limited, compact CVLs are opening new possibilities for manufacturing with this class of nanosecond laser. PMID:19404369

  10. Micro cell isolation column for allergic diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Koichiro; Sakamoto, Kenji; Yanase, Yuhki; Hide, Michihiro; Miyake, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    We suggest a new micro cell isolation column of basophils for an allergic diagnostic system for detecting human basophils activations. Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensors using human basophils allow allergic diagnosis of less than 1 ml of peripheral blood. However, an isolation of basophils from a small amount of blood is not easy. In this study, we constructed a new micro cell isolation column for basophils with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microflow pass including magnetic particles. Furthermore, we determined whether leukocytes were captured by the micro cell isolation column from a small amount of blood. We can isolate basophils from other leukocytes by using the micro cell isolation column.

  11. Qualitative Evaluation of a Liquid-Vapor Separator Concept in Micro-Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elston, Levi J.; Yerkes, Kirk L.; Thomas, Scott K.; McQuillen, John

    2009-03-01

    An innovative liquid-vapor separator design has been incorporated into a spray cooling experiment, which was flown recently on the NASA C-9 reduced gravity aircraft. This design is the latest in a series of designs that have been flown in microgravity and elevated gravity in relation to an experimental investigation into spray cooling performance with regard to possible application to high-performance aircraft undergoing combat maneuvers. Initially, significant problems occurred during flight testing due to the inability of the reservoir to separate the liquid coolant from the vapor under microgravity conditions, which resulted in a loss of coolant to the simulated electronic device that was being spray cooled. Improvements in the design of the liquid-vapor separator are described in this paper, and experimental data showing the performance of several generations of liquid-vapor separators are presented. The final separator design went through more rigorous evaluation to compare performance at multiple fill levels, each with a higher percentage of vapor space within the reservoir. It was found that, using the final reservoir design, stable flow operation was achieved in micro-gravity for mass flowrates of m = 14, 17.5, and 21 [g/s].

  12. Vapor Corrosion Cell and Method of Using Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a vapor corrosion cell for a real-time and quantitative measurement of corrosion of conductive materials in atmospheres containing chemically reactive gases and water vapor. Two prototypes are provided. Also provided are various applications of this apparatus in industry.

  13. Soft Micro-Channels for Cell Culturing and Migration Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasirazgaleh, Sara

    Various techniques and methods have been studied and developed to aid nerve regeneration and repairing nerve injuries. Among all, nerve grafting is the gold standard for bridging the gap between the injured nerve stumps. Despite the advantages of this technique, there are also various drawbacks that have encouraged the exploration of alternative, less invasive methods for promoting nerve regeneration. In this thesis, we have fabricated soft micro-channels for cell culturing and migration studies which could act as an interface capable of long-term, reliable, and high-resolution stimulation device for nerve regeneration. Micro-channels fabrication is performed using a combination of photolithography technique and physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods. Initially, the surfaces of the micro-channels are treated with oxygen plasma to convert the surface of PDMS from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and to further provide an optimal environment for cells to adhere and grow. Next, in vitro studies were performed on the fabricated micro-channels to demonstrate feasibility of the platform to promote adherence and growth of PC12 cells (cell line derived from a pheochromocytomas of the rat adrenal medulla).

  14. Microfabricated atomic vapor cell arrays for magnetic field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Woetzel, S.; Schultze, V.; IJsselsteijn, R.; Schulz, T.; Anders, S.; Stolz, R.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2011-03-15

    We describe a method for charging atomic vapor cells with cesium and buffer gas. By this, it is possible to adjust the buffer gas pressure in the cells with good accuracy. Furthermore, we present a new design of microfabricated vapor cell arrays, which combine silicon wafer based microfabrication and ultrasonic machining to achieve the arrays of thermally separated cells with 50 mm{sup 3} volume. With cells fabricated in the outlined way, intrinsic magnetic field sensitivities down to 300 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} are reached.

  15. High pressure studies using two-stage diamond micro-anvils grown by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2015-06-10

    Ultra-high static pressures have been achieved in the laboratory using a two-stage micro-ball nanodiamond anvils as well as a two-stage micro-paired diamond anvils machined using a focused ion-beam system. The two-stage diamond anvils’ designs implemented thus far suffer from a limitation of one diamond anvil sliding past another anvil at extreme conditions. We describe a new method of fabricating two-stage diamond micro-anvils using a tungsten mask on a standard diamond anvil followed by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) homoepitaxial diamond growth. A prototype two stage diamond anvil with 300 μm culet and with a CVD diamond second stage ofmore » 50 μm in diameter was fabricated. We have carried out preliminary high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on a sample of rare-earth metal lutetium sample with a copper pressure standard to 86 GPa. Furthermore, the micro-anvil grown by CVD remained intact during indentation of gasket as well as on decompression from the highest pressure of 86 GPa.« less

  16. High pressure studies using two-stage diamond micro-anvils grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2015-06-10

    Ultra-high static pressures have been achieved in the laboratory using a two-stage micro-ball nanodiamond anvils as well as a two-stage micro-paired diamond anvils machined using a focused ion-beam system. The two-stage diamond anvils’ designs implemented thus far suffer from a limitation of one diamond anvil sliding past another anvil at extreme conditions. We describe a new method of fabricating two-stage diamond micro-anvils using a tungsten mask on a standard diamond anvil followed by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) homoepitaxial diamond growth. A prototype two stage diamond anvil with 300 μm culet and with a CVD diamond second stage of 50 μm in diameter was fabricated. We have carried out preliminary high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on a sample of rare-earth metal lutetium sample with a copper pressure standard to 86 GPa. Furthermore, the micro-anvil grown by CVD remained intact during indentation of gasket as well as on decompression from the highest pressure of 86 GPa.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of an electrically contacted vapor cell.

    PubMed

    Daschner, R; Ritter, R; Kübler, H; Frühauf, N; Kurz, E; Löw, R; Pfau, T

    2012-06-15

    We demonstrate the use of electrically contacted vapor cells to switch the transmission of a probe laser. The excitation scheme makes use of electromagnetically induced transparency involving a Rydberg state. The cell fabrication technique involves thin-film-based electric feedthroughs, which are well suited for scaling this concept to many addressable pixels like in flat panel displays. PMID:22739878

  18. Are endothelial cell bioeffects from acoustic droplet vaporization proximity dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) produces gas microbubbles that provide a means of selective occlusion in gas embolotherapy. Vaporization and subsequent occlusion occur inside blood vessels supplying the targeted tissue, such as tumors. Theoretical and computational studies showed that ADV within a vessel can impart high fluid mechanical stresses on the vessel wall. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that vaporization at an endothelial layer may affect cell attachment and viability. The current study is aimed at investigating the role of vaporization distance away from the endothelial layer. HUVECs were cultured in OptiCell™ chambers until reaching confluence. Dodecafluoropentane microdroplets were added, attaining a 10:1 droplet to cell ratio. A single ultrasound pulse (7.5 MHz) consisting of 16 cycles (~ 2 μs) and a 5 MPa peak rarefactional pressure was used to produce ADV while varying the vaporization distance from the endothelial layer (0 μm, 500 μm, 1000 μm). Results indicated that cell attachment and viability was significantly different if the distance was 0 μm (at the endothelial layer). Other distances were not significantly different from the control. ADV will significantly affect the endothelium if droplets are in direct contact with the cells. Droplet concentration and flow conditions inside blood vessels may play an important role. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  19. Growth of GaN micro/nanolaser arrays by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-09-01

    Optically pumped ultraviolet lasing at room temperature based on GaN microwire arrays with Fabry–Perot cavities is demonstrated. GaN microwires have been grown perpendicularly on c-GaN/sapphire substrates through simple catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The GaN microwires are [0001] oriented single-crystal structures with hexagonal cross sections, each with a diameter of ∼1 μm and a length of ∼15 μm. A possible growth mechanism of the vertical GaN microwire arrays is proposed. Furthermore, we report room-temperature lasing in optically pumped GaN microwire arrays based on the Fabry–Perot cavity. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit lasing typically at 372 nm with an excitation threshold of 410 kW cm‑2. The result indicates that these aligned GaN microwire arrays may offer promising prospects for ultraviolet-emitting micro/nanodevices.

  20. Growth of GaN micro/nanolaser arrays by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-09-01

    Optically pumped ultraviolet lasing at room temperature based on GaN microwire arrays with Fabry-Perot cavities is demonstrated. GaN microwires have been grown perpendicularly on c-GaN/sapphire substrates through simple catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The GaN microwires are [0001] oriented single-crystal structures with hexagonal cross sections, each with a diameter of ∼1 μm and a length of ∼15 μm. A possible growth mechanism of the vertical GaN microwire arrays is proposed. Furthermore, we report room-temperature lasing in optically pumped GaN microwire arrays based on the Fabry-Perot cavity. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit lasing typically at 372 nm with an excitation threshold of 410 kW cm(-2). The result indicates that these aligned GaN microwire arrays may offer promising prospects for ultraviolet-emitting micro/nanodevices. PMID:27454350

  1. Electromagnetically induced transparency in paraffin-coated vapor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.; Hohensee, M.; Walsworth, R. L.; Phillips, D. F.

    2011-01-15

    Antirelaxation coatings in atomic vapor cells allow ground-state coherent spin states to survive many collisions with the cell walls. This reduction in the ground-state decoherence rate gives rise to ultranarrow-bandwidth features in electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectra, which can form the basis of, for example, long-time scale slow and stored light, sensitive magnetometers, and precise frequency standards. Here we study, both experimentally and theoretically, how Zeeman EIT contrast and width in paraffin-coated rubidium vapor cells are determined by cell and laser-beam geometry, laser intensity, and atomic density. Using a picture of Ramsey pulse sequences, where atoms alternately spend ''bright'' and ''dark'' time intervals inside and outside the laser beam, we explain the behavior of EIT features in coated cells, highlighting their unique characteristics and potential applications.

  2. Thermal behavior of silicon-copper micro vapor chamber for high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; Li, Zhi-xin; Zhou, Chuan-peng; Wang, Xiao-dong; You, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Micro vapor chamber (MVC) for light emitting diodes (LEDs) can be designed and fabricated to enhance the heat dissipation efficiency and improve the reliability. In this paper, we used photoresist SU-8 and electroforming copper (Cu) to fabricate three kinds of wick structures, which are star, radiation and parallel ones, and the substrate is silicon with thickness of 0.5 mm. Electroforming Cu on silicon to make micro wick structure was a critical step, the ampere-hour factor was used, and accordingly the electroforming time was predicted. The composition of electroforming solution and parameters of electroforming were optimized too. After charging and packaging, thermal behavior tests were carried out to study the heat dissipation performance of MVCs. When the input power was 8 W, the parallel wick structure reached the equivalent temperature of 69.0 °C in 226 s, while the others were higher than that. The experimental results prove that the wick structures have significant influence on the heat transfer capability of MVCs.

  3. Scanning microwave microscope imaging of micro-patterned monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, J.; Mou, S.; Chen, K.-H.; Zhuang, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of micro-patterned chemical vapor deposited monolayer graphene using a scanning microwave microscope has been presented. Monolayer graphene sheets deposited on a copper substrate were transferred to a variety of substrates and micro-patterned into a periodic array of parallel lines. The measured complex reflection coefficients exhibit a strong dependency on the operating frequency and on the samples' electrical conductivity and permittivity. The experiments show an extremely high sensitivity by detecting image contrast between single and double layer graphene sheets. Correlating the images recorded at the half- and quarter-wavelength resonant frequencies shows that the relative permittivity of the single layer graphene sheet is above 105. The results are in good agreement with the three dimensional numerical electromagnetic simulations. This method may be instrumental for a comprehensive understanding of the scanning microwave microscope image contrast and provide a unique technique to estimate the local electrical properties with nano-meter scale spatial resolution of two dimensional materials at radio frequency.

  4. Static Pressure Above 300 GPa Using Chemical Vapor Deposited Two-stage Diamond Micro-anvils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey; Samudrala, Gopi; Tsoi, Georgiy; Smith, Spencer; Vohra, Yogesh

    Two-stage diamond micro-anvils were grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on beveled diamond anvils with 30 micron central flats. These anvils were used to compress a pre-indented rhenium foil to pressures in excess of 300 Gigapascals (GPa) at relatively small applied loads. Powder diffraction patterns were collected across the high-pressure region using an x-ray beam collimated to 1x2 microns in a grid with a spacing of 1 micron. While multi-megabar pressures were seen across the entire second stage, the highest pressure regions were confined to areas of a few microns in diameter. These were observed at points near the edge of the second stage with nearby pressure gradients as high as 100 GPa/micron. The transmitted x-rays show that the second stage plastically deformed while maintaining multi-megabar pressures. This may have created a second-stage gasket consisting of CVD diamond and rhenium that supported the pressure gradient without substantial external confining pressure. Further improvements in two-stage diamond micro-anvils would require controlling the geometry and microcrystalline/nanocrystalline diamond content during CVD growth process. This work was supported by the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration under Grant Number DE-NA0002014.

  5. Electrolysis cell functions as water vapor dehumidifier and oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Water vapor is absorbed in hygroscopic electrolyte, and oxygen generated by absorbed water electrolysis at anode is added simultaneously to air stream. Cell applications include on-board aircraft oxygen systems, portable oxygen generators, oxygen concentration requirements, and commercial air conditioning and dehumidifying systems.

  6. Reactive vaporization of oxides in solid oxide fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Camas Fought

    Metals such as chromium, aluminum and silicon are of extreme technological and industrial importance due to the corrosion resistance they offer in oxidizing environments at high temperature. Much of this robustness is based on the formation of a thin, well-adhered metal-oxide (MO) layer on the surface of the metal. In particularly corrosive environments or at high-enough temperatures and or pressures, the MO will chemically react with constituents in the surrounding gas, removing atoms from the solid. For many systems, material loss and subsequent mechanical failure is the foremost concern. However, in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, the presence of gaseous metal species leads to severe degradation in electrochemical performance well before mechanical limits are reached. Reactive vaporization from ferritic stainless steels, chromia, aluminosilicates and a candidate electrode material (Sr2VMoO6), was investigated using the transpiration method. Two novel collection methods were employed: condensation of vapors on wafer collectors analyzed with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS); and, condensation of vapors on quartz wool analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Identification and quantification of vapor species provided assessment of material performance in SOFC environments. Experiments demonstrated that Cr vapor species from ferritic stainless steels used for SOFC interconnect applications could be reduced by as much as one order of magnitude through the application of barrier coatings. Base alloys were compared and exhibited a variety of Cr vaporization rates despite being similar in composition, thus illustrating the importance of minor elemental constituents in the alloy. Measurements identified Si as the primary volatile element in aluminosilicate materials when Si concentrations in the bulk material were as low as one percent. Aluminosilicate materials demonstrated a burn out phase during the first hundred hours at

  7. In-membrane micro fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Omosebi, Ayokunle; Besser, Ronald

    2016-09-06

    An in-membrane micro fuel cell comprises an electrically-insulating membrane that is permissive to the flow of cations, such as protons, and a pair of electrodes deposited on channels formed in the membrane. The channels are arranged as conduits for fluids, and define a membrane ridge between the channels. The electrodes are porous and include catalysts for promoting the liberation of a proton and an electron from a chemical species and/or or the recombination of a proton and an electron with a chemical specie. The fuel cell may be provided a biosensor, an electrochemical sensor, a microfluidic device, or other microscale devices fabricated in the fuel cell membrane.

  8. Radio-frequency-modulated Rydberg states in a vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. A.; Anderson, D. A.; Raithel, G.

    2016-05-01

    We measure strong radio-frequency (RF) electric fields using rubidium Rydberg atoms prepared in a room-temperature vapor cell as field sensors. Electromagnetically induced transparency is employed as an optical readout. We RF-modulate the 60{{{S}}}1/2 and 58{{{D}}}5/2 Rydberg states with 50 and 100 MHz fields, respectively. For weak to moderate RF fields, the Rydberg levels become Stark-shifted, and sidebands appear at even multiples of the driving frequency. In high fields, the adjacent hydrogenic manifold begins to intersect the shifted levels, providing rich spectroscopic structure suitable for precision field measurements. A quantitative description of strong-field level modulation and mixing of S and D states with hydrogenic states is provided by Floquet theory. Additionally, we estimate the shielding of DC electric fields in the interior of the glass vapor cell.

  9. Faraday rotation spectroscopy in multi-pass atomic vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuguang; Vachaspati, Pranjal; Dural, Nezih; Romalis, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Many important applications of atomic vapors, such as quantum measurements, light storage experiments, and atomic magnetometers benefit from large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. We explore multi-pass cells using cylindrical mirrors with a hole for the entrance and exit of the laser beam to achieve very high optical depth while sampling a large number of atoms. Such cells are much less sensitive to mirror quality and alignment compared to optical cavities and do not require laser frequency locking, mode matching or power coupling matching. Cells with more than 100 passes have been fabricated using internal high-reflectivity mirrors. We have performed paramagnetic Faraday rotation measurements on Rb vapor and have observed atomic rotation angles in excess of 60 radians. Quantum spin noise from unpolarized atomic vapor has also been observed with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This system also exhibits non-linear spin relaxation due to spin-exchange collisions, opening the possibility of using spin-squeezing techniques to improve long-term sensitivity of frequency measurements. We will report on the development of a scalar atomic magnetometer using such spin-squeezing techniques.

  10. Optical pumping in a microfabricated Rb vapor cell using a microfabricated Rb discharge light source

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, V.; Kang, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.; Shea, H.

    2014-02-03

    Miniature (vapor-cell based devices using optical pumping of alkali atoms, such as atomic clocks and magnetometers, today mostly employ vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers as pump light sources. Here, we report on the demonstration of optical pumping in a microfabricated alkali vapor resonance cell using (1) a microfabricated Rb discharge lamp light source, as well as (2) a conventional glass-blown Rb discharge lamp. The microfabricated Rb lamp cell is a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source, having the same inner cell volume of around 40 mm{sup 3} as that of the resonance cell, both filled with suitable buffer gases. A miniature (∼2 cm{sup 3} volume) test setup based on the M{sub z} magnetometer interrogation technique was used for observation of optical-radiofrequency double-resonance signals, proving the suitability of the microfabricated discharge lamp to introduce efficient optical pumping. The pumping ability of this light source was found to be comparable to or even better than that of a conventional glass-blown lamp. The reported results indicate that the micro-fabricated DBD discharge lamp has a high potential for the development of a new class of miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and quantum sensors.

  11. Low-temperature indium-bonded alkali vapor cell for chip-scale atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straessle, R.; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Mileti, G.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2013-02-01

    A low-temperature sealing technique for micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells for chip-scale atomic clock applications is developed and evaluated. A thin-film indium bonding technique was used for sealing the cells at temperatures of ≤140 °C. These sealing temperatures are much lower than those reported for other approaches, and make the technique highly interesting for future micro-fabricated cells, using anti-relaxation wall coatings. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on first indium-bonded cells without wall coatings are used to evaluate the cleanliness of the process as well as a potential leak rate of the cells. Both measurements confirm a stable pressure inside the cell and therefore an excellent hermeticity of the indium bonding. The double-resonance measurements performed over several months show an upper limit for the leak rate of 1.5 × 10-13 mbar.l/s. This is in agreement with additional leak-rate measurements using a membrane deflection method on indium-bonded test structures.

  12. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian; Szreders, Bernard E.

    1988-04-01

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approx. 1100 to 1300 C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20 and 50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  13. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

    1988-04-26

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  14. Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Brian, Riley; Szreders, Bernard E.

    1989-01-01

    In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

  15. Enhancing vapor generation at a liquid-solid interface using micro/nanoscale surface structures fabricated by femtosecond laser surface processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Troy P.; Wilson, Chris; Zuhlke, Craig A.; Kruse, Corey; Gogos, George; Ndao, Sidy; Alexander, Dennis

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond Laser Surface Processing (FLSP) is a versatile technique for the fabrication of a wide variety of micro/nanostructured surfaces with tailored physical and chemical properties. Through control over processing conditions such as laser fluence, incident pulse count, polarization, and incident angle, the size and density of both micrometer and nanometer-scale surface features can be tailored. Furthermore, the composition and pressure of the environment both during and after laser processing have a substantial impact on the final surface chemistry of the target material. FLSP is therefore a powerful tool for optimizing interfacial phenomena such as wetting, wicking, and phasetransitions associated with a vapor/liquid/solid interface. In the present study, we utilize a series of multiscale FLSPgenerated surfaces to improve the efficiency of vapor generation on a structured surface. Specifically, we demonstrate that FLSP of stainless steel 316 electrode surfaces in an alkaline electrolysis cell results in increased efficiency of the water-splitting reaction used to generate hydrogen. The electrodes are fabricated to be superhydrophilic (the contact angle of a water droplet on the surface is less than 5 degrees). The overpotential of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is measured using a 3-electrode configuration with a structured electrode as the working electrode. The enhancement is attributed to several factors including increased surface area, increased wettability, and the impact of micro/nanostructures on the bubble formation and release. Special emphasis is placed on identifying and isolating the relative impacts of the various contributions.

  16. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  17. microRNAs: key triggers of neuronal cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Sosa, Karla F.; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Development of the central nervous system (CNS) requires a precisely coordinated series of events. During embryonic development, different intra- and extracellular signals stimulate neural stem cells to become neural progenitors, which eventually irreversibly exit from the cell cycle to begin the first stage of neurogenesis. However, before this event occurs, the self-renewal and proliferative capacities of neural stem cells and neural progenitors must be tightly regulated. Accordingly, the participation of various evolutionary conserved microRNAs is key in distinct central nervous system (CNS) developmental processes of many organisms including human, mouse, chicken, frog, and zebrafish. microRNAs specifically recognize and regulate the expression of target mRNAs by sequence complementarity within the mRNAs 3′ untranslated region and importantly, a single microRNA can have several target mRNAs to regulate a process; likewise, a unique mRNA can be targeted by more than one microRNA. Thus, by regulating different target genes, microRNAs let-7, microRNA-124, and microRNA-9 have been shown to promote the differentiation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors into specific neural cell types while microRNA-134, microRNA-25 and microRNA-137 have been characterized as microRNAs that induce the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors. Here we review the mechanisms of action of these two sets of microRNAs and their functional implications during the transition from neural stem cells and neural progenitors to fully differentiated neurons. The genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the expression of these microRNAs as well as the role of the recently described natural RNA circles which act as natural microRNA sponges regulating post-transcriptional microRNA expression and function during the early stages of neurogenesis is also discussed. PMID:25009466

  18. Sub-picotesla Scalar Atomic Magnetometer with a Microfabricated Vapor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Mhaskar, Rahul

    2016-05-01

    We explore the sensitivity limits of scalar atomic magnetometry with a micro-fabricated Cs vapor cell. The millimeter-scale cell is fabricated using silicon Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology. The atomic spin procession is driven by an amplitude-modulated circularly polarized pump laser resonant with the D1 transition in Cs atoms. The precession is detected by an off-resonant linearly polarized probe laser using a balanced polarimeter setup. The probe light is spatially split into two beams to perform a gradiometer measurement. In a magnetic field of magnitude within the range of the earth magnetic field, we measure a sensitivity of less than 150 fT/ √Hz in the gradiometer mode, which shows that the magnetometer by itself can achieve sub-100 fT/ √Hz sensitivitiy. In addition to its high sensitivity, the magnetometer has a bandwidth of nearly 1 kHz due to the broad magnetic resonance inside the small cell. Our experiment suggests the feasibility of a portable, low-power and high-performance magnetometer, which can be operated in the earth's magnetic field. Such a device will greatly expand the range of applications for atomic magnetometers, such as the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance in an unshielded environment.

  19. Electrode kinetics of a water vapor electrolysis cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, G.

    1974-01-01

    The anodic electrochemical behavior of the water vapor electrolysis cell was investigated. A theoretical review of various aspects of cell overvoltage is presented with special emphasis on concentration overvoltage and activation overvoltage. Other sources of overvoltage are described. The experimental apparatus controlled and measured anode potential and cell current. Potentials between 1.10 and 2.60 V (vs NHE) and currents between 0.1 and 3000 mA were investigated. Different behavior was observed between the standard cell and the free electrolyte cell. The free electrolyte cell followed typical Tafel behavior (i.e. activation overvoltage) with Tafel slopes of about 0.15, and the exchange current densities of 10 to the minus 9th power A/sq cm, both in good agreement with literature values. The standard cell exhibitied this same Tafel behavior at lower current densities but deviated toward lower than expected current densities at higher potentials. This behavior and other results were examined to determine their origin.

  20. Thin film solar cells grown by organic vapor phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan

    Organic solar cells have the potential to provide low-cost photovoltaic devices as a clean and renewable energy resource. In this thesis, we focus on understanding the energy conversion process in organic solar cells, and improving the power conversion efficiencies via controlled growth of organic nanostructures. First, we explain the unique optical and electrical properties of organic materials used for photovoltaics, and the excitonic energy conversion process in donor-acceptor heterojunction solar cells that place several limiting factors of their power conversion efficiency. Then, strategies for improving exciton diffusion and carrier collection are analyzed using dynamical Monte Carlo models for several nanostructure morphologies. Organic vapor phase deposition is used for controlling materials crystallization and film morphology. We improve the exciton diffusion efficiency while maintaining good carrier conduction in a bulk heterojunction solar cell. Further efficiency improvement is obtained in a novel nanocrystalline network structure with a thick absorbing layer, leading to the demonstration of an organic solar cell with 4.6% efficiency. In addition, solar cells using simultaneously active heterojunctions with broad spectral response are presented. We also analyze the efficiency limits of single and multiple junction organic solar cells, and discuss the challenges facing their practical implementations.

  1. FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

    1999-12-01

    A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

  2. Morphology of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids as Deposited by Vapor Deposition: Micro-/Nanodroplets and Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Costa, José C S; Mendes, Adélio; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2016-07-18

    The morphology of micro- and nanodroplets and thin films of ionic liquids (ILs) prepared through physical vapor deposition is presented. The morphology of droplets deposited on indium-tin-oxide-coated glass is presented for the extended 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Cn C1 im][Ntf2 ]; n=1-8) series, and the results show the nanostructuration of ILs. The use of in-vacuum energetic particles enhances/increases the nanodroplets mobility/coalescence mechanisms and can be a pathway to the fabrication of thin IL films. PMID:27028765

  3. Laser-drilled micro-hole arrays on polyurethane synthetic leather for improvement of water vapor permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, A. H.; Zheng, R. R.; Tang, H. Q.; Qi, X. Y.; Ye, B.

    2014-06-01

    Three kinds of lasers at 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths respectively were adopted to construct micro-hole arrays on polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather with an aim to improve water vapor permeability (WVP) of PU synthetic leather. The morphology of the laser-drilled micro-holes was observed to optimize laser parameters. The WVP and slit tear resistance of the laser-drilled leather were measured. Results show that the optimized pulse energy for the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers are 0.8, 1.1 and 0.26 mJ, respectively. The diameters of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized laser pulse energy were about 20, 15 and 10 μm, respectively. The depths of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized pulse energy were about 21, 60 and 69 μm, respectively. Compared with the untreated samples, the highest WVP growth ratio was 38.4%, 46.8% and 53.5% achieved by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. And the highest decreasing ratio of slit tear resistance was 11.1%, 14.8%, and 22.5% treated by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Analysis of the interaction mechanism between laser beams at three kinds of laser wavelengths and the PU synthetic leather revealed that laser micro-drilling at 355 nm wavelength displayed both photochemical ablation and photothermal ablation, while laser micro-drilling at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths leaded to photothermal ablation only.

  4. Influence of the Joule-Thomson effect on the flow of a vapor through a micro-porous membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loimer, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    The flow of a fluid near saturation through a micro-porous membrane is considered. Upstream of the membrane, the fluid is in a state of saturated vapor. Downstreams, there is unsaturated vapor which is, due to the Joule-Thomson effect, cooler than at the upstream side. The flow is described taking into account the Joule-Thomson effect and the wetting properties between the fluid and the membrane material, i.e., the capillary pressure across a curved meniscus and capillary condensation. Different types of flow occur, depending on the permeability of the membrane, on the wetting properties between the fluid and the membrane and on the pressure difference. The fluid condenses either fully or partially at the front surface of the membrane, or a liquid film forms in front of the membrane. Liquid or a two-phase mixture flows through a part or all of the membrane and evaporates either within the membrane or at the downstream front of the membrane, or the fluid evaporates at the upstream front of the membrane and vapor flows through the entire membrane. The different types of flow are discussed and the conditions under which they occur are presented.

  5. Study of Rb-vapor coated cells — Atomic diffusion and cell curing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atutov, S. N.; Benimetskiy, F. A.; Plekhanov, A. I.; Sorokin, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of a study on an optical-resonant cell filled by a vapor of the Rb atoms and coated with a non-stick polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. We show that it is possible to define correctly the diffusion coefficient of the atoms in the coating using the geometric parameters of the cell and the vapor density in the cell volume only. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the cell curing time is presented. It is shown that the mysterious cell curing process can be explained in terms of the polymerization of the polymer coating by alkali atoms. The anomalous long dwell time of the Rb atoms on the PDMS coating is discussed as well.

  6. CONCISE REVIEW Micro RNA Expression in Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmipathy, Uma; Hart, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) isolated from various adult tissue sources have the capacity to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple lineages. Both of these processes are tightly regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Emerging evidence indicates that the class of single-stranded non-coding RNAs known as “microRNAs” also plays a critical role in this process. First described in nematodes and plants, microRNAs have been shown to modulate major regulatory mechanisms in eukaryotic cells involved in a broad array of cellular functions. Studies with various types of embryonic as well as adult stem cells indicate an intricate network of microRNAs regulating key transcription factors and other genes which in turn determine cell fate. In addition, expression of unique microRNAs in specific cell types serves as a useful diagnostic marker to define a particular cell type. MicroRNAs are also found to be regulated by extracellular signaling pathways that are important for differentiation into specific tissues, suggesting that they play a role in specifying tissue identity. In this review we describe the importance of microRNAs in stem cells focusing on our current understanding of microRNAs in MSC and their derivatives. PMID:17991914

  7. Observations of water vapor by ground-based micro-wave radiometers and Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yong; Snider, J. B.; Westwater, E. R.; Melfi, S. H.; Ferrare, R. A.

    1994-09-01

    In November to December 1991, a substantial number of remote sensors and in situ instruments were operated together in Coffeyville, Kansas, during the climate experiment FIRE II. Included in the suite of instruments were (1) the NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) three-channel microwave radiometer, (2) the NASA GSFC Raman lidar, (3) ETL radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), and (4) frequent, research-quality radiosondes. The Raman lidar operated only at night and the focus of this portion of the experiment concentrated on clear conditions. The lidar data, together with frequent radiosondes and measurements of temperature profiles (every 15 min) by RASS allowed profiles of temperature and absolute humidity to be estimated every minute. We compared 2-min measurements of brightness temperature (Tb) with calculations of Tb that were based on the Liebe and Lay ton (1987) and Liebe et al. (1993) microwave propagation models, as well as the Waters (1976) model. The comparisons showed the best agreement at 20.6 GHz with the Waters model, with the Liebe et al. (1993) model being best at 31.65 GHz. The results at 90 GHz gave about equal success with the Liebe and Layton (1987) and Liebe et al. (1993) models. Comparisons of precipitable water vapor derived independently from the two instruments also showed excellent agreement, even for averages as short as 2 min. The rms difference between Raman and radiometric determinations of precipitable water vapor was 0.03 cm which is roughly 2%. The experiments clearly demonstrate the potential of simultaneous operation of radiometers and Raman lidars for fundamental physical studies of water vapor.

  8. Vapor bubble generation around gold nano-particles and its application to damaging of cells.

    PubMed

    Kitz, M; Preisser, S; Wetterwald, A; Jaeger, M; Thalmann, G N; Frenz, M

    2011-01-01

    We investigated vapor bubbles generated upon irradiation of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses. Bubble formation was studied both with optical and acoustic means on supported single gold nanoparticles and single nanoparticles in suspension. Formation thresholds determined at different wavelengths indicate a bubble formation efficiency increasing with the irradiation wavelength. Vapor bubble generation in Bac-1 cells containing accumulations of the same particles was also investigated at different wavelengths. Similarly, they showed an increasing cell damage efficiency for longer wavelengths. Vapor bubbles generated by single laser pulses were about half the cell size when inducing acute damage. PMID:21339875

  9. Micro/nano-fabrication technologies for cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Tongcheng

    2012-01-01

    Micro/nano-fabrication techniques, such as soft lithography and electrospinning, have been well-developed and widely applied in many research fields in the past decade. Due to the low costs and simple procedures, these techniques have become important and popular for biological studies. In this review, we focus on the studies integrating micro/nano-fabrication work to elucidate the molecular mechanism of signaling transduction in cell biology. We first describe different micro/nano-fabrication technologies, including techniques generating three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering. We then introduce the application of these technologies in manipulating the physical or chemical micro/nano-environment to regulate the cellular behavior and response, such as cell life and death, differentiation, proliferation, and cell migration. Recent advancement in integrating the micro/nano-technologies and live cell imaging are also discussed. Finally, potential schemes in cell biology involving micro/nano-fabrication technologies are proposed to provide perspectives on the future research activities. PMID:20490938

  10. A thermally self-sustained micro-power plant with integrated micro-solid oxide fuel cells, micro-reformer and functional micro-fluidic carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Barbara; Evans, Anna; Santis-Alvarez, Alejandro J.; Jiang, Bo; Martynczuk, Julia; Galinski, Henning; Nabavi, Majid; Prestat, Michel; Tölke, René; Bieberle-Hütter, Anja; Poulikakos, Dimos; Muralt, Paul; Niedermann, Philippe; Dommann, Alex; Maeder, Thomas; Heeb, Peter; Straessle, Valentin; Muller, Claude; Gauckler, Ludwig J.

    2014-07-01

    Low temperature micro-solid oxide fuel cell (micro-SOFC) systems are an attractive alternative power source for small-size portable electronic devices due to their high energy efficiency and density. Here, we report on a thermally self-sustainable reformer-micro-SOFC assembly. The device consists of a micro-reformer bonded to a silicon chip containing 30 micro-SOFC membranes and a functional glass carrier with gas channels and screen-printed heaters for start-up. Thermal independence of the device from the externally powered heater is achieved by exothermic reforming reactions above 470 °C. The reforming reaction and the fuel gas flow rate of the n-butane/air gas mixture controls the operation temperature and gas composition on the micro-SOFC membrane. In the temperature range between 505 °C and 570 °C, the gas composition after the micro-reformer consists of 12 vol.% to 28 vol.% H2. An open-circuit voltage of 1.0 V and maximum power density of 47 mW cm-2 at 565 °C is achieved with the on-chip produced hydrogen at the micro-SOFC membranes.

  11. Crystalline silicon solar cells with micro/nano texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Dimitre Z.; Du, Chen-Hsun

    2013-02-01

    Crystalline silicon solar cells with two-scale texture consisting of random upright pyramids and surface nanotextured layer directly onto the pyramids are prepared and reflectance properties and I-V characteristics measured. Random pyramids texture is produced by etching in an alkaline solution. On top of the pyramids texture, a nanotexture is developed using an electroless oxidation/etching process. Solar cells with two-scale surface texturization are prepared following the standard screen-printing technology sequence. The micro/nano surface is found to lower considerably the light reflectance of silicon. The short wavelengths spectral response (blue response) improvement is observed in micro/nano textured solar cells compared to standard upright pyramids textured cells. An efficiency of 17.5% is measured for the best micro/nano textured c-Si solar cell. The efficiency improvement is found to be due to the gain in both Jsc and Voc.

  12. Methods to Characterize Vapor Cell Performance for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirijanian, James; Larsen, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The Advanced Sensors Development team at Northrop Grumman, Navigation Systems Division is developing a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG). Various methods to measure atomic spin lifetimes in vapor cells for predicting NMRG performance have been investigated. Certain methods show clear advantages over others by reducing required testing times and improving test data resolution. New modifications of methods were also developed to study and improve the precision and repeatability of test results. These methods help correlate vapor cell performance to cell filling and sealing methods for cell fabrication process improvement. The vapor cells produced in conjunction with these techniques have exhibited significant and consistent increases in both the noble gas spin lifetimes and the NMR signal strengths compared to previous cell fabrication processes, providing more precise insight into cell development techniques.

  13. Micro-crack formation in direct methanol fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Spernjak, Dusan; Zelenay, Piotr; Kim, Yu Seung

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the micro-crack formation of Nafion®-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) after extended direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) operation. All electrodes, both with metal-black and carbon-supported catalysts, contain some micro-cracks initially; the area covered by these cracks increases both in the anode and cathode after 100-hours of DMFC test. X-ray tomography shows an increase in the crack area in both anode and cathode that correlates with methanol feed concentration and methanol crossover. The MEAs with carbon-supported catalysts and thicker membrane are more resistant to the formation of micro-cracks compared to those with metal-black catalysts and thinner membrane, respectively. The impact of the micro-crack formation on cell performance and durability is limited over the 100-hour DMFC operation, with the long-term impact remaining unknown.

  14. Infrared micro-spectroscopic studies of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Melissa; Mohlenhoff, Brian; Jennings, Michael; Diem, Max

    2009-01-01

    We report results from a study of human and canine mucosal cells, investigated by infrared micro-spectroscopy, and analyzed by methods of multivariate statistics. We demonstrate that the infrared spectra of individual cells are sensitive to the stage of maturation, and that a distinction between healthy and diseased cells will be possible. Since this report is written for an audience not familiar with infrared micro-spectroscopy, a short introduction into this field is presented along with a summary of principal component analysis. PMID:16797481

  15. Vapor-deposited platinum as a fuel-cell catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asher, W. J.; Batzold, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Electrodes are prepared by vacuum deposition of platinum on nickel substrate with conventional vapor-deposition apparatus. Amount of platinum loaded on substrate can be veried by changing exposure time during deposition. These electrodes are significantly more effective than conventional oxygen electrodes.

  16. Micro-tubular flame-assisted fuel cells for micro-combined heat and power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milcarek, Ryan J.; Wang, Kang; Falkenstein-Smith, Ryan L.; Ahn, Jeongmin

    2016-02-01

    Currently the role of fuel cells in future power generation is being examined, tested and discussed. However, implementing systems is more difficult because of sealing challenges, slow start-up and complex thermal management and fuel processing. A novel furnace system with a flame-assisted fuel cell is proposed that combines the thermal management and fuel processing systems by utilizing fuel-rich combustion. In addition, the flame-assisted fuel cell furnace is a micro-combined heat and power system, which can produce electricity for homes or businesses, providing resilience during power disruption while still providing heat. A micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell achieves a significant performance of 430 mW cm-2 operating in a model fuel-rich exhaust stream.

  17. Passive cathodic water/air management device for micro-direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hsien-Chih; Chen, Po-Hon; Chen, Hung-Wen; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Pan, Chin; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    A high efficient passive water/air management device (WAMD) is proposed and successfully demonstrated in this paper. The apparatus consists of cornered micro-channels and air-breathing windows with hydrophobicity arrangement to regulate liquids and gases to flow on their predetermined pathways. A high performance water/air separation with water removal rate of about 5.1 μl s -1 cm -2 is demonstrated. The performance of the proposed WAMD is sufficient to manage a cathode-generated water flux of 0.26 μl s -1 cm -2 in the micro-direct methanol fuel cells (μDMFCs) which are operated at 100 mW cm -2 or 400 mA cm -2. Furthermore, the condensed vapors can also be collected and recirculated with the existing micro-channels which act as a passive water recycling system for μDMFCs. The durability testing shows that the fuel cells equipped with WAMD exhibit improved stability and higher current density.

  18. Progress toward cascade cells made by OM-VPE. [organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, P. G.; Larue, R. A.; Ludowise, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (COM-VPE) was used to make a sophisticated monolithic cascade cell, with a peak AMO efficiency of 16.6%, not corrected for 14% grid coverage. The cell has 9 epitaxial layers. The top cell is 1.35 microns thick with a 0.1 micron thich emitter. Both cells are heteroface n-p structures. The cascade cell uses metal interconnects. Details of growth and processing are described.

  19. Aging studies on micro-fabricated alkali buffer-gas cells for miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Mileti, G.

    2015-04-20

    We report an aging study on micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells using neon as a buffer gas. An experimental atomic clock setup is used to measure the cell's intrinsic frequency, by recording the clock frequency shift at different light intensities and extrapolating to zero intensity. We find a drift of the cell's intrinsic frequency of (−5.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −11}/day and quantify deterministic variations in sources of clock frequency shifts due to the major physical effects to identify the most probable cause of the drift. The measured drift is one order of magnitude stronger than the total frequency variations expected from clock parameter variations and corresponds to a slow reduction of buffer gas pressure inside the cell, which is compatible with the hypothesis of loss of Ne gas from the cell due to its permeation through the cell windows. A negative drift on the intrinsic cell frequency is reproducible for another cell of the same type. Based on the Ne permeation model and the measured cell frequency drift, we determine the permeation constant of Ne through borosilicate glass as (5.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} s{sup −1 }Pa{sup −1} at 81 °C. We propose this method based on frequency metrology in an alkali vapor cell atomic clock setup based on coherent population trapping for measuring permeation constants of inert gases.

  20. Regulation of Vapor Pressure Deficit by Greenhouse Micro-Fog Systems Improved Growth and Productivity of Tomato via Enhancing Photosynthesis during Summer Season.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dalong; Zhang, Zhongdian; Li, Jianming; Chang, Yibo; Du, Qingjie; Pan, Tonghua

    2015-01-01

    The role of a proposed micro-fog system in regulating greenhouse environments and enhancing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) productivity during summer season was studied. Experiments were carried out in a multi-span glass greenhouse, which was divided into two identical compartments involving different environments: (1) without environment control and (2) with a micro-fog system operating when the air vapor pressure deficit (VPD) of greenhouse was higher than 0.5 KPa. The micro-fog system effectively alleviated heat stress and evaporative demand in the greenhouse during summer season. The physiologically favourable environment maintained by micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced elongation of leaf and stem, which contributed to a substantial elevation of final leaf area and shoot biomass. These improvements in physiological and morphological traits resulted in around 12.3% increase of marketable tomato yield per plant. Relative growth rate (RGR) of micro-fog treatment was also significantly higher than control plants, which was mainly determined by the substantial elevation in net assimilation rate (NAR), and to a lesser extent caused by leaf area ratio (LAR). Measurement of leaf gas exchange parameters also demonstrated that micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced leaf photosynthesis capacity. Taken together, manipulation of VPD in greenhouses by micro-fog systems effectively enhanced tomato growth and productivity via improving photosynthesis during summer season. PMID:26221726

  1. Regulation of Vapor Pressure Deficit by Greenhouse Micro-Fog Systems Improved Growth and Productivity of Tomato via Enhancing Photosynthesis during Summer Season

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dalong; Zhang, Zhongdian; Li, Jianming; Chang, Yibo; Du, Qingjie; Pan, Tonghua

    2015-01-01

    The role of a proposed micro-fog system in regulating greenhouse environments and enhancing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) productivity during summer season was studied. Experiments were carried out in a multi-span glass greenhouse, which was divided into two identical compartments involving different environments: (1) without environment control and (2) with a micro-fog system operating when the air vapor pressure deficit (VPD) of greenhouse was higher than 0.5 KPa. The micro-fog system effectively alleviated heat stress and evaporative demand in the greenhouse during summer season. The physiologically favourable environment maintained by micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced elongation of leaf and stem, which contributed to a substantial elevation of final leaf area and shoot biomass. These improvements in physiological and morphological traits resulted in around 12.3% increase of marketable tomato yield per plant. Relative growth rate (RGR) of micro-fog treatment was also significantly higher than control plants, which was mainly determined by the substantial elevation in net assimilation rate (NAR), and to a lesser extent caused by leaf area ratio (LAR). Measurement of leaf gas exchange parameters also demonstrated that micro-fog treatment significantly enhanced leaf photosynthesis capacity. Taken together, manipulation of VPD in greenhouses by micro-fog systems effectively enhanced tomato growth and productivity via improving photosynthesis during summer season. PMID:26221726

  2. The Role of microRNAs in Animal Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Santos, María Concepción; Aragón-Raygoza, Alejandro; Espinal-Centeno, Annie; Arteaga-Vázquez, Mario; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; Bako, Laszlo; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo

    2016-07-15

    Our concept of cell reprogramming and cell plasticity has evolved since John Gurdon transferred the nucleus of a completely differentiated cell into an enucleated Xenopus laevis egg, thereby generating embryos that developed into tadpoles. More recently, induced expression of transcription factors, oct4, sox2, klf4, and c-myc has evidenced the plasticity of the genome to change the expression program and cell phenotype by driving differentiated cells to the pluripotent state. Beyond these milestone achievements, research in artificial cell reprogramming has been focused on other molecules that are different than transcription factors. Among the candidate molecules, microRNAs (miRNAs) stand out due to their potential to control the levels of proteins that are involved in cellular processes such as self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, we review the role of miRNAs in the maintenance and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, epimorphic regeneration, and somatic cell reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27224014

  3. Cell Membranes Under Hydrostatic Pressure Subjected to Micro-Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilev, Vassil M.; Kostadinov, Kostadin G.; Mladenov, Ivaïlo M.; Shulev, Assen A.; Stoilov, Georgi I.; Djondjorov, Peter A.

    2011-04-01

    The work is concerned with the determination of the mechanical behaviour of cell membranes under uniform hydrostatic pressure subject to micro-injections. For that purpose, assuming that the shape of the deformed cell membrane is axisymmetric a variational statement of the problem is developed on the ground of the so-called spontaneous curvature model. In this setting, the cell membrane is regarded as an axisymmetric surface in the three-dimensional Euclidean space providing a stationary value of the shape energy functional under the constraint of fixed total area and fixed enclosed volume. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations and natural boundary conditions are derived, analyzed and used to express the forces and moments in the membrane. Several examples of such surfaces representing possible shapes of cell membranes under pressure subjected to micro injection are determined numerically.

  4. Ultrashort laser pulse cell manipulation using nano- and micro- materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomaker, Markus; Killian, Doreen; Willenbrock, Saskia; Diebold, Eric; Mazur, Eric; Bintig, Willem; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Junghanß, Christian; Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2010-08-01

    The delivery of extra cellular molecules into cells is essential for cell manipulation. For this purpose genetic materials (DNA/RNA) or proteins have to overcome the impermeable cell membrane. To increase the delivery efficiency and cell viability of common methods different nano- and micro material based approaches were applied. To manipulate the cells, the membrane is in contact with the biocompatible material. Due to a field enhancement of the laser light at the material and the resulting effect the cell membrane gets perforated and extracellular molecules can diffuse into the cytoplasm. Membrane impermeable dyes, fluorescent labelled siRNA, as well as plasmid vectors encoded for GFP expression were used as an indicator for successful perforation or transfection, respectively. Dependent on the used material, perforation efficiencies over 90 % with a cell viability of about 80 % can be achieved. Additionally, we observed similar efficiencies for siRNA transfection. Due to the larger molecule size and the essential transport of the DNA into the nucleus cells are more difficult to transfect with GFP plasmid vectors. Proof of principle experiments show promising and adequate efficiencies by applying micro materials for plasmid vector transfection. For all methods a weakly focused fs laser beam is used to enable a high manipulation throughput for adherent and suspension cells. Furthermore, with these alternative optical manipulation methods it is possible to perforate the membrane of sensitive cell types such as primary and stem cells with a high viability.

  5. Alkali-vapor cell with metal coated windows for efficient application of an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, D.; Sarkisyan, A. S.; Guéna, J.; Lintz, M.; Bouchiat, M.-A.

    2005-05-01

    We describe the implementation of a cylindrical T-shaped alkali-vapor cell for laser spectroscopy in the presence of a longitudinal electric field. The two windows are used as two electrodes of the high-voltage assembly, which is made possible by a metallic coating which entirely covers the inner and outer sides of the windows except for a central area to let the laser beams in and out of the cell. This allows very efficient application of the electric field, up to 2kV/cm in a rather dense superheated vapor, even when significant photoemission takes place at the windows during pulsed laser irradiation. The body of the cell is made of sapphire or alumina ceramic to prevent large currents resulting from surface conduction observed in cesiated glass cells. The technique used to attach the monocrystalline sapphire windows to the cell body causes minimal stress birefringence in the windows. In addition, reflection losses at the windows can be made very small. The vapor cell operates with no buffer gas and has no magnetic part. The use of this kind of cell has resulted in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in the measurement of parity violation in cesium vapor underway at ENS, Paris. The technique can be applied to other situations where a brazed assembly would give rise to unacceptably large birefringence in the windows.

  6. MicroRNAs and cell cycle of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qing; Xu, Lunshan; Cui, Hongjuan; Xu, Minhui; Yi, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The control of malignant glioma cell cycle by microRNAs (miRNAs) is well established. The deregulation of miRNAs in glioma may contribute to tumor proliferation by directly targeting the critical cell-cycle regulators. Tumor suppressive miRNAs inhibit cell cycle through repressing the expression of positive cell-cycle regulators. However, oncogenic miRNAs promote the cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle negative regulators. Recent studies have identified that transcription factors had involved in the expression of miRNAs. Transcription factors and miRNAs are implicated in regulatory network of glioma cell cycle, the deregulation of these transcription factors might be a cause of the deregulation of miRNAs. Abnormal versions of miRNAs have been implicated in the cell cycle of glioma. Based on those, miRNAs are excellent biomarker candidates and potential targets for therapeutic intervention in glioma. PMID:26000816

  7. Spin-polarized lithium diffusion in a glass hot-vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    We report diffusion coefficients of optically pumped lithium atoms in helium buffer gas. The free-induction decay and the spin-echo signals of ground-state atoms were optically detected in an external magnetic field with the addition of field gradient. Lithium hot vapor was produced in a borosilicate-glass cell at a temperature between 290 and 360°C. The simple setup using the glass cells enabled lithium atomic spectroscopy in a similar way to other alkali-metal atoms and study of the collisional properties of lithium atoms in a hot-vapor phase.

  8. Characterization of antirelaxation-coated vapor cells in high-temperature regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenhao; Balabas, Mikhail; Pustelny, Szymon; Wickenbrock, Arne; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    Antirelaxation-coated vapor cells are widely used in modern atomic physics experiments due to the coating's ability to maintain spin polarization during wall collisions. We characterize the performance of vapor cells with different coating materials by measuring longitudinal spin relaxation and vapor density at temperatures of up to 90° C. The longitudinal spin relaxation time (τrel) is measured with a modified version of ``relaxation in the dark'' technique and the vapor density (n) is obtained by fitting atomic absorption spectrum with linear absorption function. The spin-projection-noise-limited (or atomic shot noise limited) sensitivity for atomic magnetometers is δBSNL 1 /√{ nτrel T } , where T is measurement time. Therefore, by showing the product of the longitudinal spin relaxation time and the vapor density increases with temperature, we demonstrate the potential of antirelaxation-coated cells in applications of future high-sensitivity magnetometers. W.L. would like to acknowledge support from the China Scholarship Council (CSC) enabling his research at the University of California at Berkeley.

  9. Intrinsic Impurities in Glass Alkali-Vapor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Ishikawa, K.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-07-01

    We report NMR measurements of metallic Cs133 in glass cells. The solid-liquid phase transition was studied by observing the NMR peaks arising from these two phases; surprisingly, many cells yielded two additional NMR peaks below the melting point. We attribute these signals to two distinct impurities which can dissolve in the liquid alkali metal and affect its chemical shift. Intentional contamination of cesium cells with O2 confirms this hypothesis for one peak. The other contaminant remains unknown but can appear in evacuated cells. Similar effects have been seen in Rb87 cells.

  10. Dispersive radio frequency electrometry using Rydberg atoms in a prism-shaped atomic vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, H. Q.; Kumar, S.; Kübler, H.; Shaffer, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a method to measure radio frequency (RF) electric fields (E-fields) using atoms contained in a prism-shaped vapor cell. The method utilizes the concept of electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms. The RF E-field induces changes in the index of refraction of the vapor resulting in deflection of the probe laser beam as it passes through the prism-shaped vapor cell. We measured a minimum RF E-field of 8.25 μ {{Vcm}}-1 with a sensitivity of ∼ 46.5 μ {{Vcm}}-1 {{Hz}}-1/2. The experimental results agree with a numerical model that includes dephasing effects. We discuss possible improvements to obtain higher sensitivity for RF E-field measurements.

  11. Coherent population trapping in small- and chip-scale 87Rb vapor cells with buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Semenov, V. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Pyatyshev, E. N.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics of coherent population trapping (CPT) signal were investigated in small-size glass vapor cells containing 87Rb and Ne buffer gas with narrow line-width laser pumping on D2 line. The parameters of CPT signals were measured using small-size vapor cells with Ne buffer gas pressure in the range of 200-400 Torr, cell temperature in the range of 65-120 ∘C and the values of laser pumping power of 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimal conditions, under which the minimal value of short-term instability of resonance line is achieved, were obtained in experiments. Orientation frequency shifts of CPT resonance using glass 87Rb vapor cells containing buffer gas and anti-relaxation coating were compared. CPT signals using vapor cells based on integrated technologies containing 87Rb in atmosphere of Ne were also investigated. The CPT signals with typical line widths of 2-3 kHz and signal-to-noise ratio of 1500 in 1 Hz bandwidth are observed, which allows one to provide relative frequency instability of 10-11 at 100 s.

  12. Speciated fine-particle (<2.5 {micro}m aerodynamic diameter) and vapor-phase acid concentrations in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.A. Jr.; Stover, C.A.; Westerdahl, F.D.

    1998-12-31

    A fine-particle (<2.5 {micro}m aerodynamic diameter) and vapor-phase acid sampling network has been in operation among 12 communities in southern California since late 1993. The data from this network consists of concentrations of particulate matter <10 {micro}m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide, ozone, vapor-phase hydrochloric, nitric, acetic, and formic acids, particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5), and the chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium components of PM2.5. These measurements are the basis of the exposure assessment estimates of the Children`s Health Study, a multi-year study, mainly of lung function development and respiratory illness, taking place in southern California. One of the goals of the Children`s Health Study is to utilize a cost-effective means of obtaining continuous fine-particle and vapor-phase acid data for a multi-year study with enough time resolution to allow seasonal estimates of exposure. A two-week sampler was developed to meet these needs. Four continuous years of vapor-phase acid and PM2.5 mass, chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium data have been collected. During this time, the sampler has proven to be reliable. A decline in PM2.5 mass, nitrate, and ammonium ions in most of the communities from 1994 to 1997 was observed. In contrast, very little change in vapor-phase acids was observed. There has been increased interest at the national level in fine particles and their characteristics. The network provides a rich database that can be used to characterize southern California communities on the basis of their level of fine particles (and their components) and vapor-phase acids and should prove valuable with respect to both prospective and retrospective health studies. The database also provides a general characterization of the levels of PM2.5 affecting 25 million people in southern California.

  13. A Micro Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter for Astrobiology Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Donald W.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    A micro-scale Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (microFACS) for astrobiology applications is under development. This device is designed to have a footprint of 7 cm x 7 cm x 4 cm and allow live-dead counts and sorting of cells that have fluorescent characteristics from staining. The FACS system takes advantage of microfluidics to create a cell sorter that can fit in the palm of the hand. A micron-scale channel allows cells to pass by a blue diode which causes emission of marker-expressed cells which are detected by a filtered photodetector. A small microcontroller then counts cells and operates high speed valves to select which chamber the cell is collected in (a collection chamber or a waste chamber). Cells with the expressed characteristic will be collected in the collection chamber. This system has been built and is currently being tested. We are also designing a system with integrated MEMS-based pumps and valves for a small and compact unit to fly on small satellite-based biology experiments.

  14. Stem cells and germ cells: microRNA and gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Dyce, Paul William; Toms, Derek; Li, Julang

    2010-04-01

    The study of primordial germ cell development in vivo is hampered by their low numbers and inaccessibility. Recent research has shown the ability of embryonic and adult stem cells to differentiate into primordial germ cells and more mature gametes and this generation of germ cells in vitro may be an attractive model for their study. One of the biggest challenges facing in vitro differentiation of stem cells into primordial germ cells is the lack of markers to clearly distinguish the two. As both cell types originate early in embryonic development they share many pluripotent markers such as OCT4, VASA, FRAGILIS, and NANOG. Genome wide microarray profiling has been used to identify transcriptome patterns unique to primordial germ cells. A more thorough analysis of the temporal and quantitative expression of a panel of genes may be more robust in distinguishing these two cell populations. MicroRNAs, short RNA molecules that have been shown to regulate translation through interactions with mRNA transcripts, have also recently come under investigation for the role they may play in pluripotency. Attempts to elucidate key microRNAs responsible for both stem cell and primordial germ cell characteristics have recently been undertaken. Unique microRNAs, either individually or as global profiles, may also help to distinguish differentiated primordial germ cells from stem cells in vitro. This review will examine gene expression and microRNA signatures in stem cells and germ cells as ways to distinguish these closely related cell types. PMID:20183803

  15. The functionalization of nanodiamonds (diamondoids) as a key parameter of their easily controlled self-assembly in micro- and nanocrystals from the vapor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Maria A.; Poinsot, Didier; Domenichini, Bruno; Dirand, Céline; Chevalier, Sébastien; Fokin, Andrey A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    We detail herein readily accessible processes to control previously unobserved robust self-assemblies of nanodiamonds (diamondoids) in micro- and nanocrystals from their mild vapor deposition. The chemical functionalization of uniform and discernible nanodiamonds was found to be a key parameter, and depending on the type of functional group (hydroxy, fluorine, etc.) and its position on the diamondoid, the structure of the discrete deposits can vary dramatically. Thus, well-defined anisotropic structures such as rod, needle, triangle or truncated octahedron shapes can be obtained, and self-assembled edifices of sizes ranging from 20 nm to several hundred micrometers formed with conservation of a similar structure for a given diamondoid. Key thermodynamic data including sublimation enthalpy of diamondoid derivatives are reported, and the SEM of the self-assemblies coupled with EDX analyses and XRD attest the nature and purity of nanodiamond crystal deposits. This attractive method is simple and outperforms in terms of deposit quality dip-coating methods we used. This vapor phase deposition approach is expected to allow for an easy formation of diamondoid nanoobjects on different types of substrates.We detail herein readily accessible processes to control previously unobserved robust self-assemblies of nanodiamonds (diamondoids) in micro- and nanocrystals from their mild vapor deposition. The chemical functionalization of uniform and discernible nanodiamonds was found to be a key parameter, and depending on the type of functional group (hydroxy, fluorine, etc.) and its position on the diamondoid, the structure of the discrete deposits can vary dramatically. Thus, well-defined anisotropic structures such as rod, needle, triangle or truncated octahedron shapes can be obtained, and self-assembled edifices of sizes ranging from 20 nm to several hundred micrometers formed with conservation of a similar structure for a given diamondoid. Key thermodynamic data including

  16. MicroRNAs: From Female Fertility, Germ Cells, and Stem Cells to Cancer in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Virant-Klun, Irma; Ståhlberg, Anders; Kubista, Mikael; Skutella, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a family of naturally occurring small noncoding RNA molecules that play an important regulatory role in gene expression. They are suggested to regulate a large proportion of protein encoding genes by mediating the translational suppression and posttranscriptional control of gene expression. Recent findings show that microRNAs are emerging as important regulators of cellular differentiation and dedifferentiation, and are deeply involved in developmental processes including human preimplantation development. They keep a balance between pluripotency and differentiation in the embryo and embryonic stem cells. Moreover, it became evident that dysregulation of microRNA expression may play a fundamental role in progression and dissemination of different cancers including ovarian cancer. The interest is still increased by the discovery of exosomes, that is, cell-derived vesicles, which can carry different proteins but also microRNAs between different cells and are involved in cell-to-cell communication. MicroRNAs, together with exosomes, have a great potential to be used for prognosis, therapy, and biomarkers of different diseases including infertility. The aim of this review paper is to summarize the existent knowledge on microRNAs related to female fertility and cancer: from primordial germ cells and ovarian function, germinal stem cells, oocytes, and embryos to embryonic stem cells. PMID:26664407

  17. Imaging of relaxation times and microwave field strength in a microfabricated vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, Andrew; Du, Guan-Xiang; Pellaton, Matthieu; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; Treutlein, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    We present a characterization technique for atomic vapor cells, combining time-domain measurements with absorption imaging to obtain spatially resolved information on decay times, atomic diffusion, and coherent dynamics. The technique is used to characterize a 5-mm-diameter, 2-mm-thick microfabricated Rb vapor cell, with N2 buffer gas, placed inside a microwave cavity. Time-domain Franzen and Ramsey measurements are used to produce high-resolution images of the population (T1) and coherence (T2) lifetimes in the cell, while Rabi measurements yield images of the σ-, π, and σ+ components of the applied microwave magnetic field. For a cell temperature of 90∘C, the T1 times across the cell center are found to be a roughly uniform 265μs, while the T2 times peak at around 350μs. We observe a “skin” of reduced T1 and T2 times around the edge of the cell due to the depolarization of Rb after collisions with the silicon cell walls. Our observations suggest that these collisions are far from being 100% depolarizing, consistent with earlier observations made with Na and glass walls. Images of the microwave magnetic field reveal regions of optimal field homogeneity, and thus coherence. Our technique is useful for vapor cell characterization in atomic clocks, atomic sensors, and quantum information experiments.

  18. Catalyst-free direct vapor-phase growth of Zn1-xCuxO micro-cross structures and their optical properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danhua; Fan, Donghua; Shen, Wenzhong

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple catalyst-free vapor-phase method to fabricate Zn1-xCuxO micro-cross structures. Through a series of controlled experiments by changing the location of the substrate and reaction time, we have realized the continuous evolution of product morphology from nanorods into brush-like structures and micro-cross structures at different positions, together with the epitaxial growth of branched nanorods from the central stem with the time extended. The growth mechanism of the Zn1-xCuxO micro-cross structures has been proposed to involve the synthesis of Cu/Zn square-like core, surface oxidation, and the secondary growth of nanorod arrays. By the detailed structural analysis of the yielded Zn1-xCuxO samples at different locations, we have shown that the CuO phases were gradually formed in Zn1-xCuxO, which is significant to induce the usual ZnO hexagonal structures changing into four-folded symmetrical hierarchical micro-cross structures. Furthermore, the visible luminescence can be greatly enhanced by the introduction of Cu, and the observed inhomogeneous cathode luminescence in an individual micro-cross structure is caused by the different distributions of Cu. PMID:23339397

  19. Catalyst-free direct vapor-phase growth of Zn1−xCuxO micro-cross structures and their optical properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple catalyst-free vapor-phase method to fabricate Zn1−xCuxO micro-cross structures. Through a series of controlled experiments by changing the location of the substrate and reaction time, we have realized the continuous evolution of product morphology from nanorods into brush-like structures and micro-cross structures at different positions, together with the epitaxial growth of branched nanorods from the central stem with the time extended. The growth mechanism of the Zn1−xCuxO micro-cross structures has been proposed to involve the synthesis of Cu/Zn square-like core, surface oxidation, and the secondary growth of nanorod arrays. By the detailed structural analysis of the yielded Zn1−xCuxO samples at different locations, we have shown that the CuO phases were gradually formed in Zn1−xCuxO, which is significant to induce the usual ZnO hexagonal structures changing into four-folded symmetrical hierarchical micro-cross structures. Furthermore, the visible luminescence can be greatly enhanced by the introduction of Cu, and the observed inhomogeneous cathode luminescence in an individual micro-cross structure is caused by the different distributions of Cu. PMID:23339397

  20. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors. PMID:27174318

  1. All-Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.; Branz, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) nip solar cells have been fabricated with all doped and undoped a-Si:H layers deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total deposition time of all layers, except the top ITO-contact, is less than 4 minutes.

  2. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivetal, Jérémy; Royet, David; Ciuta, Georgeta; Frenea-Robin, Marie; Haddour, Naoufel; Dempsey, Nora M.; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Simonet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications.

  3. A Micro-Preconcentrator Combined Olfactory Sensing System with a Micromechanical Cantilever Sensor for Detecting 2,4-Dinitrotoluene Gas Vapor

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myung-Sic; Kim, Jinsik; Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Kang, Ji Yoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon

    2015-01-01

    Preventing unexpected explosive attacks and tracing explosion-related molecules require the development of highly sensitive gas-vapor detection systems. For that purpose, a micromechanical cantilever-based olfactory sensing system including a sample preconcentrator was developed to detect 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), which is a well-known by-product of the explosive molecule trinitrotoluene (TNT) and exists in concentrations on the order of parts per billion in the atmosphere at room temperature. A peptide receptor (His-Pro-Asn-Phe-Ser-Lys-Tyr-Ile-Leu-His-Gln-Arg) that has high binding affinity for 2,4-DNT was immobilized on the surface of the cantilever sensors to detect 2,4-DNT vapor for highly selective detection. A micro-preconcentrator (µPC) was developed using Tenax-TA adsorbent to produce higher concentrations of 2,4-DNT molecules. The preconcentration was achieved via adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena occurring between target molecules and the adsorbent. The µPC directly integrated with a cantilever sensor and enhanced the sensitivity of the cantilever sensor as a pretreatment tool for the target vapor. The response was rapidly saturated within 5 min and sustained for more than 10 min when the concentrated vapor was introduced. By calculating preconcentration factor values, we verified that the cantilever sensor provides up to an eightfold improvement in sensing performance. PMID:26213944

  4. MicroRNAs as novel regulators of stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eunhyun; Choi, Eunmi; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence in stem cell biology has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in cell fate specification, including stem cell self-renewal, lineage-specific differentiation, and somatic cell reprogramming. These functions are tightly regulated by specific gene expression patterns that involve miRNAs and transcription factors. To maintain stem cell pluripotency, specific miRNAs suppress transcription factors that promote differentiation, whereas to initiate differentiation, lineage-specific miRNAs are upregulated via the inhibition of transcription factors that promote self-renewal. Small molecules can be used in a similar manner as natural miRNAs, and a number of natural and synthetic small molecules have been isolated and developed to regulate stem cell fate. Using miRNAs as novel regulators of stem cell fate will provide insight into stem cell biology and aid in understanding the molecular mechanisms and crosstalk between miRNAs and stem cells. Ultimately, advances in the regulation of stem cell fate will contribute to the development of effective medical therapies for tissue repair and regeneration. This review summarizes the current insights into stem cell fate determination by miRNAs with a focus on stem cell self-renewal, differentiation, and reprogramming. Small molecules that control stem cell fate are also highlighted. PMID:24179605

  5. Novel Integration Approach for In situ Monitoring of Temperature in Micro-direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Huang, Ren-De; Chuang, Chih-Wei

    2007-10-01

    In this work, a porous silicon layer is fabricated as the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a micro-direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology. Platinum is deposited on surface of the porous silicon layer to improve the electrical conductivity of the μDMFC. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) was utilized to deposit Pt metal and wet etching was adopted to form the conductive layer and micro-thermal sensors. The Pt acted both as a current collector and a micro-thermal sensor. We fabricated a resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensor for integration with the gas diffusion layer on the bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the μDMFC. GDLs with pores of various sizes (10, 30, and 50 μm) were considered to test the performance of the μDMFC. A silicon wafer (500 μm) was etched using KOH wet etching to yield fuel channels with a depth of 450 μm and a width of 200 μm. Then, a porous silicon layer was formed by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to act as the GDL of the μDMFC. The experimental results obtained at various fuel flow rates, pore sizes and other operating conditions demonstrate that the maximum power density of the μDMFC is 1.784 mW/cm2, which was reached at 203 mV with 50-μm-diameter holes. The microsensor temperature was determined to be in the range from 20 to 46 °C and the resistance of the microsensor was in the range from 7.524 to 7.677 kΩ. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature is almost linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity are 0.3 °C and 7.82× 10-4/°C, respectively.

  6. Modification of glass cell walls by rubidium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Kishinevski, A.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Reuter, C.; Happer, W.

    2009-04-01

    It has long been known that the inner walls of freshly manufactured glass cells filled with a few droplets of alkali metal undergo a “curing” process, where the properties of the cell wall change over a period of days to weeks. We report quantitative studies of “curing” in Pyrex cells filled with rubidium metal. Our experiment shows that at 94°C , the surface of Pyrex glass adsorbs about 3×1015 rubidium atoms per cm2 , which is equivalent to 6-7 monolayers of liquid rubidium.

  7. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joulaei, A.; Moody, J.; Berti, N.; Kasparian, J.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  8. Novel duplex vapor-electrochemical method for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanis, L.; Sanjurjo, A.; Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V. K.; Bartlett, R. W.; Westphal, S.

    1980-01-01

    A process was developed for the economic production of high purity Si from inexpensive reactants, based on the Na reduction of SiF4 gas. The products of reaction (NaF, Si) are separated by either aqueous leaching or by direct melting of the NaF-Si product mixture. Impurities known to degrade solar cell performance are all present at sufficiently low concentrations so that melt solidification (e.g., Czochralski) will provide a silicon material suitable for solar cells.

  9. MICRO- AND NANOSCALE ENGINEERING OF CELL SIGNALING”

    PubMed Central

    Kam, L.C.; Shen, K.; Dustin, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasing recognized that cell signaling, as a chemical process, must be considered at the local, micrometer scale. Micro- and nano-fabrication techniques provide access to these dimensions, with the potential to capture and manipulate the spatial complexity of intracellular signaling in experimental models. This review focuses on recent advances in adapting surface engineering for use with biomolecular systems that interface with cell signaling, particularly with respect to surfaces that interact with multiple receptor systems on individual cells. The utility of this conceptual and experimental approach is demonstrated in the context of epithelial cells and T lymphocytes, two system for which the convergence and balance of multiple signaling pathways has dramatic impacts on the ability of these cells to provide their physiological function. PMID:23862677

  10. Oxidative Chemical Vapor Deposition of Neutral Hole Transporting Polymer for Enhanced Solar Cell Efficiency and Lifetime.

    PubMed

    Jo, Won Jun; Nelson, Justin T; Chang, Sehoon; Bulović, Vladimir; Gradečak, Silvija; Strano, Michael S; Gleason, Karen K

    2016-08-01

    The concept of a neutral hole-transporting polymer is realized for the first time, by integrating patterned Cl(-) -doped poly(3,4-dimethoxythiophene) thin films into organic solar cells through a vacuum-based polymer vapor printing technique. Due to this novel polymer's neutrality, high transparency, good conductivity, and appropriate energy levels, the solar-cell efficiency and lifetime are significantly enhanced. PMID:27167214

  11. GHz Rabi Flopping to Rydberg States in Hot Atomic Vapor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, B.; Baluktsian, T.; Schlagmueller, M.; Koelle, A.; Kuebler, H.; Loew, R.; Pfau, T.

    2011-12-09

    We report on the observation of Rabi oscillations to a Rydberg state on a time scale below 1 ns in thermal rubidium vapor. We use a bandwidth-limited pulsed excitation and observe up to 6 full Rabi cycles within a pulse duration of {approx}4 ns. We find good agreement between the experiment and numerical simulations based on a surprisingly simple model. This result shows that fully coherent dynamics with Rydberg states can be achieved even in thermal atomic vapor, thus suggesting small vapor cells as a platform for room-temperature quantum devices. Furthermore, the result implies that previous coherent dynamics in single-atom Rydberg gates can be accelerated by 3 orders of magnitude.

  12. Effect of Bacterial Cell Moisture on the Sporicidal Activity of β-Propiolactone Vapor

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Robert K.

    1968-01-01

    The activity of a vapor-phase disinfectant is usually expressed in terms of the atmospheric relative humidity (RH). This study shows that, in β-propiolactone (BPL) vapor disinfection, the important factor is really the moisture content and location of water in the cell, and not necessarily the atmospheric RH. Previous studies revealed that only about 50% of the bacterial spores equilibrated to 45% RH were killed when exposed to the same RH to BPL vapor. On the other hand, all the spores equilibrated to and then exposed at 75% RH to BPL were readily killed. The present study shows that spores equilibrated to 98% RH are readily killed by BPL at 45% RH, but only 99% of the spores equilibrated to 75% RH are killed by BPL at 45% RH. Also, in order to be killed, desiccated spores must be exposed to BPL at higher humidities than would be required if the spores had not been previously desiccated. PMID:4967453

  13. Efficiency enhancement in solution-processed organic small molecule: Fullerene solar cells via solvent vapor annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jingsheng; Chen, Hui; Liu, Feng; Zhao, Baofeng; Hu, Lingyu; He, Zhicai; Wu, Hongbin

    2015-05-01

    We report highly efficient small molecule solar cells (SMSCs) by using dichloromethane solvent vapor annealing method. The resulted devices delivered a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 8.3%, which is among the highest in SMSCs. Comparing to the control devices, the short circuit current (Jsc), fill factor, and PCE of solvent vapor annealed devices are significantly improved. Summarizing the results of optical absorption, film morphology, and charge carrier transporting properties, we see that the enhanced structure order and reduced size of phase separation are major reasons for the improved device performances, establishing a solid structure-property relationship. The solvent vapor annealing method can thus be a useful method in device fabrication to enhance performances of SMSCs.

  14. MicroBioRobots for single cell manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakar, Mahmut Selman

    One of the great challenges in nano and micro scale science and engineering is the independent manipulation of biological cells and small man-made objects with active sensing. For such biomedical applications as single cell manipulation, telemetry, and localized targeted delivery of chemicals, it is important to fabricate microstructures that can be powered and controlled without a tether in fluidic environments. These microstructures can be used to develop microrobots that have the potential to make existing therapeutic and diagnostic procedures less invasive. Actuation can be realized using various different organic and inorganic methods. Previous studies explored different forms of actuation and control with microorganisms. Bacteria, in particular, offer several advantages as controllable microactuators: they draw chemical energy directly from their environment, they are genetically modifiable, and they are scalable and configurable in the sense that any number of bacteria can be selectively patterned. Additionally, the study of bacteria inspires inorganic schemes of actuation and control. For these reasons, we chose to employ bacteria while controlling their motility using optical and electrical stimuli. In the first part of the thesis, we demonstrate a biointegrated approach by introducing MicroBioRobots (MBRs). MBRs are negative photosensitive epoxy (SU8) microfabricated structures with typical feature sizes ranging from 1-100 mum coated with a monolayer of the swarming Serratia marcescens . The adherent bacterial cells naturally coordinate to propel the microstructures in fluidic environments which we call Self-Actuation. First, we demonstrate the control of MBRs using self-actuation, DC electric fields and ultra-violet radiation and develop an experimentally-validated mathematical model for the MBRs. This model allows us to to steer the MBR to any position and orientation in a planar micro channel using visual feedback and an inverted microscope. Examples

  15. MicroRNA-7a regulates pancreatic β cell function

    PubMed Central

    Latreille, Mathieu; Hausser, Jean; Stützer, Ina; Zhang, Quan; Hastoy, Benoit; Gargani, Sofia; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Pattou, Francois; Zavolan, Mihaela; Esguerra, Jonathan L.S.; Eliasson, Lena; Rülicke, Thomas; Rorsman, Patrik; Stoffel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctional microRNA (miRNA) networks contribute to inappropriate responses following pathological stress and are the underlying cause of several disease conditions. In pancreatic β cells, miRNAs have been largely unstudied and little is known about how specific miRNAs regulate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) or impact the adaptation of β cell function to metabolic stress. In this study, we determined that miR-7 is a negative regulator of GSIS in β cells. Using Mir7a2 deficient mice, we revealed that miR-7a2 regulates β cell function by directly regulating genes that control late stages of insulin granule fusion with the plasma membrane and ternary SNARE complex activity. Transgenic mice overexpressing miR-7a in β cells developed diabetes due to impaired insulin secretion and β cell dedifferentiation. Interestingly, perturbation of miR-7a expression in β cells did not affect proliferation and apoptosis, indicating that miR-7 is dispensable for the maintenance of endocrine β cell mass. Furthermore, we found that miR-7a levels are decreased in obese/diabetic mouse models and human islets from obese and moderately diabetic individuals with compensated β cell function. Our results reveal an interconnecting miR-7 genomic circuit that regulates insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic β cells and support a role for miR-7 in the adaptation of pancreatic β cell function in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24789908

  16. Osteogenic cell sheets reinforced with photofunctionalized micro-thin titanium.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Manabu; Hirota, Makoto; Park, Wonhee; Honda, Masaki J; Tsukimura, Naoki; Isokawa, Keitaro; Ishigami, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2015-05-01

    Cell sheet technology has been used to deliver cells in single-sheet form with an intact extracellular matrix for soft tissue repair and regeneration. Here, we hypothesized that titanium-reinforced cell sheets could be constructed for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Fifty-µm-thick titanium plates containing apertures were prepared and roughened by acid etching, some of which were photofunctionalized with 12 min of UV light treatment. Cell sheets were prepared by culturing rat calvarial periosteum-derived cells on temperature-responsive culture dishes and attached to titanium plates. Titanium-reinforced osteogenic cell sheet construction was conditional on various technical and material factors: cell sheets needed to be double-sided and sandwich the titanium plate, and the titanium plates needed to be micro thin and contain apertures to allow close apposition of the two cell sheets. Critically, titanium plates needed to be UV-photofunctionalized to ensure adherence and retention of cell sheets. Single-sided cell sheets or double-sided cell sheets on as-made titanium contracted and deformed within 4 days of incubation. Titanium-reinforced cell sheets on photofunctionalized titanium were structurally stable at least up to 14 days, developed the expected osteogenic phenotypes (ALP production and mineralization), and maintained structural integrity without functional degradation. Successful construction of titanium-reinforced osteogenic cell sheets was associated with increased cell attachment, retention, and expression of vinculin, an adhesion protein by photofunctionalization. This study identified the technical and material requirements for constructing titanium-reinforced osteogenic cell sheets. Future in vivo studies are warranted to test these titanium-reinforced cell sheets as stably transplantable, mechanically durable, and shape controllable osteogenic devices. PMID:25604095

  17. Helicobacter pylori interferes with an embryonic stem cell micro RNA cluster to block cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs, post-transcriptional regulators of eukaryotic gene expression, are implicated in host defense against pathogens. Viruses and bacteria have evolved strategies that suppress microRNA functions, resulting in a sustainable infection. In this work we report that Helicobacter pylori, a human stomach-colonizing bacterium responsible for severe gastric inflammatory diseases and gastric cancers, downregulates an embryonic stem cell microRNA cluster in proliferating gastric epithelial cells to achieve cell cycle arrest. Results Using a deep sequencing approach in the AGS cell line, a widely used cell culture model to recapitulate early events of H. pylori infection of gastric mucosa, we reveal that hsa-miR-372 is the most abundant microRNA expressed in this cell line, where, together with hsa-miR-373, it promotes cell proliferation by silencing large tumor suppressor homolog 2 (LATS2) gene expression. Shortly after H. pylori infection, miR-372 and miR-373 synthesis is highly inhibited, leading to the post-transcriptional release of LATS2 expression and thus, to a cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition. This downregulation of a specific cell-cycle-regulating microRNA is dependent on the translocation of the bacterial effector CagA into the host cells, a mechanism highly associated with the development of severe atrophic gastritis and intestinal-type gastric carcinoma. Conclusions These data constitute a novel example of host-pathogen interplay involving microRNAs, and unveil the couple LATS2/miR-372 and miR-373 as an unexpected mechanism in infection-induced cell cycle arrest in proliferating gastric cells, which may be relevant in inhibition of gastric epithelium renewal, a major host defense mechanism against bacterial infections. PMID:22027184

  18. MicroRNA-21 Increases Proliferation and Cisplatin Sensitivity of Osteosarcoma-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vanas, Vanita; Haigl, Barbara; Stockhammer, Verena; Sutterlüty-Fall, Hedwig

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor and poor prognosis for osteosarcoma patients is mainly due to chemotherapy resistance. MicroRNAs are important to maintain pathophysiological mechanisms of cancer and influence cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. In this study, we tested the functions of microRNA-21 for malignant features as well as for drug resistance of osteosarcoma. We used Northern blot to measure microRNA-21 levels in osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. MicroRNA-21 activity was modulated by either expressing a sponge to decrease its activity in an osteosarcoma-derived cell line expressing high levels of microRNA-21 or by introducing pri-microRNA-21 in a cell line with low endogenous levels. Cell migration was determined in a scratch assay and cell proliferation was measured by performing growth curve analysis. Sensitivity of the cells towards chemotherapeutics was investigated by performing cell viability assays and calculating the IC50 values. While cell migration was unaffected by modulated microRNA-21 levels, microRNA-21 inhibition slowed proliferation and exogenously expressed microRNA-21 promoted this process. Modulated microRNA-21 activity failed to effect sensitivity of osteosarcoma-derived cell lines to doxorubicin or methotrexate. Contrarily, reduction of microRNA-21 activity resulted in enhanced resistance towards cisplatin while ectopic expression of microRNA-21 showed the opposite effect. Increased microRNA-21 levels repressed the expression of Sprouty2 and ectopic expression of Sprouty2 was able to largely rescue the observed effects of microRNA-21 in osteosarcoma. In summary, our data indicate that in osteosarcoma microRNA-21 expression is an important component for regulation of cell proliferation and for determining sensitivity to cisplatin. PMID:27513462

  19. MicroRNA-21 Increases Proliferation and Cisplatin Sensitivity of Osteosarcoma-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Vanas, Vanita; Haigl, Barbara; Stockhammer, Verena; Sutterlüty-Fall, Hedwig

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor and poor prognosis for osteosarcoma patients is mainly due to chemotherapy resistance. MicroRNAs are important to maintain pathophysiological mechanisms of cancer and influence cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. In this study, we tested the functions of microRNA-21 for malignant features as well as for drug resistance of osteosarcoma. We used Northern blot to measure microRNA-21 levels in osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. MicroRNA-21 activity was modulated by either expressing a sponge to decrease its activity in an osteosarcoma-derived cell line expressing high levels of microRNA-21 or by introducing pri-microRNA-21 in a cell line with low endogenous levels. Cell migration was determined in a scratch assay and cell proliferation was measured by performing growth curve analysis. Sensitivity of the cells towards chemotherapeutics was investigated by performing cell viability assays and calculating the IC50 values. While cell migration was unaffected by modulated microRNA-21 levels, microRNA-21 inhibition slowed proliferation and exogenously expressed microRNA-21 promoted this process. Modulated microRNA-21 activity failed to effect sensitivity of osteosarcoma-derived cell lines to doxorubicin or methotrexate. Contrarily, reduction of microRNA-21 activity resulted in enhanced resistance towards cisplatin while ectopic expression of microRNA-21 showed the opposite effect. Increased microRNA-21 levels repressed the expression of Sprouty2 and ectopic expression of Sprouty2 was able to largely rescue the observed effects of microRNA-21 in osteosarcoma. In summary, our data indicate that in osteosarcoma microRNA-21 expression is an important component for regulation of cell proliferation and for determining sensitivity to cisplatin. PMID:27513462

  20. microRNAs in Pancreatic β-Cell Physiology.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Sabire

    2015-01-01

    The β-cells within the pancreas are responsible for production and secretion of insulin. Insulin is released from pancreatic β-cells in response to increasing blood glucose levels and acts on insulin-sensitive tissues such as skeletal muscle and liver in order to maintain normal glucose homeostasis. Therefore, defects in pancreatic β-cell function lead to hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus. A new class of molecules called microRNAs has been recently demonstrated to play a crucial role in regulation of pancreatic β-cell function under normal and pathophysiological conditions. miRNAs have been shown to regulate endocrine pancreas development, insulin biosynthesis, insulin exocytosis, and β-cell expansion. Many of the β-cell enriched miRNAs have multiple functions and regulate pancreas development as well as insulin biosynthesis and exocytosis. Furthermore, several of the β-cell specific miRNAs have been shown to accumulate in the circulation before the onset of diabetes and may serve as potential biomarkers for prediabetes. This chapter will focus on miRNAs that are enriched in pancreatic β-cells and play a critical role in modulation of β-cell physiology and may have clinical significance in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:26662988

  1. The Role of MicroRNAs in Cardiac Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Purvis, Nima; Bahn, Andrew; Katare, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are considered as the next generation drug treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease who are resistant to conventional treatment. Among several stem cells used in the clinical setting, cardiac stem cells (CSCs) which reside in the myocardium and epicardium of the heart have been shown to be an effective option for the source of stem cells. In normal circumstances, CSCs primarily function as a cell store to replace the physiologically depleted cardiovascular cells, while under the diseased condition they have been shown to experimentally regenerate the diseased myocardium. In spite of their major functional role, molecular mechanisms regulating the CSCs proliferation and differentiation are still unknown. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Recent studies have demonstrated the important role of miRs in regulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation, as well as other physiological and pathological processes related to stem cell function. This review summarises the current understanding of the role of miRs in CSCs. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms by which miRs regulate CSCs may lead to advances in the mode of stem cell therapies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25802528

  2. Effects of water concentration in the coating solution on the wall relaxation rate of octadecyltrichlorosilane coated rubidium vapor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guiying; Wei, Lihua; Wang, Meiling; Zhao, Kaifeng

    2015-01-28

    High quality anti-relaxation surface coatings for atomic vapor cells are essential for the preservation of atomic spin coherence and the enhancement of measurement sensitivity. In this paper, we studied the effects of water concentration in octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) coating solution on the relaxation rate and its reproducibility of OTS coated Rubidium vapor cells. We found that appropriate water concentration can improve the anti-relaxation performance of OTS coated cells.

  3. Roles of microRNA on cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Advanced studies of microRNAs (miRNAs) have revealed their manifold biological functions, including control of cell proliferation, cell cycle and cell death. However, it seems that their roles as key regulators of metabolism have drawn more and more attention in the recent years. Cancer cells display increased metabolic autonomy in comparison to non-transformed cells, taking up nutrients and metabolizing them in pathways that support growth and proliferation. MiRNAs regulate cell metabolic processes through complicated mechanisms, including directly targeting key enzymes or transporters of metabolic processes and regulating transcription factors, oncogenes / tumor suppressors as well as multiple oncogenic signaling pathways. MiRNAs like miR-375, miR-143, miR-14 and miR-29b participate in controlling cancer cell metabolism by regulating the expression of genes whose protein products either directly regulate metabolic machinery or indirectly modulate the expression of metabolic enzymes, serving as master regulators, which will hopefully lead to a new therapeutic strategy for malignant cancer. This review focuses on miRNA regulations of cancer cell metabolism,including glucose uptake, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and insulin production, lipid metabolism and amino acid biogenesis, as well as several oncogenic signaling pathways. Furthermore, the challenges of miRNA-based strategies for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics have been discussed. PMID:23164426

  4. Dicke coherent narrowing in two-photon and Raman spectroscopy of thin vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutier, Gabriel; Todorov, Petko; Hamdi, Ismahène; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Bloch, Daniel; Ducloy, Martial

    2005-10-01

    The principle of coherent Dicke narrowing in a thin vapor cell, in which sub-Doppler spectral line shapes are observed under a normal irradiation for a λ/2 thickness, is generalized to two-photon spectroscopy. Only the sum of the two wave vectors must be normal to the cell, making the two-photon scheme highly versatile. A comparison is provided between the Dicke narrowing with copropagating fields, and the residual Doppler broadening occurring with counterpropagating geometries. The experimental feasibility is discussed on the basis of a first observation of a two-photon resonance in a 300-nm-thick Cs cell. Extension to the Raman situation is finally considered.

  5. Cell migration in confinement: a micro-channel-based assay.

    PubMed

    Heuzé, Mélina L; Collin, Olivier; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method to study cells migrating in micro-channels, a confining environment of well-defined geometry. This assay is a complement to more complex 3D migration systems and provides several advantages even if it does not recapitulate the full complexity of 3D migration. Important parameters such as degree of adhesion, degree of confinement, mechanical properties, and geometry can be varied independently of each other. The device is fully compatible with almost any type of light microscopy and the simple geometry makes automated analysis very easy to perform, which allows screening strategy. The chapters is divided into five parts describing the design of different types of migration chambers, the fabrication of a mold by photolithography, the assembly of the chamber, the loading of cells, and finally the imaging on live or fixed cells. PMID:21748692

  6. Radio-frequency Electrometry Using Rydberg Atoms in Vapor Cells: Towards the Shot Noise Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Jahangiri, Akbar; Kuebler, Harald; Shaffer, James P.; 5. Physikalisches Institut, Universitat Stuttgart, Germany Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg atoms are a promising candidate for radio frequency (RF) electric field sensing. Our method uses electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms in vapor cells to read out the effect that the RF electric field has on the Rydberg atoms. The method has the potential for high sensitivity (pV cm-1 Hz- 1 / 2) and can be self-calibrated. Some of the main factors limiting the sensitivity of RF electric field sensing from reaching the shot noise limit are the residual Doppler effect and the sensitivity of the optical read-out using the probe laser. We present progress on overcoming the residual Doppler effect by using a new multi-photon scheme and reaching the shot noise detection limit using frequency modulated spectroscopy. Our experiments also show promise for studying quantum optical effects such as superradiance in vapor cells using Rydberg atoms. This work is supported by DARPA, ARO, and NRO.

  7. Micro-optical designs for angular confinement in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Feuermann, Daniel; Mashaal, Heylal

    2015-01-01

    We identify and evaluate a variety of efficient and feasible micro-optics for confining the radiative emission of solar cells. The key criteria used for assessing viable designs are (1) high optical efficiency for both the transmission of impinging solar beam radiation and the external recycling of isotropic cell luminescent emission; (2) liberal optical tolerance; (3) compactness and (4) being amenable to fabrication from existing materials and manufacturing processes. Both imaging and nonimaging candidate designs are presented, and their superiority to previous proposals is quantified. The strategy of angular confinement for boosting cell open-circuit voltage-thereby enhancing conversion efficiency-is limited to cells where radiative recombination is the dominant carrier recombination pathway. Optical systems that restrict the angular range for emission of cell luminescence must, by reciprocity, commensurately restrict the angular range for the collection of solar radiation. This, in turn, mandates the introduction of concentrators, but not for the objective of delivering concentrated flux onto the cell. Rather, the optical system must project an acceptably uniform spatial distribution of solar flux onto the cell surface at a nominal averaged irradiance of 1 sun.

  8. Temperature Sensitivity of an Atomic Vapor Cell-Based Dispersion-Enhanced Optical Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, K.; Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.; Luckay, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of the response of an optical cavity to a change in optical path length, through the use of an intracavity fast-light medium, has previously been demonstrated experimentally and described theoretically for an atomic vapor cell as the intracavity resonant absorber. This phenomenon may be used to enhance both the scale factor and sensitivity of an optical cavity mode to the change in path length, e.g. in gyroscopic applications. We study the temperature sensitivity of the on-resonant scale factor enhancement, S(sub o), due to the thermal sensitivity of the lower-level atom density in an atomic vapor cell, specifically for the case of the Rb-87 D(sub 2) transition. A semi-empirical model of the temperature-dependence of the absorption profile, characterized by two parameters, a(sub o)(T) and gamma(sub a)(T) allows the temperature-dependence of the cavity response, S(sub o)(T) and dS(sub o)/dT to be predicted over a range of temperature. We compare the predictions to experiment. Our model will be useful in determining the useful range for S(sub o), given the practical constraints on temperature stability for an atomic vapor cell.

  9. Cultivation and recovery of vascular endothelial cells in microchannels of a separable micro-chemical chip.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tadahiro; Tanaka, Yo; Idota, Naokazu; Sato, Kae; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2011-04-01

    Various micro cell culture systems have recently been developed. However, it is extremely difficult to recover cultured cells from a microchannel because the upper and lower substrates of a microchip are permanently combined. Therefore, we developed a cell culture and recovery system that uses a separable microchip with reversible combining that allows separation between closed and open channels. To realize this system, two problems related to microfluidic control-prevention of leakage and non-invasive recovery of cultured cells from the substrate-must be overcome. In the present study, we used surface chemistry modification to solve both problems. First, octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODTMS) was utilized to control the Laplace pressure at the liquid/vapor phase interface, such that it was directed toward the microchannels, which suppressed leakage from the slight gap between two substrates. Second, a thermoresponsive polymer poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was used to coat the surface of the ODTMS-modified microchannel by UV-mediated photopolymerization. PNIPAAm substrates are well known for controlled cell adhesion/detachment by alteration of temperature. Finally, the ODTMS- and PNIPAAm-modified separable microchips were subjected to patterning, and human arterial endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured in the resulting microchannels with no leakage. After 96 h of the culture, the HAECs were detached from the microchips by decreasing the temperature and were then recovered from the microchannels. This study is the first to demonstrate the recovery of living cells cultured in a microchannel, and may be useful as a fundamental technique for vascular tissue engineering. PMID:21251708

  10. Extracellular microRNAs from the epididymis as potential mediators of cell-to-cell communication

    PubMed Central

    Belleannée, Clémence

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) was previously thought to remain inside cells as an intermediate between genes and proteins during translation. However, it is now estimated that 98% of the mammalian genomic output is transcribed as noncoding RNAs, which are involved in diverse gene expression regulatory mechanisms and can be transferred from one cell to another through extracellular communication. For instance, microRNAs are 22-nucleotide-long noncoding RNAs that are generated by endonuclease cleavage of precursors inside the cells and are secreted as extracellular microRNAs to regulate target cell posttranscriptional gene expression via RNA interference. We and others have shown that different populations of microRNAs are expressed in distinct regions of the human epididymis and regulate the expression of target genes that are involved in the control of male fertility as indicated by knock-out mouse models. Importantly, some microRNAs, including the microRNA-888 (miR-888) cluster that is exclusively expressed in the reproductive system of human and nonhuman primates, are released in the sperm-surrounding fluid in the epididymis via extracellular vesicles, the so-called epididymosomes. In addition to interacting with the membrane of maturing spermatozoa, these extracellular vesicles containing microRNAs communicate with epithelial cells located downstream from their release site, suggesting a role in the luminal exocrine control of epididymal functions. Apart from their potential roles as mediators of intercellular communication within the epididymis, these extracellular microRNAs are potent molecular targets for the noninvasive diagnosis of male infertility. PMID:26178395

  11. Microbioreactors and scale-down models: growth of CHO cells using the Pall Micro24 MicroReactor system.

    PubMed

    Warr, Steve R C

    2014-01-01

    Microbioreactors are increasingly used within animal cell biotechnology to grow mammalian cells for cell line screening and to facilitate process development. Many such devices have been reported in the literature, but only a small number are available commercially. Microbioreactors range in complexity from simple plate-based systems to complex automated parallel bioreactors designed to enable the meaningful scale-down of conventional bioprocesses. The Micro24 MicroReactor system (Pall Life Sciences) fits between these extremes providing 24× 7 mL parallel "bioreactors" with individual monitoring and control of temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen. Inoculation, sampling, and feed additions are carried out manually in a Biological Safety Cabinet. In this chapter we describe the use of the Micro24 system to carry out screening or process development experiments with CHO cells. PMID:24297415

  12. microRNA-451 inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion through regulation of MIF in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Wan, Wei; Wang, Lijuan; Ji, Shishun; Zhang, Juanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The expression and functions of microRNA-451 have been studied in many human cancers. However, up to date, there is no study of microRNA-451 in renal cell carcinoma. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the expression, biological functions and molecular mechanisms of microRNA-451 in renal cell carcinoma. microRNA-451 expression level in renal cell carcinoma tissues and cell lines was measured using quantitative Real-time PCR. By using CCK8 assay, cell migration and invasion assay, we explored the functions of microRNA-451 in renal cell carcinoma. Dual-Luciferase report assay, quantitative Real-time PCR and western blot were performed to explore the molecular mechanisms of microRNA-451 functions in renal cell carcinoma. Functional assays were also performed to explore the effects of endogenous MIF in renal cell carcinoma. In this study, we showed for the first time that microRNA-451 was significantly down-regulated in renal cell carcinomas tissues and cell lines. microRNA-451 expression level was correlated with histological grade and lymph node metastasis. In addition, microRNA-451 inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of renal cell carcinomas cells. Moreover, MIF was identified as a target of microRNA-451, and down-regulation of MIF could mimic the suppressive functions of microRNA-451 in renal cell carcinomas, suggesting that microRNA-451 might be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of renal cell carcinomas. PMID:26884830

  13. Tailor cutting of crystalline solar cells by laser micro jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckert, F.; Pilat, E.; Piron, P.; Torres, P.; Carron, B.; Richerzhagen, B.; Pirot, M.; Monna, R.

    2012-03-01

    Coupling a laser into a hair thin water micro jet (Laser Micro Jet, LMJ) for cutting applications offers a wide range of processes that are quite unique. As the laser beam is guided by internal reflections inside of a liquid cylinder, the cuts are naturally straight and do not reflect any divergence as otherwise occurs with an unguided laser beam. Furthermore, having a liquid media at the point of contact ensures a fast removal of heat and eventual debris ensuring clean cuts, which are free of any burrs. Many applications have indeed been developed for a large variety of materials, which are as different as e.g. diamond, silicon, aluminum, ceramic and hard metals. The photovoltaic industry has enjoyed in the last decades tremendous growth rates, which are still projected into the future. We focus here on the segment of Building Integrated PV (BIPV), which requests tailored solutions to actual buildings and not-one-fits-it-all standardized modules. Having the option to tailor cut solar cells opens a new field of BIPV applications. For the first time, finished crystalline solar cells have been LMJ cut into predetermined shapes. First results show that the cut is clean and neat. Preliminary solar performance measurements are positive. This opens a new avenue of tailored made modules instead of having to rely on the one-fits-alloy approach used so far.

  14. Characterization of Cs vapor cell coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane using coherent population trapping spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hafiz, Moustafa Abdel; Maurice, Vincent; Chutani, Ravinder; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Guérandel, Stéphane; Clercq, Emeric de

    2015-05-14

    We report the realization and characterization using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated centimeter-scale Cs vapor cell. The dual-structure of the resonance lineshape, with presence of a narrow structure line at the top of a Doppler-broadened structure, is clearly observed. The linewidth of the narrow resonance is compared to the linewidth of an evacuated Cs cell and of a buffer gas Cs cell of similar size. The Cs-OTS adsorption energy is measured to be (0.42 ± 0.03) eV, leading to a clock frequency shift rate of 2.7 × 10{sup −9}/K in fractional unit. A hyperfine population lifetime, T{sub 1}, and a microwave coherence lifetime, T{sub 2}, of 1.6 and 0.5 ms are reported, corresponding to about 37 and 12 useful bounces, respectively. Atomic-motion induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances is observed in Cs-OTS cells by reducing the optical beam diameter. Ramsey CPT fringes are detected using a pulsed CPT interrogation scheme. Potential applications of the Cs-OTS cell to the development of a vapor cell atomic clock are discussed.

  15. Boundary Layer Observations of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles with an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Ismail, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of real-time high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of combined water vapor and aerosols in the boundary layer have been a long standing observational challenge to the meteorological, weather forecasting, and climate science communities. To overcome the high reoccurring costs associated with radiosondes as well as the lack of sufficient water vapor measurements over the continental united states, a compact and low cost eye-safe all semiconductor-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere. The laser transmitter utilizes two continuous wave external cavity diode lasers operating in the 830 nm absorption band as the online and offline seed laser sources. An optical switch is used to sequentially injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) with the two seed laser sources in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The TSOA is actively current pulsed to produce up to 7 μJ of output energy over a 1 μs pulse duration (150 m vertical resolution) at a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The measured laser transmitter spectral linewidth is less than 500 kHz while the long term frequency stability of the stabilized on-line wavelength is ± 55 MHz. The laser transmitter spectral purity was measured to be greater than 0.9996, allowing for simultaneous measurements of water vapor in the lower and upper troposphere. The DIAL receiver utilizes a commercially available full sky-scanning capable 35 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect the scattered light from the laser transmitter. Light collected by the telescope is spectrally filtered to suppress background noise and is coupled into a fiber optic cable which acts as the system field stop and limits the full angle field of view to 140 μrad. The light is sampled by a fiber coupled APD operated in a Geiger mode. The DIAL instrument is operated autonomously where water vapor and

  16. MicroRNA-21 suppression impedes medulloblastoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Grunder, Eveline; D'Ambrosio, Rocco; Fiaschetti, Giulio; Abela, Lucia; Arcaro, Alexandre; Zuzak, Tycho; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Lv, Sheng-Qing; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB), the most common malignant brain tumour in children, is characterised by a high risk of leptomeningeal dissemination. But little is known about the molecular mechanisms that promote cancer cell migration in MB. Aberrant expression of miR-21 is recognised to be causatively linked to metastasis in a variety of human neoplasms including brain tumours; however its function in MB is still unknown. In this study we investigated the expression level and the role of miR-21 in MB cell migration. miR-21 was found to be up-regulated, compared to normal cerebellum, in 29/29 MB primary samples and 6/6 MB-derived cell lines. Inverse correlation was observed between miR-21 expression and the metastasis suppressor PDCD4, while miR-21 repression increased the release of PDCD4 protein, suggesting negative regulation of PDCD4 by miR-21 in MB cells. Anti-miR-21 decreased protein expression of the tumour cell invasion mediators MAP4K1 and JNK, which are also known to be negatively regulated by PDCD4, and down-regulated integrin protein that is essential for MB leptomeningeal dissemination. Moreover miR-21 knockdown in MB cells increased the expression of two eminent negative modulators of cancer cell migration, E-Cadherin and TIMP2 proteins that are known to be positively regulated by PDCD4. Finally and importantly, suppression of miR-21 decreased the motility of MB cells and reduced their migration across basement membranes in vitro. Together, these compelling data propose miR-21 pathway as a novel mechanism impacting MB cell dissemination and raises the possibility that curability of selected MB may be improved by pharmaceutical strategies directed towards microRNA-21. PMID:21775132

  17. Dewetting Based Fabrication of Fibrous Micro-Scaffolds as Potential Injectable Cell Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hokyung; Yin, Liya; Chilian, William M.; Newby, Bi-min Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Although regenerative medicine utilizing tissue scaffolds has made enormous strides in recent years, many constraints still hamper their effectiveness. A limitation of many scaffolds is that they form surface patches, which are not particularly effective for some types of “wounds” that are deep within tissues, e.g., stroke, myocardial infarction. In this study, we reported the generation of fibrous micro-scaffolds feasible for delivering cells by injection into the tissue parenchyma. The micro-scaffolds (widths < 100 μm) were made by dewetting of poly (lactic-coglycolic acid) thin films containing parallel strips, and cells were seeded to form cell/polymer micro-constructs during or post the micro-scaffold fabrication process. Five types of cells including rat induced vascular progenitor cells were assessed for the formation of the micro-constructs. Critical factors in forming fibrous micro-scaffolds via dewetting of polymer thin films were found to be properties of polymers and supporting substrates, temperature, and proteins in the culture medium. Also, the ability of cells to attach to the micro-scaffolds was essential for forming cell/polymer micro-constructs. Both in vitro and in vivo assessments of injecting these micro-scaffolding constructs showed, as compared to free cells, enhanced cell retention at the injected site, which could lead to improved tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:25579969

  18. Optical rotation in excess of 100 rad generated by Rb vapor in a multipass cell

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.; Vachaspati, P.; Sheng, D.; Dural, N.; Romalis, M. V.

    2011-12-15

    Paramagnetic Faraday rotation is a powerful technique for atom sensing widely used in quantum nondemolition measurements, fundamental symmetry tests, and other precision measurements. We demonstrate the use of a multipass optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy and observe polarization rotation in excess of 100 rad from spin-polarized Rb vapor. Unlike optical cavities, multipass cells have a deterministic number of light passes and can be used to measure large optical rotations. We also observe a tenfold suppression of transverse spin relaxation when Rb atoms are placed in a coherent superposition state immune to spin-exchange collisions.

  19. Optical rotation in excess of 100 rad generated by Rb vapor in a multipass cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Vachaspati, P.; Sheng, D.; Dural, N.; Romalis, M. V.

    2011-12-01

    Paramagnetic Faraday rotation is a powerful technique for atom sensing widely used in quantum nondemolition measurements, fundamental symmetry tests, and other precision measurements. We demonstrate the use of a multipass optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy and observe polarization rotation in excess of 100 rad from spin-polarized Rb vapor. Unlike optical cavities, multipass cells have a deterministic number of light passes and can be used to measure large optical rotations. We also observe a tenfold suppression of transverse spin relaxation when Rb atoms are placed in a coherent superposition state immune to spin-exchange collisions.

  20. Manipulating cell shape by placing cells into micro-fabricated chambers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fred; Atilgan, Erdinc; Burgess, David; Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Cell shape is an important cellular parameter that influences the spatial organization and function of cells. However, it has often been challenging to study the effects of cell shape because of difficulties in experimentally controlling cell shape in a defined way. We describe here a method of physically manipulating sea urchin cells into specified shapes by inserting them into micro-fabricated chambers of different shapes. This method allows for generation of large systematic and quantitative data sets and may be adaptable for different cell types and contexts. PMID:24633802

  1. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Yohei; Mukohyama, Junko; Nakamura, Shun-ichi; Minami, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in virtually all biological processes, including stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and development. The dysregulation of miRNAs is associated with many human diseases including cancer. We have identified a set of miRNAs differentially expressed between human breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and non-tumorigenic cancer cells. In addition, these miRNAs are similarly upregulated or downregulated in normal mammary stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we mainly describe the miRNAs that are dysregulated in human breast CSCs directly isolated from clinical specimens. The miRNAs and their clusters, such as the miR-200 clusters, miR-183 cluster, miR-221-222 cluster, let-7, miR-142 and miR-214, target the genes and pathways important for stem cell maintenance, such as the self-renewal gene BMI1, apoptosis, Wnt signaling, Notch signaling, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In addition, the current evidence shows that metastatic breast CSCs acquire a phenotype that is different from the CSCs in a primary site. Thus, clarifying the miRNA regulation of the metastatic breast CSCs will further advance our understanding of the roles of human breast CSCs in tumor progression. PMID:26712794

  2. Spin-exchange frequency shift in alkali-metal-vapor cell frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Micalizio, Salvatore; Godone, Aldo; Levi, Filippo; Vanier, Jacques

    2006-03-15

    In this paper we calculate the effect of spin-exchange collisions in alkali-metal vapors. In the framework of the high-energy approximation, we evaluate the spin-exchange cross sections related to the line broadening and to the frequency shift of the ground state hyperfine transition. We do the calculation for the four isotopes, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 87}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs. The results are used in particular to evaluate the spin-exchange frequency shift in Rb vapor cell frequency standards used in many applications. It turns out that, due to possible fluctuations in the atomic density, spin exchange may affect significantly the medium and long term frequency stability of the frequency standard.

  3. MicroRNA profiles in various hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Asahiro; Iwama, Hisakazu; Fujihara, Shintaro; Sakamoto, Teppei; Fujita, Koji; Tani, Joji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Himoto, Takashi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Although surgery is considered the most effective treatment for patients with HCC, its indication is restricted by limited criteria and a high relapse rate following surgery; therefore, systemic chemotherapy is required for patients with advanced-stage HCC to prolong their survival. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding RNAs of 18–22 nucleotides in length. It has been reported that aberrant expression of miRNAs is a feature shared by various types of human cancer. Previous studies have indicated that the modulation of non-coding RNAs, particularly miRNAs, may be a valuable therapeutic target for HCC. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the miRNA profiles associated with differentiation and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection observed in HCC cell lines. The human Alex, Hep3B, HepG2, HuH1, HuH7, JHH1, JHH2, JHH5, JHH6, HLE, HLF and Li-7 HCC cell lines were used for an miRNA array. Replicate data were analyzed following their classification into: i) Poorly- and well-differentiated human HCC cells and ii) HBV-positive and -negative human HCC cells. Out of the 1,719 miRNAs, 4 were found to be significantly upregulated and 52 significantly downregulated in the poorly-differentiated cells, as compared with the well-differentiated cells. Conversely, in the HBV-positive cells 125 miRNAs were found to be upregulated and 2 downregulated, as compared with the HBV-negative cells. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis with Pearson's correlation revealed that the miRNA expression levels were clustered both together and separately in each group. In conclusion, miRNA profile characterization based on various parameters may be a novel approach to determine the etiology of HCC.

  4. Thin-film solar cells with InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells and a rear surface etched with light trapping micro-hole array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kentaroh; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Sodabanlu, Hassanet; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2015-08-01

    A light trapping effect in GaAs p-i-n solar cells with InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells (MQWs) in the i-layer was demonstrated by applying a light scattering texture to the rear surface of the cell. A thin-film MQW solar cell was successfully fabricated by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) to grow an inverted n-i-p photovoltaic (PV) structure; this structure was then transferred to a Si support substrate to prevent optical loss due to free carrier absorption. For the light scattering texture, the use of both the wet-etched micro-hole arrayed SiO2 dielectric layer on the rear surface of the cell and the secondarily etched micro hole array on the GaAs layer was attempted. On the SiO2 layer, the micro hole array pattern was obtained by the radio frequency sputtering of the layer followed by wet etching with photolithographic patterning. On the GaAs layer, the micro-hole array pattern was obtained by direct etching through a SiO2 template. Compared with the light scattering effects of the micro-hole-arrayed SiO2 layer, the secondarily etched GaAs rear contact layer showed a significant improvement in external quantum efficiency (EQE) in the wavelength range from 855 to 1000 nm that corresponds to the photon absorption wavelength in MQWs.

  5. Micro-Imagers for Spaceborne Cell-Growth Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Matthews, Janet; SaintAnge, Beverly; Tanabe, Helen

    2006-01-01

    A document discusses selected aspects of a continuing effort to develop five micro-imagers for both still and video monitoring of cell cultures to be grown aboard the International Space Station. The approach taken in this effort is to modify and augment pre-existing electronic micro-cameras. Each such camera includes an image-detector integrated-circuit chip, signal-conditioning and image-compression circuitry, and connections for receiving power from, and exchanging data with, external electronic equipment. Four white and four multicolor light-emitting diodes are to be added to each camera for illuminating the specimens to be monitored. The lens used in the original version of each camera is to be replaced with a shorter-focal-length, more-compact singlet lens to make it possible to fit the camera into the limited space allocated to it. Initially, the lenses in the five cameras are to have different focal lengths: the focal lengths are to be 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3 cm. Once one of the focal lengths is determined to be the most nearly optimum, the remaining four cameras are to be fitted with lenses of that focal length.

  6. Sub-natural width resonances in Cs vapor confined in micrometric thickness optical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartaleva, S.; Krasteva, A.; Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D.; Slavov, D.; Vartanyan, T.

    2013-03-01

    We present here the behavior of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT), Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonances and Velocity Selective Excitation (VSE) resonances observed in Cs vapor confined in а micrometric optical cell (MC) with thickness L = 6λ, λ = 852nm. For comparison of behavior of VSE resonance another conventional optical cell with thickness L=2.5 cm is used. Cells are irradiated in orthogonal to their windows directions by probe beam scanned on the Fg = 4 → Fe= 3, 4, 5 set of transitions and pump beam fixed at the Fg = 3 → Fe = 4 transition, on the D2 line of Cs. The enhanced absorption (fluorescence) narrow VSOP resonance at the closed transition transforms into reduced absorption (fluorescence) one with small increase of atomic concentration or light intensity. A striking difference appears between the VSE resonance broadening in L = 6λ and conventional L = 2.5cm cells.

  7. Bifacial solar cell with SnS absorber by vapor transport deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wangperawong, Artit; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yee, Yesheng; Herron, Steven M.; Clemens, Bruce M.; Cui, Yi; Bent, Stacey F.

    2014-10-27

    The SnS absorber layer in solar cell devices was produced by vapor transport deposition (VTD), which is a low-cost manufacturing method for solar modules. The performance of solar cells consisting of Si/Mo/SnS/ZnO/indium tin oxide (ITO) was limited by the SnS layer's surface texture and field-dependent carrier collection. For improved performance, a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate was used in place of the Mo to smooth the topography of the VTD SnS and to make bifacial solar cells, which are potentially useful for multijunction applications. A bifacial SnS solar cell consisting of glass/FTO/SnS/CdS/ZnO/ITO demonstrated front- and back-side power conversion efficiencies of 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively.

  8. Bifacial solar cell with SnS absorber by vapor transport deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangperawong, Artit; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yee, Yesheng; Herron, Steven M.; Clemens, Bruce M.; Cui, Yi; Bent, Stacey F.

    2014-10-01

    The SnS absorber layer in solar cell devices was produced by vapor transport deposition (VTD), which is a low-cost manufacturing method for solar modules. The performance of solar cells consisting of Si/Mo/SnS/ZnO/indium tin oxide (ITO) was limited by the SnS layer's surface texture and field-dependent carrier collection. For improved performance, a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate was used in place of the Mo to smooth the topography of the VTD SnS and to make bifacial solar cells, which are potentially useful for multijunction applications. A bifacial SnS solar cell consisting of glass/FTO/SnS/CdS/ZnO/ITO demonstrated front- and back-side power conversion efficiencies of 1.2% and 0.2%, respectively.

  9. Effects of viscosity on endothelial cell damage under acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seda, Robinson; Singh, Rahul; Li, David; Pitre, John; Putnam, Andrew; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is a process by which stabilized superheated microdroplets are able to undergo phase transition with the aid of focused ultrasound. Gas bubbles resulting from ADV can provide local occlusion of the blood vessels supplying diseased tissue, such as tumors. The ADV process can also induce bioeffects that increase vessel permeability, which is beneficial for localized drug delivery. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that vaporization at the endothelial layer will affect cell attachment and viability. Several hypotheses have been proposed to elucidate the mechanism of damage including the generation of normal and shear stresses during bubble expansion. A single 3.5 MHz ultrasound pulse consisting of 8 cycles (~2.3 μs) and a 6 MPa peak rarefactional pressure was used to induce ADV on endothelial cells in media of different viscosities. Carboxylmethyl cellulose was added to the cell media to increase the viscosity up to 300 cP to and aid in the reduction of stresses during bubble expansion. The likelihood of cell damage was decreased when compared to our control (~1 cP), but it was still present in some cases indicating that the mechanism of damage does not depend entirely on viscous stresses associated with bubble expansion. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  10. Organic solvent vapor sensitive methylammonium lead trihalide film formation for efficient hybrid perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lian, Jiarong; Wang, Qi; Yuan, Yongbo; Shao, Yuchuan; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-03-25

    In this study, the anisotropic electronic properties of the perovskite crystals originating from their non-cubic crystal structures can potentially give rise to the grain orientation correlated photovoltaic device performance. Here we report that an organic solvent vapor atmosphere introduced during the spin-coating and formation of perovskite films changes the orientation and size of perovskite grains. It was found that slightly larger but much more oriented methylammonium lead trihalide (CH3NH3PbI3) grains could be obtained under 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) vapor atmospheres. The devices with more oriented grains outperformed regular devices with more random grains by a 50 mV largermore » open circuit voltage as well as a slightly increased fill factor. The device efficiency enhancement can be attributed to the longer charge recombination lifetime resulting from the reduced trap density and oriented grains. This result is important in providing guidelines for comparing the results from various groups because organic solvent vapors are generally present in a sealed glovebox for perovskite solar cell fabrication.« less

  11. Investigating the Effect of Pyridine Vapor Treatment on Perovskite Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Alison

    2015-08-20

    Perovskite photovoltaics have recently come to prominence as a viable alternative to crystalline silicon based solar cells. In an effort to create consistent and high-quality films, we studied the effect of various annealing conditions as well as the effect of pyridine vapor treatment on mixed halide methylammonium lead perovskite films. Of six conditions tested, we found that annealing at 100°C for 90 minutes followed by 120°C for 15 minutes resulted in the purest perovskite. Perovskite films made using that condition were treated with pyridine for various amounts of time, and the effects on perovskite microstructure were studied using x-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and time-resolved photoluminescence lifetime analysis (TRPL). A previous study found that pyridine vapor caused perovskite films to have higher photoluminescence intensity and become more homogenous. In this study we found that the effects of pyridine are more complex: while films appeared to become more homogenous, a decrease in bulk photoluminescence lifetime was observed. In addition, the perovskite bandgap appeared to decrease with increased pyridine treatment time. Finally, X-ray diffraction showed that pyridine vapor treatment increased the perovskite (110) peak intensity but also often gave rise to new unidentified peaks, suggesting the formation of a foreign species. It was observed that the intensity of this unknown species had an inverse correlation with the increase in perovskite peak intensity, and also seemed to be correlated with the decrease in TRPL lifetime.

  12. Investigating the Effect of Pyridine Vapor Treatment on Perovskite Solar Cells - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Alison J.

    2015-08-25

    Perovskite photovoltaics have recently come to prominence as a viable alternative to crystalline silicon based solar cells. In an effort to create consistent and high-quality films, we studied the effect of various annealing conditions as well as the effect of pyridine vapor treatment on mixed halide methylammonium lead perovskite films. Of six conditions tested, we found that annealing at 100 degree Celsius for 90 minutes followed by 120 degree Celsius for 15 minutes resulted in the purest perovskite. Perovskite films made using that condition were treated with pyridine for various amounts of time, and the effects on perovskite microstructure were studied using x-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and time-resolved photoluminescence lifetime analysis (TRPL). A previous study found that pyridine vapor caused perovskite films to have higher photoluminescence intensity and become more homogenous. In this study we found that the effects of pyridine are more complex: while films appeared to become more homogenous, a decrease in bulkphotoluminescence lifetime was observed. In addition, the perovskite bandgap appeared to decrease with increased pyridine treatment time. Finally, X-ray diffraction showed that pyridine vapor treatment increased the perovskite (110) peak intensity but also often gave rise to new unidentified peaks, suggesting the formation of a foreign species. It was observed that the intensity of this unknown species had an inverse correlation with the increase in perovskite peak intensity, and also seemed to be correlated with the decrease in TRPL lifetime.

  13. Organic solvent vapor sensitive methylammonium lead trihalide film formation for efficient hybrid perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jiarong; Wang, Qi; Yuan, Yongbo; Shao, Yuchuan; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-03-25

    In this study, the anisotropic electronic properties of the perovskite crystals originating from their non-cubic crystal structures can potentially give rise to the grain orientation correlated photovoltaic device performance. Here we report that an organic solvent vapor atmosphere introduced during the spin-coating and formation of perovskite films changes the orientation and size of perovskite grains. It was found that slightly larger but much more oriented methylammonium lead trihalide (CH3NH3PbI3) grains could be obtained under 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) vapor atmospheres. The devices with more oriented grains outperformed regular devices with more random grains by a 50 mV larger open circuit voltage as well as a slightly increased fill factor. The device efficiency enhancement can be attributed to the longer charge recombination lifetime resulting from the reduced trap density and oriented grains. This result is important in providing guidelines for comparing the results from various groups because organic solvent vapors are generally present in a sealed glovebox for perovskite solar cell fabrication.

  14. Photo-Activated Low Temperature, Micro Fuel Cell Power Source

    SciTech Connect

    Harry L. Tuller

    2007-03-30

    A Key objective of this program is to identify electrodes that will make it possible to significantly reduce the operating temperature of micro-SOFC and thin film-based SOFCs. Towards this end, efforts are directed towards: (a) identifying the key rate limiting steps which limit presently utilized electrodes from performing at reduced temperatures, as well as, (b) investigating the use of optical, as opposed to thermal energy, as a means for photocatalyzing electrode reactions and enabling reduced operating temperatures. During Phase I, the following objectives were achieved: (a) assembly and testing of our unique Microprobe Thin Film Characterization System; (b) fabrication of the model cathode materials system in thin film form by both PLD and ink jet printing; and (c) the successful configuration and testing of the model materials as cathodes in electrochemical cells. A further key objective (d) to test the potential of illumination in enhancing electrode performance was also achieved.

  15. MicroRNA profiles classify papillary renal cell carcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wach, S; Nolte, E; Theil, A; Stöhr, C; T Rau, T; Hartmann, A; Ekici, A; Keck, B; Taubert, H; Wullich, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Besides the conventional clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), papillary RCC (pRCC) is the second most common renal malignancy. Papillary RCCs can further be subdivided into two distinct subtypes. Although a clinical relevance of pRCC subtyping has been shown, little is known about the molecular characteristics of both pRCC subtypes. Methods: We performed microarray-based microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling of primary ccRCC and pRCC cases. A subset of miRNAs was identified and used to establish a classification model for ccRCC, pRCC types 1 and 2 and normal tissue. Furthermore, we performed gene set enrichment analysis with the predicted miRNA target genes. Results: Only five miRNAs (miR-145, -200c, -210, -502-3p and let-7c) were sufficient to identify the samples with high accuracy. In a collection of 111 tissue samples, 73.9% were classified correctly. An enrichment of miRNA target genes in the family of multidrug-resistance proteins was noted in all tumours. Several components of the Jak-STAT signalling pathway might be targets for miRNAs that define pRCC tumour subtypes. Conclusion: MicroRNAs are able to accurately classify RCC samples. Deregulated miRNAs might contribute to the high chemotherapy resistance of RCC. Furthermore, our results indicate that pRCC type 2 tumours could be dependent on oncogenic MYC signalling. PMID:23799849

  16. Parametric analyses of vapor-anode, multitube AMTEC cells for Pluto/Express mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    1998-01-01

    A detailed AMTEC Performance and Evaluation Analysis Model (APEAM) was used to evaluate the effects of various design changes on the performance of next-generation, Pluto/Express multitube cells. These changes were: using a CREARE condenser; changing the number of BASE tubes and the electrode length; using other electrode materials; using molybdenum (Mo) as the structural material on the hot side of the cell; and using reflective rhodium coatings in the low vapor pressure cavity of the cell. The present analyses utilized a PX-5A type cell, with a Mo circumferential radiation shield, and 7 BASE tubes with 29 mm-long electrodes. Analyses performed for an output load voltage of 3.5 V per cell showed that: (a) A stainless steel (SS) cell with improved electrodes (50% lower contact resistance than TiN, and an increased exchange current, B=200 A.K1/2/Pa.m2) could deliver 7.1 We with an efficiency of 19.5% (b) When Mo was substituted for the SS on the hot side of this cell, the electrical power output increased to 8.8 We and the cell efficiency increased to 20.2% (c) Using rhodium coatings in the Mo/SS cell increased the electrical power output to 9.7 We, and the peak efficiency by 2.3 points, to 22.5%.

  17. Micro space power system using MEMS fuel cell for nano-satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongkwang; Kim, Taegyu

    2014-08-01

    A micro space power system using micro fuel cell was developed for nano-satellites. The power system was fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) fabrication technologies. Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell was selected in consideration of space environment. Sodium borohydride (NaBH4) was selected as a hydrogen source while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was selected as an oxygen source. The power system consists of a micro fuel cell, micro-reactor, micro-pump, and fuel cartridges. The micro fuel cell was fabricated on a light-weight and corrosion-resistant glass plates. The micro-reactor was used to generate hydrogen from NaBH4 alkaline solution via a catalytic hydrolysis reaction. All components such as micro-pump, fuel cartridges, and auxiliary battery were integrated for a complete power system. The storability of NaBH4 solution was evaluated at -25 °C and the performance of the micro power system was measured at various operating conditions. The power output of micro power system reasonably followed up the given electric load conditions.

  18. Electromagnetically-induced transparency in Cs and Rb in the same vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Matt; Gordon, Joshua; Holloway, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) in both cesium and rubidium in the same vapor cell with coincident optical fields. Each atomic system can detect radio frequency (RF) field strengths through modification of the EIT signal. We show that these two systems can detect the same RF field strength simultaneously. This allows us to perform the same measurement in two effective ``laboratories,'' providing an immediate independent reference, which will lead to an SI-traceable RF E-field measurement. We examine the impact of coincident, simultaneous EIT on RF field metrology and the EIT signal.

  19. Efficient Collection of {sup 221}Fr into a Vapor Cell Magneto-optical Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.; Corwin, K.L.; Vogel, K.R.; Wieman, C.E. |; Dinneen, T.P.; Maddi, J.; Gould, H.

    1997-08-01

    We have efficiently loaded a vapor cell magneto-optical trap from an orthotropic source of {sup 221}Fr with a trapping efficiency of 56(10){percent}. A novel detection scheme allowed us to measure 900 trapped atoms with a signal to noise ratio of {approximately}60 in 1sec. We have measured the energies and the hyperfine constants of the 7 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 7 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} states. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Transient response of nonlinear magneto-optic rotation in a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeen, M. Ummal; Rangarajan, G.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2010-01-01

    We study resonant nonlinear magneto-optic rotation (NMOR) in a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell as the magnetic field is swept. At low sweep rates, the nonlinear rotation appears as a narrow resonance signal with a linewidth of about “300 μG” (2π×420 Hz). At high sweep rates, the signal shows transient response with an oscillatory decay. The decay time constant is of order 100 ms. The behavior is different for transitions starting from the lower or the upper hyperfine level of the ground state because of optical pumping effects.

  1. Nanoparticle-coated micro-optofluidic ring resonator as a detector for microscale gas chromatographic vapor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, K.; Collin, W. R.; Fan, X.; Zellers, E. T.

    2015-05-01

    A vapor sensor comprising a nanoparticle-coated microfabricated optofluidic ring resonator (μOFRR) is introduced. A multilayer film of polyether functionalized, thiolate-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (MPN) was solvent cast on the inner wall of the hollow cylindrical SiOx μOFRR resonator structure, and whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances were generated with a 1550 nm tunable laser via an optical fiber taper. Reversible shifts in the WGM resonant wavelength upon vapor exposure were detected with a photodetector. The μOFRR chip was connected to a pair of upstream etched-Si chips containing PDMS-coated separation μcolumns and calibration curves were generated from the peak-area responses to five volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Calibration curves were linear, and the sensitivities reflected the influence of analyte volatility and analyte-MPN functional group affinity. Sorption-induced changes in film thickness apparently dominate over changes in the refractive index of the film as the determinant of responses for all VOCs. Peaks from the MPN-coated μOFRR were just 20-50% wider than those from a flame ionization detector for similar μcolumn separation conditions, reflecting the rapid response of the sensor for VOCs. The five VOCs were baseline separated in <1.67 min, with detection limits as low as 38 ng.

  2. Homojunction GaAs solar cells grown by close space vapor transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Jason W.; Ritenour, Andrew J.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2014-06-08

    We report on the first pn junction solar cells grown by homoepitaxy of GaAs using close space vapor transport (CSVT). Cells were grown both on commercial wafer substrates and on a CSVT absorber film, and had efficiencies reaching 8.1%, open circuit voltages reaching 909 mV, and internal quantum efficiency of 90%. The performance of these cells is partly limited by the electron diffusion lengths in the wafer substrates, as evidenced by the improved peak internal quantum efficiency in devices fabricated on a CSVT absorber film. Unoptimized highly-doped n-type emitters also limit the photocurrent, indicating that thinner emitters with reduced doping, and ultimately wider band gap window or surface passivation layers, are required to increase the efficiency.

  3. MicroRNA miR-125a controls hematopoietic stem cell number

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shangqin; Lu, Jun; Schlanger, Rita; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Judy Y.; Fox, Michelle C.; Purton, Louise E.; Fleming, Heather H.; Cobb, Bradley; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Golub, Todd R.; Scadden, David T.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs influence hematopoietic differentiation, but little is known about their effects on the stem cell state. Here, we report that the microRNA processing enzyme Dicer is essential for stem cell persistence in vivo and a specific microRNA, miR-125a, controls the size of the stem cell population by regulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) apoptosis. Conditional deletion of Dicer revealed an absolute dependence for the multipotent HSPC population in a cell-autonomous manner, with increased HSPC apoptosis in mutant animals. An evolutionarily conserved microRNA cluster containing miR-99b, let-7e, and miR-125a was preferentially expressed in long-term hematopoietic stem cells. MicroRNA miR-125a alone was capable of increasing the number of hematopoietic stem cells in vivo by more than 8-fold. This result was accomplished through a differentiation stage-specific reduction of apoptosis in immature hematopoietic progenitors, possibly through targeting multiple proapoptotic genes. Bak1 was directly down-regulated by miR-125a and expression of a 3′UTR-less Bak1 blocked miR-125a-induced hematopoietic expansion in vivo. These data demonstrate cell-state-specific regulation by microRNA and identify a unique microRNA functioning to regulate the stem cell pool size. PMID:20616003

  4. Single and multijunction space solar cells grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OM-VPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, P.G.; Gregory, P.E.; Larue, R.A.; Ludowise, M.J.

    1982-08-01

    Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OM-VPE) is a versatile technique for growing III-V compound semiconductor solar cells. It has good uniformity and morphology, control that allows growth of extremely thin layers, and is a technique readily automated. The vehicle for the present discussion is a metal interconnected cascade (MIC/sup 2/) solar cell that has achieved 16.6% AM0 and 22% AM3 efficiency (uncorrected for 14% grid coverage). These are the best results reported to date for a cascade solar cell. Features include a 9-layer epitaxial structure, the thinnest of which is less than 1000 thick, a high-efficiency 30% AlGaAs top cell only 1.5 microns thick, a GaAs bottom cell that has survived the 780/sup 0/C, 20-minute top cell growth, and process yields greater than 4 cm/sup 2/ per wafer. The paper describes the cell design requirements, how it was grown by OM-VPE, and performance results.

  5. Strong field radio-frequency measurements using Rydberg states in a vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephanie; Anderson, David; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    There has been a growing interest in using electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms in a room-temperature vapor cell as an all-optical readout method for measuring microwave electric fields. We present results from RF-modulating the 60S1 / 2 and 58D5 / 2 Rydberg states of rubidium with 50 MHz and 100 MHz fields, respectively. Weak RF fields AC Stark-shifts the Rydberg states. As the field strength is increased, sidebands appear at even multiples of the driving frequency. When strong fields are applied, the nearby hydrogenic manifold begins to intersect with the shifted levels. Similar investigations have been performed in cesium. Due to the significant amount of state mixing and level structure, Floquet theory is required to describe the level shifts and mixing. By comparing the calculation with the experimental data, we obtain an absolute determination of the RF electric field reaching a maximum field of 296 V/m to within +/- 0 . 35 % . Additionally, we estimate the shielding of DC fields within the vapor cell.

  6. Analysis of long-time operation of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsch, Marek; Čaja, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Micro-cogeneration is cogeneration with small performance, with maximal electric power up to 50 kWe. On the present, there are available small micro-cogeneration units with small electric performance, about 1 kWe, which are usable also in single family houses or flats. These micro-cogeneration units operate on principle of conventional combustion engine, Stirling engine, steam engine or fuel cell. Micro-cogeneration units with fuel cells are new progressive developing type of units for single family houses. Fuel cell is electrochemical device which by oxidation-reduction reaction turn directly chemical energy of fuel to electric power, secondary products are pure water and thermal energy. The aim of paper is measuring and evaluation of operation parameters of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell which uses natural gas as a fuel.

  7. Optical Measurements of Strong Microwave Fields with Rydberg Atoms in a Vapor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Miller, S. A.; Raithel, G.; Gordon, J. A.; Butler, M. L.; Holloway, C. L.

    2016-03-01

    We present a spectral analysis of Rydberg atoms in strong microwave fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) as an all-optical readout. The measured spectroscopic response enables optical, atom-based electric-field measurements of high-power microwaves. In our experiments, microwaves are irradiated into a room-temperature rubidium vapor cell. The microwaves are tuned near the two-photon 65 D -66 D Rydberg transition and reach an electric-field strength of 230 V /m , about 20% of the microwave-ionization threshold of these atoms. A Floquet treatment is used to model the Rydberg-level energies and their excitation rates. We arrive at an empirical model for the field-strength distribution inside the spectroscopic cell that yields excellent overall agreement between the measured and calculated Rydberg EIT-Floquet spectra. Using spectral features in the Floquet maps, we achieve an absolute strong-field measurement precision of 6%.

  8. microRNAs in Cancer Cell Response to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Czochor, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: microRNAs (miRNA) have been characterized as master regulators of the genome. As such, miRNAs are responsible for regulating almost every cellular pathway, including the DNA damage response (DDR) after ionizing radiation (IR). IR is a therapeutic tool that is used for the treatment of several types of cancer, yet the mechanism behind radiation response is not fully understood. Recent Advances: It has been demonstrated that IR can alter miRNA expression profiles, varying greatly from one cell type to the next. It is possible that this variation contributes to the range of tumor cell responsiveness that is observed after radiotherapy, especially considering the extensive role for miRNAs in regulating the DDR. In addition, individual miRNAs or miRNA families have been shown to play a multifaceted role in the DDR, regulating multiple members in a single pathway. Critical Issues: In this review, we will discuss the effects of radiation on miRNA expression as well as explore the function of miRNAs in regulating the cellular response to radiation-induced damage. We will discuss the importance of miRNA regulation at each stage of the DDR, including signal transduction, DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint activation, DNA double-strand break repair, and apoptosis. We will focus on emphasizing the importance of a single miRNA targeting several mediators within a pathway. Future Directions: miRNAs will continue to emerge as critical regulators of the DDR. Understanding the role of miRNAs in the response to IR will provide insights for improving the current standard therapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 293–312. PMID:24206455

  9. Efficiency of photodesorption of Rb atoms collected on polymer organic film in vapor-cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atutov, S. N.; Chubakov, V. P.; Chubakov, P. A.; Plekhanov, A. I.

    2011-04-01

    The efficiency of photodesorption of Rb atoms previously collected on polymer organic film has been studied in detail. This study was carried out in a Pyrex glass cell of which the inner surface was covered with (poly)dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film and illuminated by a powerful flash lamp. The desorption dynamic of the Rb atoms density in the cell caused by the illumination and percentage of desorbed atoms was studied by using of Rb resonance lamp and free running diode laser as sources of probing light. It was determined that 85 percent collected chemical active Rb atoms and stored during 16 s in the closed cell, 75 percent in the pumped cell can be desorbed by single flash of the lamp. The number of stored atoms decays with a characteristic time of 60 min in isolated cell and with a time 12.4 min in a pumped cell. We believe that this efficient method of collection and fast realization of atoms or molecules could be used for enhancement of sensitivity of existed sensors for the trace detection of various elements (including toxic or radioactive ones) which is important to environmental applications, medicine or in geology. The effect might help to construct an efficient light-driven atomic source for a magneto-optical trap in a case of extremely low vapor density or very weak flux of atoms, such as artificial radioactive alkali atoms.

  10. Analyses of Nb-1Zr/C-103, vapor anode, multi-tube AMTEC cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2000-01-01

    A high performance, Nb-1Zr/C-103, vapor anode, multi-tube AMTEC cell design is presented. The cell measures 41.27 mm in diameter, is 125.3 mm high, and has eight BASE tubes connected electrically in series. The hot structure of the cell (hot plate, BASE tubes support plate, hot plenum wall, evaporator standoff, evaporator wick, and side wall facing the BASE tubes) is made of Nb-1Zr. The cold structure of the cell (condenser, interior cylindrical thermal radiation shield, the casing and the wick of the liquid sodium return artery, and side wall above the BASE tubes) is made of the stronger, lower thermal conductivity niobium alloy C-103. This cell, which weighs 163.4 g, could deliver 7.0 We at 17% efficiency and load voltage of 3.3 V, when using TiN BASE electrodes characterized by B=75 A.K1/2/m2.Pa and G=50 and assuming BASE/electrode contact resistance of 0.06 Ω-cm2 and leakage resistance of the BASE braze structure of 3 Ω. For these performance parameters and when the interior cylindrical C-103 thermal radiation shield is covered with low emissivity rhodium, the projected specific mass of the cell is 23.4 g/We. The BASE brazes and the evaporator temperatures were below the recommended limits of 1123 K and 1023 K, respectively. In addition, the temperature margin in the cell was at least + 20 K. When electrodes characterized by B=120 A.K1/2/m2.Pa and G=10 were used, the cell power increased to 8.38 We at 3.5 V and efficiency of 18.8%, for a cell specific mass of 19.7 g/We. Issues related to structure strength of the cell and the performance degradation of the BASE and electrodes are not addressed in this paper. .

  11. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  12. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  13. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  14. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  15. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart IIIii of... - Required Elements of Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mercury Vapor Measurement and Cell Room Monitoring Plans 5 Table 5 to Subpart IIIII of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. IIIII... and Cell Room Monitoring Plans Your Floor-Level Mercury Vapor Measurement Plan required by §...

  16. Formaldehyde vapor produced from hexamethylenetetramine and pesticide: Simultaneous monitoring of formaldehyde and ozone in chamber experiments by flow-based hybrid micro-gas analyzer.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Akira; Hozumi, Naruto; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Asako; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    Simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3 was performed by the developed flow analysis system to prove that HCHO vapor is produced from solid pesticide in the presence of O3. HCHO is produced in many ways, including as primary emissions from fuel combustion and in secondary production from anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds by photochemical reactions. In this work, HCHO production from pesticides was investigated for the first time. Commonly pesticide contains surfactant such as hexamethylenetetramine (HMT), which is a heterocyclic compound formed from six molecules of HCHO and four molecules of NH3. HMT can react with gaseous oxidants such as ozone (O3) to produce HCHO. In the present study, a flow analysis system was developed for simultaneous analysis of HCHO and O3, and this system was used to determine if solid pesticides produced HCHO vapor in the presence of O3. HMT or the pesticide jimandaisen, which contains mancozeb as the active ingradient and HMT as a stabilizer was placed at the bottom of a 20-L stainless steel chamber. Air in the chamber was monitored using the developed flow system. Analyte gases were collected into an absorbing solution by a honeycomb-patterned microchannel scrubber that was previously developed for a micro gas analysis system (μGAS). Subsequently, indigotrisulfonate, a blue dye, was added to the absorbing solution to detect O3, which discolored the solution. HCHO was detected after mixing with the Hantzsch reaction reagent. Both gases could be detected at concentrations ranging from parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 1000 ppbv with good linearity. Both HMT and jimandaisen emitted large amount of HCHO in the presence of O3. PMID:26653496

  17. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO nano and micro structures grown by low temperature spray pyrolysis and vapor transport.

    PubMed

    Agouram, S; Bushiri, M J; Montenegro, D N; Reig, C; Martínez-Tomás, M C; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V

    2012-08-01

    In this work we present a systematic study of ZnO micro and nanostructures grown by spray pyrolysis (SP) and by physical vapour transport (PVT) on glass and c-sapphire substrates at low temperatures. Optimised growth conditions have allowed to obtain homogeneous ZnO nanolayers composed of quasi-spherical nanoparticles in the range 2 to 8 nm by spray pyrolysis, while by PVT the selected growth conditions allow to produce a wide variety of morphologies (tripods, grains, arrows and wires) of nano and microsize dimension. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used as characterization techniques in the investigation of structural, morphological and compositional nature of these nanostructures in relation with the growth method. PMID:22962824

  18. Evaluation of E-Cigarette Liquid Vapor and Mainstream Cigarette Smoke after Direct Exposure of Primary Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scheffler, Stefanie; Dieken, Hauke; Krischenowski, Olaf; Förster, Christine; Branscheid, Detlev; Aufderheide, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    E-cigarettes are emerging products, often described as “reduced-risk” nicotine products or alternatives to combustible cigarettes. Many smokers switch to e-cigarettes to quit or significantly reduce smoking. However, no regulations for e-cigarettes are currently into force, so that the quality and safety of e-liquids is not necessarily guaranteed. We exposed primary human bronchial epithelial cells of two different donors to vapor of e-cigarette liquid with or without nicotine, vapor of the carrier substances propylene glycol and glycerol as well as to mainstream smoke of K3R4F research cigarettes. The exposure was done in a CULTEX® RFS compact module, allowing the exposure of the cells at the air-liquid interface. 24 h post-exposure, cell viability and oxidative stress levels in the cells were analyzed. We found toxicological effects of e-cigarette vapor and the pure carrier substances, whereas the nicotine concentration did not have an effect on the cell viability. The viability of mainstream smoke cigarette exposed cells was 4.5–8 times lower and the oxidative stress levels 4.5–5 times higher than those of e-cigarette vapor exposed cells, depending on the donor. Our experimental setup delivered reproducible data and thus provides the opportunity for routine testing of e-cigarette liquids to ensure safety and quality for the user. PMID:25856554

  19. MicroRNAs in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    NI, HUIYUN; TONG, RONG; ZOU, LINQING; SONG, GUOQI; CHO, WILLIAM C.

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRs) has a significant impact on the biological characteristics of lymphocytes, and is important in the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). It has been demonstrated, using miR profiling and detecting distinct miR signatures, that certain miRs may accurately distinguish different subtypes and prognostic classifications of DLBCL, as well as distinguish DLBCL from other more indolent lymphomas, including follicular lymphoma. miRs are excellent biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. In DLBCL, specific miR expression profiles in the tissues of patients are associated with prognosis and clinical outcome. Over the past decade, there has been substantial investigation concerning the pathogenetic, diagnostic and prognostic roles of miRs in DLBCL. The aim of the present review is to describe the aberrant expression of miRs in DLBCL, and the functions, potential clinical use and possible therapeutic targets of miRs in this disease. PMID:26893730

  20. MicroRNAs Dynamically Remodel Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chanjae; Yan, Wei; Ward, Sean M.; Hwang, Sung Jin; Wu, Qiuxia; Hatton, William J.; Park, Jong Kun; Sanders, Kenton M.; Ro, Seungil

    2011-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) express a unique set of microRNAs (miRNAs) which regulate and maintain the differentiation state of SMCs. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of miRNAs during the development of gastrointestinal (GI) SMCs in a transgenic animal model. We generated SMC-specific Dicer null animals that express the reporter, green fluorescence protein, in a SMC-specific manner. SMC-specific knockout of Dicer prevented SMC miRNA biogenesis, causing dramatic changes in phenotype, function, and global gene expression in SMCs: the mutant mice developed severe dilation of the intestinal tract associated with the thinning and destruction of the smooth muscle (SM) layers; contractile motility in the mutant intestine was dramatically decreased; and SM contractile genes and transcriptional regulators were extensively down-regulated in the mutant SMCs. Profiling and bioinformatic analyses showed that SMC phenotype is regulated by a complex network of positive and negative feedback by SMC miRNAs, serum response factor (SRF), and other transcriptional factors. Taken together, our data suggest that SMC miRNAs are required for the development and survival of SMCs in the GI tract. PMID:21533178

  1. SMART FUEL CELL OPERATED RESIDENTIAL MICRO-GRID COMMUNITY

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mohammad S. Alam University of South Alabama ECE Department, EEB 75 Mobile, AL 36688-0002 Phone: 251-460-6117 Fax: 251-460-6028

    2005-04-13

    To build on the work of year one by expanding the smart control algorithm developed to a micro-grid of ten houses; to perform a cost analysis; to evaluate alternate energy sources; to study system reliability; to develop the energy management algorithm, and to perform micro-grid software and hardware simulations.

  2. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    PubMed Central

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  3. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications.

    PubMed

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm. PMID:26365754

  4. Laser light routing in an elongated micromachined vapor cell with diffraction gratings for atomic clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutani, Ravinder; Maurice, Vincent; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Abbé, Philippe; Galliou, Serge; Rauch, Jean-Yves; de Clercq, Emeric

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an original architecture of microfabricated alkali vapor cell designed for miniature atomic clocks. The cell combines diffraction gratings with anisotropically etched single-crystalline silicon sidewalls to route a normally-incident beam in a cavity oriented along the substrate plane. Gratings have been specifically designed to diffract circularly polarized light in the first order, the latter having an angle of diffraction matching the (111) sidewalls orientation. Then, the length of the cavity where light interacts with alkali atoms can be extended. We demonstrate that a longer cell allows to reduce the beam diameter, while preserving the clock performances. As the cavity depth and the beam diameter are reduced, collimation can be performed in a tighter space. This solution relaxes the constraints on the device packaging and is suitable for wafer-level assembly. Several cells have been fabricated and characterized in a clock setup using coherent population trapping spectroscopy. The measured signals exhibit null power linewidths down to 2.23 kHz and high transmission contrasts up to 17%. A high contrast-to-linewidth ratio is found at a linewidth of 4.17 kHz and a contrast of 5.2% in a 7-mm-long cell despite a beam diameter reduced to 600 μm.

  5. Micro-plasma Luminescence And Signal Noise Used To Solar Cells Defects Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiri, Vanek; Pavel, Koktavy; Jan, Dolensky; Ales, Vesely; Zdenek, Chobola; Petr, Paracka

    2009-04-01

    This work deals with the usage of signal noise and micro-plasmas luminescence for solar cells diagnostic. When high electric field is applied to PN junction of solar cell with some technological imperfections it produces in tiny areas of enhanced impact ionization called micro-plasmas which could lead to deterioration in quality or destruction of PN junction. On this account it is possible to use methods which indicate presence of micro-plasma in junction and enable quality and quantitative description of tested cells.

  6. Chromium vaporization from mechanically deformed pre-coated interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Sattari, Mohammad; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Cathode poisoning, associated with Cr evaporation from interconnect material, is one of the most important degradation mechanisms in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells when Cr2O3-forming steels are used as the interconnect material. Coating these steels with a thin Co layer has proven to decrease Cr vaporization. To reduce production costs, it is suggested that thin metallic PVD coatings be applied to each steel strip before pressing the material into interconnect shape. This process would enable high volume production without the need for an extra post-coating step. However, when the pre-coated material is mechanically deformed, cracks may form and lower the quality of the coating. In the present study, Chromium volatilization is measured in an air-3% H2O environment at 850 °C for 336 h. Three materials coated with 600 nm Co are investigated and compared to an uncoated material. The effect of deformation is investigated on real interconnects. Microscopy observations reveal the presence of cracks in the order of several μm on the deformed pre-coated steel. However, upon exposure, the cracks can heal and form a continuous surface oxide rich in Co and Mn. As an effect of the rapid healing, no increase in Cr vaporization is measured for the pre-coated material.

  7. Widefield microwave imaging in alkali vapor cells with sub-100 μm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, Andrew; Du, Guan-Xiang; Treutlein, Philipp

    2015-11-01

    We report on widefield microwave vector field imaging with sub-100 μ {{m}} resolution using a microfabricated alkali vapor cell. The setup can additionally image dc magnetic fields, and can be configured to image microwave electric fields. Our camera-based widefield imaging system records 2D images with a 6 × 6 mm2 field of view at a rate of 10 Hz. It provides up to 50 μ {{m}} spatial resolution, and allows imaging of fields as close as 150 μ {{m}} above structures, through the use of thin external cell walls. This is crucial in allowing us to take practical advantage of the high spatial resolution, as feature sizes in near-fields are on the order of the distance from their source, and represent an order of magnitude improvement in surface-feature resolution compared to previous vapor cell experiments. We present microwave and dc magnetic field images above a selection of devices, demonstrating a microwave sensitivity of 1.4 μ {{T}} {{Hz}}-1/2 per 50× 50× 140 μ {{{m}}}3 voxel, at present limited by the speed of our camera system. Since we image 120 × 120 voxels in parallel, a single scanned sensor would require a sensitivity of at least 12 {nT} {{Hz}}-1/2 to produce images with the same sensitivity. Our technique could prove transformative in the design, characterization, and debugging of microwave devices, as there are currently no satisfactory established microwave imaging techniques. Moreover, it could find applications in medical imaging.

  8. MicroRNAs in Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Hironori; Imai, Takao; Okano, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a type of short-length (~22 nt) non-coding RNA. Most miRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II and processed by Drosha-DGCR8 and Dicer complexes in the cropping and dicing steps, respectively. miRNAs are exported by exportin-5 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after cropping. Trimmed mature miRNA is loaded and targets mRNA at the 3′ or 5′ untranslated region (UTR) by recognition of base-pairing in the miRNA-loaded RISC, where it is involved in gene silencing including translational repression and/or degradation along with deadenylation. Recent studies have shown that miRNA participates in various biological functions including cell fate decision, developmental timing regulation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Analyses of miRNA expression profiles have demonstrated tissue- and stage-specific miRNAs including the let-7 family, miR-124, and miR-9, which regulate the differentiation of embryonic stem cells and/or neurogenesis. This review focuses on RNA-binding protein-mediated miRNA biogenesis during neurogenesis. These miRNA biogenesis-relating proteins have also been linked to human diseases because their mutations can cause several nervous system disorders. Moreover, defects in core proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis including Drosha, DGCR8, and Dicer promote tumorigenesis. Thus, the study of not only mature miRNA function but also miRNA biogenesis steps is likely to be important. PMID:22416227

  9. Numerical characterization of micro-cell UO2sbnd Mo pellet for enhanced thermal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heung Soo; Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Sun Woo; Yang, Jae Ho; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Kim, Dong Rip

    2016-08-01

    Metallic micro-cell UO2 pellet with high thermal conductivity has received attention as a promising accident-tolerant fuel. Although experimental demonstrations have been successful, studies on the potency of current metallic micro-cell UO2 fuels for further enhancement of thermal performance are lacking. Here, we numerically investigated the thermal conductivities of micro-cell UO2sbnd Mo pellets in terms of the amount of Mo content, the unit cell size, and the aspect ratio of the micro-cells. The results showed good agreement with experimental measurements, and more importantly, indicated the importance of optimizing the unit cell geometries of the micro-cell pellets for greater increases in thermal conductivity. Consequently, the micro-cell UO2sbnd Mo pellets (5 vol% Mo) with modified geometries increased the thermal conductivity of the current UO2 pellets by about 2.5 times, and lowered the temperature gradient within the pellets by 62.9% under a linear heat generation rate of 200 W/cm.

  10. Transcriptome sequencing reveals e-cigarette vapor and mainstream-smoke from tobacco cigarettes activate different gene expression profiles in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yifei; Wolkowicz, Michael J.; Kotova, Tatyana; Fan, Lonjiang; Timko, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) generate an aerosol vapor (e-vapor) thought to represent a less risky alternative to main stream smoke (MSS) of conventional tobacco cigarettes. RNA-seq analysis was used to examine the transcriptomes of differentiated human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells exposed to air, MSS from 1R5F tobacco reference cigarettes, and e-vapor with and without added nicotine in an in vitro air-liquid interface model for cellular exposure. Our results indicate that while e-vapor does not elicit many of the cell toxicity responses observed in MSS-exposed HBE cells, e-vapor exposure is not benign, but elicits discrete transcriptomic signatures with and without added nicotine. Among the cellular pathways with the most significantly enriched gene expression following e-vapor exposure are the phospholipid and fatty acid triacylglycerol metabolism pathways. Our data suggest that alterations in cellular glycerophopholipid biosynthesis are an important consequences of e-vapor exposure. Moreover, the presence of nicotine in e-vapor elicits a cellular response distinct from e-vapor alone including alterations of cytochrome P450 function, retinoid metabolism, and nicotine catabolism. These studies establish a baseline for future analysis of e-vapor and e-vapor additives that will better inform the FDA and other governmental bodies in discussions of the risks and future regulation of these products. PMID:27041137

  11. Transcriptome sequencing reveals e-cigarette vapor and mainstream-smoke from tobacco cigarettes activate different gene expression profiles in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yifei; Wolkowicz, Michael J; Kotova, Tatyana; Fan, Lonjiang; Timko, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) generate an aerosol vapor (e-vapor) thought to represent a less risky alternative to main stream smoke (MSS) of conventional tobacco cigarettes. RNA-seq analysis was used to examine the transcriptomes of differentiated human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells exposed to air, MSS from 1R5F tobacco reference cigarettes, and e-vapor with and without added nicotine in an in vitro air-liquid interface model for cellular exposure. Our results indicate that while e-vapor does not elicit many of the cell toxicity responses observed in MSS-exposed HBE cells, e-vapor exposure is not benign, but elicits discrete transcriptomic signatures with and without added nicotine. Among the cellular pathways with the most significantly enriched gene expression following e-vapor exposure are the phospholipid and fatty acid triacylglycerol metabolism pathways. Our data suggest that alterations in cellular glycerophopholipid biosynthesis are an important consequences of e-vapor exposure. Moreover, the presence of nicotine in e-vapor elicits a cellular response distinct from e-vapor alone including alterations of cytochrome P450 function, retinoid metabolism, and nicotine catabolism. These studies establish a baseline for future analysis of e-vapor and e-vapor additives that will better inform the FDA and other governmental bodies in discussions of the risks and future regulation of these products. PMID:27041137

  12. Role of microRNAs in islet beta-cell compensation and failure during diabetes.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Valérie; Waeber, Gérard; Regazzi, Romano; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell function and mass are markedly adaptive to compensate for the changes in insulin requirement observed during several situations such as pregnancy, obesity, glucocorticoids excess, or administration. This requires a beta-cell compensation which is achieved through a gain of beta-cell mass and function. Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that promote functional beta-cell mass expansion and that protect cells against death, is a key therapeutic target for diabetes. In this respect, several recent studies have emphasized the instrumental role of microRNAs in the control of beta-cell function. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression, and are pivotal for the control of beta-cell proliferation, function, and survival. On the one hand, changes in specific microRNA levels have been associated with beta-cell compensation and are triggered by hormones or bioactive peptides that promote beta-cell survival and function. Conversely, modifications in the expression of other specific microRNAs contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by diabetogenic factors including, cytokines, chronic hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidized LDL. This review underlines the importance of targeting the microRNA network for future innovative therapies aiming at preventing the beta-cell decline in diabetes. PMID:24734255

  13. Role of MicroRNAs in Islet Beta-Cell Compensation and Failure during Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Plaisance, Valérie; Waeber, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell function and mass are markedly adaptive to compensate for the changes in insulin requirement observed during several situations such as pregnancy, obesity, glucocorticoids excess, or administration. This requires a beta-cell compensation which is achieved through a gain of beta-cell mass and function. Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that promote functional beta-cell mass expansion and that protect cells against death, is a key therapeutic target for diabetes. In this respect, several recent studies have emphasized the instrumental role of microRNAs in the control of beta-cell function. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression, and are pivotal for the control of beta-cell proliferation, function, and survival. On the one hand, changes in specific microRNA levels have been associated with beta-cell compensation and are triggered by hormones or bioactive peptides that promote beta-cell survival and function. Conversely, modifications in the expression of other specific microRNAs contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by diabetogenic factors including, cytokines, chronic hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidized LDL. This review underlines the importance of targeting the microRNA network for future innovative therapies aiming at preventing the beta-cell decline in diabetes. PMID:24734255

  14. Suppression of vapor cell temperature error for spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jixi Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng; Quan, Wei

    2015-08-15

    This paper presents a method to reduce the vapor cell temperature error of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. The fluctuation of cell temperature can induce variations of the optical rotation angle, resulting in a scale factor error of the SERF magnetometer. In order to suppress this error, we employ the variation of the probe beam absorption to offset the variation of the optical rotation angle. The theoretical discussion of our method indicates that the scale factor error introduced by the fluctuation of the cell temperature could be suppressed by setting the optical depth close to one. In our experiment, we adjust the probe frequency to obtain various optical depths and then measure the variation of scale factor with respect to the corresponding cell temperature changes. Our experimental results show a good agreement with our theoretical analysis. Under our experimental condition, the error has been reduced significantly compared with those when the probe wavelength is adjusted to maximize the probe signal. The cost of this method is the reduction of the scale factor of the magnetometer. However, according to our analysis, it only has minor effect on the sensitivity under proper operating parameters.

  15. The DARPA HUMS program: revolutionizing magnetic field sensors using multiferroic materials and atomic gas vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coblenz, William S.; Wartenberg, Scott A.

    2012-06-01

    The Heterostructural Uncooled Magnetic Sensors (HUMS) program sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA/DSO) is focused on developing magnetic field sensors that operate at room temperature with an ultra-sensitivity to enable applications such as through-wall imaging, perimeter fences, tagging/tracking, and other man-portable operations. Four teams of researchers are participating in the program, with Virginia Tech and University of Maryland leading multiferroic heterostructural materials development and Princeton University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) leading atomic vapor cell development. Leveraging the strengths of these two technologies, each team has made advancements towards the program goal of ground-breaking sensitivity, reduced noise, and portability while operating under room temperature conditions. This paper summarizes the program's achievements so far and highlights the accomplishments made by each team.

  16. Theoretical description of transverse measurements of polarization in optically-pumped Rb vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiling, Joan; Tupa, Dale; Norrgard, Eric; Gay, Timothy

    2012-06-01

    In optical pumping of alkali-metal vapors, the polarization of the atoms is typically determined by probing along the entire length of the pumping beam, resulting in an averaged value of polarization over the length of the cell. Such measurements do not give any information about spatial variations of the polarization along the pump beam axis. Using a D1 probe beam oriented perpendicular to the pumping beam, we have demonstrated a heuristic method for determining the polarization along the pump beam's axis. Adapting a previously developed theory [1], we provide an analysis of the experiment which explains why this method works. The model includes the effects of Rb density, buffer gas pressure, and pump detuning. [4pt] [1] E.B. Norrgard, D. Tupa, J.M. Dreiling, and T.J. Gay, Phys. Rev. A 82, 033408 (2010).

  17. Frequency-tunable microwave field detection in an atomic vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    We use an atomic vapor cell as a frequency tunable microwave field detector operating at frequencies from GHz to tens of GHz. We detect microwave magnetic fields from 2.3 GHz to 26.4 GHz, and measure the amplitude of the σ+ component of an 18 GHz microwave field. Our proof-of-principle demonstration represents a four orders of magnitude extension of the frequency tunable range of atomic magnetometers from their previous dc to several MHz range. When integrated with a high-resolution microwave imaging system [Horsley et al., New J. Phys. 17, 112002 (2015)], this will allow for the complete reconstruction of the vector components of a microwave magnetic field and the relative phase between them. Potential applications include near-field characterisation of microwave circuitry and devices, and medical microwave sensing and imaging.

  18. MicroRNA-regulated pathways in hematological malignancies: how to avoid cells playing out of tune.

    PubMed

    Fatica, Alessandro; Fazi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The coordinated expression and interplay among lineage specific transcription factors and microRNAs contribute to the regulation of gene expression and determination of cell specificity. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), unique combinations of transcription factors largely control growth and maturation of different blood cell lineages through cooperative regulation of specific target genes. MicroRNAs provide an additional level of control beyond transcription factors. By acting as regulators of crucial lineage-specific genetic programs, microRNAs direct early multipotential progenitor cells to adopt a certain cell fate program. Thus, alteration of specific microRNA levels may affect proliferation, differentiation and genetic stability of HSCs, contributing to the onset of myeloproliferative disorders and leukemia. The major aim of this review is to highlight the critical role of microRNA-regulated pathways during the establishment and progression of hematological malignancies, with a particular attention to leukemia, lymphomas and myelodysplastic syndromes. This will give us the opportunity to discuss the potential use of microRNA-based therapeutic approaches in these diseases. MicroRNAs are indeed emerging as relevant tools to improve the efficacy of currently used therapeutic protocols. PMID:24145746

  19. MicroRNA Expression and Regulation in Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cells by Luteinizing Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Juan; Eldredge, Joanna B.; Xu, Ying; Puett, David

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs have been widely-studied with regard to their aberrant expression and high correlation with tumorigenesis and progression in various solid tumors. With the major goal of assessing gonadotropin (luteinizing hormone, LH) contributions to LH receptor (LHR)-positive ovarian cancer cells, we have conducted a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis on human epithelial ovarian cancer cells to identify the microRNA-associated cellular response to LH-mediated activation of LHR. Methods Human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3) were chosen as negative control (LHR−) and stably transfected to express functional LHR (LHR+), followed by incubation with LH (0–20 h). At different times of LH-mediated activation of LHR the cancer cells were analyzed by a high-density Ovarian Cancer Disease-Specific-Array (DSA, ALMAC™), which profiled ∼100,000 transcripts with ∼400 non-coding microRNAs. Findings In total, 65 microRNAs were identified to exhibit differential expression in either LHR expressing SKOV3 cells or LH-treated cells, a few of which have been found in the genomic fragile regions that are associated with abnormal deletion or amplification in cancer, such as miR-21, miR-101-1, miR-210 and miR-301a. By incorporating the dramatic expression changes observed in mRNAs, strong microRNA/mRNA regulatory pairs were predicted through statistical analyses coupled with collective computational prediction. The role of each microRNA was then determined through a functional analysis based on the highly-confident microRNA/mRNA pairs. Conclusion The overall impact on the transcriptome-level expression indicates that LH may regulate apoptosis and cell growth of LHR+ SKOV3 cells, particularly by reducing cancer cell proliferation, with some microRNAs involved in regulatory roles. PMID:21765906

  20. Life on magnets: stem cell networking on micro-magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka; Le-Roy, Damien; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Givord, Dominique; Dempsey, Nora M; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between a micro-magnet array and living cells may guide the establishment of cell networks due to the cellular response to a magnetic field. To manipulate mesenchymal stem cells free of magnetic nanoparticles by a high magnetic field gradient, we used high quality micro-patterned NdFeB films around which the stray field's value and direction drastically change across the cell body. Such micro-magnet arrays coated with parylene produce high magnetic field gradients that affect the cells in two main ways: i) causing cell migration and adherence to a covered magnetic surface and ii) elongating the cells in the directions parallel to the edges of the micro-magnet. To explain these effects, three putative mechanisms that incorporate both physical and biological factors influencing the cells are suggested. It is shown that the static high magnetic field gradient generated by the micro-magnet arrays are capable of assisting cell migration to those areas with the strongest magnetic field gradient, thereby allowing the build up of tunable interconnected stem cell networks, which is an elegant route for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:23936425

  1. Bioeffects due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulated micro- and nano-droplets can be vaporized via ultrasound, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization. Our interest is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular microdroplets. Additionally, the microdroplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Early timescale vaporization events, including phase change, are directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging, and the influence of acoustic parameters on droplet/bubble dynamics is discussed. Acoustic and fluid mechanics parameters affecting the severity of endothelial cell bioeffects are explored. These findings suggest parameter spaces for which bioeffects may be reduced or enhanced, depending on the objective of the therapy. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  2. Spectroscopy in an extremely thin vapor cell: Comparing the cell-length dependence in fluorescence and in absorption techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, D.; Varzhapetyan, T.; Sarkisyan, A.; Malakyan, Yu.; Papoyan, A.; Lezama, A.; Bloch, D.; Ducloy, M.

    2004-06-01

    We compare the behavior of absorption and of resonance fluorescence spectra in an extremely thin Rb vapor cell as a function of the ratio of L/λ , with L the cell thickness (L˜150 1800 nm) and λ the wavelength of the Rb D2 line (λ=780 mn) . The Dicke-type coherent narrowing [

    G. Dutier et al., Europhys. Lett. 63, 35 (2003)
    ] is observed only in transmission measurements, in the linear regime, with its typical collapse and revival, which reaches a maximum for L= (2n+1) λ/2 ( n integer). It is shown not to appear in fluorescence, whose behavior-amplitude, and spectral width, is more monotonic with L . Conversely, at high-intensity, the sub-Doppler saturation effects are shown to be the most visible in transmission around L=nλ .

  3. Search for MicroRNAs Expressed by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens in Infected Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Furuse, Yuki; Finethy, Ryan; Saka, Hector A.; Xet-Mull, Ana M.; Sisk, Dana M.; Smith, Kristen L. Jurcic; Lee, Sunhee; Coers, Jörn; Valdivia, Raphael H.; Tobin, David M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are expressed by all multicellular organisms and play a critical role as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Moreover, different microRNA species are known to influence the progression of a range of different diseases, including cancer and microbial infections. A number of different human viruses also encode microRNAs that can attenuate cellular innate immune responses and promote viral replication, and a fungal pathogen that infects plants has recently been shown to express microRNAs in infected cells that repress host cell immune responses and promote fungal pathogenesis. Here, we have used deep sequencing of total expressed small RNAs, as well as small RNAs associated with the cellular RNA-induced silencing complex RISC, to search for microRNAs that are potentially expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens and translocated into infected animal cells. In the case of Legionella and Chlamydia and the two mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis, we failed to detect any bacterial small RNAs that had the characteristics expected for authentic microRNAs, although large numbers of small RNAs of bacterial origin could be recovered. However, a third mycobacterial species, M. marinum, did express an ∼23-nt small RNA that was bound by RISC and derived from an RNA stem-loop with the characteristics expected for a pre-microRNA. While intracellular expression of this candidate bacterial microRNA was too low to effectively repress target mRNA species in infected cultured cells in vitro, artificial overexpression of this potential bacterial pre-microRNA did result in the efficient repression of a target mRNA. This bacterial small RNA therefore represents the first candidate microRNA of bacterial origin. PMID:25184567

  4. Mechanical modelling of confined cell migration across constricted-curved micro-channels.

    PubMed

    Allena, R

    2014-09-01

    Confined migration is a crucial phenomenon during embryogenesis, immune response and cancer. Here, a two-dimensional finite element model of a HeLa cell migrating across constricted-curved micro-channels is proposed. The cell is modelled as a continuum with embedded cytoplasm and nucleus, which are described by standard Maxwell viscoelastic models. The decomposition of the deformation gradient is employed to define the cyclic active strains of protrusion and contraction, which are synchronized with the adhesion forces between the cell and the substrate. The micro-channels are represented by two rigid walls and exert an additional viscous force on the cell boundaries. Five configurations have been tested: 1) top constriction, 2) top-bottom constriction, 3) shifted top-bottom constriction, 4) embedded obstacle and 5) bending micro-channel. Additionally, for the first four micro-channels both sub-cellular and sub-nuclear constrictions have been obtained, while for the fifth micro-channel three types of bending have been investigated ('curved', 'sharp' and 'sharper'). For each configuration, several parameters such as the cell behaviour, the covered distance, the migration velocity, the ratio between the cell and the nucleus area as well as the cell-substrate and cell-channel surfaces forces have been evaluated. The results show once more the fundamental role played by mechanics of both the cell and the environment. PMID:25831860

  5. Pentacene/K12 solar cells formed by organic vapor phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axmann, Sebastian; Brast, Michael; Pandey, Ajay Kumar; Burn, Paul; Meredith, Paul; Heuken, Michael; Vescan, Andrei; Kalisch, Holger

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on an organic solar cell structure utilizing K12 as a new low-temperature processable small-molecule acceptor material. Pentacene (PEN) and K12 were deposited onto indium tin oxide by means of organic vapor phase deposition (OVPD) as bilayer solar cells. The resulting solar cell was characterized electrically by current density-voltage (J-V) measurements and optically by photocurrent and reflectivity measurements. The J-V characteristic under AM 1.5 illumination indicates a short-circuit current of 0.45 mA/cm2 (Jsc), a fill factor of 38% (FF), and an open-circuit (Voc) voltage of 0.71 V. Current generation is found to predominantly occur in the K12 layer, although strong light absorption in the PEN layer is detected. We suggest that either a dipole shift between the layers or the fission of singlet excitons in the PEN layer leads to this observation. Although the efficiency of the device is low in combination with PEN, our experiment successfully demonstrates the use of K12 as a low-temperature acceptor material in OVPD processes.

  6. Amorphous Carbon Deposited by a Novel Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition for Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nurfadzilah; Kamaruzzaman, Dayana; Rusop, Mohamad

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) solar cells were successfully prepared using a novel and self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using camphor oil as a precursor. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved an efficiency of 0.008% with a fill factor of 0.15 for the device deposited at 0.5 h. The current-voltage (I-V) graph emphasized on the linear graph (ohmic) for the a-C thin films, whereas for the p-n device structure, a rectifying curve was obtained. The rectifying curves signify the heterojunction between the p-type a-C film and the n-Si substrate and designate the generation of electron-hole pair of the samples under illumination. Photoresponse characteristics of the deposited a-C was highlighted when being illuminated (AM 1.5 illumination: 100 mW/cm2, 25 °C). Transmittance spectrum exhibit a large transmittance value (>85%) and absorption coefficient value of 103-104 cm-1 at the visible range of 390 to 790 nm. The atomization of a liquid precursor solution into fine sub-micrometre-sized aerosol droplets in AACVD induced the smooth surface of a-C films. To the best of our knowledge, fabrication of a-C solar cell using this AACVD method has not yet been reported.

  7. microRNA-22 attenuates neuronal cell apoptosis in a cell model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ji; Shui, Shaofeng; Han, Xinwei; Guo, Dong; Li, Tengfei; Yan, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of injury-related deaths, and the mechanism of TBI has become a research focus, but little is known about the mechanism of microRNAs in TBI. The aim of this study is the role of microRNA-22 (miR-22) in TBI-induced neuronal cell apoptosis. Rat cortical neurons were cultured and the TBI model was induced by scratch injury in vitro, before which miR-22 level was altered by transfection of agomir or antagomir. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and TUNEL assays were performed to examine neuronal cell injury and apoptosis. The activity of caspase 3 (CASP3) and level changes of several apoptosis factors including B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1) were detected. Results showed that TBI model cells possessed a downregulated miR-22 level (P < 0.001) and more LDH release and apoptotic cells indicating the aggravated neuronal cell injury and apoptosis induced by TBI. miR-22 agomir attenuated neuronal cell injury and apoptosis of the TBI model. It also caused the corresponding changes in CASP3 activity and other apoptosis factors, with cleaved CASP3, BAX and PTEN inhibited and BCL2 and phosphorylated AKT1 promoted, while miR-22 antagomir had the opposite effects. So miR-22 has neuroprotective roles of attenuating neuronal cell injury and apoptosis induced by TBI, which may be associated with its regulation on apoptosis factors. This study reveals miR-22 as a potential approach to TBI treatment and detailed mechanism remains to be uncovered. PMID:27186313

  8. MicroRNA-203 represses selection and expansion of oncogenic Hras transformed tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Riemondy, Kent; Wang, Xiao-jing; Torchia, Enrique C; Roop, Dennis R; Yi, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In many mouse models of skin cancer, only a few tumors typically form even though many cells competent for tumorigenesis receive the same oncogenic stimuli. These observations suggest an active selection process for tumor-initiating cells. Here, we use quantitative mRNA- and miR-Seq to determine the impact of HrasG12V on the transcriptome of keratinocytes. We discover that microRNA-203 is downregulated by HrasG12V. Using a knockout mouse model, we demonstrate that loss of microRNA-203 promotes selection and expansion of tumor-initiating cells. Conversely, restoration of microRNA-203 using an inducible model potently inhibits proliferation of these cells. We comprehensively identify microRNA-203 targets required for Hras-initiated tumorigenesis. These targets include critical regulators of the Ras pathway and essential genes required for cell division. This study establishes a role for the loss of microRNA-203 in promoting selection and expansion of Hras mutated cells and identifies a mechanism through which microRNA-203 antagonizes Hras-mediated tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07004.001 PMID:26203562

  9. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Ban, K.; Hirai, Y.; Sugano, K.; Tsuchiya, T.; Mizutani, N.; Tabata, O.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN6), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460-490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches.

  10. Epitaxial Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells Fabricated by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Below 750 ..deg..C: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Alberi, K.; Martin, I. T.; Shub, M.; Teplin, C. W.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; duda, A.; Stradin, P.; Johnston, S. W.; Romero, M. J.; Branz, H. M.; Young, D. L.

    2009-06-01

    We report on fabricating film c-Si solar cells on Si wafer templates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. These devices, grown at glass-compatible temperatures < 750..deg..C, demonstrate open-circuit voltages > 500 mV and efficiencies > 5%.

  11. A MicroRNA Network Dysregulated in Asthma Controls IL-6 Production in Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Louafi, Fethi; Francisco-Garcia, Ana S.; Rupani, Hitasha; Bedke, Nicole; Holgate, Stephen; Howarth, Peter H.; Davies, Donna E.; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short non-coding single stranded RNAs that regulate gene expression. While much is known about the effects of individual microRNAs, there is now growing evidence that they can work in co-operative networks. MicroRNAs are known to be dysregulated in many diseases and affect pathways involved in the pathology. We investigated dysregulation of microRNA networks using asthma as the disease model. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway remodelling. The airway epithelium is a major contributor to asthma pathology and has been shown to produce an excess of inflammatory and pro-remodelling cytokines such as TGF-β, IL-6 and IL-8 as well as deficient amounts of anti-viral interferons. After performing microRNA arrays, we found that microRNAs -18a, -27a, -128 and -155 are down-regulated in asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells, compared to cells from healthy donors. Interestingly, these microRNAs are predicted in silico to target several components of the TGF-β, IL-6, IL-8 and interferons pathways. Manipulation of the levels of individual microRNAs in bronchial epithelial cells did not have an effect on any of these pathways. Importantly, knock-down of the network of microRNAs miR-18a, -27a, -128 and -155 led to a significant increase of IL-8 and IL-6 expression. Interestingly, despite strong in silico predictions, down-regulation of the pool of microRNAs did not have an effect on the TGF-β and Interferon pathways. In conclusion, using both bioinformatics and experimental tools we found a highly relevant potential role for microRNA dysregulation in the control of IL-6 and IL-8 expression in asthma. Our results suggest that microRNAs may have different roles depending on the presence of other microRNAs. Thus, interpretation of in silico analysis of microRNA function should be confirmed experimentally in the relevant cellular context taking into account interactions with other micro

  12. microRNA Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Izar, Benjamin; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Chakraborty, Trinad; Hain, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    microRNAs represent a family of very small non-coding RNAs that control several physiologic and pathologic processes, including host immune response and cancer by antagonizing a number of target mRNAs. There is limited knowledge about cell expression and the regulatory role of microRNAs following bacterial infections. We investigated whether infection with a Gram-positive bacterium leads to altered expression of microRNAs involved in the host cell response in epithelial cells. Caco-2 cells were infected with Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e, a mutant strain (ΔinlAB or Δhly) or incubated with purified listeriolysin (LLO). Total RNA was isolated and microRNA and target gene expression was compared to the expression in non-infected cells using microRNA microarrays and qRT-PCR. We identified and validated five microRNAs (miR- 146b, miR-16, let-7a1, miR-145 and miR-155) that were significantly deregulated following listerial infection. We show that expression patterns of particular microRNAs strongly depend on pathogen localization and the presence of bacterial effector proteins. Strikingly, miR-155 which was shown to have an important role in inflammatory responses during infection was induced by wild-type bacteria, by LLO-deficient bacteria and following incubation with purified LLO. It was downregulated following ΔinlAB infection indicating a new potent role for internalins in listerial pathogenicity and miRNA regulation. Concurrently, we observed differences in target transcript expression of the investigated miRNAs. We provide first evidence that L. monocytogenes infection leads to deregulation of a set of microRNAs with important roles in host response. Distinct microRNA expression depends on both LLO and pathogen localization. PMID:22312311

  13. MicroRNA Profiling of Primary Cutaneous Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Koens, Lianne; Qin, Yongjun; Leung, Wai Y.; Corver, Willem E.; Jansen, Patty M.; Willemze, Rein; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Tensen, Cornelis P.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs is widely accepted to be pathogenetically involved in nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs). However, the microRNAs profiles of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas (PCLBCLs) are not yet described. Its two main subtypes, i.e., primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCLBCL-LT) and primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) are characterized by an activated B-cell (ABC)-genotype and a germinal center B-cell (GCB)-genotype, respectively. We performed high-throughput sequencing analysis on frozen tumor biopsies from 19 cases of PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT to establish microRNA profiles. Cluster analysis of the complete microRNome could not distinguish between the two subtypes, but 16 single microRNAs were found to be differentially expressed. Single microRNA RT-qPCR was conducted on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies of 20 additional cases, confirming higher expression of miR-9-5p, miR-31-5p, miR-129-2-3p and miR-214-3p in PCFCL as compared to PCLBCL-LT. MicroRNAs previously described to be higher expressed in ABC-type as compared to GCB-type nodal DLBCL were not differentially expressed between PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT. In conclusion, PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT differ in their microRNA profiles. In contrast to their gene expression profile, they only show slight resemblance with the microRNA profiles found in GCB- and ABC-type nodal DLBCL. PMID:24358187

  14. MicroRNA profiling of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Koens, Lianne; Qin, Yongjun; Leung, Wai Y; Corver, Willem E; Jansen, Patty M; Willemze, Rein; Vermeer, Maarten H; Tensen, Cornelis P

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs is widely accepted to be pathogenetically involved in nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs). However, the microRNAs profiles of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas (PCLBCLs) are not yet described. Its two main subtypes, i.e., primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCLBCL-LT) and primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) are characterized by an activated B-cell (ABC)-genotype and a germinal center B-cell (GCB)-genotype, respectively. We performed high-throughput sequencing analysis on frozen tumor biopsies from 19 cases of PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT to establish microRNA profiles. Cluster analysis of the complete microRNome could not distinguish between the two subtypes, but 16 single microRNAs were found to be differentially expressed. Single microRNA RT-qPCR was conducted on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies of 20 additional cases, confirming higher expression of miR-9-5p, miR-31-5p, miR-129-2-3p and miR-214-3p in PCFCL as compared to PCLBCL-LT. MicroRNAs previously described to be higher expressed in ABC-type as compared to GCB-type nodal DLBCL were not differentially expressed between PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT. In conclusion, PCFCL and PCLBCL-LT differ in their microRNA profiles. In contrast to their gene expression profile, they only show slight resemblance with the microRNA profiles found in GCB- and ABC-type nodal DLBCL. PMID:24358187

  15. Review of micro/nano technologies and theories for electroporation of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, YiKuen; Deng, PeiGang

    2012-06-01

    Electroporation (EP) is one of the important techniques for the introduction of genes and drugs into cells with intense pulsed electric field to induce nanometer-sized electropores on cell membranes. Recently, micro/nano technology has been applied to many novel micro EP devices which can not only significantly increase uptake of biomolecules, DNA transfection and cell viability, but also enable large-scale single-cell EP. However, most EP theories developed in the past three decades can not precisely predict the experimental results of EP of biological cells. With the advanced micro EP chips for large-scale single-cell EP experiments, more precise EP theoretical models can be developed to describe the complicated multiscale dynamic behavior of EP.

  16. Micro- and Nanoengineering Approaches to Control Stem Cell-Biomaterial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Kolind, Kristian; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    As our population ages, there is a greater need for a suitable supply of engineered tissues to address a range of debilitating ailments. Stem cell based therapies are envisioned to meet this emerging need. Despite significant progress in controlling stem cell differentiation, it is still difficult to engineer human tissue constructs for transplantation. Recent advances in micro- and nanofabrication techniques have enabled the design of more biomimetic biomaterials that may be used to direct the fate of stem cells. These biomaterials could have a significant impact on the next generation of stem cell based therapies. Here, we highlight the recent progress made by micro- and nanoengineering techniques in the biomaterials field in the context of directing stem cell differentiation. Particular attention is given to the effect of surface topography, chemistry, mechanics and micro- and nanopatterns on the differentiation of embryonic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells. PMID:24956299

  17. Wafer-level filling of microfabricated atomic vapor cells based on thin-film deposition and photolysis of cesium azide

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, Li-Anne; Moreland, John; Gerginov, Vladislav

    2007-03-12

    The thin-film deposition and photodecomposition of cesium azide are demonstrated and used to fill arrays of miniaturized atomic resonance cells with cesium and nitrogen buffer gas for chip-scale atomic-based instruments. Arrays of silicon cells are batch fabricated on wafers into which cesium azide is deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation. After vacuum sealing, the cells are irradiated with ultraviolet radiation, causing the azide to photodissociate into pure cesium and nitrogen in situ. This technology integrates the vapor-cell fabrication and filling procedures into one continuous and wafer-level parallel process, and results in cells that are optically transparent and chemically pure.

  18. A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays for cell isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tao; Su, Qianhua; Yang, Zhaochu; Zhang, Yulong; Egeland, Eirik B.; Gu, Dan D.; Calabrese, Paolo; Kapiris, Matteo J.; Karlsen, Frank; Minh, Nhut T.; Wang, K.; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays has been developed and demonstrated, which can merely employ one independent lab-on-chip to realize cell isolation. The simulation, design, microfabrication and test for the new electromagnetic micro separator were executed. The simulation results of the electromagnetic field in the separator show that special soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays can amplify and redistribute the electromagnetic field generated by the micro-coils. The separator can be equipped with a strong magnetic field to isolate the target cells with a considerably low input current. The micro separator was fabricated by micro-processing technology. An electroplating bath was hired to deposit NiCo/NiFe to fabricate the micro-pillar arrays. An experimental system was set up to verify the function of the micro separator by isolating the lymphocytes, in which the human whole blood mixed with Dynabeads® FlowComp Flexi and monoclonal antibody MHCD2704 was used as the sample. The results show that the electromagnetic micro separator with an extremely low input current can recognize and capture the target lymphocytes with a high efficiency, the separation ratio reaching more than 90% at a lower flow rate. For the electromagnetic micro separator, there is no external magnetizing field required, and there is no extra cooling system because there is less Joule heat generated due to the lower current. The magnetic separator is totally reusable, and it can be used to separate cells or proteins with common antigens.

  19. Single cell adhesion force measurement for cell viability identification using an AFM cantilever-based micro putter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Kojima, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-11-01

    Fast and sensitive cell viability identification is a key point for single cell analysis. To address this issue, this paper reports a novel single cell viability identification method based on the measurement of single cell shear adhesion force using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever-based micro putter. Viable and nonviable yeast cells are prepared and put onto three kinds of substrate surfaces, i.e. tungsten probe, gold and ITO substrate surfaces. A micro putter is fabricated from the AFM cantilever by focused ion beam etching technique. The spring constant of the micro putter is calibrated using the nanomanipulation approach. The shear adhesion force between the single viable or nonviable cell and each substrate is measured using the micro putter based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. The adhesion force is calculated based on the deflection of the micro putter beam. The results show that the adhesion force of the viable cell to the substrate is much larger than that of the nonviable cell. This identification method is label free, fast, sensitive and can give quantitative results at the single cell level.

  20. The microRNA-212/132 cluster regulates B cell development by targeting Sox4

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Arnav; Mann, Mati; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Marinov, Georgi K.; Majumdar, Devdoot; Garcia-Flores, Yvette; Du, Xiaomi; Erikci, Erdem; Chowdhury, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as key regulators of B cell fate decisions and immune function. Deregulation of several microRNAs in B cells leads to the development of autoimmune disease and cancer in mice. We demonstrate that the microRNA-212/132 cluster (miR-212/132) is induced in B cells in response to B cell receptor signaling. Enforced expression of miR-132 results in a block in early B cell development at the prepro–B cell to pro–B cell transition and induces apoptosis in primary bone marrow B cells. Importantly, loss of miR-212/132 results in accelerated B cell recovery after antibody-mediated B cell depletion. We find that Sox4 is a target of miR-132 in B cells. Co-expression of SOX4 with miR-132 rescues the defect in B cell development from overexpression of miR-132 alone, thus suggesting that miR-132 may regulate B lymphopoiesis through Sox4. In addition, we show that the expression of miR-132 can inhibit cancer development in cells that are prone to B cell cancers, such as B cells expressing the c-Myc oncogene. We have thus uncovered miR-132 as a novel contributor to B cell development. PMID:26371188

  1. MicroRNA Expression and Clinical Outcome of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jih-Hsiang; Voortman, Johannes; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Voeller, Donna M.; Pham, Trung; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The role of microRNAs in small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is largely unknown. miR-34a is known as a p53 regulated tumor suppressor microRNA in many cancer types. However, its therapeutic implication has never been studied in SCLC, a cancer type with frequent dysfunction of p53. We investigated the expression of a panel of 7 microRNAs (miR-21, miR-29b, miR-34a/b/c, miR-155, and let-7a) in 31 SCLC tumors, 14 SCLC cell lines, and 26 NSCLC cell lines. We observed significantly lower miR-21, miR-29b, and miR-34a expression in SCLC cell lines than in NSCLC cell lines. The expression of the 7 microRNAs was unrelated to SCLC patients' clinical characteristics and was neither prognostic in term of overall survival or progression-free survival nor predictive of treatment response. Overexpression or downregulation of miR-34a did not influence SCLC cell viability. The expression of these 7 microRNAs also did not predict in vitro sensitivity to cisplatin or etoposide in SCLC cell lines. Overexpression or downregulation of miR-34a did not influence sensitivity to cisplatin or etoposide in SCLC cell lines. In contrast to downregulation of the miR-34a target genes cMET and Axl by overexpression of miR-34a in NSCLC cell lines, the intrinsic expression of cMET and Axl was low in SCLC cell lines and was not influenced by overexpression of miR-34a. Our results suggest that the expression of the 7 selected microRNAs are not prognostic in SCLC patients, and miR-34a is unrelated to the malignant behavior of SCLC cells and is unlikely to be a therapeutic target. PMID:21731696

  2. Fabrication of efficient planar perovskite solar cells using a one-step chemical vapor deposition method

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Gu, Leilei; Gao, Yuan; Reckmeier, Claas; He, Jin; Rogach, Andrey L.; Yao, Yan; Fan, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Organometallic trihalide perovskites are promising materials for photovoltaic applications, which have demonstrated a rapid rise in photovoltaic performance in a short period of time. We report a facile one-step method to fabricate planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), with a solar power conversion efficiency of up to 11.1%. We performed a systematic optimization of CVD parameters such as temperature and growth time to obtain high quality films of CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite. Scanning electron microscopy and time resolved photoluminescence data showed that the perovskite films have a large grain size of more than 1 micrometer, and carrier life-times of 10 ns and 120 ns for CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbI3-xClx, respectively. This is the first demonstration of a highly efficient perovskite solar cell using one step CVD and there is likely room for significant improvement of device efficiency. PMID:26392200

  3. Organic solar cells with graphene electrodes and vapor printed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) as the hole transporting layers.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyesung; Howden, Rachel M; Barr, Miles C; Bulović, Vladimir; Gleason, Karen; Kong, Jing

    2012-07-24

    For the successful integration of graphene as a transparent conducting electrode in organic solar cells, proper energy level alignment at the interface between the graphene and the adjacent organic layer is critical. The role of a hole transporting layer (HTL) thus becomes more significant due to the generally lower work function of graphene compared to ITO. A commonly used HTL material with ITO anodes is poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) with poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) as the solid-state dopant. However, graphene's hydrophobic surface renders uniform coverage of PEDOT:PSS (aqueous solution) by spin-casting very challenging. Here, we introduce a novel, yet simple, vapor printing method for creating patterned HTL PEDOT layers directly onto the graphene surface. Vapor printing represents the implementation of shadow masking in combination with oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD). The oCVD method was developed for the formation of blanket (i.e., unpatterened) layers of pure PEDOT (i.e., no PSS) with systematically variable work function. In the unmasked regions, vapor printing produces complete, uniform, smooth layers of pure PEDOT over graphene. Graphene electrodes were synthesized under low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) using a copper catalyst. The use of another electron donor material, tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene, instead of copper phthalocyanine in the organic solar cells also improves the power conversion efficiency. With the vapor printed HTL, the devices using graphene electrodes yield comparable performances to the ITO reference devices (η(p,LPCVD) = 3.01%, and η(p,ITO) = 3.20%). PMID:22724887

  4. MicroRNA Expression Patterns Related to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Infection in Human Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hong; Lee, Linkiat; Caramuta, Stefano; Höög, Anders; Browaldh, Nanna; Björnhagen, Viveca; Larsson, Catharina; Lui, Weng-Onn

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive and lethal type of neuroendocrine skin cancer. Mutated Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) is commonly found in MCC, and leads to upregulation of the survivin oncogene. However, ∼20% of MCC tumors do not have detectable MCV, suggesting alternative etiologies for this tumor type. In this study, our aim was to evaluate microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles and their associations with MCV status and clinical outcomes in MCC. We showed that miRNA expression profiles were distinct between MCV-positive (MCV+) and MCV-negative (MCV−) MCCs and further validated that miR-203, miR-30a-3p, miR-769-5p, miR-34a, miR-30a-5p, and miR-375 were significantly different. We also identified a subset of miRNAs associated with tumor metastasis and MCC-specific survival. Functionally, overexpression of miR-203 was found to inhibit cell growth, induce cell cycle arrest, and regulate survivin expression in MCV− MCC cells, but not in MCV+ MCC cells. Our findings reveal a mechanism of survivin expression regulation in MCC cells, and provide insights into the role of miRNAs in MCC tumorigenesis. PMID:23962809

  5. Differential expression of microRNAs in 2-cell and 4-cell mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Cui, Ji; Zhao, Chun; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Xirong; Shen, Rong; Zhang, Junqiang; Ling, Xiufeng

    2014-11-01

    In vitro fertilized (IVF) human embryos have a high incidence of developmental arrest before the blastocyst stage, therefore characterization of the molecular mechanisms that regulate embryo development is urgently required. Post-transcriptional control by microRNAs (miRNAs) is one of the most investigated RNA control mechanisms, and is hypothesized to be involved actively in developmental arrest in preimplantation embryos. In this study, we extracted total RNA from mouse 2-cell and 4-cell embryos. Using a miRNA microarray, 192 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in 4-cell embryos and 2-cell embryos; 122 miRNAs were upregulated and 70 were downregulated in 4-cell embryos. The microarray results were confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR for six miRNAs (mmu-miR-467h, mmu-miR-466d-3p, mmu-miR-292-5p, mmu-miR-154, mmu-miR-2145, and mmu-miR-706). Cdca4 and Tcf12 were identified as miR-154 target genes by target prediction analysis. This study provides a developmental map for a large number of miRNAs in 2-cell and 4-cell embryos. The function of these miRNAs and the mechanisms by which they modulate embryonic developmental arrest require further study. The results of this study have potential applications in the field of reproductive medicine. PMID:23731853

  6. MicroRNA-196b promotes cell proliferation and suppress cell differentiation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Donglin Hu, Liangshan; Lei, Da; Fang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Zhihong; Wang, Ting; Lin, Maorui; Huang, Jiwei; Yang, Huawen; Zhou, Xuan; Zhong, Limei

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • miRNA-196b increases proliferation and blocks differentiation of progenitor cell. • miRNA-196b inhibits apoptosis and increases viability of cells lines. • Forced expression of miR-196b blocks the differentiation of THP1 induced by PMA. - Abstract: MicroRNA-196b (miR-196b) is frequently amplified and aberrantly overexpressed in acute leukemias. To investigate the role of miR-196b in acute leukemias, it has been observed that forced expression of this miRNA increases proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in human cell lines. More importantly, we show that this miRNA can significantly increase the colony-forming capacity of mouse normal bone marrow progenitor cells alone, as well as partially blocking the cells from differentiation. Taken together, our studies suggest that miRNA-196b may play an essential role in the development of MLL-associated leukemias through inhibiting cell differentiation and apoptosis, while promoting cell proliferation.

  7. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Thusyanth; Bakhshinyan, David; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs), are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools. PMID:26064134

  8. Method and apparatus for fabricating a thin-film solar cell utilizing a hot wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Iwaniczko, Eugene

    2006-10-17

    A thin-film solar cell is provided. The thin-film solar cell comprises an a-SiGe:H (1.6 eV) n-i-p solar cell having a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer by hot wire chemical vapor deposition. A method for fabricating a thin film solar cell is also provided. The method comprises depositing a n-i-p layer at a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer.

  9. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements of MCF7 cells adhesion in confined micro-environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vitis, Stefania; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Malara, Natalia; Perozziello, Gerardo; Dattola, Elisabetta; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Undoubtedly cells can perceive the external environment, not only from a biochemical point of view with the related signalling pathways, but also from a physical and topographical perspective. In this sense controlled three dimensional micro-structures as well as patterns at the nano-scale can affect and guide the cell evolution and proliferation, due to the fact that the surrounding environment is no longer isotropic (like the flat surfaces of standard cell culturing) but possesses well defined symmetries and anisotropies. In this work regular arrays of silicon micro-pillars with hexagonal arrangement are used as culturing substrates for MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The characteristic size and spacing of the pillars are tens of microns, comparable with MCF-7 cell dimensions and then well suited to induce acceptable external stimuli. It is shown that these cells strongly modify their morphology for adapting themselves to the micro-structured landscape, by means of protrusions from the main body of the cell. Scanning electron microscopy along with both Raman micro-spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy are used for topographical and biochemical studies of the new cell arrangement. We have revealed that single MCF-7 cells exploit their capability to produce invadopodia, usually generated to invade the neighboring tissue in metastatic activity, for spanning and growing across separate pillars.

  10. The thermomechanical stability of micro-solid oxide fuel cells fabricated on anodized aluminum oxide membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chang-Woo; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Ki-Bum; Lee, Hae-Weon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, Ji-Won

    2012-07-01

    The thermomechanical stability of micro-solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) fabricated on an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane template is investigated. The full structure consists of the following layers: AAO membrane (600 nm)/Pt anode/YSZ electrolyte (900 nm)/porous Pt cathode. The utilization of a 600-nm-thick AAO membrane significantly improves the thermomechanical stability due to its well-known honeycomb-shaped nanopore structure. Moreover, the Pt anode layer deposited in between the AAO membrane and the YSZ electrolyte preserves its integrity in terms of maintaining the triple-phase boundary (TPB) and electrical conductivity during high-temperature operation. Both of these results guarantee thermomechanical stability of the micro-SOFC and extend the cell lifetime, which is one of the most critical issues in the fabrication of freestanding membrane-type micro-SOFCs.

  11. Smoking-related microRNAs and mRNAs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming-Wei; Yu, Sung-Liang; Lin, Wen-Chang; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Chen, Po-Hua; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2016-08-15

    Teenager smoking is of great importance in public health. Functional roles of microRNAs have been documented in smoke-induced gene expression changes, but comprehensive mechanisms of microRNA-mRNA regulation and benefits remained poorly understood. We conducted the Teenager Smoking Reduction Trial (TSRT) to investigate the causal association between active smoking reduction and whole-genome microRNA and mRNA expression changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 12 teenagers with a substantial reduction in smoke quantity and a decrease in urine cotinine/creatinine ratio were enrolled in genomic analyses. In Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes altered by smoke reduction were mainly associated with glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. The integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA found eleven differentially expressed microRNAs negatively correlated with predicted target genes. CD83 molecule regulated by miR-4498 in human PBMC, was critical for the canonical pathway of communication between innate and adaptive immune cells. Our data demonstrated that microRNAs could regulate immune responses in human PBMC after habitual smokers quit smoking and support the potential translational value of microRNAs in regulating disease-relevant gene expression caused by tobacco smoke. PMID:27321975

  12. Smart Energy Management and Control for Fuel Cell Based Micro-Grid Connected Neighborhoods

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

    2006-03-15

    Fuel cell power generation promises to be an efficient, pollution-free, reliable power source in both large scale and small scale, remote applications. DOE formed the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance with the intention of breaking one of the last barriers remaining for cost effective fuel cell power generation. The Alliance’s goal is to produce a core solid-state fuel cell module at a cost of no more than $400 per kilowatt and ready for commercial application by 2010. With their inherently high, 60-70% conversion efficiencies, significantly reduced carbon dioxide emissions, and negligible emissions of other pollutants, fuel cells will be the obvious choice for a broad variety of commercial and residential applications when their cost effectiveness is improved. In a research program funded by the Department of Energy, the research team has been investigating smart fuel cell-operated residential micro-grid communities. This research has focused on using smart control systems in conjunction with fuel cell power plants, with the goal to reduce energy consumption, reduce demand peaks and still meet the energy requirements of any household in a micro-grid community environment. In Phases I and II, a SEMaC was developed and extended to a micro-grid community. In addition, an optimal configuration was determined for a single fuel cell power plant supplying power to a ten-home micro-grid community. In Phase III, the plan is to expand this work to fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhoods (mini-grid). The economic implications of hydrogen cogeneration will be investigated. These efforts are consistent with DOE’s mission to decentralize domestic electric power generation and to accelerate the onset of the hydrogen economy. A major challenge facing the routine implementation and use of a fuel cell based mini-grid is the varying electrical demand of the individual micro-grids, and, therefore, analyzing these issues is vital. Efforts are needed to determine

  13. Real time monitoring of temperature of a micro proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Hu, Yuh-Chung; Shih, Wen-Pin; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chuang, Chih-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Silicon micro-hole arrays (Si-MHA) were fabricated as a gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a micro fuel cell using the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) fabrication technique. The resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensor was integrated with the GDL on a bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the fuel cell. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature was generally linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity were within 0.5 °C and 1.68×10(-3)/°C, respectively. The best experimental performance was 9.37 mW/cm(2) at an H(2)/O(2) dry gas flow rate of 30/30 SCCM. Fuel cell temperature during operation was 27 °C, as measured using thermocouples in contact with the backside of the electrode. Fuel cell operating temperature measured in situ was 30.5 °C. PMID:22573963

  14. Development of Nano/Micro Probes for Femtoliter Volume and Single Cell Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang

    Single cell analysis has recently emerged as an important field of biomedical re- search. It is now clear that heterogeneity of cell metabolism functions in complex biological systems is correlated to changes in biological function and disease processes. A variety of nano/micro probes were developed to enable investigation of cells properties such as membrane stiffness, pH value. However, very few designs were focused on single cell metabolic function studies. There is a critical need for technologies that provide analysis of heterogeneity of cell metabolic functions, especially on metabolism. Nevertheless, the few existing approaches suffer from fundamental defects and need to be improved. This work focused on developing nano/micro probes that are suitable for single cell functionality investigation. Both types of probes are designed to measure cell-to-cell/time-to-time heterogeneity in metabolic functions over a long period of time. Lab-made carbon nanoprobes were developed especially for electro-physiological measurement. The unique structure of the carbon nanoprobes makes them suitable for important intracellular applications like trans-membrane potential measurements and various electrochemical measurement for cell function studies. While it is important of have ability to carry out intracellular measure, there are also occasions where the information of a cell as a whole is collected. One of the most important indicator of a cells metabolic functions is cell respiration rate/oxygen consumption rate. A micro-perfusion based multi-functional single cell sensing probe was the developed to carry out measurements on cell as a whole. Formed by a double-barrel theta pipette, the perfusion flow enables the direct measurement of the metabolic flux for example oxygen consumption rate. In conclusion, this work developed nano/micro-probes as novel single cell investigation tools. The data acquired from these tools could provide valuable assistance on applications

  15. Simulation and design optimization of transparent heaters for spectroscopic micro cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völlm, Henning; Herrmann, Jonathan; Maier, Reinhard; Feili, Dara; Häublein, Volker; Ryssel, Heiner; Seidel, Helmut

    2013-05-01

    For several applications, micro cells with a uniform temperature profile and at least one optical port are required. One example for those cells is the physics package of a chip-scale-atomic-clock. It is necessary that the micro chambers are heated homogeneously to 353 K using a low energy consumption heater. In this work transparent heating structures are investigated to achieve this goal. First an analytical approach is used to describe the behavior of thermal energy dissipation of the heating structures. Then different approaches of possible heater structures are simulated to find the optimal basic configuration. Furthermore, this configuration is optimized to obtain a uniform temperature distribution in the whole cell.

  16. Trapping light with micro lenses in thin film organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Dal Zilio, Simone; Inganäs, Olle; Tormen, Massimo

    2008-12-22

    We demonstrate a novel light trapping configuration based on an array of micro lenses in conjunction with a self aligned array of micro apertures located in a highly reflecting mirror. When locating the light trapping element, that displays strong directional asymmetric transmission, in front of thin film organic photovoltaic cells, an increase in cell absorption is obtained. By recycling reflected photons that otherwise would be lost, thinner films with more beneficial electrical properties can effectively be deployed. The light trapping element enhances the absorption rate of the solar cell and increases the photocurrent by as much as 25%. PMID:19104592

  17. Electrochemically switchable platform for the micro-patterning and release of heterotypic cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Gabi, Michael; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Vörös, Janos

    2011-02-01

    This article describes a dynamic platform in which the biointerfacial properties of micro-patterned domains can be switched electrochemically through the spatio-temporally controlled dissolution and adsorption of polyelectrolyte coatings. Insulating SU-8 micro-patterns created on a transparent indium tin oxide electrode by photolithography allowed for the local control over the electrochemical dissolution of polyelectrolyte mono- and multilayers, with polyelectrolytes shielded from the electrochemical treatment by the underlying photoresist stencil. The platform allowed for the creation of micro-patterned cell co-cultures through the electrochemical removal of a non-fouling polyelectrolyte coating and the localized adsorption of a cell adhesive one after attachment of the first cell population. In addition, the use of weak adhesive polyelectrolyte coatings on the photoresist domains allowed for the detachment of a contiguous heterotypic cell sheet upon electrochemical trigger. Cells grown on the ITO domains peeled off upon electrochemical dissolution of the sacrificial polyelectrolyte substrate, whereas adjacent cell areas on the insulated weakly adhesive substrate easily detached through the contractile force generated by neighboring cells. This electrochemical strategy for the micro-patterning and detachment of heterotypic cell sheets combines simplicity, precision and versatility, and presents great prospects for the creation of cellular constructs which mimic the cellular complexity of native tissues. PMID:21057978

  18. Ground-state magneto-optical resonances in cesium vapor confined in an extremely thin cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, C.; Atvars, A.; Auzinsh, M.; Blush, K.; Cartaleva, S.; Petrov, L.; Slavov, D.

    2007-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are presented related to the ground-state magneto-optical resonance observed in cesium vapor confined in an extremely thin cell (ETC), with thickness equal to the wavelength of the irradiating light. It is shown that utilization of the ETC allows one to examine the formation of a magneto-optical resonance on the individual hyperfine transitions, thus distinguishing processes resulting in dark (reduced absorption) or bright (enhanced absorption) resonance formation. We report experimental evidence of bright magneto-optical resonance sign reversal in Cs atoms confined in an ETC. A theoretical model is proposed based on the optical Bloch equations that involves the elastic interaction processes of atoms in the ETC with its walls, resulting in depolarization of the Cs excited state, which is polarized by the exciting radiation. This depolarization leads to the sign reversal of the bright resonance. Using the proposed model, the magneto-optical resonance amplitude and width as a function of laser power are calculated and compared with the experimental ones. The numerical results are in good agreement with those of experiment.

  19. The role of mesoscopic PCBM crystallites in solvent vapor annealed copolymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bull, Tricia A; Pingree, Liam S C; Jenekhe, Samson A; Ginger, David S; Luscombe, Christine K

    2009-03-24

    Solution processable methanofullerene-based solar cells are the most widely studied class of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). The evolution of the electronic properties with solvent vapor annealing (SVA) in polyfluorene-copolymer and [6,6]phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blended OPVs is studied using various scanning probe techniques: light beam induced current spectroscopy (LBIC), conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM), and photoconductive AFM (pc-AFM). We demonstrate that SVA improves the power conversion efficiency by 40% while forming mesoscopic PCBM crystallites and a approximately 3 nm copolymer-rich overlayer at the cathode interface. We find that the large crystallites created during annealing do not directly improve the local performance of the device, but instead attribute the performance improvement to the ripened blend morphology and an increase in the hole mobility of the copolymer in comparison to the unannealed blend. The PCBM-rich aggregates act as a sink for excess PCBM, although excess PCBM is initially required to form the appropriate structural features prior to the annealing process. PMID:19228011

  20. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

  1. Amplification of multiple genomic loci from single cells isolated by laser micro-dissection of tissues

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Harmelin, Alon; Rechavi, Gideon; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    Background Whole genome amplification (WGA) and laser assisted micro-dissection represent two recently developed technologies that can greatly advance biological and medical research. WGA allows the analysis of multiple genomic loci from a single genome and has been performed on single cells from cell suspensions and from enzymatically-digested tissues. Laser micro-dissection makes it possible to isolate specific single cells from heterogeneous tissues. Results Here we applied for the first time WGA on laser micro-dissected single cells from stained tissue sections, and developed a protocol for sequentially performing the two procedures. The combined procedure allows correlating the cell's genome with its natural morphology and precise anatomical position. From each cell we amplified 122 genomic and mitochondrial loci. In cells obtained from fresh tissue sections, 64.5% of alleles successfully amplified to ~700000 copies each, and mitochondrial DNA was amplified successfully in all cells. Multiplex PCR amplification and analysis of cells from pre-stored sections yielded significantly poorer results. Sequencing and capillary electrophoresis of WGA products allowed detection of slippage mutations in microsatellites (MS), and point mutations in P53. Conclusion Comprehensive genomic analysis of single cells from stained tissue sections opens new research opportunities for cell lineage and depth analyses, genome-wide mutation surveys, and other single cell assays. PMID:18284708

  2. Integrated Micro/nanoengineered Functional Biomaterials for Cell Mechanics and Mechanobiology: A Materials Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials in the last two decades has empowered materials scientists and bioengineers to precisely control different aspects of the in vitro cell microenvironment. Following a philosophy of reductionism, many studies using synthetic functional biomaterials have revealed instructive roles of individual extracellular biophysical and biochemical cues in regulating cellular behaviors. Development of integrated micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials to study complex and emergent biological phenomena has also thrived rapidly in recent years, revealing adaptive and integrated cellular behaviors closely relevant to human physiological and pathological conditions. Working at the interface between materials science and engineering, biology, and medicine, we are now at the beginning of a great exploration using micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials for both fundamental biology study and clinical and biomedical applications such as regenerative medicine and drug screening. In this review, we present an overview of state of the art micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials that can control precisely individual aspects of cell-microenvironment interactions and highlight them as well-controlled platforms for mechanistic studies of mechano-sensitive and -responsive cellular behaviors and integrative biology research. We also discuss the recent exciting trend where micro/nanoengineered biomaterials are integrated into miniaturized biological and biomimetic systems for dynamic multiparametric microenvironmental control of emergent and integrated cellular behaviors. The impact of integrated micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials for future in vitro studies of regenerative medicine, cell biology, as well as human development and disease models are discussed. PMID:24339188

  3. Integrated micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials for cell mechanics and mechanobiology: a materials perspective.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yue; Fu, Jianping

    2014-03-12

    The rapid development of micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials in the last two decades has empowered materials scientists and bioengineers to precisely control different aspects of the in vitro cell microenvironment. Following a philosophy of reductionism, many studies using synthetic functional biomaterials have revealed instructive roles of individual extracellular biophysical and biochemical cues in regulating cellular behaviors. Development of integrated micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials to study complex and emergent biological phenomena has also thrived rapidly in recent years, revealing adaptive and integrated cellular behaviors closely relevant to human physiological and pathological conditions. Working at the interface between materials science and engineering, biology, and medicine, we are now at the beginning of a great exploration using micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials for both fundamental biology study and clinical and biomedical applications such as regenerative medicine and drug screening. In this review, an overview of state of the art micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials that can control precisely individual aspects of cell-microenvironment interactions is presented and they are highlighted them as well-controlled platforms for mechanistic studies of mechano-sensitive and -responsive cellular behaviors and integrative biology research. The recent exciting trend where micro/nanoengineered biomaterials are integrated into miniaturized biological and biomimetic systems for dynamic multiparametric microenvironmental control of emergent and integrated cellular behaviors is also discussed. The impact of integrated micro/nanoengineered functional biomaterials for future in vitro studies of regenerative medicine, cell biology, as well as human development and disease models are discussed. PMID:24339188

  4. Micro-spectroscopy on silicon wafers and solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gundel, Paul; Schubert, Martin C; Heinz, Friedemann D; Woehl, Robert; Benick, Jan; Giesecke, Johannes A; Suwito, Dominik; Warta, Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman (μRS) and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy (μPLS) are demonstrated as valuable characterization techniques for fundamental research on silicon as well as for technological issues in the photovoltaic production. We measure the quantitative carrier recombination lifetime and the doping density with submicron resolution by μPLS and μRS. μPLS utilizes the carrier diffusion from a point excitation source and μRS the hole density-dependent Fano resonances of the first order Raman peak. This is demonstrated on micro defects in multicrystalline silicon. In comparison with the stress measurement by μRS, these measurements reveal the influence of stress on the recombination activity of metal precipitates. This can be attributed to the strong stress dependence of the carrier mobility (piezoresistance) of silicon. With the aim of evaluating technological process steps, Fano resonances in μRS measurements are analyzed for the determination of the doping density and the carrier lifetime in selective emitters, laser fired doping structures, and back surface fields, while μPLS can show the micron-sized damage induced by the respective processes. PMID:21711723

  5. Micro-spectroscopy on silicon wafers and solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman (μRS) and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy (μPLS) are demonstrated as valuable characterization techniques for fundamental research on silicon as well as for technological issues in the photovoltaic production. We measure the quantitative carrier recombination lifetime and the doping density with submicron resolution by μPLS and μRS. μPLS utilizes the carrier diffusion from a point excitation source and μRS the hole density-dependent Fano resonances of the first order Raman peak. This is demonstrated on micro defects in multicrystalline silicon. In comparison with the stress measurement by μRS, these measurements reveal the influence of stress on the recombination activity of metal precipitates. This can be attributed to the strong stress dependence of the carrier mobility (piezoresistance) of silicon. With the aim of evaluating technological process steps, Fano resonances in μRS measurements are analyzed for the determination of the doping density and the carrier lifetime in selective emitters, laser fired doping structures, and back surface fields, while μPLS can show the micron-sized damage induced by the respective processes. PMID:21711723

  6. A study of vapor CdCl{sub 2} treatment by CSS in CdS/CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rios-Flores, A.; Pena, J.L.; Castro-Pena, V.; Ares, O.; Castro-Rodriguez, R.; Bosio, A.

    2010-06-15

    We report the effect of CdCl{sub 2} vapor treatment on the photovoltaic parameters of CdS/CdTe solar cells. Vapor treatment allows combining CdCl{sub 2} exposure time and annealing in one step. In this alternative treatment, the CdS/CdTe substrates were treated with CdCl{sub 2} vapor in a close spaced sublimation (CSS) configuration. The substrate temperature and CdCl{sub 2} powder source temperature were 400 C. The treatment was done by varying the treatment time (t) from 15 to 90 min. Such solar cells are examined by measuring their current density versus voltage (J-V) characteristics. The open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), short circuit current density (J{sub sc}) and fill factor (FF) of our best cell, fabricated and normalized to the area of 1 cm{sup 2}, were V{sub oc} = 663 mV, J{sub sc} = 18.5 mA/cm{sup 2} and FF = 40%, respectively, corresponding to a total area conversion efficiency of {eta} = 5%. In cells of minor area (0.1 cm{sup 2}) efficiencies of 8% have been obtained. (author)

  7. Nano-Bio Electrochemical Interfacing-Linking Cell Biology and Micro-Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shacham-Diamand, Y.; Popovtzer, R.; Rishpon, Y.

    Integration of biological substance within electronic devices is an innovative and challenging area combining recent progress in molecular biology and micro technology. First, we introduce the concept of integrating living cells with Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). Following a brief overview on "whole cell based biosensors" we describe the design, fabrication, and process of a biocompatible electrochemical "Lab-on-a-Chip" system. Demonstrating the application of electrochemical interfacing based whole cell bio chips, we present two different configurations: a. integration of prokaryotic cells (bacteria) for water toxicity detection, and b. integration of eukaryotic cells (human colon cancer cells) for rapid evaluation of the effectiveness of drug treatments. Both applications, with either microbes or mammalian cells integrated onto MEMS based biochips with liquid volume in the range of 100 nL-1 μL, function well and yield a detectable signal much higher than noise level after few minutes.

  8. MicroRNA-126 inhibits invasion in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.; Brawner, E.; Batte, K.; Yu, L.; Hunter, M.G.; Otterson, G.A.; Nuovo, G.; Marsh, C.B.; Nana-Sinkam, S.P.

    2008-09-05

    Crk is a member of a family of adaptor proteins that are involved in intracellular signal pathways altering cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Increased expression of Crk has been described in lung cancer and associated with increased tumor invasiveness. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs (approximately 21-25 nt long) that are capable of targeting genes for either degradation of mRNA or inhibition of translation. Crk is a predicted putative target gene for miR-126. Over-expression of miR126 in a lung cancer cell line resulted in a decrease in Crk protein without any alteration in the associated mRNA. These lung cancer cells exhibit a decrease in adhesion, migration, and invasion. Decreased cancer cell invasion was also evident following targeted knockdown of Crk. MiR-126 alters lung cancer cell phenotype by inhibiting adhesion, migration, and invasion and the effects on invasion may be partially mediated through Crk regulation.

  9. Study of solid oxide fuel cell interconnects, protective coatings and advanced physical vapor deposition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Paul Edward

    High energy conversion efficiency, decreased environmentally-sensitive emissions and fuel flexibility have attracted increasing attention toward solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for stationary, transportation and portable power generation. Critical durability and cost issues, however, continue to impede wide-spread deployment. Many intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar SOFC systems employ metallic alloy interconnect components, which physically connect individual fuel cells into electric series, facilitate gas distribution to appropriate SOFC electrode chambers (fuel/anode and oxidant[air]/cathode) and provide SOFC stack mechanical support. These demanding multifunctional requirements challenge commercially-available and inexpensive metallic alloys due to corrosion and related effects. Many ongoing investigations are aimed at enabling inexpensive metallic alloys (via bulk and/or surface modifications) as SOFC interconnects (SOFC(IC)s). In this study, two advanced physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques: large area filtered vacuum arc deposition (LAFAD), and filtered arc plasma-assisted electron beam PVD (FA-EBPVD) were used to deposit a wide-variety of protective nanocomposite (amorphous/nanocrystalline) ceramic thin-film (<5microm) coatings on commercial and specialty stainless steels with different surface finishes. Both bare and coated steel specimens were subjected to SOFC(IC)-relevant exposures and evaluated using complimentary surface analysis techniques. Significant improvements were observed under simulated SOFC(IC) exposures with many coated specimens at ˜800°C relative to uncoated specimens: stable surface morphology; low area specific resistance (ASR <100mO·cm 2 >1,000 hours); and, dramatically reduced Cr volatility (>30-fold). Analyses and discussions of SOFC(IC) corrosion, advanced PVD processes and protective coating behavior are intended to advance understanding and accelerate the development of durable and commercially-viable SOFC

  10. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  11. Magnetic micro-device for manipulating PC12 cell migration and organization.

    PubMed

    Alon, N; Havdala, T; Skaat, H; Baranes, K; Marcus, M; Levy, I; Margel, S; Sharoni, A; Shefi, O

    2015-05-01

    Directing neuronal migration and growth has an important impact on potential post traumatic therapies. Magnetic manipulation is an advantageous method for remotely guiding cells. In the present study, we have generated highly localized magnetic fields with controllable magnetic flux densities to manipulate neuron-like cell migration and organization at the microscale level. We designed and fabricated a unique miniaturized magnetic device composed of an array of rectangular ferromagnetic bars made of permalloy (Ni80Fe20), sputter-deposited onto glass substrates. The asymmetric shape of the magnets enables one to design a magnetic landscape with high flux densities at the poles. Iron oxide nanoparticles were introduced into PC12 cells, making the cells magnetically sensitive. First, we manipulated the cells by applying an external magnetic field. The magnetic force was strong enough to direct PC12 cell migration in culture. Based on time lapse observations, we analysed the movement of the cells and estimated the amount of MNPs per cell. We plated the uploaded cells on the micro-patterned magnetic device. The cells migrated towards the high magnetic flux zones and aggregated at the edges of the patterned magnets, corroborating that the cells with magnetic nanoparticles are indeed affected by the micro-magnets and attracted to the bars' magnetic poles. Our study presents an emerging method for the generation of pre-programmed magnetic micro-'hot spots' to locate and direct cellular growth, setting the stage for implanted magnetic devices. PMID:25792133

  12. Micro-adhesion rings surrounding TCR microclusters are essential for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Sakuma, Machie; Ike, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Kimura, Yayoi; Ohara, Osamu; Saito, Takashi

    2016-07-25

    The immunological synapse (IS) formed at the interface between T cells and antigen-presenting cells represents a hallmark of initiation of acquired immunity. T cell activation is initiated at T cell receptor (TCR) microclusters (MCs), in which TCRs and signaling molecules assemble at the interface before IS formation. We found that each TCR-MC was transiently bordered by a ring structure made of integrin and focal adhesion molecules in the early phase of activation, which is similar in structure to the IS in microscale. The micro-adhesion ring is composed of LFA-1, focal adhesion molecules paxillin and Pyk2, and myosin II (MyoII) and is supported by F-actin core and MyoII activity through LFA-1 outside-in signals. The formation of the micro-adhesion ring was transient but especially sustained upon weak TCR stimulation to recruit linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and SLP76. Perturbation of the micro-adhesion ring induced impairment of TCR-MC development and resulted in impaired cellular signaling and cell functions. Thus, the synapse-like structure composed of the core TCR-MC and surrounding micro-adhesion ring is a critical structure for initial T cell activation through integrin outside-in signals. PMID:27354546

  13. Micro+nanotexturing of substrates to enhance ligand-assisted cancer cell isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Mohammed Arif I.; Wan, Yuan; Islam, Muhymin; Ali, Waqas; Hanif, Madiha; Kim, Young-tae; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a simple approach to create a two-tiered surface for superior cancer cell isolation. The idea is inspired by the interactions of cells with a nanotextured basement membrane. The texture mimicked the extracellular matrix and basement membrane for superior target cell adhesion. Prepared micro+nanotextured surfaces showed enhanced cell capture. Preparation of the two-tiered surface was done using micro- and nanotexturing and was easily reproducible. It has been shown before that the larger surface area of a nanotextured surface assists the cell’s attachment through surface-anchored ligands. Taking it a step further, ligand functionalized two-level micro+nanotextured surfaces improved the sensitivity of the cancer cell isolation over simple flat nanotexturing. The isolation efficiency increased by 208% compared to the surface with a single-level nanotexture. The two-tiered surface was compatible with previously reported nanotextured devices used for cancer cell isolation. Micro-texture on the glass surface was created using simple sand gritting, followed by reactive ion etching (RIE) of the entire surface. The approach could create large surface areas within a short time while maintaining superior cell isolation efficiency.

  14. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures. PMID:27442970

  15. Bidirectional Promoter Engineering for Single Cell MicroRNA Sensors in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sladitschek, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important markers and regulators of cell identity. Precise measurements of cellular miRNA levels rely traditionally on RNA extraction and thus do not allow to follow miRNA expression dynamics at the level of single cells. Non-invasive miRNA sensors present an ideal solution but they critically depend on the performance of suitable ubiquitous promoters that reliably drive expression both in pluripotent and differentiated cell types. Here we describe the engineering of bidirectional promoters that drive the expression of precise ratiometric fluorescent miRNA sensors in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their differentiated derivatives. These promoters are based on combinations of the widely used CAG, EF1α and PGK promoters as well as the CMV and PGK enhancers. miR-142-3p, which is known to be bimodally expressed in mESCs, served as a model miRNA to gauge the precision of the sensors. The performance of the resulting miRNA sensors was assessed by flow cytometry in single stable transgenic mESCs undergoing self-renewal or differentiation. EF1α promoters arranged back-to-back failed to drive the robustly correlated expression of two transgenes. Back-to-back PGK promoters were shut down during mESC differentiation. However, we found that a back-to-back arrangement of CAG promoters with four CMV enhancers provided both robust expression in mESCs undergoing differentiation and the best signal-to-noise for measurement of miRNA activity in single cells among all the sensors we tested. Such a bidirectional promoter is therefore particularly well suited to study the dynamics of miRNA expression during cell fate transitions at the single cell level. PMID:27152616

  16. Customized homogenization and shaping of LED light by micro cells arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asoubar, Daniel; Hellmann, Christian; Schweitzer, Hagen; Kuhn, Michael; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The energy-efficient use of LED light requires the development of compact illumination systems for the customized homogenization and shaping of partially-coherent LED light. Therefore a design concept which is based on arrays of aperiodic micro structures, namely cells, for primary or secondary optics is introduced. Each cell of the array deflects locally the light into predefined directions and results in a light spot in the target plane. The light spots of all array cells together form the desired light pattern. The performance of three different cell geometries (linear gratings, micro prisms andmicromirrors) on the homogenization and shaping ofmonochromatic as well as white light LEDs is demonstrated. For the realistic evaluation of the illumination system an LED model including power spectrum, polarization, spatial and temporal coherence is chosen. Furthermore wave-optical effects like diffraction at the cell apertures are taken into account. For the grating cells arrays a rigorous analysis of the diffraction efficiencies is included.

  17. Cancer exosomes perform cell-independent microRNA biogenesis and promote tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Melo, Sonia A; Sugimoto, Hikaru; O'Connell, Joyce T; Kato, Noritoshi; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Perelman, Lev T; Melo, Carlos A; Lucci, Anthony; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-11-10

    Exosomes are secreted by all cell types and contain proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we report that breast cancer associated exosomes contain microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with the RISC-Loading Complex (RLC) and display cell-independent capacity to process precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) into mature miRNAs. Pre-miRNAs, along with Dicer, AGO2, and TRBP, are present in exosomes of cancer cells. CD43 mediates the accumulation of Dicer specifically in cancer exosomes. Cancer exosomes mediate an efficient and rapid silencing of mRNAs to reprogram the target cell transcriptome. Exosomes derived from cells and sera of patients with breast cancer instigate nontumorigenic epithelial cells to form tumors in a Dicer-dependent manner. These findings offer opportunities for the development of exosomes based biomarkers and therapies. PMID:25446899

  18. Cancer Exosomes Perform Cell-Independent MicroRNA Biogenesis and Promote Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Sonia A.; Sugimoto, Hikaru; O’Connell, Joyce T.; Kato, Noritoshi; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Perelman, Lev T.; Melo, Carlos A.; Lucci, Anthony; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A.; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Exosomes are secreted by all cell types and contain proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we report that breast cancer associated exosomes contain microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with the RISC Loading Complex (RLC) and display cell-independent capacity to process precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) into mature miRNAs. Pre-miRNAs, along with Dicer, AGO2, and TRBP, are present in exosomes of cancer cells. CD43 mediates the accumulation of Dicer specifically in cancer exosomes. Cancer exosomes mediate an efficient and rapid silencing of mRNAs to reprogram the target cell transcriptome. Exosomes derived from cells and sera of patients with breast cancer instigate non-tumorigenic epithelial cells to form tumors in a Dicer-dependent manner. These findings offer opportunities for the development of exosomes based biomarkers and therapies. PMID:25446899

  19. Gas/liquid sensing via chemotaxis of Euglena cells confined in an isolated micro-aquarium.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Lee, Jeesoo; Song, Simon; Hara, Masahiko; Maeda, Mizuo

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate on-chip gas/liquid sensing by using the chemotaxis of live bacteria (Euglena gracilis) confined in an isolated micro-aquarium, and gas/liquid permeation through porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The sensing chip consisted of one closed micro-aquarium and two separated bypass microchannels along the perimeter of the micro-aquarium. Test gas/liquid and reference samples were introduced into the two individual microchannels separately, and the gas/liquid permeated through the PDMS walls and dissolved in the micro-aquarium water, resulting in a chemical concentration gradient in the micro-aquarium. By employing the closed micro-aquarium isolated from sample flows, we succeeded in measuring the chemotaxis of Euglena for a gas substance quantitatively, which cannot be achieved with the conventional flow-type or hydro-gel-type microfluidic devices. We found positive (negative) chemotaxis for CO2 concentrations below (above) 15%, with 64 ppm as the minimum concentration affecting the cells. We also observed chemotaxis for ethanol and H2O2. By supplying culture medium via the microchannels, the Euglena culture remained alive for more than 2 months. The sensing chip is thus useful for culturing cells and using them for environmental toxicity/nutrition studies by monitoring their motion. PMID:23934095

  20. MicroRNA-Mediated Reprogramming of Somatic Cells into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sandmaier, Shelley E S; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs or miRNAs belong to a class of small noncoding RNAs that play a crucial role in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Nascent miRNAs are expressed as a longer transcript, which are then processed into a smaller 18-23-nucleotide mature miRNAs that bind to the target transcripts and induce cleavage or inhibit translation. MiRNAs therefore represent another key regulator of gene expression in establishing and maintaining unique cellular fate. Several classes of miRNAs have been identified to be uniquely expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESC) and regulated by the core transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4. One such class of miRNAs is the mir-302/367 cluster that is enriched in pluripotent cells in vivo and in vitro. Using the mir-302/367 either by themselves or in combination with the Yamanaka reprogramming factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4) has resulted in the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) with high efficiencies. In this chapter, we outline the methodologies for establishing and utilizing the miRNA-based tools for reprogramming somatic cells into iPSC. PMID:26621586

  1. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Polycrystalline Silicon : From Gas Molecule To Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenendaal, P. A. T. T.

    2002-10-01

    Although the effort to investigate the use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar energy, has increased, their contribution to the total energy consumption remains insignificant. The conversion of solar energy into electricity through solar cells is one of the most promising techniques, but the use of these cells is limited by the high cost of electricity. The major contributions to these costs are the material and manufacturing costs. Over the past decades, the development of silicon based thin film solar cells has received much attention, because the fabrication costs are low. A promising material for use in thin film solar cells is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si:H). A relatively new technique to deposit poly-Si:H is Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (Hot-Wire CVD), in which the reactant gases are catalytically decomposed at the surface of a hot filament, mainly tungsten and tantalum. The main advantages of Hot-Wire CVD over PE-CVD are absence of ion bombardment, high deposition rate, low equipment cost and high gas utilization. This thesis deals with the full spectrum of deposition, characterization and application of poly-Si:H thin films, i.e. from gas molecule to solar cell. Studies on the decomposition of silane on the filament showed that the process is catalytic of nature and that silane is decomposed into Si and 4H. The dominant gas phase reaction is the reaction of Si and H with silane, resulting in SiH3, Si2H6, Si3H6 and H2SiSiH2. The film growth precursors are Si, SiH3 and Si2H4. Also, XPS results on used tantalum and tungsten filaments are discussed. The position dependent measurements show larger silicon contents at the ends of the tungsten filament, as compared to the middle, due to a lower filament temperature. This effect is insignificant for a tantalum filament. Deposition time dependent measurements show an increase in silicon content of the tungsten filament with time, while the silicon content on the tantalum filament saturates

  2. Dynamics of high Weber number drops impacting on hydrophobic surfaces with closed micro-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Hao, Pengfei; Zhang, Xiwen; He, Feng

    2016-06-29

    The impact dynamics and bouncing performance of high Weber number drops on hydrophobic surfaces with open and closed micro-cells are investigated. Central wetted rings are observed on both closed-cell and open-cell surfaces under high Weber number collisions, which are proposed to constitute the key element affecting the bouncing behaviour. It is found that the drops rebound on closed-cell surfaces where the central area is in the "hybrid wetting state" at high Weber numbers, while the drops adhere to the open-cell surfaces where the central region is in the Wenzel state. A theoretical model is developed to explain this interesting phenomenon, in which the liquid cannot reach the bottom of the closed-cell hydrophobic surfaces since the air stored in micro-cavities prevents the sliding motion of the liquid film and functions as a "gas spring" lifting the liquid lamella. This indicates that the hydrophobic surface with simple micro cavities can maintain the water-repellent characteristics under drop impacts at high Weber numbers. These findings are expected to be crucial to a fundamental understanding of the rapid collisions between drops and micro-structured surfaces, as well as a valuable strategy to guide the fabrication of novel super water-repellant and anti-icing surfaces. PMID:27306824

  3. Effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation in a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzi, N. F. I.; Hasran, U. A.; Kamarudin, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    In a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), methanol vapor is typically obtained using a pervaporation plate in a process by which liquid methanol contained in the fuel reservoir undergoes a phase change to vapor in the anodic vapor chamber. This work investigates the effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation using a three-dimensional simulation model developed by varying the plate thickness. A. The rate of methanol evaporation was measured using Darcy's law. The rate of methanol evaporation was found to be inversely proportional to the plate thickness, where the decrease in thickness inevitably lowers the resistance along the plate and consequently increases the methanol transport through the plate. This shows that the plate thickness has a significant influence on the rate of methanol evaporation and thereby plays an important role in improving the performance of the passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell.

  4. Identification of microRNAs expressed highly in pancreatic islet-like cell clusters differentiated from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Zhi; Yu, Sung-Liang; Singh, Sher; Kao, Li-Pin; Tsai, Zong-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Shoei-Lung Li, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune destruction of pancreatic islet beta cell disease, making it important to find a new alternative source of the islet beta cells to replace the damaged cells. hES (human embryonic stem) cells possess unlimited self-renewal and pluripotency and thus have the potential to provide an unlimited supply of different cell types for tissue replacement. The hES-T3 cells with normal female karyotype were first differentiated into EBs (embryoid bodies) and then induced to generate the T3pi (pancreatic islet-like cell clusters derived from T3 cells), which expressed pancreatic islet cell-specific markers of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. The expression profiles of microRNAs and mRNAs from the T3pi were analysed and compared with those of undifferentiated hES-T3 cells and differentiated EBs. MicroRNAs negatively regulate the expression of protein-coding mRNAs. The T3pi showed very high expression of microRNAs, miR-186, miR-199a and miR-339, which down-regulated the expression of LIN28, PRDM1, CALB1, GCNT2, RBM47, PLEKHH1, RBPMS2 and PAK6. Therefore, these microRNAs and their target genes are very likely to play important regulatory roles in the development of pancreas and/or differentiation of islet cells, and they may be manipulated to increase the proportion of beta cells and insulin synthesis in the differentiated T3pi for cell therapy of type I diabetics. PMID:20735361

  5. Specification of neural cell fate and regulation of neural stem cell proliferation by microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Jacqueline T; Gallicano, G Ian

    2012-01-01

    In the approximately 20 years since microRNAs (miRNAs) were first characterized, they have been shown to play important roles in diverse physiologic functions, particularly those requiring coordinated changes in networks of signaling pathways. The ability of miRNAs to silence expression of multiple gene targets hints at complex connections that research has only begun to elucidate. The nervous system, particularly the brain, and its progenitor cells offer opportunities to examine miRNA function due to the myriad different cell types, numerous functionally distinct regions, and fluidly dynamic connections between them. This review aims to summarize current understanding of miRNA regulation in neurodevelopment, beginning with miRNAs that establish a general neural fate in cells. Particular attention is given to miR-124, the most abundant brain-specific miRNA, along with its key regulators and targets as an example of the potentially far-reaching effects of miRNAs. These modulators and mediators enable miRNAs to subtly calibrate cellular proliferation and differentiation. To better understand their mechanisms of action, miRNA profiles in distinct populations and regions of cells have been examined as well as miRNAs that regulate proliferation of stem cells, a process marked by dramatic morphological shifts in response to temporally subtle and refined shifts in gene expression. To tease out the complex interactions of miRNAs and stem cells more accurately, future studies will require more sensitive methods of assessing miRNA expression and more rigorous models of miRNA pathways. Thorough characterization of similarities and differences in specific miRNAs’ effects in different species is vital to developing better disease models and therapeutics using miRNAs. PMID:23671807

  6. Establishment of cells to monitor Microprocessor through fusion genes of microRNA and GFP

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, Motomu; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Adachi, Koichi; Miyata, Maiko; Huang, Peng; Ishiguro, Naoki; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Iwamoto, Takashi

    2008-08-08

    Microprocessor, the complex of Drosha and DGCR8, promotes the processing of primary microRNA to precursor microRNA, which is a crucial step for microRNA maturation. So far, no convenient assay systems have been developed for observing this step in vivo. Here we report the establishment of highly sensitive cellular systems where we can visually monitor the function of Microprocessor. During a series of screening of transfectants with fusion genes of the EGFP cDNA and primary microRNA genes, we have obtained certain cell lines where introduction of siRNA against DGCR8 or Drosha strikingly augments GFP signals. In contrast, these cells have not responded to Dicer siRNA; thus they have a unique character that GFP signals should be negatively and specifically correlated to the action of Microprocessor among biogenesis of microRNA. These cell lines can be useful tools for real-time analysis of Microprocessor action in vivo and identifying its novel modulators.

  7. High-efficiency solar cells based on micro-nano scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Achyut K.; Olah, Robert; Mizuno, Genki; Sengupta, Rabi; Park, Jin-Hong; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2010-04-01

    Higher efficiency solar cells are required to reduce solar array mass, stowed volume, and cost for numerous commercial and military applications. Conventional solar cell made of thin-film or crystal-Si (c-Si) or other thin films have limited conversion efficiency of 10 to 20% with the cost of 3-5/Wp. Current state-of-the-art crystalline multijunction solar cells are 30 % efficient with the cost of 30 to 40 /Wp. Increasing conversion efficiency of > 30% will enable to reduce the cost < $1/Wp and useful for various power platforms supporting mobile wireless, laptop, tent applications. Solar cell comprises with three dimensional blocks are shown to be higher conversion-efficiency than standard flat-type solar cell. Incorporating nano-scaled blocks in solar cell structures are shown to be increased performances due to (i) increase of the surface area to volume ratio, (ii) brining the junction closer to the carrier generation region which eliminate the carrier recombination , (iii) absorption of all incident photon flux, and (iv) broadening the absorption spectrum. Our activities on next generation high performance solar cells based on micro-nano scaled structures and various material systems will be presented. Details fabrication process of micro-nano scaled solar cell friendly to mass scale manufacturing will be also be described. We have achieved more than 20x optical performance enhancement for the solar cell based on micro-scaled structures, than that of flat-type (standard) solar cell, fabricated on the same Si substrate and same process. Simulation results showed that significant improvement in conversion efficiency more than 30% is possible for even c-Si solar cell based on the micro-nano scaled structures. Key issues and challenges for bringing it to the manufacturing will be discussed.

  8. MicroRNA-138 suppresses invasion and promotes apoptosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiqiang; Jiang, Lu; Wang, Anxun; Yu, Jinsheng; Shi, Fei; Zhou, Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis is a critical event in the progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). To identify microRNAs associated with HNSCC metastasis, 6 paired HNSCC cell lines with different metastatic potential were examined. Using microarrays, a panel of differentially expressed microRNAs was identified, including reduction of miR-138 in highly metastatic cells. Ectopic transfection of miR-138 suppressed cell invasion and led to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Knockdown of miR-138 enhanced cell invasion and suppressed apoptosis. Thus, our results suggested miR-138 acts as a tumor suppresser and may serve as a therapeutic target for HNSCC patients at risk of metastasis. PMID:19540661

  9. Emerging Roles for MicroRNAs in T Follicular Helper Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Maul, Julia; Baumjohann, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are essential for the formation of germinal centers (GCs) and the development of long-lived humoral immunity. Tfh cell differentiation is a multistep process driven by the balanced expression of key transcription factors that form a regulatory network in which small changes in gene expression determine the Tfh cell fate decision. Here, we review recent findings that have revealed that certain microRNAs act as important mediators within this network, with roles in tuning gene expression. We integrate these findings into the current understanding of the mechanisms governing T helper cell differentiation, and propose a model in which the establishment of Tfh cell identity is dependent on the differential expression and concerted action of distinct microRNAs and transcription factors. PMID:27068008

  10. MicroRNA-491 regulates the proliferation and apoptosis of CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ting; Zuo, Qian-Fei; Gong, Li; Wang, Li-Na; Zou, Quan-Ming; Xiao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocyte-mediated immune responses are critical for antitumour immunity; however, T cell function is impaired in the tumour environment. MicroRNAs are involved in regulation of the immune system. While little is known about the function of intrinsic microRNAs in CD8+ T cells in the tumour microenvironment. Here, we found that miR-491 was upregulated in CD8+ T cells from mice with colorectal cancer. Retroviral overexpression of miR-491 in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis and decreased the production of interferon-γ in CD8+ T cells. We found that miR-491 directly targeted cyclin-dependent kinase 4, the transcription factor T cell factor 1 and the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2-like 1 in CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, tumour-derived TGF-β induced miR-491 expression in CD8+ T cells. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-491 can act as a negative regulator of T lymphocytes, especially CD8+ T cells, in the tumour environment; thus, this study provides a novel insight on dysfunctional CD8+ T cells during tumourigenesis and cancer progression. In conclusion, miR-491 may be a new target for antitumour immunotherapy. PMID:27484289