Science.gov

Sample records for micro-hydro power development

  1. DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF A SUSTAINABLE MICRO-HYDRO POWER PLANT AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM FOR A TRIBAL VILLAGE CLUSTER IN RURAL INDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Columbia University Engineers Without Borders (CU-EWB) is developing a sustainable micro-hydro power plant for the Badi Trika Gouda village in the Indian state of Orissa. The community currently relies on firewood and animal waste matter for lighting and cooking. Our ...

  2. Power generation by high head water in a building using micro hydro turbine-a greener approach.

    PubMed

    M M S R S, Bhargav; V, Ratna Kishore; S P, Anbuudayasankar; K, Balaji

    2016-05-01

    Demand for green energy production is arising all over the world. A lot of emphasis is laid in making the buildings green. Even a small amount of energy savings made contribute to saving the environment. In this study, an idea is proposed and studied to extract power from the high head water in the pipelines of a building. A building of height 15 m is considered for this study. Water flowing in the pipe has sufficient energy to run a micro hydro turbine. The feasibility of producing electrical energy from the energy of pipe water is found. The motivation is to find the feasibility of generating power using a low-cost turbine. The experimental setup consists of micro turbine of 135 mm diameter coupled to a 12-V DC generator; LEDs and resistors are employed to validate the results. The theoretical calculations were presented using the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics. The theoretical results are validated using experimental and numerical results using CFD simulation. In addition, exergy analysis has been carried out to quantify the irreversibilities during the process in the system. PMID:26354115

  3. Analysis of performance with variable stroke of a torque based renewable micro hydro power generation plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Muhammad Mahbubul; Rahman, Md. Shad; Sultan, Rasel A.; Naif, M. Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    The most important addition of modern science is renewable energy. And the most useful and the most cheaply renewable power generation source is Hydropower. Flowing water creates energy that can be captured and turned into electricity. This is called Hydroelectric power or Hydropower. Hydropower is considered a renewable energy resource because it uses the earth's water cycle to generate electricity. Water evaporates from the earth's surface, forms clouds, precipitates back to earth, and flows toward the ocean. As far as Bangladesh is concerned, only a small fraction of electricity is generated by hydropower. The government has set a target of meeting 5 per cent of the electricity demand by 2015 by utilizing renewable energy and 10 per cent by the year 2020. Currently, renewable energies contribute to less than 1 per cent of the country's total electricity generation. The aim of our analysis is to demonstrate and observe the hydropower of our country in micro-scale by our experimental setup which is completely new in concept. This paper consists results of our findings and we find larger the number of stroke higher the rpm correspondingly higher efficiency. We find maximum rpm for 2stroke when fixed fly wheel weight was 18Kg and water was 10liter. It might help in case of utilizing this renewable energy potential at high scale.

  4. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).

    SciTech Connect

    Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

    1984-03-01

    This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

  5. Dyadic design interface between energy and agriculture: the case of Pinthali micro hydro system in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Regmi, A

    2003-01-01

    Technology, like society, is heterogeneous. It mirrors the context in which it operates. Micro hydro development in Nepal is a rural energy strategy, which relies on technology and innovation and takes place in a specific social context. In designing this energy strategy, both technology and its social context, therefore, need to be considered seriously. In technical design processes, the interplay between the content (technology) and the context (society) needs to be considered, as the outcome will affect the people. For example, the content--micro hydro system--in the domain of the context--agriculture--provides an arena for an integrated water control system. Thus, it is possible to control water for two purposes: to produce power and to provide irrigation. The end product will be "energy" as a "consumptive" output and improved food security as a "productive" output of water. Therefore, within a sociotechnical framework, energy and irrigation become constitutive outputs of the sacrosanct "water". Thus, the metaphor of power--the "sociotechnical code" of "content" and "context"--can be used with the term "agro-anergy" in the design process of micro hydro systems. Evidence suggests that this interaction can lead to a transformed water use system for both productive and consumptive output for the benefit of rural communities. PMID:12731792

  6. Experimental optimization of a free vortex propeller runner for micro hydro application

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz

    2009-09-15

    The turbine technology for low head application in the micro hydro range has been vastly neglected despite niche available in scattered regions of valley flows as well as in wastewater canals and other energy recovery schemes, where the available head does not exceed 2 meters. The goal of this study is to develop hydraulically optimized propeller turbines for the micro hydro range with a particular focus on ease of manufacture. This paper presents a wide range of geometrical optimization steps carried out on a propeller runner, whose blades have been designed using the free vortex theory, and operating with a gross head from 1.5 to 2 m and discharge of approximately 75 l/s. It further illustrates 3 stages of geometrical modifications carried out on the runner with an objective of optimizing the runner performance. These modifications comprised of changes to the tip angles (both at the runner inlet and exit) as well as the hub angles (at the runner inlet) of the runner blades. The paper also presents an interesting theoretical methodology to analyze the effects of each optimization stage. This method looks at the relative changes to shaft power and discharge at constant head and speed and gives wonderful insight as to how the internal parameters like Euler shaft work and runner hydraulic losses are behaving with respect to each optimization stage. It was found that the performance of the runner was very sensitive to changes to exit tip angle. At two levels of modification, the discharge increased in the range of 15-30%, while shaft power increased in the range of 12-45%, thus influencing the efficiency characteristics. The results of the runner inlet tip modification were very interesting in that a very significant rise of turbine efficiency was recorded from 55% to 74% at the best efficiency point, which was caused by a reduced discharge consumption as well as a higher power generation. It was also found that the optimization study on a propeller runner has

  7. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

  8. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume III, Fish and Habitat Inventory of Tributary Streams, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leathe, Stephen A.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes a study of the fisheries of the Swan River drainage in relation to potential small hydro development. This information was collected in order to obtain a reliable basin-wide database which was used to evaluate the potential cumulative effects of a number of proposed small hydro developments on the fisheries of the drainage. For each named tributary stream there is a reach-by-reach narrative summary of general habitat characteristics, outstanding features of the stream, and fish populations and spawning use. An attempt was made to rank many of the measured parameters relative to other surveyed stream reaches in the drainage. 3 refs.

  9. Simulations of Blade Angle Effects on EGAT-Micro Hydro Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuantong, Weerapon; Taechajedcadarungsri, Sirivit

    2010-06-01

    Following the feasibility study of design phase of EGAT (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand) in-house micro hydro bulb turbine at Huai Kum Dam drainage pipeline from the reservoir for irrigation, the simulation of blade angle effects had been performed. In this case study, the turbine was designed at the average head of 21 m and water flow rate of 0.424 m3/s. The simulation was conducted in order to study of the effects of blade angle on the fluid flow for this specific case. The LES turbulence model under the practical condition of unsteady flow and incompressible fluid at Huai Kum Dam was investigated. The rotating blades effect the change in pressure and momentum which depend on head and flow rate of fluid. The research studied pressure and velocity of fluid flow on blades solving the pre-design for the improvement of hydro turbine efficiency. The computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate the pressure and velocity distributions on blades of hydro bulb turbine which consists of five-blade runner and rotates at 980 rpm by using Fluent Software. The model was set at the blade twist angle of 25o and blade camber angle of 32o and then adjusted the guide vane angle to 60o, 65o and 70o respectively for comparing the maximum and minimum pressure on both sides of the blades as well as the corresponding efficiency. The results have shown that by setting guide vane angle to 60o, 65o and 70o, the maximum pressure, located at the leading edge of pressure side, are 213 kPa, 217 kPa and 207 kPa and the minimum pressure, located at the leading edge of suction side are -473 kPa, -465 kPa, and -581 kPa respectively. The flow profiles of pressure, velocity and stream line showed the guidelines of better blade angle comparisons. The maximum efficiency of hydro bulb turbine found in this study was 67.8% at blade angle of 32o and guide vane of 60o. This case study will be further investigated on the blade design for the improvement of the turbine efficiency

  10. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  11. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2004-04-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC15 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Power Generation, Inc. (SPG) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC15 began on April 19, 2004, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier startup burner. The Transport Gasifier was shutdown on April 29, 2004, accumulating 200 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. About 91 hours of the test run occurred during oxygen-blown operations. Another 6 hours of the test run was in enriched-air mode. The remainder of the test run, approximately 103 hours, took place during air-blown operations. The highest operating temperature in the gasifier mixing zone mostly varied from 1,800 to 1,850 F. The gasifier exit pressure ran between 200 and 230 psig during air-blown operations and between 110 and 150 psig in oxygen-enhanced air operations.

  12. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2003-07-01

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

  13. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  14. Developments in tidal power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, R. H.

    Successful, planned, and potential tidal power plants and sites are discussed. Units are in operation in France and Russia, with the French plant using reversible blade turbines being used as a design guide for plants in Argentina and Australia. The U.S. is studying the feasibility of a plant in Passamaquaddy Bay, and Canada is pursuing construction of a plant in the Bay of Fundy. The Severn River in Great Britain is receiving a site study, and over a hundred plants have been built as local power systems in China. Bulb-type turbines, which enhance the volume emptying and filling the retaining basin, are considered as the highest performing power unit. Simpler one-way flow turbines have been suggested as more economical to install. Governmental, institutional, and investor impediments to tidal power plant are explored.

  15. New developments in power semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper represents an overview of some recent power semiconductor developments and spotlights new technologies that may have significant impact for aircraft electric secondary power. Primary emphasis will be on NASA-Lewis-supported developments in transistors, diodes, a new family of semiconductors, and solid-state remote power controllers. Several semiconductor companies that are moving into the power arena with devices rated at 400 V and 50 A and above are listed, with a brief look at a few devices.

  16. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-05-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT3 of the Halliburton KBR transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT3. GCT3 was planned as a 250-hour test run to commission the loop seal and continue the characterization of the limits of operational parameter variations using a blend of several Powder River Basin coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: (1) Loop Seal Commissioning--Evaluate the operational stability of the loop seal with sand and limestone as a bed material at different solids circulation rates and establish a maximum solids circulation rate through the loop seal with the inert bed. (2) Loop Seal Operations--Evaluate the loop seal operational stability during coal feed operations and establish maximum solids circulation rate. Secondary objectives included the continuation of reactor characterization, including: (1) Operational Stability--Characterize the reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal feed, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. (2) Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. (3) Effects of Reactor Conditions on Syngas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam

  17. "Word Power" (Vocabulary Development).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhees, Roxy

    Containing numerous vocabulary-building activities and exercises, this guidebook is designed to help elementary students learn to manipulate language as they gain concrete experiences with words, increase their "word power," and have fun. The activities described involve dictionary games, synonyms, "saidonyms" (alternatives for the overused word…

  18. Effect of Pore Pressure on Slip Failure of an Impermeable Fault: A Coupled Micro Hydro-Geomechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    The geomechanical processes associated with subsurface fluid injection/extraction is of central importance for many industrial operations related to energy and water resources. However, the mechanisms controlling the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remain poorly understood and are critical for the assessment of seismic risk. In this work, we develop a coupled hydro-geomechanical model to investigate the effect of fluid injection induced pressure perturbation on the slip behavior of a sealing fault. The model couples single-phase flow in the pores and mechanics of the solid phase. Granular packs (see example in Fig. 1a) are numerically generated where the grains can be either bonded or not, depending on the degree of cementation. A pore network is extracted for each granular pack with pore body volumes and pore throat conductivities calculated rigorously based on geometry of the local pore space. The pore fluid pressure is solved via an explicit scheme, taking into account the effect of deformation of the solid matrix. The mechanics part of the model is solved using the discrete element method (DEM). We first test the validity of the model with regard to the classical one-dimensional consolidation problem where an analytical solution exists. We then demonstrate the ability of the coupled model to reproduce rock deformation behavior measured in triaxial laboratory tests under the influence of pore pressure. We proceed to study the fault stability in presence of a pressure discontinuity across the impermeable fault which is implemented as a plane with its intersected pore throats being deactivated and thus obstructing fluid flow (Fig. 1b, c). We focus on the onset of shear failure along preexisting faults. We discuss the fault stability criterion in light of the numerical results obtained from the DEM simulations coupled with pore fluid flow. The implication on how should faults be treated in a large-scale continuum model is also presented.

  19. [Development of ultrasonic power meter].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongxin; Hu, Changming; Zheng, Yan; Xu, Honglei; Zhou, Wohua; Wu, Ziwen; Yu, Liudan; Hao, Jiandong; Luo, Yifan

    2014-07-01

    This article describes the design and development of an ultrasonic power meter which is consist of an electronic balance, a practice target, an acoustic enclosures and a blocking. The electronic balance mounted on the blocking is linked with the practice target by connecting rod. By adjusting the blocking makes the practice target suspended above ultrasound probe, and then the ultrasonic power can be measured. After initial tests, the ultrasonic power meter performanced with good stability and high precision. PMID:25330604

  20. Tongonani geothermal power development, Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Minson, A.A.C.; Fry, T.J.; Kivell, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the features, design and construction of a 112 MWe geothermal power project, representing the first stage development of the substantial geothermal resources of the central Philippine region. The project has been undertaken by the Philippine Government. The National Powe Corporation is responsible for generation and distribution facilities and the Philippine National Oil Company Energy Development Corporation is responsible for controlled delivery of steam to the powe station.

  1. Nanosat Intelligent Power System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael A.; Beaman, Robert G.; Mica, Joseph A.; Truszkowski, Walter F.; Rilee, Michael L.; Simm, David E.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing a class of satellites called nano-satellites. The technologies developed for these satellites will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections theme and will be of great benefit to other NASA enterprises. A major challenge for these missions is meeting significant scientific- objectives with limited onboard and ground-based resources. Total spacecraft power is limited by the small satellite size. Additionally, it is highly desirable to minimize operational costs by limiting the ground support required to manage the constellation. This paper will describe how these challenges are met in the design of the nanosat power system. We will address the factors considered and tradeoffs made in deriving the nanosat power system architecture. We will discuss how incorporating onboard fault detection and correction capability yields a robust spacecraft power bus without the mass and volume penalties incurred from redundant systems and describe how power system efficiency is maximized throughout the mission duration.

  2. 25 CFR 137.6 - Power development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Power development. 137.6 Section 137.6 Indians BUREAU OF... CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.6 Power development. The cost of the power development at... power development shall be disposed of as required by the terms and conditions of the act of March...

  3. 25 CFR 137.6 - Power development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Power development. 137.6 Section 137.6 Indians BUREAU OF... CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.6 Power development. The cost of the power development at... power development shall be disposed of as required by the terms and conditions of the act of March...

  4. 25 CFR 137.6 - Power development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Power development. 137.6 Section 137.6 Indians BUREAU OF... CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.6 Power development. The cost of the power development at... power development shall be disposed of as required by the terms and conditions of the act of March...

  5. 25 CFR 137.6 - Power development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Power development. 137.6 Section 137.6 Indians BUREAU OF... CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.6 Power development. The cost of the power development at... power development shall be disposed of as required by the terms and conditions of the act of March...

  6. 25 CFR 137.6 - Power development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Power development. 137.6 Section 137.6 Indians BUREAU OF... CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.6 Power development. The cost of the power development at... power development shall be disposed of as required by the terms and conditions of the act of March...

  7. Developments in space power components for power management and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced power electronic components development for space applications is discussed. The components described include transformers, inductors, semiconductor devices such as transistors and diodes, remote power controllers, and transmission lines.

  8. Role of nuclear power in the Philippine power development program

    SciTech Connect

    Aleta, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    The reintroduction of nuclear power in the Philippines is favored by several factors such as: the inclusion of nuclear energy in the energy sector of the science and technology agenda for national development (STAND); the Large gap between electricity demand and available local supply for the medium-term power development plan; the relatively lower health risks in nuclear power fuel cycle systems compared to the already acceptable power systems; the lower environmental impacts of nuclear power systems compared to fossil fuelled systems and the availability of a regulatory framework and trained personnel who could form a core for implementing a nuclear power program. The electricity supply gap of 9600 MW for the period 1993-2005 could be partly supplied by nuclear power. The findings of a recent study are described, as well as the issues that have to be addressed in the reintroduction of nuclear power.

  9. Wind, Sun and Water: Complexities of Alternative Energy Development in Rural Northern Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Thomas; Garwood, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on recent research with NGO-driven projects in rural Cajamarca, Peru, we examine the paradoxes of relying on wind, solar and micro-hydro generation of electricity for rural community development. In spite of cost, vagaries of these energy resources and limited material benefits, especially with wind and solar systems, villagers are eagerly…

  10. X2000 power system electronics development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Franco, Lauro; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Nelson, Ron; Pantaleon, Jose; Ruiz, Ian; Treichler, John; Wester, Gene; Sauers, Jim; Giampoli, Paul; Haskell, Russ; Mulvey, Jim; Repp, John

    2005-01-01

    The X2000 Power System Electronics (PSE) is a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) task to develop a new generation of power system building blocks for potential use on future deep space missions. The effort includes the development of electronic components and modules that can be used as building blocks in the design of generic spacecraft power systems.

  11. Biomass power for rural development

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, P.

    2000-06-02

    Biomass is a proven option for electricity generation. A diverse range of biopower producers includes electric utilities, independent power producers, and the pulp and paper industry. To help expand opportunities for biomass power production, the U.S. Department of Energy established the Biopower Program and is sponsoring efforts to increase the productivity of dedicated energy crops. The Program aims to double biomass conversion efficiencies, thus reducing biomass power generation costs. These efforts will promote industrial and agricultural growth, improve the environment, create jobs, increase U.S. energy security, and provide new export markets.

  12. Space power development impact on technology requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. F.; Fitzgerald, T. J.; Gilje, R. I.; Gordon, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the selection of a specific spacecraft power technology and the identification of technology development to meet system requirements. Requirements which influence the selection of a given technology include the power level required, whether the load is constant or transient in nature, and in the case of transient loads, the time required to recover the power, and overall system safety. Various power technologies, such as solar voltaic power, solar dynamic power, nuclear power systems, and electrochemical energy storage, are briefly described.

  13. Renewables for sustainable village power

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, L

    1997-03-01

    It is estimated that two billion people live without electricity and its services. In addition, there is a sizeable number of rural villages that have limited electrical service, with either part-day operation by diesel gen-sets or partial electrification (local school or community center and several nearby houses). For many villages connected to the grid, power is often sporadically available and of poor quality. The U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has initiated a program to address these potential electricity opportunities in rural villages through the application of renewable energy (RE) technologies. The objective of this program is to develop and implement applications that demonstrate the technical performance, economic competitiveness, operational viability, and environmental benefits of renewable rural electric solutions, compared to the conventional options of line extension and isolated diesel mini-grids. These four attributes foster sustainability; therefore, the program is entitled Renewables for Sustainable Village Power (RSVP). The RSVP program is a multi-technology, multi-application program composed of six activities, including village applications development, computer model development, systems analysis, pilot project development, technical assistance, and Internet-based village power project data base. While the current program emphasizes wind, photovoltaics (PV), and their hybrids with diesel gen-sets, micro-hydro and micro-biomass technologies may be integrated in the future. NREL`s RSVP team is currently involved in rural electricity projects in thirteen countries, with U.S., foreign, and internationally based agencies and institutions. The integration of the technology developments, institutional experiences, and the financial solutions for the implementation of renewables in the main line rural electrification processes in both the developing world and remote regions of the developed world is the goal.

  14. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited in availability or intensity. NASA is maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for an affordable fission surface power system. Because affordability drove the determination of the system concept that this technology will make possible, low development and recurring costs result, while required safety standards are maintained. However, an affordable approach to fission surface power also provides the benefits of simplicity, robustness, and conservatism in design. This paper will illuminate the multiplicity of benefits to an affordable approach to fission surface power, and will describe how the foundation for these benefits is being developed and demonstrated in the Exploration Technology Development Program s Fission Surface Power Project.

  15. The development of swimming power

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, Giorgio; Leban, Bruno; Paderi, Maurizio; Padulo, Johnny; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Pau, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose: the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the transfer strength training method on swimming power. Methods: twenty male swimmers “master“ were randomly allocated to strength (n= 10, ST) and swimming training (n=10, SW) groups. Both groups performed six-weeks training based on swimming training for SW and strength training which consisted in a weight training session immediately followed by the maximum swimming velocity. The performance in both groups was assessed by Maximal-Mechanical-External-Power (MMEP) before and after the six-weeks period, using a custom ergometer that provided force, velocity, and power measurement in water. Results: a significant increased MMEP in ST group (5.73% with p< 0.05) was obtained by an increased strength (11.70% with p< 0.05) and a decreased velocity (4.99% with p> 0.05). Conversely, in the SW group there was a decreased in MMEP (7.31%; p< 0.05), force and velocity (4.16%, and 3.45; respectively p> 0.05). Conclusion: this study showed that the transfer training method, based on combination of weight training (in dry condition) immediately followed by fast swim (in water) significantly improves swimming-power in master. PMID:25767781

  16. High power microwave source development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, James N.; Miller, Gabriel; Potter, Seth; Ashby, Steve; Smith, Richard R.

    1995-05-01

    The requirements of this project have been to: (1) improve and expand the sources available in the facility for testing purposes and (2) perform specific tasks under direction of the Defense Nuclear Agency about the applications of high power microwaves (HPM). In this project the HPM application was power beaming. The requirements of this program were met in the following way: (1) We demonstrated that a compact linear induction accelerator can drive HPM sources at repetition rates in excess of 100 HZ at peak microwave powers of a GW. This was done for the relativistic magnetron. Since the conclusion of this contract such specifications have also been demonstrated for the relativistic klystron under Ballistic Missile Defense Organization funding. (2) We demonstrated an L band relativistic magnetron. This device has been used both on our single pulse machines, CAMEL and CAMEL X, and the repetitive system CLIA. (3) We demonstrated that phase locking of sources together in large numbers is a feasible technology and showed the generation of multigigawatt S-band radiation in an array of relativistic magnetrons.

  17. U.S. Wind Power Development

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    The report provides an overview of domestic wind power development which provides an understanding of where the industry stands today, how it got there, and where it is going. The advent of state renewable portfolio standards and the 3-year renewal of the production tax credit have driven wind power to record levels. A key objective of the report is to provide a comprehensive view of what is behind these developments, so that industry participants can take advantage of the opportunity offered by wind power. Topics covered include: overview of U.S. wind power including its history, current status, and future prospects; business drivers of the U.S. wind power market; barriers to the growth of the U.S. wind power market; keys to successful wind power project development; economics of U.S. wind power, including cost, revenue, and government subsidy components; analysis of key state markets for wind power development; and, profiles of major U.S. wind power project developers.

  18. Development of Power Assisting Suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keijiro; Ishii, Mineo; Hyodo, Kazuhito; Yoshimitsu, Toshihiro; Matsuo, Takashi

    In order to realize a wearable power assisting suit for assisting a nurse to carry a patient in her arms, the power supply and control systems of the suit have to be miniaturized, and it has to be wireless and pipeline-less. The new wearable suit consists of shoulders, arms, back, waist and legs units to be fitted on the nurse's body. The arms, waist and legs have new pneumatic rotary actuators driven directly by micro air pumps supplied by portable Ni-Cd batteries. The muscle forces are sensed by a new muscle hardness sensor utilizing a sensing tip mounted on a force sensing film device. An embedded microcomputer is used for the calculations of control signals. The new wearable suit was applied practically to a human body and a series of movement experiments that weights in the arms were held and taken up and down was performed. Each unit of the suit could transmit assisting torque directly to each joint verifying its practicability.

  19. Power Management and Distribution System Developed for Thermionic Power Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft solar, bimodal system combines propulsion and power generation into a single integrated system. An Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) provides orbital transfer capabilities, power generation for payloads, and onboard propulsion to the spacecraft. A key benefit of a bimodal system is a greater payload-to-spacecraft mass ratio resulting in lower launch vehicle requirements. Scaling down to smaller launch vehicles increases space access by reducing overall mission cost. NASA has joined efforts with the Air Force Phillips Laboratory to develop enabling technologies for such a system. The NASA/Air Force bimodal concept uses solar concentrators to focus energy into an integrated power plant. This power plant consists of a graphite core that stores thermal energy within a cavity. An array of thermionic converters encircles the graphite cavity and provides electrical energy conversion functions. During the power generation phase of the bimodal system, the thermionic converters are exposed to the heated cavity and convert the thermal energy to electricity. Near-term efforts of the ISUS bimodal program are focused on a ground demonstration of key technologies in order to proceed to a full space flight test. Thermionic power generation is one key technology of the bimodal concept. Thermionic power converters impose unique operating requirements upon a power management and distribution (PMAD) system design. Single thermionic converters supply large currents at very low voltages. Operating voltages can vary over a range of up to 3 to 1 as a function of operating temperature. Most spacecraft loads require regulated 28-volts direct-current (Vdc) power. A combination of series-connected converters and powerprocessing boosters is required to deliver power to the spacecraft's payloads at this level.

  20. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Harlow, Scott

    2009-01-01

    With the potential future deployment of a lunar outpost there is expected to be a clear need for a high-power, lunar surface power source to support lunar surface operations independent of the day-night cycle, and Fission Surface Power (FSP) is a very effective solution for power levels above a couple 10 s of kWe. FSP is similarly enabling for the poorly illuminated surface of Mars. The power levels/requirements for a lunar outpost option are currently being studied, but it is known that cost is clearly a predominant concern to decision makers. This paper describes the plans of NASA and the DOE to execute an affordable fission surface power system technology development project to demonstrate sufficient technology readiness of an affordable FSP system so viable and cost-effective FSP system options will be available when high power lunar surface system choices are expected to be made in the early 2010s.

  1. Advanced development of a programmable power processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukens, F. E.; Lanier, J. R., Jr.; Kapustka, R. E.; Graves, J.

    1980-01-01

    The need for the development of a multipurpose flexible programmable power processor (PPP) has increased significantly in recent years to reduce ever rising development costs. One of the program requirements the PPP specification will cover is the 25 kW power module power conversion needs. The 25 kW power module could support the Space Shuttle program during the 1980s and 1990s and could be the stepping stone to future large space programs. Trades that led to selection of a microprocessor controlled power processor are briefly discussed. Emphasis is given to the power processing equipment that uses a microprocessor to provide versatility that allows multiple use and to provide for future growth by reprogramming output voltage to a higher level (to 120 V from 30 V). Component selection and design considerations are also discussed.

  2. Biomass Power for Rural Development

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-01

    The U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture work together to advance the development of electricity generation systems that use biomass instead of fossil fuels. The national benefits include lower sulfur emissions (which contribute to acid rain), reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, and less dependence on fossil fuels.

  3. Power assist EVA glove development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.

    1992-01-01

    The design of the EVA glove is examined, emphasizing the development of a more flexible metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint for the EVA glove. The analysis of the EVA glove MCP joint is reviewed and the glove design process is recapitulated. Experimental tests of the glove are summarized.

  4. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and places beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited or environmental conditions are challenging (e.g., extreme cold, dust storms). NASA and the Department of Energy are maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for a fission surface power system. The Fission Surface Power Systems project has focused on subscale component and subsystem demonstrations to address the feasibility of a low-risk, low-cost approach to space nuclear power for surface missions. Laboratory demonstrations of the liquid metal pump, reactor control drum drive, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution technologies have validated that the fundamental characteristics and performance of these components and subsystems are consistent with a Fission Surface Power preliminary reference concept. In addition, subscale versions of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, using electric resistance heating in place of the reactor fuel, have been built and operated with liquid metal sodium-potassium and helium/xenon gas heat transfer loops, demonstrating the viability of establishing system-level performance and characteristics of fission surface power technologies without requiring a nuclear reactor. While some component and subsystem testing will continue through 2011 and beyond, the results to date provide sufficient confidence to proceed with system level technology readiness demonstration. To demonstrate the system level readiness of fission surface power in an operationally relevant environment (the primary goal of the Fission Surface Power Systems project), a full scale, 1/4 power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is under development. The TDU will consist of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, a sodium-potassium heat transfer loop, a power

  5. High-Power Electromagnetic Thruster Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.; Mikellides, Pavlos G.

    2001-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several bold new interplanetary and deep-space missions. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center designs, develops, and tests high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. Two high-power thruster concepts currently under investigation by Glenn are the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT).

  6. Multikilowatt power electronics development for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.; Rolandelli, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to several multikilowatt power electronic components developed by TRW for the Space Station Power Management and Distribution test bed at NASA Lewis Research Center. These components include a 12.5-kW DC-DC converter, a 6.25-kW battery charge/discharge regulator, an 82-channel sequential shunt unit, a 10-A remote power controllers, and three different types of 1-kW load converters. TRW is also monitoring the development of 120-V fuses for space applications. The authors discuss these developments and provide steady-state and dynamic performance parameters.

  7. High power millimeter wave source development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. V.

    1989-01-01

    High power millimeter wave sources for fusion program; ECH source development program strategy; and 1 MW, 140 GHz gyrotron experiment design philosophy are briefly outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  8. NASA developments in solid state power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last ten years, NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of solid state power amplifiers for space applications. Historically, the program may be divided into three phases. The first efforts were carried out in support of the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program, which is developing an experimental version of a Ka-band commercial communications system. These first amplifiers attempted to use hybrid technology. The second phase was still targeted at ACTS frequencies, but concentrated on monolithic implementations, while the current, third phase, is a monolithic effort that focusses on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and stresses amplifier efficiency. The topics covered include: (1) 20 GHz hybrid amplifiers; (2) 20 GHz monolithic MESFET power amplifiers; (3) Texas Instruments' (TI) 20 GHz variable power amplifier; (4) TI 20 GHz high power amplifier; (5) high efficiency monolithic power amplifiers; (6) GHz high efficiency variable power amplifier; (7) TI 32 GHz monolithic power amplifier performance; (8) design goals for Hughes' 32 GHz variable power amplifier; and (9) performance goals for Hughes' pseudomorphic 60 GHz power amplifier.

  9. Geothermal Power Development in the Phillippines

    SciTech Connect

    Jovellanos, Jose U.; Alcaraz, Arturo; Datuin, Rogelio

    1980-12-01

    The generation of electric power to meet the needs of industrial growth and dispersal in the Philippines is aimed at attaining self-reliance through availment of indigenous energy resources. The Philippines by virtue of her position in the high-heat flow region has in abundance a number of exploitable geothermal fields located all over the country. Results indicate that the geothermal areas of the Philippines presently in various stages of exploration and development are of such magnitude that they can be relied on to meet a significant portion of the country's power need. Large scale geothermal energy for electric power generation was put into operation last year with the inauguration of two 55-MW geothermal generating units at Tiwi, Albay in Southern Luzon. Another two 55-MW units were added to the Luzon Grid in the same year from Makiling-Banahaw field about 70 kilometers south of Manila. For 1979 alone, therefore, 220-MW of generating capacity was added to the power supply coming from geothermal energy. This year a total of 220-MW power is programmed for both areas. This will bring to 443-MW of installed generating capacity from geothermal energy with 3-MW contributed by the Tongonan Geothermal pilot plant in Tongonan, Leyte, Central Philippines in operation since July 1977. Financial consideration of Philippine experience showed that electric power derived from geothermal energy is competitive with other sources of energy and is a viable source of baseload electric power. Findings have proven the technical and economic acceptability of geothermal energy resources development. To realize the benefits that stem from the utilization of indigenous geothermal resources and in the light of the country's ever increasing electric power demand and in the absence of large commercial oil discovery in the Philippines, geothermal energy resource development has been accelerated anew. The program includes development of eight fields by 1989 by adding five more fields to the

  10. Phase I Space Station power system development

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    The development of the electric power system (EPS) for the Space Station is discussed. The EPS requirements related to station size, operational lifetime, operational autonomy, and technology evolution are considered. It is suggested that environmental control and life support will require 55 kWe of power. The possible use of solar photovoltaic, solar thermal dynamic, or a hybrid combination of the two are examined.

  11. High-power microwave development in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Sylvain

    1995-03-01

    This is a survey of Russian research and development in high-power microwave (HPM) sources. It emphasizes those sources of nanoseconds pulse duration time which have potential weapon as well as radar applications. It does not cover the whole range of Russian HPM research and development but concentrates on those aspects which may lead to military applications. Russian investigators have achieved many world firsts in HPM generation; for example, a multiwave Cerenkov generator with a peak output power of 15 gigawatts. Their successes are based on their impressive capability in pulsed power technology which has yielded high-current generators of terawatt peak power. They have transformed the energy of these currents into microwave radiation using tubes of both conventional and novel designs exploiting relativistic electron beams. Recently, the development of high-current mini-accelerators has moved relativistic electron-beam (REB) HPM generation out of the laboratory and enabled the development of deployable military systems with peak powers in the gigawatt range. As a result, they now see development of a REB-based radar systems as one of the most promising directions in radar systems. Details of such a system are described and the implications for HPM weapons are considered.

  12. Power Actuation and Switching Module Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, Gene W.; Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Sauers, Jim; Haskell, Russ; Mulvey, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The Deep Space Avionics (DSA) Project is developing a Power Actuation and Switching Module (PASM). This component enables a modular and scalable design approach for power switching applications, which can result in a wide variety of power switching architectures using this simple building block. The PASM is designed to provide most of the necessary power switching functions of spacecraft for various Deep Space missions including future missions to Mars, comets, Jupiter and its moons. It is fabricated using an A SIC process that is tolerant of high radiation. The development includes two application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and support circuitry all packaged using High Density Interconnect (HDI) technology. It can be operated in series or parallel with other PASMs, It can be used as a high-side or low-side switch and it can drive thruster valves, pyrotechnic devices such as NASA standard initiators, bus shunt resistors, and regular spacecraft component loads. Each PASM contains two independent switches with internal current limiting and over-current trip-off functions to protect the power subsystem from load faults. During turnon and turnoff each switch can limit the rate of current change (di/dt) to a value determined by the user. Threeway majority-voted On/Off commandability and full switch status telemetry (both analog and digital) are built into the module. This paper describes the development process used to design, model, fabricate, and test these compact and versatile power switches. Preliminary test results from prototype HDI PASM hardware are also discussed.

  13. Pulsed power molten salt battery development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, S. D.; Boos, D. L.; Ryan, D. M.

    The authors describe a program aimed at developing a primary-reserve pulse-power battery design. The program focus at the present time is on developing high-rate chlorine cathodes for the lithium-aluminum/chlorine system. A novel activation treatment has been developed to use porous carbon and graphite materials as chlorine cathodes in this battery system. Results obtained with these electrodes in molten-salt cells are discussed. In molten LiCl-KCl at 450 C, these chlorine electrodes deliver remarkable pulse-power performance, 20-25 W/cm2. The IR-free cell polarization with Li-Al/chlorine cells appears to be ohmic, which is desirable for the pulse power application.

  14. Low-Power Ion Thruster Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    An effort is on-going to examine scaling relationships and design criteria for ion propulsion systems, and to address the need for a light weight, low power, high specific impulse propulsion option for small spacecraft. An element of this activity is the development of a low-power (sub-0.5 kW) ion thruster. This development effort has led to the fabrication and preliminary performance assessment of an 8 cm prototype xenon ion thruster operating over an input power envelope of 0.1-0.3 kW. Efficiencies for the thruster vary from 0.31 at 1750 seconds specific impulse at 0.1 kW, to about 0.48 at 2700 seconds specific impulse and 0.3 kW input power. Discharge losses for the thruster over this power range varied from about 320-380 W/A down to about 220-250 W/A. Ion optics performance compare favorably to that obtained with 30 cm ion optics, when scaled for the difference in beam area. The neutralizer, fabricated using 3 mm hollow cathode technology, operated at keeper currents of about 0.2-0.3 A, at a xenon flow rate of about 0.06 mg/s, over the 0.1-0.3 kW thruster input power envelope.

  15. Millimeterwave Space Power Grid architecture development 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komerath, Narayanan; Dessanti, Brendan; Shah, Shaan

    This is an update of the Space Power Grid architecture for space-based solar power with an improved design of the collector/converter link, the primary heater and the radiator of the active thermal control system. The Space Power Grid offers an evolutionary approach towards TeraWatt-level Space-based solar power. The use of millimeter wave frequencies (around 220GHz) and Low-Mid Earth Orbits shrinks the size of the space and ground infrastructure to manageable levels. In prior work we showed that using Brayton cycle conversion of solar power allows large economies of scale compared to the linear mass-power relationship of photovoltaic conversion. With high-temperature materials permitting 3600 K temperature in the primary heater, over 80 percent cycle efficiency was shown with a closed helium cycle for the 1GW converter satellite which formed the core element of the architecture. Work done since the last IEEE conference has shown that the use of waveguides incorporated into lighter-than-air antenna platforms, can overcome the difficulties in transmitting millimeter wave power through the moist, dense lower atmosphere. A graphene-based radiator design conservatively meets the mass budget for the waste heat rejection system needed for the compressor inlet temperature. Placing the ultralight Mirasol collectors in lower orbits overcomes the solar beam spot size problem of high-orbit collection. The architecture begins by establishing a power exchange with terrestrial renewable energy plants, creating an early revenue generation approach with low investment. The approach allows for technology development and demonstration of high power millimeter wave technology. A multinational experiment using the International Space Station and another power exchange satellite is proposed to gather required data and experience, thus reducing the technical and policy risks. The full-scale architecture deploys pairs of Mirasol sunlight collectors and Girasol 1 GW converter satellites t

  16. Power Equalization through Organization Development Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartunek, Jean M.; Keys, Christopher B.

    The effects of a three-year Organization Development (OD) intervention on power equalization were examined in seven experimental and seven control schools. The principals and teachers from experimental schools participated in OD workshops, in a project-coordinating council for planning and policy, and in school goal-setting activities. The power…

  17. Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M.; Weng, C.K.; Lindsay, R.W.

    1992-06-01

    A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

  18. Experimental development of power reactor advanced controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Weng, C.K. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Lindsay, R.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing and verifying advanced controllers with potential application to commercial nuclear power plants is suggested. The central idea is to experimentally demonstrate an advanced control concept first on an ultra safe research reactor followed by demonstration on a passively safe experimental power reactor and then finally adopt the technique for improving safety, performance, reliability and operability at commercial facilities. Prior to completing an experimental sequence, the benefits and utility of candidate advanced controllers should be established through theoretical development and simulation testing. The applicability of a robust optimal observer-based state feedback controller design process for improving reactor temperature response for a TRIGA research reactor, Liquid Metal-cooled Reactor (LMR), and a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is presented to illustrate the potential of the proposed experimental development concept.

  19. Analysis of Alaska hydro power development

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, O.V.

    1983-12-01

    Alaska leads the world in terms of total potential for hydropower development, yet Alaska is 91% dependent on fossil fuels. A mix of gas, diesel and coal-fired power plants generate all but 9% of its electricity. This dependence on fossil fuels stems from the abundance of cheap gas, coal and oil-nonrenewable resources that are becoming more costly. Hydro power is also costly; however, most hydro projects are justified by long term returns. Once the water hits the turbine in a hydro project, the operating and maintenance cost is practically nil. The successful completion of two complex thin-arch concrete dams and several other hydro projects are discussed in order to meet Alaska's power demand.

  20. OTEC power system development and environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Sather, N.F.

    1980-02-20

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) is a proven solar energy technology with enormous potential as a supplier of electric power. However, before this potential can be realized there must be significant reductions in OTEC plant investment costs estimated for state-of-the-art designs. A comprehensive survey of the opportunities for reducing costs of the heat exchangers and other components of the power system of closed-cycle OTEC plants is given. These cost-reducing inventives are strongly dependent on the extent to which the environmental impacts of OTEC plants will have to be controlled. The environmental concerns associated with the deployment of OTEC plants are reviewed, and approaches to alleviating these concerns are described. Finally, the key roles of the OTEC-1 component test facility and the OTEC pilot plant planned for a 1984 start up in providing information about the critical power system development and environmental impact problems are summarized.

  1. Advanced Power Regulator Developed for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The majority of new satellites generate electrical power using photovoltaic solar arrays and store energy in batteries for use during eclipse periods. Careful regulation of battery charging during insolation can greatly increase the expected lifetime of the satellite. The battery charge regulator is usually custom designed for each satellite and its specific mission. Economic competition in the small satellite market requires battery charge regulators that are lightweight, efficient, inexpensive, and modular enough to be used in a wide variety of satellites. A new battery charge regulator topology has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to address these needs. The new regulator topology uses industry-standard dc-dc converters and a unique interconnection to provide size, weight, efficiency, fault tolerance, and modularity benefits over existing systems. A transformer-isolated buck converter is connected such that the high input line is connected in series with the output. This "bypass connection" biases the converter's output onto the solar array voltage. Because of this biasing, the converter only processes the fraction of power necessary to charge the battery above the solar array voltage. Likewise, the same converter hookup can be used to regulate the battery output to the spacecraft power bus with similar fractional power processing. The advantages of this scheme are: 1) Because only a fraction of the power is processed through the dc-dc converter, the single- stage conversion efficiency is 94 to 98 percent; 2) Costly, high-efficiency dc-dc converters are not necessary for high end-to-end system efficiency; 3) The system is highly fault tolerant because the bypass connection will still deliver power if the dc-dc converter fails; and 4) The converters can easily be connected in parallel, allowing higher power systems to be built from a common building block. This new technology will be spaceflight tested in the Photovoltaic Regulator Kit Experiment

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell power system development

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Rick; Wall, Mark; Sullivan, Neal

    2015-06-26

    This report summarizes the progress made during this contractual period in achieving the goal of developing the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cell and stack technology to be suitable for use in highly-efficient, economically-competitive, commercially deployed electrical power systems. Progress was made in further understanding cell and stack degradation mechanisms in order to increase stack reliability toward achieving a 4+ year lifetime, in cost reduction developments to meet the SECA stack cost target of $175/kW (in 2007 dollars), and in operating the SOFC technology in a multi-stack system in a real-world environment to understand the requirements for reliably designing and operating a large, stationary power system.

  3. Wireless Power Transmission Technology Development and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinsiek, F.; Weber, K.-H.; Foth, W.-P.; Foth, H. J.; Schäfer, C.

    2004-12-01

    The Wireless Power Transmission (WPT) technology has been treated to a wide extent in the recent years. A broad variety of applications has been investigated, from earth to orbit, orbit to earth, in-orbit and planetary ones, as for moon and Mars missions. In this course the question to use laser or microwave technology has widely been discussed. Beaming energy to spacecrafts could provide an important space mission-economic potential. It promises significant reduction in the cost of access to space, for scientific and commercial missions, and increases the mission capabilities for in-space systems. For the future enhancement of ISS capabilities and operational efficiency, the use of WPT technology became part of the technology research planning for the ISS. The WPT may have the potential of providing operational benefits, increase of spacecraft systems efficiency for elements like co-orbiting platforms, transfer vehicles or other ISS related in-orbit spacecrafts, and planetary exploration vehicles. The laser technology provides specific technical, operational and economic benefits compared to microwave applications and provides the actual basis for the envisioned wireless power transmission concepts. An outlook in terms of future wireless power perspectives, both for terrestrial as for space-to-space scenarios is given; these applications are part of a technology demonstration roadmap for wireless power transmission key- and supporting technologies, which is characterized by dedicated technology demonstration milestones on ground and in space. The actual technology development philosophy as conceived at EADS-Space Transportation is described and includes main system demonstration missions, as a laboratory test bed employing a small rover system, a scaled airship model demonstration as planned in 2004 and an experiment onboard the International Space Station ISS. These demonstrations represent milestones in terms of technical capability verification on the way to

  4. Power Systems Development Facility progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, R.E.; Hendrix, H.L.; Moore, D.L.; Pinkston, T.E.; Vimalchand, P.; Wheeldon, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    This is a report on the progress in design and construction of the Power Systems Development Facility. The topics of the report include background information, descriptions of the advanced gasifier, advanced PFBC, particulate control devices, and fuel cell. The major activities during the past year have been the final stages of design, procurement of major equipment and bulk items, construction of the facility, and the preparation for the operation of the Facility in late 1995.

  5. Methods for generating hydroelectric power development alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shoou-yuh; Liaw, Shu-liang; Sale, M.J.; Railsback, S.F.

    1989-01-01

    Hydropower development on large rivers can result in a number of environmental impacts, including potential reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. This study presents a methodology for generating different hydropower development alternatives for evaluation. This methodology employs a Streeter-Phelps model to simulate DO, and the Bounded Implicit Enumeration algorithm to solve an optimization model formulated to maximize hydroelectric energy production subject to acceptable DO limits. The upper Ohio River basin was used to illustrate the use and characteristics of the methodology. The results indicate that several alternatives which meet the specified DO constraints can be generated efficiently, meeting both power and environmental objectives. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Advanced Power Regulator Developed for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The majority of new satellites generate electrical power using photovoltaic solar arrays and store energy in batteries for use during eclipse periods. Careful regulation of battery charging during insolation can greatly increase the expected lifetime of the satellite. The battery charge regulator is usually custom designed for each satellite and its specific mission. Economic competition in the small satellite market requires battery charge regulators that are lightweight, efficient, inexpensive, and modular enough to be used in a wide variety of satellites. A new battery charge regulator topology has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to address these needs. The new regulator topology uses industry-standard dc-dc converters and a unique interconnection to provide size, weight, efficiency, fault tolerance, and modularity benefits over existing systems. A transformer-isolated buck converter is connected such that the high input line is connected in series with the output. This "bypass connection" biases the converter's output onto the solar array voltage. Because of this biasing, the converter only processes the fraction of power necessary to charge the battery above the solar array voltage. Likewise, the same converter hookup can be used to regulate the battery output to the spacecraft power bus with similar fractional power processing.

  7. Development of a solar-powered freezer

    SciTech Connect

    Ameen, A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a contribution to the development of a solar-powered freezer suitable for storing 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of medicine and vaccine at {minus}10 C in remote tropical areas where electricity is not available. The system comprises a freezer unit and a solar-powered conversions storage system that includes an array of photovoltaic cells and a battery. The freezer unit employs a conventional vapor-compression refrigeration cycle using R-12 as a refrigerant and a capillary tube as an expansion device. The length of the capillary tube and the refrigerant charge were optimized at 11.18 ft (3.41 m) and 0.144 lb (65.2 g), respectively, for the most efficient operation. The effectiveness of photovoltaic cells in charging lead acid batteries to supply power to the freezer compressor was also investigated and, based on the findings, recommendations were made to modify the configuration. The paper highlights the methodology used in the optimization procedure and describes the performance tests carried out on the solar-powered freezer.

  8. Development of Solar Powered Irrigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelkerim, A. I.; Sami Eusuf, M. M. R.; Salami, M. J. E.; Aibinu, A.; Eusuf, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Development of a solar powered irrigation system has been discussed in this paper. This system would be SCADA-based and quite useful in areas where there is plenty of sunshine but insufficient water to carry out farming activities, such as rubber plantation, strawberry plantation, or any plantation, that requires frequent watering. The system is powered by solar system as a renewable energy which uses solar panel module to convert Sunlight into electricity. The development and implementation of an automated SCADA controlled system that uses PLC as a controller is significant to agricultural, oil and gas monitoring and control purpose purposes. In addition, the system is powered by an intelligent solar system in which solar panel targets the radiation from the Sun. Other than that, the solar system has reduced energy cost as well as pollution. The system is equipped with four input sensors; two soil moisture sensors, two level detection sensors. Soil moisture sensor measures the humidity of the soil, whereas the level detection sensors detect the level of water in the tank. The output sides consist of two solenoid valves, which are controlled respectively by two moistures sensors.

  9. Ultrafast Power Processor for Smart Grid Power Module Development

    SciTech Connect

    MAITRA, ARINDAM; LITWIN, RAY; lai, Jason; Syracuse, David

    2012-12-30

    This project’s goal was to increase the switching speed and decrease the losses of the power semiconductor devices and power switch modules necessary to enable Smart Grid energy flow and control equipment such as the Ultra-Fast Power Processor. The primary focus of this project involves exploiting the new silicon-based Super-GTO (SGTO) technology and build on prototype modules already being developed. The prototype super gate-turn-off thyristor (SGTO) has been tested fully under continuously conducting and double-pulse hard-switching conditions for conduction and switching characteristics evaluation. The conduction voltage drop measurement results indicate that SGTO has excellent conduction characteristics despite inconsistency among some prototype devices. Tests were conducted with two conditions: (1) fixed gate voltage and varying anode current condition, and (2) fixed anode current and varying gate voltage condition. The conduction voltage drop is relatively a constant under different gate voltage condition. In terms of voltage drop as a function of the load current, there is a fixed voltage drop about 0.5V under zero current condition, and then the voltage drop is linearly increased with the current. For a 5-kV voltage blocking device that may operate under 2.5-kV condition, the projected voltage drop is less than 2.5 V under 50-A condition, or 0.1%. If the device is adopted in a converter operating under soft-switching condition, then the converter can achieve an ultrahigh efficiency, typically above 99%. The two-pulse switching test results indicate that SGTO switching speed is very fast. The switching loss is relatively low as compared to that of the insulated-gate-bipolar-transistors (IGBTs). A special phenomenon needs to be noted is such a fast switching speed for the high-voltage switching tends to create an unexpected Cdv/dt current, which reduces the turn-on loss because the dv/dt is negative and increases the turn-off loss because the dv/dt is

  10. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  11. An accelerated fusion power development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.; Baker, Charles C.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Kinkead, Susan D.

    1991-06-01

    Energy for electricity and transportation is a national issue with worldwide environmental and political implications. The world must have energy options for the next century that are not vulnerable to possible disruption for technical, environmental, public confidence, or other reasons. Growing concerns about the greenhouse effect and the safety of transporting oil may lead to reduced burning of coal and other fossil fuels, and the incidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, as well as nuclear waste storage problems, have eroded public acceptance of nuclear fission. Meeting future world energy needs will require improvements in energy efficiency and conservation. However, the world will soon need new central station power plants and increasing amounts of fuel for the transportation sector. The use of fossil fuels, and possibly even fission power, will very likely be restricted because of environmental, safety, and, eventually, supply considerations. Time is running out for policymakers. New energy technologies cannot be brought to the marketplace overnight. Decades are required to bring a new energy production technology from conception to full market penetration. With the added urgency to mitigate deleterious environmental effects of energy use, policymakers must act decisively now to establish and support vigorous energy technology development programs. The U.S. has invested 8 billion over the past 40 years in fusion research and development. If the U.S. fusion program proceeds according to its present strategy, an additional 40 years, and more money, will be expended before fusion will provide commercial electricity. Such an extended schedule is neither cost-effective nor technically necessary. It is time to launch a national venture to construct and operate a fusion power pilot plant. Such a plant could be operational within 15 years of a national commitment to proceed.

  12. The Power Systems Development Facility -- Current status

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkston, T.E.; Maxwell, J.D.; Leonard, R.F.; Vimalchand, P.

    1995-11-01

    Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) has entered into a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to build and operate the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), currently under construction in Wilsonville, Alabama, 40 miles southeast of Birmingham. The objectives of the PSDF are to develop advanced coal-fired power generation technologies through testing and evaluation of hot gas cleanup systems and other major components at the pilot scale. The performance of components will be assessed and demonstrated in an integrated mode of operation and at a component size readily scaleable to commercial systems. The facility will initially contain five modules: (1) a transport reactor gasifier and combustor, (2) an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (APFBC) system, (3) a particulate control module, (4) an advanced burner-gas turbine module, and (5) a fuel cell. The five modules will initially be configured into two separate test trains, the transport reactor train (2 tons/hour of coal feed) and the APFBC train (3 tons/hour of coal feed). In addition to a project description, the project design and construction status, preparations for operations, and project test plans are reported in this paper.

  13. High-Power Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    High-power electromagnetic thrusters have been proposed as primary in-space propulsion options for several of the bold new interplanetary and deep space missions envisioned by the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Strategic Enterprise. As the lead center for electric propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center is actively involved in the design, development, and testing of high-power electromagnetic technologies to meet these demanding mission requirements. One concept of particular interest is the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, shown schematically in the preceding figure. In its basic form, the MPD thruster consists of a central cathode surrounded by a concentric cylindrical anode. A high-current arc is struck between the anode and cathode, which ionizes and accelerates a gas (plasma) propellant. In the self-field version of the thruster, an azimuthal magnetic field generated by the current returning through the cathode interacts with the radial discharge current flowing through the plasma to produce an axial electromagnetic body force, providing thrust. In applied field-versions of the thruster, a magnetic field coil surrounding the anode is used to provide additional radial and axial magnetic fields that can help stabilize and accelerate the plasma propellant. The following figure shows an experimental megawatt-class MPD thruster developed at Glenn. The MPD thruster is fitted inside a magnetic field coil, which in turn is mounted on a thrust stand supported by thin metal flexures. A calibrated position transducer is used to determine the force provided by the thruster as a function of thrust stand displacement. Power to the thruster is supplied by a 250-kJ capacitor bank, which provides up to 30- MW to the thruster for a period of 2 msec. This short period of time is sufficient to establish thruster performance similar to steady-state operation, and it allows a number of thruster designs to be quickly and economically evaluated. In concert

  14. Gyrotron development for space power beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manheimer, Wallace M.

    1989-01-01

    The use of a gyrotron for space power beaming, especially in the form of a lunar orbiting power station is discussed. The advantages of phased array power beaming, output power, and the design of a quasi-optical gyrotron are discussed.

  15. Power Systems Development Facility. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell.

  16. Development of dielectric barrier discharging power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yinghui; Liu, Kun; Fu, Rongyao; Sun, Yaohong; Yan, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Due to the demand of a dielectric barrier discharge power supply, a high voltage and high frequency AC power supply was designed and implemented. Its output voltage is standard or approximate standard sine waveform with the frequency range of 1 kHz to 50 kHz. The output voltage and output frequency can be adjusted individually. The maximum output power of the power supply is 2 kW. It can be operated through local or remote control. The power supply has been used in the dielectric barrier discharging research under different conditions.

  17. Development of superconducting power devices in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixador, Pascal

    2010-11-01

    Europe celebrated last year (2008) the 100-year anniversary of the first liquefaction of helium by H. Kammerling Onnes in Leiden. It led to the discovery of superconductivity in 1911. Europe is still active in the development of superconducting (SC) devices. The discovery of high critical temperature materials in 1986, again in Europe, has opened a lot of opportunities for SC devices by broking the 4 K cryogenic bottleneck. Electric networks experience deep changes due to the emergence of dispersed generation (renewable among other) and to the advances in ICT (Information Communication Technologies). The networks of the future will be “smart grids”. Superconductivity will offer “smart” devices for these grids like FCL (Fault Current Limiter) or VLI (Very Low Inductance) cable and would certainly play an important part. Superconductivity also will participate to the required sustainable development by lowering the losses and enhancing the mass specific powers. Different SC projects in Europe will be presented (Cable, FCL, SMES, Flywheel and Electrical Machine) but the description is not exhaustive. Nexans has commercialized the first two FCLs without public funds in the European grid (UK and Germany). The Amsterdam HTS cable is an exciting challenge in term of losses for long SC cables. European companies (Nexans, Air Liquide, Siemens, Converteam, …) are also very active for projects outside Europe (LIPA, DOE FCL, …).

  18. Kilovolt dc solid state remote power controller development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The experience gained in developing and applying solid state power controller (SSPC) technology at high voltage dc (HVDC) potentials and power levels of up to 25 kilowatts is summarized. The HVDC switching devices, power switching concepts, drive circuits, and very fast acting overcurrent protection circuits were analyzed. A 25A bipolar breadboard with Darlington connected switching transistor was built. Fault testing at 900 volts was included. A bipolar transistor packaged breadboard design was developed. Power MOSFET remote power controller (RPC) was designed.

  19. Development of Jet Noise Power Spectral Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    High-quality jet noise spectral data measured at the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at NASA Glenn is used to develop jet noise scaling laws. A FORTRAN algorithm was written that provides detailed spectral prediction of component jet noise at user-specified conditions. The model generates quick estimates of the jet mixing noise and the broadband shock-associated noise (BBSN) in single-stream, axis-symmetric jets within a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. Shock noise is emitted when supersonic jets exit a nozzle at imperfectly expanded conditions. A successful scaling of the BBSN allows for this noise component to be predicted in both convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles. Configurations considered in this study consisted of convergent and convergent- divergent nozzles. Velocity exponents for the jet mixing noise were evaluated as a function of observer angle and jet temperature. Similar intensity laws were developed for the broadband shock-associated noise in supersonic jets. A computer program called sJet was developed that provides a quick estimate of component noise in single-stream jets at a wide range of operating conditions. A number of features have been incorporated into the data bank and subsequent scaling in order to improve jet noise predictions. Measurements have been converted to a lossless format. Set points have been carefully selected to minimize the instability-related noise at small aft angles. Regression parameters have been scrutinized for error bounds at each angle. Screech-related amplification noise has been kept to a minimum to ensure that the velocity exponents for the jet mixing noise remain free of amplifications. A shock-noise-intensity scaling has been developed independent of the nozzle design point. The computer program provides detailed narrow-band spectral predictions for component noise (mixing noise and shock associated noise), as well as the total noise. Although the methodology is confined to single

  20. Development of Asset Management Decision Support Tools for Power Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Tatsuki; Takahashi, Tsuguhiro

    Development of asset management decision support tools become very intensive in order to reduce maintenance cost of power equipment due to the liberalization of power business. This article reviews some aspects of present status of asset management decision support tools development for power equipment based on the papers published in international conferences, domestic conventions, and several journals.

  1. ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

    2005-01-20

    Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

  2. Human exploration of space and power development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Aaron

    1991-01-01

    Reasons for mounting the Space Exploration Initiative, the variables facing U.S. planners, and the developmental technologies that will be needed to support this initiative are discussed. The three more advanced technological approaches in the field of power generation described include a lunar-based solar power system, a geosynchronous-based earth orbit solar power satellite system, and the utilization of helium-3/deuterium fusion reaction to create a nuclear fuel cycle. It is noted that the major elements of the SEI will include a heavy-lift launch vehicle, a transfer vehicle and a descent/ascent vehicle for use on lunar missions and adaptable to Mars exploration.

  3. Nanostructured Materials Development for Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, B. J.; Elich, J. B.; Gennett, T.; Castro, S. L.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2003-01-01

    There have been many recent advances in the use of nanostructured materials for space power applications. In particular, the use of high purity single wall nanotubes holds promise for a variety of generation and storage devices including: thin film lithium ion batteries, microelectronic proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, polymeric thin film solar cells, and thermionic power supplies is presented. Semiconducting quantum dots alone and in conjunction with carbon nanotubes are also being investigated for possible use in high efficiency photovoltaic solar cells. This paper will review some of the work being done at RIT in conjunction with the NASA Glenn Research Center to utilize nanomaterials in space power devices.

  4. Development of the NEXT Power Processing Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, Thomas K.; Wiseman, Steve; Komm, David S.; Bond, Thomas; Pinero, Luis R.

    2005-01-01

    Boeing Electron Dynamic Devices, Inc. (EDD) has designed and fabricated a breadboard version of a 6 kW power processing unit (PPU) for gridded ion thrusters. This breadboard PPU will be integrated with an engineering model 40 cm ion engine designed and tested at NASA Glenn. The results of our tests using resistive loads are reported in this paper. The PPU demonstrated efficiencies to date are higher than 95 percent for the beam supply and higher than 92 percent for the discharge supply at full power. Overall PPU efficiency is greater than 94 percent at full throttle settings.

  5. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  6. Development and Demonstration of a 25 Watt Thermophotovoltaic Power Source for a Hybrid Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Edward; Shukla, Kailash; Metcalfe, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    The development of a propane-fueled, 25 W thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power source for use in a hybrid power system is described. The TPV power source uses a platinum emitting surface with an anti-reflective coating to radiate to gallium antimonide photocells, which converts the radiation to electric power. The development program started with the design and fabrication of an engineering prototype system. This was used as a component development vehicle to develop the technologies for the various components. A 25 W demonstration prototype was then designed and fabricated using the most advanced component approaches. The designs and test results from this development program are discussed.

  7. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  8. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  9. Human exploration of space and power development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Aaron

    1991-01-01

    The possible role of Solar Power Satellites (SPS) in advancing the goals of the Space Exploration Initiative is considered. Three approaches are examined: (1) the use of lunar raw materials to construct a large SPS in GEO, (2) the construction of a similar system on the lunar surface, and (3) a combination of (1) and (2). Emphasis is given to the mining of He-3 from the moon and its use by the SPS.

  10. Development of an Equivalent Wind Plant Power-Curve: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y. H.; Ela, E.; Orwig, K.

    2010-06-01

    Development of an equivalent wind plant power-curve becomes highly desirable and useful in predicting plant output for a given wind forecast. Such a development is described and summarized in this paper.

  11. DEVELOPMENTS IN PARTICULATE CONTROL FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses recent developments in particulate control for coal-fired power plants. The developments are responding to a double challenge to conventional coal-fired power plant emissions control technology: (1) lower particulate emissions require more efficient control de...

  12. The Power of Outdoor Management Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Glenn M.; Buller, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    Effective outdoor management development programs have certain features: emotional intensity, psychological safety, consequences, enhancement of self-confidence, use of metaphors, unpredictability, peak performance experiences, multiple skill/knowledge types, development of the whole person, and focus on transfer. They succeed because they sustain…

  13. Geothermal power development: 1984 overview and update

    SciTech Connect

    DiPippo, R.

    1984-10-01

    The status of geothermal power plants as of mid-1984 is given. There are 15 countries with active plants, and France (Guadeloupe) is expected to join the roster in the near future. The total number of operating units (defined as individual turbo-generator sets) is 145; the total installed capacity is somewhat less than 3770 MW. If plans for additional plants are met, the total could jump by more than 200 MW over the next two years. Recent growth is presented and the worldwide installed capacity is traced. A graphic portrayal of the growth pattern is presented. The countries that will be most responsible for sustaining this growth are the US, the Philippines, Mexico, and Indonesia. Other countries that will contribute significantly include Italy, Japan, Kenya, Nicaragua, and Turkey. The following countries do not now have any geothermal plants but may bring some online by 1990: Guatemala, Costa Rica, Greece, St. Lucia, Thailand, and Ethiopia.

  14. Commercial ballard PEM fuel cell natural gas power plant development

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.S.; Dunnison, D.; Cohen, R.

    1996-12-31

    The electric utility industry is in a period of rapid change. Deregulation, wholesale and retail wheeling, and corporate restructuring are forcing utilities to adopt new techniques for conducting their business. The advent of a more customer oriented service business with tailored solutions addressing such needs as power quality is a certain product of the deregulation of the electric utility industry. Distributed and dispersed power are fundamental requirements for such tailored solutions. Because of their modularity, efficiency and environmental benefits, fuel cells are a favored solution to implement distributed and dispersed power concepts. Ballard Power Systems has been working to develop and commercialize Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants for stationary power markets. PEM`s capabilities of flexible operation and multiple market platforms bodes well for success in the stationary power market. Ballard`s stationary commercialization program is now in its second phase. The construction and successful operation of a 10 kW natural gas fueled, proof-of-concept power plant marked the completion of phase one. In the second phase, we are developing a 250 kW market entry power plant. This paper discusses Ballard`s power plant development plan philosophy, the benefits from this approach, and our current status.

  15. NASA's Advanced Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Sankovic, John; Wilt, David; Abelson, Robert D.; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (ARPS) project is developing the next generation of radioisotope power conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by either photovoltaic systems or by current radioisotope power systems (RPSs). Requirements of advanced RPSs include high efficiency and high specific power (watts/kilogram) in order to meet future mission requirements with less radioisotope fuel and lower mass so that these systems can meet requirements for a variety of future space applications, including continual operation surface missions, outer-planetary missions, and solar probe. These advances would enable a factor of 2 to 4 decrease in the amount of fuel required to generate electrical power. Advanced RPS development goals also include long-life, reliability, and scalability. This paper provides an update on the contractual efforts under the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for research and development of Stirling, thermoelectric, and thermophotovoltaic power conversion technologies. The paper summarizes the current RPCT NRA efforts with a brief description of the effort, a status and/or summary of the contractor's key accomplishments, a discussion of upcoming plans, and a discussion of relevant system-level benefits and implications. The paper also provides a general discussion of the benefits from the development of these advanced power conversion technologies and the eventual payoffs to future missions (discussing system benefits due to overall improvements in efficiency, specific power, etc.).

  16. Radioisotope-based Nuclear Power Strategy for Exploration Systems Development

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, George R.; Houts, Michael G.

    2006-01-20

    Nuclear power will play an important role in future exploration efforts. Its benefits pertain to practically all the different timeframes associated with the Exploration Vision, from robotic investigation of potential lunar landing sites to long-duration crewed missions on the lunar surface. However, the implementation of nuclear technology must follow a logical progression in capability that meets but does not overwhelm the power requirements for the missions in each exploration timeframe. It is likely that the surface power infrastructure, particularly for early missions, will be distributed in nature. Thus, nuclear sources will have to operate in concert with other types of power and energy storage systems, and must mesh well with the power architectures envisioned for each mission phase. Most importantly, they must demonstrate a clear advantage over other non-nuclear options (e.g., solar power, fuel cells) for their particular function. This paper describes a strategy that does this in the form of three sequential system developments. It begins with use of radioisotope generators currently under development, and applies the power conversion technology developed for these units to the design of a simple, robust reactor power system. The products from these development efforts would eventually serve as the foundation for application of nuclear power systems for exploration of Mars and beyond.

  17. Practical superconductor development for electrical power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.

    1992-10-01

    Development of useful high-critical-temperature (high-[Tc]) superconductors requires synthesis of superconducting compounds; fabrication of wires, tapes, and films from these compounds; production of composite structures that incorporate stabilizers or insulators; and design and testing of efficient components. This report describes the technical progress of research and development efforts aimed at producing superconducting components that are based on the Y-Ba-Cu, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu, Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu, and (TI,Pb)-(Ba,Sr)-Ca-Cu oxide systems. Topics discussed are synthesis and heat treatment of high-[Tc] superconductors, formation of monolithic and composite wires and tapes, superconductor/metal connectors, characterization of structures and superconducting and mechanical properties, fabrication and properties of thin films, and development of prototype components. Collaborations with industry and academia are documented.

  18. Development of management technology for large power systems. [of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Messner, A.; Graves, J.

    1982-01-01

    Autonomous power management has been proposed as a method to perform optimization of power subsystem performance in connection with the management of multikilowatt space platforms. A concept for a 250-kW utility-type power subsystem was developed. A Cassegrain concentrator solar array primary source is conditioned by a solar array switching unit which supplies seventeen 220 +20 Vdc power channels. A power management subsystem provides the monitoring and control of the overall electrical power subsystem. The discussed system concept for autonomous management of high power space platforms utilizes on-board microprocessors in a decentralized data management architecture. A data bus protocol and a data bus contention resolution scheme were selected in conjunction with the dencentralized management architecture.

  19. Technology development issues in space nuclear power for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Atkins, K. L.; Mastal, E. F.; Mcconnell, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    Planning for future planetary exploration missions indicates that there are continuing, long range requirements for nuclear power, and in particular radioisotope-based power sources. In meeting these requirements, there is a need for higher efficiency, lower mass systems. Four technology areas currently under development that address these goals are described: modular RTG, modular RTG with advanced thermoelectric materials, dynamic isotope power system (DIPS), and the Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Converter (AMTEC).

  20. Practical superconductor development for electrical power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.

    1991-10-01

    Development of useful high-critical-temperature (high-{Tc}) superconductors requires synthesis of superconducting compounds; fabrication of wires, tapes, and films from these compounds; production of composite structures that incorporate stabilizers or insulators; and design and testing of efficient components. This report describes technical progress of research and development efforts aimed at producing superconducting components based on the Y-Ba-Cu, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu, Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu oxides systems. Topics discussed are synthesis and heat treatment of high-{Tc} superconductors, formation of monolithic and composite wires and tapes, superconductor/metal connectors, characterization of structures and superconducting and mechanical properties, and fabrication and properties of thin films. Collaborations with industry and academia are also documented. 10 figs.

  1. Heat engine development for solar thermal power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, H. Q.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1981-01-01

    The parabolic dish solar collector systems for converting sunlight to electrical power through a heat engine will, require a small heat engine of high performance long lifetime to be competitive with conventional power systems. The most promising engine candidates are Stirling, high temperature Brayton, and combined cycle. Engines available in the current market today do not meet these requirements. The development of Stirling and high temperature Brayton for automotive applications was studied which utilizes much of the technology developed in this automotive program for solar power engines. The technical status of the engine candidates is reviewed and the components that may additional development to meet solar thermal system requirements are identified.

  2. Photovoltaic power conditioners: Development, evolution, and the next generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bulawka, A.; Krauthamer, S.; Das, R.; Bower, W.

    1994-07-01

    Market-place acceptance of utility-connected photovoltaic (PV) power generation systems and their accelerated installation into residential and commercial applications are heavily dependent upon the ability of their power conditioning subsystems (PCS) to meet high reliability, low cost, and high performance goals. Many PCS development efforts have taken place over the last 15 years, and those efforts have resulted in substantial PCS hardware improvements. These improvements, however, have generally fallen short of meeting many reliability, cost and performance goals. Continuously evolving semiconductor technology developments, coupled with expanded market opportunities for power processing, offer a significant promise of improving PCS reliability, cost and performance, as they are integrated into future PCS designs. This paper revisits past and present development efforts in PCS design, identifies the evolutionary improvements and describes the new opportunities for PCS designs. The new opportunities are arising from the increased availability and capability of semiconductor switching components, smart power devices, and power integrated circuits (PICS).

  3. Technological implications of SNAP reactor power system development on future space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.V.

    1982-11-16

    Nuclear reactor systems are one method of satisfying space mission power needs. The development of such systems must proceed on a path consistent with mission needs and schedules. This path, or technology roadmap, starts from the power system technology data base available today. Much of this data base was established during the 1960s and early 1970s, when government and industry developed space nuclear reactor systems for steady-state power and propulsion. One of the largest development programs was the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. By the early 1970s, a technology base had evolved from this program at the system, subsystem, and component levels. There are many implications of this technology base on future reactor power systems. A review of this base highlights the need for performing a power system technology and mission overview study. Such a study is currently being performed by Rockwell's Energy Systems Group for the Department of Energy and will assess power system capabilities versus mission needs, considering development, schedule, and cost implications. The end product of the study will be a technology roadmap to guide reactor power system development.

  4. Developing the World's Most Powerful Solid Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priskos, Alex S.; Frame, Kyle L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Journey to Mars has begun. Indicative of that challenge, this will be a multi-decadal effort requiring the development of technology, operational capability, and experience. The first steps are underway with more than 15 years of continuous human operations aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and development of commercial cargo and crew transportation capabilities. NASA is making progress on the transportation required for deep space exploration - the Orion crew spacecraft and the Space Launch System (SLS) heavy-lift rocket that will launch Orion and large components such as in-space stages, habitat modules, landers, and other hardware necessary for deep-space operations. SLS is a key enabling capability and is designed to evolve with mission requirements. The initial configuration of SLS - Block 1 - will be capable of launching more than 70 metric tons (t) of payload into low Earth orbit, greater mass than any other launch vehicle in existence. By enhancing the propulsion elements and larger payload fairings, future SLS variants will launch 130 t into space, an unprecedented capability that simplifies hardware design and in-space operations, reduces travel times, and enhances two solid propellant five-segment boosters, both based on space shuttle technologies. This paper will focus on development of the booster, which will provide more than 75 percent of total vehicle thrust at liftoff. Each booster is more than 17 stories tall, 3.6 meters (m) in diameter and weighs 725,000 kilograms (kg). While the SLS booster appears similar to the shuttle booster, it incorporates several changes. The additional propellant segment provides additional booster performance. Parachutes and other hardware associated with recovery operations have been deleted and the booster designated as expendable for affordability reasons. The new motor incorporates new avionics, new propellant grain, asbestos-free case insulation, a redesigned nozzle, streamlined manufacturing

  5. Developing Student Character: Community College Professors Who Share Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Connie K.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the definitions, values, and experiences of seven community college professors who have tried to promote student character development by sharing some of their power in the classroom. Power sharing is a participative gesture, and participative teachers can encourage students to become more engaged in their own…

  6. Power Systems Development Facility: Design, Construction, and Commissioning Status

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, C.A.; Vimalchand; Hendrix, H.L.; Honeycut, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper will provide an introduction to the Power Systems Development Facility, a Department of Energy sponsored, engineering scale demonstration of two advanced coal-fired power technologies; and discuss current status of design, construction and commissioning of this facility. 28 viewgraphs, including 2 figs.

  7. Power Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Curriculum Development. Bulletin 1813.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Territo, Peter A., Jr.; McMurry, James G.

    This model instructional unit was developed to aid trade and industrial education teachers in Louisiana in preparing students for careers in the field of power mechanics. Students are provided experiences related to the design, theory, construction, and appropriate uses of the power systems, as well as the maintenance and repair of the more common…

  8. Status of geothermal electrical power development in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso E.H.; Manon M.A.

    1983-09-01

    A review of geothermal power generation in Mexico is given. The status of power plants on-line and under construction at Cerro Prieto, Los Azufres, and Los Humeros is presented. A forecast of generating capacity for the future is given along with the obstacles to geothermal energy development in Mexico.

  9. Development and application of automatic frequency and power control systems for large power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenko, V. A.; Melamed, A. D.; Mikushevich, E. E.; Nikol'Skii, D. Yu.; Rogachev, R. L.; Romanov, N. A.

    2008-10-01

    We describe the results of work carried out at ZAO Interavtomatika on the development and putting into use of a system for automatically controlling the frequency and power output of large power units involving the retrofitting of the turbine’s hydraulic automatic control system. Certificates affirming conformity to the Standard of the System Operator — Centralized Dispatching Administration (SO-CDA) have been received for eight power units as an outcome of these efforts.

  10. Development of High-Power Hall Thruster Power Processing Units at NASA GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Bozak, Karin E.; Santiago, Walter; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GRC successfully designed, built and tested four different power processor concepts for high power Hall thrusters. Each design satisfies unique goals including the evaluation of a novel silicon carbide semiconductor technology, validation of innovative circuits to overcome the problems with high input voltage converter design, development of a direct-drive unit to demonstrate potential benefits, or simply identification of lessonslearned from the development of a PPU using a conventional design approach. Any of these designs could be developed further to satisfy NASA's needs for high power electric propulsion in the near future.

  11. Development of a General Purpose Power System Control Board

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, S.H.; Jeong, S.H.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, S.C.; Park, S.S.; Suh, J.H.; Bellomo, P.; Cassel, R.; Larsen, R.; Nguyen, M.N.; /SLAC

    2007-07-23

    In an effort to control modern solid state power modules, a general purpose, multi function power system control board (PSCB) has been under development as a collaboration project between Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), Korea, and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), USA. The PSCB is an embedded, interlock supervisory, diagnostic, timing, and set-point control board. It is designed to use in various power systems such as sequenced kicker pulsers, solid state RF modulators, simple DC magnet power supplies, etc. The PSCB has the Ethernet communication with the TCP/IP Modbus protocol.

  12. PFBC perspectives at the Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.L.; Vimalchand, P.; Haq, Z.U.; McClung, J.D.; Quandt, M.T.

    1994-06-01

    The use of coal for power generation has come under increasing environmental scrutiny over the past five years. Advances in coal-based power generation technology will develop systems that have high efficiency, environmental superiority and lower cost of electricity compared to current coal-based technology. Advanced pressurized-fluidized-bed combustion (APFBC) is one `of the promising emerging power generation technologies striving to achieve these goals. One method of improving the efficiency and lowering the capital cost further for advanced power plants utilizing coal is by employing hot gas cleanup. Although hot gas cleanup has the potential for improving the viability of coal-based power generation, the removal of hot particulates from the gas stream has proven to be a challenging task. The demonstration of APFBC technology and the particulate control devices (PCDs) under realistic conditions for advanced power generation remain important areas for development. The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is being designed to be a flexible facility that will address the development of the PCDs and an advanced second-generation PFBC technology. With the progress made in the last decade, the basic concepts of PFBC technology can be achieved through a number of different flowsheets and reactor configurations. The choices made in developing the flowsheets and the choices made in designing the equipment in order to improve the reliability of operation may well dictate, along with the actual data from operation, the process efficiencies and the capital costs that can be achieved.

  13. High-Power, High-Temperature Superconductor Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.

    2005-01-01

    Since the first discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) 10 years ago, the most promising areas for their applications in microwave systems have been as passive components for communication systems. Soon after the discovery, experiments showed that passive microwave circuits made from HTS material exceeded the performance of conventional devices for low-power applications and could be 10 times as small or smaller. However, for superconducting microwave components, high-power microwave applications have remained elusive until now. In 1996, DuPont and Com Dev Ltd. developed high-power superconducting materials and components for communication applications under a NASA Lewis Research Center cooperative agreement, NCC3-344 "High Power High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Technology Development." The agreement was cost shared between the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Technology Reinvestment Program Office and the two industrial partners. It has the following objectives: 1) Material development and characterization for high-power HTS applications; 2) Development and validation of generic high-power microwave components; 3) Development of a proof-of-concept model for a high-power six-channel HTS output multiplexer.

  14. Development of Thin-Film Battery Powered Transdermal Medical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.B.; Sein, T.

    1999-07-06

    Research carried out at ORNL has led to the development of solid state thin-film rechargeable lithium and lithium-ion batteries. These unique devices can be fabricated in a variety of shapes and to any required size, large or small, on virtually any type of substrate. Because they have high energies per unit of volume and mass and because they are rechargeable, thin-film lithium batteries have potentially many applications as small power supplies in consumer and special electronic products. Initially, the objective of this project was to develop thin-film battery powered products. Initially, the objective of this project was to develop thin-film battery powered transdermal electrodes for recording electrocardiograms and electroencephalograms. These ''active'' electrode would eliminate the effect of interference and improve the reliability in diagnosing heart or brain malfunctions. Work in the second phase of this project was directed at the development of thin-film battery powered implantable defibrillators.

  15. Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gate ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gate House, Spokane River, approximately 0.5 mile northeast of intersection of Spokane Falls Boulevard & Post Street, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  16. Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gates ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gates & Gate-Lifting Mechanisms, Spokane River, approximately 0.5 mile northeast of intersection of Spokane Falls Boulevard & Post Street, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  17. Development of Electric Power Units Driven by Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Takao; Kaneko, Atsushi; Uchimura, Tomoyuki; Irie, Kiichi; Watanabe, Hiroyoshi

    For the development of a simple and compact power generator driven by waste heat, working fluids and an expander were studied, then a practical electric power unit was put to test. Many working fluids were calculated with the low temperature power cycle (evaporated at 77°C, condensed at 42°C),and TFE,R123,R245fa were selected to be suitable for the cycle. TFE(Trifluoroethanol CF3CH2OH) was adopted to the actual power generator which was tested. A radial turbine was adopted as an expander, and was newly designed and manufactured for working fluid TFE. The equipment was driven by hot water as heat source and cooling water as cooling source, and generated power was connected with electric utility. Characteristics of the power generating cycle and characteristics of the turbine were obtained experimentally.

  18. Advanced Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology program is developing next generation power conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by either the ubiquitous photovoltaic systems or by current Radioisotope Power System (RPS) technology. Performance goals of advanced radioisotope power systems include improvement over the state-of-practice General Purpose Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator by providing significantly higher efficiency to reduce the number of radioisotope fuel modules, and increase specific power (watts/kilogram). Other Advanced RPS goals include safety, long-life, reliability, scalability, multi-mission capability, resistance to radiation, and minimal interference with the scientific payload. NASA has awarded ten contracts in the technology areas of Brayton, Stirling, Thermoelectric, and Thermophotovoltaic power conversion including five development contracts that deal with more mature technologies and five research contracts. The Advanced RPS Systems Assessment Team includes members from NASA GRC, JPL, DOE and Orbital Sciences whose function is to review the technologies being developed under the ten Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology contracts and assess their relevance to NASA's future missions. Presented is an overview of the ten radioisotope power conversion technology contracts and NASA's Advanced RPS Systems Assessment Team.

  19. Development and Utilization of Space Fission Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael; Mason, Lee S.; Palac, Donald T.; Harlow, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Space fission power systems could enable advanced civilian space missions. Terrestrially, thousands of fission systems have been operated since 1942. In addition, the US flew a space fission system in 1965, and the former Soviet Union flew 33 such systems prior to the end of the Cold War. Modern design and development practices, coupled with 65 years of experience with terrestrial reactors, could enable the affordable development of space fission power systems for near-term planetary surface applications.

  20. Development and Utilization of Space Fission Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Mason, Lee S.; Palac, Donald T.; Harlow, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    Space fission power systems could enable advanced civilian space missions. Terrestrially, thousands of fission systems have been operated since 1942. In addition, the US flew a space fission system in 1965, and the former Soviet Union flew 33 such systems prior to the end of the Cold War. Modern design and development practices, coupled with 65 years of experience with terrestrial reactors, could enable the affordable development of space fission power systems for near-term planetary surface applications.

  1. The 20 GHz power GaAs FET development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandell, M.

    1986-01-01

    The development of power Field Effect Transistors (FET) operating in the 20 GHz frequency band is described. The major efforts include GaAs FET device development (both 1 W and 2 W devices), and the development of an amplifier module using these devices.

  2. Development of geothermal power engineering technologies in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Nikol'Skii, A. I.; Semenov, V. N.; Shipkov, A. A.

    2009-11-01

    The present state of geothermal power engineering in Russia and prospects for its development are considered. An assessment is given of the projects of constructing a pilot binary geothermal power plant in Kamchatka, developing geothermal heat supply systems in the town of Vilyuchinsk and settlement of Rozovyi, and increasing the installed capacity of the Mutnovsk geothermal power station, which are the top-priority projects implemented by OAO RusGidro with scientific and technical support from ZAO GEOINKOM and ZAO Geoterm-EM.

  3. Development status of the small community solar power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pons, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The development status and test results for the Small Community Solar Thermal Power Experiment are presented. Activities on the phase 2 power module development effort are presented with emphasis on the receiver, the plant control subsystem, and the energy transport subsystem. The components include a single prototype power module consisting of a parabolic dish concentrator, a power conversion assembly (PCA), and a multiple-module plant control subsystem. The PCA consists of a cavity receiver coupled to an organic Rankine cycle engine-alternator unit defined as the power conversion subsystem; the PCA is mounted at the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator. At a solar insolation of 100 W/sq m and ambient temperature of 28 C (82 F), the power module produces approximately 20 kW of 3-phase, 3 kHz ac power, depending on the concentrator employed. A ground-mounted rectifier to the central collection site where it is supplied directly to the common dc bus which collects the power from all modules in the plant.

  4. Development of high frequency low weight power magnetics for aerospace power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    A dominant design consideration in the development of space type power mangetic devices is the application of reliable thermal control methods to prevent device failure which is due to excessive temperature rises and hot temperatures in critical areas. The resultant design must also yield low weight, high efficiency, high reliability and maintainability, and long life. The weight savings and high efficiency that results by going to high frequency and unique thermal control techniques is demonstrated by the development of a 25 kVA, 20 kHz space type transformer under the power magnetics technology program. Work in the area of power rotary transformer is also discussed.

  5. Power transmission cable development for the Space Station Freedom electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Gregory V.; Biess, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Power transmission cable is presently being evaluated under a NASA Lewis Research Center advanced development contract for application in the Space Station Freedom (SSF) electrical power system (EPS). Evaluation testing has been performed by TRW and NASA Lewis Research Center. The results of this development contract are presented. The primary cable design goals are to provide (1) a low characteristic inductance to minimize line voltage drop at 20 kHz, (2) electromagnetic compatibility control of the 20-kHz ac power current, (3) a physical configuration that minimizes ac resistance and (4) release of trapped air for corona-free operation.

  6. Development of ceramic superconductors for electric power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.

    1997-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy supports an applied superconductivity program entitled {open_quotes}Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems.{close_quotes} Activities under this program are designed to help develop the high-temperature superconductor (HTS) technology that is needed for industry to proceed with the commercial development of electric power applications. Research is conducted in three categories: wire development, systems technology development, and Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI). Wire development activities are devoted to improving the critical current density (J{sub c}) of short-length HTS wire, whereas activities in systems technology development focus on fabrication of long-length wires, coils, and magnets. Finally, SPI activities focus on the development of prototypes that consist of a generator coil, a fault current limiter, a transmission cable, and a motor. A current overview and recent progress in the development of HTSs are outlined in this paper. 48 refs., 6 figs.

  7. 75 FR 76455 - Coso Energy Developers; Coso Finance Partners; Coso Power Developers; Notice Of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Coso Energy Developers; Coso Finance Partners; Coso Power Developers; Notice... Finance Partners, and Coso Power Developers, pursuant to section 207 of the Federal Energy...

  8. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeyer, C.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1995-04-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes.

  9. Development of a multikilowatt ion thruster power processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenfeld, A. D.; Goldin, D. S.; Biess, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    A feasibility study was made of the application of silicon-controlled, rectifier series, resonant inverter, power conditioning technology to electric propulsion power processing operating from a 200 to 400 Vdc solar array bus. A power system block diagram was generated to meet the electrical requirements of a 20 CM hollow cathode, mercury bombardment, ion engine. The SCR series resonant inverter was developed as a primary means of power switching and conversion, and the analog signal-to-discrete-time-interval converter control system was applied to achieve good regulation. A complete breadboard was designed, fabricated, and tested with a resistive load bank, and critical power processor areas relating to efficiency, weight, and part count were identified.

  10. Development of an Integrity Evaluation System for Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Choi, Jae-Boong; Lee, Joon-Seong; Jun, Hyun-Kyu; Park, Youn-Won

    This paper describes the structure and development strategy for integrity evaluation system for nuclear power plants called NPP-KINS/SAFE. NPP-KINS/SAFE consists of three different programs covering the integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessel, pipings, and pressure tubes, respectively. The system has been developed based on currently available codes and standards, and includes a number of databases, expert systems, and numerical analysis schemes. NPP-KINS/SAFE is applicable for various types of nuclear power plants constructed in Korea with the aid of attached database systems including plant specific data. Case studies for the developed system are also provided.

  11. The environment power system analysis tool development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeward, Gary A.; Kuharski, Robert A.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Stevens, N. John; Putnam, Rand M.; Roche, James C.; Wilcox, Katherine G.

    1990-01-01

    The Environment Power System Analysis Tool (EPSAT) is being developed to provide space power system design engineers with an analysis tool for determining system performance of power systems in both naturally occurring and self-induced environments. The program is producing an easy to use computer aided engineering (CAE) tool general enough to provide a vehicle for technology transfer from space scientists and engineers to power system design engineers. The results of the project after two years of a three year development program are given. The EPSAT approach separates the CAE tool into three distinct functional units: a modern user interface to present information, a data dictionary interpreter to coordinate analysis; and a data base for storing system designs and results of analysis.

  12. Should the US abandon efforts to develop commercial fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, W.D.; Kinter, E.E.

    1993-01-22

    This article presents viewpoints and rationale for continuing and disbanding the US efforts to develop commercial fusion power. The views of W.D. Kay, an assistant professor of political science at Northeastern University, are presented regarding - yes, abandon efforts. Meanwhile, the views of Edwin Keutes, former director of the Magnetic Fusion Program for DOE, are presented for continued development.

  13. Final Technical Report. Upgrades to Alabama Power Company Hydroelectric Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, James F.; Johnson, Herbie N.

    2015-03-31

    From 2010 to 2014, Alabama Power Company (“Alabama Power”) performed upgrades on four units at three of the hydropower developments it operates in east-central Alabama under licenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). These three hydropower developments are located on the Coosa River in Coosa, Chilton, and Elmore counties in east-central Alabama.

  14. Development and Operation of Dual-Mode Analyzers for Wireless Power Consortium/Power Matters Alliance Wireless Power Systems.

    PubMed

    Um, Keehong

    2016-05-01

    We have designed a protocol analyzer to be used in wireless power systems and analyzed the operation of wireless chargers defined by standards of Qi of Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) and Power Matters Alliance (PMA) protocols. The integrated circuit (IC, or microchip) developed so far for wireless power transmission is not easily adopted by chargers for specific purposes. A device for measuring the performance of test equipment currently available is required to transform and expand the types of protocol. Since a protocol analyzer with these functions is required, we have developed a device that can analyze the two protocols of WPC and PMA at the same time. As a result of our research, we present a dual-mode system that can analyze the protocols of both WPC and PMA. PMID:27483911

  15. Space shuttle orbiter auxiliary power unit development challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, R.; Weary, D.

    1985-01-01

    When the flying spacecraft was approved for development, a power unit for the hydraulic system had to be developed. Unlike other systems on the orbiter, there was no precedent in earlier spacecraft for a hydraulic system nor for the power unit to drive the hydraulic pumps. The only prototypes available were airplane auxiliary power units (APU), which were not required to operate in the severe environments of a spacecraft nor to have the longevity of an orbiter hydraulic power unit. The challenge was to build a hydraulic power unit which could operate in 0g or 3g, in a vacuum or at sea level pressure, and at -65 F or 225 F, which would be capable of restarting while hot, and which would be capable of sustaining the hydraulic loads for the life of the orbiter. The basic approach to providing hydraulic power for the orbiter was to use a small, high speed, monopropellant fueled turbine power unit to drive a conventional aircraft type hydraulic pump. The stringent requirements imposed on the orbiter APU quickly made this machine different from existing aircraft APUs.

  16. Current and future developments in diesel powered hovercraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. C.; Stevens, M. J.; Buttigieg, J. A.

    After evaluating the development status of the application of diesel power to air-cushion vehicles (ACVs) and surface-effect ships (SESs), attention is given to the AP1-88 ACV, which is both the first and largest operational diesel-powered amphibious craft of this type. An account is given of the ACV and SES features that are dictated by the need to accommodate diesel power sources; the major advantages and disadvantages of diesel (vs gas turbine) engines are discussed. Although cost reductions are achievable against gas turbine powerplant use, lower payload fractions and slightly lower performance capabilities appear to be inescapable.

  17. Development of high coherence high power 193nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Arakawa, Masaki; Fuchimukai, Atsushi; Sasaki, Yoichi; Onose, Takashi; Kamba, Yasuhiro; Igarashi, Hironori; Qu, Chen; Tamiya, Mitsuru; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinji; Kakizaki, Koji; Xuan, Hongwen; Zhao, Zhigang; Kobayashi, Yohei; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2016-03-01

    We have been developing a hybrid 193 nm ArF laser system that consists of a solid state seeding laser and an ArF excimer laser amplifier for power-boosting. The solid state laser consists of an Yb-fiber-solid hybrid laser system and an Er-fiber laser system as fundamentals, and one LBO and three CLBO crystals for frequency conversion. In an ArF power amplifier, the seed laser passes through the ArF gain media three times, and an average power of 110 W is obtained. As a demonstration of the potential applications of the laser, an interference exposure test is performed.

  18. Development of Light Powered Sensor Networks for Thermal Comfort Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dasheng

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological advances in wireless communications have enabled easy installation of sensor networks with air conditioning equipment control applications. However, the sensor node power supply, through either power lines or battery power, still presents obstacles to the distribution of the sensing systems. In this study, a novel sensor network, powered by the artificial light, was constructed to achieve wireless power transfer and wireless data communications for thermal comfort measurements. The sensing node integrates an IC-based temperature sensor, a radiation thermometer, a relative humidity sensor, a micro machined flow sensor and a microprocessor for predicting mean vote (PMV) calculation. The 935 MHz band RF module was employed for the wireless data communication with a specific protocol based on a special energy beacon enabled mode capable of achieving zero power consumption during the inactive periods of the nodes. A 5W spotlight, with a dual axis tilt platform, can power the distributed nodes over a distance of up to 5 meters. A special algorithm, the maximum entropy method, was developed to estimate the sensing quantity of climate parameters if the communication module did not receive any response from the distributed nodes within a certain time limit. The light-powered sensor networks were able to gather indoor comfort-sensing index levels in good agreement with the comfort-sensing vote (CSV) preferred by a human being and the experimental results within the environment suggested that the sensing system could be used in air conditioning systems to implement a comfort-optimal control strategy.

  19. Geothermal Power Development Resource Evaluation Aspects for Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., Fukuoka, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-30

    This report is a limited review of and presents comments on the geothermal resource exploration program of Kyushu Electric Power Company (KEPCO). This program is for developing geothermal resources to generate electric power on Kyushu Island, Japan. Many organizations in Japan and in particular Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. are actively exploring for and developing geothermal resources on Kyushu Island. KEPCO has already demonstrated an ability and expertise to explore for geothermal resources by their successful exploration and subsequent development of several fields (Hatchobaru and Otake) on the island of Kyushu for electric power generation. The review and comments are made relative to the geothermal resource aspects of Kyushu Electric Power Company's geothermal exploration program, and within the time, budget, and scope of the Rogers Engineering's effort under the existing contract. Rogers and its consultants have had a wide variety of geothermal exploration experience and have used such experience in the analysis of what has been presented by KEPCO. The remainder of the introduction section develops general knowledge concerning geothermal power development with particular emphasis on the resource exploration. The data received section describes the information available to perform the project work. There are no interpretative parts to the data received section. The philosophy section relates our understanding of the KEPCO thinking and conditions surrounding current geothermal resource development in Japan. The survey and methods sections presents three important items about each study KEPCO has performed in the resource exploration program. These three aspects are: what should be obtained from the method, what data was obtained and presented, and what is a review and analysis of where the KEPCO exploration program is currently in terms of progress and successful location of reservoirs. The final section presents recommendations on the many aspects of the

  20. High performance TWT development for the microwave power module

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, D.R.; Armstrong, C.M.; Groshart, G.; Stolz, R.

    1996-12-31

    Northrop Grumman`s ongoing development of microwave power modules (MPM) provides microwave power at various power levels, frequencies, and bandwidths for a variety of applications. Present day requirements for the vacuum power booster traveling wave tubes of the microwave power module are becoming increasingly more demanding, necessitating the need for further enhancement of tube performance. The MPM development program at Northrop Grumman is designed specifically to meet this need by construction and test of a series of new tubes aimed at verifying computation and reaching high efficiency design goals. Tubes under test incorporate several different helix designs, as well as varying electron gun and magnetic confinement configurations. Current efforts also include further development of state-of-the-art TWT modeling and computational methods at Northrop Grumman incorporating new, more accurate models into existing design tools and developing new tools to be used in all aspects of traveling wave tube design. Current status of the Northrop Grumman MPM TWT development program will be presented.

  1. Infrastructure development assistance modeling for nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. H.; Hwang, K.; Park, K. M.; Kim, S. W.; Lee, S. M.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model, a general frame to be utilized in assisting newcomer countries to start a nuclear power program. A nuclear power plant project involves technical complexity and high level of investment with long duration. Considering newcomers are mostly developing countries that lack the national infrastructure, key infrastructure issues may constitute the principal constraints to the development of a nuclear power program. In this regard, it is important to provide guidance and support to set up an appropriate infrastructure when we help them with the first launch of nuclear power plant project. To date, as a sole nuclear power generation company, KHNP has been invited many times to mentor or assist newcomer countries for their successful start of a nuclear power program since Republic of Korea is an exemplary case of a developing country which began nuclear power program from scratch and became a major world nuclear energy country in a short period of time. Through hosting events organized to aid newcomer countries' initiation of nuclear power projects, difficulties have been recognized. Each event had different contents according to circumstances because they were held as an unstructured and one-off thing. By developing a general model, we can give more adequate and effective aid in an efficient way. In this paper, we created a model to identify necessary infrastructures at the right stage, which was mainly based on a case of Korea. Taking into account the assistance we received from foreign companies and our own efforts for technological self-reliance, we have developed a general time table and specified activities required to do at each stage. From a donor's perspective, we explored various ways to help nuclear infrastructure development including technical support programs, training courses, and participating in IAEA technical cooperation programs on a regular basis. If we further develop the model, the next task would be to

  2. Utilization of recently developed codes for high power Brayton and Rankine cycle power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    1993-01-01

    Two recently developed FORTRAN computer codes for high power Brayton and Rankine thermodynamic cycle analysis for space power applications are presented. The codes were written in support of an effort to develop a series of subsystem models for multimegawatt Nuclear Electric Propulsion, but their use is not limited just to nuclear heat sources or to electric propulsion. Code development background, a description of the codes, some sample input/output from one of the codes, and state future plans/implications for the use of these codes by NASA's Lewis Research Center are provided.

  3. Power and polarization monitor development for high power millimeter-wave

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, R. Kobayashi, K.; Kubo, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-11-15

    A new type monitor of power and polarization states of millimeter-waves has been developed to be installed at a miter-bend, which is a part of transmission lines of millimeter-waves, for electron cyclotron resonance heating on the Large Helical Device. The monitor measures amplitudes and phase difference of the electric field of the two orthogonal polarizations which are needed for calculation of the power and polarization states of waves. The power and phase differences of two orthogonal polarizations were successfully detected simultaneously.

  4. High Power Silicon Carbide (SiC) Power Processing Unit Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidegger, Robert J.; Santiago, Walter; Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GRC successfully designed, built and tested a technology-push power processing unit for electric propulsion applications that utilizes high voltage silicon carbide (SiC) technology. The development specifically addresses the need for high power electronics to enable electric propulsion systems in the 100s of kilowatts. This unit demonstrated how high voltage combined with superior semiconductor components resulted in exceptional converter performance.

  5. Development Status of the NSTAR Ion Propulsion System Power Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Pinero, Luis R.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Miller, John R.; Cartier, Kevin C.; Bowers, Glen E.

    1995-01-01

    A 0.5-2.3 kW xenon ion propulsion system is presently being developed under the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Application Readiness (NSTAR) program. This propulsion system includes a 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster, a Digital Control Interface Unit, a xenon feed system, and a power processing unit (PPU). The PPU consists of the power supply assemblies which operate the thruster neutralizer, main discharge chamber, and ion optics. Also included are recycle logic and a digital microcontroller. The neutralizer and discharge power supplies employ a dual use configuration which combines the functions of two power supplies into one, significantly simplifying the PPU. Further simplification was realized by implementing a single thruster control loop which regulates the beam current via the discharge current. Continuous throttling is possible over a 0.5-2.3 kW output power range. All three power supplies have been fabricated and tested with resistive loads, and have been combined into a single breadboard unit with the recycle logic and microcontroller. All line and load regulation test results show the power supplies to be within the NSTAR flight PPU specified power output of 1.98 kW. The overall efficiency of the PPU, calculated as the combined efficiencies of the power supplies and controller, at 2.3 kW delivered to resistive loads was 0.90. The component was 6.16 kg. Integration testing of the neutralizer and discharge power supplies with a functional model thruster revealed no issues with discharge ignition or steady state operation.

  6. Soft-Fault Detection Technologies Developed for Electrical Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, partner universities, and defense contractors are working to develop intelligent power management and distribution (PMAD) technologies for future spacecraft and launch vehicles. The goals are to provide higher performance (efficiency, transient response, and stability), higher fault tolerance, and higher reliability through the application of digital control and communication technologies. It is also expected that these technologies will eventually reduce the design, development, manufacturing, and integration costs for large, electrical power systems for space vehicles. The main focus of this research has been to incorporate digital control, communications, and intelligent algorithms into power electronic devices such as direct-current to direct-current (dc-dc) converters and protective switchgear. These technologies, in turn, will enable revolutionary changes in the way electrical power systems are designed, developed, configured, and integrated in aerospace vehicles and satellites. Initial successes in integrating modern, digital controllers have proven that transient response performance can be improved using advanced nonlinear control algorithms. One technology being developed includes the detection of "soft faults," those not typically covered by current systems in use today. Soft faults include arcing faults, corona discharge faults, and undetected leakage currents. Using digital control and advanced signal analysis algorithms, we have shown that it is possible to reliably detect arcing faults in high-voltage dc power distribution systems (see the preceding photograph). Another research effort has shown that low-level leakage faults and cable degradation can be detected by analyzing power system parameters over time. This additional fault detection capability will result in higher reliability for long-lived power systems such as reusable launch vehicles and space exploration missions.

  7. DIII-D power supply, design, and development

    SciTech Connect

    Nerem, A.

    1995-02-01

    An overview of the DIII-D power supply system with information details concerning the configuration, power ratings, acquisition costs, and cost scaling relevant to the design of ITER and other tokamaks is presented. The power supplies for the DIII-D tokamak were installed and commissioned during the late 1970`s and the beginning of the 1980`s. Several upgrades have been implemented during the last two years to solve increasing reliability problems encountered as the equipment aged, to provide enhanced operational flexibilities, and to enable operation at the higher power levels needed to provide experimental data relevant to the ITER and TPX design activities. These upgrades ranged from redesign of the power supply control systems to the replacement of vacuum circuit breakers which had become unreliable in service. A new interlock and protection system has also been implemented using the latest programmable logic controllers (PLC) and computer technology. These upgrades have been highly successful and are described to provide insight to many issues in the specification of high power converters. Power supply models used in the design of the DIII-D Plasma Control System are also described along with model verification test data. These models are being used in the development of a new advanced plasma control system for the DIII-D tokamak. Recent operational experience and results are presented.

  8. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs—Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, D. H.; Conway, T. J.; Vanderhorst, Jr, T. J.; Januszewski, III, J.; Leo, R.; Perman, K.

    2013-07-01

    This document is a summarization of the report, Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs, the final report for phase 2 of the SPSP (DOE workforce study) project.

  9. Middle Eastern power systems; Present and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Middle Eastern Power systems have evolved independently of each other over many decades. The region covers a wide geographical area of over 4 million square kilometers with an estimated population in 1990 of over 120 million people. This paper discusses the present status and future power system developments in the Middle East with emphasis on the Mashrequ Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Yemen, and the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, namely, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Interconnections within MAC and possible extensions to Turkey, Europe, and Central Africa are discussed. A common characteristic of the MAC power systems is that they are all operated by government or semi-government bodies. The energy resources in the region are varied. Countries such as Iraq, Egypt, and Syria have significant hydro power resources. On the other hand, the GCC countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel reserves.

  10. Development of Lightweight Radiators for Lunar Based Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses application of a new lightweight carbon-carbon (C-C) space radiator technology developed under the NASA Civil-Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) High Capacity Power Program to a 20 kWe lunar based power system. This system comprises a nuclear (SP-100 derivative) heat source, a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) power conversion unit with heat rejection by means of a plane radiator. The new radiator concept is based on a C-C composite heat pipe with integrally woven fins and a thin walled metallic liner for containment of the working fluid. Using measured areal specific mass values (1.5 kg/m2) for flat plate radiators, comparative CBC power system mass and performance calculations show significant advantages if conventional heat pipes for space radiators are replaced by the new C-C heat pipe technology.

  11. Development of a dual-field heteropoplar power converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhaure, D. B.; Johnson, B.; Bliamptis, T.; St. George, E.

    1981-01-01

    The design and testing of a 400 watt, dual phase, dual rotor, field modulated inductor alternator is described. The system is designed for use as a flywheel to ac utility line or flywheel to dc bus (electric vehicle) power converter. The machine is unique in that it uses dual rotors and separately controlled fields to produce output current and voltage which are in phase with each other. Having the voltage and current in phase allows the power electronics to be made of simple low cost components. Based on analytical predictions and experimental results, development of a complete 22 kilowatt (30 Hp) power conversion system is recommended. This system would include power electronics and controls and would replace the inductor alternator with an improved electromagnetic conversion system.

  12. Development of Thermoelectric Self-Powered Heating Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, K.; Hayden, A. C. S.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, a self-powered residential heating system was developed using thermoelectric generation technology. A full-size prototype was designed, constructed, and tested, in which Bi2Te3-based thermoelectric modules were incorporated into a gas-fired heating boiler. Up to 161 W of electricity is generated by the thermoelectric modules. This is sufficient to power all the electrical components of the residential heating equipment including pump, fan, blower, valves, and control panel. In this way, the heating system can operate entirely on fuel combustion and does not need externally generated electricity. The performance of the thermoelectric devices has been investigated in the integrated heating system under various operating conditions. The energy system's advantages include simplicity, low noise, clean operation, and low maintenance. The thermoelectric self-powered heating system could provide the consumer with heating system reliability and a reduction in electric power consumption.

  13. The Electric Power System of the International Space Station: A Platform for Power Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gietl, Eric B.; Gholdston, Edward W.; Manners, Bruce A.; Delventhal, Rex A.

    2000-01-01

    The electrical power system developed for the International Space Station represents the largest space-based power system ever designed and, consequently, has driven some key technology aspects and operational challenges. The full U.S.-built system consists of a 160-Volt dc primary network, and a more tightly regulated 120-Volt dc secondary network. Additionally, the U.S. system interfaces with the 28-Volt system in the Russian segment. The international nature of the Station has resulted in modular converters, switchgear, outlet panels, and other components being built by different countries, with the associated interface challenges. This paper provides details of the architecture and unique hardware developed for the Space Station, and examines the opportunities it provides for further long-term space power technology development, such as concentrating solar arrays and flywheel energy storage systems.

  14. Progress in High Power Free-Piston Stirling Convertor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Kirby, Raymond L.; Chapman, Peter A.; Walter, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Space Exploration Policy has established a vision for human exploration of the moon and Mars. One option for power for future outposts on the lunar and Martian surfaces is a nuclear reactor coupled with a free-piston Stirling convertor at a power level of 30-40 kWe. A 25 kW convertor was developed in the 1990s under the SP-100 program. This system consisted of two 12.5 kWe engines connected at their hot ends and mounted in tandem to cancel vibration. Recently, NASA began a new project with Auburn University to develop a 5 kWe, single convertor for use in such a possible lunar power system. Goals of this development program include a specific power in excess of 140 We/kg at the convertor level, lifetime in excess of five years and a control system that will safely manage the convertors in case of an emergency. Foster-Miller, Inc. is developing the 5 kWe Stirling Convertor Assembly. The characteristics of the design along with progress in developing the system will be described.

  15. A Practical Approach to Starting Fission Surface Power Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2006-01-01

    The Prometheus Power and Propulsion Program has been reformulated to address NASA needs relative to lunar and Mars exploration. Emphasis has switched from the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) flight system development to more generalized technology development addressing Fission Surface Power (FSP) and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). Current NASA budget priorities and the deferred mission need date for nuclear systems prohibit a fully funded reactor Flight Development Program. However, a modestly funded Advanced Technology Program can and should be conducted to reduce the risk and cost of future flight systems. A potential roadmap for FSP technology development leading to possible flight applications could include three elements: 1) Conceptual Design Studies, 2) Advanced Component Technology, and 3) Non-Nuclear System Testing. The Conceptual Design Studies would expand on recent NASA and DOE analyses while increasing the depth of study in areas of greatest uncertainty such as reactor integration and human-rated shielding. The Advanced Component Technology element would address the major technology risks through development and testing of reactor fuels, structural materials, primary loop components, shielding, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD). The Non-Nuclear System Testing would provide a modular, technology testbed to investigate and resolve system integration issues.

  16. A Practical Approach to Starting Fission Surface Power Development

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Lee

    2006-07-01

    The Prometheus Power and Propulsion Program has been reformulated to address NASA needs relative to lunar and Mars exploration. Emphasis has switched from the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) flight system development to more generalized technology development addressing Fission Surface Power (FSP) and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). Current NASA budget priorities and the deferred mission need date for nuclear systems prohibit a fully funded reactor Flight Development Program. However, a modestly funded Advanced Technology Program can and should be conducted to reduce the risk and cost of future flight systems. A potential road-map for FSP technology development leading to possible flight applications could include three elements: 1) Conceptual Design Studies, 2) Advanced Component Technology, and 3) Non-Nuclear System Testing. The Conceptual Design Studies would expand on recent NASA and DOE analyses while increasing the depth of study in areas of greatest uncertainty such as reactor integration and human-rated shielding. The Advanced Component Technology element would address the major technology risks through development and testing of reactor fuels, structural materials, primary loop components, shielding, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD). The Non-Nuclear System Testing would provide a modular, technology test-bed to investigate and resolve system integration issues. (author)

  17. Electrodeless lighting RF power source development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-30

    An efficient, solid state RF power source has been developed on this NICE project for exciting low power electrodeless lamp bulbs. This project takes full advantage of concurrent advances in electrodeless lamp technology. Electrodeless lamp lighting systems utilizing the sulfur based bulb type developed by Fusion Lighting, Inc., is an emerging technology which is based on generating light in a confined plasma created and sustained by RF excitation. The bulb for such a lamp is filled with a particular element and inert gas at low pressure when cold. RF power from the RF source creates a plasma within the bulb which reaches temperatures approaching those of high pressure discharge lamp plasmas. At these temperatures the plasma radiates substantial visible light with a spectrum similar to sunlight.

  18. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC14

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2004-02-28

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details test campaign TC14 of the PSDF gasification process. TC14 began on February 16, 2004, and lasted until February 28, 2004, accumulating 214 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. The gasifier operating temperatures varied from 1760 to 1810 F at pressures from 188 to 212 psig during steady air blown operations and approximately 160 psig during oxygen blown operations.

  19. 300-Watt Power Source Development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the JPL program to develop a 300 Watt direct methanol fuel cell. The immediate use of the fuel cell is to power test instrumentation on armored vehicles. It reviews the challenges, the system design and the system demonstration.

  20. A Power Development Model for Managing and Preventing Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowher, Salene J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a model for understanding and applying conflict management strategies using a personal power development theory. Adds conflict management styles to this theory to address the growing need for effective conflict management in higher education. Explains the approaches to conflict in each stage of the model and provides a case study. (RJM)

  1. Thermoelectric Materials Development for Low Temperature Geothermal Power Generation

    DOE Data Explorer

    Tim Hansen

    2016-01-29

    Data includes characterization results for novel thermoelectric materials developed specifically for power generation from low temperature geothermal brines. Materials characterization data includes material density, thickness, resistance, Seebeck coefficient. This research was carried out by Novus Energy Partners in Cooperation with Southern Research Institute for a Department of Energy Sponsored Project.

  2. Environmental noise need not hinder geothermal power development

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, T.R.

    1982-10-01

    Environmental noise issues have hindered some geothermal power developments located near residents by delaying necessary regulatory approvals. However, with full use of demonstrated noise control technology, noise can be reduced to levels acceptable to most quiet rural communities at a distance of about 1000 feet. Thus, it may be feasible to drill closer to residences than is often presumed.

  3. The Mighty Atom? The Development of Nuclear Power Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy for the generation of electricity started in the 1950s and was viewed, at the time, as a source of virtually free power. Development flourished and some countries adopted the nuclear option as their principal source for producing electrical energy. However, a series of nuclear incidents and concern about the treatment of…

  4. Power and Perspective: The Discourse of Professional Development School Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breault, Rick

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a study in which the discourse within 75 professional development school (PDS)-related publications was examined to determine where the power, influence, and representation lies in PDS partnerships, as indicated by how those partnerships are described in writing. The results found that while university faculty…

  5. Development of a solar-powered residential air conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An extensive review of the literature was conducted which was concerned with the characterization of systems and equipment that could be applicable to the development of solar-powered air conditioners based on the Rankine cycle approach, and the establishment of baseline data defining the performance, physical characteristics, and cost of systems using the LiBr/H2O absorption cycle.

  6. Research, Development, Demonstration and Deployment Issues in the Power Sector

    EPA Science Inventory

    For Frank Princiotta’s book, Global Climate Change—The Technology Challenge In this chapter we explore the challenges in developing and deploying technology for mitigation of CO2 emissions associated with power generation. Past successes with controlling other pollutants (notab...

  7. Development of CCT in the Chinese power industry

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Zhesheng; Jiang Minhua

    1994-12-31

    This paper briefly describes the present situation of coal related pollution caused by utility boilers in China and the present status of development and application of CCT in Chinese power plants. The paper also introduces strategies to deal with the coal related pollution and predicts future prospects of CCT application.

  8. The Hazards Posed by the Global Development of Nuclear Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    Outlines the growth in the demand for energy on a world-wide basis. Reviews the development of nuclear power and points out the many hazards in the nuclear fuel cycle. Describes the nature of nuclear wastes and explains the quantities involved and the current techniques for waste disposal. (GS)

  9. Development of compact rapid charging power supply for capacitive energy storage in pulsed power drivers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surender Kumar; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-02-01

    High energy capacitor bank is used for primary electrical energy storage in pulsed power drivers. The capacitors used in these pulsed power drivers have low inductance, low internal resistance, and less dc life, so it has to be charged rapidly and immediately discharged into the load. A series resonant converter based 45 kV compact power supply is designed and developed for rapid charging of the capacitor bank with constant charging current up to 150 mA. It is short circuit proof, and zero current switching technique is used to commute the semiconductor switch. A high frequency resonant inverter switching at 10 kHz makes the overall size small and reduces the switching losses. The output current of the power supply is limited by constant on-time and variable frequency switching control technique. The power supply is tested by charging the 45 kV/1.67 μF and 15 kV/356 μF capacitor banks. It has charged the capacitor bank up to rated voltage with maximum charging current of 150 mA and the average charging rate of 3.4 kJ/s. The output current of the power supply is limited by reducing the switching frequency at 5 kHz, 3.3 kHz, and 1.7 kHz and tested with 45 kV/1.67 μF capacitor bank. The protection circuit is included in the power supply for over current, under voltage, and over temperature. The design details and the experimental testing results of the power supply for resonant current, output current, and voltage traces of the power supply with capacitive, resistive, and short circuited load are presented and discussed. PMID:25725838

  10. Status of Brayton Cycle Power Conversion Development at NASA GRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Shaltens, Richard K.; Dolce, James L.; Cataldo, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is pursuing the development of Brayton cycle power conversion for various NASA initiatives. Brayton cycle power systems offer numerous advantages for space power generation including high efficiency, long life, high maturity, and broad scalability. Candidate mission applications include surface rovers and bases, advanced propulsion vehicles, and earth orbiting satellites. A key advantage is the ability for Brayton converters to span the wide range of power demands of future missions from several kilowatts to multi-megawatts using either solar, isotope, or reactor heat sources. Brayton technology has been under development by NASA since the early 1960's resulting in engine prototypes in the 2 to 15 kW-class that have demonstrated conversion efficiency of almost 30% and cumulative operation in excess of 40,000 hours. Present efforts at GRC are focusing on a 2 kW testbed as a proving ground for future component advances and operational strategies, and a 25 kW engine design as a modular building block for 100 kW-class electric propulsion and Mars surface power applications.

  11. Heat engine development for solar thermal power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, H. Q.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1981-01-01

    The technical status of three heat engines (Stirling, high-temperature Brayton, and Combined cycle) for use in solar thermal power systems is presented. Performance goals necessary to develop a system competitive with conventional power requirements include an external heated engine output less than 40 kW, and efficiency power conversion subsystem at least 40% at rated output, and a half-power efficiency of at least 37%. Results show that the Stirling engine can offer a 39% efficiency with 100 hours of life, and a 20% efficiency with 10,000 hours of life, but problems with seals and heater heads exist. With a demonstrated efficiency near 31% at 1500 F and a minimum lifetime of 100,000 hours, the Brayton engine does not offer sufficient engine lifetime, efficiency, and maintenance for solar thermal power systems. Examination of the Rankine bottoming cycle of the Combined cycle engine reveals a 30 year lifetime, but a low efficiency. Additional development of engines for solar use is primarily in the areas of components to provide a long lifetime, high reliability, and low maintenance (no more than $0.001/kW-hr).

  12. Nuclear power program and technology development in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byung-Oke

    1994-12-31

    KEPCO has successfully implemented the construction and operation of nuclear power plants since the early 1970s, and will continue to build safer and more efficient nuclear plants in the future in accordance with the nuclear power development plan previously established. KEPCO will also make every effort to enhance nuclear safety and obtain the public`s acceptance for nuclear power. We are, however, facing the same difficulties, as United States and other countries have, in strengthened regulatory requirements, public acceptance, radwaste disposal, and acquisition of new plant sites despite an active nuclear power program. Story of Ted Turner, CNN; {open_quotes}It ain`t as easy as it looks.{close_quotes} Yes! It is difficult. But we will cope with these issues so that we can promote the nuclear power development and continue to supply a highly economical and clean energy to the world. In this regard, it is my sincere wish that each organization participating in the nuclear industry, especially Korea and United States strengthen their ties and help each other so that we together can successfully accomplish our goals.

  13. Development of Next Generation Segmented Thermoelectric Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurial, J.; Caillat, T.; Ewell, R. C.

    2005-12-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generators have been used for space-based applications since 1961 with a total of 22 space missions that have successfully used RTGs for electrical power production. The key advantages of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are their long life, robustness, compact size, and high reliability. Thermoelectric converters are easily scalable, and possess a linear current-voltage curve, making power generation easy to control via a shunt regulator and shunt radiator. They produce no noise, vibration or torque during operation. These properties have made RTGs ideally suitable for autonomous missions in the extreme environments of outer space and on planetary surfaces. More advanced radioisotope power systems (RPS) with higher specific power (W/kg) and/or power output are desirable for future NASA missions, including the Europa Geophysical Orbiter mission. For the past few years, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing more efficient thermoelectric materials and has demonstrated significant increases in the conversion efficiency of high temperature thermocouples, up to 14% when operated across a 975K to 300K temperature differential. In collaboration with NASA Glenn Research Center, universities (USC and UNM), Ceramic and Metal Composites Corporation and industrial partners, JPL is now planning to lead the research and development of advanced thermoelectric technology for integration into the next generations of RPS. Preliminary studies indicate that this technology has the potential for improving the RPS specific power by more than 50% over the current state-of-the-art multi-mission RTG being built for the Mars Science Laboratory mission. A second generation advanced RPS is projected at more than doubling the specific power.

  14. Development of a field test for upper-body power.

    PubMed

    Shim, A L; Bailey, M L; Westings, S H

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a field test capable of measuring upper-body power through the use of a common weight-training apparatus, a Smith machine (SM), set up for bench press (BP) movement. A small, battery-operated digital timing device was designed and constructed to allow a precise calculation of power (in conjunction with measures of distance and force) for this specific movement, which involved an explosive press from the chest to a position just short of full arm extension. In pilot work, 1 repetition maximums (1RM) were determined on the SM BP for 3 male subjects, and by subsequently testing power on the same subjects at varying resistances, an average relative percentage of the 1RM-producing peak power values was found by power curve analysis for test standardization. Reliability was assessed (using 11 men) by SM power measurements taken over 3 days on the SM fitted with the timer. An intraclass R (0.998) indicated a high correlation between the 3 separate field-test trials. Finally, 8 male subjects were used to compare SM scores with a criterion measure, the Linea Isokinetic BP station (Loredan Biomedical, Inc., Sacramento CA). A Pearson product moment coefficient found a high correlation between the field test (SM) and Linea power scores (r = 0.987). A 2-tailed dependent t-test between the field and criterion scores was not significant, suggesting that no consistent error variable was present. It can be concluded that this is a valid field test of power for this movement. PMID:11710404

  15. Power conditioning unit development for MAG-TRANSIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliland, R. G.; Smith, R. J.

    The results of a development program which has been completed on a modular inverter, referred to as the Power Conditioning Unit (PCU), employing many parallel TO-3 transistors, are discussed. The PCU has been designed to provide a precisely controlled, variable voltage, variable frequency excitation to a linear induction motor in the MAG-TRANSIT system, a form of magnetically levitated vehicles for people mover applications. The CPU, which consists of eight power modules, with 24 transistors each, has demonstrated a capacity of 73.4 kVA.

  16. Solar Power Satellite Development: Advances in Modularity and Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.

    2010-01-01

    Space solar power satellites require innovative concepts in order to achieve economically and technically feasible designs. The mass and volume constraints of current and planned launch vehicles necessitate highly efficient structural systems be developed. In addition, modularity and in-space deployment will be enabling design attributes. This paper reviews the current challenges of launching and building very large space systems. A building block approach is proposed in order to achieve near-term solar power satellite risk reduction while promoting the necessary long-term technology advances. Promising mechanical systems technologies anticipated in the coming decades including modularity, material systems, structural concepts, and in-space operations are described

  17. Modelling Sustainable Development Scenarios of Croatian Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pašičko, Robert; Stanić, Zoran; Debrecin, Nenad

    2010-05-01

    The main objective of power system sustainable development is to provide the security of electricity supply required to underpin economic growth and increase the quality of living while minimizing adverse environmental impacts. New challenges such as deregulation, liberalization of energy markets, increased competition on energy markets, growing demands on security of supply, price insecurities and demand to cut CO2 emissions, are calling for better understanding of electrical systems modelling. Existing models are not sufficient anymore and planners will need to think differently in order to face these challenges. Such a model, on the basis on performed simulations, should enable planner to distinguish between different options and to analyze sustainability of these options. PLEXOS is an electricity market simulation model, used for modeling electrical system in Croatia since 2005. Within this paper, generation expansion scenarios until 2020 developed for Croatian Energy Strategy and modeled in PLEXOS. Development of sustainable Croatian energy scenario was analyzed in the paper - impacts of CO2 emission price and wind generation. Energy Strategy sets goal for 1200 MW from wind power plants in 2020. In order to fully understand its impacts, intermittent nature of electricity generation from wind power plant was modeled. We conclude that electrical system modelling using everyday growing models has proved to be inevitable for sustainable electrical system planning in complex environment in which power plants operate today.

  18. Solar dynamic power system development for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The development of a solar dynamic electric power generation system as part of the Space Station Freedom Program is documented. The solar dynamic power system includes a solar concentrator, which collects sunlight; a receiver, which accepts and stores the concentrated solar energy and transfers this energy to a gas; a Brayton turbine, alternator, and compressor unit, which generates electric power; and a radiator, which rejects waste heat. Solar dynamic systems have greater efficiency and lower maintenance costs than photovoltaic systems and are being considered for future growth of Space Station Freedom. Solar dynamic development managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center from 1986 to Feb. 1991 is covered. It summarizes technology and hardware development, describes 'lessons learned', and, through an extensive bibliography, serves as a source list of documents that provide details of the design and analytic results achieved. It was prepared by the staff of the Solar Dynamic Power System Branch at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The report includes results from the prime contractor as well as from in-house efforts, university grants, and other contracts. Also included are the writers' opinions on the best way to proceed technically and programmatically with solar dynamic efforts in the future, on the basis of their experiences in this program.

  19. Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Model Development: Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Power management and distribution (PMAD) models were developed in the early 1990's to model candidate architectures for various Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions. They were used to generate "ballpark" component mass estimates to support conceptual PMAD system design studies. The initial set of models was provided to NASA Lewis Research Center (since renamed Glenn Research Center) in 1992. They were developed to estimate the characteristics of power conditioning components predicted to be available in the 2005 timeframe. Early 90's component and device designs and material technologies were projected forward to the 2005 timeframe, and algorithms reflecting those design and material improvements were incorporated into the models to generate mass, volume, and efficiency estimates for circa 2005 components. The models are about ten years old now and NASA GRC requested a review of them to determine if they should be updated to bring them into agreement with current performance projections or to incorporate unforeseen design or technology advances. This report documents the results of this review and the updated power conditioning models and new transmission line models generated to estimate post 2005 PMAD system masses and sizes. This effort continues the expansion and enhancement of a library of PMAD models developed to allow system designers to assess future power system architectures and distribution techniques quickly and consistently.

  20. The development of a high average power glass laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, J. D.

    1984-05-01

    The subject contract has as its objective the development of a high average power glass laser by systematically improving the factors which influence the ability of a laser glass to handle large power levels. Based upon the availability of the thermal laser glass composition Q-100, the rationale used was toward the improvement of the efficiency of a glass laser by developing methods to increase the pumping efficiency and toward the improvement of the power handling capability of the glass laser rod itself. These incremental developments were broken down as follows: (1) Characterization of Q-100 Laser Glass: The measurement of its thermo-physical and thermo-optical properties to better define its engineering design parameters. (2) Improve Pumping Efficiency or Q-100: Primarily by cladding Q-100 with a matching cladding glass which would act as a lens and improve the transfer of pumping energy from the flashlamp. (3) Reduce thermal loading of Q-100 by Selective filtering of the flashlamp radiation and/or use energy transfer schemes to increase that portion of the flashlamp radiation corresponding to the neodymium pump bands. (4) Increase the rupture strength of Q-100 to directly increase its power-handling capability. (5) Investigate alternate pump sources to improve efficiency.

  1. Development of a 55 kw diesel powered auxiliary power unit for hybrid electric vehicles. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Likos, W.E.; Podnar, D.J.; Smith, J.A.; Steiber, J.

    1998-03-01

    Three auxillary power units (APU) were developed for military hybrid vehicle applications with funding from DARPA. One APU was for the electric M113 troop carrier originally converted to electric power in the 1960`s. The other two APU`s developed during this project were for hybrid electric High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) projects. For this APU design a Volkswagen 1.5-1 diesel engine drives a permanent magnet generator, that with associated inverter produces 55kW of DC power at 380 volts. Overall thermal efficiencies of 33% were observed. The controller for the APU`s was based on the personal computer (PC) CPU. Basing the controller on the PC allowed flexibility in meeting the individual requirements of the different vehicles. Given a power level request from the vehicle controller, the APU controller set the engine speed for optimum thermal efficiency. The generator electronics adjusts the voltage and thus the current output from the inverter to deliver the requested power to the vehicle`s electrical bus.

  2. Long Duration Balloon Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) solar power system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Juan

    High altitude scientific balloons have been used for many years to provide scientists with access to near space at a fraction of the cost of satellite based or sounding rocket experiments. In recent years, these balloons have been successfully used for long duration missions of up to 40 days. Longer missions, with durations of up to 100 days (Ultra Long), are in the planning stages. Due to the flight durations, solar power systems have been utilized throughout the Long Duration Balloon (LDB) flight program to power the necessary electronic systems. Recently, Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) charge controllers have become available off-the-shelf. These controllers along with high efficiency mono-crystalline solar cells have become reliable, low cost solutions even in the harsh environments they operate in. The LDB program at the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) began supporting solar power systems with custom units fabricated by the Physical Science Laboratory (PSL) of New Mexico State University (NMSU). These charge controllers proved to be very reliable systems; however, they required intensive labor to build and were relatively expensive. As off-the-shelf MPPT charge controllers have become available, they have been integrated into the LDB flight support systems. Coupled with PSL developed interface electronics for monitoring and power switching, they have proven to be as reliable, less expensive, and more efficient. The addition of MPPT allows for the controller to operate the solar panel at it highest power production point. Newer, off-the-shelf controllers with smarter MPPT, are currently being tested. This paper describes the long and ultra-long balloon missions and the role that solar power plays in mission success. More importantly, it discusses the recent developments in off-the-shelf MPPT charge controllers configured for use in the harsh high altitude balloon environment.

  3. Development and fabrication of an augmented power transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, M. J.; Hill, F. E.; Ostop, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The development of device design and processing techniques for the fabrication of an augmented power transistor capable of fast switching and high voltage power conversion is discussed. The major device goals sustaining voltages in the range of 800 to 1000 V at 80 A and 50 A, respectively, at a gain of 14. The transistor switching rise and fall times were both to have been less than 0.5 microseconds. The development of a passivating glass technique to shield the device high voltage junction from moisture and ionic contaminants is discussed as well as the development of an isolated package that separates the thermal and electrical interfaces. A new method was found to alloy the transistors to the molybdenum disc at a relatively low temperature. The measured electrical performance compares well with the predicted optimum design specified in the original proposed design. A 40 mm diameter transistor was fabricated with seven times the emitter area of the earlier 23 mm diameter device.

  4. Development of large wind energy power generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The background and development of an experimental 100 kW wind-energy generation system are described, and the results of current field tests are presented. The experimental wind turbine is a two-bladed down-wind horizontal axis propeller type with a 29.4 m diameter rotor and a tower 28 m in height. The plant was completed in March, 1983, and has been undergoing trouble-free tests since then. The present program calls for field tests during two years from fiscal 1983 to 1984. The development of technologies relating to the linkage and operation of wind-energy power generation system networks is planned along with the acquisition of basic data for the development of a large-scale wind energy power generation system.

  5. High-power ultrasonic processing: Recent developments and prospective advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Juarez, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the application of ultrasonic energy to produce or to enhance a wide variety of processes have been explored since about the middle of the 20th century, only a reduced number of ultrasonic processes have been established at industrial level. However, during the last ten years the interest in ultrasonic processing has revived particularly in industrial sectors where the ultrasonic technology may represent a clean and efficient tool to improve classical existing processes or an innovation alternative for the development of new processes. Such seems to be the case of relevant sectors such as food industry, environment, pharmaceuticals and chemicals manufacture, machinery, mining, etc where power ultrasound is becoming an emerging technology for process development. The possible major problem in the application of high-intensity ultrasound on industrial processing is the design and development of efficient power ultrasonic systems (generators and reactors) capable of large scale successful operation specifically adapted to each individual process. In the area of ultrasonic processing in fluid media and more specifically in gases, the development of the steppedplate transducers and other power ge with extensive radiating surface has strongly contributed to the implementation at semi-industrial and industrial stage of several commercial applications, in sectors such as food and beverage industry (defoaming, drying, extraction, etc), environment (air cleaning, sludge filtration, etc...), machinery and process for manufacturing (textile washing, paint manufacture, etc). The development of different cavitational reactors for liquid treatment in continuous flow is helping to introduce into industry the wide potential of the area of sonochemistry. Processes such as water and effluent treatment, crystallization, soil remediation, etc have been already implemented at semi-industrial and/or industrial stage. Other single advances in sectors like mining or energy have

  6. Development of high-power holmium-doped fibre amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, Alexander; Simakov, Nikita; Davidson, Alan; Oermann, Michael; Corena, Len; Stepanov, Dmitrii; Carmody, Neil; Haub, John; Swain, Robert; Carter, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Resonantly pumped holmium fibre lasers present a range of opportunities for the development of novel fibre laser and amplifier devices due to the availability of mature, efficient high power thulium fibre pump lasers. In this paper we describe the operation of a large mode area holmium-doped fibre amplifier. The master-oscillator is an all-fibre linearly polarised, core pumped single mode laser operating at 27 W at 2.11 μm. This laser was amplified in a large mode area fibre producing up to 265 W of output power. This system is the first demonstration of a resonantly pumped holmiumdoped fibre amplifier. It is also the highest power fibre amplifier that is capable of operating in an atmospheric transmission window <2.05 μm. This monolithic all-fibre system is able to address a wide range of remote sensing, scientific, medical and defence applications.

  7. Further developments in LP-based optimal power flow

    SciTech Connect

    Alsac, O.; Bright, J.; Prais, M.; Stott, B.P )

    1990-08-01

    Over the past twenty five years, the optimal power flow (OPF) approach that has received the most widespread practical application is the one based on linear programming (LP). Special customized LP methods have been utilized primarily for fast reliable security-constrained dispatch using decoupled separable OPF problem formulations. They have been used in power system planning, operations and control. Nevertheless, while the LP approach has a number of important attributes, its range of application in the OPF field has remained somewhat restricted. This paper describes further developments that have transformed the LP approach into a truly general-purpose OPF solver, with computational and other advantages over even recent nonlinear programming (NLP) methods. The nonseparable loss-minimization problem can now be solved, giving the same results as NLP on power systems of any size and type.

  8. Development and fabrication of improved power transistor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Chu, C. K.

    1979-01-01

    A new class of high-voltage power transistors was achieved by adapting present interdigitated thyristor processing techniques to the fabrication of npn Si transistors. Present devices are 2.3 cm in diameter and have V sub CEO (sus) in the range of 400 to 600V. V sub CEO (sus) = 450V devices were made with an (h sub FE)(I sub C) product of 900A at V sub CE = 2.5V. The electrical performance obtained was consistent with the predictions of an optimum design theory specifically developed for power switching transistors. The device design, wafer processing, and assembly techniques are described. Experimental measurements of the dc characteristics, forward SOA, and switching times are included. A new method of characterizing the switching performance of power transistors is proposed.

  9. Development of the small community solar power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babbe, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The status of the Small Community Solar Thermal Power Experiment is presented. Activities on the Phase 2 single/module development effort are presented, together with plans for the Phase 3 1 MWe demonstration plant. A description of the various subsystems and components is given with emphasis on the unmanned microprocessor based plant control subsystem. Latest performance figures are given for the 1 MWe plant, based on 56 power modules, each consisting of a 12m low cost concentrator, a cavity receiver, a Rankine power conversion subsystem and a ground mounted solid-state rectifier. Overall plant efficiency at rated conditions is 15.8 percent. Advanced glass concentrator designs yield 20 percent overall efficiencies.

  10. Power console development for NASA's electric propulsion outreach program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Patterson, Michael J.; Satterwhite, Vincent E.

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is developing a 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster for auxiliary and primary propulsion applications. To maximize expectations for user-acceptance of ion propulsion technology, NASA LeRC, through their Electric Propulsion Outreach Program, is providing sectors of industry with portable power consoles for operation of 5 KW-class xenon ion thrusters. This power console provides all necessary functions to permit thruster operations over a 0.5-5 KW envelope under both manual and automated control. These functions include the following: discharge, cathode heater, neutralizer keeper, and neutralizer heater currents, screen and accelerator voltages, and a gas feed system to regulate and control propellant flow to the thruster. An electronic circuit monitors screen and accelerator currents and controls arcing events. The power console was successfully integrated with the NASA 30 cm thruster.

  11. High-Power Krypton Hall Thruster Technology Being Developed for Nuclear-Powered Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David T.; Manzella, David H.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been performing research and development of moderate specific impulse, xenon-fueled, high-power Hall thrusters for potential solar electric propulsion applications. These applications include Mars missions, reusable tugs for low-Earth-orbit to geosynchronous-Earth-orbit transportation, and missions that require transportation to libration points. This research and development effort resulted in the design and fabrication of the NASA-457M Hall thruster that has been tested at input powers up to 95 kW. During project year 2003, NASA established Project Prometheus to develop technology in the areas of nuclear power and propulsion, which are enabling for deep-space science missions. One of the Project-Prometheus-sponsored Nuclear Propulsion Research tasks is to investigate alternate propellants for high-power Hall thruster electric propulsion. The motivation for alternate propellants includes the disadvantageous cost and availability of xenon propellant for extremely large scale, xenon-fueled propulsion systems and the potential system performance benefits of using alternate propellants. The alternate propellant krypton was investigated because of its low cost relative to xenon. Krypton propellant also has potential performance benefits for deep-space missions because the theoretical specific impulse for a given voltage is 20 percent higher than for xenon because of krypton's lower molecular weight. During project year 2003, the performance of the high-power NASA-457M Hall thruster was measured using krypton as the propellant at power levels ranging from 6.4 to 72.5 kW. The thrust produced ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 N at a discharge specific impulse up to 4500 sec.

  12. Power Electronics Development for the SPT-100 Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.; Sankovic, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Russian electric propulsion technologies have recently become available on the world market. Of significant interest is the Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT) which has a significant flight heritage in the former Soviet space program. The SPT has performance levels of up to 1600 seconds of specific impulse at a thrust efficiency of 0.50. Studies have shown that this level of performance is well suited for stationkeeping applications, and the SPT-100, with a 1.35 kW input power level, is presently being evaluated for use on Western commercial satellites. Under a program sponsored by the Innovative Science and Technology Division of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, a team of U.S. electric propulsion specialists observed the operation of the SPT-100 in Russia. Under this same program, power electronics were developed to operate the SPT-100 to characterize thruster performance and operation in the U.S. The power electronics consisted of a discharge, cathode heater, and pulse igniter power supplies to operate the thruster with manual flow control. A Russian designed matching network was incorporated in the discharge supply to ensure proper operation with the thruster. The cathode heater power supply and igniter were derived from ongoing development projects. No attempts were made to augment thruster electromagnet current in this effort. The power electronics successfully started and operated the SPT-100 thruster in performance tests at NASA Lewis, with minimal oscillations in the discharge current. The efficiency of the main discharge supply was measured at 0.92, and straightforward modifications were identified which could increase the efficiency to 0.94.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY POWER FROM SUSTAINABLE SMALL HYDRO POWER SYSTEMS – ACAPACITY BUILDING PROJECT IN BANGANG, CAMEROON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electric power is one of the basic needs for the development of any community. With electric power lacking in most rural communities in Africa, providing basic amenities that are dependent on power such as clean portable drinking water, powering equipment in health and dent...

  14. Technology Development for a Stirling Radioisotope Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.; Qiu, Songgang; White, Maurice A.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center and the Department of Energy are developing a Stirling convertor for an advanced radioisotope power system to provide spacecraft on-board electric power for NASA deep space missions. NASA Glenn is addressing key technology issues through the use of two NASA Phase II SBIRs with Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Kennewick, WA. Under the first SBIR, STC demonstrated a synchronous connection of two thermodynamically independent free-piston Stirling convertors and a 40 to 50 fold reduction in vibrations compared to an unbalanced convertor. The second SBIR is for the development of an Adaptive Vibration Reduction System (AVRS) that will essentially eliminate vibrations over the mission lifetime, even in the unlikely event of a failed convertor. This paper presents the status and results for these two SBIR projects and also discusses a new NASA Glenn in-house project to provide supporting technology for the overall Stirling radioisotope power system development. Tasks for this new effort include convertor performance verification, controls development, heater head structural life assessment, magnet characterization and thermal aging tests, FEA analysis for a lightweight alternator concept, and demonstration of convertor operation under launch and orbit transfer load conditions.

  15. Development and fabrication of improved Schottky power diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, L. F.; Garfinkel, M.; Taft, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Reproducible methods for the fabrication of silicon Schottky diodes have been developed for tungsten, aluminum, conventional platinum silicide, and low temperature platinum silicide. Barrier heights and barrier lowering under reverse bias have been measured, permitting the accurate prediction of forward and reverse diode characteristics. Processing procedures have been developed that permit the fabrication of large area (about 1 sq cm) mesageometry power Schottky diodes with forward and reverse characteristics that approach theoretical values. A theoretical analysis of the operation of bridge rectifier circuits has been performed, which indicates the ranges of frequency and voltage for which Schottky rectifiers are preferred to p-n junctions. Power Schottky rectifiers have been fabricated and tested for voltage ratings up to 140 volts.

  16. Designs and applications for floating-hydro power systems in small streams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehder, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The project focuses on an appropriate technology for small-scale hydro power: floating waterwheels and turbines. For background, relic and existing systems such as early floating mills, traditional Amish waterwheels, and micro-hydro systems are examined. In the design phase of the project, new designs for Floating Hydro Power Systems include: an analysis of floatation materials and systems; a floating undershot waterwheel design; a floating cylinder (fiberglass storage tank) design; a submerged tube design; and a design for a floating platform with submerged propellers. Finally, in the applications phase, stream flow data from East Tennessee streams are used in a discussion of the potential applications of floating hydro power systems in small streams.

  17. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC20

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2006-09-30

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coal. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of the first demonstration of the Transport Gasifier following significant modifications of the gasifier configuration. This demonstration took place during test campaign TC20, occurring from August 8 to September 23, 2006. The modifications proved successful in increasing gasifier residence time and particulate collection efficiency, two parameters critical in broadening of the fuel operating envelope and advancing gasification technology. The gasification process operated for over 870 hours, providing the opportunity for additional testing of various gasification technologies, such as PCD failsafe evaluation and sensor development.

  18. The Power Systems Development Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Longanbach, J.R.; Pinkston, T.E.

    1995-03-01

    One of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s (METC`s) goals is to: {open_quotes}Commercialize Advanced Power Systems with improved environmental performance, higher efficiency, and lower cost. {close_quotes} Advanced coal-based power generation systems include Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized- Bed Combustion (PFBC), and Integrated Gasification/Fuel Cell systems. The strategy for achieving this goal includes: (1) Show the improved performance and lower cost of Advanced Power Systems through successful Clean Coal Technology demonstration projects, (2) Build and operate Technology Integration Sites in partnership with U.S. Industry (these sites will resolve key technology issues and effect continuous product improvement, and these partnerships result in leveraging of research and development (R&D) funds), and (3) Set up partnerships with other agencies and organizations such as Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to leverage R&D funds and skills. Demonstration of practical high-temperature particulate control devices (PCD`s) is crucial to the evolution of advanced, high- efficiency coal-based power generation systems. There are stringent particulate requirements for the fuel gas for both turbines and fuel cells. In turbines, the particulates cause erosion and chemical attack of the blade surfaces. In fuel cells, the particulates cause blinding of the electrodes. Filtration of the incoming, hot, pressurized gas is required to protect these units. Although filtration can presently be performed by first cooling the gas, the system efficiency is reduced. Development of high temperature, high pressure filtration is necessary to achieve high efficiency and extend the lifetime of downstream components to acceptable levels.

  19. Development Status: Automation Advanced Development Space Station Freedom Electric Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolce, James L.; Kish, James A.; Mellor, Pamela A.

    1990-01-01

    Electric power system automation for Space Station Freedom is intended to operate in a loop. Data from the power system is used for diagnosis and security analysis to generate Operations Management System (OMS) requests, which are sent to an arbiter, which sends a plan to a commander generator connected to the electric power system. This viewgraph presentation profiles automation software for diagnosis, scheduling, and constraint interfaces, and simulation to support automation development. The automation development process is diagrammed, and the process of creating Ada and ART versions of the automation software is described.

  20. Development of 3 kW at 325 MHz solid-state RF power amplifier using four power amplifier modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramarao, B. V.; Sonal, S.; Mishra, J. K.; Pande, M.; Singh, P.; Kumar, G.; Mukherjee, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power solid-state RF power amplifier of 3 kW at 325 MHz has been developed using only four RF power amplifier modules of 850 W power output each. The design and characterization of RF power modules have been presented. A four way Wilkinson power combiner adds the output of four power amplifier modules with a total transmission loss of less than 6%. The combined power amplifier has a power gain of 20.2 dB at 1-dB compression point, and the corresponding output power is 2.8 kW at 325 MHz. The drain efficiency of the power amplifier is 65.3% at 3 kW. All the harmonics of this amplifier are below -40 dBc. The amplifier has better characteristics like fewer numbers of active devices per kilo watt, high efficiency, high gain, and ruggedness etc for RF accelerator applications.

  1. Advanced Stirling Convertor Development for NASA Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Scott D.; Collins, Josh

    2015-01-01

    Sunpower Inc.'s Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) initiated development under contract to the NASA Glenn Research Center and after a series of successful demonstrations, the ASC began transitioning from a technology development project to a flight development project. The ASC has very high power conversion efficiency making it attractive for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) in order to make best use of the low plutonium-238 fuel inventory in the United States. In recent years, the ASC became part of the NASA and Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) Integrated Project. Sunpower held two parallel contracts to produce ASCs, one with the DOE and Lockheed Martin to produce the ASC-F flight convertors, and one with NASA Glenn for the production of ASC-E3 engineering units, the initial units of which served as production pathfinders. The integrated ASC technical team successfully overcame various technical challenges that led to the completion and delivery of the first two pairs of flightlike ASC-E3 by 2013. However, in late fall 2013, the DOE initiated termination of the Lockheed Martin ASRG flight development contract driven primarily by budget constraints. NASA continues to recognize the importance of high-efficiency ASC power conversion for RPS and continues investment in the technology including the continuation of ASC-E3 production at Sunpower and the assembly of the ASRG Engineering Unit #2. This paper provides a summary of ASC technical accomplishments, overview of tests at Glenn, plans for continued ASC production at Sunpower, and status of Stirling technology development.

  2. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Wholesale Power Rate Development Study.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2007-11-01

    The Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS) calculates BPA proposed rates based on information either developed in the WPRDS or supplied by the other studies that comprise the BPA rate proposal. All of these studies, and accompanying documentation, provide the details of computations and assumptions. In general, information about loads and resources is provided by the Load Resource Study (LRS), WP-07-E-BPA-01, and the LRS Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-01A. Revenue requirements information, as well as the Planned Net Revenues for Risk (PNNR), is provided in the Revenue Requirement Study, WP-07-E-BPA-02, and its accompanying Revenue Requirement Study Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-02A and WP-07-E-BPA-02B. The Market Price Forecast Study (MPFS), WP-07-E-BPA-03, and the MPFS Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-03A, provide the WPRDS with information regarding seasonal and diurnal differentiation of energy rates, as well information regarding monthly market prices for Demand Rates. In addition, this study provides information for the pricing of unbundled power products. The Risk Analysis Study, WP-07-E-BPA-04, and the Risk Analysis Study Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-04A, provide short-term balancing purchases as well as secondary energy sales and revenue. The Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study, WP-07-E-BPA-06, and the Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-06A, implement Section 7(b)(2) of the Northwest Power Act to ensure that BPA preference customers firm power rates applied to their general requirements are no higher than rates calculated using specific assumptions in the Northwest Power Act.

  3. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC16

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2004-08-24

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR (formerly Kellogg Brown & Root) Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report discusses Test Campaign TC16 of the PSDF gasification process. TC16 began on July 14, 2004, lasting until August 24, 2004, for a total of 835 hours of gasification operation. The test campaign consisted of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal and high sodium lignite from the North Dakota Freedom mine. The highest gasifier operating temperature mostly varied from 1,760 to 1,850 F with PRB and 1,500 to 1,600 F with lignite. Typically, during PRB operations, the gasifier exit pressure was maintained between 215 and 225 psig using air as the gasification oxidant and between 145 and 190 psig while using oxygen as the oxidant. With lignite, the gasifier operated only in air-blown mode, and the gasifier outlet pressure ranged from 150 to 160 psig.

  4. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC22

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2008-11-01

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC22, the first test campaign using a high moisture lignite from Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC22 was conducted from March 24 to April 17, 2007. The gasification process was operated for 543 hours, increasing the total gasification operation at the PSDF to over 10,000 hours. The PSDF gasification process was operated in air-blown mode with a total of about 1,080 tons of coal. Coal feeder operation was challenging due to the high as-received moisture content of the lignite, but adjustments to the feeder operating parameters reduced the frequency of coal feeder trips. Gasifier operation was stable, and carbon conversions as high as 98.9 percent were demonstrated. Operation of the PCD and other support equipment such as the recycle gas compressor and ash removal systems operated reliably.

  5. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC17

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2004-11-30

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR (formerly Kellogg Brown & Root) Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results gasification operation with Illinois Basin bituminous coal in PSDF test campaign TC17. The test campaign was completed from October 25, 2004, to November 18, 2004. System startup and initial operation was accomplished with Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, and then the system was transitioned to Illinois Basin coal operation. The major objective for this test was to evaluate the PSDF gasification process operational stability and performance using the Illinois Basin coal. The Transport Gasifier train was operated for 92 hours using PRB coal and for 221 hours using Illinois Basin coal.

  6. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2005-08-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

  7. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC21

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2007-01-30

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coal. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of the first demonstration of gasification operation with lignite coal following the 2006 gasifier configuration modifications. This demonstration took place during test campaign TC21, occurring from November 7, 2006, through January 26, 2007. The test campaign began with low sodium lignite fuel, and after 304 hours of operation, the fuel was changed to high sodium lignite, for 34 additional hours of operation. Both fuels were from the North Dakota Freedom mine. Stable operation with low sodium lignite was maintained for extended periods, although operation with high sodium lignite was problematic due to agglomeration formation in the gasifier restricting solids circulation.

  8. Access to Power: Governance and Development in the Pakistani Electrical Power Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, Ijlal

    This dissertation explores governance in Pakistan through a study of the state-run electrical power sector. At both the micro and macro level, the Pakistani power sector provides a lens into the heart of the Pakistani state and its governance institutions. This ethnographic and historical study offers an in-depth look at state operations in a developing country, situates the current Pakistani power crisis in a larger context of continuity through periods of dictatorship and democracy, and suggests how efforts to make state service delivery more responsive to citizens might be reconceived. A historical review of the Pakistani power sector establishes first and foremost that the current crisis is the product of longer-term processes for which the policy solutions currently being proposed (with the support of international donors and multilateral lenders) are inadequate. Depoliticized attempts at power sector reform have little to offer in light of the pervasively informal and negotiated nature of the fragmented Pakistani state. The institutions of power sector governance are mutually constituted by the formal rules and the informal---personal relationships, language, violence, money, and power. These rules of the game are as relevant to relations within and between public sector organizations as they are to the engagement of citizens with their state. The same rules apply at the margins of the state---informal squatter settlements---as at the core, though the resources brought to bear and the resultant outcomes are different. The internal incoherence of this state underscores the limitations of formal rules in determining outcomes, and the poor prospects for reform efforts that focus exclusively on the formal aspects of governance. To proactively engage with the question of political will leads away from top-down policy perspectives and counter to the depoliticizing tendencies that currently shape policy reforms. Instead, an energized and informed local participation

  9. Bandwidth and power efficient modulation and coding development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, P. A.; Hoeber, C. F.; Tanner, R. Michael

    This paper describes modulation and forward error correction concepts which can be used to increase the bandwidth efficiency of satellite communications links without sacrificing power efficiency. A spacecraft demodulator/decoder is being developed which advances the technology for the next generation of digital communication satellites. This demodulator/decoder is intended for TDMA applications requiring high total data rates composed of many low data rate users. Low TDMA overhead is obtained with a unique approach for achieving fast acquisition. High spectrum efficiency is obtained through the use of a bandwidth efficient coding system, and the design addresses high interference levels associated with spectrum reuse. The implementation of this demodulator and associated FEC decoder employs high speed digital processing in conjunction with parallel pipeline architecture which lends itself to digital LSI fabrication, giving the potential for a compact, power efficient, and highly reliable system appropriate for satellite applications.

  10. Wind power in Russia Today: Development, resources, and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Martinot, E.; Perminov, E.M.

    1995-12-31

    Wind power development in Russia and technology transfer from the West are discussed from an integrated perspective, including institutional and economic conditions, technologies, geography, and technology transfer experience. Commercialization has only begun in the last few years. Domestic technology development programs for 100-kW to 1000-kW turbines and wind farm projects are described. Good wind resources exist in at least 17 regions (out of 89) in the Far East, Far North, Northwest, North Caucasus, and Lower Volga. To Russians, wind power means jobs and autonomy. Joint ventures are an important form of technology transfer because of existing idle industrial capacity with skilled workers. Equipment imports to-date have been minimal. The only example of a production joint venture so far is Windenergo in Ukraine, which has begun to produce 110-kW turbines under a Kenetech Windpower license. Barriers to technology transfer are described and appear formidable. Russia remains a combination of technology transfer perspectives for developed, developing, and former Communist countries

  11. Development of an HTS hydroelectric power generator for the hirschaid power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fair, Ruben; Lewis, Clive; Eugene, Joseph; Ingles, Martin

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the development and manufacture of a 1.7MW, 5.25kV, 28pole, 214rpm hydroelectric power generator consisting of superconducting HTS field coils and a conventional stator. The generator is to be installed at a hydro power station in Hirschaid, Germany and is intended to be a technology demonstrator for the practical application of superconducting technology for sustainable and renewable power generation. The generator is intended to replace and uprate an existing conventional generator and will be connected directly to the German grid. The HTS field winding uses Bi-2223 tape conductor cooled to about 30K using high pressure helium gas which is transferred from static cryocoolers to the rotor via a bespoke rotating coupling. The coils are insulated with multi-layer insulation and positioned over laminated iron rotor poles which are at room temperature. The rotor is enclosed within a vacuum chamber and the complete assembly rotates at 214rpm. The challenges have been significant but have allowed Converteam to develop key technology building blocks which can be applied to future HTS related projects. The design challenges, electromagnetic, mechanical and thermal tests and results are presented and discussed together with applied solutions.

  12. The Environment-Power System Analysis Tool development program. [for spacecraft power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeward, Gary A.; Kuharski, Robert A.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Wilcox, Katherine G.; Stevens, N. John; Putnam, Rand M.; Roche, James C.

    1989-01-01

    The Environment Power System Analysis Tool (EPSAT) is being developed to provide engineers with the ability to assess the effects of a broad range of environmental interactions on space power systems. A unique user-interface-data-dictionary code architecture oversees a collection of existing and future environmental modeling codes (e.g., neutral density) and physical interaction models (e.g., sheath ionization). The user-interface presents the engineer with tables, graphs, and plots which, under supervision of the data dictionary, are automatically updated in response to parameter change. EPSAT thus provides the engineer with a comprehensive and responsive environmental assessment tool and the scientist with a framework into which new environmental or physical models can be easily incorporated.

  13. Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies

    SciTech Connect

    Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

    2008-10-15

    The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  14. Power Systems Development Facility. First quarterly report, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this project, herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal derived gas streams. This project entails the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device (PCD) issues to be addressed include the integration of the PCDs into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size.

  15. Continuing Development for Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Allen A.; Qiu, Songgang; Redinger, Darin L.; Augenblick, John E.; Petersen, Stephen L.

    2004-02-01

    Long-life radioisotope power generators based on free-piston Stirling engines are an energy-conversion solution for future space applications. The high efficiency of Stirling machines makes them more attractive than the thermoelectric generators currently used in space. Stirling Technology Company (STC) has been developing free-piston Stirling machines for over 30 years, and its family of Stirling generators is ideally suited for reliable, maintenance-free operation. This paper describes recent progress and status of the STC RemoteGen™ 55 W-class Stirling generator (RG-55), presents an overview of recent testing, and discusses how the technology demonstration design has evolved toward space-qualified hardware.

  16. Organizing for nuclear power facility development. Final draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Centralized power development concepts have been of interest for some years and have been given considerable study in the past, e.g., the Congressionally-directed 1975 NRC studies. In general, while all such studies have concluded that such Centers did offer potential benefits and were feasible, in the mid-1970's, when most of these studies were done, the advantages did not appear to make use of Energy Centers on balance, preferable to continued conventional or dispersed siting. The DOE recognized that more recent circumstances, particularly the TMI accident, and the new imperatives which have been defined since that event for the proper conduct of the nuclear power ''enterprise'' may well have changed that balance. Centralized siting may today offer important benefits, but clearly those benefits can only be realized if the Center is effectively organized and if the institutional problems of organization (i.e., financial, political and jurisdictional) can be dealt with. Thus the Department of Energy asked the S.M. Stoller Corporation (SMSC) to outline the institutional factors and the organizational considerations to be taken into account in the establishment of nuclear power energy centers in the United States.

  17. Development of a power system for cabled ocean observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Kirkham, H.; El-Sharkawi, M.; Lancaster, P.; Liu, C.-C.; Lu, S.; McGinnis, T.; Schneider, K.; Upadhye, A.; Vorperian, V.

    2003-04-01

    Cabled Ocean Observatories offer the potential to deliver unprecedented amounts of power to remote instruments and sensors. The availability of sufficient power will enable new instrumentation and methods. Here we describe the present NEPTUNE power system design which will be capable of delivering an average of approximately 4 kW or a maximum of 10 kW to over 40 seafloor node locations spread over approximately 500 km x 1000 km area of seafloor. The system will have a backbone of 3500 km of standard, single conductor submarine telecommunications cable connecting the nodes and operating at 10 kV; the network will operate in a parallel mode with sea water returns at each node. A network of secondary extension cables will be developed that will allow the network to be extended up to 100 km from the backbone. The sub-sea backbone cable part of the power system includes circuit breakers so that cable faults can be isolated, and system operation can continue on unfaulted sections of the cable. A minimalist approach to the design of the backbone is essential to ensure adequate reliability. Here a configuration that places only the essential circuit breakers in the backbone is considered; a node’s science interface module (with the 10 kV-400/48 V dc/dc converter, communications electronics, and connectors) is on an easily serviceable spur cable. The percentage availability of the entire observatory is improved by segregating backbone attributes from science interface elements, making it easier to bring the full force of mission assurance techniques to bear on the backbone. [Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  18. High power LPP EUV source system development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Benjamin Szu-Min; Brandt, David; Farrar, Nigel

    2009-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) technology has been recognized as the major lithography technology for 22 nm HP and beyond to fulfill Moore's Law, which predicts that circuit dimensions shrink 70% every 2~3 years in order to achieve cost down and obtain greater functionality per unit area. EUV source power is one of the key factors in determining the cost-effectiveness of EUVL compared to other lithography technologies, like double patterning. Only when EUV power can achieve a certain level, the cost of EUV lithography under high volume manufacturing (HVM) can become much more competitive than that of double patterning techniques. In this paper, the performance of the first production Cymer high power laser produced plasma (LPP) EUV source integrated with a 5 sr multi-layer mirror (MLM) collector and fully integrated debris mitigation will be shown. The latest results on power generation, stable and efficient collection, and clean transmission of EUV light through the intermediate focus will be presented. The lifetime of the MLM collector is a critical parameter in the development of extreme ultraviolet LPP lithography sources. Debris mitigation techniques are used to inhibit reflectivity degradation from deposition of target material, sputtering of the multilayer coating, and implantation of incident particles, which can reduce the efficiency of the MLM collector during exposure. The far field images of MLM collector are recorded by intermediate focus metrology with a CCD camera to determine the reflectivity status of the MLM collector during exposure. The results of these debris mitigation techniques are compared through multiple-hour EUV exposure. Testing shows cleanliness at the source-scanner interface acceptable to the limit of detection.

  19. Development and Commercialization of the Lunar Solar Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criswell, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    The proposed Lunar Solar Power (LSP) System consists of pairs of power bases located on opposite limbs of the Moon as seen from Earth. The power bases collect the solar energy and convert it to beams of microwaves. The microwaves are delivered directly to moonward-facing receivers on Earth or indirectly through relay satellites in orbit about Earth (1, 2, 3, 4). The LSP System may be the only reasonable method for establishing sustainable global energy prosperity within two generations. Commercial power prosperity requires at least 2 kWe/person. For ten billion people this implies 20 TWe and 2,000 TWe-y of electric energy or ~6,000 TWt-y of thermal energy per century (5, 6, 7, 8). A brief overview is presented of a reference LSP System that supplies 20 TWe by 2050. The engineering scales and the cost and benefits of this system are described. In order to provide low cost commercial electric energy, the power bases are made primarily of local lunar materials by machines, facilities, and people deployed from Earth (1, 2, 3). In addition, lunar production machinery can be made primarily from lunar materials. Advantages of this approach, versus the reference LSP System, are discussed. Full-scale production of a LSP System will certainly be proceeded by terrestrial and lunar operation of the production machinery and a small-scale demonstration of the operational system (1). Using government funds to establishing a permanent lunar base and the associated transportation system would significantly reduce the upfront cost for the demonstration of a commercial LSP System (2). The government program would provide a legal framework for commercial development of the LSP System (3, 9). The LSP System offers the opportunity to establish a materials industry on the Moon that can produce a growing mass and variety of goods and enable new services of benefit on the Earth and the Moon (10). New priorities are suggested for civilian space programs that can accelerate the establishment

  20. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC25

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2008-12-01

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC25, the second test campaign using a high moisture lignite coal from the Red Hills mine in Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC25 was conducted from July 4, 2008, through August 12, 2008. During TC25, the PSDF gasification process operated for 742 hours in air-blown gasification mode. Operation with the Mississippi lignite was significantly improved in TC25 compared to the previous test (TC22) with this fuel due to the addition of a fluid bed coal dryer. The new dryer was installed to dry coals with very high moisture contents for reliable coal feeding. The TC25 test campaign demonstrated steady operation with high carbon conversion and optimized performance of the coal handling and gasifier systems. Operation during TC25 provided the opportunity for further testing of instrumentation enhancements, hot gas filter materials, and advanced syngas cleanup technologies. The PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane with syngas from the Transport Gasifier.

  1. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2008-03-30

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

  2. Economic viability of photovoltaic power for development assistance applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bifano, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the development assistance market and examines a number of specific photovoltaic (PV) development assistance field tests, including water pumping/grain grinding (Tangaye, Upper Volta), vaccine refrigerators slated for deployment in 24 countries, rural medical centers to be installed in Ecuador, Guyana, Kenya and Zimbabwe, and remote earth stations to be deployed in the near future. A comparison of levelized energy cost for diesel generators and PV systems covering a range of annual energy consumptions is also included. The analysis does not consider potential societal, environmental or political benefits associated with PV power. PV systems are shown to be competitive with diesel generators, based on life cycle cost considerations, assuming a system price of $20/W(peak), for applications having an annual energy demand of up to 6000 kilowatt-hours per year.

  3. Economic viability of photovoltaic power for development assistance applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bifano, W.J.

    1982-09-01

    This paper briefly discusses the development assistance market and examines a number of specific PV development assistance field tests including water pumping/grain grinding (Tangaye, Upper Volta), vaccine refrigerators slated for deployment in 24 countries, rural medical centers to be installed in Ecuador, Guyana, Kenya and Zimbabwe, and remote earth stations to be deployed in the near future. A comparison of levelized energy cost for diesel generators and PV systems covering a range of annual energy consumptions is also included. The analysis does not consider potential societal, environmental or political benefits associated with PV power. PV systems are shown to be competitive with diesel generators based on life cycle cost considerations, assuming a system price of $20/W(peak), for applications having an annual energy demand of up to 6000 kilowatt-hours per year.

  4. Cross flow filter development for advanced fossil power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Haldipur, G.B.; Newby, R.A.; Smeltzer, E.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The porous ceramic cross flow filter has been under development at Westinghouse in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) for advanced fossil power generation. The ceramic cross flow filter is capable of high temperature operation, and is basically an absolute filter on ash. The cross flow filter can be operated at high flow capacity, while simultaneously exhibiting relatively low pressure drop flow characteristics. This paper describes the cross flow filter development at Westinghouse, and reviews the results of many in-house and field test programs. Testing has included operation of the filter in subpilot pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and coal gasification applications. Testing is also being conducted at Westinghouse to evaluate filter characteristics over long-term operation (3,000 hours) utilizing dedicated test facilities.

  5. Advanced on-site power plant development technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A 30-cell, full area short stack containing advanced cell features was tested for 2900 hours. A stack acid addition approach was selected and will be evaluated on the stack at 5000 hours test time. A brassboard inverter was designed and fabrication was initiated. Evaluation of this brassboard inverter will take place in 1984. A Teflon coated commercial heat exchanger was selected as the preferred approach for the acid condenser. A reformer catalyst with significantly less pressure drop and equivalent performance relative to the 40-K baseline catalyst was selected for the development reformer. The early 40-kW field power plant history was reviewed and adjustments were made to the On-Site Technology Development Program to address critical component issues.

  6. Development of molten carbonate fuel cell power plant technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, H. C.; Sanderson, R. A.; Wertheim, F. J.; Farris, P. F.; Mientek, A. P.; Maricle, D. L.; Briggs, T. A.; Preston, J. L., Jr.; Louis, G. A.; Abrams, M. L.

    1980-08-01

    During this quarter, effort was continued in all four major task areas: system studies to define the reference power plant design; cell and stack design, development and verification; preparation for fabrication and testing of the full-scale prototype stack; and developing the capability for operation of stacks on coal-derived gas. Preliminary module and cell stack design requirements were completed. Fuel processor characterization was completed. Design approaches for full-scale stack busbars and electrical isolation of reactant manifolds and reactant piping were defined. Preliminary design requirements were completed for the anode. Conductive nickel oxide for cathode fabrication was made by oxidation and lithiation of porous nickel sheet stock. A method of mechanizing the tape casting process for increased production rates was successfully demonstrated. Theoretical calculations indicated that hydrogen cyanide and ammonia, when present as impurities in the stack fuel gas, will have no harmful effects. Laboratory experiments using higher than anticipated levels of ethylene showed no harmful effects.

  7. Duke Power Company's development of a biofouling monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Derwort, J.E.; Gnilka, A. )

    1991-11-01

    Biofouling programs at Duke Power Company (DPC) can be traced to the invasion of the Catawba River system by Corbicula in 1968. Raw water systems at Plant Allen, a coal-fired station on Lake Wylie, became heavily infested by clams during the 1970s. Development of programs was accelerated as a result of the shutdown of Catawba nuclear station (CNS) on lake Wylie in 1986 due to clam infestations in safety-related systems, increased biofouling problems at McGuire nuclear station (MNS) on lake Norman, and by the issuance of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Generic Letter (GL) 89-13 (issued in 1989). Historical data were reviewed to identify pertinent questions, and a refined, multifaceted Corbicula monitoring plan was developed. This plan was implemented at CNS and MNS in 1989.

  8. Development of a high temperature solar powered water chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, R. A.

    1982-03-01

    The objectives of this program are: to develop a high temperature solar powered air cooled 25 ton chiller utilizing 250 to 300 F solar hot water suitable for commercial and multi-family applications; to study, design, and build a prototype Rankine powered vapor compression cycle; and to demonstrate and evaluate performance through steady state and dynamic laboratory testing. Cycle studies and preliminary turbo machine studies were completed under Phase I establishing the final conceptual approach and anticipated cost/performance. The evaluation of the working fluid thermal stability has satisfactorily shown that R-113 has excellent life potential in an oil-free steel boiler at the maximum expected temperature, 320 F, for this application. The detailed design of the turbo machine and the chiller has been completed. The turbomachine has been completed and has successfully passed its qualification tests on air. The chiller has been built in the water cooled configuration, has been installed in a test facility, instrumented and charged. A two stage boiler feed pump has been developed and successfully tested on R-113 in a separate loop.

  9. Development Status of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Geng, Steven M.; Pearson, Jon Boise; Godfoy, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the progress that has been made in the development of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). The reactor simulator core and Annular Linear Induction Pump have been fabricated and assembled into a test loop at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. A 12 kWe Power Conversion Unit (PCU) is being developed consisting of two 6 kWe free-piston Stirling engines. The two 6 kWe engines have been fabricated by Sunpower Inc. and are currently being tested separately prior to integration into the PCU. The Facility Cooling System (FCS) used to reject convertor waste heat has been assembled and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The structural elements, including a Buildup Assembly Platform (BAP) and Upper Truss Structure (UTS) have been fabricated, and will be used to test cold-end components in thermal vacuum prior to TDU testing. Once all components have been fully tested at the subsystem level, they will be assembled into an end-to-end system and tested in thermal vacuum at GRC.

  10. Development Status of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Geng, Steven M; Pearson, Jon Boise; Godfroy, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the progress that has been made in the development of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). The reactor simulator core and Annular Linear Induction Pump have been fabricated and assembled into a test loop at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. A 12 kWe Power Conversion Unit (PCU) is being developed consisting of two 6 kWe free-piston Stirling engines. The two 6 kWe engines have been fabricated by Sunpower Inc. and are currently being tested separately prior to integration into the PCU. The Facility Cooling System (FCS) used to reject convertor waste heat has been assembled and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The structural elements, including a Buildup Assembly Platform (BAP) and Upper Truss Structure (UTS) have been fabricated, and will be used to test cold-end components in thermal vacuum prior to TDU testing. Once all components have been fully tested at the subsystem level, they will be assembled into an end-to-end system and tested in thermal vacuum at NASA GRC.

  11. High Power Piezoelectric Characterization for Piezoelectric Transformer Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ural, Seyit O.

    The major goal was to develop characterization techniques to identify and define guidelines to manufacture high power density actuators. We particularly aim at improving the strengths of piezoelectric transformers, namely the high efficiency, ease of manufacturing, low electromagnetic noise, and high power to weight ratio resulting in an adaptor application by identifying material limitations, geometrical limitations and offer guidelines to counter drawbacks limiting the power density. There are 3 losses present in piezoelectrics. Namely dielectric, elastic and piezoelectric losses. These losses can be calculated using mechanical quality factors of the resonating piezoelectric actuator. But in order to calculate all three losses, the mechanical quality factor for resonance and anti resonance need to be measured. Although the mechanical quality factor for resonance is conventionally measured, measurements in antiresonance have been ignored. Since there was no unique measurement technique to address antiresonance and resonance Q in one single sweep, in this study constant vibration velocity method was developed. During the constant vibration velocity measurement, the input electrical energy is monitored and significant differences between resonance and antiresonance drives are observed. For the same output work (identical vibration velocity) significant differences in the losses were observed. Thermographic images have shown increasing temperature differences for resonance and antiresonance nodal point temperatures, with higher vibration velocities. The theoretical evaluation identified the difference observed in the mechanical quality factors at resonance and antiresonance to stem from the piezoelectric loss. In order to investigate losses in the absence of thermal effects a transient characterization technique was adopted. The burst technique, originally developed for characterization of the mechanical quality factor at resonance, has been modified with a switch

  12. White LEDs for lighting remote communities in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craine, Stewart; Irvine-Halliday, Dave

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 5 years, the application of white LEDs for ambient lighting has been investigated in the remote villages of Nepal. Currently, lighting is often met using kerosene wick lamps, which emit unhealthy levels of fumes, or by burning sap-filled pine sticks, which are worse than the kerosene lamps. A team of students from Calgary University developed some LED lamps that could easily be fabricated in Nepal using local materials and personnel. To generate power, a pedal DC generator was developed to charge batteries, as well as a simple wind turbine. The Nepal Light Project implemented a series of many projects over the last 2 years in several villages across Nepal, using several different power generating systems. A total of 142 households, two schools and a temple were fitted with lamps in 2000, and more will follow in 2001. A research project has also been undertaken in Nepal for the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA) to investigate the potential for energy efficient lamps in the micro hydro industry. The R&D project was very small, and conducted basic testing on locally available compact fluorescent lamps and LED lamps. The report concluded that encouraging the use of CFLs would decrease costs by 30-50%, and that they should be included in the subsidy policy, along with power factor correcting capacitors. LED lamps should not be overly encouraged as the development of the diodes was advancing very rapidly. The real advantage of LED lamps lies in extremely low maintenance costs due to the low power requirements and long life, which is just as important for remote villages as it is for traffic lights and exit signs. It is estimated that these low ongoing costs could be as low as $3/household/year for a rural lighting project. Pilot projects should be encouraged to demonstrate and investigate the potential of WLEDs for lighting in remote communities in developing countries. With 2 billion people without access to electricity, and lighting being

  13. Toward Development and Measurement of the Interpersonal Power Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, John; Pate, Larry

    1977-01-01

    Tests a scaling instrument that measures an individual's power in four communication situations. Shows that positive and negative personal power and reward power are three stable factors accounting for seven-tenths of the total variance. Supports the hypothesis that perceived interpersonal power varies across communication contexts. (RL)

  14. Progress in developing tidal electric power plants reported

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhnin, A.

    1984-12-01

    The natural energy potential of tides on the shores of the U.S.S.R. is equal to about a third of the world's total. The Achilles heel of tidal power plants is their pulsating operation. One solution to this problem was to build a hydroelectric power plant for use in tandem with the tidal power plant. During lulls in the tidal plant, the hydraulic power plant switches on at full power. Possible sites for dual plants were discussed.

  15. LIFE: a sustainable solution for developing safe, clean fusion power.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Susana; Dunne, Mike; Kramer, Kevin; Anklam, Tom; Havstad, Mark; Mazuecos, Antonio Lafuente; Miles, Robin; Martinez-Frias, Joel; Deri, Bob

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California is currently in operation with the goal to demonstrate fusion energy gain for the first time in the laboratory-also referred to as "ignition." Based on these demonstration experiments, the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant is being designed at LLNL in partnership with other institutions with the goal to deliver baseload electricity from safe, secure, sustainable fusion power in a time scale that is consistent with the energy market needs. For this purpose, the LIFE design takes advantage of recent advances in diode-pumped, solid-state laser technology and adopts the paradigm of Line Replaceable Units used on the NIF to provide high levels of availability and maintainability and mitigate the need for advanced materials development. The LIFE market entry plant will demonstrate the feasibility of a closed fusion fuel cycle, including tritium breeding, extraction, processing, refueling, accountability, and safety, in a steady-state power-producing device. While many fusion plant designs require large quantities of tritium for startup and operations, a range of design choices made for the LIFE fuel cycle act to reduce the in-process tritium inventory. This paper presents an overview of the delivery plan and the preconceptual design of the LIFE facility with emphasis on the key safety design principles being adopted. In order to illustrate the favorable safety characteristics of the LIFE design, some initial accident analysis results are presented that indicate potential for a more attractive licensing regime than that of current fission reactors. PMID:23629070

  16. Development of high-power gyrotrons with gradually tapered cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Chaojun; Yu Sheng; Niu Xinjian; Liu Yinghui; Li Hongfu; Li Xiang

    2012-12-15

    In high power gyrotrons, the parasitic modes coupled with the operating mode cannot be avoided in the beam-wave interaction. These parasitic modes will decrease the efficiency of the gyrotrons. The purity of the operating mode affected by different tapers should be carefully studied. The steady-state self-consistent nonlinear theory for gyrotron with gradually tapered cavity is developed in this paper. A steady-state calculation code including 'cold cavity' and 'hot cavity' is designed. By comparison, a time-domain model analysis of gyrotron operation is also studied by particle-in-cell (PIC). It is found that the tapers of gyrotron have different influences on the modes coupling between the operating mode and the parasitic modes. During the study, an example of 94 GHz gyrotron with pure operating mode TE{sub 03} has been designed. The purity of the operating mode in the optimized cavity is up to -77 dB, and in output waveguide of the cavity is up to -76 dB. At the same time, the beam-wave interaction in the designed cavity has been simulated, too. An output power of 120 kW, corresponding to 41.6% efficiency and an oscillation frequency of 94.099 GHz have been achieved with a 50 kV, 6 A helical electron beam at a guiding magnetic field of 3.5485 T. The results show that the power in spurious modes of the optimized cavity may be kept far below than that of the traditional tapered cavity.

  17. Development of a naturally aspired thermosyphon for power amplifier cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedel, S.; Robinson, A. J.; Kempers, R.; Kerslake, S.

    2014-07-01

    This paper details the early development steps of a two-phase thermosyphon thermal management solution for power amplifiers (PA) in the telecommunication industry. These components, attached to a vertical PCB within an enclosure between the RF filter and a natural or forced convection heat sink, dissipate a large amount of heat with a high heat flux density. Currently cooled by direct contact to a shared heat sink, they tend to spread heat towards other components of their board, affecting their reliability. A thermosyphon thus appear as an ideal thermal management solution to transport the heat from the power amplifiers in order to dissipate it to a remote and dedicated natural convection heat sink. In the present study, the performance and the heat spreading of a forced convection unit is measured. A thermosyphon solution is then designed with a flat vertical evaporator and a radial natural convection heat sink and condenser. The performance of the thermosyphon thermal management solution is measured and compared to the initial solution. The limits and improvement needs of the thermosyphon solution are then discussed.

  18. Power Systems Development Facility. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particular control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the Foster Wheeler portion of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDs) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter.

  19. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC09

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2002-09-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC09 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC09 in air- and oxygen-blown modes. Test Run TC09 was started on September 3, 2002, and completed on September 26, 2002. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run, with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen was smooth. The gasifier temperature varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 125 to 270 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC09, 414 hours of solid circulation and over 300 hours of coal feed were attained with almost 80 hours of pure oxygen feed.

  20. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services

    2003-04-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

  1. Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-31

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 ''Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III.'' The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47% NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input all solid wastes benign cost of electricity {le}{le} 90% of present plants Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. Phase II, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase III. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase III program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase II Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4, and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters

  2. Preliminary design development of 100 KW rotary power transfer device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberger, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Contactless power transfer devices for transferring electrical power across a rotating spacecraft interface were studied. A power level of 100 KW was of primary interest and the study was limited to alternating current devices. Rotary transformers and rotary capacitors together with the required dc to ac power conditioning electronics were examined. Microwave devices were addressed. The rotary transformer with resonant circuit power conditioning was selected as the most feasible approach. The rotary capacitor would be larger while microwave devices would be less efficient. A design analysis was made of a 100 KW, 20 kHz power transfer device consisting of a rotary transformer, power conditioning electronics, drive mechanism and heat rejection system. The size, weight and efficiency of the device were determined. The characteristics of a baseline slip ring were presented. Aspects of testing the 100 KW power transfer device were examined. The power transfer device is a feasible concept which can be implemented using presently available technologies.

  3. Multi-kilowatt modularized spacecraft power processing system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, R. E.; Hayden, J. H.; Hedges, R. T.; Rehmann, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    A review of existing information pertaining to spacecraft power processing systems and equipment was accomplished with a view towards applicability to the modularization of multi-kilowatt power processors. Power requirements for future spacecraft were determined from the NASA mission model-shuttle systems payload data study which provided the limits for modular power equipment capabilities. Three power processing systems were compared to evaluation criteria to select the system best suited for modularity. The shunt regulated direct energy transfer system was selected by this analysis for a conceptual design effort which produced equipment specifications, schematics, envelope drawings, and power module configurations.

  4. Development of lighting system for hologram using high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Junko; Yaeda, Asami; Asakawa, Hisashi; Shibuya, Takehisa; Wakaki, Moriaki

    2007-02-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) became popular rapidly by the appearance of blue LED. Three color (R, G, B) emitting LEDs are utilized for the image display system by the development of multi color emitting LED. White LEDs became to commercial base by combining blue or UV light sources for excitation and materials for fluorescence. White LEDs are prevailing for general lighting applications. A single tip with the power of 5W became line up for commercial market owing to the research for high intensity LEDs. As a result, LEDs are replacing the market of conventional incandescent lighting and even head lights of the automobile. In this study, we aim to fabricate the white and R, G, B lighting system using high brightness LEDs for the lighting of holograms instead of a conventional halogen lamp.

  5. Short-Term Forecasting of Loads and Wind Power for Latvian Power System: Accuracy and Capacity of the Developed Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziukynas, V.; Klementavičius, A.

    2016-04-01

    The paper analyses the performance results of the recently developed short-term forecasting suit for the Latvian power system. The system load and wind power are forecasted using ANN and ARIMA models, respectively, and the forecasting accuracy is evaluated in terms of errors, mean absolute errors and mean absolute percentage errors. The investigation of influence of additional input variables on load forecasting errors is performed. The interplay of hourly loads and wind power forecasting errors is also evaluated for the Latvian power system with historical loads (the year 2011) and planned wind power capacities (the year 2023).

  6. Development of an Organic Rankine-Cycle power module for a small community solar thermal power experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiceniuk, T.

    1985-01-01

    An organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) power module was developed for use in a multimodule solar power plant to be built and operated in a small community. Many successful components and subsystems, including the reciever, power conversion subsystem, energy transport subsystem, and control subsystem, were tested. Tests were performed on a complete power module using a test bed concentrator in place of the proposed concentrator. All major single-module program functional objectives were met and the multimodule operation presented no apparent problems. The hermetically sealed, self-contained, ORC power conversion unit subsequently successfully completed a 300-hour endurance run with no evidence of wear or operating problems.

  7. Development of a high permeability cored transintegumental power transformer.

    PubMed

    Helmicki, A J; Melvin, D M; Henderson, H T; Nebrigic, D; Venkat, R; Glos, D L

    1996-01-01

    Circulatory support devices require 10-20 W. Currently, several devices are under development for the transmission of this power via transcutaneous transformers, with the secondary implanted subcutaneously and the primary worn externally. Because these devices are air cored, they have relatively large, bulky external appliances, poor coil to coil coupling, and result in significant stray fields passing through adjacent tissues. This article reports on the engineering design of a novel, high permeability cored transformer implanted in a transenteric configuration using an isolated intestinal pouch. Such an approach offers greater energy transmission efficiency, less heat dissipation, less stray electromagnetic energy, and greatly reduced device size. Two competing designs using this concept have been developed and tested. Each consists of the transformer, together with power interface electronics, forming a direct current (DC)/DC resonant converter. Operating frequencies are 90.2 and 14.7 kHz, respectively, with primary/secondary turns ratios of 10/10 and 11/14, respectively. In addition, data interface electronics allows communication across the transformer of up to four signals at a per channel sample rate of 10 Hz. Both designs are able to continuously transmit 25 W at an output level of 12 Vdc into a 5.8 omega load. Calorimetry tests indicate DC to DC efficiencies greater than 75% and coil to coil efficiencies greater than 96%. Total package size for the implantable portion of each device (including sensor internal interface electronics) is less than 40 ml, with a weight weight of less than 100 g. The results of short-term implantation studies have been favorable. Long-term implantation studies currently are under way. PMID:8944956

  8. Power Electronics Being Developed for Deep Space Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2003-01-01

    Electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space missions need to operate reliably and efficiently in harsh environments that include very low temperatures. Spacecraft that operate in such cold environments carry a large number of heaters so that the ambient temperature for the onboard electronics remains near 20 C. Electronics that can operate at cryogenic temperatures will simplify system design and reduce system size and weight by eliminating the heaters and their associated structures. As a result, system development and launch cost will be reduced. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, an ongoing program is focusing on the development of power electronics geared for deep space low-temperature environments. The research and development efforts include electrical components design, circuit design and construction, and system integration and demonstration at cryogenic temperatures. Investigations are being carried out on circuits and systems that are targeted for use in NASA missions where low temperatures will be encountered: devices such as ceramic and tantalum capacitors, metal film resistors, semiconductor switches, magnetics, and integrated circuits including dc/dc converters, operational amplifiers, voltage references, and motor controllers. Test activities cover a wide range of device and circuit performance under simple as well as complex test conditions, such as multistress and thermal cycling. The effect of low-temperature conditions on the switching characteristics of an advanced silicon-on-insulator field effect transistor is shown. For gate voltages (VGS) below 2.6 V, drain currents at -190 C are lower than drain currents at room temperature (20 C).

  9. Bi-directional four quadrant (BDQ4) power converter development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility for implementation of a concept for direct ac/dc multikilowatt power conversion with bidirectional transfer of energy was investigated. A 10 kHz current carrier was derived directly from a common 60 Hz three phase power system. This carrier was modulated to remove the 360 Hz ripple, inherent in the three phase power supply and then demodulated and processed by a high frequency filter. The resulting dc power was then supplied to a load. The process was implemented without the use of low frequency transformers and filters. This power conversion processes was reversible and can operate in the four quadrants as viewed from any of the two of the converter's ports. Areas of application include: power systems on air and spacecraft; terrestrial traction; integration of solar and wind powered systems with utility networks; HVDC; asynchronous coupling of polyphase networks; heat treatment; industrial machine drives; and power supplies for any use including instrumentation.

  10. Development of an externally powered prosthetic hook for amputees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchak, A., Jr.; Allen, J. R.; Bontrager, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    The powered hook with trigger finger appears to be a useful adaptation of a terminal device for an amputee when performing vocational activities involving the use of a powered tool requiring a trigger control. The proportional control system includes transducers and amplifiers and appears to have widespread application for control of any external power, whether it be in the orthotic or prosthetic field.