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Sample records for microbial oxygenase expression

  1. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  3. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects melanocytes from stress-induced cell death: implications for vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Elassiuty, Yasser E.; Klarquist, Jared; Speiser, Jodi; Yousef, Randa M.; EL Refaee, Abdelaziz A.; Hunter, Nahla S.; Shaker, Olfat G.; Gundeti, Mohan; Nieuweboer-Krobotova, Ludmila; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2013-01-01

    To study protection of melanocytes from stress-induced cell death by heme oxygenases during depigmentation and repigmentation in vitiligo, expression of isoforms 1 and 2 was studied in cultured control and patient melanocytes and normal skin explants exposed to UV or bleaching agent 4-TBP. Similarly, expression of heme oxygenases was followed in skin from vitiligo patients before and after PUVA treatment. Single and double immunostainings were used in combination with light and confocal microscopic analysis and Western blotting. Melanocyte expression of heme oxygenase 1 is upregulated, whereas heme oxygenase 2 is reduced in response to UV and 4-TBP. Upregulation of inducible heme oxygenase 1 was also observed in UV-treated explant cultures, in skin of successfully PUVA-treated patients and in melanocytes cultured from vitiligo non-lesional skin. Heme oxygenase encoding genes were subsequently cloned to study consequences of either gene product on cell viability, demonstrating that HO-1 but not HO-2 overexpression offers protection from stress-induced cell death in MTT assays. HO-1 expression by melanocytes may contribute to beneficial effects of UV treatment for vitiligo patients. PMID:21426408

  5. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Expressing Heme Oxygenase-1 Reverse Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Olin D.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Chang, Mun Seog; Vergadi, Eleni; Lee, Changjin; Aslam, Muhammad; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Liu, Xianlan; Baveja, Rajiv; Kourembanas, Stella

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a serious disease, and, while current treatments may prolong and improve quality of life, search for novel and effective therapies is warranted. Using genetically-modified mouse lines, we tested the ability of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSCs), to treat chronic hypoxia-induced PAH. Recipient mice were exposed for five weeks to normobaric hypoxia (8%–10% O2), MSC preparations were delivered through jugular vein injection and their effect on PAH was assessed after two additional weeks in hypoxia. Donor MSCs derived from wild-type (WT) mice or Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) null mice (Hmox1KO) conferred partial protection from PAH when transplanted into WT or Hmox1KO recipients, whereas treatment with MSCs isolated from transgenic mice harboring a human HO-1 transgene under the control of surfactant protein C promoter (SHO1 line) reversed established disease in WT recipients. SH01-MSC treatment of Hmox1KO animals, which develop right ventricular (RV) infarction under prolonged hypoxia, resulted in normal RV systolic pressure, significant reduction of RV hypertrophy and prevention of RV infarction. Donor MSCs isolated from a bitransgenic mouse line with doxycycline-inducible, lung-specific expression of HO-1 exhibited similar therapeutic efficacy only upon doxycycline treatment of the recipients. In vitro experiments indicate that potential mechanisms of MSC action include modulation of hypoxia-induced lung inflammation and inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation. Cumulative, our results demonstrate that MSCs ameliorate chronic hypoxia – induced PAH and their efficacy is highly augmented by lung-specific HO-1 expression in the transplanted cells, suggesting an interplay between HO-1 dependent and HO-1 independent protective pathways. PMID:20957739

  6. Regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Okinaga, S; Takahashi, K; Takeda, K; Yoshizawa, M; Fujita, H; Sasaki, H; Shibahara, S

    1996-06-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 is an essential enzyme in heme catabolism, and its human gene promoter contains a putative heat shock element (HHO-HSE). This study was designed to analyze the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress. The amounts of heme oxygenase-1 protein were not increased by heat shock (incubation at 42 degrees C) in human alveolar macrophages and in a human erythroblastic cell line, YN-1-0-A, whereas heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was noticeably induced. However, heat shock factor does bind in vitro to HHO-HSE and the synthetic HHO-HSE by itself is sufficient to confer the increase in the transient expression of a reporter gene upon heat shock. The deletion of the sequence, located downstream from HHO-HSE, resulted in the activation of a reporter gene by heat shock. These results suggest that HHO-HSE is potentially functional but is repressed in vivo. Interestingly, heat shock abolished the remarkable increase in the levels of heme oxygenase-1 mRNA in YN-1-0-A cells treated with hemin or cadmium, in which HSP70 mRNA was noticeably induced. Furthermore, transient expression assays showed that heat shock inhibits the cadmium-mediated activation of the heme oxygenase-1 promoter, whereas the HSP70 gene promoter was activated upon heat shock. Such regulation of heme oxygenase-1 under thermal stress may be of physiologic significance in erythroid cells. PMID:8652820

  7. Alternative 5’ Untranslated Regions Are Involved in Expression Regulation of Human Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Marcel; Sponholz, Christoph; Slaba, Monique; Wissuwa, Bianka; Claus, Ralf A.; Menzel, Uwe; Huse, Klaus; Platzer, Matthias; Bauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism rs2071746 and a (GT)n microsatellite within the human gene encoding heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) are associated with incidence or outcome in a variety of diseases. Most of these associations involve either release of heme or oxidative stress. Both polymorphisms are localized in the promoter region, but previously reported correlations with heme oxygenase-1 expression remain not coherent. This ambiguity suggests a more complex organization of the 5’ gene region which we sought to investigate more fully. We evaluated the 5‘ end of HMOX1 and found a novel first exon 1a placing the two previously reported polymorphisms in intronic or exonic positions within the 5’ untranslated region respectively. Expression of exon 1a can be induced in HepG2 hepatoma cells by hemin and is a repressor of heme oxygenase-1 translation as shown by luciferase reporter assays. Moreover, minigene approaches revealed that the quantitative outcome of alternative splicing within the 5’ untranslated region is affected by the (GT)n microsatellite. This data supporting an extended HMOX1 gene model and provide further insights into expression regulation of heme oxygenase-1. Alternative splicing within the HMOX1 5' untranslated region contributes to translational regulation and is a mechanistic feature involved in the interplay between genetic variations, heme oxygenase-1 expression and disease outcome. PMID:24098580

  8. Expression and characterization of an N-oxygenase from Rhodococcus jostii RHAI.

    PubMed

    Indest, Karl J; Eberly, Jed O; Hancock, Dawn E

    2015-01-01

    Nitro group-containing natural products are rare in nature. There are few examples of N-oxygenases, enzymes that incorporate atmospheric oxygen into primary and secondary amines, characterized in the literature. N-oxygenases have yet to be characterized from the Corynebacterineae, a metabolically diverse group of organisms that includes the genera Rhodococcus, Gordonia, and Mycobacterium. A preliminary in silico search for N-oxygenase AurF gene orthologs revealed multiple protein candidates present in the genome of the Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHAI (RHAI_ro06104). Towards the goal of identifying novel biocatalysts with potential utility for the biosynthesis of nitroaromatics, AurF ortholog RHAI_ro6104 was cloned, expressed and purified in E. coli and amine and nitro containing phenol substrates tested for activity. RHAI-ro06104 showed the highest activity with 4-aminophenol, producing a Vmax of 18.76 μM s(-1) and a Km of 15.29 mM and demonstrated significant activities with 2-aminophenol and 2-amino-5-methylphenol, producing a Vmax of 12.86 and 12.72 μM s(-1) with a Km of 8.34 and 2.81 mM, respectively. These findings are consistent with a substrate range observed in other N-oxygenases, which seem to accommodate substrates that lack halogenated substitutions and side groups directly flanking the amine group. Attempts to identify modulators of RHAI-ro06104 gene activity demonstrated that aromatic amino acids inhibit expression by almost 50%. PMID:26782651

  9. Positive and negative regulation of the human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Takahashi, Y; Ito, K; Nagano, T; Shibahara, S; Miura, T

    1999-10-28

    To elucidate the regulation of the human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene expression, we assessed approximately 4 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the hHO-1 gene for basal promoter activity and sequenced approximately 2 kb of the 5'-flanking region. A series of deletion mutants of the 5'-flanking region linked to the luciferase gene was constructed. Basal level expression of these constructs was tested in HepG2 human hepatoma cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. By measuring luciferase activity, which was transiently expressed in the transfected cells, we found a positive regulatory region at position -1976 to -1655 bp. This region functions in HepG2 cells but not in HeLa cells. A negative regulatory region was also found at position -981 to -412 bp that functions in both HepG2 cells and HeLa cells. PMID:10542320

  10. Expression and activity analysis reveal that heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 is associated with blue egg formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z P; Liu, R F; Wang, A R; Li, J Y; Deng, X M

    2011-04-01

    Biliverdin is responsible for the coloration of blue eggs and is secreted onto the eggshell by the shell gland. Previous studies confirmed that a significant difference exists in biliverdin content between blue eggs and brown eggs, although the reasons are still unknown. Because the pigment is derived from oxidative degradation of heme catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO), this study compared heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 (HMOX1), the gene encoding HO expression and HO activity, in the shell glands of the Dongxiang blue-shelled chicken (n = 12) and the Dongxiang brown-shelled chicken (n = 12). Results showed that HMOX1 was highly expressed at the mRNA (1.58-fold; P < 0.05) and protein levels in blue-shelled chickens compared with brown-shelled chickens. At the functional level, blue-shelled chickens also showed 1.40-fold (P < 0.05) higher HO activity than brown-shelled chickens. To explore the reasons for the differential expression of HMOX1, an association study of 6 SNP capturing the majority of HMOX1 variants with the blue egg coloration was performed. Results showed no significant association between SNP and the blue egg coloration in HMOX1 (P > 0.05). Taken together, these results show that blue egg formation is associated with high expression of HMOX1 in the shell gland of Dongxiang blue-shelled chickens, and suggest that differential expression of HMOX1 in the 2 groups of chickens is most likely to arise from an alteration in the trans-acting factor. PMID:21406370

  11. Pathway of assembly of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anabaena 7210 expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevitz, M.; Somerville, C.R.; McIntosh, L.

    1985-10-01

    The authors have placed the genes encoding ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the Anabaena 7120 operon under transcriptional control of the lac promoter carried on the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19. The genes encoding both the large and small subunit polypeptides (rbcL and rbcS) are transcribed and translated so that approx. = 0.6% of the soluble protein in E. coli extracts is a fully functional holoenzyme with a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 18S, which contains stoichiometric amounts of the two subunits. However, expression of the large subunit polypeptide vastly exceeds that of the small subunit because the majority of transcripts terminate in the intergenic region between the rbcL and rbcS genes. As a result, excess large subunit is synthesized and accumulates in E. coli as an insoluble and catalytically inactive form. Because small subunit is found only in the high molecular weight soluble form of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the authors propose that the small subunit promotes assembly of the hexadecameric form of the enzyme via heterodimers of large and small subunits.

  12. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  13. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Stimulates Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Expression and Inhibits Neointima Formation in Rat Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-ming; Azam, Mohammed A.; Peyton, Kelly J.; Ensenat, Diana; Keswani, Amit N.; Wang, Hong; Durante, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is a synthetic phenolic compound that is a potent inducer of phase II genes. Since heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a vasoprotective protein that is upregulated by phase II inducers, the present study examined the effects of BHA on HO-1 gene expression and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Methods The regulation of HO-1 gene expression and vascular cell growth by BHA was studied in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells and in balloon injured rat carotid arteries. Results Treatment of cultured smooth muscle cells with BHA stimulated the expression of HO-1 protein, mRNA and promoter activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. BHA-mediated HO-1 expression was dependent on the activation of NF-E2-related factor-2 by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. BHA also inhibited cell cycle progression and DNA synthesis in a HO-1-dependent manner. In addition, the local perivascular delivery of BHA immediately after arterial injury of rat carotid arteries induced HO-1 protein expression and markedly attenuated neointima formation. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that BHA stimulates HO-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells, and that the induction of HO-1 contributes to the antiproliferative actions of this phenolic antioxidant. BHA represents a potentially novel therapeutic agent in treating or preventing vasculoproliferative disease. PMID:17320844

  14. Upregulation of human heme oxygenase gene expression by Ets-family proteins.

    PubMed

    Deramaudt, B M; Remy, P; Abraham, N G

    1999-03-01

    Overexpression of human heme oxygenase-1 has been shown to have the potential to promote EC proliferation and angiogenesis. Since Ets-family proteins have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis, we investigated the presence of ETS binding sites (EBS), GGAA/T, and ETS protein contributing to human HO-1 gene expression. Several chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs were examined in order to analyze the effect of ETS family proteins on the transduction of HO-1 in Xenopus oocytes and in microvessel endothelial cells. Heme oxygenase promoter activity was up-regulated by FLI-1ERGETS-1 protein(s). Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays demonstrated that the promoter region (-1500 to +19) contains positive and negative control elements and that all three members of the ETS protein family were responsible for the up-regulation of HHO-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), performed with nuclear extracts from endothelial cells overexpressing HHO-1 gene, and specific HHO-1 oligonucleotides probes containing putative EBS resulted in a specific and marked bandshift. Synergistic binding was observed in EMSA between AP-1 on the one hand, FLI-1, ERG, and ETS-1 protein on the other. Moreover, 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated the existence of a negative control element of HHO-1 expression located between positions -1500 and -120 on the HHO-1 promoter. The presence of regulatory sequences for transcription factors such as ETS-1, FLI-1, or ERG, whose activity is associated with cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation, and matrix metalloproteinase transduction, may be an indication of the important role that HO-1 may play in coronary collateral circulation, tumor growth, angiogenesis, and hemoglobin-induced endothelial cell injuries. PMID:10022513

  15. Isotetrandrine ameliorates tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress through upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lidong; Ci, Xinxin; Lv, Hongming; Wang, Xiaosong; Qin, F Xiaofeng; Cheng, Genhong

    2016-08-01

    1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine, a naturally occurring plant alkaloid found in Mahonia of Berberidaceae, possesses anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiviral properties, but the antioxidative activity and mechanism action remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the antioxidative effect and mechanism of 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells. We found that 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine suppressed cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species generation, and glutathione depletion. Additionally, our study confirmed that 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine significantly increased the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 expression and nuclear translocation of factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Specifically, the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 induced by 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine was associated with Nrf2 negative regulatory protein Keap1 inactivation and phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase. Preincubation with thiol-reducing agents reduced 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression, and treatment with either extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase or c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitors attenuated the levels of 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine-induced Nrf2 activation and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Furthermore, the cytoprotective effect of 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine was abolished by heme oxygenase-1, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitors. These results indicated that the 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine ameliorated tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative damage through upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression by the dissociation of Nrf2 from Nrf2-Keap1 complex via extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation and Keap1 inactivation. PMID:27190261

  16. Tumoral Immune Suppression by Macrophages Expressing Fibroblast Activation Protein-Alpha and Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, James N.; Magiera, Lukasz; Kraman, Matthew; Fearon, Douglas T.

    2013-01-01

    The depletion of tumor stromal cells that are marked by their expression of the membrane protein fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP) overcomes immune suppression and allows an anti-cancer cell immune response to control tumor growth. In subcutaneous tumors established with immunogenic Lewis lung carcinoma cells expressing ovalbumin (LL2/OVA), the FAP+ population comprises CD45+ and CD45− cells. In the present study, we further characterize the tumoral FAP+/CD45+ population as a minor sub-population of F4/80hi/CCR2+/CD206+ M2 macrophages. Using bone marrow chimeric mice in which the primate diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) is restricted either to the FAP+/CD45+ or to the FAP+/CD45− subset, we demonstrate by conditionally depleting each subset that both independently contribute to the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment. A basis for the function of the FAP+/CD45+ subset is shown to be the immune inhibitory enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The FAP+/CD45+ cells are the major tumoral source of HO-1, and an inhibitor of HO-1, Sn mesoporphyrin, causes the same extent of immune-dependent arrest of LL2/OVA tumor growth as does the depletion of these cells. Since this observation of immune suppression by HO-1 expressed by the FAP+/CD45+ stromal cell is replicated in a transplanted model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, we conclude that pharmacologically targeting this enzyme may improve cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24778275

  17. Oxidative stress suppression by luteolin-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Gui-bo; Sun, Xiao; Wang, Min; Ye, Jing-xue; Si, Jian-yong; Xu, Hui-bo; Meng, Xiang-bao; Qin, Meng; Sun, Jing; Wang, Hong-wei; Sun, Xiao-bo

    2012-12-01

    Luteolin, a flavonoid that exhibits antioxidative properties, exerts myocardial protection effects. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. To investigate the effects of luteolin on myocardial injury protection and its possible mechanisms, a myocardial injury model was established with intragastric administration of 4 mg/kg isoproterenol (ISO) to male Sprague–Dawley rats (200–220 g) daily for 2 days. We found that pretreatment of luteolin (160, 80 and 40 mg/kg, i.g., respectively) daily for 15 days can prevent ISO-induced myocardial damage, including decrease of serum cardiac enzymes, improvement electrocardiography and heart vacuolation. Luteolin also improved the free radical scavenging and antioxidant potential, suggesting one possible mechanism of luteolin-induced cardio-protection is mediated by blocking the oxidative stress. To clarify the mechanisms, we performed the in vitro study by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced cytotoxicty model in H9c2 cells. We found that luteolin pretreatment prevented apoptosis, increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and enhanced the binding of Nrf2 to the antioxidant response element, providing an adaptive survival response against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-derived oxidative cytotoxicity. The addition of Znpp, a selective HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reduced the cytoprotective ability of luteolin, indicating the vital role of HO-1 on these effects. Luteolin also activated Akt and ERK, whereas the addition of LY294002 and U0126, the pharmacologic inhibitors of PI3K and ERK, attenuated luteolin-induced HO-1 expression and cytoprotective effect. Taken together, the above findings suggest that luteolin protects against myocardial injury and enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity through the activation of Akt and ERK signal pathways that leads to Nrf2 activation, and subsequently HO-1 induction. -- Highlights: ► Luteolin prevents isoproterenol-induced myocardial damage.

  18. Myelodysplastic syndrome macrophages have aberrant iron storage and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Nybakken, Grant; Gratzinger, Dita

    2016-08-01

    Iron overload and transfusion dependance portend poor risk in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS); bone marrow macrophages store iron and limit oxidative damage through heme oxygenase-1 (HO1). We assessed iron stores and macrophage HO1 expression in MDS using image analysis of intact diagnostic bone marrow biopsies and qualitative scoring of marrow aspirate iron among 129 cytopenic patients, 67 with MDS and 62 similarly aged patients with benign cytopenias. Using double immunofluorescence and sequential iron and immunohistochemistry staining, we showed that marrow iron colocalizes with HO1 and H-ferritin to CD163 + macrophages. Marrow iron was elevated in MDS independent of transfusion status, a finding of potential utility in distinguishing benign cytopenia from MDS. Among MDS patients only, CD163 + macrophage density and HO1 and H-ferritin expression by CD163 + macrophages increased in tandem with marrow iron. High HO1 was significantly associated with shorter overall survival among MDS patients independent of IPSSR and history of transfusion. PMID:26758041

  19. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression Underlies Distinct Disease Profiles in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Bruno B; Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Amaral, Eduardo P; Riteau, Nicolas; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Tosh, Kevin W; Maier, Nolan; Conceição, Elisabete L; Kubler, Andre; Sridhar, Rathinam; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Jawahar, Mohideen S; Barbosa, Theolis; Manganiello, Vincent C; Moss, Joel; Fontana, Joseph R; Marciano, Beatriz E; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Olivier, Kenneth N; Holland, Steven M; Jackson, Sharon H; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen; Sereti, Irini; Barber, Daniel L; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash; Sher, Alan

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is characterized by oxidative stress and lung tissue destruction by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The interplay between these distinct pathological processes and the implications for TB diagnosis and disease staging are poorly understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels were previously shown to distinguish active from latent TB, as well as successfully treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. MMP-1 expression is also associated with active TB. In this study, we measured plasma levels of these two important biomarkers in distinct TB cohorts from India and Brazil. Patients with active TB expressed either very high levels of HO-1 and low levels of MMP-1 or the converse. Moreover, TB patients with either high HO-1 or MMP-1 levels displayed distinct clinical presentations, as well as plasma inflammatory marker profiles. In contrast, in an exploratory North American study, inversely correlated expression of HO-1 and MMP-1 was not observed in patients with other nontuberculous lung diseases. To assess possible regulatory interactions in the biosynthesis of these two enzymes at the cellular level, we studied the expression of HO-1 and MMP-1 in M. tuberculosis-infected human and murine macrophages. We found that infection of macrophages with live virulent M. tuberculosis is required for robust induction of high levels of HO-1 but not MMP-1. In addition, we observed that CO, a product of M. tuberculosis-induced HO-1 activity, inhibits MMP-1 expression by suppressing c-Jun/AP-1 activation. These findings reveal a mechanistic link between oxidative stress and tissue remodeling that may find applicability in the clinical staging of TB patients. PMID:26268658

  20. Change in renal heme oxygenase expression in cyclosporine A-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi; Buffoli, Barbara; Goodman, Alvin A; Abraham, Nader G; Lianos, Elias A; Bianchi, Rossella

    2005-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is the first immunosuppressant used in allotransplantation. Its use is associated with side effects that include nephrotoxicity. This study explored the anatomic structures involved in CsA nephrotoxicity and the effect of heme oxygenase (HO) in preventing CsA injury. Rats were divided into four groups, which were treated with olive oil, CsA (15 mg/kg/day), CsA plus the HO inhibitor (SnMP; 30 microM/kg/day), and with the HO inducer (CoPP; 5 mg/100 g bw). Renal tissue was treated for morphological, biochemical, and immunohistochemical studies. CsA-treated rats showed degenerative changes with renal fibrosis localized mainly around proximal tubules. Collapsed vessels were sometimes seen in glomeruli. No HO-1 expression and increased expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) were observed in CsA-treated rats compared with controls. In CsA plus SnMP-treated rats, HO-1 expression was further reduced and the morphology was not changed compared to the CsA group, whereas CsA plus CoPP-treated animals again showed normal morphology and with restoration and an increase in HO-1 levels. HO activity and immunohistochemical data showed similar alterations as HO expression. No changes were observed for HO-2 analysis. The observations indicate that HO-1 downregulation and ET-1 upregulation by CsA might be one mechanism underlying CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. Therefore, attempts to preserve HO levels attenuate CsA nephrotoxicity. PMID:15637343

  1. Tanshinone IIA Induces Heme Oxygenase 1 Expression and Inhibits Cyclic Strain-Induced Interleukin 8 Expression in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shaowei; Cheng, Tzu-Hurng; Shih, Nang-Lang; Liu, Ju-Chi; Chen, Jin-Jer; Hong, Hong-Jye; Chan, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Tanshinone IIA is the main effective component of Salvia miltiorrhiza, known as "Danshen," which has been used in many therapeutic remedies in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the direct effects of tanshinone IIA on vascular endothelial cells have not yet been fully described. In the present study, we demonstrated that tanshinone IIA increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Western blot analyses and experiments with specific inhibitors indicated tanshinone IIA enhanced HO-1 expression through the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the subsequent induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation. In addition, tanshinone IIA inhibited cyclic strain induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. HO-1 silencing significantly abrogated the repressive effects of tanshinone IIA on strain-induced IL-8 expression, which suggests HO-1 has a role in mediating the effects of tanshinone IIA. This study reports for the first time that tanshinone IIA inhibits cyclic strain-induced IL-8 expression via the induction of HO-1 in endothelial cells, providing valuable new insight into the molecular pathways that may contribute to the effects of tanshinone IIA. PMID:27080946

  2. Targeted expression of heme oxygenase-1 prevents the pulmonary inflammatory and vascular responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamino, Tohru; Christou, Helen; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Liu, Yuxiang; Dhawan, Vijender; Abraham, Nader G.; Perrella, Mark A.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2001-07-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension with smooth muscle cell proliferation and matrix deposition in the wall of the pulmonary arterioles. We demonstrate here that hypoxia also induces a pronounced inflammation in the lung before the structural changes of the vessel wall. The proinflammatory action of hypoxia is mediated by the induction of distinct cytokines and chemokines and is independent of tumor necrosis factor- signaling. We have previously proposed a crucial role for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in protecting cardiomyocytes from hypoxic stress, and potent anti-inflammatory properties of HO-1 have been reported in models of tissue injury. We thus established transgenic mice that constitutively express HO-1 in the lung and exposed them to chronic hypoxia. HO-1 transgenic mice were protected from the development of both pulmonary inflammation as well as hypertension and vessel wall hypertrophy induced by hypoxia. Significantly, the hypoxic induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was suppressed in HO-1 transgenic mice. Our findings suggest an important protective function of enzymatic products of HO-1 activity as inhibitors of hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory pathways.

  3. Proinflammatory cytokines promote glial heme oxygenase-1 expression and mitochondrial iron deposition: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mehindate, K; Sahlas, D J; Frankel, D; Mawal, Y; Liberman, A; Corcos, J; Dion, S; Schipper, H M

    2001-06-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines, pathological iron deposition, and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). HO-1 mRNA levels and mitochondrial uptake of [(55)Fe]Cl(3)-derived iron were measured in rat astroglial cultures exposed to interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) alone or in combination with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitors, tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) or dexamthasone (DEX), or interferon beta1b (INF-beta). HO-1 expression in astrocytes was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining of spinal cord tissue derived from MS and control subjects. IL-1beta or TNF-alpha promoted sequestration of non-transferrin-derived (55)Fe by astroglial mitochondria. HO-1 inhibitors, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MTP) blockers and antioxidants significantly attenuated cytokine-related mitochondrial iron sequestration in these cells. IFN-beta decreased HO-1 expression and mitochondrial iron sequestration in IL-1beta- and TNF-alpha-challenged astroglia. The percentage of astrocytes coexpressing HO-1 in affected spinal cord from MS patients (57.3% +/- 12.8%) was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than in normal spinal cord derived from controls subjects (15.4% +/- 8.4%). HO-1 is over-expressed in MS spinal cord astroglia and may promote mitochondrial iron deposition in MS plaques. In MS, IFN-beta may attenuate glial HO-1 gene induction and aberrant mitochondrial iron deposition accruing from exposure to proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:11389189

  4. Protective effects of heme-oxygenase expression in cyclosporine A--induced injury.

    PubMed

    Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi; Bianchi, Rossella; Goodman, Alvin I; Lianos, Elias A

    2005-04-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is the immunosuppressant of first choice in allotransplantation. Its use is associated with side effects of nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, which are among the most prominent. This study was undertaken to explore whether expression and activity of heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is altered in a rat model of CsA-induced injury. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups and treated for 21 days. Group I (control) was injected with olive oil (vehicle), group II with CsA (15 mg/kg/day), group III with CsA and the HO inhibitor stannous mesoporphyrin (SnMP) (30 micromol/kg/day) and group IV with one dose of the HO inducer cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) 5 mg/100 or heme (10 mg/kg body weight), three days after onset of CsA treatment. Renal tissue was processed for light microscopy, and for HO-1 enzyme activity, assay and for Western blot analysis. In CsA-treated rats there was histological evidence of tubulointerstitial scarring. HO-1 was undetectable in CsA-treated rats compared to control while there was no change in HO-2. In animals treated with a combination of CsA and SnMP, HO-1 activity was further reduced. In animals treated with a combination of CsA and CoPP, HO-1 protein levels were partially restored. These observations indicate that downregulation of HO-1 expression by CsA could be one mechanism underlying CsA-induced toxicity. The CsA-induced decrease in HO-1 expression is partial and restorable, and attempts to preserve HO levels may attenuate CsA toxicity. PMID:16181108

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Bolisetty, Subashini; DeAlmeida, Angela; Litovsky, Silvio H.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2013-01-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (MHC-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice) with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed stop signal (CBA-flox mice). MHC-HO-1 overexpress the HO-1 gene and enzymatically protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on two consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23732814

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; DeAlmeida, Angela C; Litovsky, Silvio H; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F

    2013-08-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (myosin heavy chain (MHC)-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice), with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed-stop signal. MHC-HO-1 mice overexpress HO-1 mRNA and the enzymatically active protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on 2 consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity, and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23732814

  7. Over-expression of heme oxygenase-1 promotes oxidative mitochondrial damage in rat astroglia.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Su, Haixiang; Song, Sisi; Paudel, Hemant K; Schipper, Hyman M

    2006-03-01

    Glial heme oxygenase-1 is over-expressed in the CNS of subjects with Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Up-regulation of HO-1 in rat astroglia has been shown to facilitate iron sequestration by the mitochondrial compartment. To determine whether HO-1 induction promotes mitochondrial oxidative stress, assays for 8-epiPGF(2alpha) (ELISA), protein carbonyls (ELISA) and 8-OHdG (HPLC-EC) were used to quantify oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, respectively, in mitochondrial fractions and whole-cell compartments derived from cultured rat astroglia engineered to over-express human (h) HO-1 by transient transfection. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and the MTT assay, and cell proliferation was determined by [3H] thymidine incorporation and total cell counts. In rat astrocytes, hHO-1 over-expression (x 3 days) resulted in significant oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, partial growth arrest, and increased cell death. These effects were attenuated by incubation with 1 microM tin mesoporphyrin, a competitive HO inhibitor, or the iron chelator, deferoxamine. Up-regulation of HO-1 engenders oxidative mitochondrial injury in cultured rat astroglia. Heme-derived ferrous iron and carbon monoxide (CO) may mediate the oxidative modification of mitochondrial lipids, proteins and nucleic acids in these cells. Glial HO-1 hyperactivity may contribute to cellular oxidative stress, pathological iron deposition, and bioenergetic failure characteristic of degenerating and inflamed neural tissues and may constitute a rational target for therapeutic intervention in these conditions. PMID:16222706

  8. Comparative transcriptional and translational analysis of heme oxygenase expression in response to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent which reacts with nucleophilic groups on DNA, RNA and proteins. It is capable of inducing cellular toxicity and oxidative stress via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The accumulation of high amounts of the reactive species causes harmful effects such as DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, inflammation and apoptosis. Although SM (also known as mustard gas) and its derivatives are rapidly removed from the body, long-term damages are much more serious than the short-term effects and may be correlated with the subsequent changes occurred on the genome. In order to defend against oxidative properties of this toxic molecule, cells trigger several anti-oxidant pathways through up-regulating the corresponding genes. Enzymes like heme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase are the examples of such genes. These enzymes produce anti-oxidant substances that are able to scavenge the reactive species, alleviate their noxious effects and protect the cells. Following SM gas exposure, gene transcription (mRNA levels) of these enzymes are ramped up to help detoxify the cells. Yet, some studies have reported that the up-regulated transcription does not necessarily translate into higher protein expression levels. The exact reason why this phenomenon happens is not clear. Creation of mutations in the genome sequence may lead to protein structure changes. Phosphorylation or other post-translational alterations of proteins upon SM exposure are also considered as possible causes. In addition, alterations in some microRNAs responsible for regulating post-translation events may inhibit the expression of the anti-oxidant proteins in the poisoned cells at translational level. PMID:26096165

  9. Substrate diversity and expression of the 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid oxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Danganan, C E; Shankar, S; Ye, R W; Chakrabarty, A M

    1995-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 uses the chlorinated aromatic compound 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid as a sole source of carbon and energy. The genes encoding the proteins involved in the first step (tftA and tftB [previously designated tftA1 and tftA2, respectively]) have been cloned and sequenced. The oxygenase, TftAB, is capable of converting not only 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid to 2,4,5-trichlorophenol but also a wide range of chlorinated aromatic phenoxyacetates to their corresponding phenolic derivatives, as shown by whole-cell and cell-free assays. The rate of substrate utilization by TftAB depends upon the extent of chlorination of the substrate, the positions of the chlorines, and the phenoxy group. These results indicate a mechanistic similarity between TftAB and the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid/alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, TfdA, from Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134. The promoter of the oxygenase genes was localized by promoter-probe analysis, and the transcriptional start site was identified by primer extension. The beta-galactosidase activity of the construct containing the promoter region cloned upstream of the beta-galactosidase gene in the promoter-probe vector pKRZ-1 showed that this construct is constitutively expressed in Escherichia coli and in AC1100. The -35 and -10 regions of the oxygenase genes show significant sequence identity to typical Escherichia coli sigma 70 promoters. PMID:8534119

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (P<0.05) in LXSN rats (23+/-1, 37+/-2, and 52+/-2 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng). Importantly, treating LSN-HHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli. PMID:15166181

  11. Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation in Chlorinated Ethene Degradation by Bacteria Expressing Three Toluene Oxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Clingenpeel, Scott R.; Moan, Jaina L.; McGrath, Danielle M.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Watwood, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    One difficulty in using bioremediation at a contaminated site is demonstrating that biodegradation is actually occurring in situ. The stable isotope composition of contaminants may help with this, since they can serve as an indicator of biological activity. To use this approach it is necessary to establish how a particular biodegradation pathway affects the isotopic composition of a contaminant. This study examined bacterial strains expressing three aerobic enzymes for their effect on the 13C/12C ratio when degrading both trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (c-DCE): toluene 3-monoxygenase, toluene 4-monooxygenase, and toluene 2,3-dioxygenase. We found no significant differences in fractionation among the three enzymes for either compound. Aerobic degradation of c-DCE occurred with low fractionation producing δ13C enrichment factors of −0.9 ± 0.5 to −1.2 ± 0.5, in contrast to reported anaerobic degradation δ13C enrichment factors of −14.1 to −20.4‰. Aerobic degradation of TCE resulted in δ13C enrichment factors of −11.6 ± 4.1 to −14.7 ± 3.0‰ which overlap reported δ13C enrichment factors for anaerobic TCE degradation of −2.5 to −13.8‰. The data from this study suggest that stable isotopes could serve as a diagnostic for detecting aerobic biodegradation of TCE by toluene oxygenases at contaminated sites. PMID:22363335

  12. Methamphetamine induces heme oxygenase-1 expression in cortical neurons and glia to prevent its toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-N.; Wu, C.-H.; Lin, T.-C.; Wang, J.-Y.

    2009-11-01

    The impairment of cognitive and motor functions in humans and animals caused by methamphetamine (METH) administration underscores the importance of METH toxicity in cortical neurons. The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts a cytoprotective effect against various neuronal injures; however, it remains unclear whether HO-1 is involved in METH-induced toxicity. We used primary cortical neuron/glia cocultures to explore the role of HO-1 in METH-induced toxicity. Exposure of cultured cells to various concentrations of METH (0.1, 0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mM) led to cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. A METH concentration of 5 mM, which caused 50% of neuronal death and glial activation, was chosen for subsequent experiments. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that METH significantly induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, both preceded cell death. Double and triple immunofluorescence staining further identified HO-1-positive cells as activated astrocytes, microglia, and viable neurons, but not dying neurons. Inhibition of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly blocked HO-1 induction by METH and aggravated METH neurotoxicity. Inhibition of HO activity using tin protoporphyrine IX significantly reduced HO activity and exacerbated METH neurotoxicity. However, prior induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrine IX partially protected neurons from METH toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest that induction of HO-1 by METH via the p38 signaling pathway may be protective, albeit insufficient to completely protect cortical neurons from METH toxicity.

  13. Expression of L-ornithine Ndelta-oxygenase (PvdA) in fluorescent Pseudomonas species: an immunochemical and in silico study.

    PubMed

    Putignani, Lorenza; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Ascenzi, Paolo; Visca, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Omega-amino acid monooxygenases (EC 1.14.13.-), catalysing the formation of hydroxamate precursors of microbial siderophores (e.g., pyoverdine), have so far eluded structural and biochemical characterisation. Here, the expression of recombinant L-ornithine-Ndelta-oxygenase (PvdA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is reported. A library of eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against PvdA has been generated. Two MAb families recognising the N- and C-terminal regions of PvdA were identified. The MAbs made it possible to demonstrate that 45-48 kDa PvdA homologues are expressed in response to iron limitation by different species and strains of fluorescent pseudomonads. Despite the different degrees in sequence similarity between P. aeruginosa PvdA and putative homologues from Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas syringae, Burkholderia cepacia, and Ralstonia solanacearum, in silico domain scanning predicts an impressive conservation of putative cofactor and substrate binding domains. The MAb library was also used to monitor PvdA expression during the transition of P. aeruginosa from iron-sufficient to iron-deficient growth. PMID:14684153

  14. Correlation Between Cyclo-oxygenase-2 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in Canine and Feline Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Millanta, F; Andreani, G; Rocchigiani, G; Lorenzi, D; Poli, A

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 is involved in tumour growth and spread by modulating the production of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Expression of COX-2 and VEGF was investigated immunohistochemically in 51 canine and feline cutaneous and non-cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and the correlation between expression of these molecules and clinicopathological variables was evaluated. COX-2 and VEGF expression was not observed in normal skin keratinocytes. COX-2 overexpression occurred in 53% and 61% of the canine and feline SCCs, respectively. The expression of both markers was higher in cutaneous compared with non-cutaneous SCCs. In both species COX-2 and VEGF expression was correlated with the progression of the disease, but not with the presence of lymphatic invasion, tumour grading or tumour classification in the cutaneous tumours. Further study will be required to understand the role of the COX-2 pathway in angiogenesis in SCC. PMID:27012907

  15. AZD3582 increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and antioxidant activity in vascular endothelial and gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Georg; Grosser, Nina; Hoogstraate, Janet; Schröder, Henning

    2005-06-01

    AZD3582 [4-(nitrooxy)-butyl-(2S)-2-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-propanoate] is a COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD). Incubation of human endothelial cells (derived from umbilical cord) with AZD3582 (10-100muM) led to increased expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a crucial mediator of antioxidant and tissue-protective actions. In contrast, naproxen (a non-selective NSAID) and rofecoxib (a selective inhibitor of COX-2), did not affect HO-1 expression. Pre-treating endothelial cells with AZD3582 at concentrations that were effective at inducing HO-1 also reduced NADPH-dependent production of oxygen radicals. Antioxidant activity in the endothelial cells persisted after AZD3582 had been washed out from the incubation medium. When added exogenously to the cells at low micromolar concentrations, the HO-1 metabolite, bilirubin, virtually abolished NADPH-dependent oxidative stress. AZD3582-induced blockade of free-radical formation was reversed in the presence of the HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin-IX (SnPP). Similar results were obtained in human gastric mucosal cells (KATO-III). Our results demonstrate that HO-1 is a novel target of AZD3582. PMID:15911218

  16. Bryonolic Acid: A Large-Scale Isolation and Evaluation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Expression in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Emily C.; Gatbonton-Schwager, Tonibelle N.; Han, Yong; Clay, Jennifer E.; Letterio, John J.; Tochtrop, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    Bryonolic acid (BA) is a triterpenoid found in the Cucurbitaceae family of plants. Our interests in the immunomodulatory effects of this class of natural products led us to discover that BA induces a marked increase in the expression of a phase 2 response enzyme, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in a dose dependent manner. This phenotype has translational implications in malarial disease progression, and consequently we developed a large scale isolation method for BA that will be enabling in terms of future in vitro and in vivo analysis. We have determined ideal growth conditions and time scale for maximizing BA content in the roots of Cucurbita pepo L., and analyzed BA production by HPLC. Large-scale extraction yielded 1.34% BA based on dry weight, allowing for the isolation of BA on a multi-gram scale. PMID:20481554

  17. eckol enhances heme oxygenase-1 expression through activation of Nrf2/JNK pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Jun, Young-Jin; Lee, Minsup; Shin, Taisun; Yoon, Nayoung; Kim, Ji-Hoe; Kim, Hyeung-Rak

    2014-01-01

    Eckol isolated from Ecklonia stolonifera was previously reported to exhibit cytoprotective activity with its intrinsic antioxidant activity in in vitro studies. In this study, we characterized the mechanism underlying the eckol-mediated the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Eckol suppressed the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and increased glutathione level in HepG2 cells. Eckol treatment enhanced the expression of HO-1 at the both level of protein and mRNA in HepG2 cells. Enhanced expression of HO-1 by eckol was presumed to be the activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) demonstrated by its nuclear translocation and increased transcriptional activity. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs) and PI3K/Akt contributed to Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression. These results demonstrate that the eckol-mediated expression of HO-1 in HepG2 cells is regulated by Nrf2 activation via JNK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways, suggesting that eckol may be used as a natural antioxidant and cytoprotective agent. PMID:25268719

  18. Withaferin A induces heme oxygenase (HO-1) expression in endothelial cells via activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Heyninck, Karen; Sabbe, Linde; Chirumamilla, Chandra Sekhar; Szarc Vel Szic, Katarzyna; Vander Veken, Pieter; Lemmens, Kristien J A; Lahtela-Kakkonen, Maija; Naulaerts, Stefan; Op de Beeck, Ken; Laukens, Kris; Van Camp, Guy; Weseler, Antje R; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R M M; Haegeman, Guy; Vanden Berghe, Wim

    2016-06-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a natural phytochemical derived from the plant Withania somnifera, is a well-studied bioactive compound exerting a broad spectrum of health promoting effects. To gain better insight in the potential therapeutic capacity of WA, we evaluated the transcriptional effects of WA on primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and an endothelial cell line (EA.hy926). RNA microarray analysis of WA treated HUVEC cells demonstrated increased expression of the antioxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1). Transcriptional regulation of this gene is strongly dependent on the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which senses chemical changes in the cell and coordinates transcriptional responses to maintain chemical homeostasis via expression of antioxidant genes and cytoprotective Phase II detoxifying enzymes. Under normal conditions, Nrf2 is kept in the cytoplasm by Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), an adaptor protein controlling the half-life of Nrf2 via constant proteasomal degradation. In this study we demonstrate that WA time- and concentration-dependently induces HO-1 expression in endothelial cells via upregulation and increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2. According to the crucial negative regulatory role of Keap1 in Nrf2 expression levels, a direct interaction of WA with Keap1 could be demonstrated. In vitro and in silico evaluations suggest that specific cysteine residues in Keap1 might be involved in the interaction with WA. PMID:27045103

  19. Dynamics of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene expression in the coccolithophorid Coccolithus pelagicus during a tracer release experiment in the Northeast Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Wyman, Michael; Davies, John T; Hodgson, Sylvia; Tarran, Glen A; Purdie, Duncan A

    2005-03-01

    We report a pronounced diel rhythm in ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) gene expression in a natural population of the coccolithophorid Coccolithus pelagicus sampled during a Lagrangian experiment in the Northeast Atlantic. Our observations show that there is greater heterogeneity in the temporal regulation of RubisCO expression among planktonic chromophytes than has been reported hitherto. PMID:15746374

  20. ACTIVATION OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE AND HEME OXYGENASE-1 EXPRESSION BY ELECTROPHILIC NITRO-FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Rudolph, Volker; Cole, Marsha P.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Batthyany, Carlos; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species mediate a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction, with secondary oxidized and nitrated byproducts of these reactions contributing to the pathogenesis of numerous vascular diseases. While oxidized lipids and lipoproteins exacerbate inflammatory reactions in the vasculature, in stark contrast the nitration of polyunsaturated fatty acids and complex lipids yield electrophilic products that exhibit pluripotent anti-inflammatory signaling capabilities acting via both cGMP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Herein we report that nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) treatment increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in the vasculature, thus transducing vascular protective effects associated with enhanced NO production. Administration of OA-NO2 via osmotic pump results in a significant increase in eNOS and HO-1 mRNA in mouse aortas. Moreover, HPLC-MS/MS analysis showed that NO2-FAs are rapidly metabolized in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and treatment with NO2-FAs stimulated the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179. These post-translational modifications of eNOS, in concert with elevated eNOS gene expression, contributed to an increase in endothelial NO production. In aggregate, OA-NO2-induced eNOS and HO-1 expression by vascular cells can induce beneficial effects on endothelial function and provide a new strategy for treating various vascular inflammatory and hypertensive disorders. PMID:19857569

  1. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 expression on sterol homeostasis in rat astroglia.

    PubMed

    Vaya, Jacob; Song, Wei; Khatib, Soliman; Geng, Guoyan; Schipper, Hyman M

    2007-03-15

    Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and altered cholesterol metabolism are characteristic of Alzheimer-diseased (AD) neural tissues. Central oxidation of cholesterol to oxysterols has been implicated in neuroembryogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and membrane repair. In the current study, we demonstrated that transient transfection of rat astroglia with human (h)ho-1 cDNA for 3 days significantly decreased intracellular cholesterol concentrations and increased levels of four oxysterol species (measured by GC/MS) compared to untreated control cultures and HO-1-transfected cells exposed to the HO inhibitor, tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP). Relative to control preparations, oxidative stress was augmented in mitochondria (isolated by subcellular fractionation) and culture media derived from HO-1-transfected astrocytes, as evidenced by enhanced oxidation of the synthetic reporter molecules, linoleoyl tyrosine (LT), linoleoyl tyrosine cholesterol ester (LTC), or linoleoyl tyrosine deoxyguanosyl ester (LTG; measured by GC/MS and LC/MS/MS). We also observed enhanced oxidation of exogenous LTC in human neuroblastoma (M17) cells exposed for 18 h to conditioned media collected from HO-1-transfected astrocytes relative to control media. In AD and other pathological states, glial HO-1 induction may transduce ambient noxious stimuli (e.g., beta-amyloid) into altered patterns of glial sterol metabolism which, in turn, may affect neuronal membrane turnover, survival, and adaptability. PMID:17320768

  2. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli cells of a plasmid pBS195 gene that determines the activity of oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlova, E.V.; Suvorova, E.S.; Romanov, V.P.; Boronin, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    Plasmid pBS195, detected in a strain of Lactobacillus sp. isolated from long-living persons, has a broad host range, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. Plasmid-harboring colonies of the strain Escherichia coli HB101 give a color reaction with catechol. This indicates that genes mediating the activity of oxygenase are present in this plasmid. The high activity level of this enzyme, mediated by pBS195, and substrate specificity, which has not been detected in any known metapyrocatechases, were found in cells of E. coli. Hybridization with a {sup 32}P-labeled fragment containing the NahC gene revealed a region of homology with a 1.6-kb EcoR I-BamH I fragment of plasmid pBS195. Deletion variants of this plasmid that lost oxygenase activity confirmed the location of the oxygenase gene in this region. The gene responsible for oxygenase activity in the plasmid was cloned on the pUC19 vector in E. coli cells. The expression of the cloned gene is controlled by the lac promoter of this vector. Physical, hybridization, and deletion analyses as well as analysis of polypeptides, which are synthesized in E. coli minicells, showed that this activity requires the participation of a polypeptide with molecular mass of 34 kDa. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Desoxyrhapontigenin up-regulates Nrf2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression in macrophages and inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Joo Choi, Ran; Cheng, Mao-sheng; Shik Kim, Yeong

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an important anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and cytoprotective enzyme that is regulated by the activation of the major transcription factor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). In the present study, six stilbene derivatives isolated from Rheum undulatum L. were assessed for their antioxidative potential. In the tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line, desoxyrhapontigenin was the most potent component that reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxynitrite. In response to desoxyrhapontigenin, the mRNA expression levels of antioxidant enzymes were up-regulated. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed that desoxyrhapontigenin promoted the DNA binding of Nrf2 and increased the expression of antioxidant proteins and enzymes regulated by Nrf2. Further investigation utilizing specific inhibitors of Akt, p38, JNK and ERK demonstrated that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway mediates HO-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in Nrf2 expression mediated by treatment with desoxyrhapontigenin was reversed by Nrf2 or Akt gene knock-down. In the LPS-induced in vivo lung inflammation model, pretreatment with desoxyrhapontigenin markedly ameliorated LPS-induced lung inflammation and histological changes. Immunohistochemical analysis of Nrf2, HO-1 and p65 was conducted and confirmed that treatment with desoxyrhapontigenin induced Nrf2 and HO-1 expression but reduced p65 expression. These findings suggest that desoxyrhapontigenin may be a potential therapeutic candidate as an antioxidant or an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:24624340

  4. Gold nanoparticles induce heme oxygenase-1 expression through Nrf2 activation and Bach1 export in human vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tsung-Hsuan; Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Tsou, Chih-Jen; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that increased levels and activity of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein ameliorate tissue injuries. In the present study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of action of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on HO-1 protein expression in human vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The AuNPs induced HO-1 protein and mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction was reduced by the thiol-containing antioxidants, including N-acetylcysteine and glutathione, but not by the non-thiol-containing antioxidants and inhibitors that block the enzymes for intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. The AuNPs enhanced Nrf2 protein levels but did not affect Nrf2 mRNA expression. In response to the AuNP treatment, the cytosolic Nrf2 translocated to the nucleus, and, concomitantly, Bach1 exited the nucleus and its tyrosine phosphorylation increased. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the translocated Nrf2 bound to the antioxidant-response element located in the E2 enhancer region of the HO-1 gene promoter and acted as a transcription factor. Although N-acetylcysteine inhibited the AuNP-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, the AuNPs did not promote intracellular reactive oxygen species production or endoplasmic reticulum stress in the ECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 expression by RNA interference significantly inhibited AuNP-induced HO-1 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. In summary, AuNPs enhance the levels and nuclear translocation of the Nrf2 protein and Bach1 export/tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 E2 enhancer promoter region to drive HO-1 expression in ECs. This study, together with our parallel findings, demonstrates that AuNPs can act as an HO-1 inducer, which may partially contribute to their anti-inflammatory bioactivity in human vascular ECs. PMID:26445536

  5. Expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Thick Ascending Loop of Henle Attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Heather A.; Gousette, Monette U.; Storm, Megan V.; Abraham, Nader G.; Csongradi, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Kidney-specific induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) attenuates the development of angiotensin II (Ang II) -dependent hypertension, but the relative contribution of vascular versus tubular induction of HO-1 is unknown. To determine the specific contribution of thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) -derived HO-1, we generated a transgenic mouse in which the uromodulin promoter controlled expression of human HO-1. Quantitative RT-PCR and confocal microscopy confirmed successful localization of the HO-1 transgene to TALH tubule segments. Medullary HO activity, but not cortical HO activity, was significantly higher in transgenic mice than control mice. Enhanced TALH HO-1 attenuated the hypertension induced by Ang II delivered by an osmotic minipump for 10 days (139±3 versus 153±2 mmHg in the transgenic and control mice, respectively; P<0.05). The lower blood pressure in transgenic mice associated with a 60% decrease in medullary NKCC2 transporter expression determined by Western blot. Transgenic mice also exhibited a 36% decrease in ouabain-sensitive sodium reabsorption and a significantly attenuated response to furosemide in isolated TALH segments,. In summary, these results show that increased levels of HO-1 in the TALH can lower blood pressure by a mechanism that may include alterations in NKCC2-dependent sodium reabsorption. PMID:22323644

  6. Coordinated expression of heme oxygenase-1 and ubiquitin in the porcine heart subjected to ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H S; Maulik, N; Gho, B C; Das, D K; Verdouw, P D

    Heme oxygenase (HO) isozymes, HO-1 and HO-2 catalyze the cleavage of heme b to form the antioxidant biliverdin IXa, iron and the putative cellular messenger carbon monoxide (CO). Heat and stress have been reported to induce the expression of HO-1, in analogy to ubiquitin, a protein of 8 kDa involved in ATP dependent proteolysis. Earlier, we have shown in anesthetized pigs that brief periods of coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion produce prolonged regional cardiac dysfunction (stunning) associated with altered expression of a number of genes. In the present study, we report on a coordinated expression pattern of HO-1 and ubiquitin in the same porcine model in which the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was occluded for 10 min and reperfused for 30 min (group I) and after a second occlusion of 10 min, reperfused for either 30 min (group II) or 90 min (group III) or 210 min (group IV). Myocardial tissue from LAD (stunned) and left circumflex coronary artery (LCx, control) perfused regions were collected in liquid nitrogen and analysed by Northern and dot blot hybridization techniques. We demonstrated a basal myocardial expression of multiple mRNAs (monomer and polymers) encoding ubiquitin and a single mRNA species (1.8 kb) encoding HO-1. However, the expression of both genes was drastically enhanced in the stunned myocardium as compared to the control in groups II and III with maximum mRNAs levels in group II. These results suggest that the myocardial adaptive response to ischemia involves the coordinated induction of HO-1 and ubiquitin, which may be indicative for the existence of a pathophysiologically important defense mechanism whereby, both degradation of denatured cellular proteins and generation of biologically active products of heme metabolism are accelerated. PMID:8739236

  7. Ectopic Expression of a Glycine soja myo-Inositol Oxygenase Gene (GsMIOX1a) in Arabidopsis Enhances Tolerance to Alkaline Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Sun, Xiaoli; Duanmu, Huizi; Yu, Yang; Liu, Ailin; Xiao, Jialei; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol participates in various aspects of plant physiology, and myo-inositol oxygenase is the key enzyme of the myo-inositol oxygenation pathway. Previous studies indicated that myo-inositol oxygenase may play a role in plant responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, we focused on the functional characterization of GsMIOX1a, a remarkable alkaline stress-responsive gene of Glycine soja 07256, based on RNA-seq data. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we demonstrated that GsMIOX1a is rapidly induced by alkaline stress and expressed predominantly in flowers. We also elucidated the positive function of GsMIOX1a in the alkaline response in the wild type, atmiox1 mutant as well as GsMIOX1a-overexpressing Arabidopsis. We determined that atmiox1 mutant decreased Arabidopsis tolerance to alkaline stress, whereas GsMIOX1a overexpression increased tolerance. Moreover, the expression levels of some alkaline stress-responsive and inducible marker genes, including H+-Ppase, NADP-ME, KIN1 and RD29B, were also up-regulated in GsMIOX1a overexpression lines compared with the wild type and atmiox1 mutant. Together, these results suggest that the GsMIOX1a gene positively regulates plant tolerance to alkaline stress. This is the first report to demonstrate that ectopic expression of myo-inositol oxygenase improves alkaline tolerance in plants. PMID:26091094

  8. Effect of four probiotic strains and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on tight junction integrity and cyclo-oxygenase expression.

    PubMed

    Putaala, Heli; Salusjärvi, Tuomas; Nordström, Malin; Saarinen, Markku; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Bech Hansen, Egon; Rautonen, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists as to whether contact between a probiotic bacterial cell and an epithelial cell in the gut is needed to confer beneficial effects of probiotics, or whether metabolites from probiotics are sufficient to cause this effect. To address this question, Caco-2 cells were treated with cell-free supernatants of four probiotics, Bifidobacterium lactis 420, Bifidobacterium lactis HN019, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, and by a cell-free supernatant of a pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Tight junction integrity as well as expression of cyclo-oxygenases, which are prostaglandin-producing enzymes, were measured. Probiotic-specific as well as EHEC-specific effects on tight junction integrity and cyclo-oxygenase expression were evident, indicating that live bacterial cells were not necessary for the manifestation of the effects. B. lactis 420 cell-free supernatant increased tight junction integrity, while EHEC cell-free supernatant induced damage on tight junctions. In general, EHEC and probiotics had opposite effects upon cyclo-oxygenase expression. Furthermore, B. lactis 420 cell-free supernatant protected the tight junctions from EHEC-induced damage when administered prior to the cell-free supernatant of EHEC. These results indicate that probiotics produce bioactive metabolites, suggesting that consumption of specific probiotic bacteria might be beneficial in protecting intestinal epithelial cells from the deleterious effects of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:18783733

  9. Regulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression and MAPK pathways in response to kaempferol and rhamnocitrin in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.-T.; Yen, J.-H.; Wang Lisu; Lo, Y.-H.; Chen, Z.-T.; Wu, M.-J.

    2009-05-15

    Oxidative stress has been considered as a major cause of cellular injuries in a variety of clinical abnormalities, especially neural diseases. Our aim of research is to investigate the protective effects and mechanisms of kaempferol and rhamnocitrin (kaempferol-7-methyl ether) on oxidative damage in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells induced by a limited supply of serum and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The current result demonstrated that kaempferol protected PC12 cells from serum deprivation-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of cells with kaempferol also diminished intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and strongly elevated cell viability. RT-Q-PCR and Western blotting revealed that kaempferol and rhamnocitrin significantly induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 gene expression. Addition of zinc protoporphyrin (Znpp), a HO-1 competitive inhibitor, significantly attenuated their protective effects in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated cells, indicating the vital role of HO-1 in cell resistance to oxidative injury. While investigating the signaling pathways responsible for HO-1 induction, we observed that kaempferol induced sustained extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in PC12 cells grown in low serum medium; while rhamnocitrin only stimulated transient ERK cascade. Addition of U0126, a highly selective inhibitor of MEK1/2, which is upstream of ERK1/2, had no effect on kaempferol- or rhamnocitrin-induced HO-1 mRNA expression, indicating no direct cross-talk between these two pathways. Furthermore, both kaempferol and rhamnocitrin were able to persistently attenuate p38 phosphorylation. Taking together, the above findings suggest that kaempferol and rhamnocitrin can augment cellular antioxidant defense capacity, at least in part, through regulation of HO-1 expression and MAPK signal transduction.

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells Modulates the Oxidative Response in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Mercedes; Wan, Xinhai; Meiss, Roberto; Yang, Jun; De Siervi, Adriana; Navone, Nora; Vazquez, Elba

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a leading cause of death among males. It is currently estimated that inflammatory responses are linked to 15-20% of all deaths from cancer worldwide. PCa is dominated by complications arising from metastasis to the bone where the tumor cells interact with the bone microenvironment impairing the balance between bone formation and degradation. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is not completely understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) counteracts oxidative damage and inflammation. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that HO-1 is implicated in PCa, demonstrating that endogenous HO-1 inhibits bone derived-prostate cancer cells proliferation, invasion and migration and decreases tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. The aim of this work was to analyze the impact of HO-1 modulated PCa cells on osteoblasts proliferation in vitro and on bone remodeling in vivo. Using a co-culture system of PC3 cells with primary mice osteoblasts (PMOs), we demonstrated that HO-1 pharmacological induction (hemin treatment) abrogated the diminution of PMOs proliferation induced by PCa cells and decreased the expression of osteoclast-modulating factors in osteoblasts. No changes were detected in the expression of genes involved in osteoblasts differentiation. However, co-culture of hemin pre-treated PC3 cells (PC3 Hem) with PMOs provoked an oxidative status and activated FoxO signaling in osteoblasts. The percentage of active osteoblasts positive for HO-1 increased in calvarias explants co-cultured with PC3 Hem cells. Nuclear HO-1 expression was detected in tumors generated by in vivo bone injection of HO-1 stable transfected PC3 (PC3HO-1) cells in the femur of SCID mice. These results suggest that HO-1 has the potential to modify the bone microenvironment impacting on PCa bone metastasis. PMID:24224047

  11. Chromium (VI) Inhibits Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression In Vivo and in Arsenic-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    O’HARA, KIMBERLEY A.; NEMEC, ANTONIA A.; ALAM, JAWED; KLEI, LINDA R.; MOSSMAN, BROOKE T.; BARCHOWSKY, AARON

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) promotes lung injury and pulmonary diseases through poorly defined mechanisms. One hypothesis for this lung pathogenesis is that Cr(VI) silences induction of cytoprotective genes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), whose total lung mRNA levels were reduced 21 days after nasal instillation of potassium dichromate in C57BL/6 mice. To investigate the mechanisms for this inhibition, Cr(VI) effects on basal and arsenic (As(III))-induced HO-1 expression were examined in cultured human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. An effect of Cr(VI) on the low basal HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in BEAS-2B cells was not detectible. In contrast, Cr(VI) added to the cells before As(III), but not simultaneously with As(III), attenuated As(III)-induced HO-1 expression. Transient transfection with luciferase reporter gene constructs controlled by the full length ho-1 promoter or deletion mutants demonstrated that this inhibition occurred in the E1 enhancer region containing critical antioxidant response elements (ARE). Cr(VI) pretreatment inhibited As(III)-induced activity of a transiently expressed reporter construct regulated by three ARE tandem repeats. The mechanism for this Cr(VI)-attenuated transactivation appeared to be Cr(VI) reduction of the nuclear levels of the transcription factor Nrf2 and As(III)-stimulated Nrf2 transcriptional complex binding to the ARE cis element. Finally, exposing cells to Cr(VI) prior to co-exposure with As(III) synergized for apoptosis and loss of membrane integrity. These data suggest that Cr(VI) silences induction of ARE-driven genes required for protection from secondary insults. The data also have important implications for understanding the toxic mechanisms of low level, mixed metal exposures in the lung. PMID:16775837

  12. Expression and characterization of truncated human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) and a fusion protein of hHO-1 with human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Wilks, A; Black, S M; Miller, W L; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1995-04-01

    A human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) gene without the sequence coding for the last 23 amino acids has been expressed in Escherichia coli behind the pho A promoter. The truncated enzyme is obtained in high yields as a soluble, catalytically-active protein, making it available for the first time for detailed mechanistic studies. The purified, truncated hHO-1/heme complex is spectroscopically indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme and converts heme to biliverdin when reconstituted with rat liver cytochrome P450 reductase. A self-sufficient heme oxygenase system has been obtained by fusing the truncated hHO-1 gene to the gene for human cytochrome P450 reductase without the sequence coding for the 20 amino acid membrane binding domain. Expression of the fusion protein in pCWori+ yields a protein that only requires NADPH for catalytic turnover. The failure of exogenous cytochrome P450 reductase to stimulate turnover and the insensitivity of the catalytic rate toward changes in ionic strength establish that electrons are transferred intramolecularly between the reductase and heme oxygenase domains of the fusion protein. The Vmax for the fusion protein is 2.5 times higher than that for the reconstituted system. Therefore, either the covalent tether does not interfere with normal docking and electron transfer between the flavin and heme domains or alternative but equally efficient electron transfer pathways are available that do not require specific docking. PMID:7703255

  13. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression by dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DHCA) through the AMPK–Nrf2 dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junghun; Kim, Sunyoung

    2014-11-15

    Oxidative stress is induced by the accumulation of free radicals, resulting in an imbalanced cellular redox state, which has been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DHCA), a lignan compound isolated from Cucurbita moschata, has previously been reported to contain anti-adipogenic and anti-lipogenic effects on 3T3-L1 cells and primary MEFs (Abraham and Kappas, 2008). In this study, it was tested whether DHCA could affect the expression of HO-1, using Raw264.7 mouse macrophage cell line. DHCA increased the protein and RNA levels of HO-1 and upregulated its promoter activity. Data from transient transfection assays indicated that ARE located in the E1 region of the HO-1 promoter are important in this DHCA-mediated induction of HO-1 expression. DHCA was also shown to enhance the nuclear translocation and binding of Nrf2 to the respective DNA sequences. The upregulation of HO-1 expression by DHCA was also observed in primary macrophages derived from wild type animals, but not in those from Nrf2 KO mice. Effects of DHCA on HO-1 and Nrf2 were reduced when cells were treated with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C, but not by PI3K/Akt or MAPK inhibitors. Data from an experiment using a specific siRNA or chemical inhibitor for HO-1 suggested that the DHCA-mediated induction of the HO-1 protein could suppress the LPS-stimulated production of NO. Taken together, our data suggest that DHCA induces the expression of HO-1 by controlling its promoter activity through the AMPK–Nrf2 pathway, eventually leading to the reduction of NO production, and may thus have potential as an effective antioxidant. - Highlights: • Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DHCA) induced the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. • The AMPK–Nrf2 pathway is critically involved in the DHCA-mediated induction of HO-1. • DHCA increased the expression of HO-1, Gclc and Gclm in primary macrophages. • DHCA-mediated induction of HO-1 contributed to the suppression of NO production.

  14. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene expression and diversity of Lake Erie planktonic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.H.; Tabita, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    Carbon dioxide fixation is carried out primarily through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate cycle, in which rubulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is the key enzyme. The primary structure of the large subunit of form I RubisCO is well conserved; however, four distinct types, A, B, C, and D, may be distinguished. To better understand the environmental regulation of RubisCO in Lake Erie phytoplanktonic microorganisms, we have isolated total RNA and DNA from four Lake Erie sampling sites. Probes prepared from RubisCO large-subunit genes (rbcL) of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 (representative of type IB) and the diatom Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1 (representative of type ID) was determined. It appeared that type ID (diatom) rbcL gene expression per gene dose decreased as the sampling sites shifted toward open water. By contrast, a similar trend was not observed for cyanobacterial (type IB) rbcL gene expression per gene dose. Thus far, a total of 21 clones of rbcL genes derived from mRNA have been obtained and completely sequenced from the Ballast Island site. For surface water samples, deduced amino acid sequences of five of six clones appeared to be representative of green algae. In contrast, six of nine sequenced rbcL clones from 10-m-deep samples were a chromophytic and rhodophytic lineages. At 5 m deep, the active CO{sub 2}-fixing planktonic organisms represented a diverse group, including organisms related to Chlorella ellipsoidea, Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1, and Olisthodiscus luteus. Although many more samplings at diverse sites must be accomplished, the discovery of distinctly different sequences of rbcL mRNA at different water depths suggests that there is a stratification of active CO{sub 2}-fixing organisms in western Lake Erie. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Treatment of Chronic Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate and Glatiramer Acetate Alters Expression of Heme-Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Antonia; Fiebiger, Sebastian; Bros, Helena; Hertwig, Laura; Romero-Suarez, Silvina; Hamann, Isabell; Chanvillard, Coralie; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Paul, Friedemann; Millward, Jason M.; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) synergizes with the immunomodulatory agent glatiramer acetate (GA) in eliciting anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in the relapsing-remitting EAE model. Thus, we hypothesized that mice with chronic EAE may also benefit from this combination therapy. We first assessed how a treatment with a single dose of GA together with daily application of EGCG may modulate EAE. Although single therapies with a suboptimal dose of GA or EGCG led to disease amelioration and reduced CNS inflammation, the combination therapy had no effects. While EGCG appeared to preserve axons and myelin, the single GA dose did not improve axonal damage or demyelination. Interestingly, the neuroprotective effect of EGCG was abolished when GA was applied in combination. To elucidate how a single dose of GA may interfere with EGCG, we focused on the anti-inflammatory, iron chelating and anti-oxidant properties of EGCG. Surprisingly, we observed that while EGCG induced a downregulation of the gene expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in affected CNS areas, the combined therapy of GA+EGCG seems to promote an increased HO-1 expression. These data suggest that upregulation of HO-1 may contribute to diminish the neuroprotective benefits of EGCG alone in this EAE model. Altogether, our data indicate that neuroprotection by EGCG in chronic EAE may involve regulation of oxidative processes, including downmodulation of HO-1. Further investigation of the re-dox balance in chronic neuroinflammation and in particular functional studies on HO-1 are warranted to understand its role in disease progression. PMID:26114502

  16. Cobalt Protoporphyrin Upregulates Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression Through a Heme Oxygenase-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Lin, Chingju; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chang, Pei-Chun; Wu, Ling-Hsuan; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) is a potent HO-1 inducer and generally known to be an antioxidant in various cell types. Little is known about the CoPP-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and its downstream signaling in microglial cells. In current study, CoPP caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in COX-2 expression in microglial cells. Furthermore, activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (ASK) 1/MAP kinase involved in CoPP-induced COX-2 expression in microglia. CoPP also induced P2X7 receptor activation, and treatment of P2X7 inhibitors effectively reduced CoPP-induced COX-2 expression. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) 1 is reported to be involved in modulating anti-inflammatory response through negative regulation of transcription factors. Interestingly, treatment with CoPP markedly induced PIAS1 degradation which is regulated by PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3α/β (GSK3α/β) signaling pathways. These results suggest that CoPP induces COX-2 expression through activating P2X7 receptors and ASK1/MAP kinases as well as PIAS1 degradation signaling pathways. Our study provides a new insight into the regulatory effect of CoPP on neuroinflammation in microglial cells. PMID:26255181

  17. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer. PMID:27280718

  18. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer. PMID:27280718

  19. Hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1 and antioxidant response element-mediated genes following administration of ethinyl estradiol to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Morio, Lisa A.; Leone, Angelique; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Nie, Alex Y.; Brandon Parker, J.; Taggart, Peter; Barron, Alfred M.; McMillian, Michael K. . E-mail: mmcmilli@prdus.jnj.com; Lord, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is one of several enzymes induced by hepatotoxicants, and is thought to have an important protective role against cellular stress during liver inflammation and injury. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of HO-1 in estradiol-induced liver injury. A single dose of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg, po) resulted in mild liver injury. Repeated administration of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg/day for 4 days, po) resulted in no detectable liver injury or dysfunction. Using RT-PCR analysis, we demonstrate that HO-1 gene expression in whole liver tissue is elevated (> 20-fold) after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. The number and intensity of HO-1 immunoreactive macrophages were increased after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. HO-1 expression was undetectable in hepatic parenchymal cells from rats receiving Methocel control or a single dose of ethinyl estradiol, however cytosolic HO-1 immunoreactivity in these cells after repeated dosing of ethinyl estradiol was pronounced. The increases in HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 immunoreactivity following administration of a single dose of ethinyl estradiol suggested that this enzyme might be responsible for the observed protection of the liver during repeated dosing. To investigate the effect of HO-1 expression on ethinyl estradiol-induced hepatotoxicity, rats were pretreated with hemin (50 {mu}mol/kg, ip, a substrate and inducer of HO-1), with tin protoporphyrin IX (60 {mu}mol/kg, ip, an HO-1 inhibitor), or with gadolinium chloride (10 mg/kg, iv, an inhibitor/toxin of Kupffer cells) 24 h before ethinyl estradiol treatment. Pretreatment with modulators of HO-1 expression and activity had generally minimal effects on ethinyl estradiol-induced liver injury. These data suggest that HO-1 plays a limited role in antioxidant defense against ethinyl estradiol-induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and suggests that other coordinately induced enzymes are responsible for protection observed

  20. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase gene expression and diversity of Lake Erie planktonic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Tabita, F R

    1996-06-01

    Carbon dioxide fixation is carried out primarily through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate cycle, in which ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is the key enzyme. The primary structure of the large subunit of form I RubisCO is well conserved; however, four distinct types, A, B, C, and D, may be distinguished, with types A and B and types C and D more closely related to one another. To better understand the environmental regulation of RubisCO in Lake Erie phytoplanktonic microorganisms, we have isolated total RNA and DNA from four Lake Erie sampling sites. Probes prepared from RubisCO large-subunit genes (rbcL) of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 (representative of type IB) and the diatom Cylindrotheca sp. strain N1 (representative of type ID) were hybridized to the isolated RNA and DNA. To quantitate rbcL gene expression for each sample, the amount of gene expression per gene dose (i.e., the amount of mRNA divided by the amount of target DNA) was determined. With a limited number of sampling sites, it appeared that type ID (diatom) rbcL gene expression per gene dose decreased as the sampling sites shifted toward open water. By contrast, a similar trend was not observed for cyanobacterial (type IB) rbcL gene expression per gene dose. Complementary DNA specific for rbcL was synthesized from Lake Erie RNA samples and used as a template for PCR amplification of portions of various rbcL genes. Thus far, a total of 21 clones of rbcL genes derived from mRNA have been obtained and completely sequenced from the Ballast Island site. For surface water samples, deduced amino acid sequences of five of six clones appeared to be representative of green algae. In contrast, six of nine sequenced rbcL clones from 10-m-deep samples were of chromophytic and rhodophytic lineages. At 5 m deep, the active CO2-fixing planktonic organisms represented a diverse group, including organisms related to Chlorella ellipsoidea

  1. Systemic effects of orally-administered zinc and tin (IV) metalloporphyrins on heme oxygenase expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Ichiro; Wong, Ronald J; Abate, Aida; Vreman, Hendrik J; Contag, Christopher H; Stevenson, David K

    2006-05-01

    Some metalloporphyrins (Mps) inhibit heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of bilirubin, and are potential compounds for the treatment of neonatal jaundice. We studied the safety and efficacy of Mps following oral administration. Adult HO-1-luc reporter mice were administered 30 micromol/kg body weight of tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), zinc bis glycol deuteroporphyrin (ZnBG), or zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), or vehicle by oral gavage. Bilirubin production was measured as total body carbon monoxide (CO) excretion (VeCO). HO activity was quantitated via CO measurements by gas chromatography. HO-1 protein was determined by Western blot. HO-1 transcription levels were assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. A significant 28% decrease in bilirubin production occurred within 3 h of SnMP treatment and persisted beyond 48 h. Bilirubin production decreased 15% and 9% by 3 h after administration of ZnBG and ZnPP, respectively, but returned to baseline within 48 h. Maximal inhibition of liver, spleen, and intestine HO activity was seen at 3 h with inhibitory effects decreasing in the order: SnMP > or = ZnBG > or = ZnPP. After SnMP treatment, HO-1 transcription increased 5.7-fold after 24 h. Furthermore, liver and spleen HO-1 protein significantly increased 3.7- and 2.0-fold, respectively, after 24 h. HO-1 transcription and protein were not affected in ZnBG- or ZnPP-treated mice. We conclude that the three Mps are absorbed at different rates in the mouse and affect bilirubin production and HO-1 expression in a tissue- and time-dependent manner. PMID:16627879

  2. Upregulation of endothelial heme oxygenase-1 expression through the activation of the JNK pathway by sublethal concentrations of acrolein

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.C.; Hsieh, C.W.; Lai, P.H.; Lin, J.B.; Liu, Y.C.; Wung, B.S. . E-mail: bswung@mail.ncyu.edu.tw

    2006-08-01

    Acrolein is a highly electrophilic {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde that is present in cigarette smoke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective enzyme activated by various such electrophilic compounds. In this study, the regulatory effects of acrolein upon the expression of HO-1 were investigated in endothelial cells (ECs). We demonstrate that acrolein induces the elevation of HO-1 protein levels, and subsequent enzyme activity, at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An additional {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, was also found to increase HO-1 expression and have less cytotoxicity than acrolein. Moreover, acrolein-mediated HO-1 induction is abrogated in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Nrf2 is a transcription factor involved in the induction of HO-1 through an antioxidant response element (ARE) in the promoter region of the HO-1 gene. We show that acrolein induces Nrf2 translocation and ARE-luciferase reporter activity. Acrolein was also found to induce the production of both superoxide and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at levels greater than 100 {mu}M. However, with the exception of NAC, no antioxidant generated any effect upon acrolein-dependent HO-1 expression in ECs. Our present findings suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may not be a major modulator for HO-1 induction. Using buthionine sulfoximine to deplete the intracellular GSH levels further enhanced the effects of acrolein. We also found that cellular GSH level was rapidly reduced after both 10 and 100 {mu}M acrolein treatment. However, after 6 h of exposure to ECs, only 10 {mu}M acrolein treatment increases GSH level. In addition, only the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein had any significant inhibitory impact upon the upregulation of HO-1 by acrolein. Pretreatment with a range of other PI3 kinase inhibitors, including wortmannin and LY294002, showed no effects. Hence, we show in our current experiments that a sublethal concentration of

  3. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) Anthocyanins Modulate Heme Oxygenase-1 and Glutathione S-Transferase-pi Expression in the ARPE-19 Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PURPOSE. To determine whether anthocyanin-enriched bilberry extracts modulate pre- or post-translational levels of oxidative stress defense enzymes heme-oxygenase (HO)-1 and glutathione S-transferase-pi (GST-pi) in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. METHODS. Confluent ARPE-19 c...

  4. Curcumin-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression prevents H2O2-induced cell death in wild type and heme oxygenase-2 knockout adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Niels A J; Lundvig, Ditte M S; van Dalen, Stephanie C M; Schelbergen, Rik F; van Lent, Peter L E M; Szarek, Walter A; Regan, Raymond F; Carels, Carine E; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration is a promising adjuvant therapy to treat tissue injury. However, MSC survival after administration is often hampered by oxidative stress at the site of injury. Heme oxygenase (HO) generates the cytoprotective effector molecules biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron/ferritin by breaking down heme. Since HO-activity mediates anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative effects, we hypothesized that modulation of the HO-system affects MSC survival. Adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) from wild type (WT) and HO-2 knockout (KO) mice were isolated and characterized with respect to ASC marker expression. In order to analyze potential modulatory effects of the HO-system on ASC survival, WT and HO-2 KO ASCs were pre-treated with HO-activity modulators, or downstream effector molecules biliverdin, bilirubin, and CO before co-exposure of ASCs to a toxic dose of H2O2. Surprisingly, sensitivity to H2O2-mediated cell death was similar in WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. However, pre-induction of HO-1 expression using curcumin increased ASC survival after H2O2 exposure in both WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. Simultaneous inhibition of HO-activity resulted in loss of curcumin-mediated protection. Co-treatment with glutathione precursor N-Acetylcysteine promoted ASC survival. However, co-incubation with HO-effector molecules bilirubin and biliverdin did not rescue from H2O2-mediated cell death, whereas co-exposure to CO-releasing molecules-2 (CORM-2) significantly increased cell survival, independently from HO-2 expression. Summarizing, our results show that curcumin protects via an HO-1 dependent mechanism against H2O2-mediated apoptosis, and likely through the generation of CO. HO-1 pre-induction or administration of CORMs may thus form an attractive strategy to improve MSC therapy. PMID:25299695

  5. Curcumin-Induced Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Prevents H2O2-Induced Cell Death in Wild Type and Heme Oxygenase-2 Knockout Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Niels A. J.; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; van Dalen, Stephanie C. M.; Schelbergen, Rik F.; van Lent, Peter L. E. M.; Szarek, Walter A.; Regan, Raymond F.; Carels, Carine E.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration is a promising adjuvant therapy to treat tissue injury. However, MSC survival after administration is often hampered by oxidative stress at the site of injury. Heme oxygenase (HO) generates the cytoprotective effector molecules biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron/ferritin by breaking down heme. Since HO-activity mediates anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative effects, we hypothesized that modulation of the HO-system affects MSC survival. Adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) from wild type (WT) and HO-2 knockout (KO) mice were isolated and characterized with respect to ASC marker expression. In order to analyze potential modulatory effects of the HO-system on ASC survival, WT and HO-2 KO ASCs were pre-treated with HO-activity modulators, or downstream effector molecules biliverdin, bilirubin, and CO before co-exposure of ASCs to a toxic dose of H2O2. Surprisingly, sensitivity to H2O2-mediated cell death was similar in WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. However, pre-induction of HO-1 expression using curcumin increased ASC survival after H2O2 exposure in both WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. Simultaneous inhibition of HO-activity resulted in loss of curcumin-mediated protection. Co-treatment with glutathione precursor N-Acetylcysteine promoted ASC survival. However, co-incubation with HO-effector molecules bilirubin and biliverdin did not rescue from H2O2-mediated cell death, whereas co-exposure to CO-releasing molecules-2 (CORM-2) significantly increased cell survival, independently from HO-2 expression. Summarizing, our results show that curcumin protects via an HO-1 dependent mechanism against H2O2-mediated apoptosis, and likely through the generation of CO. HO-1 pre-induction or administration of CORMs may thus form an attractive strategy to improve MSC therapy. PMID:25299695

  6. Crocin Suppresses LPS-Stimulated Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Park, Ga-Young; Bang, Soo Young; Park, Sun Young; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Kim, YoungHee

    2014-01-01

    Crocin is a water-soluble carotenoid pigment that is primarily used in various cuisines as a seasoning and coloring agent, as well as in traditional medicines for the treatment of edema, fever, and hepatic disorder. In this study, we demonstrated that crocin markedly induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which leads to an anti-inflammatory response. Crocin inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide production via downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. These effects were abrogated by blocking of HO-1 expression or activity. Crocin also induced Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular pools and phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 4 (CAMK4). CAMK4 knockdown and kinase-dead mutant inhibited crocin-mediated HO-1 expression, Nrf2 activation, and phosphorylation of Akt, indicating that HO-1 expression is mediated by CAMK4 and that Akt is a downstream mediator of CAMK4 in crocin signaling. Moreover, crocin-mediated suppression of iNOS expression was blocked by CAMK4 inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that crocin suppresses LPS-stimulated expression of iNOS by inducing HO-1 expression via Ca2+/calmodulin-CAMK4-PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling cascades. Our findings provide a novel molecular mechanism for the inhibitory effects of crocin against endotoxin-mediated inflammation. PMID:24839356

  7. Thirty years of microbial P450 monooxygenase research: Peroxo-heme intermediates-The central bus station in heme oxygenase catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sligar, Stephen G. . E-mail: s-sligar@uiuc.edu; Makris, Thomas M.; Denisov, Ilia G.

    2005-12-09

    Oxygen has always been recognized as an essential element of many life forms, initially through its role as a terminal electron acceptor for the energy-generating pathways of oxidative phosphorylation. In 1955, Hayaishi et al. [Mechanism of the pyrocatechase reaction, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 77 (1955) 5450-5451] presented the most important discovery that changed this simplistic view of how Nature uses atmospheric dioxygen. His discovery, the naming and mechanistic understanding of the first 'oxygenase' enzyme, has provided a wonderful opportunity and scientific impetus for four decades of researchers. This volume provides an opportunity to recognize the breakthroughs of the 'Hayaishi School.' Notable have been the prolific contributions of Professor Ishimura et al. [Oxygen and life. Oxygenases, Oxidases and Lipid Mediators, International Congress Series, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2002], a first-generation Hayaishi product, to characterization of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases.

  8. Interleukin-4 inhibits prostaglandin E2 production by freshly prepared adherent rheumatoid synovial cells via inhibition of biosynthesis and gene expression of cyclo-oxygenase II but not of cyclo-oxygenase I.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, E; Taki, H; Kuroda, A; Mino, T; Yamashita, N; Kobayashi, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise the effect of interleukin-4 (IL-4) on the biosynthesis of cyclo-oxygenases I (COX I) and II (COX II), the rate limiting enzymes of the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in freshly prepared rheumatoid synovial cells. METHODS: Adherent synovial cells were obtained from rheumatoid synovium by collagenase digestion. The concentrations of PGE2 in culture supernatants were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The protein and mRNA concentrations of COX I and COX II were determined by Western blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. RESULTS: Freshly prepared synovial cells produced large amounts of PGE2. They also showed increased gene expression of COX I and COX II, and synthesised these proteins. IL-4 had suppressive effects on the production of PGE2 by untreated or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated synovial cells. In addition, IL-4 inhibited the biosynthesis of COX II at the mRNA level. In contrast, it did not modify the protein concentration of COX I. In tests of cell specificity, IL-4 did not reduce the mRNA concentration of COX II in interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) stimulated cultured synovial fibroblasts at passages 3-6, but it reduced considerably the mRNA concentrations of COX II in an LPS or IL-1 alpha stimulated U937 monocyte/macrophage cell line. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that IL-4 might inhibit overproduction of PGE2 in rheumatoid synovia via selective inhibition of the biosynthesis of COX II, and that this inhibition might be specific to macrophage-like synovial cells. Images PMID:8694577

  9. Immunohistochemical expression of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase 1 in normal bovine lung and bovine lung infected with Mannheimia haemolytica

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Amira Talaat; Singh, Baljit; Al-Dissi, Ahmad N.

    2015-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is an important cause of pneumonia in feedlot cattle. Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor responsible for the induction of antioxidant enzymes, such as heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), within the lung. The expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 was immunohistochemically evaluated in 4 calves 24 h after experimental infection with M. haemolytica. Calves receiving normal saline served as controls. In the infected lungs, cytoplasmic Nrf2 expression was high in macrophages and bronchioles and low in alveolar epithelium, whereas nuclear expression was high in endothelial cells, macrophages, and bronchioles and lowest in alveolar epithelium. Normal lung samples displayed only faint Nrf2 cytoplasmic staining within bronchiolar epithelium. Expression of HO-1 was detected within the cytoplasm of macrophages and bronchiolar epithelial cells in all infected lung samples, whereas normal lungs displayed only weak cytoplasmic staining in bronchiolar epithelial cells. These findings suggest that bronchiolar epithelial cells and macrophages up-regulate Nrf2 expression early in the course of infection, which results in increased expression of HO-1 within these cells. PMID:25852222

  10. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .epsilon.N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the .epsilon.-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed.

  11. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit epsilon N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the .epsilon.-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed.

  12. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit epsilon N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, R.L.

    1999-02-02

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS){sup {epsilon}}N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the {epsilon}-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed. 8 figs.

  13. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit N-methyltransferase

    DOEpatents

    Houtz, R.L.

    1998-03-03

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) {epsilon}N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the {epsilon}-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed. 5 figs.

  14. Silencing heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibits proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lu, Hong; Matsukura, Makoto; Zhao, Jien; Shinohara, Makoto

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HO-1 is highly induced in RPE cells by hypoxia. •Inhibition of HO-1 activity and knockdown of HO-1 expression inhibit VEGF expression in RPE cells under hypoxia. •Knockdown of HO-1 in RPE cells inhibits angiogenesis of endothelial cells in vitro. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the vasculature and in the angiogenesis of tumors, wounds and other environments. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) are the main cells involved in choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a process in which hypoxia plays an important role. Our aim was to evaluate the role of human RPE-cell HO-1 in the angiogenic activities of cocultured endothelial cells under hypoxia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for HO-1 was transfected into human RPE cell line ARPE-19, and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was used to inhibit HO-1 activity. Knockdown of HO-1 expression and inhibition of HO-1 activity resulted in potent reduction of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) under hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of HO-1 suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells. These findings indicated that HO-1 might have an angiogenic effect in CNV through modulation of VEGF expression and might be a potential target for treating CNV.

  15. Leptin potentiates IFN-γ-induced expression of nitric oxide synthase and cyclo-oxygenase-2 in murine macrophage J774A.1

    PubMed Central

    Raso, Giuseppina Mattace; Pacilio, Maria; Esposito, Emanuela; Coppola, Anna; Di Carlo, Raffaele; Meli, Rosaria

    2002-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic hormone believed to regulate body weight, has recently been associated with inflammatory states and immune activity. Here we have studied the effect of leptin on expression of IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), both prominent markers of macrophage activation, using the murine macrophage J774A.1 cell line. After 24 h of incubation, leptin (1–10 μg ml−1) potently synergized with IFN-γ (100 U ml−1) in nitric oxide (NO) release, evaluated as nitrite and nitrate (NOx), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in culture medium. The observed increase of NO and PGE2 was related to enhanced expression of the respective inducible enzyme isoforms, measured in mRNA and protein by RT–PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. When cells were stimulated only with leptin, a weak induction of NO and PGE2 release and of the expression of related inducible enzymes was observed. Moreover IFN-γ increased the expression of the functional form of leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) and this effect was potentiated by leptin in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that macrophages, among the peripheral immune cells, represent a target for leptin and confirm the relevance of this hormone in the pathophysiology of inflammation. PMID:12411410

  16. Expression of glnB and a glnB-Like Gene (glnK) in a Ribulose Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase-Deficient Mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yilei; Tabita, F. Robert

    1998-01-01

    In a ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO)-deficient mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, strain 16PHC, nitrogenase activity was derepressed in the presence of ammonia under photoheterotrophic growth conditions. Previous studies also showed that reintroduction of a functional RubisCO and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) pathway suppressed the deregulation of nitrogenase synthesis in this strain. In this study, the derepression of nitrogenase synthesis in the presence of ammonia in strain 16PHC was further explored by using a glnB::lacZ fusion, since the product of the glnB gene is known to have a negative effect on ammonia-regulated nif control. It was found that glnB expression was repressed in strain 16PHC under photoheterotrophic growth conditions with either ammonia or glutamate as the nitrogen source; glutamine synthetase (GS) levels were also affected in this strain. However, when cells regained a functional CBB pathway by trans complementation of the deleted genes, wild-type levels of GS and glnB expression were restored. Furthermore, a glnB-like gene, glnK, was isolated from this organism, and its expression was found to be under tight nitrogen control in the wild type. Surprisingly, glnK expression was found to be derepressed in strain 16PHC under photoheterotrophic conditions in the presence of ammonia. PMID:9721307

  17. High expression of heme oxygenase-1 in target organs may attenuate acute graft-versus-host disease through regulation of immune balance of TH17/Treg.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meisheng; Wang, Jishi; Fang, Qin; Liu, Ping; Chen, Shuya; Zhe, Nana; Lin, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yaming; Zhao, Jiangyuan; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    The high incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Grades III and IV aGVHD are the leading causes of death in allo-HSCT recipients. Heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) has anti-inflammatory and immune-regulatory functions. In this study, we evaluated the none GVHD and grade I-IV patients samples which were collected at the first re-examination after successful allo-HSCT, we found that expressions of HO-1 mRNA in the bone marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of allo-HSCT recipients who had subsequent non-GVHD and grade I aGVHD were significantly higher than those in patients with Grade III-IV aGVHD. We then demonstrated that enhanced expression of HO-1 in target organs by infusing HO-1-gene-modified Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) alleviated the clinical and histopathological severity of aGVHD in experimental mice. Flow cytometry revealed a higher expression of Treg cells and a lower expression of TH17 cells in splenic and lymph node tissues of mice with enhanced HO-1 expression, as compared to that in the aGVHD mice. This was further substantiated by lower expression levels of ROR-Υt and IL-17A mRNA, and higher levels of Foxp3 mRNA in the splenic tissue of mice with enhanced HO-1 expression. Our results indicate that high expression of HO-1 may reduce the severity of aGVHD by regulation of the TH17/Treg balance. PMID:27168057

  18. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  19. Protective effects of protostemonine on LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure: Roles of increased hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Yue, Ling; Zhao, Wenhao; Yang, Xinzhou; Shu, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    Here, we explored protective effects of protostemonine (PSN), on mouse acute liver failure induced by lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN). PSN dose-dependently declined LPS/GalN-induced lethality of mice as well as increase of ALT/AST activities in their serum. Hepatoprotective effects of PSN were also supported by liver histopathological examinations. After LPS/GalN treatment, severe oxidative stresses in the liver could be detected by boosted MDA and ROS as well as decreased GSH. Moreover, hepatic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, were sharply elevated. These symptoms were dose-dependently ameliorated by PSN. Mechanistically, PSN promoted the transcription and translation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in hepatocytes and liver Kupffer cells. Nrf2 is a master transcription factor contributing to the expression of HO-1. PSN elevated Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and enhanced Nrf2/HO-1 promoter interaction. Suppressing enzyme activity of HO-1 by co-treating mice with HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP abolished protective effects of PSN. ZnPP also abrogated alleviative impacts of PSN on LPS/GalN-mediated hepatic oxidative stresses and inflammatory responses. Finally, we showed that PSN exhibited undetectable toxic effects on vital organs of mice. Our findings suggested that PSN is able to attenuate LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure and upregulating HO-1 expression is implicated in its hepatoprotective activity. PMID:26363973

  20. KCHO-1, a Novel Antineuroinflammatory Agent, Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuroinflammatory Responses through Nrf2-Mediated Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Mouse BV2 Microglia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Yoon, Chi-Su; Kim, Dong-Cheol; Yun, Jinju; Lee, Jun-Kyung; Jun, Ki-Young; Son, Ilhong; Kim, Dong-Woung; Song, Bong-Keun; Choi, Seulah; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Sungchul; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2014-01-01

    The brain is vulnerable to oxidative stress and inflammation that can occur as a result of aging or neurodegenerative diseases. Our work has sought to identify natural products that regulate heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and to determine their mechanism of action in neurodegenerative diseases. KCHO-1 is a novel herbal therapeutic containing 30% ethanol (EtOH) extracts from nine plants. In this study, we investigated the antineuroinflammatory effects of KCHO-1 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated mouse BV2 microglia. KCHO-1 inhibited the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), iNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, and COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia. It also reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 production. This effect was correlated with the suppression of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B-α (IκB-α) phosphorylation and degradation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocation and DNA binding. Additionally, KCHO-1 upregulated HO-1 expression by promoting nuclear translocation of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in mouse BV2 microglia. Tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), an HO activity inhibitor, was used to verify the inhibitory effects of KCHO-1 on proinflammatory mediators and proteins associated with HO-1 expression. Our data suggest that KCHO-1 has therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative diseases caused by neuroinflammation. PMID:25580149

  1. Physical exercise-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and heme oxygenase-1 in human leukocytes: effects of RRR-alpha-tocopherol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Niess, A M; Sommer, M; Schneider, M; Angres, C; Tschositsch, K; Golly, I C; Battenfeld, N; Northoff, H; Biesalski, H K; Dickhuth, H H; Fehrenbach, E

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of RRR-alpha-tocopherol (500 IU/day, 8 days) on in vivo cytokine response and cytoplasmic expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the antioxidant stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in human leukocytes after exhaustive exercise. Thirteen men were investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study with a wash-out period of 28 days. The exercise procedure consisted of an incremental treadmill test followed by a continuous run until exhaustion at 110% of the individual anaerobic threshold (total duration 28.5 +/- 0.8 min). HO-1 and iNOS protein were assessed in mono- (M), lympho-, and granulocytes (G) using flow cytometry. Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 were measured by ELISA. IL-6 rose significantly whereas IL-8 did not exhibit significant changes after exercise. Changes of IL-6 were not affected by RRR-alpha-tocopherol. Exercise induced an increase of iNOS protein primarily in M and G. A small, but significant, increase of HO-1 protein was measured in M and G. RRR-alpha-Tocopherol did not show any significant effects on cytoplasmic expression of iNOS and HO-1 at rest and after exercise. In conclusion, exhaustive exercise induces expression of iNOS and HO-1 in human leukocytes by a mechanism that is not sensitive to RRR-alpha-tocopherol supplementation. PMID:11232592

  2. Cobalt Alleviates GA-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Wheat Aleurone Layers via the Regulation of H2O2 Production and Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingzhu; Li, Jiale; Wang, Fangquan; Li, Feng; Yang, Jun; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are key signaling molecules that are produced in response to various environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt is able to delay gibberellic acid (GA)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers. A similar response was observed when samples were pretreated with carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two end-products of HO catalysis. We further observed that increased HO-1 expression played a role in the cobalt-induced alleviation of PCD. The application of HO-1-specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPPIX), substantially prevented the increases of HO-1 activity and the alleviation of PCD triggered by cobalt. The stimulation of HO-1 expression, and alleviation of PCD might be caused by the initial H2O2 production induced by cobalt. qRT-PCR and enzymatic assays revealed that cobalt-induced gene expression and the corresponding activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), three enzymes that metabolize reactive oxygen species, were consistent with the H2O2 accumulation during GA treatment. These cobalt responses were differentially blocked by co-treatment with ZnPPIX. We therefore suggest that HO-1 functions in the cobalt-triggered alleviation of PCD in wheat aleurone layers, which is also dependent on the enhancement of the activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25405743

  3. Heme oxygenase expression as a biomarker of exposure to amphiphilic polymer-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

    PubMed

    McConnachie, Lisa A; White, Collin C; Botta, Dianne; Zadworny, Megan E; Cox, David P; Beyer, Richard P; Hu, Xiaoge; Eaton, David L; Gao, Xiaohu; Kavanagh, Terrance J

    2013-03-01

    Because of their unique optical properties, quantum dots (QDs) have become a preferred system for ultrasensitive detection and imaging. However, since QDs commonly contain Cd and other heavy metals, concerns have been raised regarding their toxicity. QDs are thus commonly synthesised with a ZnS cap structure and/or coated with polymeric stabilisers. We recently synthesised amphiphilic polymer-coated tri-n-octylphosphine oxide - poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-tetradecene (TOPO-PMAT) QDs, which are highly stable in aqueous environments. The effects of these QDs on viability and stress response in five cell lines of mouse and human origins are reported here. Human and mouse macrophages and human kidney cells readily internalised these QDs, resulting in modest toxicity. TOPO-PMAT QD exposure was highly correlated with the induction of the stress response protein heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1). Other stress biomarkers (glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit, NAD(P)H, necrosis) were only moderately affected. HMOX1 may thus be a useful biomarker of TOPO-QDOT QD exposure across cell types and species. PMID:22264017

  4. Impact of immunosuppressive agents on the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, heme oxygenase-1 and interleukin-7 in mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, GUO-BIAO; LUO, GUANG-HENG; BAO, DING-SU; CHEN, AN-JIAN; ZHUANG, YONG-XIANG; GUO, YA-NAN; WANG, XIN; WANG, YUAN-LIANG; CHEN, ZONG-PING; LU, YI-PING; LI, YOU-PING

    2015-01-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is a major cause of graft loss following kidney transplantation and may result from the interactions of various immune and non-immune factors. The aim of the present study was to establish an in vitro model of glomerular mesangial cell injury in order to examine the gene expression levels of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and interleukin-7 (IL-7) in mesangial cells during the healing process as well as to investigate the effects of various immunosuppressants on the expression of these genes. The HBZY-1 glomerular mesangial cell line was pre-treated in vitro with cytochalasin B for 2 h to induce reversible damage. Following the pre-treatment, the HBZY-1 cells were divided into five groups: Blank control group, cyclosporine A (CsA) group, tacrolimus (Tac) group, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) group and rapamycin (RAPA) group. After treating the mesangial cells with each immunosuppressive drug for 6, 12 or 24 h, the mRNA and protein expression levels of IDO, HO-1 and IL-7 were examined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The results showed that expression levels of HO-1 were significantly upregulated in response to treatment with CsA, FK506, RAPA and MMF, whereas the expression levels of IL-7 were markedly downregulated by treatment with the above immunosuppressants. CsA, FK506 and MMF significantly enhanced the expression levels of IDO, whereas RAPA exhibited no apparent effect on IDO. The present study may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of CAN and provide novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of CAN. PMID:25936769

  5. Whiskey congeners suppress LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production in murine macrophage RAW 264 cells by inducing heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Ando, Masashi; Tsukamasa, Yasuyuki; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Nukaya, Haruo

    2012-12-26

    Whiskey includes many nonvolatile substances (whiskey congeners; Whc) that seep from the oak cask during the maturation process. To date, many functions of Whc have reported, such as antiallergy and antimelanogenesis. This study examined the effect of Whc on LPS/IFNγ-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in murine macrophage RAW 264 cells. Whc suppressed LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production in a concentration-dependent manner. To determine the active compounds in Whc, the effect of 10 major compounds isolated from Whc on LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production was examined. Coniferylaldehyde (CA) and sinapylaldehyde (SiA) strongly suppressed LPS/IFNγ-induced NO production. Pretreatment with Whc, CA, and SiA induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. The expression of HO-1 by Whc, CA, and SiA pretreatment was due to activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling via the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. To investigate the in vivo effects of Whc, Whc was administered to mice with antitype II collagen antibody-induced arthritis, and we the arthritis score and hind paw volume were measured. Administration of Whc remarkably suppressed the arthritis score and hind paw volume. Taken together, these findings suggest that Whc is beneficial for the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:23199195

  6. Preconditioning with hyperbaric oxygen induces tolerance against oxidative injury via increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 in primary cultured spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingbo; Li, Jinsheng; Zhang, Lifan; Wang, Bairen; Xiong, Lize

    2007-02-27

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) preconditioning can induce ischemic tolerance in the spinal cord. The effect can be attenuated by the administration of an oxygen free radical scavenger or by inhibition of antioxidant enzymes. However, the mechanism underlying HBO preconditioning of neurons against ischemic injury remains enigmatic. Therefore, in the present study primary cultured spinal cord neurons were treated with HBO and then subjected to a hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) insult. The results show that H(2)O(2) stimulation of the cultured spinal neurons caused severe DNA damage and decreased cell viability, and that these neurons were well protected against damage after a single exposure to HBO preconditioning (0.35 MPa, 98% O(2), 37 degrees C, 2 h). The protective effect started 4 h after pretreatment and lasted for at least 24 h. The cultured neurons after HBO treatment also exhibited increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression at both the protein and mRNA levels, which paralleled the protective effect of HBO. Treatment with tin-mesoporphyrin IX (SnMP), a specific HO-1 inhibitor, before HBO pretreatment abolished the HBO-induced adaptive protection noted in the cultured spinal neurons. In conclusion, HBO preconditioning can protect primary cultured spinal cord neurons against oxidative stress, and the upregulation of HO-1 expression plays an essential role in HBO induced preconditioning effect. PMID:17291539

  7. Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression Reveals that Cyclo-oxygenase-2 Gene Therapy Up-regulates Hematopoiesis and Down-regulates Inflammation During Endochondral Bone Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lau, K.-H. William; Popa, Nicoleta L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cyclo-oxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is an inflammatory mediator that is necessary for the tissue repair, including bone fracture healing. Although the application of Cox-2 gene therapy to a murine closed femoral fracture has accelerated bony union, but the beneficial effect was not observed until the endochondral stage of bone repair that is well after the inflammatory stage normally subsides. Methods To identify the molecular pathways through which Cox-2 regulates fracture healing, we examined gene expression profile in fracture tissues in response to Cox-2 gene therapy during the endochondral bone repair phase. Cox-2 gene therapy was applied to the closed murine femur fracture model. Microarray analysis was performed at 10 days post-fracture to examine global gene expression profile in the fracture tissues during the endochondral bone repair phase. The entire repertoire of significantly expressed genes was examined by gene set enrichment analysis, and the most up-regulated individual genes were evaluated further. Results The genes that normally promote inflammation were under-represented in the microarray analysis, and the expression of several inflammatory chemokines was significantly down-regulated. There was an up-regulation of two key transcription factor genes that regulate hematopoiesis and erythropoiesis. More surprisingly, there was no significant up-regulation in the genes that are normally involved in angiogenesis or bone formation. However, the expression of two tissue remodeling genes was up-regulated. Conclusions The down-regulation of the inflammatory genes in response to Cox-2 gene therapy was unexpected, given the pro-inflammatory role of prostaglandins. Cox-2 gene therapy could promote bony union through hematopoietic precursor proliferation during endochondral bone repair and thereby enhances subsequently fracture callus remodeling that leads to bony union of the fracture gap. PMID:25247155

  8. Metformin inhibits heme oxygenase-1 expression in cancer cells through inactivation of Raf-ERK-Nrf2 signaling and AMPK-independent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Hee; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2013-09-01

    Resistance to therapy is the major obstacle to more effective cancer treatment. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is often highly up-regulated in tumor tissues, and its expression is further increased in response to therapies. It has been suggested that inhibition of HO-1 expression is a potential therapeutic approach to sensitize tumors to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the anti-tumor effects of metformin are mediated by suppression of HO-1 expression in cancer cells. Our results indicate that metformin strongly suppresses HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in human hepatic carcinoma HepG2, cervical cancer HeLa, and non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells. Metformin also markedly reduced Nrf2 mRNA and protein levels in whole cell lysates and suppressed tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ)-induced Nrf2 protein stability and antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase activity in HepG2 cells. We also found that metformin regulation of Nrf2 expression is mediated by a Keap1-independent mechanism and that metformin significantly attenuated Raf-ERK signaling to suppress Nrf2 expression in cancer cells. Inhibition of Raf-ERK signaling by PD98059 decreased Nrf2 mRNA expression in HepG2 cells, confirming that the inhibition of Nrf2 expression is mediated by an attenuation of Raf-ERK signaling in cancer cells. The inactivation of AMPK by siRNA, DN-AMPK or the pharmacological AMPK inhibitor compound C, revealed that metformin reduced HO-1 expression in an AMPK-independent manner. These results highlight the Raf-ERK-Nrf2 axis as a new molecular target in anticancer therapy in response to metformin treatment. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits HO-1 expression in cancer cells. • Metformin attenuates Raf-ERK-Nrf2 signaling. • Suppression of HO-1 by metformin is independent of AMPK. • HO-1 inhibition contributes to anti-proliferative effects of metformin.

  9. Effect of Sphingosine 1-Phosphate on Cyclo-Oxygenase-2 Expression, Prostaglandin E2 Secretion, and β2-Adrenergic Receptor Desensitization.

    PubMed

    Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Rahman, M Mostafizur; Oliver, Brian G; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-01-01

    Tachyphylaxis of the β2-adrenergic receptor limits the efficacy of bronchodilatory β2-agonists in respiratory disease. Cellular studies in airway smooth muscle (ASM) have shown that inflammatory mediators and infectious stimuli reduce β2-adrenergic responsiveness in a cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2-mediated, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-dependant manner. Herein, we show that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive sphingolipid that plays an important role in pathophysiology of asthma, also induces β2-adrenergic receptor desensitization in bronchial ASM cells and exerts hyporesponsiveness to β2-agonists. We treated ASM cells with S1P (1 μM) for up to 24 hours and then examined the temporal kinetics of COX-2 mRNA expression, protein up-regulation, and PGE2 secretion. S1P significantly enhanced COX-2 expression and PGE2 secretion, and this was repressed by the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib, the corticosteroid dexamethasone, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of COX-2 expression. In combination with another proinflammatory mediator found elevated in asthmatic airways, the cytokine TNF-α, we observed that S1P-induced COX-2 mRNA expression and protein up-regulation and PGE2 secretion from ASM cells were significantly enhanced. Notably, S1P induced heterologous β2-adrenergic desensitization, as measured by inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate production in response to the short-acting β2-agonist, salbutamol, and the long-acting β2-agonist, formoterol. Taken together, these data indicate that S1P represses β2-adrenergic activity in ASM cells by increasing COX-2-mediated PGE2 production, and suggest that this bioactive sphingolipid found elevated in asthma may contribute to β2-adrenergic desensitization. PMID:26098693

  10. Expression patterns reveal niche diversification in a marine microbial assemblage

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Scott M; Sharma, Shalabh; Booth, Melissa; Moran, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Resolving the ecological niches of coexisting marine microbial taxa is challenging due to the high species richness of microbial communities and the apparent functional redundancy in bacterial genomes and metagenomes. Here, we generated over 11 million Illumina reads of protein-encoding transcripts collected from well-mixed southeastern US coastal waters to characterize gene expression patterns distinguishing the ecological roles of hundreds of microbial taxa sharing the same environment. The taxa with highest in situ growth rates (based on relative abundance of ribosomal protein transcripts) were typically not the greatest contributors to community transcription, suggesting strong top-down ecological control, and their diverse transcriptomes indicated roles as metabolic generalists. The taxa with low in situ growth rates typically had low diversity transcriptomes dominated by specialized metabolisms. By identifying protein-encoding genes with atypically high expression for their level of conservation, unique functional roles of community members emerged related to substrate use (such as complex carbohydrates, fatty acids, methanesulfonate, taurine, tartrate, ectoine), alternative energy-conservation strategies (proteorhodopsin, AAnP, V-type pyrophosphatases, sulfur oxidation, hydrogen oxidation) and mechanisms for negotiating a heterogeneous environment (flagellar motility, gliding motility, adhesion strategies). On average, the heterotrophic bacterioplankton dedicated 7% of their transcriptomes to obtaining energy by non-heterotrophic means. This deep sequencing of a coastal bacterioplankton transcriptome provides the most highly resolved view of bacterioplankton niche dimensions yet available, uncovering a spectrum of unrecognized ecological strategies. PMID:22931830

  11. Reciprocal Effects of Oxidative Stress on Heme Oxygenase Expression and Activity Contributes to Reno-Vascular Abnormalities in EC-SOD Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Tomoko; Puri, Nitin; Sodhi, Komal; Bellner, Lars; Takahashi, Toru; Morita, Kiyoshi; Rezzani, Rita; Oury, Tim D.; Abraham, Nader G.

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) system is one of the key regulators of cellular redox homeostasis which responds to oxidative stress (ROS) via HO-1 induction. However, recent reports have suggested an inhibitory effect of ROS on HO activity. In light of these conflicting reports, this study was designed to evaluate effects of chronic oxidative stress on HO system and its role in contributing towards patho-physiological abnormalities observed in extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD, SOD3) KO animals. Experiments were performed in WT and EC-SOD(−/−) mice treated with and without HO inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). EC-SOD(−/−) mice exhibited oxidative stress, renal histopathological abnormalities, elevated blood pressure, impaired endothelial function, reduced p-eNOS, p-AKT and increased HO-1 expression; although, HO activity was significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated along with attenuation of serum adiponectin and vascular epoxide levels (P < 0.05). CoPP, in EC-SOD(−/−) mice, enhanced HO activity (P < 0.05) and reversed aforementioned pathophysiological abnormalities along with restoration of vascular EET, p-eNOS, p-AKT and serum adiponectin levels in these animals. Taken together our results implicate a causative role of insufficient activation of heme-HO-adiponectin system in pathophysiological abnormalities observed in animal models of chronic oxidative stress such as EC-SOD(−/−) mice. PMID:22292113

  12. Effect of CO{sub 2} concentration on carbonic anhydrase and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase expression in pea

    SciTech Connect

    Majeau, N.; Coleman, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of external CO{sub 2} concentration on the expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was examined in pea (Pisum sativum cv Little Marvel) leaves. Enzyme activities and their transcript levels were reduced in plants grown at 1000 {mu}L/L CO{sub 2} compared with plants grown in ambient air. Growth at 160 {mu}L/L CO{sub 2} also appeared to reduce steady-state transcript levels for the rbcS, the gene encoding the small subunit of Rubisco, and for ca, the gene encoding CA; however, rbcS transcripts were reduced to a greater extent at this concentration. Rubisco activity was slightly lower in plants grown at 160 {mu}L/L CO{sub 2}, and CA activity was significantly higher than that observed in air-grown plants. Transfer of plants from 1000 {mu}L/L to air levels of CO{sub 2} resulted in a rapid increase in both ca and rbcS transcript abundance in fully expanded leaves, followed by an increase in enzyme activity. Plants transferred from air to high-CO{sub 2} concentrations appeared to modulate transcript abundance and enzyme activity less quickly. Foliar carbohydrate levels were also examined in plants grown continuously at high and ambient CO{sub 2}, and following changes in growth conditions that rapidly altered ca and rbcS transcript abundance and enzyme activities. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Eriodictyol Protects Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death through Modulating ERK/Nrf2/ARE-Dependent Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Hana; Son, Gun Woo; Park, Hye Rim; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Yong Seek

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases is complex and may involve oxidative stress-related pathways. Eriodictyol is a flavonoid present in citrus fruits that demonstrates anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, neurotrophic, and antioxidant effects in a range of pathophysiological conditions including vascular diseases. Because oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the present study was designed to verify whether eriodictyol has therapeutic potential. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a phase II detoxifying enzyme, in endothelial cells is considered to be helpful in cardiovascular disease. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with eriodictyol showed the upregulation of HO-1 through extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathways. Further, eriodictyol treatment provided protection against hydrogen peroxide-provoked cell death. This protective effect was eliminated by treatment with a specific inhibitor of HO-1 and RNA interference-mediated knockdown of HO-1 expression. These data demonstrate that eriodictyol induces ERK/Nrf2/ARE-mediated HO-1 upregulation in human endothelial cells, which is directly associated with its vascular protection against oxidative stress-related endothelial injury, and propose that targeting the upregulation of HO-1 is a promising approach for therapeutic intervention in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26132561

  14. Eriodictyol Protects Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death through Modulating ERK/Nrf2/ARE-Dependent Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Hana; Son, Gun Woo; Park, Hye Rim; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Yong Seek

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases is complex and may involve oxidative stress-related pathways. Eriodictyol is a flavonoid present in citrus fruits that demonstrates anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, neurotrophic, and antioxidant effects in a range of pathophysiological conditions including vascular diseases. Because oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the present study was designed to verify whether eriodictyol has therapeutic potential. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a phase II detoxifying enzyme, in endothelial cells is considered to be helpful in cardiovascular disease. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with eriodictyol showed the upregulation of HO-1 through extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathways. Further, eriodictyol treatment provided protection against hydrogen peroxide-provoked cell death. This protective effect was eliminated by treatment with a specific inhibitor of HO-1 and RNA interference-mediated knockdown of HO-1 expression. These data demonstrate that eriodictyol induces ERK/Nrf2/ARE-mediated HO-1 upregulation in human endothelial cells, which is directly associated with its vascular protection against oxidative stress-related endothelial injury, and propose that targeting the upregulation of HO-1 is a promising approach for therapeutic intervention in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26132561

  15. Aspirin inhibits expression of sFLT1 from human cytotrophoblasts induced by hypoxia, via cyclo-oxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Raikwar, Nandita S; Santillan, Mark K; Santillan, Donna A; Thomas, Christie P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Elevated circulating soluble FLT1 (sFLT1) levels in preeclampsia may play a role in its development. Aspirin is recommended for prevention of preeclampsia. We hypothesized that aspirin may inhibit the production of sFlt1. Methods Placentas from women with and without preeclampsia were collected. Primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) were cultured from normal placentas and treated with aspirin, sc-560, a COX1 inhibitor or celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor. The expression of sFLT1, FLT1, COX1, COX2 was studied. The effect of aspirin on sFlt1 expression was also studied in HEK293 cells and in HTR-8/SVNeo cells. Results The expression of sFLT1 was increased in preeclamptic placentas compared to control placentas and the expression and release of sFLT1 increased in CTBs exposed to 2% O2 compared to controls. Aspirin at 3 and 12 mM concentration reduced the expression and release of sFLT1 in CTBs. Aspirin also inhibited sFlt1 expression from HTR-8/SVNeo and HEK293 cells. Sc-560, but not celecoxib, reduced sFLT1 expression and release from CTBs. Aspirin and sc-560 also reduced hypoxia-induced FLT1 mRNA expression and inhibited COX1 mRNA in CTBs. Discussion This study confirms that sFLT1 expression is increased in preeclamptic placentas and in CTBs exposed to hypoxia. Aspirin inhibits the production sFLT1 in CTBs and in HTR-8/SVNeo. Sc-560 recapitulated the effects of aspirin on sFLT1 expression and release in CTBs suggesting that the aspirin effect may be mediated via inhibition of COX1. The study increases our understanding of the mechanisms regulating sFlt1 expression and provides a plausible explanation for the effect of aspirin to prevent preeclampsia. PMID:25638730

  16. Low concentration of 4-hydroxy hexenal increases heme oxygenase-1 expression through activation of Nrf2 and antioxidative activity in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikado, Atsushi; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Morino, Katsutaro; Ugi, Satoshi; Kondo, Hajime; Makino, Taketoshi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Low doses of 4-HHE and 4-HNE induce HO-1 expression in vascular endothelial cells. {yields} 4-HHE and 4-HNE increase the intranuclear expression and DNA binding of Nrf2. {yields} 4-HHE and 4-HNE-induced HO-1 expression depends on the activation of Nrf2. {yields} Pretreatment with 4-HHE and 4-HNE prevents oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Large-scale clinical studies have shown that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) such as eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids reduce cardiovascular events without improving classical risk factors for atherosclerosis. Recent studies have proposed that direct actions of n-3 PUFAs themselves, or of their enzymatic metabolites, have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects on vascular cells. Although a recent study showed that plasma 4-hydroxy hexenal (4-HHE), a peroxidation product of n-3 PUFA, increased after supplementation of docosahexaenoic acid, the antiatherogenic effects of 4-HHE in vascular cells remain unclear. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that 4-HHE induces the antioxidative enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) through activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a master regulatory transcriptional factor, and prevents oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity in vascular endothelial cells. This mechanism could partly explain the cardioprotective effects of n-3 PUFAs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with 1-10 {mu}M 4-HHE or 4-hydroxy nonenal (4-HNE), a peroxidation product of n-6 PUFAs. Both 4-HHE and 4-HNE dose-dependently increased HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and intranuclear expression and DNA binding of Nrf2 at 5 {mu}M. Small interfering RNA for Nrf2 significantly reduced 4-HHE- or 4-HNE-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, pretreatment with 4-HHE or 4-HNE prevented tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, 4-HHE, a peroxidation product of n-3 PUFAs, stimulated

  17. A fraction from Dojuksan 30% ethanol extract exerts its anti-inflammatory effects through Nrf2-dependent heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Su; Ko, Wonmin; Bae, Gi-Sang; Park, Sung-Joo; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2016-02-01

    Dojuksan is a traditional herbal medicine used in Korea and China to treat urinary diseases. In the present study, we aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of an ethanol solvent extract of Dojuksan and a fraction (by bioassay-guided fractionation) derived from this extract, and to elucidate the specific mechanisms involved. The Dojuksan 30% ethanol extract (DEE) had a more significant and potent anti-inflammatory effect than the Dojuksan water extract (DWE). DEE markedly inhibited the production of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), as well as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) binding activity. We found that the anti-inflammatory effects of DEE were mediated by the induction of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). To further explore the anti-inflammatory effects of DEE, we generated 6 different fractions of DEE. Of these, DEE-5 decreased the production of NO more significantly than the other fractions. DEE-5 also significantly decreased the expression of iNOS and COX-2, and the production of NO, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-1β. In addition, DEE-5 also significantly increased HO-1 levels; HO-1 significanlty contributed to the inhibitory effects of DEE-5 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. In this study, we determined whether the choice of extraction solvent affects the biological activity of Dojuksan, a traditional herbal formula. Our findings demonstrate that DEE and a fraction derived from this extract exerts anti-inflammatory effects through Nrf2‑dependent HO-1 expression, and that DEE may thus have greater potential therapeutic application than DWE. PMID:26647788

  18. Characterization of Nrf2 activation and heme oxygenase-1 expression in NIH3T3 cells exposed to aqueous extracts of cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Knörr-Wittmann, Constanze; Hengstermann, Arnd; Gebel, Stephan; Alam, Jawed; Müller, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a complex chemical mixture estimated to be composed of up to 5000 different chemicals, many of which are prooxidant. Here we show that, at least in vitro, the cellular response designed to combat oxidative stress resulting from CS exposure is primarily controlled by the transcription factor Nrf2, a principal inducer of antioxidant and phase II-related genes. The prominent role of Nrf2 in the cellular response to CS is substantiated by the following observations: In NIH3T3 cells exposed to aqueous extracts of CS (i) Nrf2 is strongly stabilized and becomes detectable in nuclear extracts. (ii) Nuclear localization of Nrf2 coincides with increased DNA binding of a putative Nrf2/MafK heterodimer to its cognate cis-regulatory site, i.e., the antioxidant-responsive element (ARE). (iii) Studies on the regulatory elements of the oxidative stress-inducible gene heme oxygenase-1 (hmox1) using various hmox1 promoter/luciferase reporter constructs revealed that the strong CS-dependent expression of this gene is primarily governed by the distal enhancers 1 ("E1") and 2 ("E2"), which both contain three canonical ARE-like stress-responsive elements (StREs). Notably, depletion of Nrf2 levels caused by RNA interference significantly compromised CS-induced hmox1 promoter activation, based on the distinct Nrf2 sensitivity exhibited by E1 and E2. Finally, (iv) siRNA-dependent knock-down of Nrf2 completely abrogated CS-induced expression of phase II-related genes. Taken together, these results confirm the outstanding role of Nrf2 both in sensing (oxidant) stress and in orchestrating an efficient transcriptional response aimed at resolving the stressing conditions. PMID:16274879

  19. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Ectopic over-expression of BoHO1, a cabbage heme oxygenase gene, improved salt tolerance in Arabidopsis: A case study on proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xingliang; Dai, Chen; Li, Zhiwei; Zhou, Heng; Xiao, Tianyu; Xie, Yanjie; Shen, Wenbiao

    2016-06-01

    Plant heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the oxygenation of heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and free iron, and is regarded as a stress-responsive protein. Here, a cabbage HO1 gene (named as BoHO1) was isolated and characterized. BoHO1 shares a high degree homology with Arabidopsis AtHO1, and could locate in Arabidopsis chloroplast. BoHO1 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in cabbage tissues, and was responsive to several stimuli and chemicals. Genetic evidence illustrated that over-expression of BoHO1 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:BoHO1-1 and 35S:BoHO1-2) significantly alleviated salinity stress-inhibited seedling growth, which were accompanied with the re-establishment of reactive oxygen species and ion homeostasis. Comparative proteomic analysis was subsequently performed. Results revealed that protein abundance related to light reactions was greatly suppressed by NaCl stress in wild-type, whereas was partially recovered in 35S:BoHO1-1. Salinity stress also strongly activated stress-related metabolic processes in wild-type, i.e. carbon and energy metabolism, ammonium detoxification, and protein turnover, and these induced tendencies were more intensive in 35S:BoHO1-1. Particularly, proteins related to glutathione metabolism and ion homeostasis were specifically enriched in NaCl-stressed 35S:BoHO1-1. On the basis of above results, we propose that BoHO1 could activate multiple stress-responsive pathways to help Arabidopsis regain cellular homeostasis, thus presenting enhanced adaptation to salinity stress. PMID:27016873

  1. Expression Level and Subcellular Localization of Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulates Its Cytoprotective Properties in Response to Lung Injury: A Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Fumihiko; Go, Hayato; Murphy, Jennifer A.; La, Ping; Yang, Guang; Sengupta, Shaon; Fernando, Amal P.; Yohannes, Mekdes; Biswas, Chhanda; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Dennery, Phyllis A.

    2014-01-01

    Premature infants exposed to hyperoxia suffer acute and long-term pulmonary consequences. Nevertheless, neonates survive hyperoxia better than adults. The factors contributing to neonatal hyperoxic tolerance are not fully elucidated. In contrast to adults, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchored protein, is abundant in the neonatal lung but is not inducible in response to hyperoxia. The latter may be important, because very high levels of HO-1 overexpression are associated with significant oxygen cytotoxicity in vitro. Also, in contrast to adults, HO-1 localizes to the nucleus in neonatal mice exposed to hyperoxia. To understand the mechanisms by which HO-1 expression levels and subcellular localization contribute to hyperoxic tolerance in neonates, lung-specific transgenic mice expressing high or low levels of full-length HO-1 (cytoplasmic, HO-1-FL(H) or HO-1-FL(L)) or C-terminally truncated HO-1 (nuclear, Nuc-HO-1-TR) were generated. In HO-1-FL(L), the lungs had a normal alveolar appearance and lesser oxidative damage after hyperoxic exposure. In contrast, in HO-1-FL(H), alveolar wall thickness with type II cell hyperproliferation was observed as well worsened pulmonary function and evidence of abnormal lung cell hyperproliferation in recovery from hyperoxia. In Nuc-HO-1-TR, the lungs had increased DNA oxidative damage, increased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expression, and reduced poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) hydrolysis as well as reduced pulmonary function in recovery from hyperoxia. These data indicate that low cytoplasmic HO-1 levels protect against hyperoxia-induced lung injury by attenuating oxidative stress, whereas high cytoplasmic HO-1 levels worsen lung injury by increasing proliferation and decreasing apoptosis of alveolar type II cells. Enhanced lung nuclear HO-1 levels impaired recovery from hyperoxic lung injury by disabling PAR-dependent regulation of DNA repair. Lastly both high cytoplasmic and nuclear expression of

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 is involved in nitric oxide- and cGMP-induced α-Amy2/54 gene expression in GA-treated wheat aleurone layers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingzhu; Wang, Fangquan; Zhang, Chen; Xie, Yanjie; Han, Bin; Huang, Jingjing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-01-01

    Here, α-Amy2/54 gene expression was used as a molecular probe to investigate the interrelationship among nitric oxide (NO), cyclic GMP (cGMP), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in GA-treated wheat aleurone layers. The inducible expressions of α-Amy2/54 and α-amylase activity were respectively amplified by two NO-releasing compounds, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and spermine NONOate, in a GA-dependent fashion. Similar responses were observed when an inducer of HO-1, hemin-or one of its catalytic products, carbon monoxide (CO) in aqueous solution-was respectively added. The SNP-induced responses, mimicked by 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), a cGMP derivative, were NO-dependent. This conclusion was supported by the fact that endogenous NO overproduction was rapidly induced by SNP, and thereafter induction of α-Amy2/54 gene expression and increased α-amylase activity were sensitive to the NO scavenger. We further observed that the above induction triggered by SNP and 8-Br-cGMP was partially prevented by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), an inhibitor of HO-1. These blocking effects were clearly reversed by CO, confirming that the above response was HO-1-specific. Further analyses showed that both SNP and 8-Br-cGMP rapidly up-regulated HO-1 gene expression and increased HO activity, and SNP responses were sensitive to cPTIO and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY83583). Molecular evidence confirmed that GA-induced GAMYB and ABA-triggered PKABA1 transcripts were up-regulated or down-regulated by SNP, 8-Br-cGMP or CO cotreated with GA. Contrasting changes were observed when cPTIO, LY83583, or ZnPPIX was added. Together, our results suggested that HO-1 is involved in NO- and cGMP-induced α-Amy2/54 gene expression in GA-treated aleurone layers. PMID:23090695

  3. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreases hepatic cytochrome P-450, especially CYP2B1/2B2, and simultaneously induces heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in scurvy-prone ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Miura, Natsuko; Tokuda, Yuki; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) content in ascorbic acid deficiency was investigated in scurvy-prone ODS rats. First, male ODS rats were fed a diet containing sufficient ascorbic acid (control) or a diet without ascorbic acid (deficient) for 18 days, with or without the intraperitoneal injection of phenobarbital. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex IV subunit I protein, and simultaneously increased heme oxygenase-1 protein in microsomes and mitochondria. Next, heme oxygenase-1 inducers, that is lipopolysaccharide and hemin, were administered to phenobaribital-treated ODS rats fed sufficient ascorbic acid. The administration of these inducers decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial COX complex IV subunit I protein. These results suggested that the stimulation of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 expression by ascorbic acid deficiency caused the decrease in CYP content in liver. PMID:25036135

  4. Analyzing gene expression from marine microbial communities using environmental transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Poretsky, Rachel S; Gifford, Scott; Rinta-Kanto, Johanna; Vila-Costa, Maria; Moran, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Analogous to metagenomics, environmental transcriptomics (metatranscriptomics) retrieves and sequences environmental mRNAs from a microbial assemblage without prior knowledge of what genes the community might be expressing. Thus it provides the most unbiased perspective on community gene expression in situ. Environmental transcriptomics protocols are technically difficult since prokaryotic mRNAs generally lack the poly(A) tails that make isolation of eukaryotic messages relatively straightforward (1) and because of the relatively short half lives of mRNAs (2). In addition, mRNAs are much less abundant than rRNAs in total RNA extracts, thus an rRNA background often overwhelms mRNA signals. However, techniques for overcoming some of these difficulties have recently been developed. A procedure for analyzing environmental transcriptomes by creating clone libraries using random primers to reverse-transcribe and amplify environmental mRNAs was recently described was successful in two different natural environments, but results were biased by selection of the random primers used to initiate cDNA synthesis (3). Advances in linear amplification of mRNA obviate the need for random primers in the amplification step and make it possible to use less starting material decreasing the collection and processing time of samples and thereby minimizing RNA degradation (4). In vitro transcription methods for amplifying mRNA involve polyadenylating the mRNA and incorporating a T7 promoter onto the 3' end of the transcript. Amplified RNA (aRNA) can then be converted to double stranded cDNA using random hexamers and directly sequenced by pyrosequencing (5). A first use of this method at Station ALOHA demonstrated its utility for characterizing microbial community gene expression (6). PMID:19229184

  5. Differential Expression of the Demosponge (Suberites domuncula) Carotenoid Oxygenases in Response to Light: Protection Mechanism Against the Self-Produced Toxic Protein (Suberitine)

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Werner E. G.; Wang, Xiaohong; Binder, Michael; von Lintig, Johannes; Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz C.

    2012-01-01

    The demosponge Suberites domuncula has been described to contain high levels of a proteinaceous toxin, Suberitine, that displays haemolytic activityIn the present study this 7–8 kDa polypeptide has been isolated and was shown to exhibit also cytotoxic effects on cells of the same species. Addition of retinal, a recently identified metabolite of β-carotene that is abundantly present in S. domuncula was found to reduce both the haemolytic and the cell toxic activity of Suberitine at a molar ratio of 1:1. Spectroscopic analyses revealed that the interaction between β-carotene and Suberitine can be ascribed to a reversible energy transfer reaction. The enzyme that synthesises retinal in the sponge system is the β,β-carotene-15,15′-dioxygenase [carotene dioxygenase]. In order to clarify if this enzyme is the only β-carotene-metabolizing enzyme a further oxygenase had been identified and cloned, the (related) carotenoid oxygenase. In contrast to the dioxygenase, the carotenoid oxygenase could not degrade β-carotene or lycopene in Escherichia coli strains that produced these two carotenoids; therefore it had been termed related-carotenoid oxygenase. Exposure of primmorphs to light of different wavelengths from the visible spectrum resulted after 3 days in a strong upregulation of the dioxygenase in those 3D-cell aggregates that had been incubated with β-carotene. The strongest effect is seen with blue light at a maximum around 490 nm. It is concluded that the toxin Suberitine is non-covalently modified by retinal, the cleavage product from β-carotene via the enzyme carotene dioxygenase, a light inducible oxygenase. Hence, this study highlights that in S. domuncula the bioactive metabolite, retinal, has the property to detoxify its homologous toxin. PMID:22363229

  6. Hydrogen sulfide delays GA-triggered programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers by the modulation of glutathione homeostasis and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanjie; Zhang, Chen; Lai, Diwen; Sun, Ya; Samma, Muhammad Kaleem; Zhang, Jing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is considered as a cellular signaling intermediate in higher plants, but corresponding molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways in plant biology are still limited. In the present study, a combination of pharmacological and biochemical approaches was used to study the effect of H2S on the alleviation of GA-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone cells. The results showed that in contrast with the responses of ABA, GA brought about a gradual decrease of l-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) activity and H2S production, and thereafter PCD occurred. Exogenous H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) not only effectively blocked the decrease of endogenous H2S release, but also alleviated GA-triggered PCD in wheat aleurone cells. These responses were sensitive to hypotaurine (HT), a H2S scavenger, suggesting that this effect of NaHS was in an H2S-dependent fashion. Further experiment confirmed that H2S, rather than other sodium- or sulphur-containing compounds derived from the decomposing of NaHS, was attributed to the rescuing response. Importantly, the reversing effect was associated with glutathione (GSH) because the NaHS triggered increases of endogenous GSH content and the ratio of GSH/oxidized GSH (GSSG) in GA-treated layers, and the NaHS-mediated alleviation of PCD was markedly eliminated by l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO, a selective inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis). The inducible effect of NaHS was also ascribed to the modulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), because the specific inhibitor of HO-1 zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) significantly suppressed the NaHS-related responses. By contrast, the above inhibitory effects were reversed partially when carbon monoxide (CO) aqueous solution or bilirubin (BR), two of the by-products of HO-1, was added, respectively. NaHS-triggered HO-1 gene expression in GA-treated layers was also confirmed. Together, the above results clearly suggested that the H2S-delayed PCD in GA-treated wheat

  7. Activity-dependent labeling of oxygenase enzymes in a trichloroethene-contaminated groundwater site.

    PubMed

    Lee, M Hope; Clingenpeel, Scott C; Leiser, Owen P; Wymore, Ryan A; Sorenson, Kent S; Watwood, Mary E

    2008-05-01

    A variety of naturally occurring bacteria produce enzymes that cometabolically degrade trichloroethene (TCE), including organisms with aerobic oxygenases. Groundwater contaminated with TCE was collected from the aerobic region of the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory. Samples were evaluated with enzyme activity probes, and resulted in measurable detection of toluene oxygenase activity (6-79% of the total microbial cells). Wells from both inside and outside contaminated plume showed activity. Toluene oxygenase-specific PCR primers determined that toluene-degrading genes were present in all groundwater samples evaluated. In addition, bacterial isolates were obtained and possessed toluene oxygenase enzymes, demonstrated activity, and were dominated by the phylotype Pseudomonas. This study demonstrated, through the use of enzymatic probes and oxygenase gene identification, that indigenous microorganisms at a contaminated site were cometabolically active. Documentation such as this can be used to substantiate observations of natural attenuation of TCE-contaminated groundwater plumes. PMID:17904715

  8. Ecogenomics: Ensemble Analysis of Gene Expression in Microbial Communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sogin, Mitchell; DesMarais, David J.; Stahl, D. A.; Pace, Norman R.

    2001-01-01

    The hierarchical organization of microbial ecosystems determines process rates that shape Earth's environment, create the biomarker sedimentary and atmospheric signatures of life, and define the stage upon which major evolutionary events occurred. In order to understand how microorganisms have shaped the global environment of Earth and, potentially, other worlds, we must develop an experimental paradigm that links biogeochemical processes with ever-changing temporal and spatial distributions of microbial populations and their metabolic properties. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Utilization of Dioxygen by Carotenoid Cleavage Oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xuewu; Golczak, Marcin; Zhang, Jianye; Kleinberg, Katie A; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D

    2015-12-18

    Carotenoid cleavage oxygenases (CCOs) are non-heme, Fe(II)-dependent enzymes that participate in biologically important metabolic pathways involving carotenoids and apocarotenoids, including retinoids, stilbenes, and related compounds. CCOs typically catalyze the cleavage of non-aromatic double bonds by dioxygen (O2) to form aldehyde or ketone products. Expressed only in vertebrates, the RPE65 sub-group of CCOs catalyzes a non-canonical reaction consisting of concerted ester cleavage and trans-cis isomerization of all-trans-retinyl esters. It remains unclear whether the former group of CCOs functions as mono- or di-oxygenases. Additionally, a potential role for O2 in catalysis by the RPE65 group of CCOs has not been evaluated to date. Here, we investigated the pattern of oxygen incorporation into apocarotenoid products of Synechocystis apocarotenoid oxygenase. Reactions performed in the presence of (18)O-labeled water and (18)O2 revealed an unambiguous dioxygenase pattern of O2 incorporation into the reaction products. Substitution of Ala for Thr at position 136 of apocarotenoid oxygenase, a site predicted to govern the mono- versus dioxygenase tendency of CCOs, greatly reduced enzymatic activity without altering the dioxygenase labeling pattern. Reevaluation of the oxygen-labeling pattern of the resveratrol-cleaving CCO, NOV2, previously reported to be a monooxygenase, using a purified enzyme sample revealed that it too is a dioxygenase. We also demonstrated that bovine RPE65 is not dependent on O2 for its cleavage/isomerase activity. In conjunction with prior research, the results of this study resolve key issues regarding the utilization of O2 by CCOs and indicate that dioxygenase activity is a feature common among double bond-cleaving CCOs. PMID:26499794

  10. Aged garlic extract enhances heme oxygenase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit expression via the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-antioxidant response element signaling pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kei; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Morihara, Naoaki

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway defends cells against oxidative stress and regulates the cellular redox balance. Activation of this pathway induces a variety of antioxidant enzymes, resulting in the protection of our bodies against oxidative damage. It has been reported that aged garlic extract (AGE), a garlic preparation that is rich in water-soluble cysteinyl moieties, reduces oxidative stress and helps to ameliorate of cardiovascular, renal and hepatic diseases. We hypothesized that AGE enhances the expression of antioxidant enzymes via the Nrf2-ARE pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture. Gene expression of antioxidant enzymes was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and antioxidant enzymes expression were evaluated using western blotting analyses. We found that AGE promoted the accumulation of Nrf2 into the nucleus in a time- and dose-dependent manner and increased the gene expression and polypeptide level of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). Moreover, the effect of AGE in elevating the gene expression of HO-1 and GCLM was found to be mediated via Nrf2 activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that AGE induces the expression of HO-1 and GCLM, which are antioxidant enzymes, via activation of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. PMID:26507778

  11. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing heme oxygenase-1 expression through an estrogen receptor-related PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway in human dopaminergic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae), is a popular traditional herbal medicine. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), an active component commonly found in ginseng root, is a phytoestrogen that exerts estrogen-like activity. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen Rb1 inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with Rb1 significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Rb1 also up-regulated HO-1 expression, which conferred cytoprotection against 6-OHDA-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, Rb1 induced both Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of HO-1 expression and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Also, Rb1-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that Rb1 augments the cellular antioxidant defenses through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. Thus our study indicates that Rb1 has a partial cytoprotective role in dopaminergic cell culture systems.

  12. Oxygenases for aliphatic hydrocarbons and fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenases catalyzing the insertion of oxygen into either aliphatic hydrocarbons or fatty acids have great similarity. There are two classes of oxygenases: monooxygenases and dioxygenases. Dioxygenase inserts both atoms of molecular oxygen into a substrate, whereas monooxygenase incorporates one a...

  13. Targeting heme oxygenase after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Roetling, Jing; Lu, Xiangping; Regan, Raymond F.

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the primary event in approximately 10% of strokes, and has higher rates of morbidity and mortality than ischemic stroke. Experimental evidence suggests that the toxicity of hemoglobin and its degradation products contributes to secondary injury that may be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Hemin, the oxidized form of heme, accumulates in intracranial hematomas to cytotoxic levels. The rate limiting step of its breakdown is catalyzed by the heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes, which consist of inducible HO-1 and constitutively-expressed HO-2. The effect of these enzymes on perihematomal injury and neurological outcome has been investigated in ICH models using both genetic and pharmacological approaches to alter their expression, with variable results reported. These findings are summarized and reconciled in this review; therapeutic strategies that may optimize HO expression and activity after ICH are described. PMID:25642455

  14. BJ-1103, 6-aminopyridin-3-ol skeletal compound, modulates neuroprotective and anti-neuroinflammatory effects in murine hippocampal and microglial cells via Nrf2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Nam, Tae-Gyu; Jeong, Byeong-Seon; Jeong, Gil-Saeng

    2016-08-01

    BJ-1103, as a 6-aminopyridin-3-ol skeletal compound, was originally developed as an antioxidant against free radicals and oxidative stress was prepared from pyridoxine·HCl by the reported procedure. In the present study, we examined the effect of BJ-1103 on neuroprotection and neuroinflammation. Our data showed that BJ-1103 can protect HT22 cells against glutamate-induced cell cytotoxicity. And, BJ-1103 also inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory action. In addition, BJ-1103-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and elevated HO-1 activities in the two cell lines studied. Additionally, BJ-1103 treatment induced nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) and increased the promoter activity of antioxidant response elements (AREs). We have demonstrated using the Nrf2 siRNA, HO inhibitor or HO-1 siRNA that BJ-1103 suppressed neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation through the Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression. These results demonstrated that BJ-1103 may have good therapeutic agent against neurodegenerative diseases that are induced by oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. PMID:27238747

  15. Expression and characterization of full-length human heme oxygenase-1: the presence of intact membrane-binding region leads to increased binding affinity for NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Huber, Warren J; Backes, Wayne L

    2007-10-30

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is the chief regulatory enzyme in the oxidative degradation of heme to biliverdin. In the process of heme degradation, HO-1 receives the electrons necessary for catalysis from the flavoprotein NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR), releasing free iron and carbon monoxide. Much of the recent research involving heme oxygenase has been done using a 30 kDa soluble form of the enzyme, which lacks the membrane binding region (C-terminal 23 amino acids). The goal of this study was to express and purify a full-length human HO-1 (hHO-1) protein; however, due to the lability of the full-length form, a rapid purification procedure was required. This was accomplished by use of a glutathione-s-transferase (GST)-tagged hHO-1 construct. Although the procedure permitted the generation of a full-length HO-1, this form was contaminated with a 30 kDa degradation product that could not be eliminated. Therefore, attempts were made to remove a putative secondary thrombin cleavage site by a conservative mutation of amino acid 254, which replaces arginine with lysine. This mutation allowed the expression and purification of a full-length hHO-1 protein. Unlike wild type (WT) HO-1, the R254K mutant could be purified to a single 32 kDa protein capable of degrading heme at the same rate as the WT enzyme. The R254K full-length form had a specific activity of approximately 200-225 nmol of bilirubin h-1 nmol-1 HO-1 as compared to approximately 140-150 nmol of bilirubin h-1 nmol-1 for the WT form, which contains the 30 kDa contaminant. This is a 2-3-fold increase from the previously reported soluble 30 kDa HO-1, suggesting that the C-terminal 23 amino acids are essential for maximal catalytic activity. Because the membrane-spanning domain is present, the full-length hHO-1 has the potential to incorporate into phospholipid membranes, which can be reconstituted at known concentrations, in combination with other endoplasmic reticulum resident enzymes. PMID:17915953

  16. The plastid genome as a platform for the expression of microbial resistance genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, our fundamental understanding of host-microbe interaction has developed considerably. We have begun to tease out the genetic components that influence host resistance to microbial colonization. The use of advancing molecular technologies such as microarray expression profiling and...

  17. Warming Alters Expressions of Microbial Functional Genes Important to Ecosystem Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kai; Xie, Jianping; Zhou, Aifen; Liu, Feifei; Li, Dejun; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play critical roles in ecosystem functioning and are likely altered by climate warming. However, so far, little is known about effects of warming on microbial functional gene expressions. Here, we applied functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to analyze cDNA reversely transcribed from total RNA to assess expressed functional genes in active soil microbial communities after nine years of experimental warming in a tallgrass prairie. Our results showed that warming significantly altered the community wide gene expressions. Specifically, expressed genes for degrading more recalcitrant carbon were stimulated by warming, likely linked to the plant community shift toward more C4 species under warming and to decrease the long-term soil carbon stability. In addition, warming changed expressed genes in labile C degradation and N cycling in different directions (increase and decrease), possibly reflecting the dynamics of labile C and available N pools during sampling. However, the average abundances of expressed genes in phosphorus and sulfur cycling were all increased by warming, implying a stable trend of accelerated P and S processes which might be a mechanism to sustain higher plant growth. Furthermore, the expressed gene composition was closely related to both dynamic (e.g., soil moisture) and stable environmental attributes (e.g., C4 leaf C or N content), indicating that RNA analyses could also capture certain stable trends in the long-term treatment. Overall, this study revealed the importance of elucidating functional gene expressions of soil microbial community in enhancing our understanding of ecosystem responses to warming. PMID:27199978

  18. Recent advances in the heterologous expression of microbial natural product biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Ongley, Sarah E; Bian, Xiaoying; Neilan, Brett A; Müller, Rolf

    2013-08-01

    The heterologous expression of microbial natural product biosynthetic pathways coupled with advanced DNA engineering enables optimisation of product yields, functional elucidation of cryptic gene clusters, and generation of novel derivatives. This review summarises the recent advances in cloning and maintenance of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters for heterologous expression and the efforts fundamental for discovering novel natural products in the post-genomics era, with a focus on polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal polypeptide synthetases (NRPS). PMID:23832108

  19. Anti-inflammatory effect of methanol extract from Erigeron Canadensis L. may be involved with upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression and suppression of NFκB and MAPKs activation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jeehye; Sung, Misun; Kim, Younghwa; Ham, Hyeonmi; Jeong, Heon-Sang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES In this study, we determined the anti-inflammatory activities and the underlying molecular mechanisms of the methanol extract from Erigeron Canadensis L. (ECM) in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. MATERIALS/METHODS The potential anti-inflammatory properties of ECM were investigated by using RAW264.7 macrophages. We used western blot assays and real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect protein and mRNA expression, respectively. Luciferase assays were performed to determine the transactivity of transcription factors. RESULTS ECM significantly inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-derived NO and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) derived PGE2 production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. These inhibitory effects of ECM were accompanied by decreases in LPS-induced nuclear translocations and transactivities of NFκB. Moreover, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) including extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2), p38, and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was significantly suppressed by ECM in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Further studies demonstrated that ECM by itself induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression at the protein levels in dose-dependent manner. However, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), a selective HO-1 inhibitor, abolished the ECM-induced suppression of NO production. CONCLUSIONS These results suggested that ECM-induced HO-1 expression was partly responsible for the resulting anti-inflammatory effects. These findings suggest that ECM exerts anti-inflammatory actions and help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the potential therapeutic values of Erigeron Canadensis L. PMID:25110553

  20. Presence and Expression of Microbial Genes Regulating Soil Nitrogen Dynamics Along the Tanana River Successional Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, R. D.; Rogers, S. L.

    2004-12-01

    We report on work to assess the functional gene sequences for soil microbiota that control nitrogen cycle pathways along the successional sequence (willow, alder, poplar, white spruce, black spruce) on the Tanana River floodplain, Interior Alaska. Microbial DNA and mRNA were extracted from soils (0-10 cm depth) for amoA (ammonium monooxygenase), nifH (nitrogenase reductase), napA (nitrate reductase), and nirS and nirK (nitrite reductase) genes. Gene presence was determined by amplification of a conserved sequence of each gene employing sequence specific oligonucleotide primers and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Expression of the genes was measured via nested reverse transcriptase PCR amplification of the extracted mRNA. Amplified PCR products were visualized on agarose electrophoresis gels. All five successional stages show evidence for the presence and expression of microbial genes that regulate N fixation (free-living), nitrification, and nitrate reduction. We detected (1) nifH, napA, and nirK presence and amoA expression (mRNA production) for all five successional stages and (2) nirS and amoA presence and nifH, nirK, and napA expression for early successional stages (willow, alder, poplar). The results highlight that the existing body of previous process-level work has not sufficiently considered the microbial potential for a nitrate economy and free-living N fixation along the complete floodplain successional sequence.

  1. Microbial expression profiles in the rhizosphere of willows depend on soil contamination

    PubMed Central

    Yergeau, Etienne; Sanschagrin, Sylvie; Maynard, Christine; St-Arnaud, Marc; Greer, Charles W

    2014-01-01

    The goal of phytoremediation is to use plants to immobilize, extract or degrade organic and inorganic pollutants. In the case of organic contaminants, plants essentially act indirectly through the stimulation of rhizosphere microorganisms. A detailed understanding of the effect plants have on the activities of rhizosphere microorganisms could help optimize phytoremediation systems and enhance their use. In this study, willows were planted in contaminated and non-contaminated soils in a greenhouse, and the active microbial communities and the expression of functional genes in the rhizosphere and bulk soil were compared. Ion Torrent sequencing of 16S rRNA and Illumina sequencing of mRNA were performed. Genes related to carbon and amino-acid uptake and utilization were upregulated in the willow rhizosphere, providing indirect evidence of the compositional content of the root exudates. Related to this increased nutrient input, several microbial taxa showed a significant increase in activity in the rhizosphere. The extent of the rhizosphere stimulation varied markedly with soil contamination levels. The combined selective pressure of contaminants and rhizosphere resulted in higher expression of genes related to competition (antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation) in the contaminated rhizosphere. Genes related to hydrocarbon degradation were generally more expressed in contaminated soils, but the exact complement of genes induced was different for bulk and rhizosphere soils. Together, these results provide an unprecedented view of microbial gene expression in the plant rhizosphere during phytoremediation. PMID:24067257

  2. Fisetin inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammatory action and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells through PI3K/AKT/Nrf-2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung-Hee; Jeong, Gil-Saeng

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative skin damage and skin inflammation play key roles in the pathogenesis of skin-related diseases. Fisetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid abundantly found in several vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been shown to exert various positive biological effects, such as anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, neuroprotective and anti-oxidative effects. In this study, we investigate the skin protective effects and anti-inflammatory properties of fisetin in hydrogen peroxide- and TNF-α-challenged human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. When HaCaT cells were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of fisetin (1-20μM), heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, fisetin dose-dependently increased cell viability and reduced ROS production in hydrogen peroxide-treated HaCaT cells. Fisetin also inhibited the production of NO, PGE2 IL-1β, IL-6, expression of iNOS and COX-2, and activation of NF-κB in HaCaT cells treated with TNF-α. Fisetin induced Nrf2 translocation to the nuclei. HO-1 siRNA transient transfection reversed the effects of fisetin on cytoprotection, ROS reduction, NO, PGE2, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α production, and NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Moreover, fisetin increased Akt phosphorylation and a PI3K pathway inhibitor (LY294002) abolished fisetin-induced cytoprotection and NO inhibition. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a beneficial role of fisetin in skin therapy. PMID:26590114

  3. The Heme Oxygenase-1 Inducer THI-56 Negatively Regulates iNOS Expression and HMGB1 Release in LPS-Activated RAW 264.7 Cells and CLP-Induced Septic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Min; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear DNA binding protein high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has recently been suggested to act as a late mediator of septic shock. The effect of ((S)-6,7-dihydroxy-1-(4-hydroxynaphthylmethyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, also known as THI-56, in an experimental model of sepsis was investigated. THI-56 exhibited potent anti-inflammatory properties in response to LPS in RAW 264.7 cells. In particular, THI-56 significantly inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the release of HMGB1 in activated macrophages. THI-56 activated NE-F2-regulated factor 2 (Nrf-2)/heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The specific knockdown of the HO-1 gene by HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of THI-56 on iNOS expression and HMGB1 release in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Importantly, THI-56 administration protected animals from death induced by either a lethal dose of LPS or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Furthermore, the ALT, AST, BUN, creatinine, and HMGB1 levels in the blood were significantly increased in CLP-induced septic mice, and the administration of THI-56 reduced these levels in a concentration-dependent and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX)-sensitive manner. In addition, the administration of THI-56 significantly ameliorated not only lung damage but also macrophage infiltration in the livers of CLP-induced septic mice, and these effects were also abrogated in the presence of ZnPPIX. Thus, we conclude that THI-56 significantly attenuates the proinflammatory response induced by LPS and reduces organ damage in a CLP-induced sepsis model through the upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1. PMID:24098466

  4. Subsets of human dendritic cell precursors express different toll-like receptors and respond to different microbial antigens.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, N; Ho, S; Antonenko, S; Malefyt, R W; Kastelein, R A; Bazan, F; Liu, Y J

    2001-09-17

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are ancient microbial pattern recognition receptors highly conserved from Drosophila to humans. To investigate if subsets of human dendritic cell precursors (pre-DC), including monocytes (pre-DC1), plasmacytoid DC precursors (pre-DC2), and CD11c(+) immature DCs (imDCs) are developed to recognize different microbes or microbial antigens, we studied their TLR expression and responses to microbial antigens. We demonstrate that whereas monocytes preferentially express TLR 1, 2, 4, 5, and 8, plasmacytoid pre-DC strongly express TLR 7 and 9. In accordance with these TLR expression profiles, monocytes respond to the known microbial ligands for TLR2 (peptidoglycan [PGN], lipoteichoic acid) and TLR4 (lipopolysaccharide), by producing tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6. In contrast, plasmacytoid pre-DCs only respond to the microbial TLR9-ligand, CpG-ODNs (oligodeoxynucleotides [ODNs] containing unmethylated CpG motifs), by producing IFN-alpha. CD11c(+) imDCs preferentially express TLR 1, 2, and 3 and respond to TLR 2-ligand PGN by producing large amounts of TNF-alpha, and to viral double-stranded RNA-like molecule poly I:C, by producing IFN-alpha and IL-12. The expression of distinct sets of TLRs and the corresponding difference in reactivity to microbial molecules among subsets of pre-DCs and imDCs support the concept that they have developed through distinct evolutionary pathways to recognize different microbial antigens. PMID:11561001

  5. Subsets of Human Dendritic Cell Precursors Express Different Toll-like Receptors and Respond to Different Microbial Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Ho, Stephen; Antonenko, Svetlana; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Kastelein, Robert A.; Bazan, Fernando; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2001-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are ancient microbial pattern recognition receptors highly conserved from Drosophila to humans. To investigate if subsets of human dendritic cell precursors (pre-DC), including monocytes (pre-DC1), plasmacytoid DC precursors (pre-DC2), and CD11c+ immature DCs (imDCs) are developed to recognize different microbes or microbial antigens, we studied their TLR expression and responses to microbial antigens. We demonstrate that whereas monocytes preferentially express TLR 1, 2, 4, 5, and 8, plasmacytoid pre-DC strongly express TLR 7 and 9. In accordance with these TLR expression profiles, monocytes respond to the known microbial ligands for TLR2 (peptidoglycan [PGN], lipoteichoic acid) and TLR4 (lipopolysaccharide), by producing tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6. In contrast, plasmacytoid pre-DCs only respond to the microbial TLR9-ligand, CpG-ODNs (oligodeoxynucleotides [ODNs] containing unmethylated CpG motifs), by producing IFN-α. CD11c+ imDCs preferentially express TLR 1, 2, and 3 and respond to TLR 2-ligand PGN by producing large amounts of TNF-α, and to viral double-stranded RNA-like molecule poly I:C, by producing IFN-α and IL-12. The expression of distinct sets of TLRs and the corresponding difference in reactivity to microbial molecules among subsets of pre-DCs and imDCs support the concept that they have developed through distinct evolutionary pathways to recognize different microbial antigens. PMID:11561001

  6. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harb, Moustapha; Wei, Chun-Hai; Wang, Nan; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower. PMID:27441825

  7. Modifying the maker: Oxygenases target ribosome biology

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Qinqin; Feng, Tianshu; Coleman, Mathew L

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of the eukaryotic protein synthesis machinery is partly driven by extensive and diverse modifications to associated proteins and RNAs. These modifications can have important roles in regulating translation factor activity and ribosome biogenesis and function. Further investigation of ‘translational modifications’ is warranted considering the growing evidence implicating protein synthesis as a critical point of gene expression control that is commonly deregulated in disease. New evidence suggests that translation is a major new target for oxidative modifications, specifically hydroxylations and demethylations, which generally are catalyzed by a family of emerging oxygenase enzymes that act at the interface of nutrient availability and metabolism. This review summarizes what is currently known about the role or these enzymes in targeting rRNA synthesis, protein translation and associated cellular processes. PMID:26779412

  8. Modifying the maker: Oxygenases target ribosome biology.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qinqin; Feng, Tianshu; Coleman, Mathew L

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of the eukaryotic protein synthesis machinery is partly driven by extensive and diverse modifications to associated proteins and RNAs. These modifications can have important roles in regulating translation factor activity and ribosome biogenesis and function. Further investigation of 'translational modifications' is warranted considering the growing evidence implicating protein synthesis as a critical point of gene expression control that is commonly deregulated in disease. New evidence suggests that translation is a major new target for oxidative modifications, specifically hydroxylations and demethylations, which generally are catalyzed by a family of emerging oxygenase enzymes that act at the interface of nutrient availability and metabolism. This review summarizes what is currently known about the role or these enzymes in targeting rRNA synthesis, protein translation and associated cellular processes. PMID:26779412

  9. 2,3,5,6-Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) down-regulated arsenic-induced heme oxygenase-1 and ARS2 expression by inhibiting Nrf2, NF-κB, AP-1 and MAPK pathways in human proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xuezhong; Ivanov, Vladimir N; Hei, Tom K

    2016-09-01

    Our recent study demonstrated that sodium arsenite at a clinically relevant dose induced nephrotoxicity in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line HK-2, which could be inhibited by natural product 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) with antioxidant activity. The present study demonstrated that arsenic exposure resulted in protein and enzymatic induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in dose- and time-dependent manners in HK-2 cells. Blocking HO-1 enzymatic activity by zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) augmented arsenic-induced apoptosis, ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting a critical role for HO-1 as a renal protectant in this procession. On the other hand, TMP, upstream of HO-1, inhibited arsenic-induced ROS production and ROS-dependent HO-1 expression. TMP also prevented mitochondria dysfunction and suppressed activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in HK-2 cells. Our results revealed that the regulation of arsenic-induced HO-1 expression was performed through multiple ROS-dependent signal pathways and the corresponding transcription factors, including p38 MAPK and JNK (but not ERK), AP-1, Nrf2 and NF-κB. TMP inhibited arsenic-induced activations of JNK, p38 MAPK, ERK, AP-1 and Nrf2 and block HO-1 protein expression. The present study, furthermore, demonstrated arsenic-induced expression of arsenic response protein 2 (ARS2) that was regulated by p38 MAPK, ERK and NF-κB. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that ARS2 involved in arsenic-induced nephrotoxicity, while TMP pretreatment prevented such an up-regulation of ARS2 in HK-2 cells. Given ARS2 and HO-1 sharing the similar regulation mechanism, we speculated that ARS2 might also mediate cell survival in this procession. In summary, our study highlighted a role of HO-1 in the protection against arsenic-induced cytotoxicity downstream from the primary targets of TMP and further indicated that TMP may be used as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of arsenic

  10. Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how sequential expression mediates soil carbon stabilization and turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Mary

    2015-03-31

    It is now understood that most plant C is utilized or transformed by soil microorganisms en route to stabilization. Hence the composition of microbial communities that mediate decomposition and transformation of root C is critical, as are the metabolic capabilities of these communities. The change in composition and function of the C-transforming microbial communities over time in effect defines the biological component of soil C stabilization. Our research was designed to test 2 general hypotheses; the first two hypotheses are discussed first; H1: Root-exudate interactions with soil microbial populations results in the expression of enzymatic capacities for macromolecular, complex carbon decomposition; and H2: Microbial communities surrounding roots undergo taxonomic succession linked to functional gene activities as roots grow, mature, and decompose in soil. Over the term of the project we made significant progress in 1) quantifying the temporal pattern of root interactions with the soil decomposing community and 2) characterizing the role of root exudates in mediating these interactions.

  11. Escherichia coli heme oxygenase modulates host innate immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Maharshak, Nitsan; Ryu, Hyungjin Sally; Fan, Ting-Jia; Onyiah, Joseph C.; Schulz, Stephanie; Otterbein, Sherrie L.; Wong, Ron; Hansen, Jonathan; Otterbein, Leo E; Carroll, Ian; Plevy, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of mammalian heme oxygenase-1 and exposure of animals to carbon monoxide ameliorates experimental colitis. When enteric bacteria, including Escherichia coli, are exposed to low iron conditions, they express an heme oxygenase-like enzyme, chuS, and metabolize heme into iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide. Given the abundance of enteric bacteria residing in the intestinal lumen, we hypothesized that commensal intestinal bacteria may be a significant source of carbon monoxide, with the consequence that enteric bacteria expressing chuS and other heme oxygenase -like molecules suppress inflammatory immune responses through release of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide exposed mice have altered enteric bacterial composition and increased E. coli 16S and chuS DNA by real-time PCR. Moreover, severity of experimental colitis correlates with increased E. coli chuS expression in IL-10 deficient mice. To explore functional roles, E. coli were genetically modified to overexpress chuS or the chuS gene was deleted. Co-culture of chuS-overexpressing E. coli with bone marrow derived macrophages results in decreased IL-12 p40 and increased IL-10 secretion compared to wild-type or chuS-deficient E. coli. Mice infected with chuS-overexpressing E. coli have increased levels of hepatic carbon monoxide and decreased serum IL-12 p40 compared to mice infected with chuS-deficient E. coli. Thus, carbon monoxide alters the composition of the commensal intestinal microbiota and expands E. coli populations harboring the chuS gene. These bacteria are capable of attenuating innate immune responses through expression of chuS. Bacterial heme oxygenase -like molecules and bacterial-derived carbon monoxide may represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory conditions. PMID:26146866

  12. The coordinated increased expression of biliverdin reductase and heme oxygenase-2 promotes cardiomyocyte survival: a reductase-based peptide counters β-adrenergic receptor ligand-mediated cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bo; Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Brookes, Paul S.; Maines, Mahin D.

    2011-01-01

    HO-2 oxidizes heme to CO and biliverdin; the latter is reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase (BVR). In addition, HO-2 is a redox-sensitive K/Ca2-associated protein, and BVR is an S/T/Y kinase. The two enzymes are components of cellular defense mechanisms. This is the first reporting of regulation of HO-2 by BVR and that their coordinated increase in isolated myocytes and intact heart protects against cardiotoxicity of β-adrenergic receptor activation by isoproterenol (ISO). The induction of BVR mRNA, protein, and activity and HO-2 protein was maintained for ≥96 h; increase in HO-1 was modest and transient. In isolated cardiomyocytes, experiments with cycloheximide, proteasome inhibitor MG-132, and siBVR suggested BVR-mediated stabilization of HO-2. In both models, activation of BVR offered protection against the ligand's stimulation of apoptosis. Two human BVR-based peptides known to inhibit and activate the reductase, KKRILHC281 and KYCCSRK296, respectively, were tested in the intact heart. Perfusion of the heart with the inhibitory peptide blocked ISO-mediated BVR activation and augmented apoptosis; conversely, perfusion with the activating peptide inhibited apoptosis. At the functional level, peptide-mediated inhibition of BVR was accompanied by dysfunction of the left ventricle and decrease in HO-2 protein levels. Perfusion of the organ with the activating peptide preserved the left ventricular contractile function and was accompanied by increased levels of HO-2 protein. Finding that BVR and HO-2 levels, myocyte apoptosis, and contractile function of the heart can be modulated by small human BVR-based peptides offers a promising therapeutic approach for treatment of cardiac dysfunctions.—Ding, B., Gibbs, P. E. M., Brookes, P. S., Maines, M. D. The coordinated increased expression of biliverdin reductase and heme oxygenase-2 promotes cardiomyocyte survival; a reductase-based peptide counters β-adrenergic receptor ligand-mediated cardiac dysfunction

  13. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) Gene Expression and Photosynthetic Activity in Nutrient-enriched Mesocosm Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, M.; Davies, J. T.; Weston, K.; Crawford, D. W.; Purdie, D. A.

    1998-02-01

    The temporal variability in carbon dioxide fixation rates and the relative abundance ofrbcLSmRNA (encoding the large subunit of the Calvin cycle enzyme, RubisCO) was determined for nutrient-stimulated populations of marine phytoplankton enclosed in diatom-dominated and coccolithophorid-dominated mesocosms. Both mesocosms were characterized by successive bloom events that were preceded by marked increases in the level of RubisCO gene expression. In general, maxima inrbcLmRNA abundance showed the strongest temporal covariation with peaks in the value of the photosynthetic parameter PBmax, the chlorophyll-specific maximum rate of CO2fixation. Somewhat looser temporal co-variations were observed between peaks in transcript levels and maxima in chlorophyll concentrations or phytoplankton biomass. The specific contribution of the haptophyteEmiliania huxleyito the overall level of gene expression in the diatom-dominated enclosure was investigated using an homologousrbcLgene probe. The results were compared to data obtained at lower hybridization stringency using a generalrbcLprobe originating from the oceanic cyanobacteriumSynechococcusWH8103. The comparative data suggest that, whereas diatoms made a substantial contribution to the mRNA signal during the initial part of the experiment, the contribution ofE. huxleyito the overall level of gene expression increased as the experiment progressed.

  14. Cobalt induces heme oxygenase-1 expression by a hypoxia-inducible factor-independent mechanism in Chinese hamster ovary cells: regulation by Nrf2 and MafG transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Gong, P; Hu, B; Stewart, D; Ellerbe, M; Figueroa, Y G; Blank, V; Beckman, B S; Alam, J

    2001-07-20

    We have shown previously that activation of the heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1) gene by hypoxia in aortic smooth muscle cells is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). In mutant (Ka13) Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking HIF activity, accumulation of ho-1 mRNA in response to hypoxia and the hypoxia-mimetic CoCl(2) was similar to that observed in wild type (K1) cells. These results support the existence of HIF-dependent and HIF-independent mechanisms for ho-1 gene activation by hypoxia and CoCl(2). In Ka13 cells, CoCl(2) stimulated expression of a luciferase reporter gene under the control of a 15-kilobase pair mouse ho-1 promoter (pHO15luc). Mutation analyses identified the cobalt-responsive sequences as the stress-response elements (StREs). In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, two specific StRE-protein complexes were observed using extracts from Ka13 cells. In response to cobalt, the level of the slower migrating complex X increased, whereas that of complex Y decreased, in a time-dependent manner. Members of the AP-1 superfamily of basic-leucine zipper factors bind to the StRE. Antibody supershift electrophoretic mobility shift assays did not detect Jun, Fos, or ATF/CREB proteins but identified Nrf2 and the small Maf protein, MafG, as components of complex X. Furthermore, dominant-negative mutants of Nrf2 and small Maf, but not of other bZIP factors, attenuated cobalt-mediated gene activation. Additional experiments demonstrated that induction by cobalt does not result from increased expression of MafG or regulated nuclear translocation of Nrf2 but is dependent on cellular oxidative stress. Unlike cobalt, hypoxia did not stimulate pHO15luc expression and did not increase StRE binding activity, indicating distinct mechanisms for ho-1 gene activation by cobalt and hypoxia in Chinese hamster ovary cells. PMID:11356853

  15. Sulforaphane Suppresses Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Up-Regulating Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression through PI3K/Nrf2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jung-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Chun; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Hsu, Yao-Chin; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-induced oxidative stress is a major risk factor for the development of HCV-associated liver disease. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an antioxidant phytocompound that acts against cellular oxidative stress and tumorigenesis. However, there is little known about its anti-viral activity. In this study, we demonstrated that SFN significantly suppressed HCV protein and RNA levels in HCV replicon cells and infectious system, with an IC50 value of 5.7 ± 0.2 μM. Moreover, combination of SFN with anti-viral drugs displayed synergistic effects in the suppression of HCV replication. In addition, we found nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/HO-1 induction in response to SFN and determined the signaling pathways involved in this process, including inhibition of NS3 protease activity and induction of IFN response. In contrast, the anti-viral activities were attenuated by knockdown of HO-1 with specific inhibitor (SnPP) and shRNA, suggesting that anti-HCV activity of SFN is dependent on HO-1 expression. Otherwise, SFN stimulated the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) leading Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression against HCV replication. Overall, our results indicated that HO-1 is essential in SFN-mediated anti-HCV activity and provide new insights in the molecular mechanism of SFN in HCV replication. PMID:27023634

  16. Sulforaphane Suppresses Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Up-Regulating Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression through PI3K/Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Hsu, Yao-Chin; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-induced oxidative stress is a major risk factor for the development of HCV-associated liver disease. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an antioxidant phytocompound that acts against cellular oxidative stress and tumorigenesis. However, there is little known about its anti-viral activity. In this study, we demonstrated that SFN significantly suppressed HCV protein and RNA levels in HCV replicon cells and infectious system, with an IC50 value of 5.7 ± 0.2 μM. Moreover, combination of SFN with anti-viral drugs displayed synergistic effects in the suppression of HCV replication. In addition, we found nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/HO-1 induction in response to SFN and determined the signaling pathways involved in this process, including inhibition of NS3 protease activity and induction of IFN response. In contrast, the anti-viral activities were attenuated by knockdown of HO-1 with specific inhibitor (SnPP) and shRNA, suggesting that anti-HCV activity of SFN is dependent on HO-1 expression. Otherwise, SFN stimulated the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) leading Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression against HCV replication. Overall, our results indicated that HO-1 is essential in SFN-mediated anti-HCV activity and provide new insights in the molecular mechanism of SFN in HCV replication. PMID:27023634

  17. Warming rate drives microbial limitation and enzyme expression during peat decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglett, P.; Sihi, D.; Inglett, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments of enzyme-based decomposition models highlight the importance of enzyme kinetics with warming, but most modeling exercises are based on studies with a step-wise warming. This approach may mask the effect of temperature in controlling in-situ activities as in most ecosystems soil temperature change more gradually than air temperature. We conducted an experiment to test the effects of contrasting warming rates on the kinetics of C, N, and P degradation enzymes in subtropical peat soils. We also wanted to evaluate if the stoichiometry of enzyme kinetics shifts under contrasting warming rates and if so, how does it relate to the stoichiometry in microbial biomass. Contrasting warming rates altered microbial biomass stoichiometry leading to differing patterns of enzyme expression and microbial nutrient limitation. Activity (higher Vmax) and efficiency (lower Km) of C acquisition enzymes were greater in the step treatment; however, expressions of nutrient (N and P) acquiring enzymes were enhanced in the ramp treatment at the end of the experiment. In the step treatment, there was a typical pattern of an initial peak in the Vmax and drop in the Km for all enzyme groups followed by later adjustments. On the other hand, a consistent increase in Vmax and decline in Km of all enzyme groups were observed in the slow warming treatment. These changes were sufficient to alter microbial identity (as indicated by enzyme Km and biomass stoichiometry) with two apparently stable endpoints under contrasting warming rates. This observation resembles the concept of alternate stable states and highlights a need for improved representation of warming in models.

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Stuart T.; Midwinter, Robyn G.; Coupland, Lucy A.; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S.; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Chong, Beng H.; Parish, Christopher R.; Stocker, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119+-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119+-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes. PMID:25682599

  19. Microbial Gene Abundance and Expression Patterns across a River to Ocean Salinity Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Caroline S.; Crump, Byron C.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate the biogeochemical cycles that drive ecosystems, and it is important to understand how these communities are affected by changing environmental conditions, especially in complex coastal zones. As fresh and marine waters mix in estuaries and river plumes, the salinity, temperature, and nutrient gradients that are generated strongly influence bacterioplankton community structure, yet, a parallel change in functional diversity has not been described. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses were conducted on five water samples spanning the salinity gradient of the Columbia River coastal margin, including river, estuary, plume, and ocean, in August 2010. Samples were pre-filtered through 3 μm filters and collected on 0.2 μm filters, thus results were focused on changes among free-living microbial communities. Results from metagenomic 16S rRNA sequences showed taxonomically distinct bacterial communities in river, estuary, and coastal ocean. Despite the strong salinity gradient observed over sampling locations (0 to 33), the functional gene profiles in the metagenomes were very similar from river to ocean with an average similarity of 82%. The metatranscriptomes, however, had an average similarity of 31%. Although differences were few among the metagenomes, we observed a change from river to ocean in the abundance of genes encoding for catabolic pathways, osmoregulators, and metal transporters. Additionally, genes specifying both bacterial oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant and expressed in the estuary and plume. Denitrification genes were found throughout the Columbia River coastal margin, and most highly expressed in the estuary. Across a river to ocean gradient, the free-living microbial community followed three different patterns of diversity: 1) the taxonomy of the community changed strongly with salinity, 2) metabolic potential was highly similar across samples, with few differences in functional gene abundance

  20. Microbial Gene Abundance and Expression Patterns across a River to Ocean Salinity Gradient.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Crump, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities mediate the biogeochemical cycles that drive ecosystems, and it is important to understand how these communities are affected by changing environmental conditions, especially in complex coastal zones. As fresh and marine waters mix in estuaries and river plumes, the salinity, temperature, and nutrient gradients that are generated strongly influence bacterioplankton community structure, yet, a parallel change in functional diversity has not been described. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses were conducted on five water samples spanning the salinity gradient of the Columbia River coastal margin, including river, estuary, plume, and ocean, in August 2010. Samples were pre-filtered through 3 μm filters and collected on 0.2 μm filters, thus results were focused on changes among free-living microbial communities. Results from metagenomic 16S rRNA sequences showed taxonomically distinct bacterial communities in river, estuary, and coastal ocean. Despite the strong salinity gradient observed over sampling locations (0 to 33), the functional gene profiles in the metagenomes were very similar from river to ocean with an average similarity of 82%. The metatranscriptomes, however, had an average similarity of 31%. Although differences were few among the metagenomes, we observed a change from river to ocean in the abundance of genes encoding for catabolic pathways, osmoregulators, and metal transporters. Additionally, genes specifying both bacterial oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were abundant and expressed in the estuary and plume. Denitrification genes were found throughout the Columbia River coastal margin, and most highly expressed in the estuary. Across a river to ocean gradient, the free-living microbial community followed three different patterns of diversity: 1) the taxonomy of the community changed strongly with salinity, 2) metabolic potential was highly similar across samples, with few differences in functional gene abundance

  1. Effects of CaMSRB2-Expressing Transgenic Rice Cultivation on Soil Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Soo-In; Oh, Young-Ju; Kim, Byung-Yong; Cho, Hyun-Suk

    2016-07-28

    Although many studies on the effects of genetically modified (GM) crops on soil microorganisms have been carried out over the past decades, they have provided contradictory information, even for the same GM crop, owing to the diversity of the soil environments in which they were conducted. This inconsistency in results suggests that the effects of GM crops on soil microorganisms should be considered from many aspects. In this study, we investigated the effects of the GM drought-tolerant rice MSRB2-Bar-8, which expresses the CaMSRB2 gene, on soil microorganisms based on the culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. To this end, rhizosphere soils of GM and non-GM (IM) rice were analyzed for soil chemistry, population densities of soil microorganisms, and microbial community structure (using pyrosequencing technology) at three growth stages (seedling, tillering, and maturity). There was no significant difference in the soil chemistry between GM and non-GM rice. The microbial densities of the GM soils were found to be within the range of those of the non-GM rice. In the pyrosequencing analyses, Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi were dominant at the seedling stage, while Chloroflexi showed dominance over Proteobacteria at the maturity stage in both the GM and non-GM soils. An UPGMA dendrogram showed that the soil microbial communities were clustered by growth stage. Taken together, the results from this study suggest that the effects of MSRB2-Bar-8 cultivation on soil microorganisms are not significant. PMID:27090184

  2. Ribosomal Oxygenases are Structurally Conserved from Prokaryotes to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Krojer, Tobias; Ho, Chia-hua; Ng, Stanley S.; Clifton, Ian J.; Ge, Wei; Kershaw, Nadia J.; Fox, Gavin C.; Muniz, Joao R. C.; Vollmar, Melanie; Phillips, Claire; Pilka, Ewa S.; Kavanagh, Kathryn L.; von Delft, Frank; Oppermann, Udo; McDonough, Michael A.; Doherty, Aiden J.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases play important roles in the regulation of gene expression via demethylation of N-methylated chromatin components1,2, hydroxylation of transcription factors3, and of splicing factor proteins4. Recently, 2OG-oxygenases that catalyze hydroxylation of tRNA5-7 and ribosomal proteins8, have been shown to play roles in translation relating to cellular growth, TH17-cell differentiation and translational accuracy9-12. The finding that the ribosomal oxygenases (ROX) occur in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans8 raises questions as to their structural and evolutionary relationships. In Escherichia coli, ycfD catalyzes arginine-hydroxylation in the ribosomal protein L16; in humans, Mina53 (MYC-induced nuclear antigen) and NO66 (Nucleolar protein 66) catalyze histidine-hydroxylation in ribosomal proteins rpL27a and rpL8, respectively. The functional assignments of the ROX open therapeutic possibilities via either ROX inhibition or targeting of differentially modified ribosomes. Despite differences in residue- and protein-selectivities of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ROX, crystal structures of ycfD and ycfDRM from E. coli and Rhodothermus marinus with those of human Mina53 and NO66 (hROX) reveal highly conserved folds and novel dimerization modes defining a new structural subfamily of 2OG-oxygenases. ROX structures in complex with/without their substrates, support their functional assignments as hydroxylases, but not demethylases and reveal how the subfamily has evolved to catalyze the hydroxylation of different residue sidechains of ribosomal proteins. Comparison of ROX crystal structures with those of other JmjC-hydroxylases including the hypoxia-inducible factor asparaginyl-hydroxylase (FIH) and histone Nε-methyl lysine demethylases (KDMs) identifies branchpoints in 2OG-oxygenase evolution and distinguishes between JmjC-hydroxylases and -demethylases catalyzing modifications of translational and transcriptional machinery. The

  3. Microinjection of heme oxygenase genes rescues phytochrome-chromophore-deficient mutants of the moss Ceratodon purpureus.

    PubMed

    Brücker, G; Zeidler, M; Kohchi, T; Hartmann, E; Lamparter, T

    2000-03-01

    In protonemal tip cells of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid., phototropism and chlorophyll accumulation are regulated by the photoreceptor phytochrome. The mutant ptr116 lacks both responses as a result of a defect in the biosynthesis of phytochromobilin, the chromophore of phytochrome, at the point of biliverdin formation. The rescue of the phototropic response and of chlorophyll synthesis were tested by injecting different substances into tip cells of ptr116. Microinjection was first optimised with the use of fluorescent dyes and an expression plasmid containing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. Injected phycocyanobilin, which substitutes for phytochromobilin, rescued both the phototropic response and light-induced chlorophyll accumulation in ptr116. The same results were obtained when expression plasmids with heme oxygenase genes of rat (HO-1) and Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (HY1) were injected. Heme oxygenase catalyses the conversion of heme into biliverdin. Whereas HY1 has a plastid target sequence and is presumably transferred to plastids, HO-1 is proposed to be cytosolic. The data show that ptr116 lacks heme oxygenase enzyme activity and indicate that heme oxygenases of various origin are active in Ceratodon bilin synthesis. In addition, it can be inferred from the data that the intracellular localisation of the expressed heme oxygenase is not important since the plastid enzyme can be replaced by a cytosolic one. PMID:10787045

  4. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E.; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L.; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P.; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process. PMID:25429286

  5. Microbial trophic interactions and mcrA gene expression in monitoring of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alejandra; Montañez-Hernández, Lilia E; Palacio-Molina, Sandra L; Oropeza-Navarro, Ricardo; Luévanos-Escareño, Miriam P; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a biological process where different trophic groups of microorganisms break down biodegradable organic materials in the absence of oxygen. A wide range of AD technologies is being used to convert livestock manure, municipal and industrial wastewaters, and solid organic wastes into biogas. AD gains importance not only because of its relevance in waste treatment but also because of the recovery of carbon in the form of methane, which is a renewable energy and is used to generate electricity and heat. Despite the advances on the engineering and design of new bioreactors for AD, the microbiology component always poses challenges. Microbiology of AD processes is complicated as the efficiency of the process depends on the interactions of various trophic groups involved. Due to the complex interdependence of microbial activities for the functionality of the anaerobic bioreactors, the genetic expression of mcrA, which encodes a key enzyme in methane formation, is proposed as a parameter to monitor the process performance in real time. This review evaluates the current knowledge on microbial groups, their interactions, and their relationship to the performance of anaerobic biodigesters with a focus on using mcrA gene expression as a tool to monitor the process. PMID:25429286

  6. BμG@Sbase—a microbial gene expression and comparative genomic database

    PubMed Central

    Witney, Adam A.; Waldron, Denise E.; Brooks, Lucy A.; Tyler, Richard H.; Withers, Michael; Stoker, Neil G.; Wren, Brendan W.; Butcher, Philip D.; Hinds, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The reducing cost of high-throughput functional genomic technologies is creating a deluge of high volume, complex data, placing the burden on bioinformatics resources and tool development. The Bacterial Microarray Group at St George's (BμG@S) has been at the forefront of bacterial microarray design and analysis for over a decade and while serving as a hub of a global network of microbial research groups has developed BμG@Sbase, a microbial gene expression and comparative genomic database. BμG@Sbase (http://bugs.sgul.ac.uk/bugsbase/) is a web-browsable, expertly curated, MIAME-compliant database that stores comprehensive experimental annotation and multiple raw and analysed data formats. Consistent annotation is enabled through a structured set of web forms, which guide the user through the process following a set of best practices and controlled vocabulary. The database currently contains 86 expertly curated publicly available data sets (with a further 124 not yet published) and full annotation information for 59 bacterial microarray designs. The data can be browsed and queried using an explorer-like interface; integrating intuitive tree diagrams to present complex experimental details clearly and concisely. Furthermore the modular design of the database will provide a robust platform for integrating other data types beyond microarrays into a more Systems analysis based future. PMID:21948792

  7. Functional metagenomic selection of ribulose 1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from uncultivated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Varaljay, Vanessa A; Satagopan, Sriram; North, Justin A; Witte, Brian; Dourado, Manuella N; Anantharaman, Karthik; Arbing, Mark A; McCann, Shelley Hoeft; Oremland, Ronald S; Banfield, Jillian F; Wrighton, Kelly C; Tabita, F Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is a critical yet severely inefficient enzyme that catalyses the fixation of virtually all of the carbon found on Earth. Here, we report a functional metagenomic selection that recovers physiologically active RubisCO molecules directly from uncultivated and largely unknown members of natural microbial communities. Selection is based on CO2 -dependent growth in a host strain capable of expressing environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), precluding the need for pure cultures or screening of recombinant clones for enzymatic activity. Seventeen functional RubisCO-encoded sequences were selected using DNA extracted from soil and river autotrophic enrichments, a photosynthetic biofilm and a subsurface groundwater aquifer. Notably, three related form II RubisCOs were recovered which share high sequence similarity with metagenomic scaffolds from uncultivated members of the Gallionellaceae family. One of the Gallionellaceae RubisCOs was purified and shown to possess CO2 /O2 specificity typical of form II enzymes. X-ray crystallography determined that this enzyme is a hexamer, only the second form II multimer ever solved and the first RubisCO structure obtained from an uncultivated bacterium. Functional metagenomic selection leverages natural biological diversity and billions of years of evolution inherent in environmental communities, providing a new window into the discovery of CO2 -fixing enzymes not previously characterized. PMID:26617072

  8. Efficient microbial production of stylopine using a Pichia pastoris expression system

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Kentaro; Okano, Shunsuke; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Stylopine is a protoberberine-type alkaloid that has potential biological activities. Based on the successful microbial production of (S)-reticuline, we attempted to produce stylopine from (S)-reticuline by the reaction of berberine bridge enzyme, cheilanthifoline synthase (CYP719A5), and stylopine synthase (CYP719A2). Biosynthetic enzyme expression was examined in a methanol-utilizing yeast (Pichia pastoris), and both a “consolidated” system with all genes expressed in one cell and a “co-culture” system with three cell lines that each express a single gene were examined. Although both systems efficiently converted reticuline to stylopine, the consolidated system was more rapid and efficient than the co-culture system. However, substrate-feeding experiments revealed a decrease in the conversion efficiency in the consolidated system during successive cultures, whereas the conversion efficiency in the co-culture system remained constant. Thus, the final amount of stylopine produced from reticuline after successive feedings in the co-culture system was more than 150 nmoles from 750 nmoles of (R, S)-reticuline (375 nmoles of (S)-reticuline). The advantages and drawbacks of the “consolidated” system and the “co-culture” system are discussed. PMID:26923560

  9. Therapeutic Efficacy of Stem Cells Transplantation in Diabetes: Role of Heme Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Marco; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio A.; Vanella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The growing data obtained from in vivo studies and clinical trials demonstrated the benefit of adult stem cells transplantation in diabetes; although an important limit is represented by their survival after the transplant. To this regard, recent reports suggest that genetic manipulation of stem cells prior to transplantation can lead to enhanced survival and better engraftment. The following review proposes to stimulate interest in the role of heme oxygenase-1 over-expression on transplantation of stem cells in diabetes, focusing on the clinical potential of heme oxygenase protein and activity to restore tissue damage and/or to improve the immunomodulatory properties of transplanted stem cells. PMID:27547752

  10. Heme Oxygenases in Cardiovascular Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Anita; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam; Stocker, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Heme oxygenases are composed of two isozymes, Hmox1 and Hmox2, that catalyze the degradation of heme to carbon monoxide (CO), ferrous iron, and biliverdin, the latter of which is subsequently converted to bilirubin. While initially considered to be waste products, CO and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown over the last 20 years to modulate key cellular processes, such as inflammation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, as well as antioxidant defense. This shift in paradigm has led to the importance of heme oxygenases and their products in cell physiology now being well accepted. The identification of the two human cases thus far of heme oxygenase deficiency and the generation of mice deficient in Hmox1 or Hmox2 have reiterated a role for these enzymes in both normal cell function and disease pathogenesis, especially in the context of cardiovascular disease. This review covers the current knowledge on the function of both Hmox1 and Hmox2 at both a cellular and tissue level in the cardiovascular system. Initially, the roles of heme oxygenases in vascular health and the regulation of processes central to vascular diseases are outlined, followed by an evaluation of the role(s) of Hmox1 and Hmox2 in various diseases such as atherosclerosis, intimal hyperplasia, myocardial infarction, and angiogenesis. Finally, the therapeutic potential of heme oxygenases and their products are examined in a cardiovascular disease context, with a focus on how the knowledge we have gained on these enzymes may be capitalized in future clinical studies. PMID:27604527

  11. Heme oxygenase metabolites inhibit tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF).

    PubMed

    Ren, YiLin; D'Ambrosio, Martin A; Wang, Hong; Liu, Ruisheng; Garvin, Jeffrey L; Carretero, Oscar A

    2008-10-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) is the mechanism by which the macula densa (MD) senses increases in luminal NaCl concentration and sends a signal to constrict the afferent arteriole (Af-Art). The kidney expresses constitutively heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) and low levels of HO-1. HOs release carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and free iron. We hypothesized that renal HOs inhibit TGF via release of CO and biliverdin. Rabbit Af-Arts and attached MD were simultaneously microperfused in vitro. The TGF response was determined by measuring Af-Art diameter before and after increasing NaCl in the MD perfusate. When HO activity was inhibited by adding stannous mesoporphyrin (SnMP) to the MD perfusate, the TGF response increased from 2.1+/-0.2 to 4.1+/-0.4 microm (P=0.003, control vs. SnMP, n=7). When a CO-releasing molecule, (CORM-3; 50 microM), was added to the MD perfusate, the TGF response decreased by 41%, from 3.6+/-0.3 to 2.1+/-0.2 microm (P<0.001, control vs. CORM-3, n=12). When CORM-3 at 100 microM was added to the perfusate, it completely blocked the TGF response, from 4.2+/-0.4 to -0.2+/-0.3 microm (P<0.001, control vs. CORM-3, n=6). When biliverdin was added to the perfusate, the TGF response decreased by 79%, from 3.4+/-0.3 to 0.7+/-0.4 microm (P=0.001, control vs. biliverdin, n=6). The effects of SnMP and CORM-3 were not blocked by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. We concluded that renal HO inhibits TGF probably via release of CO and biliverdin. HO regulation of TGF is a novel mechanism that could lead to a better understanding of the control of renal microcirculation and function. PMID:18715939

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1−/− fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death. PMID:26405158

  13. Heme oxygenase effect on mesenchymal stem cells action on experimental Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Aziza, MT; Atta, HM; Samer, H; Ahmed, HH; Rashed, LA; Sabry, D; Abdel Raouf, ER; Alkaffas, Marwa Abdul latif

    2013-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate the effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) enzyme inducer and inhibitor on Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in Alzheimer disease. 70 female albino rats were divided equally into 7 groups as follows: group 1: healthy control; group 2: Aluminium chloride induced Alzheimer disease; group 3: induced Alzheimer rats that received intravenous injection of MSCs; group 4: induced Alzheimer rats that received MSCs and HO inducer cobalt protoporphyrin; group 5: induced Alzheimer rats that received MSCs and HO inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin; group 6: induced Alzheimer rats that received HO inducer; group7: induced Alzheimer rats that received HO inhibitor. Brain tissue was collected for HO-1, seladin-1 gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, heme oxygenase activity, cholesterol estimation and histopathological examination. MSCs decreased the plaque lesions, heme oxygenase induction with stem cells also decreased plaque lesions however there was hemorrhage in the brain. Both heme oxygenase inducer alone or with stem cells increased seladin-1 expression and decreased cholesterol level. MSCs alone or with HO-1 induction exert a therapeutic effect against the brain lesion in Alzheimer's disease possibly through decreasing the brain cholesterol level and increasing seladin-1 gene expression. PMID:26622218

  14. Secreted lipoxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits biomembrane oxygenase activity and induces hemolysis in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Banthiya, Swathi; Pekárová, Mária; Kuhn, Hartmut; Heydeck, Dagmar

    2015-10-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) expresses a secreted lipoxygenase (LOX), which oxygenates free arachidonic acid predominantly to 15S-H(p)ETE. The enzyme is capable of binding phospholipids at its active site and physically interacts with model membranes. However, its membrane oxygenase activity has not been quantified. To address this question, we overexpressed PA-LOX as intracellular his-tag fusion protein in Escherichia coli, purified it to electrophoretic homogeneity and compared its biomembrane oxygenase activity with that of rabbit ALOX15. We found that both enzymes were capable of oxygenating mitochondrial membranes to specific oxygenation products and 13S-H(p)ODE and 15S-H(p)ETE esterified to phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were identified as major oxygenation products. When normalized to similar linoleic acid oxygenase activity, the rabbit enzyme exhibited a much more effective mitochondrial membrane oxygenase activity. In contrast, during long-term incubations (24 h) with red blood cells PA-LOX induced significant (50%) hemolysis whereas rabbit ALOX15 was more or less ineffective. These data indicate the principle capability of PA-LOX of oxygenating membrane bound phospholipids which is likely to alter the barrier function of the biomembranes. Although the membrane oxygenase activity was lower than the fatty acid oxygenase activity of PA-LOX red blood cell membrane oxygenation might be of biological relevance for P. aeruginosa septicemia. PMID:26361973

  15. Curcumin inhibits HCV replication by induction of heme oxygenase-1 and suppression of AKT

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, MING-HO; LEE, MING-YANG; CHUANG, JING-JING; LI, YI-ZHEN; NING, SIN-TZU; CHEN, JUNG-CHOU; LIU, YI-WEN

    2012-01-01

    Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects approximately 130–170 million people worldwide, no vaccines are available. HCV is an important cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, leading to the need for liver transplantation. In this study, curcumin, a constituent used in traditional Chinese medicine, has been evaluated for its anti-HCV activity and mechanism, using a human hepatoma cell line containing the HCV genotype 1b subgenomic replicon. Below the concentration of 20% cytotoxicity, curcumin dose-dependently inhibited HCV replication by luciferase reporter gene assay, HCV RNA detection and HCV protein analysis. Under the same conditions, curcumin also dose-dependently induced heme oxygenase-1 with the highest induction at 24 h. Hemin, a heme oxygenase-1 inducer, also inhibited HCV protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. The knockdown of heme oxygenase-1 partially reversed the curcumin-inhibited HCV protein expression. In addition to the heme oxygenase-1 induction, signaling molecule activities of AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were inhibited by curcumin. Using specific inhibitors of PI3K-AKT, MEK-ERK and NF-κB, the results suggested that only PI3K-AKT inhibition is positively involved in curcumin-inhibited HCV replication. Inhibition of ERK and NF-κB was likely to promote HCV protein expression. In summary, curcumin inhibited HCV replication by heme oxygenase-1 induction and AKT pathway inhibition. Although curcumin also inhibits ERK and NF-κB activities, it slightly increased the HCV protein expression. This result may provide information when curcumin is used as an adjuvant in anti-HCV therapy. PMID:22922731

  16. In situ expression of eukaryotic ice-binding proteins in microbial communities of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, Christiane; Kilpert, Fabian; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Kegel, Jessica U; Krell, Andreas; Mock, Thomas; Valentin, Klaus; Beszteri, Bánk

    2015-01-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) have been isolated from various sea-ice organisms. Their characterisation points to a crucial role in protecting the organisms in sub-zero environments. However, their in situ abundance and diversity in natural sea-ice microbial communities is largely unknown. In this study, we analysed the expression and phylogenetic diversity of eukaryotic IBP transcripts from microbial communities of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. IBP transcripts were found in abundances similar to those of proteins involved in core cellular processes such as photosynthesis. Eighty-nine percent of the IBP transcripts grouped with known IBP sequences from diatoms, haptophytes and crustaceans, but the majority represented novel sequences not previously characterized in cultured organisms. The observed high eukaryotic IBP expression in natural eukaryotic sea ice communities underlines the essential role of IBPs for survival of many microorganisms in communities living under the extreme conditions of polar sea ice. PMID:25885562

  17. In situ expression of eukaryotic ice-binding proteins in microbial communities of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Christiane; Kilpert, Fabian; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Kegel, Jessica U; Krell, Andreas; Mock, Thomas; Valentin, Klaus; Beszteri, Bánk

    2015-11-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) have been isolated from various sea-ice organisms. Their characterisation points to a crucial role in protecting the organisms in sub-zero environments. However, their in situ abundance and diversity in natural sea-ice microbial communities is largely unknown. In this study, we analysed the expression and phylogenetic diversity of eukaryotic IBP transcripts from microbial communities of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. IBP transcripts were found in abundances similar to those of proteins involved in core cellular processes such as photosynthesis. Eighty-nine percent of the IBP transcripts grouped with known IBP sequences from diatoms, haptophytes and crustaceans, but the majority represented novel sequences not previously characterized in cultured organisms. The observed high eukaryotic IBP expression in natural eukaryotic sea ice communities underlines the essential role of IBPs for survival of many microorganisms in communities living under the extreme conditions of polar sea ice. PMID:25885562

  18. Compound-specific Isotope Analysis of Cyanobacterial Pure cultures and Microbial Mats: Effects of Photorespiration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Summons, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial mats are considered modern homologs of Precambrian stromatolites. The carbon isotopic compositions of organic matter and biomarker lipids provide clues to the depositional environments of ancient mat ecosystems. As the source of primary carbon fixation for over two billion years, an understanding of cyanobacterial lipid biosynthesis, associated isotopic discriminations, and the influence of physiological factors on growth and isotope expression is essential to help us compare modern microbial ecosystems to their ancient counterparts. Here, we report on the effects of photorespiration (PR) on the isotopic composition of cyanobacteria and biomarker lipids, and on potential PR effects associated with the composition of various microbial mats. The high light, high O2 and limiting CO2 conditions often present at the surface of microbial mats are known to support PR in cyanobacteria. The oxygenase function of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase can result in photoexcretion of glycolate and subsequent degration by heterotrophic bacteria. We have found evidence which supports an isotopic depletion (increased apparent E) scaled to O2 level associated with growth of Phormidium luridum at low CO2 concentrations (less than 0.04%). Similar to previous studies, isotopic differences between biomass and lipid biomarkers, and between lipid classes were positively correlated with overall fractionation, and should provide a means of estimating the influence of PR on overall isotopic composition of microbial mats. Several examples of microbial mats growing in the hydrothermal waters of Yellowstone National Park and the hypersaline marine evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja Sur Mexico will be compared with a view to PR as a possible explanation of the relatively heavy C-isotope composition of hypersaline mats.

  19. Genomes and gene expression across light and productivity gradients in eastern subtropical Pacific microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Chris L; McCrow, John P; Valas, Ruben; Moustafa, Ahmed; Walworth, Nathan; Goodenough, Ursula; Roth, Robyn; Hogle, Shane L; Bai, Jing; Johnson, Zackary I; Mann, Elizabeth; Palenik, Brian; Barbeau, Katherine A; Venter, J Craig; Allen, Andrew E

    2015-05-01

    Transitions in community genomic features and biogeochemical processes were examined in surface and subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) microbial communities across a trophic gradient from mesotrophic waters near San Diego, California to the oligotrophic Pacific. Transect end points contrasted in thermocline depth, rates of nitrogen and CO2 uptake, new production and SCM light intensity. Relative to surface waters, bacterial SCM communities displayed greater genetic diversity and enrichment in putative sulfur oxidizers, multiple actinomycetes, low-light-adapted Prochlorococcus and cell-associated viruses. Metagenomic coverage was not correlated with transcriptional activity for several key taxa within Bacteria. Low-light-adapted Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, and low abundance gamma-proteobacteria enriched in the>3.0-μm size fraction contributed disproportionally to global transcription. The abundance of these groups also correlated with community functions, such as primary production or nitrate uptake. In contrast, many of the most abundant bacterioplankton, including SAR11, SAR86, SAR112 and high-light-adapted Prochlorococcus, exhibited low levels of transcriptional activity and were uncorrelated with rate processes. Eukaryotes such as Haptophytes and non-photosynthetic Aveolates were prevalent in surface samples while Mamielles and Pelagophytes dominated the SCM. Metatranscriptomes generated with ribosomal RNA-depleted mRNA (total mRNA) coupled to in vitro polyadenylation compared with polyA-enriched mRNA revealed a trade-off in detection eukaryotic organelle and eukaryotic nuclear origin transcripts, respectively. Gene expression profiles of SCM eukaryote populations, highly similar in sequence identity to the model pelagophyte Pelagomonas sp. CCMP1756, suggest that pelagophytes are responsible for a majority of nitrate assimilation within the SCM. PMID:25333462

  20. Genomes and gene expression across light and productivity gradients in eastern subtropical Pacific microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Chris L; McCrow, John P; Valas, Ruben; Moustafa, Ahmed; Walworth, Nathan; Goodenough, Ursula; Roth, Robyn; Hogle, Shane L; Bai, Jing; Johnson, Zackary I; Mann, Elizabeth; Palenik, Brian; Barbeau, Katherine A; Craig Venter, J; Allen, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    Transitions in community genomic features and biogeochemical processes were examined in surface and subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) microbial communities across a trophic gradient from mesotrophic waters near San Diego, California to the oligotrophic Pacific. Transect end points contrasted in thermocline depth, rates of nitrogen and CO2 uptake, new production and SCM light intensity. Relative to surface waters, bacterial SCM communities displayed greater genetic diversity and enrichment in putative sulfur oxidizers, multiple actinomycetes, low-light-adapted Prochlorococcus and cell-associated viruses. Metagenomic coverage was not correlated with transcriptional activity for several key taxa within Bacteria. Low-light-adapted Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, and low abundance gamma-proteobacteria enriched in the>3.0-μm size fraction contributed disproportionally to global transcription. The abundance of these groups also correlated with community functions, such as primary production or nitrate uptake. In contrast, many of the most abundant bacterioplankton, including SAR11, SAR86, SAR112 and high-light-adapted Prochlorococcus, exhibited low levels of transcriptional activity and were uncorrelated with rate processes. Eukaryotes such as Haptophytes and non-photosynthetic Aveolates were prevalent in surface samples while Mamielles and Pelagophytes dominated the SCM. Metatranscriptomes generated with ribosomal RNA-depleted mRNA (total mRNA) coupled to in vitro polyadenylation compared with polyA-enriched mRNA revealed a trade-off in detection eukaryotic organelle and eukaryotic nuclear origin transcripts, respectively. Gene expression profiles of SCM eukaryote populations, highly similar in sequence identity to the model pelagophyte Pelagomonas sp. CCMP1756, suggest that pelagophytes are responsible for a majority of nitrate assimilation within the SCM. PMID:25333462

  1. Volatile Gas Production by Methyl Halide Transferase: An In Situ Reporter Of Microbial Gene Expression In Soil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Masiello, Caroline A; Bennett, George N; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2016-08-16

    Traditional visual reporters of gene expression have only very limited use in soils because their outputs are challenging to detect through the soil matrix. This severely restricts our ability to study time-dependent microbial gene expression in one of the Earth's largest, most complex habitats. Here we describe an approach to report on dynamic gene expression within a microbial population in a soil under natural water levels (at and below water holding capacity) via production of methyl halides using a methyl halide transferase. As a proof-of-concept application, we couple the expression of this gas reporter to the conjugative transfer of a bacterial plasmid in a soil matrix and show that gas released from the matrix displays a strong correlation with the number of transconjugant bacteria that formed. Gas reporting of gene expression will make possible dynamic studies of natural and engineered microbes within many hard-to-image environmental matrices (soils, sediments, sludge, and biomass) at sample scales exceeding those used for traditional visual reporting. PMID:27415416

  2. Challenges of microarray applications for microbial detection and gene expression profiling in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray technology represents one of the latest advances in molecular biology. The diverse types of microarrays have been applied to clinical and environmental microbiology, microbial ecology, and in human, veterinary, and plant diagnostics. Since multiple genes can be analyzed simultaneously, ...

  3. The Guaymas Basin Hiking Guide to Hydrothermal Mounds, Chimneys, and Microbial Mats: Complex Seafloor Expressions of Subsurface Hydrothermal Circulation.

    PubMed

    Teske, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; McKay, Luke J; Tivey, Margaret K; Biddle, Jennifer F; Hoer, Daniel; Lloyd, Karen G; Lever, Mark A; Røy, Hans; Albert, Daniel B; Mendlovitz, Howard P; MacGregor, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal mats, mounds, and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview, we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heat flow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for comprehensive surveys of the wider spreading region. PMID:26925032

  4. The Guaymas Basin Hiking Guide to Hydrothermal Mounds, Chimneys, and Microbial Mats: Complex Seafloor Expressions of Subsurface Hydrothermal Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; McKay, Luke J.; Tivey, Margaret K.; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Hoer, Daniel; Lloyd, Karen G.; Lever, Mark A.; Røy, Hans; Albert, Daniel B.; Mendlovitz, Howard P.; MacGregor, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal mats, mounds, and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview, we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heat flow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for comprehensive surveys of the wider spreading region. PMID:26925032

  5. Cyclo-oxygenase isoenzymes: physiological and pharmacological role.

    PubMed

    Kam, P C; See, A U

    2000-05-01

    Prostaglandins play important roles in inflammation and the maintenance of normal physiological function of several organ systems. Prostaglandin production requires the conversion of arachidonic acid to the intermediate prostaglandin H2 catalysed by the cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzyme. There are two isoforms of the COX enzyme, COX-1 and COX-2. These isoforms vary in their distribution and expression but are similar in size, substrate specificity and kinetics. Normal physiological functions are mediated by 'constitutive' COX-1, while the inflammatory response is mediated by 'inducible' COX-2. Current nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit both enzymes to varying degrees and can cause adverse effects in the gastrointestinal tract, kidney, respiratory system and platelets. Newer, selective COX-2 inhibitors offer real hope for safer anti-inflammatory drugs although their long-term safety and efficacy need to be studied as questions remain unanswered about possible physiological functions of COX-2. PMID:10792135

  6. Global analysis of gene expression dynamics within the marine microbial community during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundt, Ulrike; Spungin, Dina; Bonnet, Sophie; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-07-01

    Microbial gene expression was followed for 23 days within a mesocosm (M1) isolating 50 m3 of seawater and in the surrounding waters in the Nouméa lagoon, New Caledonia, in the southwest Pacific as part of the VAriability of vertical and tropHIc transfer of diazotroph derived N in the south wEst Pacific (VAHINE) experiment. The aim of VAHINE was to examine the fate of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) in a low-nutrient, low-chlorophyll ecosystem. On day 4 of the experiment, the mesocosm was fertilized with phosphate. In the lagoon, gene expression was dominated by the cyanobacterium Synechococcus, closely followed by Alphaproteobacteria. In contrast, drastic changes in the microbial community composition and transcriptional activity were triggered within the mesocosm within the first 4 days, with transcription bursts from different heterotrophic bacteria in rapid succession. The microbial composition and activity of the surrounding lagoon ecosystem appeared more stable, although following similar temporal trends as in M1. We detected significant gene expression from Chromerida in M1, as well as the Nouméa lagoon, suggesting these photoautotrophic alveolates were present in substantial numbers in the open water. Other groups contributing substantially to the metatranscriptome were affiliated with marine Euryarchaeota Candidatus Thalassoarchaea (inside and outside) and Myoviridae bacteriophages likely infecting Synechococcus, specifically inside M1. High transcript abundances for ammonium transporters and glutamine synthetase in many different taxa (e.g., Pelagibacteraceae, Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and Rhodobacteraceae) was consistent with the known preference of most bacteria for this nitrogen source. In contrast, Alteromonadaceae highly expressed urease genes; Rhodobacteraceae and Prochlorococcus showed some urease expression, too. Nitrate reductase transcripts were detected on day 10 very prominently in Synechococcus and in Halomonadaceae. Alkaline

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 in macrophages controls prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Li, Mailin; Csizmadia, Eva; Döme, Balazs; Johansson, Martin; Persson, Jenny Liao; Seth, Pankaj; Otterbein, Leo; Wegiel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune cells strongly influence cancer growth and progression via multiple mechanisms including regulation of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we investigated whether expression of the metabolic gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in tumor microenvironment imparts significant effects on prostate cancer progression. We showed that HO-1 is expressed in MARCO-positive macrophages in prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts and human prostate cancers. We demonstrated that macrophage specific (LyzM-Cre) conditional deletion of HO-1 suppressed growth of PC3 xenografts in vivo and delayed progression of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in TRAMP mice. However, initiation and progression of cancer xenografts in the presence of macrophages lacking HO-1 resulted in loss of E-cadherin, a known marker of poor prognosis as well as EMT. Application of CO, a product of HO-1 catalysis, increased levels of E-cadherin in the adherens junctions between cancer cells. We further showed that HO-1-driven expression of E-cadherin in cancer cells cultured in the presence of macrophages is dependent on mitochondrial activity of cancer cells. In summary, these data suggest that HO-1-derived CO from tumor-associated macrophages influences, in part, E-cadherin expression and thus tumor initiation and progression. PMID:26418896

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 in macrophages controls prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Li, Mailin; Csizmadia, Eva; Döme, Balazs; Johansson, Martin; Persson, Jenny Liao; Seth, Pankaj; Otterbein, Leo; Wegiel, Barbara

    2015-10-20

    Innate immune cells strongly influence cancer growth and progression via multiple mechanisms including regulation of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we investigated whether expression of the metabolic gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in tumor microenvironment imparts significant effects on prostate cancer progression.We showed that HO-1 is expressed in MARCO-positive macrophages in prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts and human prostate cancers. We demonstrated that macrophage specific (LyzM-Cre) conditional deletion of HO-1 suppressed growth of PC3 xenografts in vivo and delayed progression of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in TRAMP mice. However, initiation and progression of cancer xenografts in the presence of macrophages lacking HO-1 resulted in loss of E-cadherin, a known marker of poor prognosis as well as EMT. Application of CO, a product of HO-1 catalysis, increased levels of E-cadherin in the adherens junctions between cancer cells. We further showed that HO-1-driven expression of E-cadherin in cancer cells cultured in the presence of macrophages is dependent on mitochondrial activity of cancer cells.In summary, these data suggest that HO-1-derived CO from tumor-associated macrophages influences, in part, E-cadherin expression and thus tumor initiation and progression. PMID:26418896

  9. Effect Of Spaceflight On Microbial Gene Expression And Virulence: Preliminary Results From Microbe Payload Flown On-Board STS-115

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; HonerzuBentrup, K,; Schurr, M. J.; Buchanan, K.; Morici, L.; Hammond, T.; Allen, P.; Baker, C.; Ott, C. M.; Nelman-Gonzalez M.; Schurr, J. R.; Pierson, D. L.; Stodieck, L.; Hing, S.; Hammond, T.; Allen, P.; Baker, C.; Parra, M.; Dumars, P.; Stefanyshyn-Piper, H. M.; Nickerson, C. A.

    2007-01-01

    Human presence in space, whether permanent or temporary, is accompanied by the presence of microbes. However, the extent of microbial changes in response to spaceflight conditions and the corresponding changes to infectious disease risk is unclear. Previous studies have indicated that spaceflight weakens the immune system in humans and animals. In addition, preflight and in-flight monitoring of the International Space Station (ISS) and other spacecraft indicates the presence of opportunistic pathogens and the potential of obligate pathogens. Altered antibiotic resistance of microbes in flight has also been shown. As astronauts and cosmonauts live for longer periods in a closed environment, especially one using recycled water and air, there is an increased risk to crewmembers of infectious disease events occurring in-flight. Therefore, understanding how the space environment affects microorganisms and their disease potential is critically important for spaceflight missions and requires further study. The goal of this flight experiment, operationally called MICROBE, is to utilize three model microbial pathogens, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans to examine the global effects of spaceflight on microbial gene expression and virulence attributes. Specifically, the aims are (1) to perform microarray-mediated gene expression profiling of S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans, in response to spaceflight in comparison to ground controls and (2) to determine the effect of spaceflight on the virulence potential of these microorganisms immediately following their return from spaceflight using murine models. The model microorganisms were selected as they have been isolated from preflight or in-flight monitoring, represent different degrees of pathogenic behavior, are well characterized, and have sequenced genomes with available microarrays. In particular, extensive studies of S. typhimurium by the Principal Investigator, Dr. Nickerson

  10. ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsi...

  11. A hemocyte-expressed fibrinogen-related protein gene (LvFrep) from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: Expression analysis after microbial infection and during larval development.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Jaqueline da Rosa; Barreto, Cairé; Silveira, Amanda da Silva; Vieira, Graziela Cleusa; Rosa, Rafael Diego; Perazzolo, Luciane Maria

    2016-09-01

    Fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) comprise a large family of microbial recognition proteins involved in many biological functions in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. By taking advantage of publicly accessible databases, we have identified a FREP-like homolog in the most cultivated penaeid shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (LvFrep). The obtained sequence showed a conserved fibrinogen-related domain (FReD) and displayed significant similarities to FREP-like proteins from other invertebrates and to ficolins from crustaceans. The expression of LvFrep appeared to be limited to circulating hemocytes. Interestingly, LvFrep gene expression was induced in shrimp hemocytes only in response to a Vibrio infection but not to the White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Moreover, LvFrep transcript levels were detected early in fertilized eggs, suggesting the participation of this immune-related gene in the antimicrobial defenses during shrimp development. PMID:27380968

  12. Nitrification inhibition by hexavalent chromium Cr(VI)--Microbial ecology, gene expression and off-gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Mo; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the responses in the physiology, microbial ecology and gene expression of nitrifying bacteria to imposition of and recovery from Cr(VI) loading in a lab-scale nitrification bioreactor. Exposure to Cr(VI) in the reactor strongly inhibited nitrification performance resulting in a parallel decrease in nitrate production and ammonia consumption. Cr(VI) exposure also led to an overall decrease in total bacterial concentrations in the reactor. However, the fraction of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased to a greater extent than the fraction of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In terms of functional gene expression, a rapid decrease in the transcript concentrations of amoA gene coding for ammonia oxidation in AOB was observed in response to the Cr(VI) shock. In contrast, transcript concentrations of the nxrA gene coding for nitrite oxidation in NOB were relatively unchanged compared to Cr(VI) pre-exposure levels. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure selectively and directly inhibited activity of AOB, which indirectly resulted in substrate (nitrite) limitation to NOB. Significantly, trends in amoA expression preceded performance trends both during imposition of and recovery from inhibition. During recovery from the Cr(VI) shock, the high ammonia concentrations in the bioreactor resulted in an irreversible shift towards AOB populations, which are expected to be more competitive in high ammonia environments. An inadvertent impact during recovery was increased emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), consistent with recent findings linking AOB activity and the production of these gases. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure elicited multiple responses on the microbial ecology, gene expression and both aqueous and gaseous nitrogenous conversion in a nitrification process. A complementary interrogation of these multiple responses facilitated an understanding of both direct and indirect inhibitory impacts on nitrification. PMID:26874778

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 modulates fetal growth in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kreiser, Doron; Nguyen, Xuandai; Wong, Ron; Seidman, Daniel; Stevenson, David; Quan, Shou; Abraham, Nader; Dennery, Phyllis A

    2002-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality as well as with lifelong cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Deficiency of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is associated with growth restriction in mice and in humans, suggesting a role for HO-1 in fetal growth and maintenance of pregnancy. We hypothesized that modulation of HO-1 in the pregnant rat would alter fetal growth. In pregnant dams, placental HO activity was significantly inhibited with zinc deuteroporphyrin IX 2,4 bis glycol, and HO-1 protein was increased by transducing adenoviral human HO-1. Inhibition of HO-1 by zinc deuteroporphyrin IX 2,4 bis glycol resulted in a significant decrease in pup size, whereas transfection with hHO-1 resulted in increased pup size. Furthermore, the expression of IGF binding protein-1 and its receptor paralleled the expression of HO-1 in the placenta and were significantly modulated by modification of HO-1 along with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. These observations demonstrate that HO-1 modulates fetal growth by its effects on placental growth factors. PMID:12065678

  14. Generation and Characterization of Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Transgenic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J.; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D.; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation. PMID:23071605

  15. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Hye-Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation. PMID:23071605

  16. Heme Oxygenase-1: A Metabolic Nike

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Bulmer, Andrew C.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme degradation, which was described more than 30 years ago, is still very actively explored with many novel discoveries on its role in various disease models every year. Recent Advances: The heme oxygenases (HO) are metabolic enzymes that utilize NADPH and oxygen to break apart the heme moiety liberating biliverdin (BV), carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Heme that is derived from hemoproteins can be toxic to the cells and if not removed immediately, it causes cell apoptosis and local inflammation. Elimination of heme from the milieu enables generation of three products that influences numerous metabolic changes in the cell. Critical Issues: CO has profound effects on mitochondria and cellular respiration and other hemoproteins to which it can bind and affect their function, while BV and bilirubin (BR), the substrate and product of BV, reductase, respectively, are potent antioxidants. Sequestration of iron into ferritin and its recycling in the tissues is a part of the homeodynamic processes that control oxidation-reduction in cellular metabolism. Further, heme is an important component of a number of metabolic enzymes, and, therefore, HO-1 plays an important role in the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. Future Directions: In this review, we describe the cross-talk between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its products with other metabolic pathways. HO-1, which we have labeled Nike, the goddess who personified victory, dictates triumph over pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes, ischemia, and cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1709–1722. PMID:24180257

  17. Human mesenchymal stem cells elevate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells of asthmatic patients via heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-guo; Zhuan-sun, Yong-xun; Wen, Bing; Wu, Hao; Huang, Feng-ting; Ghimire, Hridaya bibhu; Ran, Pi-xin

    2013-09-01

    Up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a new target in the treatment of asthma. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can up-regulate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in vitro, meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the development and maintenance of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. However the mechanism has not yet been adequately understood. Hence, we wondered what effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 made on regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from asthmatic patients and healthy controls were co-cultured with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells which were pretreated with Hemin (the revulsive of Heme Oxygenase-1), Protoporphyrin Ⅸ zinc (the inhibitor of Heme Oxygenase-1) and saline. The expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in MSCs was enhanced by Hemin and inhibited by Protoporphyrin  zinc in vitro. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 elevated the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells, meanwhile, inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1 decreased the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells as compared with mesenchymal stem cells alone. Taken together, these data demonstrated that Heme Oxygenase-1 contributed to the up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells in asthma.  PMID:23893806

  18. Nickel induction of microsomal heme oxygenase activity in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Reid, M.C.; Bibeau, L.M.; Linden, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    Heme oxygenase activity was measured in tissues of rats killed after administration of NiCl/sub 2/ or Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/. Induction of renal heme oxygenase activity occurred 6 hr after NiCl/sub 2/ injection (0.25 mmol/kg sc), reached a maximum of five to six times the baseline activity at 17 hr, and remained significantly increased at 72 hr. Heme oxygenase activities were also increased in liver, lung, and brain at 17 hr after the NiCl/sub 2/ injection; heme oxygenase activities in spleen and intestinal mucosa were unchanged. The effects of NiCl/sub 2/ on heme oxygenase activities in kidney and liver were dose-related from 0.06 to 0.75 mmol/kg, sc. Three Ni chelators were administered (1 mmol/kg, im) prior to injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.25 mmol/kg, sc); d-penicillamine partially prevented Ni induction of renal heme oxygenase activity; triethylenetetramine had no effect; sodium diethyldithiocarbamate enhanced the Ni induction of renal heme oxygenase activity (three times greater than NiCl/sub 2/ alone). Intrarenal injection of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/ (10 mg/rat) caused induction of renal heme oxygenase activity at 1 week but not at 2, 3, or 4 weeks; no correlation was observed between induction of renal heme oxygenase activity and erythropoietin-mediated erythrocytosis. Hypoxia (10% O/sub 2/, 12 hr/day, 7 days) did not affect renal heme oxygenase activity. Induction of renal heme oxygenase activity was observed in mice, hamsters, and guinea pigs killed 17 hr after injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.25 mmol/kg, sc). These studies established (a) the time course, dose-effect, organ selectivity, and species susceptibility relationships for Ni induction of microsomal heme oxygenase activity, (b) the effects of Ni chelators, and (c) the lack of relationship between induction of renal heme oxygenase activity and the erythrocytosis that develops after intrarenal injection of Ni/sub 3/S/sub 2/.

  19. Complex formation between heme oxygenase and phytochrome during biosynthesis in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Schwach, Julia; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2012-06-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato carries two genes encoding bacterial phytochromes. Sequence motifs identify both proteins (PstBphP1 and PstBphP2, respectively) as biliverdin IXα (BV)-binding phytochromes. PstbphP1 is arranged in an operon with a heme oxygenase (PstBphO)-encoding gene (PstbphO), whereas PstbphP2 is flanked downstream by a gene encoding a CheY-type response regulator. Expression of the heme oxygenase PstBphO yielded a green protein (λ(max) = 650 nm), indicative for bound BV. Heterologous expression of PstbphP1 and PstbphP2 and in vitro assembly with BV IXα yielded the apoproteins for both phytochromes, but only in the case of PstBphP1 a light-inducible chromoprotein. Attempts to express the endogenous heme oxygenase BphO and either of the two phytochromes from two plasmids yielded only holo-PstBphP1. Relatively small amounts of soluble holo-PstBphP2 were just obtained upon co-expression with BphO from P. aeruginosa. Expression of the operon containing PstbphO:PstbphP1 led to an improved yield and better photoreactivity for PstBphP1, whereas an identical construct, exchanging PstbphP1 for PstbphP2 (PstbphO:PstbphP2), again yielded only minute amounts of chromophore-loaded BphP2-holoprotein. The improved yield for PstBphP1 from the PstbphO:PstbphP1 operon expression is apparently caused by complex formation between both proteins during biosynthesis as affinity chromatography of either protein using two different tags always co-purified the reaction partner. These results support the importance of protein-protein interactions during tetrapyrrole metabolism and phytochrome assembly. PMID:22415794

  20. Mining microbial metatranscriptomes for expression of antibiotic resistance genes under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Dennis; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Ramiro Garcia, Javier; Leimena, Milkha M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Zhang, Jing; Öztürk, Başak; Nylund, Lotta; Sipkema, Detmer; Schaik, Willem Van; de Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Passel, Mark W. J. Van

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes are found in a broad range of ecological niches associated with complex microbiota. Here we investigated if resistance genes are not only present, but also transcribed under natural conditions. Furthermore, we examined the potential for antibiotic production by assessing the expression of associated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. Metatranscriptome datasets from intestinal microbiota of four human adults, one human infant, 15 mice and six pigs, of which only the latter have received antibiotics prior to the study, as well as from sea bacterioplankton, a marine sponge, forest soil and sub-seafloor sediment, were investigated. We found that resistance genes are expressed in all studied ecological niches, albeit with niche-specific differences in relative expression levels and diversity of transcripts. For example, in mice and human infant microbiota predominantly tetracycline resistance genes were expressed while in human adult microbiota the spectrum of expressed genes was more diverse, and also included β-lactam, aminoglycoside and macrolide resistance genes. Resistance gene expression could result from the presence of natural antibiotics in the environment, although we could not link it to expression of corresponding secondary metabolites biosynthesis clusters. Alternatively, resistance gene expression could be constitutive, or these genes serve alternative roles besides antibiotic resistance.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates mitochondrial quality control in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Boddu, Ravindra; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C.; Traylor, Amie M.; Patel, Bindiya; Joseph, Reny; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The cardioprotective inducible enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) degrades prooxidant heme into equimolar quantities of carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and iron. We hypothesized that HO-1 mediates cardiac protection, at least in part, by regulating mitochondrial quality control. We treated WT and HO-1 transgenic mice with the known mitochondrial toxin, doxorubicin (DOX). Relative to WT mice, mice globally overexpressing human HO-1 were protected from DOX-induced dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac cytoarchitectural derangement, and infiltration of CD11b+ mononuclear phagocytes. Cardiac-specific overexpression of HO-1 ameliorated DOX-mediated dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondrial disorganization in the form of mitochondrial fragmentation and increased numbers of damaged mitochondria in autophagic vacuoles. HO-1 overexpression promotes mitochondrial biogenesis by upregulating protein expression of NRF1, PGC1α, and TFAM, which was inhibited in WT animals treated with DOX. Concomitantly, HO-1 overexpression inhibited the upregulation of the mitochondrial fission mediator Fis1 and resulted in increased expression of the fusion mediators, Mfn1 and Mfn2. It also prevented dynamic changes in the levels of key mediators of the mitophagy pathway, PINK1 and parkin. Therefore, these findings suggest that HO-1 has a novel role in protecting the heart from oxidative injury by regulating mitochondrial quality control. PMID:27110594

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol; Woo, Je Moon; Son, Yong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 protects against vascular constriction and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Duckers, H J; Boehm, M; True, A L; Yet, S F; San, H; Park, J L; Clinton Webb, R; Lee, M E; Nabel, G J; Nabel, E G

    2001-06-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) is an inducible protein activated in systemic inflammatory conditions by oxidant stress. Vascular injury is characterized by a local reparative process with inflammatory components, indicating a potential protective role for HO-1 in arterial wound repair. Here we report that HO-1 directly reduces vasoconstriction and inhibits cell proliferation during vascular injury. Expression of HO-1 in arteries stimulated vascular relaxation, mediated by guanylate cyclase and cGMP, independent of nitric oxide. The unexpected effects of HO-1 on vascular smooth muscle cell growth were mediated by cell-cycle arrest involving p21Cip1. HO-1 reduced the proliferative response to vascular injury in vivo; expression of HO-1 in pig arteries inhibited lesion formation and Hmox1-/- mice produced hyperplastic arteries compared with controls. Induction of the HO-1 pathway moderates the severity of vascular injury by at least two adaptive mechanisms independent of nitric oxide, and is a potential therapeutic target for diseases of the vasculature. PMID:11385506

  4. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin-has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  5. Genome-Wide Tuning of Protein Expression Levels to Rapidly Engineer Microbial Traits.

    PubMed

    Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Weiss, Sophie J; Garst, Andrew D; Mutalik, Vivek K; Arkin, Adam P; Knight, Rob; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The reliable engineering of biological systems requires quantitative mapping of predictable and context-independent expression over a broad range of protein expression levels. However, current techniques for modifying expression levels are cumbersome and are not amenable to high-throughput approaches. Here we present major improvements to current techniques through the design and construction of E. coli genome-wide libraries using synthetic DNA cassettes that can tune expression over a ∼10(4) range. The cassettes also contain molecular barcodes that are optimized for next-generation sequencing, enabling rapid and quantitative tracking of alleles that have the highest fitness advantage. We show these libraries can be used to determine which genes and expression levels confer greater fitness to E. coli under different growth conditions. PMID:26478262

  6. Catalytic residues and a predicted structure of tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Watschinger, Katrin; Fuchs, Julian E.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Keller, Markus A.; Golderer, Georg; Hermetter, Albin; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Hulo, Nicolas; Werner, Ernst R.

    2012-01-01

    Alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase (EC 1.14.16.5) forms a third, distinct, class among tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent enzymes in addition to aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthases. Its protein sequence contains the fatty acid hydroxylase motif, a signature indicative of a di-iron centre, which contains eight conserved histidine residues. Membrane enzymes containing this motif, including alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase, are especially labile and so far have not been purified to homogeneity in active form. To obtain a first insight into structure–function relationships of this enzyme, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of 26 selected amino acid residues and expressed wild-type and mutant proteins containing a C-terminal Myc tag together with fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in Chinese-hamster ovary cells. Among all of the acidic residues within the eight-histidine motif, only mutation of Glu137 to alanine led to an 18-fold increase in the Michaelis–Menten constant for tetrahydrobiopterin, suggesting a role in tetrahydrobiopterin interaction. A ninth additional histidine residue essential for activity was also identified. Nine membrane domains were predicted by four programs: ESKW, TMHMM, MEMSAT and Phobius. Prediction of a part of the structure using the Rosetta membrane ab initio method led to a plausible suggestion for a structure of the catalytic site of alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase. PMID:22220568

  7. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain Induces a Heme Oxygenase Dependent Increase in Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Khalil; Kandiah, Nalaayini; Chau, Jessie; Bienenstock, John; Forsythe, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the consequences of feeding with a Lactobacillus species on the immune environment in GALT, and the role of dendritic cells and heme oxygenase-1 in mediating these responses. Feeding with a specific strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus induced a significant increase in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ functional regulatory T cells in GALT. This increase was greatest in the mesenteric lymph nodes and associated with a marked decrease in TNF and IFNγ production. Dendritic cell regulatory function and HO-1 expression was also increased. The increase in Foxp3+ T cells could be prevented by treatment with a heme oxygenase inhibitor. However, neither inhibition of heme oxygenase nor blockade of IL-10 and TGFβ prevented the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production. In conclusion Lactobacillus feeding induced a tolerogenic environment in GALT. HO-1 was critical to the enhancement of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells while additional, as yet unknown, pathways were involved in the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. PMID:23077634

  8. Catalytic residues and a predicted structure of tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Fuchs, Julian E; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Keller, Markus A; Golderer, Georg; Hermetter, Albin; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Hulo, Nicolas; Werner, Ernst R

    2012-04-01

    Alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase (EC 1.14.16.5) forms a third, distinct, class among tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent enzymes in addition to aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthases. Its protein sequence contains the fatty acid hydroxylase motif, a signature indicative of a di-iron centre, which contains eight conserved histidine residues. Membrane enzymes containing this motif, including alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase, are especially labile and so far have not been purified to homogeneity in active form. To obtain a first insight into structure-function relationships of this enzyme, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of 26 selected amino acid residues and expressed wild-type and mutant proteins containing a C-terminal Myc tag together with fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in Chinese-hamster ovary cells. Among all of the acidic residues within the eight-histidine motif, only mutation of Glu137 to alanine led to an 18-fold increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for tetrahydrobiopterin, suggesting a role in tetrahydrobiopterin interaction. A ninth additional histidine residue essential for activity was also identified. Nine membrane domains were predicted by four programs: ESKW, TMHMM, MEMSAT and Phobius. Prediction of a part of the structure using the Rosetta membrane ab initio method led to a plausible suggestion for a structure of the catalytic site of alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase. PMID:22220568

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao; Fan, Wen-Guo; Li, Dong-Pei; Lin, Marie CM; Kung, Hsiangfu

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system catabolizes heme into three products: carbon monoxide, biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron. It is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. A great deal of data has demonstrated the roles of HO-1 in the formation, growth and metastasis of tumors. The interest in this system by investigators involved in gastrointestinal tumors is fairly recent, and few papers on HO-1 have touched upon this subject. This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiological significance of HO-1 induction and its possible roles in the gastrointestinal tumors studied to date. The implications for possible therapeutic manipulation of HO-1 in gastrointestinal tumors are also discussed. PMID:20518085

  10. Involvement of Relish gene from Macrobrachium rosenbergii in the expression of anti-microbial peptides.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-Ru; Jin, Min; Ma, Fu-Tong; Huang, Ying; Huang, Xin; Feng, Jin-Ling; Zhao, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yi-Hong; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    Relish is an NF-kB transcription factor involved in immune-deficiency (IMD) signal pathway. In this study, a Relish gene (MrRelish) was identified from Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The full length of MrRelish comprises 5072 bp, including a 3510 bp open reading frame encoding a 1169 bp amino acid protein. MrRelish contains a Rel homology domain (RHD), a nucleus localization signal, an IκB-like domain (6 ankyrin repeats), and a death domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrRelish and other Relish from crustaceans belong to one group. MrRelish was expressed in all detected tissues, with the highest expression level in hemocytes and intestines. MrRelish was also upregulated in hepatopancreas at 6 h after Vibrio anguillarum challenge. The over-expression of MrRelish could induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), such as Drosophila Metchnikowin (Mtk), Attacin (Atta), Drosomycin (Drs), and Cecropin (CecA) and shrimp Penaeidin (Pen4). The RNAi of MrRelish in gills showed that the expression of crustin (cru) 2, Cru5, Cru8, lysozyme (Lyso) 1, and Lyso2 was inhibited. However, the expression of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) 1 and ALF3 did not change when MrRelish was knocked down. These results indicate that MrRelish may play an important role in innate immune defense against V. anguillarum in M. rosenbergii. PMID:26026243

  11. Protein Hydroxylation Catalyzed by 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent Oxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Markolovic, Suzana; Wilkins, Sarah E.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational hydroxylation of prolyl and lysyl residues, as catalyzed by 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent oxygenases, was first identified in collagen biosynthesis. 2OG oxygenases also catalyze prolyl and asparaginyl hydroxylation of the hypoxia-inducible factors that play important roles in the adaptive response to hypoxia. Subsequently, they have been shown to catalyze N-demethylation (via hydroxylation) of Nϵ-methylated histone lysyl residues, as well as hydroxylation of multiple other residues. Recent work has identified roles for 2OG oxygenases in the modification of translation-associated proteins, which in some cases appears to be conserved from microorganisms through to humans. Here we give an overview of protein hydroxylation catalyzed by 2OG oxygenases, focusing on recent discoveries. PMID:26152730

  12. β-Carotene-9',10'-oxygenase status modulates the impact of dietary tomato and lycopene on hepatic nuclear receptor-, stress-, and metabolism-related gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hsueh-Li; Moran, Nancy E; Cichon, Morgan J; Riedl, Ken M; Schwartz, Steven J; Erdman, John W; Pearl, Dennis K; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Clinton, Steven K

    2014-04-01

    Tomato and lycopene (ψ,ψ-carotene) consumption is hypothesized to protect against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocarcinogenesis, processes that may depend upon diet and gene interactions. To investigate the interaction of tomato or lycopene feeding with β-carotene-9',10'-monooxygenase (Bco2) on hepatic metabolic and signaling pathways, male wild-type (WT) and Bco2(-/-) mice (3-wk-old; n = 36) were fed semi-purified control, 10% tomato powder-containing, or 0.25% lycopene beadlet-containing diets for 3 wk. Serum lycopene concentrations were higher in lycopene- and tomato-fed Bco2(-/-) mice compared with WT (P = 0.03). Tomato- and lycopene-fed mice had detectable hepatic apolipoprotein (apo)-6'-, apo-8'-, and apo-12'-lycopenal concentrations. Hepatic expression of β-carotene-15,15'-monooxygenase was increased in Bco2(-/-) mice compared with WT (P = 0.02), but not affected by diet. Evaluation of hepatic gene expression by focused quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction arrays for nuclear receptors and coregulators (84 genes) and stress and metabolism (82 genes) genes indicates that tomato feeding affected 31 genes (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05) and lycopene feeding affected 19 genes, 16 of which were affected by both diets. Lycopene down-regulation of 7 nuclear receptors and coregulators, estrogen-related receptor-α, histone deacetylase 3, nuclear receptor coactivator 4, RevErbA-β, glucocorticoid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ, coactivator 1 β was dependent upon interaction with Bco2 status. Lycopene and tomato feeding induced gene expression patterns consistent with decreased lipid uptake, decreased cell proliferation and mitosis, down-regulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling, and decreased expression of genes involved in retinoid X receptor heterodimer activation. Tomato feeding also caused expression changes consistent with down-regulation of DNA synthesis and terpenoid metabolism. These

  13. β-Carotene-9′,10′-Oxygenase Status Modulates the Impact of Dietary Tomato and Lycopene on Hepatic Nuclear Receptor–, Stress-, and Metabolism-Related Gene Expression in Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hsueh-Li; Moran, Nancy E.; Cichon, Morgan J.; Riedl, Ken M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Erdman, John W.; Pearl, Dennis K.; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2014-01-01

    Tomato and lycopene (ψ, ψ-carotene) consumption is hypothesized to protect against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocarcinogenesis, processes that may depend upon diet and gene interactions. To investigate the interaction of tomato or lycopene feeding with β-carotene-9′,10′-monooxygenase (Bco2) on hepatic metabolic and signaling pathways, male wild-type (WT) and Bco2−/− mice (3-wk-old; n = 36) were fed semi-purified control, 10% tomato powder–containing, or 0.25% lycopene beadlet–containing diets for 3 wk. Serum lycopene concentrations were higher in lycopene- and tomato-fed Bco2−/− mice compared with WT (P = 0.03). Tomato- and lycopene-fed mice had detectable hepatic apolipoprotein (apo)-6′-, apo-8′-, and apo-12′-lycopenal concentrations. Hepatic expression of β-carotene-15,15’-monooxygenase was increased in Bco2−/− mice compared with WT (P = 0.02), but not affected by diet. Evaluation of hepatic gene expression by focused quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction arrays for nuclear receptors and coregulators (84 genes) and stress and metabolism (82 genes) genes indicates that tomato feeding affected 31 genes (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05) and lycopene feeding affected 19 genes, 16 of which were affected by both diets. Lycopene down-regulation of 7 nuclear receptors and coregulators, estrogen-related receptor-α, histone deacetylase 3, nuclear receptor coactivator 4, RevErbA-β, glucocorticoid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ, coactivator 1 β was dependent upon interaction with Bco2 status. Lycopene and tomato feeding induced gene expression patterns consistent with decreased lipid uptake, decreased cell proliferation and mitosis, down-regulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling, and decreased expression of genes involved in retinoid X receptor heterodimer activation. Tomato feeding also caused expression changes consistent with down-regulation of DNA synthesis and

  14. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 in atrial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Lung-An; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Chen, Wei-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium constitutes the main feature of atrial fibrillation (AF), which is characterized by increased oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a potent anti-oxidant system that may provide protection against various oxidative stress-related diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate whether HO-1 has a protective effect on AF-related remodeling. Cultured atrium-derived myocytes (HL-1 cell line) were used to evaluate tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, structural, and electrical remodeling. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was utilized to assess collagen (a main fibrosis-related protein) expression in atrial fibroblasts. Tachypacing in HL-1 myocytes and treatment of atrial fibroblasts with TGF-β enhanced the expression of HO-1, both of which were mediated by the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2. Over-expression of HO-1 in HL-1 cells attenuated tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, down-regulation of L-type calcium channel, and shortening of action potential duration. Furthermore, HO-1 over-expression in atrial fibroblasts blocked the up-regulation of collagen by TGF-β, implicating a protective role of HO-1 in structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium. In vivo, HO-1(-/-) mice exhibited a higher degree of oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, and collagen deposit in their atria than wild-type mice. Moreover, burst atrial pacing induced a greater susceptibility to AF in HO-1(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. In conclusion, a negative-feedback regulation of HO-1 in activated atrial myocytes and fibroblasts may provide protection against AF-related remodeling and AF development. PMID:27562817

  15. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  16. Time-resolved Studies of IsdG Protein Identify Molecular Signposts along the Non-canonical Heme Oxygenase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Streit, Bennett R; Kant, Ravi; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Celis, Arianna I; Machovina, Melodie M; Skaar, Eric P; Bothner, Brian; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    IsdGs are heme monooxygenases that break open the tetrapyrrole, releasing the iron, and thereby allowing bacteria expressing this protein to use heme as a nutritional iron source. Little is currently known about the mechanism by which IsdGs degrade heme, although the products differ from those generated by canonical heme oxygenases. A synthesis of time-resolved techniques, including in proteo mass spectrometry and conventional and stopped-flow UV/visible spectroscopy, was used in conjunction with analytical methods to define the reaction steps mediated by IsdG from Staphylococcus aureus and their time scales. An apparent meso-hydroxyheme (forming with k = 0.6 min(-1), pH 7.4, 10 mm ascorbate, 10 μm IsdG-heme, 22 °C) was identified as a likely common intermediate with the canonical heme oxygenases. Unlike heme oxygenases, this intermediate does not form with added H2O2 nor does it convert to verdoheme and CO. Rather, the next observable intermediates (k = 0.16 min(-1)) were a set of formyloxobilin isomers, similar to the mycobilin products of the IsdG homolog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MhuD). These converted in separate fast and slow phases to β-/δ-staphylobilin isomers and formaldehyde (CH2O). Controlled release of this unusual C1 product may support IsdG's dual role as both an oxygenase and a sensor of heme availability in S. aureus. PMID:26534961

  17. The heme oxygenases: important regulators of pregnancy and preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    George, Eric M.; Warrington, Junie P.; Spradley, Frank T.; Palei, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    The heme oxygenase system has long been believed to act largely as a housekeeping unit, converting prooxidant free heme from heme protein degradation into the benign bilirubin for conjugation and safe excretion. In recent decades, however, heme oxygenases have emerged as important regulators of cardiovascular function, largely through the production of their biologically active metabolites: carbon monoxide, bilirubin, and elemental iron. Even more recently, a number of separate lines of evidence have demonstrated an important role for the heme oxygenases in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Early preclinical and clinical studies have associated defects in the heme oxygenase with the obstetrical complication preeclampsia, as well as failure to establish adequate placental blood flow, an underlying mechanism of the disorder. Several recent preclinical studies have suggested, however, that the heme oxygenase system could serve as a valuable therapeutic tool for the management of preeclampsia, which currently has few pharmacological options. This review will summarize the role of heme oxygenases in pregnancy and highlight their potential in advancing the management of patients with preeclampsia. PMID:24898840

  18. High-level intracellular expression of hydroxynitrile lyase from the tropical rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis in microbial hosts.

    PubMed

    Hasslacher, M; Schall, M; Hayn, M; Bona, R; Rumbold, K; Lückl, J; Griengl, H; Kohlwein, S D; Schwab, H

    1997-10-01

    (S)-Hydroxynitrile lyase (Hnl) from the tropical rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis catalyzes the formation of (S)-cyanohydrins from hydrocyanic acid and aldehydes or ketones. This enzyme accepts aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic carbonyl compounds as substrates and is therefore considered a potent biocatalyst for the industrial production of optically active chemicals. Limitations in enzyme supply from natural resources were overcome by production of the enzyme in the microbial host systems Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Pichia pastoris. Expression of Hnl in the prokaryotic system led to the formation of inclusion bodies whereas in both yeast hosts high levels of soluble protein were obtained. Highest yields were obtained in a high cell density batch fermentation of a P. pastoris transformant that expressed heterologous Hnl to about 50% of the soluble cytosolic protein. At a cell density of 100 g/liter cell dry weight, a volume yield of 22 g/liter of heterologous product was obtained. Attempts to produce the Hnl protein extracellularly with the yeast hosts by applying different leader peptide strategies were not successful. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies indicated that the secretion-directed heterologous Hnl protein accumulated in the plasma membrane forming aggregated clusters of inactive protein. PMID:9325140

  19. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Ma, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Hou, Jue; Hei, Tom K; Yu, K N; Han, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1-10cGy) induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells). Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5cGy). Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells. PMID:26966892

  20. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lingzhi; Ma, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Hou, Jue; Hei, Tom K.; Yu, K.N.; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1–10 cGy) induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells). Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5 cGy). Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells. PMID:26966892

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates alcoholic liver steatosis: histopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Palipoch, Sarawoot; Koomhin, Phanit; Punsawad, Chuchard; Na-Ek, Prasit; Sattayakhom, Apsorn; Suwannalert, Prasit

    2015-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is one of the most important causes of hepatic steatosis, which involves oxidative stress. In particular, increased oxidative stress has been strongly linked to stimulation of the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This study aimed to investigate whether HO-1 could alleviates alcoholic steatosis in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: 1) the control group, 2) the EtOH group, 3) the EtOH + ZnPP-IX group and 4) the EtOH + Hemin group. Liver histopathology was investigated in weeks 1 and 4 after the start of the treatment period. Alcohol treatment significantly increased the hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, an oxidative stress marker. In addition, it increased the triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in both weeks. Gross examination demonstrated a yellowish and slightly enlarged liver in the alcohol-treated rats. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Oil Red O staining indicated hepatic steatosis, which was characterized by diffuse, extensive fatty accumulation and discrete lipid droplets of variable size in hepatocytes of the alcohol-treated rats. Administration of the HO-1 inducer hemin resulted in upregulation of hepatic HO-1 gene expression, reduced the MDA, triglyceride, ALT and AST levels and alleviated alcoholic hepatic steatosis, whereas administration of the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX) resulted in downregulation of hepatic HO-1 gene expression and could not alleviate alcoholic hepatic steatosis either week. In conclusion, HO-1 could alleviate alcoholic hepatic steatosis in male Wistar rats and may be useful in development of a new therapeutic approach. PMID:26989297

  2. Microbial Forensics: Predicting Phenotypic Characteristics and Environmental Conditions from Large-Scale Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minseung; Zorraquino, Violeta; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    A tantalizing question in cellular physiology is whether the cellular state and environmental conditions can be inferred by the expression signature of an organism. To investigate this relationship, we created an extensive normalized gene expression compendium for the bacterium Escherichia coli that was further enriched with meta-information through an iterative learning procedure. We then constructed an ensemble method to predict environmental and cellular state, including strain, growth phase, medium, oxygen level, antibiotic and carbon source presence. Results show that gene expression is an excellent predictor of environmental structure, with multi-class ensemble models achieving balanced accuracy between 70.0% (±3.5%) to 98.3% (±2.3%) for the various characteristics. Interestingly, this performance can be significantly boosted when environmental and strain characteristics are simultaneously considered, as a composite classifier that captures the inter-dependencies of three characteristics (medium, phase and strain) achieved 10.6% (±1.0%) higher performance than any individual models. Contrary to expectations, only 59% of the top informative genes were also identified as differentially expressed under the respective conditions. Functional analysis of the respective genetic signatures implicates a wide spectrum of Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways with condition-specific information content, including iron transport, transferases, and enterobactin synthesis. Further experimental phenotypic-to-genotypic mapping that we conducted for knock-out mutants argues for the information content of top-ranked genes. This work demonstrates the degree at which genome-scale transcriptional information can be predictive of latent, heterogeneous and seemingly disparate phenotypic and environmental characteristics, with far-reaching applications. PMID:25774498

  3. Comparison of three microbial hosts for the expression of an active catalytic scFv.

    PubMed

    Robin, Sylvain; Petrov, Kliment; Dintinger, Thierry; Kujumdzieva, Anna; Tellier, Charles; Dion, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Antibodies represent an interesting protein framework on which catalytic functions can be grafted. In previous studies, we have reported the characterization of the catalytic antibody 4B2 obtained on the basis of the "bait and switch" strategy which catalyzes two different chemical reactions: the allylic isomerization of beta,gamma-unsaturated ketones and the Kemp elimination. We have cloned the antibody 4B2 and expressed it as a single-chain Fv (scFv) fragment in different expression systems, Escherichia coli and two yeasts species, in order to elicit the most suitable system to study its catalytic activity. The scFv4B2 was secreted as an active form in the culture medium of Pichia pastoris and Kluyveromyces lactis, which led respectively to 4 and 1.3mg/l after purification. In E. coli, different strategies were investigated to increase the cytoplasmic soluble fraction, which resulted, in all cases, in the expression of a low amount of functional antibodies. By contrast, substantial amount of scFv4B2 could be purified when it was expressed as inclusion bodies (12mg/l) and submitted to an in vitro refolding process. Its catalytic activity was measured and proved to be comparable to that of the whole IgG. However, the instability of the scFv4B2 in solution prevented from an exhaustive characterization of its activity and stabilization of this protein appears to be essential before designing strategies to improve its catalytic activity. PMID:12531284

  4. Microbial populations and enzyme activities in soil in situ under transgenic corn expressing cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Icoz, I; Saxena, D; Andow, D A; Zwahlen, C; Stotzky, G

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic Bt crops produce insecticidal Cry proteins that are released to soil in plant residues, root exudates, and pollen and that may affect soil microorganisms. As a continuation of studies in the laboratory and a plant-growth room, a field study was conducted at the Rosemount Experiment Station of the University of Minnesota. Three Bt corn varieties that express the Cry1Ab protein, which is toxic to the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner), and one Bt corn variety that expresses the Cry3Bb1 protein, which is toxic to the corn rootworm complex (Diabrotica spp.), and their near-isogenic non-Bt varieties were evaluated for their effects on microbial diversity by classical dilution plating and molecular (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) techniques and for the activities of some enzymes (arylsulfatases, acid and alkaline phosphatases, dehydrogenases, and proteases) involved in the degradation of plant biomass. After 4 consecutive years of corn cultivation (2003-2006), there were, in general, no consistent statistically significant differences in the numbers of different groups of microorganisms, the activities of the enzymes, and the pH between soils planted with Bt and non-Bt corn. Numbers and types of microorganisms and enzyme activities differed with season and with the varieties of corn, but these differences were not related to the presence of the Cry proteins in soil. The Cry1Ab protein of Bt corn (events Bt11 and MON810) was detected in most soils during the 4 yr, whereas the Cry3Bb1 protein was not detected in soils of Bt corn (event MON863) expressing the cry3Bb1 gene. PMID:18396552

  5. Responses in colonic microbial community and gene expression of pigs to a long-term high resistant starch diet

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Zhou, Liping; Fang, Lingdong; Su, Yong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2015-01-01

    Intake of raw potato starch (RPS) has been associated with various intestinal health benefits, but knowledge of its mechanism in a long-term is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term intake of RPS on microbial composition, genes expression profiles in the colon of pigs. Thirty-six Duroc × Landrace × Large White growing barrows were randomly allocated to corn starch (CS) and RPS groups with a randomized block design. Each group consisted of six replicates (pens), with three pigs per pen. Pigs in the CS group were offered a corn/soybean-based diet, while pigs in the RPS group were put on a diet in which 230 g/kg (growing period) or 280 g/kg (finishing period) purified CS was replaced with purified RPS during a 100-day trial. Real-time PCR assay showed that RPS significantly decreased the number of total bacteria in the colonic digesta. MiSeq sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA genes showed that RPS significantly decreased the relative abundance of Clostridium, Treponema, Oscillospira, Phascolarctobacterium, RC9 gut group, and S24-7-related operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and increased the relative abundance of Turicibacter, Blautia, Ruminococcus, Coprococcus, Marvinbryantia, and Ruminococcus bromii-related OTUs in colonic digesta and mucosa. Analysis of the colonic transcriptome profiles revealed that the RPS diet changed the colonic expression profile of the host genes mainly involved in immune response pathways. RPS significantly increased proinflammartory cytokine IL-1β gene expression and suppressed genes involved in lysosome. Our findings suggest that long-term intake of high resistant starch (RS) diet may result in both positive and negative roles in gut health. PMID:26379652

  6. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Crystallization of recombinant cyclo-oxygenase-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Anna M.; Pawlitz, Jennifer L.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Gierse, James K.; Moreland, Kirby T.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Loduca, Jina Y.; Stallings, William C.

    1999-01-01

    The integral membrane protein, prostaglandin H 2 synthase, or cyclo-oxygenase (COX), catalyses the first step in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs) and is the target of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Two isoforms are known. The constitutive enzyme, COX-1, is present in most tissues and is responsible for the physiological production of PGs. The isoform responsible for the elevated production of PGs during inflammation is COX-2 which is induced specifically at inflammatory sites. Three-dimensional structures of inhibitor complexes of COX-2, and of site variants of COX-2 which mimic COX-1, provide insight into the structural basis for selective inhibition of COX-2. Additionally, structures of COX-2 mutants and complexes with the substrate can provide a clearer understanding of the catalytic mechanism of the reaction. A crystallization protocol has been developed for COX-2 which reproducibly yields diffraction quality crystals. Polyethyleneglycol 550 monomethylether (MMP550) and MgCl 2 were systematically varied and used in conjunction with the detergent β- D-octylglucopyranoside ( β-OG). As a result of many crystallization trials, we determined that the initial β-OG concentration should be held constant, allowing the salt concentration to modulate the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the detergent. Over 25 crystal structures have been solved using crystals generated from this system. Most crystals belong to the space group P2 12 12, with lattice constants of a=180, b=134, c=120 Å in a pseudo body-centered lattice.

  8. Cloning and expression of an inhibitor of microbial metalloproteinases from insects contributing to innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The first IMPI (inhibitor of metalloproteinases from insects) was identified in the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella [Wedde, Weise, Kopacek, Franke and Vilcinskas (1998) Eur. J. Biochem. 255, 535–543]. Here we report cloning and expression of a cDNA coding for this IMPI. The IMPI mRNA was identified among the induced transcripts from a subtractive and suppressive PCR analysis after bacterial challenge of G. mellonella larvae. Induced expression of the IMPI during a humoral immune response was confirmed by real-time PCR, which documented up to 500 times higher amounts of IMPI mRNA in immunized larvae in comparison with untreated ones. The IMPI sequence shares no similarity with those of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases or other natural inhibitors of metalloproteinases, and the recombinant IMPI specifically inhibits thermolysin-like metalloproteinases, but not matrix metalloproteinases. These results support the hypothesis that the IMPI represents a novel type of immune-related protein which is induced and processed during the G. mellonella humoral immune response to inactivate pathogen-associated thermolysin-like metalloproteinases. PMID:15115439

  9. Phenotypic Variability in Synthetic Biology Applications: Dealing with Noise in Microbial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bandiera, Lucia; Furini, Simone; Giordano, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The stochasticity due to the infrequent collisions among low copy-number molecules within the crowded cellular compartment is a feature of living systems. Single cell variability in gene expression within an isogenic population (i.e., biological noise) is usually described as the sum of two independent components: intrinsic and extrinsic stochasticity. Intrinsic stochasticity arises from the random occurrence of events inherent to the gene expression process (e.g., the burst-like synthesis of mRNA and protein molecules). Extrinsic fluctuations reflect the state of the biological system and its interaction with the intra and extracellular environments (e.g., concentration of available polymerases, ribosomes, metabolites, and micro-environmental conditions). A better understanding of cellular noise would help synthetic biologists design gene circuits with well-defined functional properties. In silico modeling has already revealed several aspects of the network topology’s impact on noise properties; this information could drive the selection of biological parts and the design of reliably engineered pathways. Importantly, while optimizing artificial gene circuitry for industrial applications, synthetic biology could also elucidate the natural mechanisms underlying natural phenotypic variability. In this review, we briefly summarize the functional roles of noise in unicellular organisms and address their relevance to synthetic network design. We will also consider how noise might influence the selection of network topologies supporting reliable functions, and how the variability of cellular events might be exploited when designing innovative biotechnology applications. PMID:27092132

  10. [Expression of cecropin P1 gene increases resistance of Camelina sativa (L.) plants to microbial phytopathogenes].

    PubMed

    Zakharchenko, N S; Kaliaeva, M A; Bur'ianov, Ia I

    2013-05-01

    Transgenic plants of camelina (Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz) with the synthetic gene of antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (cecP1) were obtained. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is performed using the binary vector pGA482::cecP1 by vacuum infiltration of flower buds. The presence of the cecP1 gene in the genome of plants was confirmed by PCR. cecP1 gene expression in transgenic plants was shown by Western blot analysis and by antimicrobial activity of plant extracts against the bacterial phytopathogene Erwinia carotovora. The plants of F0 and F1 generations had the normal phenotype and retained the ability to form viable seeds in self-pollination. cecP1 plants exhibit enhanced resistance to bacterial and fungal phytopathogens: Erwinia carotovora and Fusarium sporotrichioides. The increased sustainability of cecropin P1-expressing plants against salt stress is shown. The possibility of the integration of the cecP1 gene into the overall protective system of plants against biotic and abiotic stresses is discussed. PMID:24159802

  11. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Lanceta, Lilibeth; Mattingly, Jacob M.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer) and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by “loose” (probably intralysosomal) iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment). Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity–CO and bilirubin–have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity. PMID:26270345

  12. Signalling through MyD88 drives surface expression of the mycobacterial receptors MCL (Clecsf8, Clec4d) and Mincle (Clec4e) following microbial stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kerscher, Bernhard; Dambuza, Ivy M; Christofi, Maria; Reid, Delyth M; Yamasaki, Sho; Willment, Janet A; Brown, Gordon D

    2016-01-01

    The heterodimeric mycobacterial receptors, macrophage C-type lectin (MCL) and macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle), are upregulated at the cell surface following microbial challenge, but the mechanisms underlying this response are unclear. Here we report that microbial stimulation triggers Mincle expression through the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) pathway; a process that does not require MCL. Conversely, we show that MCL is constitutively expressed but retained intracellularly until Mincle is induced, whereupon the receptors form heterodimers which are translocated to the cell surface. Thus this "two-step" model for induction of these key receptors provides new insights into the underlying mechanisms of anti-mycobacterial immunity. PMID:27005451

  13. Flavoprotein monooxygenases for oxidative biocatalysis: recombinant expression in microbial hosts and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ceccoli, Romina D.; Bianchi, Dario A.; Rial, Daniela V.

    2014-01-01

    External flavoprotein monooxygenases comprise a group of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyze the insertion of one atom of molecular oxygen into an organic substrate and the second atom is reduced to water. These enzymes are involved in a great number of metabolic pathways both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Flavoprotein monooxygenases have attracted the attention of researchers for several decades and the advent of recombinant DNA technology caused a great progress in the field. These enzymes are subjected to detailed biochemical and structural characterization and some of them are also regarded as appealing oxidative biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and valuable intermediates toward active pharmaceutical ingredients due to their high chemo-, stereo-, and regioselectivity. Here, we review the most representative reactions catalyzed both in vivo and in vitro by prototype flavoprotein monooxygenases, highlighting the strategies employed to produce them recombinantly, to enhance the yield of soluble proteins, and to improve cofactor regeneration in order to obtain versatile biocatalysts. Although we describe the most outstanding features of flavoprotein monooxygenases, we mainly focus on enzymes that were cloned, expressed and used for biocatalysis during the last years. PMID:24567729

  14. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. PMID:26862199

  15. Heme oxygenase system and hypertension: a comprehensive insight.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shuchita; Ndisang, Joseph Fomusi

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex interplay of interrelated etiologies, and the leading risk factor for many cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. Cardinal pathophysiological features of hypertension include enhanced vascular inflammation, vascular remodeling, vascular contractility and increased oxidative stress. In response to oxidative, inflammatory or other noxious stimuli, many physiological pathways like the heme oxygenase (HO) system are activated in an attempt to counteract tissue insults. However, the pathophysiological activation of the HO system only results to a transient increase of HO activity that fall below the necessary threshold capable of activating the downstream signaling components of the HO system like the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) secondary messenger system. Therefore, a more robust potentiation of the HO system by pharmacological agents such as hemin, heme-arginate, cobalt protoporphyrin or through retroviral HO-1 gene delivery would be needed to surmount the threshold for cytoprotection. The HO system modulates cellular homeostasis. Importantly, the HO system plays a vital role in a wide spectrum of physiologic including the regulation of blood vessel tone. Alterations in the activity and expression of HO has been correlated to pathophysiology of hypertension and related complications such as hypertrophy, myocardial infarction and heart failure. Moreover, the cytoprotection exerted by HO is attributable to its catabolic products namely, carbon monoxide, bilirubin/biliverdin, and ferritin that are known to modulate immune, inflammatory and oxidative insults. The growing incidence of hypertension and associated cardiometabolic complications has prompted the need for the exploration of alternative therapeutic strategies like substances capable of potentiating the HO system. This review briefly, highlights the functional significance of the HO system and its downstream signaling molecules

  16. Natural heme oxygenase-1 inducers in hepatobiliary function

    PubMed Central

    Volti, Giovanni Li; Sacerdoti, David; Giacomo, Claudia Di; Barcellona, Maria Luisa; Scacco, Antonio; Murabito, Paolo; Biondi, Antonio; Basile, Francesco; Gazzolo, Diego; Abella, Raul; Frigiola, Alessandro; Galvano, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological effects of natural antioxidants, their extracts or their major active components, have been reported in recent decades. Most of these compounds are characterized by a phenolic structure, similar to that of α-tocopherol, and present antioxidant properties that have been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Polyphenols may increase the capacity of endogenous antioxidant defences and modulate the cellular redox state. Changes in the cellular redox state may have wide-ranging consequences for cellular growth and differentiation. The majority of in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far have attributed the protective effect of bioactive polyphenols to their chemical reactivity toward free radicals and their capacity to prevent the oxidation of important intracellular components. However, in recent years a possible novel aspect in the mode of action of these compounds has been suggested; that is, the ultimate stimulation of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway is likely to account for the established and powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties of these polyphenols. The products of the HO-catalyzed reaction, particularly carbon monoxide (CO) and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown to exert protective effects in several organs against oxidative and other noxious stimuli. In this context, it is interesting to note that induction of HO-1 expression by means of natural compounds contributes to protection against liver damage in various experimental models. The focus of this review is on the significance of targeted induction of HO-1 as a potential therapeutic strategy to protect the liver against various stressors in several pathological conditions. PMID:18985801

  17. Heme Oxygenase-1 and Carbon Monoxide Promote Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection.

    PubMed

    Stolt, Claudia; Schmidt, Imke H E; Sayfart, Yana; Steinmetz, Ivo; Bast, Antje

    2016-08-01

    The environmental bacterium and potential biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, an often fatal infectious disease. Increased serum bilirubin has been shown to be a negative predictive factor in melioidosis patients. We therefore investigated the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which catalyzes the degradation of heme into the bilirubin precursor biliverdin, ferrous iron, and CO during B. pseudomallei infection. We found that infection of murine macrophages induces HO-1 expression, involving activation of several protein kinases and the transcription factor nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Deficiency of Nrf2 improved B. pseudomallei clearance by macrophages, whereas Nrf2 activation by sulforaphane and tert-butylhydroquinone with subsequent HO-1 induction enhanced intracellular bacterial growth. The HO-1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin IX diminished proinflammatory cytokine levels, leading to an increased bacterial burden in macrophages. In contrast, HO-1 gene knockdown reduced the survival of intramacrophage B. pseudomallei Pharmacological administration of cobalt protoporphyrin IX to mice resulted in an enhanced bacterial load in various organs and was associated with higher mortality of intranasally infected mice. The unfavorable outcome of B. pseudomallei infection after HO-1 induction was associated with higher serum IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1 levels but decreased secretion of IFN-γ. Finally, we demonstrate that the CO-releasing molecule CORM-2 increases the B. pseudomallei load in macrophages and mice. Thus, our data suggest that the B. pseudomallei-mediated induction of HO-1 and the release of its metabolite CO impair bacterial clearance in macrophages and during murine melioidosis. PMID:27316684

  18. Heme oxygenase metabolites inhibit tubuloglomerular feedback in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Garvin, Jeffrey L; D'Ambrosio, Martin A; Falck, John R; Leung, Pablo; Liu, Ruisheng; Ren, YiLin; Carretero, Oscar A

    2011-04-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) is a renal autoregulatory mechanism that constricts the afferent arteriole in response to increases in distal NaCl. Heme oxygenases (HO-1 and HO-2) release carbon monoxide (CO) and biliverdin, which may help control renal function. We showed in vitro that HO products inhibit TGF; however, we do not know whether this also occurs in vivo or the mechanism(s) involved. We hypothesized that in vivo HO-1 and HO-2 in the nephron inhibit TGF via release of CO and biliverdin. We first performed laser capture microdissection followed by real-time PCR and found that both HO-1 and HO-2 are expressed in the macula densa. We next performed micropuncture experiments in vivo on individual rat nephrons, adding different compounds to the perfusate, and found that an HO inhibitor, stannous mesoporphyrin (SnMP), potentiated TGF (P < 0.05, SnMP vs. control). The CO-releasing molecule (CORM)-3 partially inhibited TGF at 50 μmol/l (P < 0.01, CORM-3 vs. control) and blocked it completely at higher doses. A soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, LY83583, blocked the inhibitory effect of CORM-3 on TGF. Biliverdin also partially inhibited TGF (P < 0.01, biliverdin vs. control), most likely attributable to decreased superoxide (O(2)(-)) because biliverdin was rendered ineffective by tempol, a O(2)(-) dismutase mimetic. We concluded that HO-1 and HO-2 in the nephron inhibit TGF by releasing CO and biliverdin. The inhibitory effect of CO on TGF is mediated by the sGC/cGMP signaling pathway, whereas biliverdin probably acts by reducing O(2)(-). PMID:21239629

  19. PGL, encoding chlorophyllide a oxygenase 1, impacts leaf senescence and indirectly affects grain yield and quality in rice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaolong; Xu, Jie; Huang, Lichao; Leng, Yujia; Dai, Liping; Rao, Yuchun; Chen, Long; Wang, Yuqiong; Tu, Zhengjun; Hu, Jiang; Ren, Deyong; Zhang, Guangheng; Zhu, Li; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zeng, Dali

    2016-03-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) b is a ubiquitous accessory pigment in land plants, green algae, and prochlorophytes. This pigment is synthesized from Chl a by chlorophyllide a oxygenase and plays a key role in adaptation to various environments. This study characterizes a rice mutant, pale green leaf (pgl), and isolates the gene PGL by using a map-based cloning approach. PGL, encoding chlorophyllide a oxygenase 1, is mainly expressed in the chlorenchyma and activated in the light-dependent Chl synthesis process. Compared with wild-type plants, pgl exhibits a lower Chl content with a reduced and disorderly thylakoid ultrastructure, which decreases the photosynthesis rate and results in reduced grain yield and quality. In addition, pgl exhibits premature senescence in both natural and dark-induced conditions and more severe Chl degradation and reactive oxygen species accumulation than does the wild-type. Moreover, pgl is sensitive to heat stress. PMID:26709310

  20. PGL, encoding chlorophyllide a oxygenase 1, impacts leaf senescence and indirectly affects grain yield and quality in rice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaolong; Xu, Jie; Huang, Lichao; Leng, Yujia; Dai, Liping; Rao, Yuchun; Chen, Long; Wang, Yuqiong; Tu, Zhengjun; Hu, Jiang; Ren, Deyong; Zhang, Guangheng; Zhu, Li; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zeng, Dali

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) b is a ubiquitous accessory pigment in land plants, green algae, and prochlorophytes. This pigment is synthesized from Chl a by chlorophyllide a oxygenase and plays a key role in adaptation to various environments. This study characterizes a rice mutant, pale green leaf (pgl), and isolates the gene PGL by using a map-based cloning approach. PGL, encoding chlorophyllide a oxygenase 1, is mainly expressed in the chlorenchyma and activated in the light-dependent Chl synthesis process. Compared with wild-type plants, pgl exhibits a lower Chl content with a reduced and disorderly thylakoid ultrastructure, which decreases the photosynthesis rate and results in reduced grain yield and quality. In addition, pgl exhibits premature senescence in both natural and dark-induced conditions and more severe Chl degradation and reactive oxygen species accumulation than does the wild-type. Moreover, pgl is sensitive to heat stress. PMID:26709310

  1. Expression of tfdA genes in aquatic microbial communities during acclimation to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lipthay, Julia R; Aamand, Jens; Barkay, Tamar

    2002-06-01

    The role of gene expression during acclimation of aquatic microbial communities was examined by relating transcription of tfdA to the degradation of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The tfdA gene encodes for a 2,4-D/2-oxoglutarate dioxygenase that transforms 2,4-D to 2,4-dichlorophenol. Transcription of tfdA, the abundance of tfdA genes and 2,4-D degrading populations, and the rate of 2,4-D disappearance were followed in laboratory incubations of two pond water samples that were exposed to 0.11 mM 2,4-D. Both communities responded to 2,4-D exposure by induction of tfdA transcription but the dynamics of transcript abundance and the homology to the tfdA riboprobe suggested different populations of 2,4-D degraders in the two ponds. In one community, where tfdA transcripts were highly homologous to the tfdA gene of Ralstonia eutropha JMP134, transcription of tfdA was transient and dropped while 2,4-D degradation continued. In the other freshwater community, where tfdA genes with a lower similarity to the tfdA gene of strain JMP134 were transcribed, transcript levels remained high although 2,4-D degradation had ceased. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of tfdA amplicons similarly demonstrated the presence of different tfdA loci in the two freshwater communities, and this difference in populations of tfdA genes probably explains the observed difference in dynamics of catabolic gene transcription. PMID:19709228

  2. Ascorbic acid partly antagonizes resveratrol mediated heme oxygenase-1 but not paraoxonase-1 induction in cultured hepatocytes - role of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both resveratrol and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) are frequently used in complementary and alternative medicine. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms for potential health benefits of resveratrol and its interactions with ascorbic acid. Methods The antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 were analysed for their mRNA and protein levels in HUH7 liver cells treated with 10 and 25 μmol/l resveratrol in the absence and presence of 100 and 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Additionally the transactivation of the transcription factor Nrf2 and paraoxonase-1 were determined by reporter gene assays. Results Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol induces the antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 in cultured hepatocytes. Heme oxygenase-1 induction by resveratrol was accompanied by an increase in Nrf2 transactivation. Resveratrol mediated Nrf2 transactivation as well as heme oxygenase-1 induction were partly antagonized by 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Conclusions Unlike heme oxygenase-1 (which is highly regulated by Nrf2) paraoxonase-1 (which exhibits fewer ARE/Nrf2 binding sites in its promoter) induction by resveratrol was not counteracted by ascorbic acid. Addition of resveratrol to the cell culture medium produced relatively low levels of hydrogen peroxide which may be a positive hormetic redox-signal for Nrf2 dependent gene expression thereby driving heme oxygenase-1 induction. However, high concentrations of ascorbic acid manifold increased hydrogen peroxide production in the cell culture medium which may be a stress signal thereby disrupting the Nrf2 signalling pathway. PMID:21199573

  3. ARSENIC INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory


    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) are not. Therefore, HO enzyme induction ...

  4. AN ELISA ASSAY FOR HEME OXYGENASE (HO-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ELISA assay for heme oxygenase (HO-l )

    Abstract

    A double antibody capture ELISA for the HO-l protein has been developed to separately quantitate HO-I protein. The use of 2.5% NP40 detergent greatly assists in freeing HO-l protein from membranes and/or other cel...

  5. [Heme oxygenase activity in rat organs during cadmium chloride administration].

    PubMed

    Strel'chenko, E V; Nikitchenko, I V; Kaliman, P A

    2002-01-01

    Heme oxygenase activity, the level of spontaneous and ascorbat-induced LPO in the liver, kidney and spleen homogenates of rats and blood serum absorption spectrum in the Soret region in different periods both after CdCl2 and prior alpha-tocopherol administration were studied. The increase in the hemolysis products content in the serum was observed in 15 min after CdCl2 injection and remained during 24 h. Heme oxygenase activity in the liver and kidney increased after 6 h and stayed at the same level 24 h after CdCl2 administration. The level of spontaneous LPO in the spleen increased after 6 h, and in the liver and kidney the level of spontaneous and ascorbat-induced LPO increased in 24 h after CdCl2 injection. The preliminary alpha-tocopherol administration did not prevent the accumulation of hemolysis products in the serum and the increase of heme oxygenase activity in the liver and kidney caused by CdCl2 administration. However, the increase in the ascorbat-induced LPO in these organs was completely blocked. The role of heme and LPO in the heme oxygenase induction by CdCl2 are discussed. PMID:12916165

  6. DOWNY MILDEW RESISTANT 6 and DMR6-LIKE OXYGENASE 1 are partially redundant but distinct suppressors of immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zeilmaker, Tieme; Ludwig, Nora R; Elberse, Joyce; Seidl, Michael F; Berke, Lidija; Van Doorn, Arjen; Schuurink, Robert C; Snel, Berend; Van den Ackerveken, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis downy mildew resistant 6 (dmr6) mutants have lost their susceptibility to the downy mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Here we show that dmr6 is also resistant to the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae and the oomycete Phytophthora capsici. Resistance is accompanied by enhanced defense gene expression and elevated salicylic acid levels. The suppressive effect of the DMR6 oxygenase was confirmed in transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing DMR6 that show enhanced susceptibility to H. arabidopsidis, P. capsici, and P. syringae. Phylogenetic analysis of the superfamily of 2-oxoglutarate Fe(II)-dependent oxygenases revealed a subgroup of DMR6-LIKE OXYGENASEs (DLOs). Within Arabidopsis, DMR6 is most closely related to DLO1 and DLO2. Overexpression of DLO1 and DLO2 in the dmr6 mutant restored the susceptibility to downy mildew indicating that DLOs negatively affect defense, similar to DMR6. DLO1, but not DLO2, is co-expressed with DMR6, showing strong activation during pathogen attack and following salicylic acid treatment. DMR6 and DLO1 differ in their spatial expression pattern in downy mildew-infected Arabidopsis leaves; DMR6 is mostly expressed in cells that are in contact with hyphae and haustoria of H. arabidopsidis, while DLO1 is expressed mainly in the vascular tissues near infection sites. Strikingly, the dmr6-3_dlo1 double mutant, that is completely resistant to H. arabidopsidis, showed a strong growth reduction that was associated with high levels of salicylic acid. We conclude that DMR6 and DLO1 redundantly suppress plant immunity, but also have distinct activities based on their differential localization of expression. PMID:25376907

  7. Microbial Disruption of Autophagy Alters Expression of the RISC Component AGO2, a Critical Regulator of the miRNA Silencing Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sibony, Michal; Abdullah, Majd; Greenfield, Laura; Raju, Deepa; Wu, Ted; Rodrigues, David M.; Galindo-Mata, Esther; Mascarenhas, Heidi; Philpott, Dana J.; Silverberg, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autophagy is implicated in Crohn's disease (CD) pathogenesis. Recent evidence suggests autophagy regulates the microRNA (miRNA)-induced silencing complex (miRISC). Therefore, autophagy may play a novel role in CD by regulating expression of miRISC, thereby altering miRNA silencing. As microbes associated with CD can alter autophagy, we hypothesized that microbial disruption of autophagy affects the critical miRISC component AGO2. Methods: AGO2 expression was assessed in epithelial and immune cells, and intestinal organoids with disrupted autophagy. Microarray technology was used to determine the expression of downstream miRNAs in cells with defective autophagy. Results: Increased AGO2 was detected in autophagy-deficient ATG5−/− and ATG16−/− mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) in comparison with wild-type MEFs. Chemical agents and VacA toxin, which disrupt autophagy, increased AGO2 expression in MEFs, epithelial cells lines, and human monocytes, respectively. Increased AGO2 was also detected in ATG7−/− intestinal organoids, in comparison with wild-type organoids. Five miRNAs were differentially expressed in autophagy-deficient MEFs. Pathway enrichment analysis of the differentially expressed miRNAs implicated signaling pathways previously associated with CD. Conclusions: Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy is involved in the regulation of the critical miRISC component AGO2 in epithelial and immune cells and primary intestinal epithelial cells. We propose a mechanism by which autophagy alters miRNA expression, which likely impacts the regulation of CD-associated pathways. Furthermore, as enteric microbial products can manipulate autophagy and AGO2, our findings suggest a novel mechanism by which enteric microbes could influence miRNA to promote disease. PMID:26332312

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes tumor progression and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma cells by inhibiting antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Geom Seog; Jiang, Wen-Yi; Chi, Jin Hua; Jin, Hao; Park, Won-Chul; Sohn, Dong Hwan; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Sung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is upregulated in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells. However, the role of HO-1 in the metastatic potential of CRC remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential of HO-1 to control the antitumor immunity of CRC. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role in the immune surveillance system. Hemin-induced HO-1 expression suppressed the expression of ICAM-1 in human CRC cells. HO-1 regulated ICAM-1 expression via tristetraprolin, an mRNA-binding protein, at the posttranscriptional level in CRC cells. The upregulated HO-1 expression in CRC cells markedly decreased the adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear lymphocytes (PBMLs) to CRC cells and PBML-mediated cytotoxicity against CRC cells. Production of CXCL10, an effector T cell-recruiting chemokine, was significantly reduced by the increased HO-1 expression. The expression of the CXCL10 receptor, CXCR3, decreased significantly in PBMLs that adhered to CRC cells. HO-1 expression correlated negatively, although nonsignificantly, with ICAM-1 and CXCL10 expression in xenograft tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that HO-1 expression is functionally linked to the mediation of tumor progression and metastasis of CRC cells by inhibiting antitumor immunity. PMID:26087182

  9. Mechanisms by which heme oxygenase rescue renal dysfunction in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ndisang, Joseph Fomusi; Tiwari, Shuchita

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and excessive inflammation/oxidative stress are pathophysiological forces associated with kidney dysfunction. Although we recently showed that heme-oxygenase (HO) improves renal functions, the mechanisms are largely unclear. Moreover, the effects of the HO-system on podocyte cytoskeletal proteins like podocin, podocalyxin, CD2-associated-protein (CD2AP) and proteins of regeneration/repair like beta-catenin, Oct3/4, WT1 and Pax2 in renal tissue from normoglycemic obese Zucker-fatty rats (ZFs) have not been reported. Treatment with hemin reduced renal histo-pathological lesions including glomerular-hypertrophy, tubular-cast, tubular-atrophy and mononuclear cell-infiltration in ZFs. These were associated with enhanced expression of beta-catenin, Oct3/4, WT1, Pax2 and nephrin, an essential transmembrane protein required for the formation of the scaffoldings of the podocyte slit-diaphragm, permitting the filtration of small ions, but not massive excretion of proteins, hence proteinuria. Besides nephrin, hemin also enhanced other important podocyte-regulators including, podocalyxin, podocin and CD2AP. Correspondingly, important markers of renal dysfunction such as albuminuria and proteinuria were reduced, while creatinine clearance increased, suggesting improved renal function in hemin-treated ZFs. The renoprotection by hemin was accompanied by the reduction of inflammatory/oxidative mediators including, macrophage-inflammatory-protein-1α, macrophage-chemoattractant-protein-1 and 8-isoprostane, whereas HO-1, HO-activity and the total-anti-oxidant-capacity increased. Contrarily, the HO-inhibitor, stannous-mesoporphyrin nullified the reno-protection by hemin. Collectively, these data suggest that hemin ameliorates nephropathy by potentiating the expression of proteins of repair/regeneration, abating oxidative/inflammatory mediators, reducing renal histo-pathological lesions, while enhancing nephrin, podocin, podocalyxin, CD2AP and creatinine clearance, with

  10. Analysis of Carotenoid Isomerase Activity in a Prototypical Carotenoid Cleavage Enzyme, Apocarotenoid Oxygenase (ACO)*

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Xuewu; Kiser, Philip D.; Che, Tao; Carey, Paul R.; Golczak, Marcin; Shi, Wuxian; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage enzymes (CCEs) constitute a group of evolutionarily related proteins that metabolize a variety of carotenoid and non-carotenoid substrates. Typically, these enzymes utilize a non-heme iron center to oxidatively cleave a carbon-carbon double bond of a carotenoid substrate. Some members also isomerize specific double bonds in their substrates to yield cis-apocarotenoid products. The apocarotenoid oxygenase from Synechocystis has been hypothesized to represent one such member of this latter category of CCEs. Here, we developed a novel expression and purification protocol that enabled production of soluble, native ACO in quantities sufficient for high resolution structural and spectroscopic investigation of its catalytic mechanism. High performance liquid chromatography and Raman spectroscopy revealed that ACO exclusively formed all-trans products. We also found that linear polyoxyethylene detergents previously used for ACO crystallization strongly inhibited the apocarotenoid oxygenase activity of the enzyme. We crystallized the native enzyme in the absence of apocarotenoid substrate and found electron density in the active site that was similar in appearance to the density previously attributed to a di-cis-apocarotenoid intermediate. Our results clearly demonstrated that ACO is in fact a non-isomerizing member of the CCE family. These results indicate that careful selection of detergent is critical for the success of structural studies aimed at elucidating structures of CCE-carotenoid/retinoid complexes. PMID:24648526

  11. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guang-Huey; Chen, Hao-Ping; Shu, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR. PMID:26390211

  12. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guang-Huey; Chen, Hao-Ping; Shu, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR. PMID:26390211

  13. Beyond gastric acid reduction: Proton pump inhibitors induce heme oxygenase-1 in gastric and endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jan C. . E-mail: beckeja@uni-muenster.de; Grosser, Nina; Waltke, Christian; Schulz, Stephanie; Erdmann, Kati; Domschke, Wolfram; Schroeder, Henning; Pohle, Thorsten

    2006-07-07

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been demonstrated to prevent gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms independent of acid inhibition. Here we demonstrate that both omeprazole and lansoprazole protect human gastric epithelial and endothelial cells against oxidative stress. This effect was abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnBG. Exposure to either PPI resulted in a strong induction of HO-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, and led to an increased activity of this enzyme. Expression of cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 remained unaffected, and COX-inhibitors did not antagonize HO-1 induction by PPIs. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense protein HO-1 is a target of PPIs in both endothelial and gastric epithelial cells. HO-1 induction might account for the gastroprotective effects of PPIs independently of acid inhibition, especially in NSAID gastropathy. Moreover, our findings provide additional perspectives for a possible but yet unexplored use of PPIs in vasoprotection.

  14. Biosensor for direct determination of organophosphate nerve agents using recombinant Escherichia coli with surface-expressed organophosphorus hydrolase. 2. Fiber-optic microbial biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mulchandani, A; Kaneva, I; Chen, W

    1998-12-01

    A fiber-optic microbial biosensor suitable for direct measurement of organophosphate nerve agents was developed. The unique features of this novel microbial biosensor were the recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase on the cell surface and the optical detection of the products of enzyme-catalyzed organophosphate hydrolysis. The use of cells with the metabolic enzyme expressed on the cell surface as a biological sensing element provides advantages of no resistance to mass transport of the analyte and product across the cell membrane and low cost due to elimination of enzyme purification, over the conventional microbial biosensors based on cells expressing enzyme intracellularly and enzyme-based sensors, respectively. The use of an optical transducer allows the detection of different organophosphates in a mixture, presently not feasible with acetylcholinesterase-based biosensors. E. coli cells expressing organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on the cell surface were immobilized in low melting temperature agarose on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated fiber-optic bundle. OPH-expressing E. coli cells catalyzed the hydrolysis of organophosphorus pesticides to form stoichiometric amounts of chromophoric products that absorb light at specific wavelengths. The backscattered radiation of the specific wavelength incident light was measured using a photomultiplier detector and correlated to the organophosphate concentration. The best sensitivity and response time were obtained using a sensor constructed with 1.5 mg of cells operating in pH 9, 50 mM HEPES buffer with 100 mM NaCl and 0.05 mM CoCl2 at 30 degrees C. At optimized conditions, the biosensor measured paraoxon, parathion, and coumaphos pesticides with high selectivity against triazine and carbamate pesticides in approximately 10 min. The lower detection limits were 3 microM for paraoxon and parathion and 5 microM for coumaphos. When stored in the

  15. Functional characterization of diverse ring-hydroxylating oxygenases and induction of complex aromatic catabolic gene clusters in Sphingobium sp. PNB

    PubMed Central

    Khara, Pratick; Roy, Madhumita; Chakraborty, Joydeep; Ghosal, Debajyoti; Dutta, Tapan K.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. PNB, like other sphingomonads, has multiple ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (RHO) genes. Three different fosmid clones have been sequenced to identify the putative genes responsible for the degradation of various aromatics in this bacterial strain. Comparison of the map of the catabolic genes with that of different sphingomonads revealed a similar arrangement of gene clusters that harbors seven sets of RHO terminal components and a sole set of electron transport (ET) proteins. The presence of distinctly conserved amino acid residues in ferredoxin and in silico molecular docking analyses of ferredoxin with the well characterized terminal oxygenase components indicated the structural uniqueness of the ET component in sphingomonads. The predicted substrate specificities, derived from the phylogenetic relationship of each of the RHOs, were examined based on transformation of putative substrates and their structural homologs by the recombinant strains expressing each of the oxygenases and the sole set of available ET proteins. The RHO AhdA1bA2b was functionally characterized for the first time and was found to be capable of transforming ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, cumene, p-cymene and biphenyl, in addition to a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Overexpression of aromatic catabolic genes in strain PNB, revealed by real-time PCR analyses, is a way forward to understand the complex regulation of degradative genes in sphingomonads. PMID:24918041

  16. Intestinal epithelial expression of TNFAIP3 results in microbial invasion of the inner mucus layer and induces colitis in IL-10-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen F; Rhee, Lesley; Grimm, Wesley A; Weber, Christopher R; Messer, Jeannette S; Lodolce, James P; Chang, Jonathan E; Bartulis, Sarah J; Nero, Thomas; Kukla, Renata A; MacDougall, Gordon; Binghay, Charles; Kolodziej, Lauren E; Boone, David L

    2014-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3; also known as A20) negatively regulates NF-κB and MAPK signals to control inflammatory responses. TNFAIP3 also protects against TNF-induced cell death. Intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) expression of TNFAIP3 improves barrier function and tight junction integrity and prevents dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced IEC death and colitis. We therefore investigated the effects of TNFAIP3 expression in IEC on immune homeostasis in the intestines of immune-compromised mice. Villin-TNFAIP3 (v-TNFAIP3) transgenic mice were interbred with IL-10(-/-) mice (v-TNFAIP3 × IL-10(-/-)) and incidence, onset, and severity of colitis was assessed. v-TNFAIP3 × IL-10(-/-) mice displayed severe, early onset, and highly penetrant colitis that was not observed in IL-10(-/-) or v-TNFAIP3 mice. V-TNFAIP3 mice displayed altered expression of mucosal cytokines, increased numbers of mucosal regulatory T cells, and altered expression of mucosal antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Microbial colonization of the inner mucus layer of v-TNFAIP3 mice was observed, along with alterations in the microbiome, but this was not sufficient to induce colitis in v-TNFAIP3 mice. The relative sterility of the inner mucus layer observed in wild-type and IL-10(-/-) mice was lost in v-TNFAIP3 × IL-10(-/-) mice. Thus IEC-derived factors, induced by signals that are inhibited by TNFAIP3, suppress the onset of inflammatory bowel disease in IL-10(-/-) mice. Our results indicate that IEC expression of TNFAIP3 alters AMP expression and allows microbial colonization of the inner mucus layer, which activates an IL-10-dependent anti-inflammatory process that is necessary to prevent colitis. PMID:25234043

  17. Intestinal epithelial expression of TNFAIP3 results in microbial invasion of the inner mucus layer and induces colitis in IL-10-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen F.; Rhee, Lesley; Grimm, Wesley A.; Weber, Christopher R.; Messer, Jeannette S.; Lodolce, James P.; Chang, Jonathan E.; Bartulis, Sarah J.; Nero, Thomas; Kukla, Renata A.; MacDougall, Gordon; Binghay, Charles; Kolodziej, Lauren E.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3; also known as A20) negatively regulates NF-κB and MAPK signals to control inflammatory responses. TNFAIP3 also protects against TNF-induced cell death. Intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) expression of TNFAIP3 improves barrier function and tight junction integrity and prevents dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced IEC death and colitis. We therefore investigated the effects of TNFAIP3 expression in IEC on immune homeostasis in the intestines of immune-compromised mice. Villin-TNFAIP3 (v-TNFAIP3) transgenic mice were interbred with IL-10−/− mice (v-TNFAIP3 × IL-10−/−) and incidence, onset, and severity of colitis was assessed. v-TNFAIP3 × IL-10−/− mice displayed severe, early onset, and highly penetrant colitis that was not observed in IL-10−/− or v-TNFAIP3 mice. V-TNFAIP3 mice displayed altered expression of mucosal cytokines, increased numbers of mucosal regulatory T cells, and altered expression of mucosal antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Microbial colonization of the inner mucus layer of v-TNFAIP3 mice was observed, along with alterations in the microbiome, but this was not sufficient to induce colitis in v-TNFAIP3 mice. The relative sterility of the inner mucus layer observed in wild-type and IL-10−/− mice was lost in v-TNFAIP3 × IL-10−/− mice. Thus IEC-derived factors, induced by signals that are inhibited by TNFAIP3, suppress the onset of inflammatory bowel disease in IL-10−/− mice. Our results indicate that IEC expression of TNFAIP3 alters AMP expression and allows microbial colonization of the inner mucus layer, which activates an IL-10-dependent anti-inflammatory process that is necessary to prevent colitis. PMID:25234043

  18. Biosensor for direct determination of organophosphate nerve agents using recombinant Escherichia coli with surface-expressed organophosphorus hydrolase. 1. Potentiometric microbial electrode.

    PubMed

    Mulchandani, A; Mulchandani, P; Kaneva, I; Chen, W

    1998-10-01

    A potentiometric microbial biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate (OP) nerve agents was developed by modifying a pH electrode with an immobilized layer of Escherichia coli cells expressing organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) on the cell surface. OPH catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosporus pesticides to release protons, the concentration of which is proportional to the amount of hydrolyzed substrate. The sensor signal and response time were optimized with respect to the buffer pH, ionic concentration of buffer, temperature, and weight of cells immobilized using paraoxon as substrate. The best sensitivity and response time were obtained using a sensor constructed with 2.5 mg of cells and operating in pH 8.5, 1 mM HEPES buffer. Using these conditions, the biosensor was used to measure as low as 2 microM of paraoxon, methyl parathion, and diazinon. The biosensor had very good storage and multiple use stability. The use of cells with the metabolic enzyme expressed on cell surface as a biological transducer provides advantages of no resistances to mass transport of the analyte and product across the cell membrane and low cost due to elimination of enzyme purification, over the conventional microbial biosensors based on cells expressing enzyme intracellularly and enzyme-based sensors, respectively. PMID:9784751

  19. Substrate Specificity of Purified Recombinant Chicken β-Carotene 9',10'-Oxygenase (BCO2).

    PubMed

    Dela Seña, Carlo; Sun, Jian; Narayanasamy, Sureshbabu; Riedl, Kenneth M; Yuan, Yan; Curley, Robert W; Schwartz, Steven J; Harrison, Earl H

    2016-07-01

    Provitamin A carotenoids are oxidatively cleaved by β-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase (BCO1) at the central 15-15' double bond to form retinal (vitamin A aldehyde). Another carotenoid oxygenase, β-carotene 9',10'-oxygenase (BCO2) catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at the 9'-10' bond to yield an ionone and an apo-10'-carotenoid. Previously published substrate specificity studies of BCO2 were conducted using crude lysates from bacteria or insect cells expressing recombinant BCO2. Our attempts to obtain active recombinant human BCO2 expressed in Escherichia coli were unsuccessful. We have expressed recombinant chicken BCO2 in the strain E. coli BL21-Gold (DE3) and purified the enzyme by cobalt ion affinity chromatography. Like BCO1, purified recombinant chicken BCO2 catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of the provitamin A carotenoids β-carotene, α-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin. Its catalytic activity with β-carotene as substrate is at least 10-fold lower than that of BCO1. In further contrast to BCO1, purified recombinant chicken BCO2 also catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of 9-cis-β-carotene and the non-provitamin A carotenoids zeaxanthin and lutein, and is inactive with all-trans-lycopene and β-apocarotenoids. Apo-10'-carotenoids were detected as enzymatic products by HPLC, and the identities were confirmed by LC-MS. Small amounts of 3-hydroxy-β-apo-8'-carotenal were also consistently detected in BCO2-β-cryptoxanthin reaction mixtures. With the exception of this activity with β-cryptoxanthin, BCO2 cleaves specifically at the 9'-10' bond to produce apo-10'-carotenoids. BCO2 has been shown to function in preventing the excessive accumulation of carotenoids, and its broad substrate specificity is consistent with this. PMID:27143479

  20. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 attenuates chemotherapy-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats: A possible link between heme oxygenase-1 and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Raheem, Ihab Talat; Omran, Gamal Abd El-Hay

    2016-03-01

    A critical restriction in the use of bleomycin (BLM) is development of pulmonary fibrosis via oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms. Drugs that induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) like hemin (HEM), have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects. Accordingly, it is worth to test HEM against BLM-induced lung Injury. Four groups of rats were used: control group; HEM group (50 mg/kg, i.p.); BLM group (5 mg/kg, intratracheal single injection) and HEM+BLM group (HEM administered 1 day before BLM injection and continued for 14 days). At the end of experiment, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and NO levels were estimated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Hydroxyproline (HP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), IL-6, GSH, MDA levels and SOD activity were determined in lung tissues. In addition, expression of HO-1 and NF-κB protein in lung tissues was determined using both western blot and immunohistochemical techniques. Also lung tissues were investigated histopathologically. BLM produced lung damage as indicated from the elevation in LDH and NO, perturbation in lung oxidative stress indicators, increased HP, MPO, IL-6 contents and NF-κB expression. On the other side, HEM, reduced BLM harmful effects as noticed from amelioration of biochemical markers and histopathological lesions, which is concomitant with over-expression of HO-1. Therefore, induction of HO-1 in lung by HEM may alleviate the lung damaging effects of BLM. PMID:27113308

  1. Endocannabinoids and their oxygenation by cyclo-oxygenases, lipoxygenases and other oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, P; Nicolaou, A; Woodward, D F

    2015-04-01

    The naturally occurring mammalian endocannabinoids possess biological attributes that extend beyond interaction with cannabinoid receptors. These extended biological properties are the result of oxidative metabolism of the principal mammalian endocannabinoids arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide; A-EA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Both endocannabinoids are oxidized by cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), but not by COX-1, to a series of prostaglandin derivatives (PGs) with quite different biological properties from those of the parent substrates. PG ethanolamides (prostamides, PG-EAs) and PG glyceryl esters (PG-Gs) are not only pharmacologically distinct from their parent endocannabinoids, they are distinct from the corresponding acidic PGs, and are differentiated from each other. Ethanolamides and glyceryl esters of the major prostanoids PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, and PGI2 are formed by the various PG synthases, and thromboxane ethanolamides and glyceryl esters are not similarly produced. COX-2 is also of interest by virtue of its corollary central role in modulating endocannabinoid tone, providing a new therapeutic approach for treating pain and anxiety. Other major oxidative conversion pathways are provided for both A-EA and 2-AG by several lipoxygenases (LOXs), resulting in the formation of numerous hydroxyl metabolites. These do not necessarily represent inactivation pathways for endocannabinoids but may mimic or modulate the endocannabinoids or even display alternative pharmacology. Similarly, A-EA and 2-AG may be oxidized by P450 enzymes. Again a very diverse number of metabolites are formed, with either cannabinoid-like biological properties or an introduction of disparate pharmacology. The biological activity of epoxy and hydroxyl derivatives of the endocannabinoids remains to be fully elucidated. This review attempts to consolidate and compare the findings obtained to date in an increasingly important research area. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulation in the Brain: Implications for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S; Kolson, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a highly inducible and ubiquitous cellular enzyme that subserves cytoprotective responses to toxic insults, including inflammation and oxidative stress. In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis, HO-1 expression is increased, presumably reflecting an endogenous neuroprotective response against ongoing cellular injury. In contrast, we have found that in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the brain, which is also associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, HO-1 expression is decreased, likely reflecting a unique role for HO-1 deficiency in neurodegeneration pathways activated by HIV infection. We have also shown that HO-1 expression is significantly suppressed by HIV replication in cultured macrophages which represent the primary cellular reservoir for HIV in the brain. HO-1 deficiency is associated with release of neurotoxic levels of glutamate from both HIV-infected and immune-activated macrophages; this glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity is suppressed by pharmacological induction of HO-1 expression in the macrophages. Thus, HO-1 induction could be a therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection against HIV infection and other neuroinflammatory brain diseases. Here, we review various stimuli and signaling pathways regulating HO-1 expression in macrophages, which could promote neuronal survival through HO-1-modulation of endogenous antioxidant and immune modulatory pathways, thus limiting the oxidative stress that can promote HIV disease progression in the CNS. The use of pharmacological inducers of endogenous HO-1 expression as potential adjunctive neuroprotective therapeutics in HIV infection is also discussed. PMID:24862327

  3. A Heme Oxygenase-1 Transducer Model of Degenerative and Developmental Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, Hyman M.; Song, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In “stressed” astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders. PMID:25761244

  4. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Bellner, Lars; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; van Rooijen, Nico; Dunn, Michael W.; Abraham, Nader G.; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-2 deficiency impairs wound healing and exacerbates inflammation following injury. We examine the impact of HO-2 deficiency on macrophage function and the contribution of macrophage HO-2 to inflammatory and repair responses to injury. Corneal epithelial debridement was performed in control and macrophage-depleted HO-2−/− and wild-type (WT) mice and in bone marrow chimeras. Peritoneal macrophages were collected for determination of phagocytic activity and classically activated macrophage (M1)-alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Depletion of macrophages delayed corneal healing (13.2%) and increased neutrophil infiltration (54.1%) by day 4 in WT mice, whereas in HO-2−/− mice, it did not worsen the already impaired wound healing and exacerbated inflammation. HO-2−/− macrophages displayed an altered M1 phenotype with no significant expression of M2 or M2-like activated cells and a 31.3% reduction in phagocytic capacity that was restored by inducing HO-1 activity or supplementing biliverdin. Macrophage depletion had no effect, whereas adoptive transfer of WT bone marrow improved wound healing (34% on day 4) but did not resolve the exaggerated inflammatory response in HO-2−/− mice. These findings indicate that HO-2–deficient macrophages are dysfunctional and that macrophage HO-2 is required for proper macrophage function but is insufficient to correct the impaired healing of the HO-2−/− cornea, suggesting that corneal epithelial expression of HO-2 is a key to resolution and repair in wound healing.—Bellner, L., Marrazzo, G., van Rooijen, N., Dunn, M. W., Abraham, N. G., Schwartzman, M. L. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing. PMID:25342128

  5. IgG and IgA with potential microbial-binding activity are expressed by normal human skin epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dongyang; Ge, Jing; Liao, Qinyuan; Ma, Junfan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Jing; Wang, Chong; Xu, Weiyan; Zheng, Jie; Shao, Wenwei; Lee, Gregory; Qiu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system of the skin is thought to depend largely on a multi-layered mechanical barrier supplemented by epidermis-derived antimicrobial peptides. To date, there are no reports of antimicrobial antibody secretion by the epidermis. In this study, we report the expression of functional immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA), previously thought to be only produced by B cells, in normal human epidermal cells and the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. While B cells express a fully diverse Ig, epidermal cell-expressed IgG or IgA showed one or two conservative VHDJH rearrangements in each individual. These unique VDJ rearrangements in epidermal cells were found neither in the B cell-derived Ig VDJ databases published by others nor in our positive controls. IgG and IgA from epidermal cells of the same individual had different VDJ rearrangement patterns. IgG was found primarily in prickle cells, and IgA was mainly detected in basal cells. Both epidermal cell-derived IgG and IgA showed potential antibody activity by binding pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus, the most common pathogenic skin bacteria, but the microbial-binding profile was different. Our data indicates that normal human epidermal cells spontaneously express IgG and IgA, and we speculate that these Igs participate in skin innate immunity. PMID:25625513

  6. Arsenic Trioxide Activate Transcription of Heme Oxygenase-1 by Promoting Nuclear Translocation of NFE2L2

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Zhen; Zhong, Lingzhi; Mou, Yan; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Haiying; Wang, Yang; Xia, Jianxin; Li, Ronggui; Wang, Zonggui

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that induced expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO). The present study was aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of HO-1 that occurs after exposure of MG63 cells to ATO. First, using RT-QPCT and Western-blot, we found that ATO strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in these human osteosarcoma cells. Then by analyzing HO-1 mRNA of MG63 cells exposed to ATO in the presence and absence of a transcription inhibitor Actinomycin-D (Act-D), we demonstrated that ATO activates HO-1 expression in MG63 cells by regulating the transcription of the gene. Finally, through the analysis of the NFE2L2 protein levels among the total cellular and nuclear proteins by Western-blot and Immunocytochemical staning, we determined that ATO enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), also known as Nrf2. From these results we have concluded that transcription activation of HO-1 resulting from the nuclear translocation of NFE2L2 is the underlying molecular mechanism for its high induction, which, in turn, is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma cells to ATO treatment. PMID:26283888

  7. Covalent heme attachment to the protein in human heme oxygenase-1 with selenocysteine replacing the His25 proximal iron ligand.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongying; Trnka, Michael J; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Ouellet, Hugues; Wang, Yongqiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-03-01

    To characterize heme oxygenase with a selenocysteine (SeCys) as the proximal iron ligand, we have expressed truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) His25Cys, in which Cys-25 is the only cysteine, in the Escherichia coli cysteine auxotroph strain BL21(DE3)cys. Selenocysteine incorporation into the protein was demonstrated by both intact protein mass measurement and mass spectrometric identification of the selenocysteine-containing tryptic peptide. One selenocysteine was incorporated into approximately 95% of the expressed protein. Formation of an adduct with Ellman's reagent (DTNB) indicated that the selenocysteine in the expressed protein was in the reduced state. The heme-His25SeCys hHO-1 complex could be prepared by either (a) supplementing the overexpression medium with heme, or (b) reconstituting the purified apoprotein with heme. Under reducing conditions in the presence of imidazole, a covalent bond is formed by addition of the selenocysteine residue to one of the heme vinyl groups. No covalent bond is formed when the heme is replaced by mesoheme, in which the vinyls are replaced by ethyl groups. These results, together with our earlier demonstration that external selenolate ligands can transfer an electron to the iron [Y. Jiang, P.R. Ortiz de Montellano, Inorg. Chem. 47 (2008) 3480-3482 ], indicate that a selenyl radical is formed in the hHO-1 His25SeCys mutant that adds to a heme vinyl group. PMID:19135260

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Nathan W; Weaver, Eric A; May, Shannon M; Croatt, Anthony J; Foreman, Oded; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A; Barry, Michael A; Nath, Karl A; Badley, Andrew D

    2012-07-01

    Underlying mechanisms of individual variation in severity of influenza infection and response to vaccination are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of reduced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression on vaccine response and outcome of influenza infection. HO-1-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice (kingdom, Animalia; phylum, Chordata; genus/species, Mus musculus) were infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 with or without prior vaccination with an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine. A genome-wide association study evaluated the expression of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HO-1 gene and the response to influenza vaccination in healthy humans. HO-1-deficient mice had decreased survival after influenza infection compared to WT mice (median survival 5.5 vs. 6.5 d, P=0.016). HO-1-deficient mice had impaired production of antibody following influenza vaccination compared to WT mice (mean antibody titer 869 vs. 1698, P=0.02). One SNP in HO-1 and one SNP in the constitutively expressed isoform HO-2 were independently associated with decreased antibody production after influenza vaccination in healthy human volunteers (P=0.017 and 0.014, respectively). HO-1 deficient mice were paired with sex- and age-matched WT controls. HO-1 affects the immune response to both influenza infection and vaccination, suggesting that therapeutic induction of HO-1 expression may represent a novel adjuvant to enhance influenza vaccine effectiveness. PMID:22490782

  9. PIOX, a new pathogen-induced oxygenase with homology to animal cyclooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, A; Moreno, J I; Castresana, C

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression induced in tobacco leaves by the harpin HrpN protein elicitor were examined, and a new cDNA, piox (for pathogen-induced oxygenase), with homology to genes encoding cyclooxygenase or prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PGHS), was identified. In addition to the amino acid identity determined, the protein encoded by piox is predicted to have a structural core similar to that of ovine PGHS-1. Moreover, studies of protein functionality demonstrate that the PIOX recombinant protein possesses at least one of the two enzymatic activities of PGHSs, that of catalyzing the oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. piox transcripts accumulated after protein elicitor treatment or inoculation with bacteria. Expression of piox was induced in tissues responding to inoculation with both incompatible and compatible bacteria, but RNA and protein accumulation differed for both types of interactions. We show that expression of piox is rapidly induced in response to various cellular signals mediating plant responses to pathogen infection and that activation of piox expression is most likely related to the oxidative burst that takes place during the cell death processes examined. Cyclooxygenase catalyzes the first committed step in the formation of prostaglandins and thromboxanes, which are lipid-derived signal molecules that mediate many cellular processes, including the immune response in vertebrates. The finding of tobacco PIOX suggests that more similarities than hitherto expected will be found between the lipid-based responses for plant and animal systems. PMID:9724698

  10. Arsenic promotes angiogenesis in vitro via a heme oxygenase-1-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Dan; Wang Xin; Chang Qingshan; Hitron, Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Xu Mei; Chen Gang; Luo Jia; Jiang Binghua; Fang Jing; Shi Xianglin

    2010-05-01

    Angiogenesis and vessel remodeling are fundamental to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases caused by environmental arsenic exposure, including tumorigenesis and cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic (AsIII) has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis and vascular remodeling in vivo. However, the exact molecular mechanisms accounting for arsenic-induced angiogenesis are not clear. The present study investigates the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in sodium arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro. Transwell assay, three-dimensional Matrigel assay, RT-PCR, ELISA and immunoblotting were used to determine cell migration, vascular tube formation, mRNA and protein expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assay were applied to examine the DNA binding with protein and HO-1 transcriptional activity. Here, we report that low concentrations of arsenite (0.1-1 muM) stimulated cell migration and vascular tube formation in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Arsenite induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Knock down of HO-1 expression decreased arsenite-induced VEGF expression, cell migration, and tube formation. We showed that arsenite promoted dissociation of Bach1 (a transcriptional repressor) from the HO-1 enhancers and increased Nrf2 binding to these elements. Site directed mutagenesis assay identified that Bach1 cysteine residues 557 and 574 were essential for the induction of HO-1 gene in response to arsenite. These findings demonstrate a role for HO-1 in arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro.