Science.gov

Sample records for microbial rhodopsins restores

  1. Biochemical Analysis of Microbial Rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Julia A; Keffer, Jessica L; Miller, Kelsey J

    2016-01-01

    Ion-pumping rhodopsins transfer ions across the microbial cell membrane in a light-dependent fashion. As the rate of biochemical characterization of microbial rhodopsins begins to catch up to the rate of microbial rhodopsin identification in environmental and genomic sequence data sets, in vitro analysis of their light-absorbing properties and in vivo analysis of ion pumping will remain critical to characterizing these proteins. As we learn more about the variety of physiological roles performed by microbial rhodopsins in different cell types and environments, observing the localization patterns of the rhodopsins and/or quantifying the number of rhodopsin-bearing cells in natural environments will become more important. Here, we provide protocols for purification of rhodopsin-containing membranes, detection of ion pumping, and observation of functional rhodopsins in laboratory and environmental samples using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27153387

  2. Ion-pumping microbial rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Kandori, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsins are light-sensing proteins used in optogenetics. The word “rhodopsin” originates from the Greek words “rhodo” and “opsis,” indicating rose and sight, respectively. Although the classical meaning of rhodopsin is the red-colored pigment in our eyes, the modern meaning of rhodopsin encompasses photoactive proteins containing a retinal chromophore in animals and microbes. Animal and microbial rhodopsins possess 11-cis and all-trans retinal, respectively, to capture light in seven transmembrane α-helices, and photoisomerizations into all-trans and 13-cis forms, respectively, initiate each function. Ion-transporting proteins can be found in microbial rhodopsins, such as light-gated channels and light-driven pumps, which are the main tools in optogenetics. Light-driven pumps, such as archaeal H+ pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and Cl− pump halorhodopsin (HR), were discovered in the 1970s, and their mechanism has been extensively studied. On the other hand, different kinds of H+ and Cl− pumps have been found in marine bacteria, such as proteorhodopsin (PR) and Fulvimarina pelagi rhodopsin (FR), respectively. In addition, a light-driven Na+ pump was found, Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2 (KR2). These light-driven ion-pumping microbial rhodopsins are classified as DTD, TSA, DTE, NTQ, and NDQ rhodopsins for BR, HR, PR, FR, and KR2, respectively. Recent understanding of ion-pumping microbial rhodopsins is reviewed in this paper. PMID:26442282

  3. Mechanism divergence in microbial rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Spudich, John L; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Govorunova, Elena G

    2014-05-01

    A fundamental design principle of microbial rhodopsins is that they share the same basic light-induced conversion between two conformers. Alternate access of the Schiff base to the outside and to the cytoplasm in the outwardly open "E" conformer and cytoplasmically open "C" conformer, respectively, combined with appropriate timing of pKa changes controlling Schiff base proton release and uptake make the proton path through the pumps vectorial. Phototaxis receptors in prokaryotes, sensory rhodopsins I and II, have evolved new chemical processes not found in their proton pump ancestors, to alter the consequences of the conformational change or modify the change itself. Like proton pumps, sensory rhodopsin II undergoes a photoinduced E→C transition, with the C conformer a transient intermediate in the photocycle. In contrast, one light-sensor (sensory rhodopsin I bound to its transducer HtrI) exists in the dark as the C conformer and undergoes a light-induced C→E transition, with the E conformer a transient photocycle intermediate. Current results indicate that algal phototaxis receptors channelrhodopsins undergo redirected Schiff base proton transfers and a modified E→C transition which, contrary to the proton pumps and other sensory rhodopsins, is not accompanied by the closure of the external half-channel. The article will review our current understanding of how the shared basic structure and chemistry of microbial rhodopsins have been modified during evolution to create diverse molecular functions: light-driven ion transport and photosensory signaling by protein-protein interaction and light-gated ion channel activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks. PMID:23831552

  4. Functional metagenomic screen reveals new and diverse microbial rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Ion-translocating retinylidene rhodopsins are widely distributed among marine and freshwater microbes. The translocation is light-driven, contributing to the production of biochemical energy in diverse microbes. Until today, most microbial rhodopsins had been detected using bioinformatics based on homology to other rhodopsins. In the past decade, there has been increased interest in microbial rhodopsins in the field of optogenetics since microbial rhodopsins were found to be most useful in vertebrate neuronal systems. Here we report on a functional metagenomic assay for detecting microbial rhodopsins. Using an array of narrow pH electrodes and light-emitting diode illumination, we were able to screen a metagenomic fosmid library to detect diverse marine proteorhodopsins and an actinorhodopsin based solely on proton-pumping activity. Our assay therefore provides a rather simple phenotypic means to enrich our understanding of microbial rhodopsins without any prior knowledge of the genomic content of the environmental entities screened. PMID:26894445

  5. Functional metagenomic screen reveals new and diverse microbial rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded

    2016-09-01

    Ion-translocating retinylidene rhodopsins are widely distributed among marine and freshwater microbes. The translocation is light-driven, contributing to the production of biochemical energy in diverse microbes. Until today, most microbial rhodopsins had been detected using bioinformatics based on homology to other rhodopsins. In the past decade, there has been increased interest in microbial rhodopsins in the field of optogenetics since microbial rhodopsins were found to be most useful in vertebrate neuronal systems. Here we report on a functional metagenomic assay for detecting microbial rhodopsins. Using an array of narrow pH electrodes and light-emitting diode illumination, we were able to screen a metagenomic fosmid library to detect diverse marine proteorhodopsins and an actinorhodopsin based solely on proton-pumping activity. Our assay therefore provides a rather simple phenotypic means to enrich our understanding of microbial rhodopsins without any prior knowledge of the genomic content of the environmental entities screened. PMID:26894445

  6. Optogenetic Vision Restoration Using Rhodopsin for Enhanced Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gaub, Benjamin M; Berry, Michael H; Holt, Amy E; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Flannery, John G

    2015-10-01

    Retinal disease is one of the most active areas of gene therapy, with clinical trials ongoing in the United States for five diseases. There are currently no treatments for patients with late-stage disease in which photoreceptors have been lost. Optogenetic gene therapies are in development, but, to date, have suffered from the low light sensitivity of microbial opsins, such as channelrhodopsin and halorhodopsin, and azobenzene-based photoswitches. Several groups have shown that photoreceptive G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be expressed heterologously, and photoactivate endogenous Gi/o signaling. We hypothesized such a GPCR could increase sensitivity due to endogenous signal amplification. We targeted vertebrate rhodopsin to retinal ON-bipolar cells of blind rd1 mice and observed restoration of: (i) light responses in retinal explants, (ii) visually-evoked potentials in visual cortex in vivo, and (iii) two forms of visually-guided behavior: innate light avoidance and discrimination of temporal light patterns in the context of fear conditioning. Importantly, both the light responses of the retinal explants and the visually-guided behavior occurred reliably at light levels that were two to three orders of magnitude dimmer than required for channelrhodopsin. Thus, gene therapy with native light-gated GPCRs presents a novel approach to impart light sensitivity for visual restoration in a useful range of illumination. PMID:26137852

  7. Optogenetic Vision Restoration Using Rhodopsin for Enhanced Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gaub, Benjamin M; Berry, Michael H; Holt, Amy E; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Flannery, John G

    2015-01-01

    Retinal disease is one of the most active areas of gene therapy, with clinical trials ongoing in the United States for five diseases. There are currently no treatments for patients with late-stage disease in which photoreceptors have been lost. Optogenetic gene therapies are in development, but, to date, have suffered from the low light sensitivity of microbial opsins, such as channelrhodopsin and halorhodopsin, and azobenzene-based photoswitches. Several groups have shown that photoreceptive G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be expressed heterologously, and photoactivate endogenous Gi/o signaling. We hypothesized such a GPCR could increase sensitivity due to endogenous signal amplification. We targeted vertebrate rhodopsin to retinal ON-bipolar cells of blind rd1 mice and observed restoration of: (i) light responses in retinal explants, (ii) visually-evoked potentials in visual cortex in vivo, and (iii) two forms of visually-guided behavior: innate light avoidance and discrimination of temporal light patterns in the context of fear conditioning. Importantly, both the light responses of the retinal explants and the visually-guided behavior occurred reliably at light levels that were two to three orders of magnitude dimmer than required for channelrhodopsin. Thus, gene therapy with native light-gated GPCRs presents a novel approach to impart light sensitivity for visual restoration in a useful range of illumination. PMID:26137852

  8. Microbial rhodopsins: wide distribution, rich diversity and great potential

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Marie; Sudo, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    One of the major topics in biophysics and physicobiology is to understand and utilize biological functions using various advanced techniques. Taking advantage of the photoreactivity of the seven-transmembrane rhodopsin protein family has been actively investigated by a variety of methods. Rhodopsins serve as models for membrane-embedded proteins, for photoactive proteins and as a fundamental tool for optogenetics, a new technology to control biological activity with light. In this review, we summarize progress of microbial rhodopsin research from the viewpoint of distribution, diversity and potential. PMID:27493861

  9. Recent Advances in Engineering Microbial Rhodopsins for Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Frances H.

    2015-01-01

    Protein engineering of microbial rhodopsins has been successful in generating variants with improved properties for applications in optogenetics. Members of this membrane protein family can act as both actuators and sensors of neuronal activity. Chimeragenesis, structure-guided mutagenesis, and directed evolution have proven effective strategies for tuning absorption wavelength, altering ion specificity and increasing fluorescence. These approaches facilitate the development of useful optogenetic tools and, in some cases, have yielded insights into rhodopsin structure-function relationships. PMID:26038227

  10. Ultrasensitive Measurements of Microbial Rhodopsin Photocycles Using Photochromic FRET

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Halil; Fields, Alexander P.; Kralj, Joel M.; Spudich, John L.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.; Cohen, Adam E.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are an important class of light-activated transmembrane proteins whose function is typically studied on bulk samples. Here we apply photochromic fluorescence resonance energy transfer (pcFRET) to investigate the dynamics of these proteins with sensitivity approaching the single-molecule limit. The brightness of a covalently linked organic fluorophore is modulated by changes in the absorption spectrum of the endogenous retinal chromophore that occur as the molecule undergoes a light-activated photocycle. We studied the photocycles of blue-absorbing proteorhodopsin (BPR) and sensory rhodopsin II (SRII). Clusters of 2–3 molecules of SRII clearly showed a light-induced photocycle. Single molecules of SRII showed a photocycle upon signal averaging over several illumination cycles. PMID:22010969

  11. Ultrasensitive measurements of microbial rhodopsin photocycles using photochromic FRET.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Halil; Fields, Alexander P; Kralj, Joel M; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J; Cohen, Adam E

    2012-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are an important class of light-activated transmembrane proteins whose function is typically studied on bulk samples. Herein, we apply photochromic fluorescence resonance energy transfer to investigate the dynamics of these proteins with sensitivity approaching the single-molecule limit. The brightness of a covalently linked organic fluorophore is modulated by changes in the absorption spectrum of the endogenous retinal chromophore that occur as the molecule undergoes a light-activated photocycle. We studied the photocycles of blue-absorbing proteorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin II (SRII). Clusters of 2-3 molecules of SRII clearly showed a light-induced photocycle. Single molecules of SRII showed a photocycle upon signal averaging over several illumination cycles. PMID:22010969

  12. Mechanism of voltage-sensitive fluorescence in a microbial rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Maclaurin, Dougal; Venkatachalam, Veena; Lee, Hohjai; Cohen, Adam E.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins were recently introduced as genetically encoded fluorescent indicators of membrane voltage. An understanding of the mechanism underlying this function would aid in the design of improved voltage indicators. We asked, what states can the protein adopt, and which states are fluorescent? How does membrane voltage affect the photostationary distribution of states? Here, we present a detailed spectroscopic characterization of Archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch). We performed fluorescence spectroscopy on Arch and its photogenerated intermediates in Escherichia coli and in single HEK293 cells under voltage-clamp conditions. These experiments probed the effects of time-dependent illumination and membrane voltage on absorption, fluorescence, membrane current, and membrane capacitance. The fluorescence of Arch arises through a sequential three-photon process. Membrane voltage modulates protonation of the Schiff base in a 13-cis photocycle intermediate (M ⇌ N equilibrium), not in the ground state as previously hypothesized. We present experimental protocols for optimized voltage imaging with Arch, and we discuss strategies for engineering improved rhodopsin-based voltage indicators. PMID:23530193

  13. Sequence and intramolecular distance scoring analyses of microbial rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Miki; Ide, Shunta; Kamata, Atsushi; Takahasi, Kiyohiro; Okada, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Recent accumulation of sequence and structural data, in conjunction with systematical classification into a set of families, has significantly advanced our understanding of diverse and specific protein functions. Analysis and interpretation of protein family data requires comprehensive sequence and structural alignments. Here, we present a simple scheme for analyzing a set of experimental structures of a given protein or family of proteins, using microbial rhodopsins as an example. For a data set comprised of around a dozen highly similar structures to each other (overall pairwise root-mean-squared deviation < 2.3 Å), intramolecular distance scoring analysis yielded valuable information with respect to structural properties, such as differences in the relative variability of transmembrane helices. Furthermore, a comparison with recent results for G protein-coupled receptors demonstrates how the results of the present analysis can be interpreted and effectively utilized for structural characterization of diverse protein families in general. PMID:26998236

  14. MicRhoDE: a curated database for the analysis of microbial rhodopsin diversity and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Boeuf, Dominique; Audic, Stéphane; Brillet-Guéguen, Loraine; Caron, Christophe; Jeanthon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are a diverse group of photoactive transmembrane proteins found in all three domains of life and in viruses. Today, microbial rhodopsin research is a flourishing research field in which new understandings of rhodopsin diversity, function and evolution are contributing to broader microbiological and molecular knowledge. Here, we describe MicRhoDE, a comprehensive, high-quality and freely accessible database that facilitates analysis of the diversity and evolution of microbial rhodopsins. Rhodopsin sequences isolated from a vast array of marine and terrestrial environments were manually collected and curated. To each rhodopsin sequence are associated related metadata, including predicted spectral tuning of the protein, putative activity and function, taxonomy for sequences that can be linked to a 16S rRNA gene, sampling date and location, and supporting literature. The database currently covers 7857 aligned sequences from more than 450 environmental samples or organisms. Based on a robust phylogenetic analysis, we introduce an operational classification system with multiple phylogenetic levels ranging from superclusters to species-level operational taxonomic units. An integrated pipeline for online sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction is also provided. With a user-friendly interface and integrated online bioinformatics tools, this unique resource should be highly valuable for upcoming studies of the biogeography, diversity, distribution and evolution of microbial rhodopsins. Database URL: http://micrhode.sb-roscoff.fr. PMID:26286928

  15. MicRhoDE: a curated database for the analysis of microbial rhodopsin diversity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Boeuf, Dominique; Audic, Stéphane; Brillet-Guéguen, Loraine; Caron, Christophe; Jeanthon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are a diverse group of photoactive transmembrane proteins found in all three domains of life and in viruses. Today, microbial rhodopsin research is a flourishing research field in which new understandings of rhodopsin diversity, function and evolution are contributing to broader microbiological and molecular knowledge. Here, we describe MicRhoDE, a comprehensive, high-quality and freely accessible database that facilitates analysis of the diversity and evolution of microbial rhodopsins. Rhodopsin sequences isolated from a vast array of marine and terrestrial environments were manually collected and curated. To each rhodopsin sequence are associated related metadata, including predicted spectral tuning of the protein, putative activity and function, taxonomy for sequences that can be linked to a 16S rRNA gene, sampling date and location, and supporting literature. The database currently covers 7857 aligned sequences from more than 450 environmental samples or organisms. Based on a robust phylogenetic analysis, we introduce an operational classification system with multiple phylogenetic levels ranging from superclusters to species-level operational taxonomic units. An integrated pipeline for online sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction is also provided. With a user-friendly interface and integrated online bioinformatics tools, this unique resource should be highly valuable for upcoming studies of the biogeography, diversity, distribution and evolution of microbial rhodopsins. Database URL: http://micrhode.sb-roscoff.fr. PMID:26286928

  16. Investigation of the chromophore binding cavity in the 11-cis acceptable microbial rhodopsin MR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Arisa; Yagasaki, Jin; Homma, Michio; Reissig, Louisa; Sudo, Yuki

    2013-06-01

    Rhodopsins are photoactive molecules functioning as photo-energy or photo-signal converters with the chromophore retinal. Recently we characterized a unique microbial rhodopsin (middle rhodopsin, MR) which can also bind 11-cis retinal besides all-trans and 13-cis retinal at a particular ratio. In this study, we investigated the structural characteristics around the retinal binding cavity in MR. The results suggest that the space of the retinal binding site of MR is less restricted to the retinal chromophore and the presence of the 11-cis conformer is regulated by the residues located around the retinal. Furthermore, although the triple mutant of MR has identical residues with the well-studied microbial rhodopsin bacteriorhodopsin (BR) within 5 Å from the retinal, the absorption maximum and retinal composition of MR did not reach those of BR, indicating that some long-range effect(s) (>5 Å) is also important for the maintenance of the chemical properties of MR.

  17. Microbial rhodopsins of Halorubrum species isolated from Ejinoor salt lake in Inner Mongolia of China.

    PubMed

    Chaoluomeng; Dai, Gang; Kikukawa, Takashi; Ihara, Kunio; Iwasa, Tatsuo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are photoactive proteins that use a retinal molecule as the photoactive center. Because of structural simplicity and functional diversity, microbial rhodopsins have been an excellent model system for structural biology. In this study, a halophilic archaea that has three microbial rhodopsin-type genes in its genome was isolated from Ejinoor salt lake in Inner Mongolia of China. A sequence of 16S rRNA showed that the strain belongs to Halorubrum genus and named Halorubrum sp. ejinoor (He). The translated amino acid sequences of its microbial rhodopsin-type genes suggest that they are homologs of archaerhodopsin (HeAR), halorhodopsin (HeHR) and sensory rhodopsin II (HeSRII). The mRNAs of three types of genes were detected by RT-PCR and their amounts were investigated by Real-Time RT-PCR. The amount of mRNA of HeSRII was the smallest and the amounts of of HeAR and HeHR were 30 times and 10 times greater than that of HeSRII. The results of light-induced pH changes suggested the presence of a light-driven proton pump and a light-driven chloride ion pump in the membrane vesicles of He. Flash induced absorbance changes of the He membrane fraction indicated that HeAR and HeHR are photoactive and undergo their own photocycles. This study revealed that three microbial rhodopsin-type genes are all expressed in the strain and at least two of them, HeAR and HeHR, are photochemically and physiologically active like BR and HR of Halobacterium salinarum, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of physiological activity of HR-homolog of Halorubrum species. PMID:26328780

  18. Optical recording of action potentials in mammalian neurons using a microbial rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kralj, Joel M.; Douglass, Adam D.; Hochbaum, Daniel R.; Maclaurin, Dougal; Cohen, Adam E.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable optical detection of single action potentials in mammalian neurons has been one of the longest-standing challenges in neuroscience. Here we achieve this goal by using the endogenous fluorescence of a microbial rhodopsin protein, Archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch) from Halorubrum sodomense, expressed in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This genetically encoded voltage indicator exhibited an approximately 10-fold improvement in sensitivity and speed over existing protein-based voltage indicators, with a roughly linear two-fold increase in brightness between −150 mV and +150 mV and a sub-millisecond response time. Arch detected single electrically triggered action potentials with an optical signal-to-noise ratio > 10. The mutant Arch(D95N) lacked endogenous proton pumping and showed 50% greater sensitivity than wild-type, but had a slower response (41 ms). Nonetheless, Arch(D95N) also resolved individual action potentials. Microbial rhodopsin-based voltage indicators promise to enable optical interrogation of complex neural circuits, and electrophysiology in systems for which electrode-based techniques are challenging. PMID:22120467

  19. Hydrogen-bonding changes of internal water molecules upon the actions of microbial rhodopsins studied by FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yuji; Kandori, Hideki

    2014-05-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are classified into type-I rhodopsins, which utilize light energy to perform wide varieties of function, such as proton pumping, ion pumping, light sensing, cation channels, and so on. The crystal structures of several type-I rhodopsins were solved and the molecular mechanisms have been investigated based on the atomic structures. However, the crystal structures of proteins of interest are not always available and the basic architectures are sometimes quite similar, which obscures how the proteins achieve different functions. Stimulus-induced difference FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful tool to detect minute structural changes providing a clue for elucidating the molecular mechanisms. In this review, the studies on type-I rhodopsins from fungi and marine bacteria, whose crystal structures have not been solved yet, were summarized. Neurospora rhodopsin and Leptosphaeria rhodopsin found from Fungi have sequence similarity. The former has no proton pumping function, while the latter has. Proteorhodopsin is another example, whose proton pumping machinery is altered at alkaline and acidic conditions. We described how the structural changes of protein were different and how water molecules were involved in them. We reviewed the results on dynamics of the internal water molecules in pharaonis halorhodopsin as well. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks. PMID:24041645

  20. Flash memory: photochemical imprinting of neuronal action potentials onto a microbial rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Veena; Brinks, Daan; Maclaurin, Dougal; Hochbaum, Daniel; Kralj, Joel; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-02-12

    We developed a technique, "flash memory", to record a photochemical imprint of the activity state--firing or not firing--of a neuron at a user-selected moment in time. The key element is an engineered microbial rhodopsin protein with three states. Two nonfluorescent states, D1 and D2, exist in a voltage-dependent equilibrium. A stable fluorescent state, F, is reached by a photochemical conversion from D2. When exposed to light of a wavelength λ(write), population transfers from D2 to F, at a rate determined by the D1 ⇌ D2 equilibrium. The population of F maintains a record of membrane voltage which persists in the dark. Illumination at a later time at a wavelength λ(read) excites fluorescence of F, probing this record. An optional third flash at a wavelength λ(reset) converts F back to D2, for a subsequent write-read cycle. The flash memory method offers the promise to decouple the recording of neural activity from its readout. In principle, the technique may enable one to generate snapshots of neural activity in a large volume of neural tissue, e.g., a complete mouse brain, by circumventing the challenge of imaging a large volume with simultaneous high spatial and high temporal resolution. The proof-of-principle flash memory sensors presented here will need improvements in sensitivity, speed, brightness, and membrane trafficking before this goal can be realized. PMID:24428326

  1. Flash Memory: Photochemical Imprinting of Neuronal Action Potentials onto a Microbial Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We developed a technique, “flash memory”, to record a photochemical imprint of the activity state—firing or not firing—of a neuron at a user-selected moment in time. The key element is an engineered microbial rhodopsin protein with three states. Two nonfluorescent states, D1 and D2, exist in a voltage-dependent equilibrium. A stable fluorescent state, F, is reached by a photochemical conversion from D2. When exposed to light of a wavelength λwrite, population transfers from D2 to F, at a rate determined by the D1 ⇌ D2 equilibrium. The population of F maintains a record of membrane voltage which persists in the dark. Illumination at a later time at a wavelength λread excites fluorescence of F, probing this record. An optional third flash at a wavelength λreset converts F back to D2, for a subsequent write–read cycle. The flash memory method offers the promise to decouple the recording of neural activity from its readout. In principle, the technique may enable one to generate snapshots of neural activity in a large volume of neural tissue, e.g., a complete mouse brain, by circumventing the challenge of imaging a large volume with simultaneous high spatial and high temporal resolution. The proof-of-principle flash memory sensors presented here will need improvements in sensitivity, speed, brightness, and membrane trafficking before this goal can be realized. PMID:24428326

  2. Wetland Microbial Community Response to Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been proposed as a potential long-term carbon storage solution, with a goal of engineering geochemical dynamics to accelerate peat accretion and encourage greenhouse gas (GHG) sequestration. However, wetland microbial community composition and metabolic rates are poorly understood and their predicted response to wetland restoration is a veritable unknown. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors that shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater tidal marshes to hypersaline ponds in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun metagenomics, coupled with greenhouse gas measurements, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range in salinity and restoration status. Seawater delivers sulfate to wetland ecosystems, encouraging sulfate reduction and discouraging methane production. As expected, we observed the highest rates of methane production in the freshwater wetlands. Recently restored wetlands had significantly higher rates of methane production compared to their historic counterparts that could be attributed to variations in trace metal and organic carbon content in younger wetlands. In contrast, our sequencing results revealed an almost immediate return of the indigenous microbial communities following seasonal flooding and full tidal restoration in saline and hypersaline wetlands and managed ponds. Notably, we found elevated methane production rates in hypersaline ponds, the result of methylotrophic methane production confirmed by sequence data and lab incubations. Our study links belowground microbial communities and their aboveground greenhouse gas production and highlights the inherent complexity in predicting wetland microbial response in the face of both natural and unnatural disturbances.

  3. Natural light-gated anion channels: A family of microbial rhodopsins for advanced optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Govorunova, Elena G.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Janz, Roger; Liu, Xiaoqin; Spudich, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Light-gated rhodopsin cation channels from chlorophyte algae have transformed neuroscience research through their use as membrane-depolarizing optogenetic tools for targeted photoactivation of neuron firing. Photosuppression of neuronal action potentials has been limited by the lack of equally efficient tools for membrane hyperpolarization. We describe anion channel rhodopsins (ACRs), a family of light-gated anion channels from cryptophyte algae that provide highly sensitive and efficient membrane hyperpolarization and neuronal silencing through light-gated chloride conduction. ACRs strictly conducted anions, completely excluding protons and larger cations, and hyperpolarized the membrane of cultured animal cells with much faster kinetics at less than one-thousandth of the light intensity required by the most efficient currently available optogenetic proteins. Natural ACRs provide optogenetic inhibition tools with unprecedented light sensitivity and temporal precision. PMID:26113638

  4. NEUROSCIENCE. Natural light-gated anion channels: A family of microbial rhodopsins for advanced optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Janz, Roger; Liu, Xiaoqin; Spudich, John L

    2015-08-01

    Light-gated rhodopsin cation channels from chlorophyte algae have transformed neuroscience research through their use as membrane-depolarizing optogenetic tools for targeted photoactivation of neuron firing. Photosuppression of neuronal action potentials has been limited by the lack of equally efficient tools for membrane hyperpolarization. We describe anion channel rhodopsins (ACRs), a family of light-gated anion channels from cryptophyte algae that provide highly sensitive and efficient membrane hyperpolarization and neuronal silencing through light-gated chloride conduction. ACRs strictly conducted anions, completely excluding protons and larger cations, and hyperpolarized the membrane of cultured animal cells with much faster kinetics at less than one-thousandth of the light intensity required by the most efficient currently available optogenetic proteins. Natural ACRs provide optogenetic inhibition tools with unprecedented light sensitivity and temporal precision. PMID:26113638

  5. Halobacterial rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Mukohata, Y; Ihara, K; Tamura, T; Sugiyama, Y

    1999-04-01

    Following the discovery of the bacteriorhodopsin proton pump in Halobacterium halobium (salinarum), not only the halorhodopsin halide pump and two photosensor rhodopsins (sensory rhodopsin and phoborhodopsin) in the same species, but also homologs of these four rhodopsins in strains of other genera of Halobacteriaceae have been reported. Twenty-eight full (and partial) sequences of the genomic DNA of these rhodopsins have been analyzed. The deduced amino acid sequences have led to new strategies and tactics for understanding bacterial rhodopsins on a comparative basis, as summarized briefly in this article. The data discussed include (i) alignment of the sequences to qualify/characterize the conserved residues; (ii) assignment of residues that cause differences in function(s)/properties; and (iii) phylogeny of the halobacterial rhodopsins to suggest their evolutionary paths. The four kinds of rhodopsin in each strain are assumed, on the basis of their genera-specific distributions, to have arisen by at least two gene-duplication processes during evolution prior to generic speciation. The first duplication of the rhodopsin ancestor gene yielded two genes, each of which was duplicated again to give four genes in the ancestor halobacterium. The bacterium carrying four rhodopsin genes, after accumulating mutations, became ready for generic speciation and the delivery of four rhodopsins to each species. The original rhodopsin ancestor is speculated to be closest to the proton pump (bacteriorhodopsin). PMID:10101275

  6. Microbial Rhodopsin Optogenetic Tools: Application for Analyses of Synaptic Transmission and of Neuronal Network Activity in Behavior.

    PubMed

    Glock, Caspar; Nagpal, Jatin; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics was introduced as a new technology in the neurosciences about a decade ago (Zemelman et al., Neuron 33:15-22, 2002; Boyden et al., Nat Neurosci 8:1263-1268, 2005; Nagel et al., Curr Biol 15:2279-2284, 2005; Zemelman et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100:1352-1357, 2003). It combines optics, genetics, and bioengineering to render neurons sensitive to light, in order to achieve a precise, exogenous, and noninvasive control of membrane potential, intracellular signaling, network activity, or behavior (Rein and Deussing, Mol Genet Genomics 287:95-109, 2012; Yizhar et al., Neuron 71:9-34, 2011). As C. elegans is transparent, genetically amenable, has a small nervous system mapped with synapse resolution, and exhibits a rich behavioral repertoire, it is especially open to optogenetic methods (White et al., Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 314:1-340, 1986; De Bono et al., Optogenetic actuation, inhibition, modulation and readout for neuronal networks generating behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, In: Hegemann P, Sigrist SJ (eds) Optogenetics, De Gruyter, Berlin, 2013; Husson et al., Biol Cell 105:235-250, 2013; Xu and Kim, Nat Rev Genet 12:793-801, 2011). Optogenetics, by now an "exploding" field, comprises a repertoire of different tools ranging from transgenically expressed photo-sensor proteins (Boyden et al., Nat Neurosci 8:1263-1268, 2005; Nagel et al., Curr Biol 15:2279-2284, 2005) or cascades (Zemelman et al., Neuron 33:15-22, 2002) to chemical biology approaches, using photochromic ligands of endogenous channels (Szobota et al., Neuron 54:535-545, 2007). Here, we will focus only on optogenetics utilizing microbial rhodopsins, as these are most easily and most widely applied in C. elegans. For other optogenetic tools, for example the photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs, that drive neuronal activity by increasing synaptic vesicle priming, thus exaggerating rather than overriding the intrinsic activity of a neuron, as occurs with

  7. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Theroux, Susanna; Hartman, Wyatt; He, Shaomei; Tringe, Susannah

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  8. Retinal analog restoration of photophobic responses in a blind Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant. Evidence for an archaebacterial like chromophore in a eukaryotic rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, M A; Zacks, D N; Derguini, F; Nakanishi, K; Spudich, J L

    1991-01-01

    The strain CC-2359 of the unicellular eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii originally described as a low pigmentation mutant is found to be devoid of photophobic stop responses to photostimuli over a wide range of light intensities. Photophobic responses of the mutant are restored by exogenous addition of all-trans retinal. We have combined computer-based cell-tracking and motion analysis with retinal isomer and retinal analog reconstitution of CC-2359 to investigate properties of the photophobic response receptor. Most rapid and most complete reconstitution is obtained with all-trans retinal compared to 13-cis, 11-cis, and 9-cis retinal. An analog locked by a carbon bridge in a 6-s-trans conformation reconstitutes whereas the corresponding 6-s-cis locked analog does not. Retinal analogs prevented from isomerization around the 13-14 double bond by a five-membered ring in the polyene chain (locked in either the 13-trans or 13-cis configuration) do not restore the response, but enter the chromophore binding pocket as evidenced by their inhibition of all-trans retinal regeneration of the response. Results of competition experiments between all-trans and each of the 13-locked analogs fit a model in which each chromophore exhibits reversible binding to the photoreceptor apoprotein. A competitive inhibition scheme closely fits the data and permits calculation of apparent dissociation constants for the in vivo reconstitution process of 2.5 x 10(-11) M, 5.2 x 10(-10) M, and 5.4 x 10(-9) M, for all-trans, 13-trans-locked and 13-cis-locked analogs, respectively. The chromophore requirement for the trans configuration and 6-s-trans conformation, and the lack of signaling function from analogs locked at the 13 position, are characteristic of archaebacterial rhodopsins, rather than the previously studied eukaryotic rhodopsins (i.e., visual pigments). PMID:1777569

  9. Ecological restoration alters microbial communities in mine tailings profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Zhongjun; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Ecological restoration of mine tailings have impact on soil physiochemical properties and microbial communities. The surface soil has been a primary concern in the past decades, however it remains poorly understood about the adaptive response of microbial communities along the profile during ecological restoration of the tailings. In this study, microbial communities along a 60-cm profile were investigated in a mine tailing pond during ecological restoration of the bare waste tailings (BW) with two vegetated soils of Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanioides (CZ) plants. Revegetation of both IC and CZ could retard soil degradation of mine tailing by stimulation of soil pH at 0–30 cm soils and altered the bacterial communities at 0–20 cm depths of the mine tailings. Significant differences existed in the relative abundance of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Nitrospira. Slight difference of bacterial communities were found at 30–60 cm depths of mine tailings. Abundance and activity analysis of nifH genes also explained the elevated soil nitrogen contents at the surface 0–20 cm of the vegetated soils. These results suggest that microbial succession occurred primarily at surface tailings and vegetation of pioneering plants might have promoted ecological restoration of mine tailings.

  10. Ecological restoration alters microbial communities in mine tailings profiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Jia, Zhongjun; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Ecological restoration of mine tailings have impact on soil physiochemical properties and microbial communities. The surface soil has been a primary concern in the past decades, however it remains poorly understood about the adaptive response of microbial communities along the profile during ecological restoration of the tailings. In this study, microbial communities along a 60-cm profile were investigated in a mine tailing pond during ecological restoration of the bare waste tailings (BW) with two vegetated soils of Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanioides (CZ) plants. Revegetation of both IC and CZ could retard soil degradation of mine tailing by stimulation of soil pH at 0-30 cm soils and altered the bacterial communities at 0-20 cm depths of the mine tailings. Significant differences existed in the relative abundance of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Nitrospira. Slight difference of bacterial communities were found at 30-60 cm depths of mine tailings. Abundance and activity analysis of nifH genes also explained the elevated soil nitrogen contents at the surface 0-20 cm of the vegetated soils. These results suggest that microbial succession occurred primarily at surface tailings and vegetation of pioneering plants might have promoted ecological restoration of mine tailings. PMID:27126064

  11. Development of soil microbial communities during tallgrass prairie restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microbial communities were examined in a chronosequence of four different land-use treatments at the Konza Prairie Biological Station, Kansas. The time series comprised a conventionally tilled cropland (CTC) developed on former prairie soils, two restored grasslands that were initiated on forme...

  12. Ecological restoration alters microbial communities in mine tailings profiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Jia, Zhongjun; Sun, Qingye; Zhan, Jing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Ecological restoration of mine tailings have impact on soil physiochemical properties and microbial communities. The surface soil has been a primary concern in the past decades, however it remains poorly understood about the adaptive response of microbial communities along the profile during ecological restoration of the tailings. In this study, microbial communities along a 60-cm profile were investigated in a mine tailing pond during ecological restoration of the bare waste tailings (BW) with two vegetated soils of Imperata cylindrica (IC) and Chrysopogon zizanioides (CZ) plants. Revegetation of both IC and CZ could retard soil degradation of mine tailing by stimulation of soil pH at 0–30 cm soils and altered the bacterial communities at 0–20 cm depths of the mine tailings. Significant differences existed in the relative abundance of the phyla Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes and Nitrospira. Slight difference of bacterial communities were found at 30–60 cm depths of mine tailings. Abundance and activity analysis of nifH genes also explained the elevated soil nitrogen contents at the surface 0–20 cm of the vegetated soils. These results suggest that microbial succession occurred primarily at surface tailings and vegetation of pioneering plants might have promoted ecological restoration of mine tailings. PMID:27126064

  13. Dead Sea rhodopsins revisited.

    PubMed

    Bodaker, Idan; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Oren, Aharon; Béjà, Oded

    2012-12-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique hypersaline ecosystem with near toxic magnesium levels (∼2 M), dominance of divalent cations and a slightly acidic pH. Previously, we reported a haloarchaeon related to Halobacterium salinarum to dominate in a microbial bloom that developed in 1992 in the upper water layers of the lake following massive freshwater runoff. Whether this clade also dominated an earlier bloom in 1980-1982 cannot be ascertained as no samples for cultivation-independent analysis were preserved. The presence of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin was reported in the 1980-1982 bloom of prokaryotes that had developed in the Dead Sea. To test the hypothesis that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping may play a major role in determining what type of haloarchaea may dominate in specific bloom conditions, we compared rhodopsin genes recovered from Dead Sea biomass collected in different periods with genes coding for retinal proteins in isolated haloarchaea. Novel bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin genes were found in samples collected in 2007 and 2010. The fact that no rhodopsin genes were recovered from samples collected during the 1992 bloom, which was dominated by a single species, suggests that different clades were present in the 1980-1982 and 1992 blooms, and that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping did not necessarily play a determinative role in the dominance of specific halophiles in the blooms. PMID:23760932

  14. Soil microbial community successional patterns during forest ecosystem restoration.

    PubMed

    Banning, Natasha C; Gleeson, Deirdre B; Grigg, Andrew H; Grant, Carl D; Andersen, Gary L; Brodie, Eoin L; Murphy, D V

    2011-09-01

    Soil microbial community characterization is increasingly being used to determine the responses of soils to stress and disturbances and to assess ecosystem sustainability. However, there is little experimental evidence to indicate that predictable patterns in microbial community structure or composition occur during secondary succession or ecosystem restoration. This study utilized a chronosequence of developing jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) forest ecosystems, rehabilitated after bauxite mining (up to 18 years old), to examine changes in soil bacterial and fungal community structures (by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis [ARISA]) and changes in specific soil bacterial phyla by 16S rRNA gene microarray analysis. This study demonstrated that mining in these ecosystems significantly altered soil bacterial and fungal community structures. The hypothesis that the soil microbial community structures would become more similar to those of the surrounding nonmined forest with rehabilitation age was broadly supported by shifts in the bacterial but not the fungal community. Microarray analysis enabled the identification of clear successional trends in the bacterial community at the phylum level and supported the finding of an increase in similarity to nonmined forest soil with rehabilitation age. Changes in soil microbial community structure were significantly related to the size of the microbial biomass as well as numerous edaphic variables (including pH and C, N, and P nutrient concentrations). These findings suggest that soil bacterial community dynamics follow a pattern in developing ecosystems that may be predictable and can be conceptualized as providing an integrated assessment of numerous edaphic variables. PMID:21724890

  15. Soil microbial community structure and functionality during grassland restoration in the Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microbial communities are an indispensable part of restoration programs due to their significant role in ecosystem functioning and sensitivity to disturbance. We evaluated soil microbial community structure using ester-linked fatty acid (EL-FAME) profiling and metabolic functioning, by measurin...

  16. Transition of soil microbial communities in a tallgrass prairie restoration chronosequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive agriculture since the 1830’s has led to a 82-99% decline of the tallgrass prairie ecosystem in North America. Restoration of these prairies is of great interest. Objectives were to: (1) investigate the change in soil microbial communities during grassland restoration and (2) study the in...

  17. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.; He, S.

    2013-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of below-ground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  18. Binding of rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues to transducin, rhodopsin kinase and arrestin-1

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Nelson A; Sanz-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Bubis, José

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interaction of reconstituted rhodopsin, 9-cis-retinal-rhodopsin and 13-cis-retinal-rhodopsin with transducin, rhodopsin kinase and arrestin-1. METHODS: Rod outer segments (ROS) were isolated from bovine retinas. Following bleaching of ROS membranes with hydroxylamine, rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues were generated with the different retinal isomers and the concentration of the reconstituted pigments was calculated from their UV/visible absorption spectra. Transducin and arrestin-1 were purified to homogeneity by column chromatography, and an enriched-fraction of rhodopsin kinase was obtained by extracting freshly prepared ROS in the dark. The guanine nucleotide binding activity of transducin was determined by Millipore filtration using β,γ-imido-(3H)-guanosine 5’-triphosphate. Recognition of the reconstituted pigments by rhodopsin kinase was determined by autoradiography following incubation of ROS membranes containing the various regenerated pigments with partially purified rhodopsin kinase in the presence of (γ-32P) ATP. Binding of arrestin-1 to the various pigments in ROS membranes was determined by a sedimentation assay analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. RESULTS: Reconstituted rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues containing 9-cis-retinal and 13-cis-retinal rendered an absorption spectrum showing a maximum peak at 498 nm, 486 nm and about 467 nm, respectively, in the dark; which was shifted to 380 nm, 404 nm and about 425 nm, respectively, after illumination. The percentage of reconstitution of rhodopsin and the rhodopsin analogues containing 9-cis-retinal and 13-cis-retinal was estimated to be 88%, 81% and 24%, respectively. Although only residual activation of transducin was observed in the dark when reconstituted rhodopsin and 9-cis-retinal-rhodopsin was used, the rhodopsin analogue containing the 13-cis isomer of retinal was capable of activating transducin independently of light. Moreover

  19. The Determinant of Light-Energy and Light-Signal Conversion in Rhodopsins

    SciTech Connect

    Kandori, Hideki

    2007-12-26

    Rhodopsins can convert light into either chemical energy or signal [1, 2]. It is therefore reasonable to postulate the existence of specific structures for each function. Nevertheless, X-ray crystallographic structures showed similar protein architectures for microbial rhodopsins of both functional classes. But then, the question is how is each function achieved?.

  20. MICROBIAL POPULATION ANALYSIS AS A MEASURE OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a controlled oil spill study in a freshwater wetland, four methods were used to track changes in microbial populations in response to in situ remediation treatments, including nutrient amendments and the removal of surface vegetation. Most probable number (MPN) esimates o...

  1. Microbial transformations of radioactive wastes and environmental restoration through bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, A. J.

    1994-10-01

    Bioremediation stabilizes and reclaims radionuclides and toxic metals from contaminated materials, soils, sediments, or wastes. The mechanism of microbial transformations of the radionuclides and toxic metals commonly found in energy wastes are summarized, and two processes for treating such wastes are described. In one process, anaerobic bacteria are used to concentrate, contain and stabilize the toxic metals and radionuclides in the waste, with a concurrent reduction in its volume. In the second process, the radionuclides and toxic metals are extracted from the wastes with citric acid which is then subjected to biodegradation, followed by photodegradation to recover the metals.

  2. Alteration of soil microbial communities and water quality in restored wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossio, D.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Scow, K.M.; Fujii, R.

    2006-01-01

    Land usage is a strong determinant of soil microbial community composition and activity, which in turn determine organic matter decomposition rates and decomposition products in soils. Microbial communities in permanently flooded wetlands, such as those created by wetland restoration on Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta islands in California, function under restricted aeration conditions that result in increasing anaerobiosis with depth. It was hypothesized that the change from agricultural management to permanently flooded wetland would alter microbial community composition, increase the amount and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds in Delta waters; and have a predominant impact on microbial communities as compared with the effects of other environmental factors including soil type and agricultural management. Based on phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, active microbial communities of the restored wetlands were changed significantly from those of the agricultural fields, and wetland microbial communities varied widely with soil depth. The relative abundance of monounsaturated fatty acids decreased with increasing soil depth in both wetland and agricultural profiles, whereas branched fatty acids were relatively more abundant at all soil depths in wetlands as compared to agricultural fields. Decomposition conditions were linked to DOC quantity and quality using fatty acid functional groups to conclude that restricted aeration conditions found in the wetlands were strongly related to production of reactive carbon compounds. But current vegetation may have had an equally important role in determining DOC quality in restored wetlands. In a larger scale analysis, that included data from wetland and agricultural sites on Delta islands and data from two previous studies from the Sacramento Valley, an aeration gradient was defined as the predominant determinant of active microbial communities across soil types and land usage. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All

  3. Rod/cone dysplasia in Irish setters. Presence of an altered rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Cunnick, J; Rider, M; Takemoto, L J; Takemoto, D J

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of the amino acid sequence of bovine rhodopsin, a series of peptides from the C-terminus (Rhod-4 and Rhod-1) and external loops (Rhod-10) were synthesized. Rabbit antisera to these peptides recognize the rhodopsin molecule in whole retina from 8-week-old normal and affected rcdl (rod/cone-dysplasic) Irish setters (8- and 4-weeks-old). When the rhodopsin content was equalized by using a solid-phase radioimmunoassay, the reaction with anti-peptide antisera to the C-terminal octapeptide (residues 341-348) is severely decreased in the rcdl-dog retinas. The results of mixing experiments suggest that this is not due to proteolytic clipping of the rhodopsin C-terminus from the affected dogs. Treatment of retinas with 1.0 mM-NaF, a phosphatase inhibitor, or pretreatment with alkaline and acid phosphatases does alter the reaction of the rhodopsin with anti-rhodopsin antisera. This suggests that the decreased reaction of the affected rhodopsin with the anti-peptide antisera may partially result from differences in intrinsic rhodopsin phosphorylation. However, since the reaction of rcdl retinas cannot be restored to that of the normals, these results suggest that the rhodopsin molecule from the rcdl dogs may be structurally altered in other ways. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3355528

  4. Rod/cone dysplasia in Irish setters. Presence of an altered rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Cunnick, J; Rider, M; Takemoto, L J; Takemoto, D J

    1988-03-01

    On the basis of the amino acid sequence of bovine rhodopsin, a series of peptides from the C-terminus (Rhod-4 and Rhod-1) and external loops (Rhod-10) were synthesized. Rabbit antisera to these peptides recognize the rhodopsin molecule in whole retina from 8-week-old normal and affected rcdl (rod/cone-dysplasic) Irish setters (8- and 4-weeks-old). When the rhodopsin content was equalized by using a solid-phase radioimmunoassay, the reaction with anti-peptide antisera to the C-terminal octapeptide (residues 341-348) is severely decreased in the rcdl-dog retinas. The results of mixing experiments suggest that this is not due to proteolytic clipping of the rhodopsin C-terminus from the affected dogs. Treatment of retinas with 1.0 mM-NaF, a phosphatase inhibitor, or pretreatment with alkaline and acid phosphatases does alter the reaction of the rhodopsin with anti-rhodopsin antisera. This suggests that the decreased reaction of the affected rhodopsin with the anti-peptide antisera may partially result from differences in intrinsic rhodopsin phosphorylation. However, since the reaction of rcdl retinas cannot be restored to that of the normals, these results suggest that the rhodopsin molecule from the rcdl dogs may be structurally altered in other ways. PMID:3355528

  5. Extractable nitrogen and microbial community structure respond to grassland restoration regardless of historical context and soil composition

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, Sara Jo M.; Allen, Edith B.; Santiago, Louis S.; Crowley, David

    2015-01-01

    Grasslands have a long history of invasion by exotic annuals, which may alter microbial communities and nutrient cycling through changes in litter quality and biomass turnover rates. We compared plant community composition, soil chemical and microbial community composition, potential soil respiration and nitrogen (N) turnover rates between invaded and restored plots in inland and coastal grasslands. Restoration increased microbial biomass and fungal : bacterial (F : B) ratios, but sampling season had a greater influence on the F : B ratio than did restoration. Microbial community composition assessed by phospholipid fatty acid was altered by restoration, but also varied by season and by site. Total soil carbon (C) and N and potential soil respiration did not differ between treatments, but N mineralization decreased while extractable nitrate and nitrification and N immobilization rate increased in restored compared with unrestored sites. The differences in soil chemistry and microbial community composition between unrestored and restored sites indicate that these soils are responsive, and therefore not resistant to feedbacks caused by changes in vegetation type. The resilience, or recovery, of these soils is difficult to assess in the absence of uninvaded control grasslands. However, the rapid changes in microbial and N cycling characteristics following removal of invasives in both grassland sites suggest that the soils are resilient to invasion. The lack of change in total C and N pools may provide a buffer that promotes resilience of labile pools and microbial community structure. PMID:25555522

  6. Extractable nitrogen and microbial community structure respond to grassland restoration regardless of historical context and soil composition.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Sara Jo M; Allen, Edith B; Santiago, Louis S; Crowley, David

    2015-01-01

    Grasslands have a long history of invasion by exotic annuals, which may alter microbial communities and nutrient cycling through changes in litter quality and biomass turnover rates. We compared plant community composition, soil chemical and microbial community composition, potential soil respiration and nitrogen (N) turnover rates between invaded and restored plots in inland and coastal grasslands. Restoration increased microbial biomass and fungal : bacterial (F : B) ratios, but sampling season had a greater influence on the F : B ratio than did restoration. Microbial community composition assessed by phospholipid fatty acid was altered by restoration, but also varied by season and by site. Total soil carbon (C) and N and potential soil respiration did not differ between treatments, but N mineralization decreased while extractable nitrate and nitrification and N immobilization rate increased in restored compared with unrestored sites. The differences in soil chemistry and microbial community composition between unrestored and restored sites indicate that these soils are responsive, and therefore not resistant to feedbacks caused by changes in vegetation type. The resilience, or recovery, of these soils is difficult to assess in the absence of uninvaded control grasslands. However, the rapid changes in microbial and N cycling characteristics following removal of invasives in both grassland sites suggest that the soils are resilient to invasion. The lack of change in total C and N pools may provide a buffer that promotes resilience of labile pools and microbial community structure. PMID:25555522

  7. Lipid-Rhodopsin Hydrophobic Mismatch Alters Rhodopsin Helical Content

    SciTech Connect

    Soubias,O.; Niu, S.; Mitchell, D.; Gawrisch, K.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of photoactivated rhodopsin to achieve the enzymatically active metarhodopsin II conformation is exquisitely sensitive to bilayer hydrophobic thickness. The sensitivity of rhodopsin to the lipid matrix has been explained by the hydrophobic matching theory, which predicts that lipid bilayers adjust elastically to the hydrophobic length of transmembrane helices. Here, we examined if bilayer thickness adjusts to the length of the protein or if the protein alters its conformation to adapt to the bilayer. Purified bovine rhodopsin was reconstituted into a series of mono-unsaturated phosphatidylcholines with 14-20 carbons per hydrocarbon chain. Changes of hydrocarbon chain length were measured by 2H NMR, and protein helical content was quantified by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism and conventional circular dichroism. Experiments were conducted on dark-adapted rhodopsin, the photo-intermediates metarhodopsin I/II/III, and opsin. Changes of bilayer thickness upon rhodopsin incorporation and photoactivation were mostly absent. In contrast, the helical content of rhodopsin increased with membrane hydrophobic thickness. Helical content did not change measurably upon photoactivation. The increases of bilayer thickness and helicity of rhodopsin are accompanied by higher metarhodopsin II/metarhodopsin I ratios, faster rates of metarhodopsin II formation, an increase of tryptophan fluorescence, and higher temperatures of rhodopsin denaturation. The data suggest a surprising adaptability of this G protein-coupled membrane receptor to properties of the lipid matrix.

  8. Soil Microbial Community Successional Patterns during Forest Ecosystem Restoration ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Banning, Natasha C.; Gleeson, Deirdre B.; Grigg, Andrew H.; Grant, Carl D.; Andersen, Gary L.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Murphy, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Soil microbial community characterization is increasingly being used to determine the responses of soils to stress and disturbances and to assess ecosystem sustainability. However, there is little experimental evidence to indicate that predictable patterns in microbial community structure or composition occur during secondary succession or ecosystem restoration. This study utilized a chronosequence of developing jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) forest ecosystems, rehabilitated after bauxite mining (up to 18 years old), to examine changes in soil bacterial and fungal community structures (by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis [ARISA]) and changes in specific soil bacterial phyla by 16S rRNA gene microarray analysis. This study demonstrated that mining in these ecosystems significantly altered soil bacterial and fungal community structures. The hypothesis that the soil microbial community structures would become more similar to those of the surrounding nonmined forest with rehabilitation age was broadly supported by shifts in the bacterial but not the fungal community. Microarray analysis enabled the identification of clear successional trends in the bacterial community at the phylum level and supported the finding of an increase in similarity to nonmined forest soil with rehabilitation age. Changes in soil microbial community structure were significantly related to the size of the microbial biomass as well as numerous edaphic variables (including pH and C, N, and P nutrient concentrations). These findings suggest that soil bacterial community dynamics follow a pattern in developing ecosystems that may be predictable and can be conceptualized as providing an integrated assessment of numerous edaphic variables. PMID:21724890

  9. Technical considerations for the implementation of subsurface microbial barriers for restoration of groundwater at UMTRA sites

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action (UMTRA) Program is responsible for the assessment and remedial action at the 24 former uranium mill tailings sites located in the United States. The surface remediation phase, which has primarily focused on containment and stabilization of the abandoned uranium mill tailings piles, is nearing completion. Attention has now turned to the groundwater restoration phase. One alternative under consideration for groundwater restoration at UMTRA sites is the use of in-situ permeable reactive subsurface barriers. In this type of a system, contaminated groundwater will be allowed to flow naturally through a barrier filled with material which will remove hazardous constituents from the water by physical, chemical or microbial processes while allowing passage of the pore water. The subject of this report is a reactive barrier which would remove uranium and other contaminants of concern from groundwater by microbial action (i.e., a microbial barrier). The purpose of this report is to assess the current state of this technology and to determine issues that must be addressed in order to use this technology at UMTRA sites. The report focuses on six contaminants of concern at UMTRA sites including uranium, arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, cadmium and chromium. In the first section of this report, the fundamental chemical and biological processes that must occur in a microbial barrier to control the migration of contaminants are described. The second section contains a literature review of research which has been conducted on the use of microorganisms to immobilize heavy metals. The third section addresses areas which need further development before a microbial barrier can be implemented at an UMTRA site.

  10. Spreading Topsoil Encourages Ecological Restoration on Embankments: Soil Fertility, Microbial Activity and Vegetation Cover

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M.; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  11. Photosensitivities of iodopsin and rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Okano, T; Fukada, Y; Shichida, Y; Yoshizawa, T

    1992-12-01

    The relative photosensitivity and the molar extinction coefficient of a highly purified iodopsin (chicken red sensitive cone visual pigment) solubilized in a mixture of 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate and phosphatidylcholine (CHAPS-PC) were measured using bovine rhodopsin solubilized in 2% digitonin as a standard and compared with those of chicken and bovine rhodopsins. The photosensitivity obtained (1.08) was close to those of rhodopsins (chicken, 1.04; bovine, 0.99) in CHAPS-PC. The molar extinction coefficient of iodopsin (47,200) was 1.15-1.17 times higher than those of rhodopsins (chicken, 40,500; bovine, 41,200). The oscillator strength of iodopsin (0.60) calculated from the extinction coefficient was nearly identical to that of chicken rhodopsin (0.61), suggesting that the chromophore of iodopsin is similar in configuration to rhodopsin. In contrast, the difference in quantum yield between iodopsin (0.62) and chicken rhodopsin (0.70) suggests that the chromophore-opsin interaction after absorption of a photon by the chromophore may be different. PMID:1492139

  12. Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of a Proton Pumping Rhodopsin from an Extreme Thermophile*

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Takashi; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki; Sudo, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    So far retinylidene proteins (∼rhodopsin) have not been discovered in thermophilic organisms. In this study we investigated and characterized a microbial rhodopsin derived from the extreme thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus, which lives in a hot spring at around 75 °C. The gene for the retinylidene protein, named thermophilic rhodopsin (TR), was chemically synthesized with codon optimization. The codon optimized TR protein was functionally expressed in the cell membranes of Escherichia coli cells and showed active proton transport upon photoillumination. Spectroscopic measurements revealed that the purified TR bound only all-trans-retinal as a chromophore and showed an absorption maximum at 530 nm. In addition, TR exhibited both photocycle kinetics and pH-dependent absorption changes, which are characteristic of rhodopsins. Of note, time-dependent thermal denaturation experiments revealed that TR maintained its absorption even at 75 °C, and the denaturation rate constant of TR was much lower than those of other proton pumping rhodopsins such as archaerhodopsin-3 (200 ×), Haloquadratum walsbyi bacteriorhodopsin (by 10-times), and Gloeobacter rhodopsin (100 ×). Thus, these results suggest that microbial rhodopsins are also distributed among thermophilic organisms and have high stability. TR should allow the investigation of the molecular mechanisms of ion transport and protein folding. PMID:23740255

  13. Light-Promoted Rhodopsin Expression and Starvation Survival in the Marine Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of microbial rhodopsins in marine proteobacteria changed the dogma that photosynthesis is the only pathway to use the solar energy for biological utilization in the marine environment. Although homologs of these rhodopsins have been identified in dinoflagellates, the diversity of the encoding genes and their physiological roles remain unexplored. As an initial step toward addressing the gap, we conducted high-throughput transcriptome sequencing on Oxyrrhis marina to retrieve rhodopsin transcripts, rapid amplification of cDNA ends to isolate full-length cDNAs of dominant representatives, and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR to investigate their expression under varying conditions. Our phylogenetic analyses showed that O. marina contained both the proton-pumping type (PR) and sensory type (SR) rhodopsins, and the transcriptome data showed that the PR type dominated over the SR type. We compared rhodopsin gene expression for cultures kept under light: dark cycle and continuous darkness in a time course of 24 days without feeding. Although both types of rhodopsin were expressed under the two conditions, the expression levels of PR were much higher than SR, consistent with the transcriptomic data. Furthermore, relative to cultures kept in the dark, rhodopsin expression levels and cell survival rate were both higher in cultures grown in the light. This is the first report of light-dependent promotion of starvation survival and concomitant promotion of PR expression in a eukaryote. While direct evidence needs to come from functional test on rhodopsins in vitro or gene knockout/knockdown experiments, our results suggest that the proton-pumping rhodopsin might be responsible for the light-enhanced survival of O. marina, as previously demonstrated in bacteria. PMID:25506945

  14. Site History and Edaphic Features Override the Influence of Plant Species on Microbial Communities in Restored Tidal Freshwater Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Prasse, Christine E.; Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Restored wetland soils differ significantly in physical and chemical properties from their natural counterparts even when plant community compositions are similar, but effects of restoration on microbial community composition and function are not well understood. Here, we investigate plant-microbe relationships in restored and natural tidal freshwater wetlands from two subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Soil samples were collected from the root zone of Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Peltandra virginica, and Lythrum salicaria. Soil microbial composition was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing, and genes representing bacteria, archaea, denitrification, methanogenesis, and methane oxidation were quantified. Our analysis revealed variation in some functional gene copy numbers between plant species within sites, but intersite comparisons did not reveal consistent plant-microbe trends. We observed more microbial variations between plant species in natural wetlands, where plants have been established for a long period of time. In the largest natural wetland site, sequences putatively matching methanogens accounted for ∼17% of all sequences, and the same wetland had the highest numbers of genes coding for methane coenzyme A reductase (mcrA). Sequences putatively matching aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) were detected in all sites, suggesting that both aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation are possible in these systems. Our data suggest that site history and edaphic features override the influence of plant species on microbial communities in restored wetlands. PMID:25769832

  15. Regulation of retinal transducin by C-terminal peptides of rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, D J; Takemoto, L J; Hansen, J; Morrison, D

    1985-01-01

    Transducin is a multi-subunit guanine-nucleotide-binding protein that mediates signal coupling between rhodopsin and cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase in retinal rod outer segments. Whereas the T alpha subunit of transducin binds guanine nucleotides and is the activator of the phosphodiesterase, the T beta gamma subunit may function to link physically T alpha with photolysed rhodopsin. In order to determine the binding sites of rhodopsin to transducin, we have synthesized eight peptides (Rhod-1 etc.) that correspond to the C-terminal regions of rhodopsin and to several external and one internal loop region. These peptides were tested for their inhibition of restored GTPase activity of purified transducin reconstituted into depleted rod-outer-segment disc membranes. A marked inhibition of GTPase activity was observed when transducin was pre-incubated with peptides Rhod-1, Rhod-2 and Rhod-3. These peptides correspond to opsin amino acid residues 332-339, 324-331 and 317-321 respectively. Peptides corresponding to the three external loop regions or to the C-terminal residues 341-348 did not inhibit reconsituted GTPase activity. Likewise, Rhod-8, a peptide corresponding to an internal loop region of rhodopsin, did not inhibit GTPase activity. These findings support the concept that these specific regions of the C-terminus of rhodopsin serve as recognition sites for transducin. PMID:3867351

  16. Effects of organic amendments and mulches on soil microbial communities in quarry restoration under semiarid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna Ramos, Lourdes; Pastorelli, Roberta; Miralles Mellado, Isabel; Fabiani, Arturo; Bastida López, Felipe; Hernández Fernández, María Teresa; García Izquierdo, Carlos; Solé Benet, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Mining activities generate loss of the quality of the environment and landscape specially in arid and semiarid Mediterranean regions. A precondition for ecosystem reclamation in such highly disturbed mining areas is the development of functional soils with appropriate levels of organic matter. In an experimental soil restoration in limestone quarries from Sierra de Gádor (Almería), SE Spain, 9 plots 15 x 5 m were prepared to test organic amendments (compost from solid urban residues-DOW-, sludge from urban water treatment-SS-, control-NA-) and different mulches (fine gravel-GM-, wood chips-WM-, control-NM-) with the aim to improve soil/substrate properties and to reduce evaporation and erosion. In each experimental plot, 75 native plants (Macrochloa tenacissima, Anthyllis terniflora and Anthyllis cytisoides) were planted. After 5 years from the start of the experiment, we evaluated how microbial community composition responded to the organic amendments and mulches. Microbial community composition of both bacteria and fungi was determined by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprinting. The results of the two-way ANOVA showed that PLFAs were significantly affected by organic amendments but not by the mulches or interaction of both factors. Experimental plots with DOW showed significantly higher level of fungal PLFAs than those with SS and NA, even higher than the reference undisturbed soil. However, any plot with organic amendments did not reach the content of bacterial PLFAs of the reference soils. The bacterial diversity (evaluated by diversity indices calculated from DGGE profiles) was greater in soil samples taken under NA and GM. Comparing these indices in fungal DGGE, we found greater values for soil samples taken under DOW and without mulches. Results from UPGMA analysis showed significant differences in the structure of soil bacterial communities from the different treatments

  17. Changes in microbial activity of soils during the natural restoration of abandoned lands in central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsepyan, Lilit; Mostovaya, Anna; Lopes de Gerenyu, Valentin; Kurganova, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Most changes in land use affect significantly the amount of soil organic carbon (SOC) and alter the nutrition status of soil microbial community. The arable lands withdrawal induced usually the carbon sequestration in soil, the significant shifts in quality of soil organic matter and structure of microbial community. This study was aimed to determine the microbial activity of the abandoned lands in Central Russia due to the process of natural self-restoration. For the study, two representative chronosequences were selected in Central Russia: (1) deciduous forest area, DFA (Moscow region, 54o49N'; 37o34'E; Haplic Luvisols) and (2) forest steppe area, FSA (Belgorod region 50o36'N, 36o01'E Luvic Phaeozems). Each chronosequence included current arable, abandoned lands of different age, and forest plots. The total soil organic carbon (Corg, automatic CHNS analyzer), carbon immobilized in microbial biomass (Cmic, SIR method), and respiratory activity (RA) were determined in the topsoil (0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm layers) for each plots. Relationships between Corg, Cmic, and RA were determined by liner regression method. Our results showed that the conversion of croplands to the permanent forest induced the progressive accumulation Corg, Cmic and acceleration of RA in the top 10-cm layer for both chronosequences. Carbon stock increased from 24.1 Mg C ha-1 in arable to 45.3 Mg C ha-1 in forest soil (Luvic Phaeozems, Belgorod region). In Haplic Luvisols (Moscow region), SOC build up was 2 time less: from 13.5 Mg C ha-1 in arable to 27.9 Mg C ha-1 in secondary forest. During post-agrogenic evolution, Cmic also increased significantly: from 0.34 to 1.43 g C kg-1 soil in Belgorod region and from 0.34 to 0.64 g C kg-1 soil in Moscow region. RA values varied widely in soils studied: from 0.54-0.63 mg C kg-1h-1 in arable plots to 2.02-3.4 mg C kg-1h-1 in forest ones. The close correlations between Cmic, RA and Corg in the top 0-5cm layer (R2 = 0.81-0.90; P<0.01-0.05) were

  18. Genomic makeup of the marine flavobacterium Nonlabens (Donghaeana) dokdonensis and identification of a novel class of rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Byung Kwon; Song, Ju Yeon; Kwak, Min-Jung; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin-containing marine microbes such as those in the class Flavobacteriia play a pivotal role in the biogeochemical cycle of the euphotic zone (Fuhrman JA, Schwalbach MS, Stingl U. 2008. Proteorhodopsins: an array of physiological roles? Nat Rev Microbiol. 6:488-494). Deciphering the genome information of flavobacteria and accessing the diversity and ecological impact of microbial rhodopsins are important in understanding and preserving the global ecosystems. The genome sequence of the orange-pigmented marine flavobacterium Nonlabens dokdonensis (basonym: Donghaeana dokdonensis) DSW-6 was determined. As a marine photoheterotroph, DSW-6 has written in its genome physiological features that allow survival in the oligotrophic environments. The sequence analysis also uncovered a gene encoding an unexpected type of microbial rhodopsin containing a unique motif in addition to a proteorhodopsin gene and a number of photolyase or cryptochrome genes. Homologs of the novel rhodopsin gene were found in other flavobacteria, alphaproteobacteria, a species of Cytophagia, a deinococcus, and even a eukaryote diatom. They all contain the characteristic NQ motif and form a phylogenetically distinct group. Expression analysis of this rhodopsin gene in DSW-6 indicated that it is induced at high NaCl concentrations, as well as in the presence of light and the absence of nutrients. Genomic and metagenomic surveys demonstrate the diversity of the NQ rhodopsins in nature and the prevalent occurrence of the encoding genes among microbial communities inhabiting hypersaline niches, suggesting its involvement in sodium metabolism and the sodium-adapted lifestyle. PMID:23292138

  19. Genomic Makeup of the Marine Flavobacterium Nonlabens (Donghaeana) dokdonensis and Identification of a Novel Class of Rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Byung Kwon; Song, Ju Yeon; Kwak, Min-Jung; Lee, Choong Hoon; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Oh, Tae Kwang; Kim, Jihyun F.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin-containing marine microbes such as those in the class Flavobacteriia play a pivotal role in the biogeochemical cycle of the euphotic zone (Fuhrman JA, Schwalbach MS, Stingl U. 2008. Proteorhodopsins: an array of physiological roles? Nat Rev Microbiol. 6:488–494). Deciphering the genome information of flavobacteria and accessing the diversity and ecological impact of microbial rhodopsins are important in understanding and preserving the global ecosystems. The genome sequence of the orange-pigmented marine flavobacterium Nonlabens dokdonensis (basonym: Donghaeana dokdonensis) DSW-6 was determined. As a marine photoheterotroph, DSW-6 has written in its genome physiological features that allow survival in the oligotrophic environments. The sequence analysis also uncovered a gene encoding an unexpected type of microbial rhodopsin containing a unique motif in addition to a proteorhodopsin gene and a number of photolyase or cryptochrome genes. Homologs of the novel rhodopsin gene were found in other flavobacteria, alphaproteobacteria, a species of Cytophagia, a deinococcus, and even a eukaryote diatom. They all contain the characteristic NQ motif and form a phylogenetically distinct group. Expression analysis of this rhodopsin gene in DSW-6 indicated that it is induced at high NaCl concentrations, as well as in the presence of light and the absence of nutrients. Genomic and metagenomic surveys demonstrate the diversity of the NQ rhodopsins in nature and the prevalent occurrence of the encoding genes among microbial communities inhabiting hypersaline niches, suggesting its involvement in sodium metabolism and the sodium-adapted lifestyle. PMID:23292138

  20. The Activation Pathway of Human Rhodopsin in Comparison to Bovine Rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Szczepek, Michal; Elgeti, Matthias; Ritter, Eglof; Piechnick, Ronny; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Scheerer, Patrick; Hildebrand, Peter W; Bartl, Franz J

    2015-08-14

    Rhodopsin, the photoreceptor of rod cells, absorbs light to mediate the first step of vision by activating the G protein transducin (Gt). Several human diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa or congenital night blindness, are linked to rhodopsin malfunctions. Most of the corresponding in vivo studies and structure-function analyses (e.g. based on protein x-ray crystallography or spectroscopy) have been carried out on murine or bovine rhodopsin. Because these rhodopsins differ at several amino acid positions from human rhodopsin, we conducted a comprehensive spectroscopic characterization of human rhodopsin in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. We show by FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopy that the light-induced transformations of the early photointermediates are very similar. Significant differences between the pigments appear with formation of the still inactive Meta I state and the transition to active Meta II. However, the conformation of Meta II and its activity toward the G protein are essentially the same, presumably reflecting the evolutionary pressure under which the active state has developed. Altogether, our results show that although the basic activation pathways of human and bovine rhodopsin are similar, structural deviations exist in the inactive conformation and during receptor activation, even between closely related rhodopsins. These differences between the well studied bovine or murine rhodopsins and human rhodopsin have to be taken into account when the influence of point mutations on the activation pathway of human rhodopsin are investigated using the bovine or murine rhodopsin template sequences. PMID:26105054

  1. Molecular bases for the selection of the chromophore of animal rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Melaccio, Federico; Rinaldi, Silvia; Gozem, Samer; Olivucci, Massimo

    2015-12-15

    The functions of microbial and animal rhodopsins are triggered by the isomerization of their all-trans and 11-cis retinal chromophores, respectively. To lay the molecular basis driving the evolutionary transition from the all-trans to the 11-cis chromophore, multiconfigurational quantum chemistry is used to compare the isomerization mechanisms of the sensory rhodopsin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120 (ASR) and of the bovine rhodopsin (Rh). It is found that, despite their evolutionary distance, these eubacterial and vertebrate rhodopsins start to isomerize via distinct implementations of the same bicycle-pedal mechanism originally proposed by Warshel [Warshel A (1976) Nature 260:678-683]. However, by following the electronic structure changes of ASR (featuring the all-trans chromophore) during the isomerization, we find that ASR enters a region of degeneracy between the first and second excited states not found in Rh (featuring the 11-cis chromophore). We show that such degeneracy is modulated by the preorganized structure of the chromophore and by the position of the reactive double bond. It is argued that the optimization of the electronic properties of the chromophore, which affects the photoisomerization efficiency and the thermal isomerization barrier, provided a key factor for the emergence of the striking amino acid sequence divergence observed between the microbial and animal rhodopsins. PMID:26607446

  2. Molecular bases for the selection of the chromophore of animal rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Melaccio, Federico; Rinaldi, Silvia; Gozem, Samer; Olivucci, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The functions of microbial and animal rhodopsins are triggered by the isomerization of their all-trans and 11-cis retinal chromophores, respectively. To lay the molecular basis driving the evolutionary transition from the all-trans to the 11-cis chromophore, multiconfigurational quantum chemistry is used to compare the isomerization mechanisms of the sensory rhodopsin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120 (ASR) and of the bovine rhodopsin (Rh). It is found that, despite their evolutionary distance, these eubacterial and vertebrate rhodopsins start to isomerize via distinct implementations of the same bicycle-pedal mechanism originally proposed by Warshel [Warshel A (1976) Nature 260:678–683]. However, by following the electronic structure changes of ASR (featuring the all-trans chromophore) during the isomerization, we find that ASR enters a region of degeneracy between the first and second excited states not found in Rh (featuring the 11-cis chromophore). We show that such degeneracy is modulated by the preorganized structure of the chromophore and by the position of the reactive double bond. It is argued that the optimization of the electronic properties of the chromophore, which affects the photoisomerization efficiency and the thermal isomerization barrier, provided a key factor for the emergence of the striking amino acid sequence divergence observed between the microbial and animal rhodopsins. PMID:26607446

  3. Microbial Biomass and Activity in Geomorphic Features in Forested and Urban Restored and Degraded Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geomorphic spatial heterogeneity affects sediment denitrification, an anaerobic microbial process that results in the loss of nitrogen (N), and other anaerobic microbial processes such as methanogenesis in urban streams. We measured sediment denitrification potential (DEA), metha...

  4. Four of the six Drosophila rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment in low light.

    PubMed

    Saint-Charles, Alexandra; Michard-Vanhée, Christine; Alejevski, Faredin; Chélot, Elisabeth; Boivin, Antoine; Rouyer, François

    2016-10-01

    Light is the major stimulus for the synchronization of circadian clocks with day-night cycles. The light-driven entrainment of the clock that controls rest-activity rhythms in Drosophila relies on different photoreceptive molecules. Cryptochrome (CRY) is expressed in most brain clock neurons, whereas six different rhodopsins (RH) are present in the light-sensing organs. The compound eye includes outer photoreceptors that express RH1 and inner photoreceptors that each express one of the four rhodopsins RH3-RH6. RH6 is also expressed in the extraretinal Hofbauer-Buchner eyelet, whereas RH2 is only found in the ocelli. In low light, the synchronization of behavioral rhythms relies on either CRY or the canonical rhodopsin phototransduction pathway, which requires the phospholipase C-β encoded by norpA (no receptor potential A). We used norpA(P24) cry(02) double mutants that are circadianly blind in low light and restored NORPA function in each of the six types of photoreceptors, defined as expressing a particular rhodopsin. We first show that the NORPA pathway is less efficient than CRY for synchronizing rest-activity rhythms with delayed light-dark cycles but is important for proper phasing, whereas the two light-sensing pathways can mediate efficient adjustments to phase advances. Four of the six rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment, and all are more efficient for advancing than for delaying the behavioral clock. In contrast, neither RH5-expressing retinal photoreceptors nor RH2-expressing ocellar photoreceptors are sufficient to mediate synchronization through the NORPA pathway. Our results thus reveal different contributions of rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors and suggest the existence of several circuits for rhodopsin-dependent circadian entrainment. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2828-2844, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26972685

  5. Changes in the soil microbial community with a pine plantation restoration in a dry valley of the upper reaches of the Minjiang River, southwest China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanfeng; Liu, Guohua; Fu, Bojie; Wu, Yaqiong; Hu, Huifeng; Fu, Shenglei

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in soil microbial biomass C, microbial metabolic activity, functional diversity, and metabolic diversity pattern during the restoration process of a pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantation. In this study, a chronosequence approach was adopted. Three sites of pine plantations along a restoration chronosequence (12 years old (PF12), 25 years old (PF25), 35 years old (PF35)), and their paired reference sites of natural shrub community (Shrub1, Shrub2, and Shrub3) were selected. Soil microbial biomass C increased and microbial quotient declined with pine plantation age. Microbial metabolic activity, as measured by average well color development (using Biolog GN(2) plates), exhibited a decline along the restoration chronosequence with values ranked as PF12 > PF35 > PF25 in topsoil and PF12 > PF25 > PF35 in subsoil. Functional diversity, as estimated by substrate diversity and substrate richness, exhibited a pattern similar to the metabolic activity. Principal component analysis indicated that metabolic diversity followed recognized patterns along the restoration chronosequence with PF12 significantly different from PF25 and PF35. There was an apparent reduction of microbial metabolic activity and functional diversity during pine plantation restoration, which can be explained by a general decline in soil nutrient availability, particularly C availability, and soil pH associated with the establishment of a coniferous species. PMID:20586776

  6. Photo-induced Regulation of the Chromatic Adaptive Gene Expression by Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin*

    PubMed Central

    Irieda, Hiroki; Morita, Teppei; Maki, Kimika; Homma, Michio; Aiba, Hiroji; Sudo, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsin molecules are photochemically reactive membrane-embedded proteins, with seven transmembrane α-helices, which bind the chromophore retinal (vitamin A aldehyde). They are roughly divided into two groups according to their basic functions: (i) ion transporters such as proton pumps, chloride pumps, and cation channels; and (ii) photo-sensors such as sensory rhodopsin from microbes and visual pigments from animals. Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), found in 2003 in the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, is categorized as a microbial sensory rhodopsin. To investigate the function of ASR in vivo, ASR and the promoter sequence of the pigment protein phycocyanin were co-introduced into Escherichia coli cells with the reporter gene crp. The result clearly showed that ASR functions as a repressor of the CRP protein expression and that this is fully inhibited by the light activation of ASR, suggesting that ASR would directly regulate the transcription of crp. The repression is also clearly inhibited by the truncation of the C-terminal region of ASR, or mutations on the C-terminal Arg residues, indicating the functional importance of the C-terminal region. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel function of rhodopsin molecules and raise the possibility that the membrane-spanning protein ASR could work as a transcriptional factor. In the future, the ASR activity could be utilized as a tool for arbitrary protein expression in vivo regulated by visible light. PMID:22872645

  7. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and soil water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zong-Sheng; Fu, Yu-Hong; Yu, Li-Fei

    2012-10-01

    By the method of taking space instead of time, an incubation test was conducted to study the characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest in Maolan Nature Reserve, Guizhou Province of Southwest China. The soil microbial biomass carbon content and soil basal respiration decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with the process of the natural restoration, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and with the process of restoration, and soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased with increasing soil depth. In the process of the natural restoration, surface soil water soluble organic carbon content increased, while sublayer soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase. The ratio of soil water soluble organic carbon to total soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased with the process of restoration. Soil quality increased with the process of restoration. Also, the quality and quantity of soil organic carbon increased with the process of restoration, in which, soil microbial biomass carbon content had the greatest change, while soil water soluble organic carbon content had less change. PMID:23359931

  8. Characterization of an Unconventional Rhodopsin from the Freshwater Actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola

    PubMed Central

    Keffer, J. L.; Hahn, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodopsin-encoding microorganisms are common in many environments. However, knowing that rhodopsin genes are present provides little insight into how the host cells utilize light. The genome of the freshwater actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola encodes a rhodopsin of the uncharacterized actinorhodopsin family. We hypothesized that actinorhodopsin was a light-activated proton pump and confirmed this by heterologously expressing R. lacicola actinorhodopsin in retinal-producing Escherichia coli. However, cultures of R. lacicola did not pump protons, even though actinorhodopsin mRNA and protein were both detected. Proton pumping in R. lacicola was induced by providing exogenous retinal, suggesting that the cells lacked the retinal cofactor. We used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and oxidation of accessory pigments to confirm that R. lacicola does not synthesize retinal. These results suggest that in some organisms, the actinorhodopsin gene is constitutively expressed, but rhodopsin-based light capture may require cofactors obtained from the environment. IMPORTANCE Up to 70% of microbial genomes in some environments are predicted to encode rhodopsins. Because most microbial rhodopsins are light-activated proton pumps, the prevalence of this gene suggests that in some environments, most microorganisms respond to or utilize light energy. Actinorhodopsins were discovered in an analysis of freshwater metagenomic data and subsequently identified in freshwater actinobacterial cultures. We hypothesized that actinorhodopsin from the freshwater actinobacterium Rhodoluna lacicola was a light-activated proton pump and confirmed this by expressing actinorhodopsin in retinal-producing Escherichia coli. Proton pumping in R. lacicola was induced only after both light and retinal were provided, suggesting that the cells lacked the retinal cofactor. These results indicate that photoheterotrophy in this organism and others may require cofactors obtained from the

  9. Relevance of rhodopsin studies for GPCR activation.

    PubMed

    Deupi, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Rhodopsin, the dim-light photoreceptor present in the rod cells of the retina, is both a retinal-binding protein and a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Due to this conjunction, it benefits from an arsenal of spectroscopy techniques that can be used for its characterization, while being a model system for the important family of Class A (also referred to as "rhodopsin-like") GPCRs. For instance, rhodopsin has been a crucial player in the field of GPCR structural biology. Until 2007, it was the only GPCR for which a high-resolution crystal structure was available, so all structure-activity analyses on GPCRs, from structure-based drug discovery to studies of structural changes upon activation, were based on rhodopsin. At present, about a third of currently available GPCR structures are still from rhodopsin. In this review, I show some examples of how these structures can still be used to gain insight into general aspects of GPCR activation. First, the analysis of the third intracellular loop in rhodopsin structures allows us to gain an understanding of the structural and dynamic properties of this region, which is absent (due to protein engineering or poor electron density) in most of the currently available GPCR structures. Second, a detailed analysis of the structure of the transmembrane domains in inactive, intermediate and active rhodopsin structures allows us to detect early conformational changes in the process of ligand-induced GPCR activation. Finally, the analysis of a conserved ligand-activated transmission switch in the transmembrane bundle of GPCRs in the context of the rhodopsin activation cycle, allows us to suggest that the structures of many of the currently available agonist-bound GPCRs may correspond to intermediate active states. While the focus in GPCR structural biology is inevitably moving away from rhodopsin, in other aspects rhodopsin is still at the forefront. For instance, the first studies of the structural basis of disease mutants in

  10. Rhodopsin-Mediated Photoreception in Cryptophyte Flagellates

    PubMed Central

    Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Govorunova, Elena G.; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Zauner, Stefan; Maier, Uwe-G.; Spudich, John L.

    2005-01-01

    We show that phototaxis in cryptophytes is likely mediated by a two-rhodopsin-based photosensory mechanism similar to that recently demonstrated in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and for the first time, to our knowledge, report spectroscopic and charge movement properties of cryptophyte algal rhodopsins. The marine cryptophyte Guillardia theta exhibits positive phototaxis with maximum sensitivity at 450 nm and a secondary band above 500 nm. Variability of the relative sensitivities at these wavelengths and light-dependent inhibition of phototaxis in both bands by hydroxylamine suggest the involvement of two rhodopsin photoreceptors. In the related freshwater cryptophyte Cryptomonas sp. two photoreceptor currents similar to those mediated by the two sensory rhodopsins in green algae were recorded. Two cDNA sequences from G. theta and one from Cryptomonas encoding proteins homologous to type 1 opsins were identified. The photochemical reaction cycle of one Escherichia-coli-expressed rhodopsin from G. theta (GtR1) involves K-, M-, and O-like intermediates with relatively slow (∼80 ms) turnover time. GtR1 shows lack of light-driven proton pumping activity in E. coli cells, although carboxylated residues are at the positions of the Schiff base proton acceptor and donor as in proton pumping rhodopsins. The absorption spectrum, corresponding to the long-wavelength band of phototaxis sensitivity, makes this pigment a candidate for one of the G. theta sensory rhodopsins. A second rhodopsin from G. theta (GtR2) and the one from Cryptomonas have noncarboxylated residues at the donor position as in known sensory rhodopsins. PMID:16150961

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy of rhodopsins: insights and approaches.

    PubMed

    Alexiev, Ulrike; Farrens, David L

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has become an established tool at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics because of its exquisite sensitivity and recent technical advancements. However, rhodopsin proteins present the fluorescence spectroscopist with a unique set of challenges and opportunities due to the presence of the light-sensitive retinal chromophore. This review briefly summarizes some approaches that have successfully met these challenges and the novel insights they have yielded about rhodopsin structure and function. We start with a brief overview of fluorescence fundamentals and experimental methodologies, followed by more specific discussions of technical challenges rhodopsin proteins present to fluorescence studies. Finally, we end by discussing some of the unique insights that have been gained specifically about visual rhodopsin and its interactions with affiliate proteins through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks. PMID:24183695

  12. Intermediate Excited States in Rhodopsin Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, L. J.; Yan, M.; Jedju, T. M.; Callender, R. H.; Chao, H.; Alfano, R. R.

    1996-03-01

    Recent work by Wang et.al. footnote Q. Wang et.al., Science 266, 422 (1994) reports rapid coherent photoisomerization in rhodopsin. The bathorhodopsin photoproduct appears in 200 fs and exhibits torsional oscillations which remain synchronized with the initial photoexcitation. We report transient absorption experiments which suggest that the fraction of excited rhodopsin molecules which does not isomerize in this fashion (approximately 1/3) remains in an electronically excited state, probably the twisted state described by Birge and Hubbard,footnote R. R. Birge and L. M. Hubbard, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 102, 2195 (1980) for ~ 3 ps and then reforms rhodopsin. This picture explains the long bleaching recovery time for rhodopsin and the controversial spectral dynamics which are observed in the red.

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopy of rhodopsins: Insights and approaches

    PubMed Central

    Alexiev, Ulrike; Farrens, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has become an established tool at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics because of its exquisite sensitivity and recent technical advancements. However, rhodopsin proteins present the fluorescence spectroscopist with a unique set of challenges and opportunities due to the presence of the light-sensitive retinal chromophore. This review briefly summarizes some approaches that have successfully met these challenges and the novel insights they have yielded about rhodopsin structure and function. We start with a brief overview of fluorescence fundamentals and experimental methodologies, followed by more specific discussions of technical challenges rhodopsin proteins present to fluorescence studies. Finally, we end by discussing some of the unique insights that have been gained specifically about visual rhodopsin and its interactions with affiliate proteins through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24183695

  14. Rhodopsin determinants for transducin activation: a gain-of-function approach.

    PubMed

    Natochin, Michael; Gasimov, Karim G; Moussaif, Mustapha; Artemyev, Nikolai O

    2003-09-26

    Three cytoplasmic loops in the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin, C2, C3, and C4, have been implicated as key sites for binding and activation of the visual G protein transducin. Non-helical portions of the C2- and C3-loops and the cytoplasmic helix-8 from the C4 loop were targeted for a "gain-of-function" mutagenesis to identify rhodopsin residues critical for transducin activation. Mutant opsins with residues 140-148 (C2-loop), 229-244 (C3-loop), or 310-320 (C4-loop) substituted by poly-Ala sequences of equivalent lengths served as templates for mutagenesis. The template mutants with poly-Ala substitutions in the C2- and C3-loops formed the 500-nm absorbing pigments but failed to activate transducin. Reverse substitutions of the Ala residues by rhodopsin residues have been generated in each of the templates. Significant ( approximately 50%) restoration of the rhodopsin/transducin coupling was achieved with re-introduction of residues Cys140/Lys141 and Arg147/Phe148 into the C2 template. The reverse substitutions of the C3-loop residues Thr229/Val230 and Ser240/Thr242/Thr243/Gln244 produced a pigment with a full capacity for transducin activation. The C4 template mutant was unable to bind 11-cis-retinal, and the presence of Asn310/Lys311 was required for correct folding of the protein. Subsequent mutagenesis of the C4-loop revealed the role of Phe313 and Met317. On the background of Asn310/Lys311, the inclusion of Phe313 and Met317 produced a mutant pigment with the potency of transducin activation equal to that of the wild-type rhodopsin. Overall, our data support the role of the three cytoplasmic loops of rhodopsin and suggest that residues adjacent to the transmembrane helices are most important for transducin activation. PMID:12860986

  15. Gloeobacter Rhodopsin, Limitation of Proton Pumping at High Electrochemical Load

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Arend; Wietek, Jonas; Hegemann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We studied the photocurrents of a cyanobacterial rhodopsin Gloeobacter violaceus (GR) in Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. This protein is a light-driven proton pump with striking similarities to marine proteorhodopsins, including the D121-H87 cluster of the retinal Schiff base counterion and a glutamate at position 132 that acts as a proton donor for chromophore reprotonation during the photocycle. Interestingly, at low extracellular pHo and negative voltage, the proton flux inverted and directed inward. Using electrophysiological measurements of wild-type and mutant GR, we demonstrate that the electrochemical gradient limits outward-directed proton pumping and converts it into a purely passive proton influx. This conclusion contradicts the contemporary paradigm that at low pH, proteorhodopsins actively transport H+ into cells. We identified E132 and S77 as key residues that allow inward directed diffusion. Substitution of E132 with aspartate or S77 with either alanine or cysteine abolished the inward-directed current almost completely. The proton influx is likely caused by the pKa of E132 in GR, which is lower than that of other microbial ion pumping rhodopsins. The advantage of such a low pKa is an acceleration of the photocycle and high pump turnover at high light intensities. PMID:24209850

  16. The influence of salinity and restoration on wetland soil microbial communities and carbon cycling in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; He, S.; Windham-Myers, L.; Tringe, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to increase the average salinity of the San Francisco Bay-Delta watershed as sea levels rise and alpine snow volume decreases. Wetland soil microbial communities are responsible for cycling greenhouse gases and their response to climate change will heavily influence whether increasing salinity will have a negative or positive effect on the net greenhouse gas budgets of wetlands. To better understand the underlying factors determining the balance of greenhouse gas flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater to full seawater in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range of wetland plant types and restoration states. We determined a suite of soil biogeochemical parameters including moisture, carbon and nutrient contents, pH, sulfate, chloride, and trace metal concentrations. The results of our microbial diversity survey (16S rRNA gene Illumina tag sequencing) showed that salinity and sampling location were the primary drivers of belowground microbial community composition. Freshwater wetland soils, with lower sulfate concentrations, produced more methane than saline sites and we found a parallel increase in the relative abundance of methanogen populations in the high-methane samples. Surprisingly, wetland restoration status did not significantly alter microbial community composition, despite orders of magnitude greater methane flux in restored wetlands compared to reference sites. Deeper metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing in a restored wetland allowed us to further evaluate the roles of methanogen abundance and activity in shaping soil methane production. Our study links belowground microbial communities with their greenhouse gas production, providing a mechanistic microbial framework for assessing climate change feedbacks in wetland soils resulting from sea

  17. FTIR difference and resonance Raman spectroscopy of rhodopsins with applications to optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint Clair, Erica C.

    or absent. Structural changes of internal water molecules and possible bands associated with the interaction with beta-arrestins were also detected in photoactivated squid rhodopsin when transformed to the acid Meta intermediate. Near-IR confocal resonance Raman measurements were performed both on AR3 reconstituted into E. coli polar lipids and in vivo in E. coli expressing AR3 in the absence and presence of a negative transmembrane potential. On the basis of these measurements, a model is proposed which provides a possible explanation for the observed fluorescence dependence of AR3 and other microbial rhodopsins on transmembrane potential.

  18. A Rhodopsin-Guanylyl Cyclase Gene Fusion Functions in Visual Perception in a Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Avelar, Gabriela M.; Schumacher, Robert I.; Zaini, Paulo A.; Leonard, Guy; Richards, Thomas A.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sensing light is the fundamental property of visual systems, with vision in animals being based almost exclusively on opsin photopigments [1]. Rhodopsin also acts as a photoreceptor linked to phototaxis in green algae [2, 3] and has been implicated by chemical means as a light sensor in the flagellated swimming zoospores of the fungus Allomyces reticulatus [4]; however, the signaling mechanism in these fungi remains unknown. Here we use a combination of genome sequencing and molecular inhibition experiments with light-sensing phenotype studies to examine the signaling pathway involved in visual perception in the closely related fungus Blastocladiella emersonii. Our data show that in these fungi, light perception is accomplished by the function of a novel gene fusion (BeGC1) of a type I (microbial) rhodopsin domain and guanylyl cyclase catalytic domain. Photobleaching of rhodopsin function prevents accumulation of cGMP levels and phototaxis of fungal zoospores exposed to green light, whereas inhibition of guanylyl cyclase activity negatively affects fungal phototaxis. Immunofluorescence microscopy localizes the BeGC1 protein to the external surface of the zoospore eyespot positioned close to the base of the swimming flagellum [4, 5], demonstrating this is a photoreceptive organelle composed of lipid droplets. Taken together, these data indicate that Blastocladiomycota fungi have a cGMP signaling pathway involved in phototaxis similar to the vertebrate vision-signaling cascade but composed of protein domain components arranged as a novel gene fusion architecture and of distant evolutionary ancestry to type II rhodopsins of animals. PMID:24835457

  19. A rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase gene fusion functions in visual perception in a fungus.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Gabriela M; Schumacher, Robert I; Zaini, Paulo A; Leonard, Guy; Richards, Thomas A; Gomes, Suely L

    2014-06-01

    Sensing light is the fundamental property of visual systems, with vision in animals being based almost exclusively on opsin photopigments [1]. Rhodopsin also acts as a photoreceptor linked to phototaxis in green algae [2, 3] and has been implicated by chemical means as a light sensor in the flagellated swimming zoospores of the fungus Allomyces reticulatus [4]; however, the signaling mechanism in these fungi remains unknown. Here we use a combination of genome sequencing and molecular inhibition experiments with light-sensing phenotype studies to examine the signaling pathway involved in visual perception in the closely related fungus Blastocladiella emersonii. Our data show that in these fungi, light perception is accomplished by the function of a novel gene fusion (BeGC1) of a type I (microbial) rhodopsin domain and guanylyl cyclase catalytic domain. Photobleaching of rhodopsin function prevents accumulation of cGMP levels and phototaxis of fungal zoospores exposed to green light, whereas inhibition of guanylyl cyclase activity negatively affects fungal phototaxis. Immunofluorescence microscopy localizes the BeGC1 protein to the external surface of the zoospore eyespot positioned close to the base of the swimming flagellum [4, 5], demonstrating this is a photoreceptive organelle composed of lipid droplets. Taken together, these data indicate that Blastocladiomycota fungi have a cGMP signaling pathway involved in phototaxis similar to the vertebrate vision-signaling cascade but composed of protein domain components arranged as a novel gene fusion architecture and of distant evolutionary ancestry to type II rhodopsins of animals. PMID:24835457

  20. Primary reactions of sensory rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, I.; Sieg, A.; Wegener, A. A.; Engelhard, M.; Boche, I.; Otsuka, M.; Oesterhelt, D.; Wachtveitl, J.; Zinth, W.

    2001-01-01

    The first steps in the photocycles of the archaeal photoreceptor proteins sensory rhodopsin (SR) I and II from Halobacterium salinarum and SRII from Natronobacterium pharaonis have been studied by ultrafast pump/probe spectroscopy and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The data for both species of the blue-light receptor SRII suggests that their primary reactions are nearly analogous with a fast decay of the excited electronic state in 300–400 fs and a transition between two red-shifted product states in 4–5 ps. Thus SRII behaves similarly to bacteriorhodopsin. In contrast for SRI at pH 6.0, which absorbs in the orange part of the spectrum, a strongly increased fluorescence quantum yield and a drastically slower and biexponential decay of the excited electronic state occurring on the picosecond time scale (5 ps and 33 ps) is observed. The results suggest that the primary reactions are controlled by the charge distribution in the vicinity of the Schiff base and demonstrate that there is no direct connection between absorption properties and reaction dynamics for the retinal protein family. PMID:11158578

  1. Application of organic amendments to restore degraded soil: effects on soil microbial properties.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jennifer; Saxena, Jyotisna; Basta, Nicholas; Hundal, Lakhwinder; Busalacchi, Dawn; Dick, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Topsoil removal, compaction, and other practices in urban and industrial landscapes can degrade soil and soil ecosystem services. There is growing interest to remediate these for recreational and residential purposes, and urban waste materials offers potential to improve degraded soils. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the effects of urban waste products on microbial properties of a degraded industrial soil. The soil amendments were vegetative yard waste compost (VC), biosolids (BioS), and a designer mix (DM) containing BioS, biochar (BC), and drinking water treatment residual (WTR). The experiment had a completely randomized design with following treatments initiated in 2009: control soil, VC, BioS-1 (202 Mg ha(-1)), BioS-2 (403 Mg ha(-1)), and DM (202 Mg BioS ha(-1) plus BC and WTR). Soils (0-15-cm depth) were sampled in 2009, 2010, and 2011 and analyzed for enzyme activities (arylsulfatase, β-glucosaminidase, β-glucosidase, acid phosphatase, fluorescein diacetate, and urease) and soil microbial community structure using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). In general, all organic amendments increased enzyme activities in 2009 with BioS treatments having the highest activity. However, this was followed by a decline in enzyme activities by 2011 that were still significantly higher than control. The fungal PLFA biomarkers were highest in the BioS treatments, whereas the control soil had the highest levels of the PLFA stress markers (P < 0.10). In conclusion, one-time addition of VC or BioS was most effective on enzyme activities; the BioS treatment significantly increased fungal biomass over the other treatments; addition of BioS to soils decreased microbial stress levels; and microbial measures showed no statistical differences between BioS and VC treatments after 3 years of treatment. PMID:25673270

  2. Crystallization and crystal properties of squid rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Midori; Kitahara, Rei; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2007-06-01

    Truncated rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was extracted and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. Rhodopsin, a photoreceptor membrane protein in the retina, is a prototypical member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. In this study, rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was treated with V8 protease to remove the C-terminal extension. Truncated rhodopsin was selectively extracted from the microvillar membranes using alkyl glucoside in the presence of zinc ions and was then crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Of the various crystals obtained, hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. The diffraction data suggested that the crystal belongs to space group P6{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.1, c = 158.6 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis, together with linear dichroism results, suggested that the rhodopsin dimers are packed in such a manner that their transmembrane helices are aligned nearly parallel to the c axis.

  3. Molecular physiology of rhodopsin: Computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fel'Dman, T. B.; Kholmurodov, Kh. T.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    Computer simulation is used for comparative investigation of the molecular dynamics of rhodopsin containing the chromophore group (11- cis-retinal) and free opsin. Molecular dynamics is traced within a time interval of 3000 ps; 3 × 106 discrete conformational states of rhodopsin and opsin are obtained and analyzed. It is demonstrated that the presence of the chromophore group in the chromophore center of opsin influences considerably the nearest protein environment of 11- cis-retinal both in the region of the β-ionone ring and in the region of the protonated Schiff base bond. Based on simulation results, a possible intramolecular mechanism of keeping rhodopsin as a G-protein-coupled receptor in the inactive state, i.e., the chromophore function as an efficient ligand antagonist, is discussed.

  4. The action of enzymes on rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    RADDING, C M; WALD, G

    1958-11-20

    The effects have been examined of chymotrypsin, pepsin, trypsin, and pancreatic lipase on cattle rhodopsin in digitonin solution. The digestion of rhodopsin by chymotrypsin was measured by the hydrolysis of peptide bonds (formol titration), changes in pH, and bleaching. The digestion proceeds in two stages: an initial rapid hydrolysis which exposes about 30 amino groups per molecule, without bleaching; superimposed on a slower hydrolysis which exposes about 50 additional amino groups, with proportionate bleaching. The chymotryptic action begins at pH about 6.0 and increases logarithmically in rate to pH 9.2. Trypsin and pepsin also bleach rhodopsin in solution. A preparation of pancreatic lipase bleached it slightly, but no more than could be explained by contamination with proteases. In digitonin solution each rhodopsin molecule is associated in a micelle with about 200 molecules of digitonin; yet the latter do not appear to hinder enzyme action. It is suggested that the digitonin sheath is sufficiently fluid to be penetrated on collision with an enzyme molecule; and that once together the enzyme and substrate are held together by intermolecular attractive forces, and by the "cage effect" of bombardment by surrounding solvent molecules. The two stages of chymotryptic digestion of rhodopsin may correspond to an initial rapid fragmentation, such as has been observed with many proteinases and substrates; superimposed upon a slower digestion of the fragments. Since the first phase involves no bleaching, this may mean that rhodopsin can be broken into considerably smaller fragments without loss of optical properties. PMID:13587919

  5. The rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii enables fast optical control of cGMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Scheib, Ulrike; Stehfest, Katja; Gee, Christine E; Körschen, Heinz G; Fudim, Roman; Oertner, Thomas G; Hegemann, Peter

    2015-08-11

    Blastocladiomycota fungi form motile zoospores that are guided by sensory photoreceptors to areas of optimal light conditions. We showed that the microbial rhodopsin of Blastocladiella emersonii is a rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase (RhGC), a member of a previously uncharacterized rhodopsin class of light-activated enzymes that generate the second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Upon application of a short light flash, recombinant RhGC converted within 8 ms into a signaling state with blue-shifted absorption from which the dark state recovered within 100 ms. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, Chinese hamster ovary cells, or mammalian neurons, RhGC generated cGMP in response to green light in a light dose-dependent manner on a subsecond time scale. Thus, we propose RhGC as a versatile tool for the optogenetic analysis of cGMP-dependent signaling processes in cell biology and the neurosciences. PMID:26268609

  6. Partial restoration of the microbiota of cesarean-born infants via vaginal microbial transfer.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Bello, Maria G; De Jesus-Laboy, Kassandra M; Shen, Nan; Cox, Laura M; Amir, Amnon; Gonzalez, Antonio; Bokulich, Nicholas A; Song, Se Jin; Hoashi, Marina; Rivera-Vinas, Juana I; Mendez, Keimari; Knight, Rob; Clemente, Jose C

    2016-03-01

    Exposure of newborns to the maternal vaginal microbiota is interrupted with cesarean birthing. Babies delivered by cesarean section (C-section) acquire a microbiota that differs from that of vaginally delivered infants, and C-section delivery has been associated with increased risk for immune and metabolic disorders. Here we conducted a pilot study in which infants delivered by C-section were exposed to maternal vaginal fluids at birth. Similarly to vaginally delivered babies, the gut, oral and skin bacterial communities of these newborns during the first 30 d of life was enriched in vaginal bacteria--which were underrepresented in unexposed C-section-delivered infants--and the microbiome similarity to those of vaginally delivered infants was greater in oral and skin samples than in anal samples. Although the long-term health consequences of restoring the microbiota of C-section-delivered infants remain unclear, our results demonstrate that vaginal microbes can be partially restored at birth in C-section-delivered babies. PMID:26828196

  7. Incorporating H2 Dynamics and Inhibition into a Microbially Based Methanogenesis Model for Restored Wetland Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, David; Jaffe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Estimates of global CH4 emissions from wetlands indicate that wetlands are the largest natural source of CH4 to the atmosphere. In this paper, we propose that there is a missing component to these models that should be addressed. CH4 is produced in wetland sediments from the microbial degradation of organic carbon through multiple fermentation steps and methanogenesis pathways. There are multiple sources of carbon for methananogenesis; in vegetated wetland sediments, microbial communities consume root exudates as a major source of organic carbon. In many methane models propionate is used as a model carbon molecule. This simple sugar is fermented into acetate and H2, acetate is transformed to methane and CO2, while the H2 and CO2 are used to form an additional CH4 molecule. The hydrogenotrophic pathway involves the equilibrium of two dissolved gases, CH4 and H2. In an effort to limit CH4 emissions from wetlands, there has been growing interest in finding ways to limit plant transport of soil gases through root systems. Changing planted species, or genetically modifying new species of plants may control this transport of soil gases. While this may decrease the direct emissions of methane, there is little understanding about how H2 dynamics may feedback into overall methane production. The results of an incubation study were combined with a new model of propionate degradation for methanogenesis that also examines other natural parameters (i.e. gas transport through plants). This presentation examines how we would expect this model to behave in a natural field setting with changing sulfate and carbon loading schemes. These changes can be controlled through new plant species and other management practices. Next, we compare the behavior of two variations of this model, with or without the incorporation of H2 interactions, with changing sulfate, carbon loading and root volatilization. Results show that while the models behave similarly there may be a discrepancy of nearly

  8. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin: A Prospectus

    PubMed Central

    Filipek, Sławomir; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Teller, David C.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a retinal photoreceptor protein of bipartite structure consisting of the transmembrane protein opsin and a light-sensitive chromophore 11-cis-retinal, linked to opsin via a protonated Schiff base. Studies on rhodopsin have unveiled many structural and functional features that are common to a large and pharmacologically important group of proteins from the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, of which rhodopsin is the best-studied member. In this work, we focus on structural features of rhodopsin as revealed by many biochemical and structural investigations. In particular, the high-resolution structure of bovine rhodopsin provides a template for understanding how GPCRs work. We describe the sensitivity and complexity of rhodopsin that lead to its important role in vision. PMID:12471166

  9. Targeting the Proteostasis Network in Rhodopsin Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, David A; Cheetham, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin are one of the most common causes of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Misfolding of rhodopsin can result in disruptions in cellular protein homeostasis, or proteostasis. There is currently no available treatment for RP. In this review, we discuss the different approaches currently being investigated for treatment of rhodopsin RP, focusing on the potential of manipulation of the proteostasis network as a therapeutic approach to combat retinal degeneration. PMID:26427449

  10. The rhodopsins: structure and function. Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    Nature makes use of the propensity of retinal for light-dependent double-bond isomerization in a number of systems and in a variety of ways. The common theme for light receptors based on this kind of chemistry is that (1) the retinal is bound in most cases to a small membrane protein via a protonated lysine-retinal Schiff base, (2) the absorption maximum in the visible is tuned to a suitable wavelength largely by electrostatic interaction with polar protein residues, and (3) the light-induced bond rotations and strains in the retinal set off reaction chains during which at least part of the excess free energy acquired is transferred to the protein and causes pK shifts of acidic residues and/or backbone conformational changes. The physiological consequence of the process initiated by absorption of light is either the activation of an information transfer chain (sensory and visual rhodopsins) or energy transduction which drives the electrogenic movement of ions across the membrane (ion-motive rhodopsins). Rhodopsins with these functions occur in bacteria and in higher organisms; from an evolutionary standpoint they are not related to one another. Nevertheless, all of these proteins are remarkably similar and form a distinct family.

  11. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  12. Legacy effects overwhelm the short-term effects of exotic plant invasion and restoration on soil microbial community structure, enzyme activities, and nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Elgersma, Kenneth J; Ehrenfeld, Joan G; Yu, Shen; Vor, Torsten

    2011-11-01

    Plant invasions can have substantial consequences for the soil ecosystem, altering microbial community structure and nutrient cycling. However, relatively little is known about what drives these changes, making it difficult to predict the effects of future invasions. In addition, because most studies compare soils from uninvaded areas to long-established dense invasions, little is known about the temporal dependence of invasion impacts. We experimentally manipulated forest understory vegetation in replicated sites dominated either by exotic Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii), native Viburnums, or native Vacciniums, so that each vegetation type was present in each site-type. We compared the short-term effect of vegetation changes to the lingering legacy effects of the previous vegetation type by measuring soil microbial community structure (phospholipid fatty acids) and function (extracellular enzymes and nitrogen mineralization). We also replaced the aboveground litter in half of each plot with an inert substitute to determine if changes in the soil microbial community were driven by aboveground or belowground plant inputs. We found that after 2 years, the microbial community structure and function was largely determined by the legacy effect of the previous vegetation type, and was not affected by the current vegetation. Aboveground litter removal had only weak effects, suggesting that changes in the soil microbial community and nutrient cycling were driven largely by belowground processes. These results suggest that changes in the soil following either invasion or restoration do not occur quickly, but rather exhibit long-lasting legacy effects from previous belowground plant inputs. PMID:21618010

  13. Thermal Stability of Rhodopsin and Progression of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Monica Yun; Liu, Jian; Mehrotra, Devi; Liu, Yuting; Guo, Ying; Baldera-Aguayo, Pedro A.; Mooney, Victoria L.; Nour, Adel M.; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Over 100 point mutations in the rhodopsin gene have been associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of inherited visual disorders. Among these, we focused on characterizing the S186W mutation. We compared the thermal properties of the S186W mutant with another RP-causing mutant, D190N, and with WT rhodopsin. To assess thermal stability, we measured the rate of two thermal reactions contributing to the thermal decay of rhodopsin as follows: thermal isomerization of 11-cis-retinal and hydrolysis of the protonated Schiff base linkage between the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and opsin protein. We used UV-visible spectroscopy and HPLC to examine the kinetics of these reactions at 37 and 55 °C for WT and mutant rhodopsin purified from HEK293 cells. Compared with WT rhodopsin and the D190N mutant, the S186W mutation dramatically increases the rates of both thermal isomerization and dark state hydrolysis of the Schiff base by 1–2 orders of magnitude. The results suggest that the S186W mutant thermally destabilizes rhodopsin by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the receptor's active site. The decrease in the thermal stability of dark state rhodopsin is likely to be associated with higher levels of dark noise that undermine the sensitivity of rhodopsin, potentially accounting for night blindness in the early stages of RP. Further studies of the thermal stability of additional pathogenic rhodopsin mutations in conjunction with clinical studies are expected to provide insight into the molecular mechanism of RP and test the correlation between rhodopsin's thermal stability and RP progression in patients. PMID:23625926

  14. Structure of an Inward Proton-Transporting Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin Mutant: Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bamboo; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Luecke, Hartmut

    2016-09-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are light-activated, seven-α-helical, retinylidene transmembrane proteins that have been identified in thousands of organisms across archaea, bacteria, fungi, and algae. Although they share a high degree of sequence identity and thus similarity in structure, many unique functions have been discovered and characterized among them. Some function as outward proton pumps, some as inward chloride pumps, whereas others function as light sensors or ion channels. Unique among the microbial rhodopsins characterized thus far, Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a photochromic sensor that interacts with a soluble 14-kDa cytoplasmic transducer that is encoded on the same operon. The sensor itself stably interconverts between all-trans-15-anti and 13-cis-15-syn retinal forms depending on the wavelength of illumination, although only the former participates in a photocycle with a signaling M intermediate. A mutation in the cytoplasmic half-channel of the protein, replacing Asp217 with Glu (D217E), results in the creation of a light-driven, single-photon, inward proton transporter. We present the 2.3 Å structure of dark-adapted D217E ASR, which reveals significant changes in the water network surrounding Glu217, as well as a shift in the carbon backbone near retinal-binding Lys210, illustrating a possible pathway leading to the protonation of Glu217 in the cytoplasmic half-channel, located 15 Å from the Schiff base. Crystallographic evidence for the protonation of nearby Glu36 is also discussed, which was described previously by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. Finally, two histidine residues near the extracellular surface and their possible role in proton uptake are discussed. PMID:27602724

  15. Archaebacterial rhodopsin sequences: Implications for evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    It was proposed over 10 years ago that the archaebacteria represent a separate kingdom which diverged very early from the eubacteria and eukaryotes. It follows that investigations of archaebacterial characteristics might reveal features of early evolution. So far, two genes, one for bacteriorhodopsin and another for halorhodopsin, both from Halobacterium halobium, have been sequenced. We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the polypeptide of another one of these rhodopsins, a halorhodopsin in Natronobacterium pharaonis. Peptide sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments, and immuno-reactions of the protein and synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal gene sequence, confirmed that the open reading frame was the structural gene for the pharaonis halorhodopsin polypeptide. The flanking DNA sequences of this gene, as well as those of other bacterial rhodopsins, were compared to previously proposed archaebacterial consensus sequences. In pairwise comparisons of the open reading frame with DNA sequences for bacterio-opsin and halo-opsin from Halobacterium halobium, silent divergences were calculated. These indicate very considerable evolutionary distance between each pair of genes, even in the dame organism. In spite of this, three protein sequences show extensive similarities, indicating strong selective pressures.

  16. Free backbone carbonyls mediate rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Sanchez-Reyes, Omar B; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-08-01

    Conserved prolines in the transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often considered to function as hinges that divide the helix into two segments capable of independent motion. Depending on their potential to hydrogen-bond, the free C=O groups associated with these prolines can facilitate conformational flexibility, conformational switching or stabilization of the receptor structure. To address the role of conserved prolines in family A GPCRs through solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we focus on bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR in the visual receptor subfamily. The free backbone C=O groups on helices H5 and H7 stabilize the inactive rhodopsin structure through hydrogen-bonds to residues on adjacent helices. In response to light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore, hydrogen-bonding interactions involving these C=O groups are released, thus facilitating repacking of H5 and H7 onto the transmembrane core of the receptor. These results provide insights into the multiple structural and functional roles of prolines in membrane proteins. PMID:27376589

  17. An Empirical Test of Convergent Evolution in Rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Kristine A.; Roy, Richard A.; Theobald, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsins are photochemically reactive membrane proteins that covalently bind retinal chromophores. Type I rhodopsins are found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotic microbes, whereas type II rhodopsins function as photoactivated G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in animal vision. Both rhodopsin families share the seven transmembrane α-helix GPCR fold and a Schiff base linkage from a conserved lysine to retinal in helix G. Nevertheless, rhodopsins are widely cited as a striking example of evolutionary convergence, largely because the two families lack detectable sequence similarity and differ in many structural and mechanistic details. Convergence entails that the shared rhodopsin fold is so especially suited to photosensitive function that proteins from separate origins were selected for this architecture twice. Here we show, however, that the rhodopsin fold is not required for photosensitive activity. We engineered functional bacteriorhodopsin variants with novel folds, including radical noncircular permutations of the α-helices, circular permutations of an eight-helix construct, and retinal linkages relocated to other helices. These results contradict a key prediction of convergence and thereby provide an experimental attack on one of the most intractable problems in molecular evolution: how to establish structural homology for proteins devoid of discernible sequence similarity. PMID:24077848

  18. Projection structure of frog rhodopsin in two crystal forms.

    PubMed Central

    Schertler, G F; Hargrave, P A

    1995-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that upon light activation triggers the visual transduction cascade. Rod cell outer segment disc membranes were isolated from dark-adapted frog retinas and were extracted with Tween detergents to obtain two-dimensional rhodopsin crystals for electron crystallography. When Tween 80 was used, tubular structures with a p2 lattice (a = 32 A, b = 83 A, gamma = 91 degrees) were formed. The use of a Tween 80/Tween 20 mixture favored the formation of larger p22(1)2(1) lattices (a = 40 A, b = 146 A, gamma = 90 degrees). Micrographs from frozen hydrated frog rhodopsin crystals were processed, and projection structures to 7-A resolution for the p22(1)2(1) form and to 6-A resolution for the p2 form were calculated. The maps of frog rhodopsin in both crystal forms are very similar to the 9-A map obtained previously for bovine rhodopsin and show that the arrangement of the helices is the same. In a tentative topographic model, helices 4, 6, and 7 are nearly perpendicular to the plane of the membrane. In the higher-resolution projection maps of frog rhodopsin, helix 5 looks more tilted than it appeared previously. The quality of the two frog rhodopsin crystals suggests that they would be suitable to obtain a three-dimensional structure in which all helices would be resolved. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 6 PMID:8524807

  19. Voltage imaging in vivo with a new class of rhodopsin-based indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Reliable, optical detection of single action potentials in an intact brain is one of the longest-standing challenges in neuroscience. We have recently shown that a number of microbial rhodopsins exhibit intrinsic fluorescence that is sensitive to transmembrane potential. One class of indicator, derived from Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), responds to voltage transients with a speed and sensitivity that enable near-perfect identification of single action potentials in cultured neurons [Nat Methods. (2011). 9:90-5]. We have extended the use of these indicators to an in vivo context through the application of advanced imaging techniques to the larval zebrafish. Using planar-illumination, spinning-disk confocal, and epifluorescence imaging modalities, we have successfully recorded electrical activity in a variety of fish structures, including the brain and heart, in a completely noninvasive manner. Transgenic lines expressing Arch variants in defined cells enable comprehensive measurements to be made from specific target populations. In parallel, we have also extended the capabilities of our indicators by improving their multiphoton excitability and overall brightness. Microbial rhodopsin-based voltage indicators now enable optical interrogation of complex neural circuits, and electrophysiology in systems for which electrode-based techniques are challenging.

  20. Noninvasive optical inhibition with a red-shifted microbial rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Amy S; Miri, Mitra L; Busskamp, Volker; Matthews, Gillian A C; Acker, Leah C; Sørensen, Andreas T; Young, Andrew; Klapoetke, Nathan C; Henninger, Mike A; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Ogawa, Masaaki; Ramanlal, Shreshtha B; Bandler, Rachel C; Allen, Brian D; Forest, Craig R; Chow, Brian Y; Han, Xue; Lin, Yingxi; Tye, Kay M; Roska, Botond; Cardin, Jessica A; Boyden, Edward S

    2014-08-01

    Optogenetic inhibition of the electrical activity of neurons enables the causal assessment of their contributions to brain functions. Red light penetrates deeper into tissue than other visible wavelengths. We present a red-shifted cruxhalorhodopsin, Jaws, derived from Haloarcula (Halobacterium) salinarum (strain Shark) and engineered to result in red light-induced photocurrents three times those of earlier silencers. Jaws exhibits robust inhibition of sensory-evoked neural activity in the cortex and results in strong light responses when used in retinas of retinitis pigmentosa model mice. We also demonstrate that Jaws can noninvasively mediate transcranial optical inhibition of neurons deep in the brains of awake mice. The noninvasive optogenetic inhibition opened up by Jaws enables a variety of important neuroscience experiments and offers a powerful general-use chloride pump for basic and applied neuroscience. PMID:24997763

  1. Noninvasive optical inhibition with a red-shifted microbial rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Amy S; Miri, Mitra L; Busskamp, Volker; Matthews, Gillian A C; Acker, Leah C; Sørensen, Andreas T; Young, Andrew; Klapoetke, Nathan C; Henninger, Mike A; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Ogawa, Masaaki; Ramanlal, Shreshtha B; Bandler, Rachel C; Allen, Brian D; Forest, Craig R; Chow, Brian Y; Han, Xue; Lin, Yingxi; Tye, Kay M; Roska, Botond; Cardin, Jessica A; Boyden, Edward S

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic inhibition of the electrical activity of neurons enables the causal assessment of their contributions to brain functions. Red light penetrates deeper into tissue than other visible wavelengths. We present a red-shifted cruxhalorhodopsin, Jaws, derived from Haloarcula (Halobacterium) salinarum (strain Shark) and engineered to result in red light–induced photocurrents three times those of earlier silencers. Jaws exhibits robust inhibition of sensory-evoked neural activity in the cortex and results in strong light responses when used in retinas of retinitis pigmentosa model mice. We also demonstrate that Jaws can noninvasively mediate transcranial optical inhibition of neurons deep in the brains of awake mice. The noninvasive optogenetic inhibition opened up by Jaws enables a variety of important neuroscience experiments and offers a powerful general-use chloride pump for basic and applied neuroscience. PMID:24997763

  2. Conformational activation of visual rhodopsin in native disc membranes.

    PubMed

    Malmerberg, Erik; M Bovee-Geurts, Petra H; Katona, Gergely; Deupi, Xavier; Arnlund, David; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Johansson, Linda C; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Nazarenko, Elena; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Menzel, Andreas; de Grip, Willem J; Neutze, Richard

    2015-03-10

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that serves as a dim-light receptor for vision in vertebrates. We probed light-induced conformational changes in rhodopsin in its native membrane environment at room temperature using time-resolved wide-angle x-ray scattering. We observed a rapid conformational transition that is consistent with an outward tilt of the cytoplasmic portion of transmembrane helix 6 concomitant with an inward movement of the cytoplasmic portion of transmembrane helix 5. These movements were considerably larger than those reported from the basis of crystal structures of activated rhodopsin, implying that light activation of rhodopsin involves a more extended conformational change than was previously suggested. PMID:25759477

  3. Rhodopsin on tracks: new ways to go in signaling.

    PubMed

    Schertler, Gebhard F X

    2015-04-01

    In this issue of Structure, Gunkel et al. describe cryoelectron tomography analysis of the nano-organization of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin in the rod photoreceptor disk membranes in a near-native environment. Their data strongly suggest that rhodopsin is organized in the native rod disk as dimers arranged in parallel tracks aligned to the incisure. PMID:25862930

  4. Vitamin A activates rhodopsin and sensitizes it to ultraviolet light

    PubMed Central

    Miyazono, Sadaharu; Isayama, Tomoki; Delori, François C.; Makino, Clint L.

    2013-01-01

    The visual pigment, rhodopsin, consists of opsin protein with 11-cis retinal chromophore, covalently bound. Light activates rhodopsin by isomerizing the chromophore to the all-trans conformation. The activated rhodopsin sets in motion a biochemical cascade that evokes an electrical response by the photoreceptor. All-trans retinal is eventually released from the opsin and reduced to vitamin A. Rod and cone photoreceptors contain vast amounts of rhodopsin, so after exposure to bright light, the concentration of vitamin A can reach relatively high levels within their outer segments. Since a retinal analog, β-ionone, is capable of activating some types of visual pigments, we tested whether vitamin A might produce a similar effect. In single-cell recordings from isolated dark-adapted salamander green-sensitive rods, exogenously applied vitamin A decreased circulating current and flash sensitivity and accelerated flash response kinetics. These changes resembled those produced by exposure of rods to steady light. Microspectrophotometric measurements showed that vitamin A accumulated in the outer segments and binding of vitamin A to rhodopsin was confirmed in in vitro assays. In addition, vitamin A improved the sensitivity of photoreceptors to ultraviolet (UV) light. Apparently, the energy of a UV photon absorbed by vitamin A transferred by a radiationless process to the 11-cis retinal chromophore of rhodopsin, which subsequently isomerized. Therefore, our results suggest that vitamin A binds to rhodopsin at an allosteric binding site distinct from the chromophore binding pocket for 11-cis retinal to activate the rhodopsin, and that it serves as a sensitizing chromophore for UV light. PMID:22192505

  5. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype.

    PubMed

    Han, Zongchao; Banworth, Marcellus J; Makkia, Rasha; Conley, Shannon M; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R; Cooper, Mark J; Naash, Muna I

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause retinal degeneration and clinical phenotypes including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and congenital stationary night blindness. Effective gene therapies have been difficult to develop, however, because generating precise levels of rhodopsin expression is critical; overexpression causes toxicity, and underexpression would result in incomplete rescue. Current gene delivery strategies routinely use cDNA-based vectors for gene targeting; however, inclusion of noncoding components of genomic DNA (gDNA) such as introns may help promote more endogenous regulation of gene expression. Here we test the hypothesis that inclusion of genomic sequences from the rhodopsin gene can improve the efficacy of rhodopsin gene therapy in the rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of RP. We utilize our compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), which have the ability to transfer larger and more complex genetic constructs, to deliver murine rhodopsin cDNA or gDNA. We show functional and structural improvements in RKO eyes for up to 8 months after NP-mediated gDNA but not cDNA delivery. Importantly, in addition to improvements in rod function, we observe significant preservation of cone function at time points when cones in the RKO model are degenerated. These results suggest that inclusion of native expression elements, such as introns, can significantly enhance gene expression and therapeutic efficacy and may become an essential option in the array of available gene delivery tools. PMID:25713057

  6. LEDGF1-326 Decreases P23H and Wild Type Rhodopsin Aggregates and P23H Rhodopsin Mediated Cell Damage in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baid, Rinku; Scheinman, Robert I.; Shinohara, Toshimichi; Singh, Dhirendra P.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2011-01-01

    Background P23H rhodopsin, a mutant rhodopsin, is known to aggregate and cause retinal degeneration. However, its effects on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of P23H rhodopsin in RPE cells and further assess whether LEDGF1-326, a protein devoid of heat shock elements of LEDGF, a cell survival factor, reduces P23H rhodopsin aggregates and any associated cellular damage. Methods ARPE-19 cells were transiently transfected/cotransfected with pLEDGF1-326 and/or pWT-Rho (wild type)/pP23H-Rho. Rhodopsin mediated cellular damage and rescue by LEDGF1-326 was assessed using cell viability, cell proliferation, and confocal microscopy assays. Rhodopsin monomers, oligomers, and their reduction in the presence of LEDGF1-326 were quantified by western blot analysis. P23H rhodopsin mRNA levels in the presence and absence of LEDGF1-326 was determined by real time quantitative PCR. Principal Findings P23H rhodopsin reduced RPE cell viability and cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner, and disrupted the nuclear material. LEDGF1-326 did not alter P23H rhodopsin mRNA levels, reduced its oligomers, and significantly increased RPE cell viability as well as proliferation, while reducing nuclear damage. WT rhodopsin formed oligomers, although to a smaller extent than P23H rhodopsin. Further, LEDGF1-326 decreased WT rhodopsin aggregates. Conclusions P23H rhodopsin as well as WT rhodopsin form aggregates in RPE cells and LEDGF1-326 decreases these aggregates. Further, LEDGF1-326 reduces the RPE cell damage caused by P23H rhodopsin. LEDGF1-326 might be useful in treating cellular damage associated with protein aggregation diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:21915354

  7. Responses of soil microbial biomass and bacterial community structure to closed-off management (an ecological natural restoration measures): A case study of Dongting Lake wetland, middle China.

    PubMed

    Dai, Juan; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Liang, Jie; Guo, Shenglian; Li, Xiaodong; Huang, Lu; Lu, Lunhui; Yuan, Yujie

    2016-09-01

    Soil microbial biomass (SMB) and bacterial community structure, which are critical to global ecosystem and fundamental ecological processes, are sensitive to anthropogenic activities and environmental conditions. In this study, we examined the possible effects of closed-off management (an ecological natural restoration measures, ban on anthropogenic activity, widely employed for many important wetlands) on SMB, soil bacterial community structure and functional marker genes of nitrogen cycling in Dongting Lake wetland. Soil samples were collected from management area (MA) and contrast area (CA: human activities, such as hunting, fishing and draining, are permitted) in November 2013 and April 2014. Soil properties, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and bacterial community structure were investigated. Comparison of the values of MA and CA showed that SMB and bacterial community diversity of the MA had a significant increase after 7 years closed-off management. The mean value of Shannon-Weiner diversity index of MA and CA respectively were 2.85 and 2.07. The gene copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nosZ of MA were significant higher than those of CA. the gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and nirK of MA were significant lower than those of CA. However, there was no significant change in the gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nirS. PMID:27036597

  8. Crystal Structure of Sensory Rhodopsin II at 2.4 Angstroms: Insights into Color Tuning and Transducer Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, Hartmut; Schobert, Brigitte; Lanyi, Janos K.; Spudich, Elena N.; Spudich, John L.

    2016-01-01

    We report an atomic-resolution structure for a sensory member of the microbial rhodopsin family, the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin II (NpSRII), which mediates blue-light avoidance by the haloarchaeon Natronobacterium pharaonis. The 2.4 angstrom structure reveals features responsible for the 70- to 80-nanometer blue shift of its absorption maximum relative to those of haloarchaeal transport rhodopsins, as well as structural differences due to its sensory, as opposed to transport, function. Multiple factors appear to account for the spectral tuning difference with respect to bacteriorhodopsin: (i) repositioning of the guanidinium group of arginine 72, a residue that interacts with the counterion to the retinylidene protonated Schiff base; (ii) rearrangement of the protein near the retinal ring; and (iii) changes in tilt and slant of the retinal polyene chain. Inspection of the surface topography reveals an exposed polar residue, tyrosine 199, not present in bacteriorhodopsin, in the middle of the membrane bilayer. We propose that this residue interacts with the adjacent helices of the cognate NpSRII transducer NpHtrII. PMID:11452084

  9. His166 Is the Schiff Base Proton Acceptor in Attractant Phototaxis Receptor Sensory Rhodopsin I

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photoactivation of attractant phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) in Halobacterium salinarum entails transfer of a proton from the retinylidene chromophore’s Schiff base (SB) to an unidentified acceptor residue on the cytoplasmic half-channel, in sharp contrast to other microbial rhodopsins, including the closely related repellent phototaxis receptor SRII and the outward proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, in which the SB proton acceptor is an aspartate residue salt-bridged to the SB in the extracellular (EC) half-channel. His166 on the cytoplasmic side of the SB in SRI has been implicated in the SB proton transfer reaction by mutation studies, and mutants of His166 result in an inverted SB proton release to the EC as well as inversion of the protein’s normally attractant phototaxis signal to repellent. Here we found by difference Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy the appearance of Fermi-resonant X–H stretch modes in light-minus-dark difference spectra; their assignment with 15N labeling and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that His166 is the SB proton acceptor during the photochemical reaction cycle of the wild-type SRI–HtrI complex. PMID:25162914

  10. X-ray Crystallographic Structure of Thermophilic Rhodopsin: IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGH THERMAL STABILITY AND OPTOGENETIC FUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Takashi; Mizutani, Kenji; Hasegawa, Taisuke; Takahashi, Megumi; Honda, Naoya; Hashimoto, Naoki; Shimono, Kazumi; Yamashita, Keitaro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Miyauchi, Seiji; Takagi, Shin; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Murata, Takeshi; Sudo, Yuki

    2016-06-01

    Thermophilic rhodopsin (TR) is a photoreceptor protein with an extremely high thermal stability and the first characterized light-driven electrogenic proton pump derived from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus JL-18. In this study, we confirmed its high thermal stability compared with other microbial rhodopsins and also report the potential availability of TR for optogenetics as a light-induced neural silencer. The x-ray crystal structure of TR revealed that its overall structure is quite similar to that of xanthorhodopsin, including the presence of a putative binding site for a carotenoid antenna; but several distinct structural characteristics of TR, including a decreased surface charge and a larger number of hydrophobic residues and aromatic-aromatic interactions, were also clarified. Based on the crystal structure, the structural changes of TR upon thermal stimulation were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations revealed the presence of a thermally induced structural substate in which an increase of hydrophobic interactions in the extracellular domain, the movement of extracellular domains, the formation of a hydrogen bond, and the tilting of transmembrane helices were observed. From the computational and mutational analysis, we propose that an extracellular LPGG motif between helices F and G plays an important role in the thermal stability, acting as a "thermal sensor." These findings will be valuable for understanding retinal proteins with regard to high protein stability and high optogenetic performance. PMID:27129243

  11. Characterization of a Cyanobacterial Chloride-pumping Rhodopsin and Its Conversion into a Proton Pump.

    PubMed

    Hasemi, Takatoshi; Kikukawa, Takashi; Kamo, Naoki; Demura, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Light-driven ion-pumping rhodopsins are widely distributed in microorganisms and are now classified into the categories of outward H(+) and Na(+) pumps and an inward Cl(-) pump. These different types share a common protein architecture and utilize the photoisomerization of the same chromophore, retinal, to evoke photoreactions. Despite these similarities, successful pump-to-pump conversion had been confined to only the H(+) pump bacteriorhodopsin, which was converted to a Cl(-) pump in 1995 by a single amino acid replacement. In this study we report the first success of the reverse conversion from a Cl(-) pump to a H(+) pump. A novel microbial rhodopsin (MrHR) from the cyanobacterium Mastigocladopsis repens functions as a Cl(-) pump and belongs to a cluster that is far distant from the known Cl(-) pumps. With a single amino acid replacement, MrHR is converted to a H(+) pump in which dissociable residues function almost completely in the H(+) relay reactions. MrHR most likely evolved from a H(+) pump, but it has not yet been highly optimized into a mature Cl(-) pump. PMID:26578511

  12. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zongchao; Banworth, Marcellus J.; Makkia, Rasha; Conley, Shannon M.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Cooper, Mark J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause retinal degeneration and clinical phenotypes including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and congenital stationary night blindness. Effective gene therapies have been difficult to develop, however, because generating precise levels of rhodopsin expression is critical; overexpression causes toxicity, and underexpression would result in incomplete rescue. Current gene delivery strategies routinely use cDNA-based vectors for gene targeting; however, inclusion of noncoding components of genomic DNA (gDNA) such as introns may help promote more endogenous regulation of gene expression. Here we test the hypothesis that inclusion of genomic sequences from the rhodopsin gene can improve the efficacy of rhodopsin gene therapy in the rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of RP. We utilize our compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), which have the ability to transfer larger and more complex genetic constructs, to deliver murine rhodopsin cDNA or gDNA. We show functional and structural improvements in RKO eyes for up to 8 months after NP-mediated gDNA but not cDNA delivery. Importantly, in addition to improvements in rod function, we observe significant preservation of cone function at time points when cones in the RKO model are degenerated. These results suggest that inclusion of native expression elements, such as introns, can significantly enhance gene expression and therapeutic efficacy and may become an essential option in the array of available gene delivery tools.— Han, Z., Banworth, M. J., Makkia, R., Conley, S. M., Al-Ubaidi, M. R., Cooper, M. J., Naash, M. I. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype. PMID:25713057

  13. Determining the role of a probiotic in the restoration of intestinal microbial balance by molecular and cultural techniques.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Affhan; Dachang, W; Xin, Y

    2015-01-01

    The human intestine has a vast variety of microorganisms, and their balance is dependent on several factors. Antibiotics affect microfloral balance and allow naturally opportunistic organisms to multiply. Azithromycin is the most widely used macrolide antibiotic, active against a wide number of pathogens including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. It is currently used in the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients. The use of probiotics has advantages in gastrointestinal conditions, including infectious diarrhea and imbalance due to antibiotic use. In this research, the effect of azithromycin on the intestinal microbiota of Sprague Dawley rats and the role of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the restoration of the balance by employing molecular and cultural techniques was investigated. PCR with universal primers targeting the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene followed by DGGE was used to characterize the overall intestinal microbiota composition. Cultivable fecal bacteria count using microbiological media and semi-quantitative PCR with group-specific primers were also utilized to analyze the effects of antibiotic and probiotic on microflora. We found that the total amount of 16S rRNA gene and fecal aerobic bacterial count was reduced following azithromycin administration along with elimination of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli, but it was restored by the use of the probiotic. The results from PCR with group-specific primers showed that Bacteroides sp was present in the control and probiotic groups, but it was nearly eliminated in the antibiotic group. Moreover, semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the numbers of Enterobacteriaceae were nearly the same in the probiotic group and decreased in the antibiotic group, while Bifidobacterium was significantly increased in the probiotic group and decreased in the antibiotic group (P < 0.05) as compared with that in the control group. Azithromycin-induced dysbiosis can result in prolonged deleterious effects on the

  14. A Drosophila metallophosphoesterase mediates deglycosylation of rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jinguo; Li, Yi; Xia, Wenjing; Reddig, Keith; Hu, Wen; Xie, Wei; Li, Hong-Sheng; Han, Junhai

    2011-01-01

    Oligosaccharide chains of newly synthesized membrane receptors are trimmed and modified to optimize their trafficking and/or signalling before delivery to the cell surface. For most membrane receptors, the functional significance of oligosaccharide chain modification is unknown. During the maturation of Rh1 rhodopsin, a Drosophila light receptor, the oligosaccharide chain is trimmed extensively. Neither the functional significance of this modification nor the enzymes mediating this process are known. Here, we identify a dmppe (Drosophila metallophosphoesterase) mutant with incomplete deglycosylation of Rh1, and show that the retained oligosaccharide chain does not affect Rh1 localization or signalling. The incomplete deglycosylation, however, renders Rh1 more sensitive to endocytic degradation, and causes morphological and functional defects in photoreceptors of aged dmppe flies. We further demonstrate that the dMPPE protein functions as an Mn2+/Zn2+-dependent phosphoesterase and mediates in vivo dephosphorylation of α-Man-II. Most importantly, the dephosphorylated α-Man-II is required for the removal of the Rh1 oligosaccharide chain. These observations suggest that the glycosylation status of membrane proteins is controlled through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, and that MPPE acts as the phosphoesterase in this regulation. PMID:21804530

  15. Repair of rhodopsin mRNA by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing: a new approach for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  16. Repair of Rhodopsin mRNA by Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-Splicing: A New Approach for Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  17. Photometer for measuring intensity and rhodopsin distributions in intact eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Theodore P.; Webbers, Jacob P. P.

    1995-09-01

    We describe a photometer that measures light transmitted through excised eyes. The instrument, an ocular transmission photometer, employs sensitive single photon-counting techniques, and its usefulness has been tested by the study of the absorbance of rhodopsin in retinal rod cells in situ. We find that absorbances of rat rods agree well with those predicted by microspectrophotometry without making corrections for cellular mosaics. Additional tests of the ocular transmission photometer show that (a) the instrument is sensitive to subtle differences in rhodopsin absorbance, known to exist in specific locations in the rat retina, and (b) using the rate of rhodopsin bleaching as the measure of intensity, we can determine the intensity distribution at several locations across the rat retina.

  18. Chemistry and molecular physiology of vision: light-sensitive protein rhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, Mikhail A.; Feldman, Tatyana B.

    2012-11-01

    The review concerns literature data on the structure, functions and molecular simulation of rhodopsin. The mechanisms of the spectral tuning of visual pigments, photoisomerization of the rhodopsin chromophore group (11-cis-retinal moiety) and the formation of the physiologically active state of rhodopsin as a G-protein-coupled receptor are considered. Particular attention is given to the rhodopsin visual cycle and pathogenetic consequences of its impairment. A knowledge of the structure and photochemistry of rhodopsin was shown to be of importance for the use in nanotechnology of the future. The bibliography includes 219 references.

  19. Robust Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation of Rhodopsin Precedes Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Kroeger, Heike; Sakami, Sanae; Messah, Carissa; Yasumura, Douglas; Matthes, Michael T.; Coppinger, Judith A.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; LaVail, Matthew M.; Lin, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a G protein-coupled receptor essential for vision and rod photoreceptor viability. Disease-associated rhodopsin mutations, such as P23H rhodopsin, cause rhodopsin protein misfolding and trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, activating the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The pathophysiologic effects of ER stress and UPR activation on photoreceptors are unclear. Here, by examining a P23H rhodopsin knock-in mouse, we found that the UPR IRE1 signaling pathway is strongly activated in misfolded rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors. IRE1 significantly upregulated ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD), triggering pronounced P23H rhodopsin degradation. Rhodopsin protein loss occurred as soon as photoreceptors developed, preceding photoreceptor cell death. By contrast, IRE1 activation did not affect JNK signaling or rhodopsin mRNA levels. Interestingly, pro-apoptotic signaling from the PERK UPR pathway was also not induced. Our findings reveal that an early and significant pathophysiologic effect of ER stress in photoreceptors is the highly efficient elimination of misfolded rhodopsin protein. We propose that early disruption of rhodopsin protein homeostasis in photoreceptors could contribute to retinal degeneration. PMID:25270370

  20. The bilayer enhances rhodopsin kinetic stability in bovine rod outer segment disk membranes.

    PubMed

    Corley, Scott C; Sprangers, Peter; Albert, Arlene D

    2011-06-22

    Rhodopsin is a kinetically stable protein constituting >90% of rod outer segment disk membrane protein. To investigate the bilayer contribution to rhodopsin kinetic stability, disk membranes were systematically disrupted by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside. Rhodopsin kinetic stability was examined under subsolubilizing (rhodopsin in a bilayer environment perturbed by octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside) and under fully solubilizing conditions (rhodopsin in a micelle with cosolubilized phospholipids). As determined by DSC, rhodopsin exhibited a scan-rate-dependent irreversible endothermic transition at all stages of solubilization. The transition temperature (T(m)) decreased in the subsolubilizing stage. However, once the rhodopsin was in a micelle environment there was little change of the T(m) as the phospholipid/rhodopsin ratio in the mixed micelles decreased during the fully solubilized stage. Rhodopsin thermal denaturation is consistent with the two-state irreversible model at all stages of solubilization. The activation energy of denaturation (E(act)) was calculated from the scan rate dependence of the T(m) and from the rate of rhodopsin thermal bleaching at all stages of solubilization. The E(act) as determined by both techniques decreased in the subsolubilizing stage, but remained constant once fully solubilized. These results indicate the bilayer structure increases the E(act) to rhodopsin denaturation. PMID:21689528

  1. Depth-resolved rhodopsin molecular contrast imaging for functional assessment of photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tan; Wen, Rong; Lam, Byron L.; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2015-09-01

    Rhodopsin, the light-sensing molecule in the outer segments of rod photoreceptors, is responsible for converting light into neuronal signals in a process known as phototransduction. Rhodopsin is thus a functional biomarker for rod photoreceptors. Here we report a novel technology based on visible-light optical coherence tomography (VIS-OCT) for in vivo molecular imaging of rhodopsin. The depth resolution of OCT allows the visualization of the location where the change of optical absorption occurs and provides a potentially accurate assessment of rhodopsin content by segmentation of the image at the location. Rhodopsin OCT can be used to quantitatively image rhodopsin distribution and thus assess the distribution of functional rod photoreceptors in the retina. Rhodopsin OCT can bring significant impact into ophthalmic clinics by providing a tool for the diagnosis and severity assessment of a variety of retinal conditions.

  2. Depth-resolved rhodopsin molecular contrast imaging for functional assessment of photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Wen, Rong; Lam, Byron L.; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the light-sensing molecule in the outer segments of rod photoreceptors, is responsible for converting light into neuronal signals in a process known as phototransduction. Rhodopsin is thus a functional biomarker for rod photoreceptors. Here we report a novel technology based on visible-light optical coherence tomography (VIS-OCT) for in vivo molecular imaging of rhodopsin. The depth resolution of OCT allows the visualization of the location where the change of optical absorption occurs and provides a potentially accurate assessment of rhodopsin content by segmentation of the image at the location. Rhodopsin OCT can be used to quantitatively image rhodopsin distribution and thus assess the distribution of functional rod photoreceptors in the retina. Rhodopsin OCT can bring significant impact into ophthalmic clinics by providing a tool for the diagnosis and severity assessment of a variety of retinal conditions. PMID:26358529

  3. Is rhodopsin isomerization correlated to astronauts' phosphene perceptions in space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, L.; Altea-Biophys Team

    Anomalous Phosphene Perception APP phoenomenon may just be a first example of how microgravity and particle radiation may modify the normal behaviour of the Central Nervous System CNS and also is an evidence that space environment may indeed influence the correct functioning of the visual system The ALTEA program is going to provide i an assesment of the CNS functional hazard due to microgravity and particle radiation during long space human permanence ii a definition for the needed shielding optimized for reducing these risks and iii a survey of ISS radiation environment aimed at the validation of spacecrafts computer models As known Rhodopsin is at the start of the photo-transduction cascade and its involvement in the phosphene perception would suggest a possible physiological pathway The bleaching of few molecules in the retina is sufficient to start the process of vision A very preliminary measurements on rhodopsin irradiation has been conducted in April 2003 Irradiation of 17 vials containing a solution of suine rhodopsine has been performed with 12 C ions at 200 MeV n - total dose has been varied from 10 9 to 10 13 ions over each vial New and more complete data from most recent measurements are now available Preparation and purification of bovine rhodopsin and regenerations of bleached molecules was carried out using reproducible procedures The samples was irradiated with controlled 12 C ion beams and with different amount of light radiation in order 1 to understand if the molecules have been

  4. Conserved rhodopsin intradiscal structural motifs mediate stabilization: effects of zinc.

    PubMed

    Gleim, Scott; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Arehart, Eric; Byington, Daniel; Hwa, John

    2009-03-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a neurodegenerative disorder, can arise from single point mutations in rhodopsin, leading to a cascade of protein instability, misfolding, aggregation, rod cell death, retinal degeneration, and ultimately blindness. Divalent cations, such as zinc and copper, have allosteric effects on misfolded aggregates of comparable neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, prion diseases, and ALS. We report that two structurally conserved low-affinity zinc coordination motifs, located among a cluster of RP mutations in the intradiscal loop region, mediate dose-dependent rhodopsin destabilization. Disruption of native interactions involving histidines 100 and 195, through site-directed mutagenesis or exogenous zinc coordination, results in significant loss of receptor stability. Furthermore, chelation with EDTA stabilizes the structure of both wild-type rhodopsin and the most prevalent rhodopsin RP mutation, P(23)H. These interactions suggest that homeostatic regulation of trace metal concentrations in the rod outer segment of the retina may be important both physiologically and for an important cluster of RP mutations. Furthermore, with a growing awareness of allosteric zinc binding domains on a diverse range of GPCRs, such principles may apply to many other receptors and their associated diseases. PMID:19206210

  5. Conserved rhodopsin intradiscal structural motifs mediate stabilization; effects of zinc†

    PubMed Central

    Gleim, Scott; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Arehart, Eric; Byington, Daniel; Hwa, John

    2009-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a neurodegenerative disorder, can arise from single point mutations in rhodopsin, leading to a cascade of protein instability, misfolding, aggregation, rod cell death, retinal degeneration, and ultimately blindness. Divalent cations, such as zinc and copper, have allosteric effects on misfolded aggregates of comparable neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, prion diseases, and ALS. We report that two structurally conserved low-affinity zinc coordination motifs, located among a cluster of RP mutations in the intradiscal loop region, mediate dose-dependent rhodopsin destabilization. Disruption of native interactions involving histidines 100 and 195, through site-directed mutagenesis or exogenous zinc coordination, results in significant loss of receptor stability. Furthermore, chelation with EDTA stabilizes the structure of both wild type rhodopsin and the most prevalent rhodopsin RP mutation, P23H. These interactions suggest that homeostatic regulation of trace metal concentrations in the rod outer segment of the retina may be important both physiologically and for an important cluster of RP mutations. Furthermore, with a growing awareness of allosteric zinc binding domains on a diverse range of GPCRs, such principles may apply to many other receptors and their associated diseases. PMID:19206210

  6. Crystal Structure of a Thermally Stable Rhodopsin Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Standfuss, Jörg; Xie, Guifu; Edwards, Patricia C.; Burghammer, Manfred; Oprian, Daniel D.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.

    2007-01-01

    We determined the structure of the rhodopsin mutant N2C/D282C expressed in mammalian cells; the first structure of a recombinantly produced G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The mutant was designed to form a disulfide bond between the N-terminus and loop E3 which allows handling of opsin in detergent solution and increases thermal stability of rhodopsin by 10°C. It furthermore allowed us to crystallize a fully deglycosylated rhodopsin (N2C/N15D/D282C). N15 mutations are normally misfolding and cause retinitis pigmentosa in humans. Microcrystallographic techniques and a 5μm x-ray beam were used to collect data along a single needle measuring 5x5x90μm3. The disulfide introduces only minor changes but fixes the N-terminal cap over the β-sheet lid covering the ligand binding site, a likely explanation for the increased stability. This work allows structural investigation of rhodopsin mutants and shows the problems encountered during structure determination of GPCRs and other mammalian membrane proteins. PMID:17825322

  7. Rhodopsin Molecular Evolution in Mammals Inhabiting Low Light Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabin; Ru, Binghua; Teeling, Emma C.; Faulkes, Christopher G.; Zhang, Shuyi; Rossiter, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The ecological radiation of mammals to inhabit a variety of light environments is largely attributed to adaptive changes in their visual systems. Visual capabilities are conferred by anatomical features of the eyes as well as the combination and properties of their constituent light sensitive pigments. To test whether evolutionary switches to different niches characterized by dim-light conditions coincided with molecular adaptation of the rod pigment rhodopsin, we sequenced the rhodopsin gene in twenty-two mammals including several bats and subterranean mole-rats. We compared these to thirty-seven published mammal rhodopsin sequences, from species with divergent visual ecologies, including nocturnal, diurnal and aquatic groups. All taxa possessed an intact functional rhodopsin; however, phylogenetic tree reconstruction recovered a gene tree in which rodents were not monophyletic, and also in which echolocating bats formed a monophyletic group. These conflicts with the species tree appear to stem from accelerated evolution in these groups, both of which inhabit low light environments. Selection tests confirmed divergent selection pressures in the clades of subterranean rodents and bats, as well as in marine mammals that live in turbid conditions. We also found evidence of divergent selection pressures among groups of bats with different sensory modalities based on vision and echolocation. Sliding window analyses suggest most changes occur in transmembrane domains, particularly obvious within the pinnipeds; however, we found no obvious pattern between photopic niche and predicted spectral sensitivity based on known critical amino acids. This study indicates that the independent evolution of rhodopsin vision in ecologically specialised groups of mammals has involved molecular evolution at the sequence level, though such changes might not mediate spectral sensitivity directly. PMID:20016835

  8. Resonance raman spectroscopy of an ultraviolet-sensitive insect rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Deng, H.; Rath, P.; Callender, R.H.; Schwemer, J.

    1987-11-17

    The authors present the first visual pigment resonance Raman spectra from the UV-sensitive eyes of an insect, Ascalaphus macaronius (owlfly). This pigment contains 11-cis-retinal as the chromophore. Raman data have been obtained for the acid metarhodopsin at 10/sup 0/C in both H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O. The C=N stretching mode at 1660 cm/sup -1/ in H/sub 2/O shifts to 1631 cm/sup -1/ upon deuteriation of the sample, clearly showing a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. The structure-sensitive fingerprint region shows similarities to the all-trans-protonated Schiff base of model retinal chromophores, as well as to the octopus acid metarhodopsin and bovine metarhodopsin I. Although spectra measured at -100/sup 0/C with 406.7-nm excitation, to enhance scattering from rhodopsin (lambda/sub max/ 345 nm), contain a significant contribution from a small amount of contaminants (cytochrome(s) and/or accessory pigment) in the sample, the C=N stretch at 1664 cm/sup -1/ suggests a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein in rhodopsin as well. For comparison, this mode also appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in both the vertebrate (bovine) and the invertebrate (octopus) rhodopsins. These data are particularly interesting since the absorption maximum of 345 nm for rhodopsin might be expected to originate from an unprotonated Schiff base linkage. That the Schiff base linkage in the owlfly rhodopsin, like in bovine and in octopus, is protonated suggests that a charged chromophore is essential to visual transduction.

  9. Cyanobacterial Light-Driven Proton Pump, Gloeobacter Rhodopsin: Complementarity between Rhodopsin-Based Energy Production and Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ah Reum; Shi, Lichi; Brown, Leonid S.; Jung, Kwang-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    A homologue of type I rhodopsin was found in the unicellular Gloeobacter violaceus PCC7421, which is believed to be primitive because of the lack of thylakoids and peculiar morphology of phycobilisomes. The Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR) gene encodes a polypeptide of 298 amino acids. This gene is localized alone in the genome unlike cyanobacterium Anabaena opsin, which is clustered together with 14 kDa transducer gene. Amino acid sequence comparison of GR with other type I rhodopsin shows several conserved residues important for retinal binding and H+ pumping. In this study, the gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and bound all-trans retinal to form a pigment (λmax  = 544 nm at pH 7). The pKa of proton acceptor (Asp121) for the Schiff base, is approximately 5.9, so GR can translocate H+ under physiological conditions (pH 7.4). In order to prove the functional activity in the cell, pumping activity was measured in the sphaeroplast membranes of E. coli and one of Gloeobacter whole cell. The efficient proton pumping and rapid photocycle of GR strongly suggests that Gloeobacter rhodopsin functions as a proton pumping in its natural environment, probably compensating the shortage of energy generated by chlorophyll-based photosynthesis without thylakoids. PMID:25347537

  10. Rhodopsin molecular contrast imaging by optical coherence tomography for functional assessment of photoreceptors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafra, Zahra; Liu, Tan; Jiao, Shuliang

    2016-03-01

    Rhodopsin, the light-sensing molecule in the outer segments of rod photoreceptors, is responsible for converting light into neuronal signals in a process known as phototransduction. Rhodopsin is thus a functional biomarker for rod photoreceptors. We developed a novel technology based on visible-light optical coherence tomography (VIS-OCT) for in vivo molecular imaging of rhodopsin. The depth resolution of OCT allows the visualization of the location where the change of optical absorption occurs and provides a potentially accurate assessment of rhodopsin content by segmentation of the image at the location. A broadband supercontinuum laser, whose filtered output was centered at 520 nm, was used as the illuminating light source. To test the capabilities of the system on rhodopsin mapping we imaged the retina of albino rats. The rats were dark adapted before imaging. An integrated near infrared OCT was used to guide the alignment in dark. VIS-OCT three-dimensional images were then acquired under dark- and light- adapted states sequentially. Rhodopsin distribution was calculated from the differential image. The rhodopsin distributions can be displayed in both en face view and depth-resolved cross-sectional image. Rhodopsin OCT can be used to quantitatively image rhodopsin distribution and thus assess the distribution of functional rod photoreceptors in the retina. Rhodopsin OCT can bring significant impact into ophthalmic clinics by providing a tool for the diagnosis and severity assessment of a variety of retinal conditions.

  11. Structural, energetic, and mechanical perturbations in rhodopsin mutant that causes congenital stationary night blindness.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Shiho; Colozo, Alejandro T; Ge, Lin; Müller, Daniel J; Park, Paul S-H

    2012-06-22

    Several point mutations in rhodopsin cause retinal diseases including congenital stationary night blindness and retinitis pigmentosa. The mechanism by which a single amino acid residue substitution leads to dysfunction is poorly understood at the molecular level. A G90D point mutation in rhodopsin causes constitutive activity and leads to congenital stationary night blindness. It is unclear which perturbations the mutation introduces and how they can cause the receptor to be constitutively active. To reveal insight into these mechanisms, we characterized the perturbations introduced into dark state G90D rhodopsin from a transgenic mouse model expressing exclusively the mutant rhodopsin in rod photoreceptor cells. UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy revealed hydroxylamine accessibility to the chromophore-binding pocket of dark state G90D rhodopsin, which is not detected in dark state wild-type rhodopsin but is detected in light-activated wild-type rhodopsin. Single-molecule force spectroscopy suggested that the structural changes introduced by the mutation are small. Dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed that, compared with dark state wild-type rhodopsin, the G90D mutation decreased energetic stability and increased mechanical rigidity of most structural regions in the dark state mutant receptor. The observed structural, energetic, and mechanical changes in dark state G90D rhodopsin provide insights into the nature of perturbations caused by a pathological point mutation. Moreover, these changed properties observed for dark state G90D rhodopsin are consistent with properties expected for an active state. PMID:22549882

  12. Signals Governing the Trafficking and Mistrafficking of a Ciliary GPCR, Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Lodowski, Kerrie H.; Lee, Richard; Ropelewski, Philip; Nemet, Ina; Tian, Guilian

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a cilia-specific GPCR essential for vision. Rhodopsin mislocalization is associated with blinding diseases called retinal ciliopathies. The mechanism by which rhodopsin mislocalizes in rod photoreceptor neurons is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin mislocalization. Rhodopsin and its truncation mutants were fused to a photoconvertible fluorescent protein, Dendra2, and expressed in Xenopus laevis rod photoreceptors. Photoconversion of Dendra2 causes a color change from green to red, enabling visualization of the dynamic events associated with rhodopsin trafficking and renewal. We found that rhodopsin mislocalization is a facilitated process for which a signal located within 322–326 aa (CCGKN) is essential. An additional signal within 327–336 aa further facilitated the mislocalization. This collective mistrafficking signal confers toxicity to rhodopsin and causes mislocalization when the VXPX cilia-targeting motif is absent. We also determined that the VXPX motif neutralizes this mistrafficking signal, enhances ciliary targeting at least 10-fold, and accelerates trafficking of post-Golgi vesicular structures. In the absence of the VXPX motif, mislocalized rhodopsin is actively cleared through secretion of vesicles into the extracellular milieu. Therefore, this study unveiled the multiple roles of trafficking signals in rhodopsin localization and renewal. PMID:23966685

  13. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Berry, Justin D; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Cornwall, M Carter

    2016-07-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1(-/-)), Arr1-deficient (Arr1(-/-)), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1(ox)) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1(ox) rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo. PMID:27353443

  14. Spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in retinal rod outer segment membranes studied by spin-labeling and pulsed electron double resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Hara, Hideyuki; Tokunaga, Fumio; Arata, Toshiaki

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of spin labeling and PELDOR to measure inter-rhodopsin distance in ROS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong decay of PELDOR signal indicated a high density (mM range) of rhodopsin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decay was modeled by rhodopsin monomers dispersed in a planar membrane. -- Abstract: We have determined the spatial arrangement of rhodopsin in the retinal rod outer segment (ROS) membrane by measuring the distances between rhodopsin molecules in which native cysteines were spin-labeled at {approx}1.0 mol/mol rhodopsin. The echo modulation decay of pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) from spin-labeled ROS curved slightly with strong background decay. This indicated that the rhodopsin was densely packed in the retina and that the rhodopsin molecules were not aligned well. The curve was simulated by a model in which rhodopsin is distributed randomly as monomers in a planar membrane.

  15. Restoration of carbon and microbial activity in salt-induced soil by application of peanut shell biochar during short-term incubation study.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Debarati; Saha, Ajoy; Desai, Deepali; Meena, H N

    2016-04-01

    For the present study, soil samples of four artificially-induced salinity gradients (S0: control, S1: 2.0, S2: 4.0, S3: 6.0 ECiw) was incubated with fine-textured peanut shell biochar at various ratios (B0: control, B1: 2.5%, B2: 5.0%, B3: 10% w/w) for 30 days. At 1, 3, 7, 15, 30 days of incubation, samples were analyzed for soil carbon and selected enzyme activities. Results showed that biochar could increase soil organic carbon on application of highest rate of biochar addition (B3), hence potentially restored the saline soils by less C mineralization, and more sequestration of soil C. However, soil enzyme activities were biochar rate(s), day(s) of incubation and enzyme dependent. The lowest rate of biochar addition (B1) showed highest dehydrogenase (20.5 μg TPF g(-1) soil h(-1)), acid phosphatase (29.1 μg PNP g(-1) soil h(-1)) and alkaline phosphatase (16.1 μg PNP g(-1) soil h(-1)) whereas the higher rate (B2) increased the urease (5.51 μg urea-N g(-1) soil h(-1)) and fluorescein diacetate hydrolyzing activities (3.95 μg fluorescein g(-1) OD soil h(-1)) in soil. All the positive changes persisted at higher levels of salinity (S2, S3) suggesting biochar-amended soil may be potential for better nutrient cycling. Soil enzymes were found to be correlated with soil carbon and with each other while principal component analysis (PCA) extracted the most sensitive parameters as the acid and alkaline phosphatases and urease activities in the present experimental condition. This is the first time report of examining soil microbial environment using peanut shell biochar under a degraded (saline) soil. PMID:26802267

  16. QM/MM Study of Dehydro and Dihydro β-Ionone Retinal Analogues in Squid and Bovine Rhodopsins: Implications for Vision in Salamander Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Altun, Ahmet; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Visual pigment rhodopsin provides a decisive crossing point for interaction between organisms and environment. Naturally occurring visual pigments contain only PSB11 and 3,4-dehydro-PSB11 as chromophores. Therefore, the ability of visual opsin to discriminate between the retinal geometries is investigated by means of QM/MM incorporation of PSB11, 6-s-cis and 6-s-trans forms of 3,4-dehydro-PSB11, 3,4-dehydro-5,6-dihydro-PSB11, 5,6-dihydro-PSB11 analogues into squid and bovine rhodopsin environments. The analogue-protein interaction reveals the binding site of squid rhodopsin to be malleable and ductile, while that of bovine rhodopsin to be rigid and stiff. On the basis of these studies, a tentative model of salamander rhodopsin binding site is also proposed. PMID:20964383

  17. The plant pathology of native plant restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restoration of ecologically degraded sites will benefit from the convergence of knowledge drawn from such disparate and often compartmentalized (and heretofore not widely considered) areas of research as soil microbial ecology, plant pathology and agronomy. Restoration following biological control w...

  18. Rhodopsin Forms Nanodomains in Rod Outer Segment Disc Membranes of the Cold-Blooded Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Tatini; Senapati, Subhadip; Sinha, Satyabrata; Whited, A M; Park, Paul S-H

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin forms nanoscale domains (i.e., nanodomains) in rod outer segment disc membranes from mammalian species. It is unclear whether rhodopsin arranges in a similar manner in amphibian species, which are often used as a model system to investigate the function of rhodopsin and the structure of photoreceptor cells. Moreover, since samples are routinely prepared at low temperatures, it is unclear whether lipid phase separation effects in the membrane promote the observed nanodomain organization of rhodopsin from mammalian species. Rod outer segment disc membranes prepared from the cold-blooded frog Xenopus laevis were investigated by atomic force microscopy to visualize the organization of rhodopsin in the absence of lipid phase separation effects. Atomic force microscopy revealed that rhodopsin nanodomains form similarly as that observed previously in mammalian membranes. Formation of nanodomains in ROS disc membranes is independent of lipid phase separation and conserved among vertebrates. PMID:26492040

  19. Rhodopsin Kinase Activity in the Mammalian Pineal Gland and Other Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Robert L.; Klein, David C.

    1984-10-01

    Rhodopsin kinase, an enzyme involved in photochemical transduction in the retina, has been found in the mammalian pineal gland in amounts equal to those in the retina; other tissues had 7 percent of this amount, or less. This finding suggests that, in mammals, rhodopsin kinase functions in the pineal gland and other tissues to phosphorylate rhodopsin-like integral membrane receptors and is thereby involved in signal transduction.

  20. A Photoisomerizing Rhodopsin Mimic Observed at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Meisam; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H

    2016-07-20

    The members of the rhodopsin family of proteins are involved in many essential light-dependent processes in biology. Specific photoisomerization of the protein-bound retinylidene PSB at a specified wavelength range of light is at the heart of all of these systems. Nonetheless, it has been difficult to reproduce in an engineered system. We have developed rhodopsin mimics, using intracellular lipid binding protein family members as scaffolds, to study fundamental aspects of protein/chromophore interactions. Herein we describe a system that specifically isomerizes the retinylidene protonated Schiff base both thermally and photochemically. This isomerization has been characterized at atomic resolution by quantitatively interconverting the isomers in the crystal both thermally and photochemically. This event is accompanied by a large pKa change of the imine similar to the pKa changes observed in bacteriorhodopsin and visual opsins during isomerization. PMID:27310917

  1. Explaining the mobility of retinal in activated rhodopsin and opsin.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Blake; Feng, Jun; Corcoran, Conor; Neeley, Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Rhodopsin, the mammalian dim light photoreceptor, is the canonical model for G protein-coupled receptors. Activation of rhodopsin occurs when the covalently bound inverse agonist, retinal, absorbs a photon and undergoes an 11-cis to all-trans isomerization. Two critical components of the visual cycle occur with the (1) hydrolytic release of all-trans retinaldehyde and subsequent (2) uptake of 11-cis retinaldehyde to reform the Schiff base linkage in the apoprotein opsin. Two pores on the surface of opsin are connected via the retinal channel, as discovered upon solution of the X-ray crystal structure (Park et al., Nature, 2008), and could serve as potential entryways for uptake and release. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we examined the behavior of rhodopsin in the Meta-II conformation (active) under Meta-I conditions (inactive), and discovered that the retinal binding pocket is flexible enough to allow a 180° rotation along the long axis of the retinal polyene chain. This result reconciles a discrepancy between the known polyene chain orientation from crystallographic and spectroscopic studies and opens the door for further investigation into the intermolecular interactions between the retinal ligand and the apoprotein opsin. Subsequent docking studies of both isomers of retinal into the opsin channel were then conducted to identify the mechanism for uptake and release. Our results suggest that retinal undergoes unidirectional uptake through Pore A and release through Pore B, and that aromatic sidechain interactions play a key role in stabilizing retinal within the opsin channel. These findings are significant in developing our understanding of the retinoid cycle and how ligand-receptor interactions in rhodopsin relate to G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:26248892

  2. Modelling vibrational coherence in the primary rhodopsin photoproduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingart, O.; Garavelli, M.

    2012-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the rhodopsin photoreaction reveal coherent low frequency oscillations in the primary photoproduct (photorhodopsin), with frequencies slightly higher than observed in the experiment. The coherent molecular motions in the batho-precursor can be attributed to the activation of ground state vibrational modes in the hot photo-product, involving out-of-plane deformations of the carbon skeleton. Results are discussed and compared with respect to spectroscopic data and suggested reaction mechanisms.

  3. Localization of the retinal protonated Schiff base counterion in rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Han, M.; DeDecker, B. S.; Smith, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    Semiempirical molecular orbital calculations are combined with 13C NMR chemical shifts to localize the counterion in the retinal binding site of vertebrate rhodopsin. Charge densities along the polyene chain are calculated for an 11-cis-retinylidene protonated Schiff base (11-cis-RPSB) chromophore with 1) a chloride counterion at various distances from the Schiff base nitrogen, 2) one or two chloride counterions at different positions along the retinal chain from C10 to C15 and at the Schiff base nitrogen, and 3) a carboxylate counterion out of the retinal plane near C12. Increasing the distance of the negative counterion from the Schiff base results in an enhancement of alternating negative and positive partial charge on the even- and odd-numbered carbons, respectively, when compared to the 11-cis-RPSB chloride model compound. In contrast, the observed 13C NMR data of rhodopsin exhibit downfield chemical shifts from C8 to C13 relative to the 11-cis-RPSB.Cl corresponding to a net increase of partial positive or decrease of partial negative charge at these positions (Smith, S. O., I. Palings, M. E. Miley, J. Courtin, H. de Groot, J. Lugtenburg, R. A. Mathies, and R. G. Griffin. 1990. Biochemistry. 29:8158-8164). The anomalous changes in charge density reflected in the rhodopsin NMR chemical shifts can be qualitatively modeled by placing a single negative charge above C12. The calculated fit improves when a carboxylate counterion is used to model the retinal binding site. Inclusion of water in the model does not alter the fit to the NMR data, although it is consistent with observations based on other methods. These data constrain the location and the orientation of the Glu113 side chain, which is known to be the counterion in rhodopsin, and argue for a strong interaction centered at C12 of the retinylidene chain. PMID:8105993

  4. Rhodopsin Photoactivation Dynamics Revealed by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchhithranga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision. During photoactivation, the chromophore retinal dissociates from protein yielding the opsin apoprotein. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks individual hydrogen atom motion because of the much higher neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen than other atoms. We used protein with CHAPS detergent hydrated with heavy water. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. The QENS experiments at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate an increase in protein dynamic behavior with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin is faster compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which unlike protein, manifests localized motions.

  5. Probing the Photodynamics of Rhodopsins with Reduced Retinal Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Manathunga, Madushanka; Yang, Xuchun; Luk, Hoi Ling; Gozem, Samer; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Valentini, Alessio; Ferrè, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    While the light-induced population dynamics of different photoresponsive proteins has been investigated spectroscopically, systematic computational studies have not yet been possible due to the phenomenally high cost of suitable high level quantum chemical methods and the need of propagating hundreds, if not thousands, of nonadiabatic trajectories. Here we explore the possibility of studying the photodynamics of rhodopsins by constructing and investigating quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) models featuring reduced retinal chromophores. In order to do so we use the sensory rhodopsin found in the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120 (ASR) as a benchmark system. We find that the basic mechanistic features associated with the excited state dynamics of ASR QM/MM models are reproduced using models incorporating a minimal (i.e., three double-bond) chromophore. Furthermore, we show that ensembles of nonadiabatic ASR trajectories computed using the same abridged models replicate, at both the CASPT2 and CASSCF levels of theory, the trends in spectroscopy and lifetimes estimated using unabridged models and observed experimentally at room temperature. We conclude that a further expansion of these studies may lead to low-cost QM/MM rhodopsin models that may be used as effective tools in high-throughput in silico mutant screening. PMID:26640959

  6. Molecular complexes that direct rhodopsin transport to primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Deretic, Dusanka

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a key molecular constituent of photoreceptor cells, yet understanding of how it regulates photoreceptor membrane trafficking and biogenesis of light-sensing organelles, the rod outer segments (ROS) is only beginning to emerge. Recently identified sequence of well-orchestrated molecular interactions of rhodopsin with the functional networks of Arf and Rab GTPases at multiple stages of intracellular targeting fits well into the complex framework of the biogenesis and maintenance of primary cilia, of which the ROS is one example. This review will discuss the latest progress in dissecting the molecular complexes that coordinate rhodopsin incorporation into ciliary-targeted carriers with the recruitment and activation of membrane tethering complexes and regulators of fusion with the periciliary plasma membrane. In addition to revealing the fundamental principals of ciliary membrane renewal, recent advances also provide molecular insight into the ways by which disruptions of the exquisitely orchestrated interactions lead to cilia dysfunction and result in human retinal dystrophies and syndromic diseases that affect multiple organs, including the eyes. PMID:24135424

  7. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  8. In vivo imaging rhodopsin distribution in the photoreceptors with nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Liu, Xiaojing; Wen, Rong; Lam, Byron L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhodopsin is a biomarker for the function of rod photoreceptors, the dysfunction of which is related to many blinding diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Imaging rhodopsin quantitatively may provide a powerful clinical tool for diagnosis of these diseases. To map rhodopsin distribution accurately in the retina, absorption by rhodopsin intermediates need to be minimized. Methods and materials We developed nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) to image rhodopsin distribution in the retina. The system takes advantage of the light-induced shift of rhodopsin absorption spectra, which in turn affects the fundus spectral reflection before and after photo-bleaching. By imaging the retina twice, one in the dark-adapted state and the other one in the light-adapted state, the rhodopsin absorption change can be calculated from the differential image, which is a function of the rhodopsin concentration in the rod photoreceptors. Results The system was successfully applied to in vivo imaging of rat retina in different bleaching conditions to verify its feasibility. Our studies showed that the differential image between the dark- and light-adapted states represents rhodopsin distribution in the retina. We also conducted a dynamic bleaching experiment to prove the importance of reducing light absorption of rhodopsin intermediates. Conclusions The preliminary results showed that our nano-second pulsed-light SLO is promising in imaging the functional biomarker of the rod photoreceptors. By using nanosecond pulsed laser, in which one laser pulse generates one pixel of the image, the absorption of rhodopsin intermediates can be reduced. PMID:25694955

  9. C-terminal peptides of rhodopsin. Determination of the optimum sequence for recognition of retinal transducin.

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, D J; Morrison, D; Davis, L C; Takemoto, L J

    1986-01-01

    In vertebrate retinal rod outer segments, transducin, a guanine-nucleotide-binding protein, mediates signal coupling between rhodopsin and cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase. Whereas the T alpha subunit (39 kDa) of transducin binds guanine nucleotides and is the activator of the phosphodiesterase, the T beta gamma subunits (35 and 10 kDa) may function to physically link T alpha with photolysed rhodopsin. We have previously reported that a site of binding of transducin is on the C-terminus of bovine rhodopsin. By using competition with synthetic peptides, the recognition region was localized to bovine opsin amino acid residues 317-339. Further studies are detailed which determine the boundaries of this binding site on rhodopsin, as well as some of the critical amino acids needed for transducin binding. These results suggest that the serine and threonine residues in the rhodopsin C-terminal peptides Rhod-1 and Rhod-3 are critical for reconstitution of transducin GTPase activity. PMID:3461782

  10. The electric dipole moment of rhodopsin solubilized in Triton X-100.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, D C; Cone, R A

    1975-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of solubilized rhodopsin was determined with dielectric dispersion measurements. Rhodopsin was extracted from disc membranes of cattle rod outer segments with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. The dipole moment of rhodopsin at its isoionic point in the detergent micelle is 720 D (150 charge-A). This value is comparable to dipole moments of nonmembrane proteins, especially those which tend to aggregate or polymerize. Flash irradiation of the rhodopsin results in an increase in the dipole moment of about 25 D (5 charge-A). The light-induced increase in dipole moment appears to be composed of two parts--a faster component related to a change in the number of protons bound by rhodopsin and a slower component apparently independent of the change in proton binding. PMID:1203446

  11. Comparative Mutagenesis Studies of Retinal Release in Light-Activated Zebrafish Rhodopsin Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morrow, J M; Chang, B S W

    2015-07-28

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment responsible for initiating scotopic (dim-light) vision in vetebrates. Once activated by light, release of all-trans-retinal from rhodopsin involves hydrolysis of the Schiff base linkage, followed by dissociation of retinal from the protein moiety. This kinetic process has been well studied in model systems such as bovine rhodopsin, but not in rhodopsins from cold-blooded animals, where physiological temperatures can vary considerably. Here, we characterize the rate of retinal release from light-activated rhodopsin in an ectotherm, zebrafish (Danio rerio), demonstrating in a fluorescence assay that this process occurs more than twice as fast as bovine rhodopsin at similar temperatures in 0.1% dodecyl maltoside. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that differences in retinal release rates can be attributed to a series of variable residues lining the retinal channel in three key structural motifs: an opening in metarhodopsin II between transmembrane helix 5 (TM5) and TM6, in TM3 near E122, and in the "retinal plug" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2). The majority of these sites are more proximal to the β-ionone ring of retinal than the Schiff base, indicating their influence on retinal release is more likely due to steric effects during retinal dissociation, rather than alterations to Schiff base stability. An Arrhenius plot of zebrafish rhodopsin was consistent with this model, inferring that the activation energy for Schiff base hydrolysis is similar to that of bovine rhodopsin. Functional variation at key sites identified in this study is consistent with the idea that retinal release might be an adaptive property of rhodopsin in vertebrates. Our study is one of the few investigating a nonmammalian rhodopsin, which will help establish a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms contributing to vision in cold-blooded vertebrates. PMID:26098991

  12. Characterization of the primary photointermediates of Drosophila rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Vought, B W; Salcedo, E; Chadwell, L V; Britt, S G; Birge, R R; Knox, B E

    2000-11-21

    Invertebrate opsins are unique among the visual pigments because the light-activated conformation, metarhodopsin, is stable following exposure to light in vivo. Recovery of the light-activated pigment to the dark conformation (or resting state) occurs either thermally or photochemically. There is no evidence to suggest that the chromophore becomes detached from the protein during any stage in the formation or recovery processes. Biochemical and structural studies of invertebrate opsins have been limited by the inability to express and purify rhodopsins for structure-function studies. In this study, we used Drosophila to produce an epitope-tagged opsin, Rh1-1D4, in quantities suitable for spectroscopic and photochemical characterization. When expressed in Drosophila, Rh1-1D4 is localized to the rhabdomere membranes, has the same spectral properties in vivo as wild-type Rh1, and activates the phototransduction cascade in a normal manner. Purified Rh1-1D4 visual pigment has an absorption maximum of the dark-adapted state of 474 nm, while the metarhodopsin absorption maximum is 572 nm. However, the metarhodopsin state is not stable as purified in dodecyl maltoside but decays with kinetics that require a double-exponential fit having lifetimes of 280 and 2700 s. We investigated the primary properties of the pigment at low temperature. At 70 K, the pigment undergoes a temperature-induced red shift to 486 nm. Upon illumination with 435 nm light, a photostationary state mixture is formed consisting of bathorhodopsin (lambda(max) = 545 nm) and isorhodopsin (lambda(max) = 462 nm). We also compared the spectroscopic and photochemical properties of this pigment with other vertebrate pigments. We conclude that the binding site of Drosophila rhodopsin is similar to that of bovine rhodopsin and is characterized by a protonated Schiff base chromophore stabilized via a single negatively charged counterion. PMID:11087361

  13. Rhodopsin in the rod surface membrane regenerates more rapidly than bulk rhodopsin in the disc membranes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Christopher; Tillman, Megan; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2014-07-01

    Sustained vertebrate vision requires that opsin chromophores isomerized by light to the all-trans form be replaced with 11-cis retinal to regenerate the visual pigment. We have characterized the early receptor potential (ERP), a component of the electroretinogram arising from photoisomerization-induced charge displacements in plasma membrane visual pigment, and used it to measure pigment bleaching and regeneration in living mice. The mouse ERP was characterized by an outward 'R2' charge displacement with a time constant of 215 μs that discharged through a membrane with an apparent time constant of ∼0.6 ms. After complete bleaching of rhodopsin, the ERP recovered in two phases. The initial, faster phase had a time constant of ∼1 min, accounted for ∼20% of the total, and was not dependent on the level of expression of the retinal pigment epithelium isomerase, Rpe65. The slower, complementary phase had a time constant of 23 min in wild-type (WT) mice (C57Bl/6) and was substantially slowed in Rpe65(+/-) mice. Comparison of the ERPs of a mouse line expressing 150% of the normal level of cone M-opsin with those of WT mice revealed that M-opsin contributed 26% of the total WT ERP in these experiments, with the remaining 74% arising from rhodopsin. Thus, the fast regenerating fraction (20%) corresponds approximately to the fraction of the total ERP independently estimated to arise from M-opsin. Because both phases of the ERP recover substantially faster than previous measurements of bulk rhodopsin regeneration in living mice, we conclude that delivery of the highly hydrophobic 11-cis retinal to the interior of rod photoreceptors appears to be retarded by transit across the cytoplasmic gap between plasma and disc membranes. PMID:24801306

  14. Rhodopsin in the rod surface membrane regenerates more rapidly than bulk rhodopsin in the disc membranes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Christopher; Tillman, Megan; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2014-01-01

    Sustained vertebrate vision requires that opsin chromophores isomerized by light to the all-trans form be replaced with 11-cis retinal to regenerate the visual pigment. We have characterized the early receptor potential (ERP), a component of the electroretinogram arising from photoisomerization-induced charge displacements in plasma membrane visual pigment, and used it to measure pigment bleaching and regeneration in living mice. The mouse ERP was characterized by an outward ‘R2’ charge displacement with a time constant of 215 μs that discharged through a membrane with an apparent time constant of ∼0.6 ms. After complete bleaching of rhodopsin, the ERP recovered in two phases. The initial, faster phase had a time constant of ∼1 min, accounted for ∼20% of the total, and was not dependent on the level of expression of the retinal pigment epithelium isomerase, Rpe65. The slower, complementary phase had a time constant of 23 min in wild-type (WT) mice (C57Bl/6) and was substantially slowed in Rpe65+/− mice. Comparison of the ERPs of a mouse line expressing 150% of the normal level of cone M-opsin with those of WT mice revealed that M-opsin contributed 26% of the total WT ERP in these experiments, with the remaining 74% arising from rhodopsin. Thus, the fast regenerating fraction (20%) corresponds approximately to the fraction of the total ERP independently estimated to arise from M-opsin. Because both phases of the ERP recover substantially faster than previous measurements of bulk rhodopsin regeneration in living mice, we conclude that delivery of the highly hydrophobic 11-cis retinal to the interior of rod photoreceptors appears to be retarded by transit across the cytoplasmic gap between plasma and disc membranes. PMID:24801306

  15. Periodontal restorative interrelationships: the isolated restoration.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1985-06-01

    Only by controlling plaque early and consistently, before periodontal and restorative problems require intervention in the form of a full prosthetic and periodontal reconstruction, the continued maintenance of a full dentition is assured. Plaque control is not merely continued prophylaxes, but a striving for a healthy biologic situation with the placement of every restoration. This is attainable only through ensuring a normal attachment apparatus and establishing that all restorative margins be accessible to plaque control measures. Deep, subgingival restorations are not only difficult to place and finish correctly, but, by providing an environment conducive to microbial plaque retention and proliferation, also lead to inflammatory periodontal destruction and recurrent carious lesions. Early detection, although difficult, is essential to avoid excessive destruction of the tooth and its supporting structures. A deterrent to early detection may be the response of the patient's tissue. Paradoxically, if the patient's periodontal tissues respond in a fibrotic manner to early gingival inflammation, rather than in a dramatic, edematous manner, the situation may appear clinically healthy. Waerhaug discussed "submarginal gingivitis," a situation in which the tissue will appear pink and firm, elicit to exudate or bleeding on probing, and mimic healthy to the casual examiner. When this is coupled with the difficulty inherent in detecting early recurrent carious lesions, resulting from the radiographic superimposition of the existing restoration or the deep subgingival extent of the restoration, the situation becomes all the more demanding of the practitioner's efforts. PMID:3860551

  16. Photoreactions and Structural Changes of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is an archaeal-type rhodopsin found in eubacteria. The gene encoding ASR forms a single operon with ASRT (ASR transducer) which is a 14 kDa soluble protein, suggesting that ASR functions as a photochromic sensor by activating the soluble transducer. This article reviews the detailed photoreaction processes of ASR, which were studied by low-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The former research reveals that the retinal isomerization is similar to bacteriorhodopsin (BR), but the hydrogen-bonding network around the Schiff base and cytoplasmic region is different. The latter study shows the stable photoproduct of the all-trans form is 100% 13-cis, and that of the 13-cis form is 100% all-trans. These results suggest that the structural changes of ASR in the cytoplasmic domain play important roles in the activation of the transducer protein, and photochromic reaction is optimized for its sensor function. PMID:22303148

  17. Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is a light-driven unidirectional rotor

    PubMed Central

    Strambi, Angela; Durbeej, Bo; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of multiconfigurational quantum chemistry methods into a quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics protocol has allowed the construction of a realistic computer model for the sensory rhodopsin of the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120. The model, which reproduces the absorption spectra of both the all-trans and 13-cis forms of the protein and their associated K and L intermediates, is employed to investigate the light-driven steps of the photochromic cycle exhibited by the protein. It is found that the photoisomerizations of the all-trans and 13-cis retinal chromophores occur through unidirectional, counterclockwise 180° rotations of the ═C14─C15═ moiety with respect to the Lys210-linked end of the chromophore axis. Thus, the sequential interconversions of the all-trans and 13-cis forms during a single photochromic cycle yield a complete (360°) unidirectional rotation of the ═C14─C15═ moiety. This finding implies that Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is a biological realization of a light-driven molecular rotor. PMID:21098308

  18. Nuclear Wavepacket Propogation Model for the Retinal Chromophore in Rhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corn, Brittany; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2009-05-01

    Rhodopsin, consisting of a retinal chromophore and a protein opsin, is responsible for the first steps in the vision process through a cis to trans photoisomerization, which is completed within 200 fs[1]. Efforts to control the ultrafast dynamics of this molecule have been carried out experimentally[2] as well as through quantum mechanical modeling of nuclear wave packet propagation[3]. We propose a two state model in which the ground electronic Potential Energy Surface (PES) is made up of two adjacent harmonic potentials, representing the cis and trans retinal saddle points, as well as an excited PES, characterized by the Morse potential, which meets the ground PES at a conical intersection. We explore the achievement of a high quantum yield of the trans retinal configuration by varying parameters of the external field and choosing the most adequate shape. Another investigation is presented in which we compare the charge distribution of cis and trans retinal in order to reveal a charge transfer mechanism behind the isomerization of rhodopsin. The results of the Lowdin and Natural Population Analyses demonstrate a significant transfer of charge in and around the isomerization region. [1] RW Schoenlein, LA Peteanu, RA Mathies, CV Shank, Science 254, 412 (1991) [2] VI Prokhorenko, AM Nagy, SA Waschuk, LS Brown, RR Birge, RJD Miller, Science 313, 1257 (2006) [3] S Hahn, G Stock, Chem Phys 259, 297-312 (2000)

  19. Intramolecular Interactions That Induce Helical Rearrangement upon Rhodopsin Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Yoichi; Nagata, Tomoko; Terakita, Akihisa; Kandori, Hideki; Shichida, Yoshinori; Imamoto, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin undergoes rearrangements of its transmembrane helices after photon absorption to transfer a light signal to the G-protein transducin. To investigate the mechanism by which rhodopsin adopts the transducin-activating conformation, the local environmental changes in the transmembrane region were probed using the cysteine S-H group, whose stretching frequency is well isolated from the other protein vibrational modes. The S-H stretching modes of cysteine residues introduced into Helix III, which contains several key residues for the helical movements, and of native cysteine residues were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This method was applied to metarhodopsin IIa, a precursor of the transducin-activating state in which the intramolecular interactions are likely to produce a state ready for helical movements. No environmental change was observed near the ionic lock between Arg-135 in Helix III and Glu-247 in Helix VI that maintains the inactive conformation. Rather, the cysteine residues that showed environmental changes were located around the chromophore, Ala-164, His-211, and Phe-261. These findings imply that the hydrogen bond between Helix III and Helix V involving Glu-122 and His-211 and the hydrophobic packing between Helix III and Helix VI involving Gly-121, Leu-125, Phe-261, and Trp-265 are altered before the helical rearrangement leading toward the active conformation. PMID:24692562

  20. A role for direct interactions in the modulation of rhodopsin by -3 polyunsaturated lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossfield, Alan; Feller, Scott E.; Pitman, Michael C.

    2006-03-01

    Rhodopsin, the G protein-coupled receptor primarily responsible for sensing light, is found in an environment rich in polyunsaturated lipid chains and cholesterol. Biophysical experiments have shown that lipid unsaturation and cholesterol both have significant effects on rhodopsin's stability and function; -3 polyunsaturated chains, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), destabilize rhodopsin and enhance the kinetics of the photocycle, whereas cholesterol has the opposite effect. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the possibility that polyunsaturated chains modulate rhodopsin stability and kinetics via specific direct interactions. By analyzing the results of 26 independent 100-ns simulations of dark-adapted rhodopsin, we found that DHA routinely forms tight associations with the protein in a small number of specific locations qualitatively different from the nonspecific interactions made by saturated chains and cholesterol. Furthermore, the presence of tightly packed DHA molecules tends to weaken the interhelical packing. These results are consistent with recent NMR work, which proposes that rhodopsin binds DHA, and they suggest a molecular rationale for DHA's effects on rhodopsin stability and kinetics. cholesterol | molecular dynamics | fatty acid | protein-lipid interactions

  1. Covalent Bond between Ligand and Receptor Required for Efficient Activation in Rhodopsin*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Take; Yamashita, Takahiro; Imai, Hiroo; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is an extensively studied member of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although rhodopsin shares many features with the other GPCRs, it exhibits unique features as a photoreceptor molecule. A hallmark in the molecular structure of rhodopsin is the covalently bound chromophore that regulates the activity of the receptor acting as an agonist or inverse agonist. Here we show the pivotal role of the covalent bond between the retinal chromophore and the lysine residue at position 296 in the activation pathway of bovine rhodopsin, by use of a rhodopsin mutant K296G reconstituted with retinylidene Schiff bases. Our results show that photoreceptive functions of rhodopsin, such as regiospecific photoisomerization of the ligand, and its quantum yield were not affected by the absence of the covalent bond, whereas the activation mechanism triggered by photoisomerization of the retinal was severely affected. Furthermore, our results show that an active state similar to the Meta-II intermediate of wild-type rhodopsin did not form in the bleaching process of this mutant, although it exhibited relatively weak G protein activity after light irradiation because of an increased basal activity of the receptor. We propose that the covalent bond is required for transmitting structural changes from the photoisomerized agonist to the receptor and that the covalent bond forcibly keeps the low affinity agonist in the receptor, resulting in a more efficient G protein activation. PMID:20042594

  2. Picosecond kinetic absorption and fluorescence studies of bovine rhodopsin with a fixed 11-ene.

    PubMed Central

    Buchert, J; Stefancic, V; Doukas, A G; Alfano, R R; Callender, R H; Pande, J; Akita, H; Balogh-Nair, V; Nakanishi, K

    1983-01-01

    A synthetic retinal having a fixed 11-cis geometry has been used to prepare a nonbleachable analogue of bovine rhodopsin. Marked differences in the picosecond absorption and fluorescence behavior of this analogue at room temperature, compared with that of natural rhodopsin, were observed. This not only indicates that the 11-cis to trans isomerization of the retinal moiety is the crucial primary event in the photolysis of rhodopsin, but also it establishes that this isomerization must occur on the picosecond time scale or faster. PMID:6626668

  3. Relocating the active-site lysine in rhodopsin and implications for evolution of retinylidene proteins

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Erin L.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Theobald, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Type I and type II rhodopsins share several structural features including a G protein-coupled receptor fold and a highly conserved active-site Lys residue in the seventh transmembrane segment of the protein. However, the two families lack significant sequence similarity that would indicate common ancestry. Consequently, the rhodopsin fold and conserved Lys are widely thought to have arisen from functional constraints during convergent evolution. To test for the existence of such a constraint, we asked whether it were possible to relocate the highly conserved Lys296 in the visual pigment bovine rhodopsin. We show here that the Lys can be moved to three other locations in the protein while maintaining the ability to form a pigment with 11-cis-retinal and activate the G protein transducin in a light-dependent manner. These results contradict the convergent hypothesis and support the homology of type I and type II rhodopsins by divergent evolution from a common ancestral protein. PMID:23904486

  4. Electrophysiological measurement of the number of rhodopsin molecules in single Limulus photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Two partly independent electrophysiological methods are described for measuring the number of rhodopsin molecules (R) in single ventral photoreceptors. Method 1 is based on measurements of the relative intensity required to elicit a quantal response and the relative intensity required to half-saturate the early receptor potential (ERP). Method 2 is based on measurements of the absolute intensity required to elicit a quantal response. Both methods give values of R approximately equal to 10(9). From these and other measurements, estimates are derived for the surface density of rhodopsin (8,000/micrometer2), the charge movement during the ERP per isomerized rhodopsin (20 X 10(-21) C), and the half-time for thermal isomerization of rhodopsin (36yr). PMID:591915

  5. The supramolecular structure of the GPCR rhodopsin in solution and native disc membranes

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kitaru; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Engel, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    Summary Rhodopsin, the prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, which is densely packed in the disc membranes of rod outer segments, was proposed to function as a monomer. However, a growing body of evidence indicates dimerization and oligomerization of numerous G-protein-coupled receptors, and atomic force microscopy images revealed rows of rhodopsin dimers in murine disc membranes. In this work we demonstrate by electron microscopy of negatively stained samples, blue native- and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, chemical crosslinking, and by proteolysis that native bovine rhodopsin exists mainly as dimers and higher oligomers. These results corroborate the recent findings from atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling on the supramolecular structure and packing arrangement of murine rhodopsin dimers. PMID:15764373

  6. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Bacteriorhodopsin and Rhodopsin: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Balu, R.; Zhang, H.; Zukowski, E.; Chen, J.-Y.; Markelz, A. G.; Gregurick, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the low-frequency terahertz spectroscopy of two photoactive protein systems, rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin, as a means to characterize collective low-frequency motions in helical transmembrane proteins. From this work, we found that the nature of the vibrational motions activated by terahertz radiation is surprisingly similar between these two structurally similar proteins. Specifically, at the lowest frequencies probed, the cytoplasmic loop regions of the proteins are highly active; and at the higher terahertz frequencies studied, the extracellular loop regions of the protein systems become vibrationally activated. In the case of bacteriorhodopsin, the calculated terahertz spectra are compared with the experimental terahertz signature. This work illustrates the importance of terahertz spectroscopy to identify vibrational degrees of freedom which correlate to known conformational changes in these proteins. PMID:18199669

  7. Photochemical chromophore isomerization in histidine kinase rhodopsin HKR1.

    PubMed

    Luck, Meike; Bruun, Sara; Keidel, Anke; Hegemann, Peter; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-04-28

    Histidine kinase rhodopsin 1 is a photoreceptor in green algae functioning as a UV-light sensor. It switches between a UV-absorbing state (Rh-UV) and a blue-absorbing state (Rh-Bl) with a protonated retinal Schiff base (RSB) cofactor in a mixture of 13-trans,15-anti and 13-cis,15-syn isomers. The present spectroscopic study now shows that cofactor-protein assembly stabilizes the protonated 13-trans,15-anti RSB isomer. Formation of the active photoswitch requires the photoinduced conversion to Rh-UV. The transitions between the Rh-Bl isomers and the deprotonated 13-cis,15-anti and 13-trans,15-syn isomers of Rh-UV proceed via multiple photoisomerizations of one or simultaneously two double bonds. PMID:25836735

  8. Kinetically resolved states of the Halobacterium halobium flagellar motor switch and modulation of the switch by sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    McCain, D A; Amici, L A; Spudich, J L

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous switching of the rotation sense of the flagellar motor of the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium and modulation of the switch by attractant and repellent photostimuli were analyzed by using a computerized cell-tracking system with 67-ms resolution coupled to electronic shutters. The data fit a three-state model of the switch, in which a Poisson process governs the transition from state N (nonreversing) to state R (reversing). After a reversal, the switch returns to state N, passing through an intermediate state I (inactive), which produces a ca. 2-s period of low reversal frequency before the state N Poisson rate is restored. The stochastic nature of the H. halobium switch reveals a close similarity to Escherichia coli flagellar motor properties as elucidated previously. Sensory modulation of the switch by both photoattractant and photorepellent signals can be interpreted in terms of modulation of the single forward rate constant of the N to R transition. Insight into the mechanism of modulation by the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SR-I) was gained by increasing the lifetime of the principal photointermediate of the SR-I photochemical reaction cycle, S373, by replacing the native chromophore, all-trans-retinal, with the acyclic analog, 3,7,11-trimethyl-2,4,6,8-dodecapentaenal. Flash photolysis of analog-containing cells revealed an eightfold decrease in the rate of thermal decay of S373, and behavioral analysis showed longer periods of reversal suppression than that of cells with the native chromophore over similar ranges of illumination intensities. This indicates that attractant signaling is governed by the lifetime of the S373 intermediate rather than by the frequency of photocycling. In this sense, SR-I is similar to rhodopsin, whose function depends on an active photoproduct (Meta-II). PMID:3654583

  9. Normal and Mutant Rhodopsin Activation Measured with the Early Receptor Current in a Unicellular Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Pragati; Sullivan, Jack M.

    1999-01-01

    The early receptor current (ERC) represents molecular charge movement during rhodopsin conformational dynamics. To determine whether this time-resolved assay can probe various aspects of structure–function relationships in rhodopsin, we first measured properties of expressed normal human rhodopsin with ERC recordings. These studies were conducted in single fused giant cells containing on the order of a picogram of regenerated pigment. The action spectrum of the ERC of normal human opsin regenerated with 11-cis-retinal was fit by the human rhodopsin absorbance spectrum. Successive flashes extinguished ERC signals consistent with bleaching of a rhodopsin photopigment with a normal range of photosensitivity. ERC signals followed the univariance principle since millisecond-order relaxation kinetics were independent of the wavelength of the flash stimulus. After signal extinction, dark adaptation without added 11-cis-retinal resulted in spontaneous pigment regeneration from an intracellular store of chromophore remaining from earlier loading. After the ERC was extinguished, 350-nm flashes overlapping metarhodopsin-II absorption promoted immediate recovery of ERC charge motions identified by subsequent 500-nm flashes. Small inverted R2 signals were seen in response to some 350-nm flashes. These results indicate that the ERC can be photoregenerated from the metarhodopsin-II state. Regeneration with 9-cis-retinal permits recording of ERC signals consistent with flash activation of isorhodopsin. We initiated structure–function studies by measuring ERC signals in cells expressing the D83N and E134Q mutant human rhodopsin pigments. D83N ERCs were simplified in comparison with normal rhodopsin, while E134Q ERCs had only the early phase of charge motion. This study demonstrates that properties of normal rhodopsin can be accurately measured with the ERC assay and that a structure–function investigation of rapid activation processes in analogue and mutant visual pigments is

  10. Diversity and functional analysis of light-driven pumping rhodopsins in marine Flavobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Min; Kim, So-Young; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study are the description of diversity for proteorhodopsin (PR)-containing flavobacteria in marine environments, the finding of novel photoreceptive membrane proteins, and the elucidation of the effect of light on the growth of three rhodopsin genes containing flavobacterium. We investigated novel sodium ion rhodopsin (NaR) and halorhodopsin (HR) genes from PR-containing flavobacteria that were previously isolated from diverse aquatic sites, mainly from tidal flat sediment (62.5%). In 16 PR-containing isolates, three new types of genes were found. Among these three isolates, one (Nonlabens sp. YIK11 isolated from sediment) contained both the NaR and chloride ion rhodopsin (ClR) - HR type of gene. The sequences showed that the DTE (proton pump), NDQ (sodium ion pump) and NTQ (chloride ion pump) motifs corresponding to the D85, T89, and D96 positions in bacteriorhodopsin (BR) were well conserved. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three NaR and one ClR grouped within the same clade, as previously reported. Illumination of cell suspensions showed the change in proton pump activity, supporting that one or more rhodopsins are functional. The qRT-PCR study revealed that three rhodopsin genes, especially NaR, are highly induced when they are incubated in the presence of light or in the absence of sufficient nutrients. The expression levels of the DTE, NDQ, and NTQ motif-containing rhodopsin genes in YIK11 correlate positively with illumination, but negatively with nutrient levels. Based on those results, we concluded that light has a positive impact on the relative expression levels of the three rhodopsin genes in the flavobacterium, Nonlabens sp. YIK11, but with no apparent positive impact on growth. Consequently, light did not stimulate the growth of YIK11 as determined by cell numbers in a nutrient-limited or -enriched medium, although it contains and induces three rhodopsins. PMID:26663527

  11. Photoreceptor for Curling Behavior in Peranema trichophorum and Evolution of Eukaryotic Rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Saranak, Jureepan; Foster, Kenneth W.

    2005-01-01

    When it is gliding, the unicellular euglenoid Peranema trichophorum uses activation of the photoreceptor rhodopsin to control the probability of its curling behavior. From the curled state, the cell takes off in a new direction. In a similar manner, archaea such as Halobacterium use light activation of bacterio- and sensory rhodopsins to control the probability of reversal of the rotation direction of flagella. Each reversal causes the cell to change its direction. In neither case does the cell track light, as known for the rhodopsin-dependent eukaryotic phototaxis of fungi, green algae, cryptomonads, dinoflagellates, and animal larvae. Rhodopsin was identified in Peranema by its native action spectrum (peak at 2.43 eV or 510 nm) and by the shifted spectrum (peak at 3.73 eV or 332 nm) upon replacement of the native chromophore with the retinal analog n-hexenal. The in vivo physiological activity of n-hexenal incorporated to become a chromophore also demonstrates that charge redistribution of a short asymmetric chromophore is sufficient for receptor activation and that the following isomerization step is probably not required when the rest of the native chromophore is missing. This property seems universal among the Euglenozoa, Plant, and Fungus kingdom rhodopsins. The rhodopsins of animals have yet to be studied in this respect. The photoresponse appears to be mediated by Ca2+ influx. PMID:16215167

  12. A role for direct interactions in the modulation of rhodopsin by ω-3 polyunsaturated lipids

    PubMed Central

    Grossfield, Alan; Feller, Scott E.; Pitman, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the G protein-coupled receptor primarily responsible for sensing light, is found in an environment rich in polyunsaturated lipid chains and cholesterol. Biophysical experiments have shown that lipid unsaturation and cholesterol both have significant effects on rhodopsin’s stability and function; ω-3 polyunsaturated chains, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), destabilize rhodopsin and enhance the kinetics of the photocycle, whereas cholesterol has the opposite effect. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the possibility that polyunsaturated chains modulate rhodopsin stability and kinetics via specific direct interactions. By analyzing the results of 26 independent 100-ns simulations of dark-adapted rhodopsin, we found that DHA routinely forms tight associations with the protein in a small number of specific locations qualitatively different from the nonspecific interactions made by saturated chains and cholesterol. Furthermore, the presence of tightly packed DHA molecules tends to weaken the interhelical packing. These results are consistent with recent NMR work, which proposes that rhodopsin binds DHA, and they suggest a molecular rationale for DHA’s effects on rhodopsin stability and kinetics. PMID:16547139

  13. Chemical Kinetic Analysis of Thermal Decay of Rhodopsin Reveals Unusual Energetics of Thermal Isomerization and Hydrolysis of Schiff Base*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Liu, Monica Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Gefei Alex; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal properties of rhodopsin, which set the threshold of our vision, have long been investigated, but the chemical kinetics of the thermal decay of rhodopsin has not been revealed in detail. To understand thermal decay quantitatively, we propose a kinetic model consisting of two pathways: 1) thermal isomerization of 11-cis-retinal followed by hydrolysis of Schiff base (SB) and 2) hydrolysis of SB in dark state rhodopsin followed by opsin-catalyzed isomerization of free 11-cis-retinal. We solve the kinetic model mathematically and use it to analyze kinetic data from four experiments that we designed to assay thermal decay, isomerization, hydrolysis of SB using dark state rhodopsin, and hydrolysis of SB using photoactivated rhodopsin. We apply the model to WT rhodopsin and E181Q and S186A mutants at 55 °C, as well as WT rhodopsin in H2O and D2O at 59 °C. The results show that the hydrogen-bonding network strongly restrains thermal isomerization but is less important in opsin and activated rhodopsin. Furthermore, the ability to obtain individual rate constants allows comparison of thermal processes under various conditions. Our kinetic model and experiments reveal two unusual energetic properties: the steep temperature dependence of the rates of thermal isomerization and SB hydrolysis in the dark state and a strong deuterium isotope effect on dark state SB hydrolysis. These findings can be applied to study pathogenic rhodopsin mutants and other visual pigments. PMID:21921035

  14. Using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy To Visualize Rhodopsin-Containing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keffer, J. L.; Sabanayagam, C. R.; Lee, M. E.; DeLong, E. F.; Hahn, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sunlight is captured and converted to chemical energy in illuminated environments. Although (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosystems have been characterized in detail, retinal-based photosystems, rhodopsins, have only recently been identified as important mediators of light energy capture and conversion. Recent estimates suggest that up to 70% of cells in some environments harbor rhodopsins. However, because rhodopsin autofluorescence is low—comparable to that of carotenoids and significantly less than that of (bacterio)chlorophylls—these estimates are based on metagenomic sequence data, not direct observation. We report here the use of ultrasensitive total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to distinguish between unpigmented, carotenoid-producing, and rhodopsin-expressing bacteria. Escherichia coli cells were engineered to produce lycopene, β-carotene, or retinal. A gene encoding an uncharacterized rhodopsin, actinorhodopsin, was cloned into retinal-producing E. coli. The production of correctly folded and membrane-incorporated actinorhodopsin was confirmed via development of pink color in E. coli and SDS-PAGE. Cells expressing carotenoids or actinorhodopsin were imaged by TIRF microscopy. The 561-nm excitation laser specifically illuminated rhodopsin-containing cells, allowing them to be differentiated from unpigmented and carotenoid-containing cells. Furthermore, water samples collected from the Delaware River were shown by PCR to have rhodopsin-containing organisms and were examined by TIRF microscopy. Individual microorganisms that fluoresced under illumination from the 561-nm laser were identified. These results verify the sensitivity of the TIRF microscopy method for visualizing and distinguishing between different molecules with low autofluorescence, making it useful for analyzing natural samples. PMID:25769822

  15. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to visualize rhodopsin-containing cells.

    PubMed

    Keffer, J L; Sabanayagam, C R; Lee, M E; DeLong, E F; Hahn, M W; Maresca, J A

    2015-05-15

    Sunlight is captured and converted to chemical energy in illuminated environments. Although (bacterio)chlorophyll-based photosystems have been characterized in detail, retinal-based photosystems, rhodopsins, have only recently been identified as important mediators of light energy capture and conversion. Recent estimates suggest that up to 70% of cells in some environments harbor rhodopsins. However, because rhodopsin autofluorescence is low-comparable to that of carotenoids and significantly less than that of (bacterio)chlorophylls-these estimates are based on metagenomic sequence data, not direct observation. We report here the use of ultrasensitive total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to distinguish between unpigmented, carotenoid-producing, and rhodopsin-expressing bacteria. Escherichia coli cells were engineered to produce lycopene, β-carotene, or retinal. A gene encoding an uncharacterized rhodopsin, actinorhodopsin, was cloned into retinal-producing E. coli. The production of correctly folded and membrane-incorporated actinorhodopsin was confirmed via development of pink color in E. coli and SDS-PAGE. Cells expressing carotenoids or actinorhodopsin were imaged by TIRF microscopy. The 561-nm excitation laser specifically illuminated rhodopsin-containing cells, allowing them to be differentiated from unpigmented and carotenoid-containing cells. Furthermore, water samples collected from the Delaware River were shown by PCR to have rhodopsin-containing organisms and were examined by TIRF microscopy. Individual microorganisms that fluoresced under illumination from the 561-nm laser were identified. These results verify the sensitivity of the TIRF microscopy method for visualizing and distinguishing between different molecules with low autofluorescence, making it useful for analyzing natural samples. PMID:25769822

  16. Ecological restoration of a copper polluted vineyard: Long-term impact of farmland abandonment on soil bio-chemical properties and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Cavani, Luciano; Manici, Luisa M; Caputo, Francesco; Peruzzi, Elisabetta; Ciavatta, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed at investigating the degree of interference of high soil copper (Cu) contamination when an old vineyard is converted into a protected area. This study was performed within an intensive agricultural system; it was organized into a two-factorial nested design to analyze the impact of management (conventional vs re-naturalized orchard) and position within each orchard (tree-rows and strips). Chemical and biochemical properties along with bacterial and fungal communities, evaluated with PCR-DGGE starting from total soil DNA, were analyzed. Total Cu was localized in tree rows in the old vineyard at 1000 mg kg(-1) of soil, whereas it did not exceed 80 mg kg(-1) soil in the other treatments. Total organic carbon and all biochemical properties significantly improved in re-naturalized compared to conventionally cultivated site, while no significant differences were observed between tree row and strip. Moreover, a higher extractable carbon-extractable nitrogen (Cext-to-Next) ratio in the re-naturalized (19.3) site than in the conventionally managed site (10.2) indicated a shift of soil system from C-limited to N-limited, confirming a successful ecological restoration. Deep improvement of soil biochemical properties exceeded the negative impact of Cu contamination. A shift of bacterial community composition as well as increased bacterial diversity in Cu contaminated treatment indicated a bacterial response to Cu stress; to the contrary, soil fungi were less susceptible than bacteria, though an overall reduction of fungal DNA was detected. Findings suggest that ecological restoration of highly polluted agricultural soils leads to overcoming the reduction of soil functionalities linked to Cu contamination and opens interesting perspectives for mitigating Cu stress in agricultural soils with strategies based on conservative agriculture. PMID:27454095

  17. Retinal Photoisomerization in Rhodopsin: Electrostatic and Steric Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasello, Gaia; Altoe, Piero; Stenta, Marco; Olaso-Gonzalez, Gloria; Garavelli, Marco; Orlandi, Giorgio

    2007-12-26

    Excited state QM(CASPT2//CASSCF)/MM(GAFF) calculations, by our recently developed code COBRAMM (Computations at Bologna Relating Ab-initio and Molecular Mechanic Methods), were carried out in rhodopsin to investigate on the steric and electrostatic effects in retinal photoisomerization catalysis due to the {beta}-ionone ring and glutammate 181 (GLU 181), respectively. The excited state photoisomerization channel has been mapped and a new christallographyc structure (2.2 Aa resolution) has been used for this purpose. Two different set-ups have been used to evaluate the electrostatic effects of GLU 181 (which is very close to the central double bond of the chromophore): the first with a neutral GLU 181 (as commonly accepted), the second with a negatively charged (i.e. deprotonated) GLU 181 (as very recent experimental findings seem to suggest). On the other hand, {beta}-ionone ring steric effects were evaluated by calculating the photoisomerization path of a modified chromophore, where the ring double bond has been saturated. Spectroscopic properties were calculated and compared with the available experimental data.

  18. Light-induced currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, B E; Khorana, H G; Nasi, E

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the functioning of bovine rod opsin, which is efficiently synthesized from RNA made by in vitro transcription, following injection into Xenopus oocytes. We found that oocytes expressing the gene for opsin exhibit light-dependent ionic currents only after pigment generation by incubation with 11-cis-retinal. These currents are similar to the endogenous muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) response of oocytes, but their amplitude is substantially smaller. 2. In order to optimize the conditions for obtaining light-induced currents in RNA-injected oocytes, the native ACh response was examined under several conditions. It was found that elevated external calcium markedly enhances the muscarinic response and that these currents have a non-linear dependence on membrane voltage, increasing substantially with depolarization. 3. Using the optimal conditions for evoking the largest ACh responses, (28 mM [Ca2+]o, 0 mV, omission of serum and Hepes from the media), the light-evoked currents obtained in RNA-injected oocytes were remarkably enhanced, and responses to multiple light stimuli could be obtained. 4. The light response appeared to desensitize, even after long periods of recovery and pigment regeneration. By contrast, the ACh responses continued to appear normal. These results suggest that desensitization of photoresponses expressed in Xenopus oocytes involve changes at early stages of the pathway, resulting in a reduced ability of rhodopsin to couple to the endogenous signalling system. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7692039

  19. Evolutionary Dynamics of Rhodopsin Type 2 Opsins in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Tada, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Among the five groups of visual pigments in vertebrates, the rhodopsin type 2 (RH2) group shows the largest number of gene duplication events. We have isolated three intact and one nonfunctional RH2 opsin genes each from Northern lampfish (Stenobrachius leucopsarus) and scabbardfish (Lepidopus fitchi). Using the deduced amino acid sequences of these and other representative RH2 opsin genes in vertebrates, we have estimated the divergence times and evolutionary rates of amino acid substitution at various stages of RH2 opsin evolution. The results show that the duplications of the lampfish and scabbardfish RH2 opsins have occurred ∼60 and ∼30 million years ago (Ma), respectively. The evolutionary rates of RH2 opsins in the early vertebrate ancestors were ∼0.25 × 10−9/site/year, which increased to ∼1 × 10−9 to 3 × 10−9/site/year in euteleost lineages and to ∼0.3 × 10−9 to 0.5 × 10−9/site/year in coelacanth and tetrapods. PMID:19759234

  20. Different modes of proton translocation by sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    Haupts, U; Bamberg, E; Oesterhelt, D

    1996-01-01

    The membrane-bound complex between sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) and its transducer HtrI forms the functional photoreceptor unit that allows transmission of light signals to the flagellar motor. Although being a photosensor, SRI, the mutant SRI-D76N and the HtrI-SRI complex can transport protons, as we demonstrate by using the sensitive and ion-specific black lipid membrane technique. SRI sustains an orange light-driven (one-photon-driven) outward proton transport which is enhanced by additional blue light (two-photon-driven). The vectoriality of the two-photon-driven transport could be reversed at neutral pH from the outward to the inward direction by switching the cut-off wavelength of the long wavelength light from 550 to 630 nm. The cut-off wavelength determining the reversal point decreases with decreasing pH. The currents could be enhanced by azide. A two-photon-driven inward proton transport by SRI-D76N (catalyzed by azide) and by the complex HtrI-SRI is demonstrated. The influence of pH and azide concentration on the rise and decay kinetics of the SRI380 intermediate is analyzed. The different modes of proton translocation of the SRI species are discussed on the basis of a general model of proton translocation of retinal proteins and in the context of signal transduction. Images PMID:8617229

  1. Investigation of evolution-related aspects of bacterial rhodopsins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated evolution-related aspects of bacterial rhodopsins, the unique retinal-based energy transducing systems of halophilic archae. The approach was to describe both structural and functional aspects: the structure by sequencing genes to explore which regions are conserved, and the function by comparing proton and chloride transport in the closely related systems, bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin, respectively. In the latter, we have made a good start toward the ultimate goal of separating the attributes of the general principles of retinal-based ionic pumps from those of the specific ion specificities, by determining the thermodynamics of the internal steps of the protein-mediated active transport process, as well as some of the intraprotein ion-transfer steps. Our present emphasis is on continuing to acquire the tools for studying what distinguishes proton transport from chloride transport. We consider it important, therefore, that we have been able to provide firm mathematical grounds for the kinetics analyses which underlies these studies. Our molecular biological studies have received a great boost from the expression vector for the bop gene based on a halobacterial plasmid, that we recently developed.

  2. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12242.001 PMID:26974343

  3. Photosensitivities of rhodopsin mutants with a displaced counterion.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Kei; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2010-11-30

    Visual pigments consist of a protein moiety opsin and an 11-cis-retinal chromophore that is covalently bound to the opsin via a Schiff base linkage. They have a high photosensitivity, which can be attributed to the high probability of photon absorption and the high photoisomerization quantum yield of the retinal chromophore. Both of these parameters are regulated by the opsin, though the precise mechanism is unknown. We previously found that counterion residue E113, which stabilizes the proton on the Schiff base, is involved in the efficient photoisomerization in vertebrate visual pigments. To test the positional effect of the counterion on the photon absorption and the photoisomerization, we measured the photosensitivities of a set of mutants of bovine rhodopsin in which the counterion was displaced to position 90, 94, 117, or 292. The molar extinction coefficient was reduced in many of the mutants, leading to reductions in the photosensitivity for monochromatic lights. However, the oscillator strength, the probability of photon absorption integrated over the entire wavenumber range of the absorption band, was relatively similar among the mutants and the wild type. In addition, the quantum yields of the mutants were not markedly different from that of the wild type. These results indicate that the counterion does not need to be located at position 113 for a high photosensitivity for natural light. Interestingly, all of the mutants exhibited greatly increased hydroxylamine sensitivity. This result suggests that the counterion in vertebrate visual pigments is optimally located for the stability of the Schiff base linkage. PMID:21038858

  4. Regulation of Mammalian Cone Phototransduction by Recoverin and Rhodopsin Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Keisuke; Chen, Jeannie; Khani, Shahrokh C.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2015-01-01

    Cone photoreceptors function under daylight conditions and are essential for color perception and vision with high temporal and spatial resolution. A remarkable feature of cones is that, unlike rods, they remain responsive in bright light. In rods, light triggers a decline in intracellular calcium, which exerts a well studied negative feedback on phototransduction that includes calcium-dependent inhibition of rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by recoverin. Rods and cones share the same isoforms of recoverin and GRK1, and photoactivation also triggers a calcium decline in cones. However, the molecular mechanisms by which calcium exerts negative feedback on cone phototransduction through recoverin and GRK1 are not well understood. Here, we examined this question using mice expressing various levels of GRK1 or lacking recoverin. We show that although GRK1 is required for the timely inactivation of mouse cone photoresponse, gradually increasing its expression progressively delays the cone response recovery. This surprising result is in contrast with the known effect of increasing GRK1 expression in rods. Notably, the kinetics of cone responses converge and become independent of GRK1 levels for flashes activating more than ∼1% of cone pigment. Thus, mouse cone response recovery in bright light is independent of pigment phosphorylation and likely reflects the spontaneous decay of photoactivated visual pigment. We also find that recoverin potentiates the sensitivity of cones in dim light conditions but does not contribute to their capacity to function in bright light. PMID:25673692

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal specific interactions of post-translational palmitoyl modifications with rhodopsin in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Bjoern E.S.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Brown, Michael F.; Feller, Scott E.; Vogel, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the behavior of the highly flexible post-translational lipid modifications of rhodopsin from multiple-microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Rhodopsin was studied in a realistic membrane environment that includes cholesterol, as well as saturated and polyunsaturated lipids with phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine headgroups. The simulation reveals striking differences between the palmitoylations at Cys322 and Cys323 as well as between the palmitoyl chains and the neighboring lipids. Notably the palmitoyl group at Cys322 shows considerably greater contact with helix H1 of rhodopsin, yielding frequent chain upturns with longer reorientational correlation times, and relatively low order parameters. While the palmitoylation at Cys323 makes fewer protein contacts and has increased order compared to Cys322, it nevertheless exhibits greater flexibility with smaller order parameters than the stearoyl chains of the surrounding lipids. The dynamical structure of the palmitoylations—as well as their extensive fluctuations—suggests a complex function for the post-translational modifications in rhodopsin and potentially other G protein-coupled receptors, going beyond their role as membrane anchoring elements. Rather, we propose that the palmitoylation at Cys323 has a potential role as a lipid anchor, whereas the palmitoyl-protein interaction observed for Cys322 suggests a more specific interaction that affects the stability of the dark state of rhodopsin. PMID:22280374

  6. A Photochromic Histidine Kinase Rhodopsin (HKR1) That Is Bimodally Switched by Ultraviolet and Blue Light*

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Meike; Mathes, Tilo; Bruun, Sara; Fudim, Roman; Hagedorn, Rolf; Tran Nguyen, Tra My; Kateriya, Suneel; Kennis, John T. M.; Hildebrandt, Peter; Hegemann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsins are light-activated chromoproteins that mediate signaling processes via transducer proteins or promote active or passive ion transport as ion pumps or directly light-activated channels. Here, we provide spectroscopic characterization of a rhodopsin from the Chlamydomonas eyespot. It belongs to a recently discovered but so far uncharacterized family of histidine kinase rhodopsins (HKRs). These are modular proteins consisting of rhodopsin, a histidine kinase, a response regulator, and in some cases an effector domain such as an adenylyl or guanylyl cyclase, all encoded in a single protein as a two-component system. The recombinant rhodopsin fragment, Rh, of HKR1 is a UVA receptor (λmax = 380 nm) that is photoconverted by UV light into a stable blue light-absorbing meta state Rh-Bl (λmax = 490 nm). Rh-Bl is converted back to Rh-UV by blue light. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the Rh-UV chromophore is in an unusual 13-cis,15-anti configuration, which explains why the chromophore is deprotonated. The excited state lifetime of Rh-UV is exceptionally stable, probably caused by a relatively unpolar retinal binding pocket, converting into the photoproduct within about 100 ps, whereas the blue form reacts 100 times faster. We propose that the photochromic HKR1 plays a role in the adaptation of behavioral responses in the presence of UVA light. PMID:23027869

  7. Expression and light-triggered movement of rhodopsins in the larval visual system of mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Manuel; Kimler, Kyle J.; Leming, Matthew T.; Hu, Xiaobang; Whaley, Michelle A.; O'Tousa, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the larval stages, the visual system of the mosquito Aedes aegypti contains five stemmata, often referred to as larval ocelli, positioned laterally on each side of the larval head. Here we show that stemmata contain two photoreceptor types, distinguished by the expression of different rhodopsins. The rhodopsin Aaop3 (GPROP3) is expressed in the majority of the larval photoreceptors. There are two small clusters of photoreceptors located within the satellite and central stemmata that express the rhodopsin Aaop7 (GPROP7) instead of Aaop3. Electroretinogram analysis of transgenic Aaop7 Drosophila indicates that Aaop3 and Aaop7, both classified as long-wavelength rhodopsins, possess similar but not identical spectral properties. Light triggers an extensive translocation of Aaop3 from the photosensitive rhabdoms to the cytoplasmic compartment, whereas light-driven translocation of Aaop7 is limited. The results suggest that these photoreceptor cell types play distinct roles in larval vision. An additional component of the larval visual system is the adult compound eye, which starts to develop at the anterior face of the larval stemmata during the 1st instar stage. The photoreceptors of the developing compound eye show rhodopsin expression during the 4th larval instar stage, consistent with indications from previous reports that the adult compound eye contributes to larval and pupal visual capabilities. PMID:25750414

  8. Study of the orientation of retinal in bovine rhodopsin: the use of a photoactivatable retinal analog

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.

    1987-05-01

    Rhodopsin is the major transmembrane protein in the photoreceptor cells of vertebrate and invertebrate retina. Bovine rhodopsin consists of a polypeptide chain of 348 amino acids of known sequence in which the chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, is linked to Lys-296 as a Schiff base. To investigate the orientation of retinal in the protein and to study the interactions between retinal and the protein, the authors have developed a crosslinking approach using a /sup 3/H-labeled photoactivatable analog of retinal. Bleached rhodopsin in rod outer segments was reconstituted with the analog to give a pigment with lambda/sub max/ at 460nm. Reduction of the Schiff base with borane dimenthylamine, followed by degradation with CNBr and sequencing of the radioactive fragment showed that the analog is attached to Lys-296, as in the native rhodopsin. Further, the reconstitute protein after photolysis was phosphorylated by rhodopsin kinase. Photolysis of the reconstituted pigment at -15/sup 0/C resulted in crosslinking of the analog to the opsin to the extent of 30% as analyzed by SDS electrophoresis. The site(s) of crosslinking in the protein are under investigation.

  9. Efficient mutagenesis of the rhodopsin gene in rod photoreceptor neurons in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Fung; Hauswirth, William W.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Wilson, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the rhodopsin gene, which is expressed in rod photoreceptor cells, are a major cause of the hereditary-blinding disease, autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Therapeutic strategies designed to edit such mutations will likely depend on the introduction of double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair by homologous recombination or non-homologous end joining. At present, the break repair capabilities of mature neurons, in general, and rod cells, in particular, are undefined. To detect break repair, we generated mice that carry a modified human rhodopsin-GFP fusion gene at the normal mouse rhodopsin locus. The rhodopsin-GFP gene carries tandem copies of exon 2, with an ISceI recognition site situated between them. An ISceI-induced break can be repaired either by non-homologous end joining or by recombination between the duplicated segments, generating a functional rhodopsin-GFP gene. We introduced breaks using recombinant adeno-associated virus to transduce the gene encoding ISceI nuclease. We found that virtually 100% of transduced rod cells were mutated at the ISceI site, with ∼85% of the genomes altered by end joining and ∼15% by the single-strand annealing pathway of homologous recombination. These studies establish that the genomes of terminally differentiated rod cells can be efficiently edited in living organisms. PMID:21478169

  10. Phagosome maturation during endosome interaction revealed by partial rhodopsin processing in retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T.; Meschede, Ingrid P.; Seabra, Miguel C.; Futter, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defects in phagocytosis and degradation of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are associated with aging and retinal disease. The daily burst of rod outer segment (ROS) phagocytosis by the RPE provides a unique opportunity to analyse phagosome processing in vivo. In mouse retinae, phagosomes containing stacked rhodopsin-rich discs were identified by immuno-electron microscopy. Early apical phagosomes stained with antibodies against both cytoplasmic and intradiscal domains of rhodopsin. During phagosome maturation, a remarkably synchronised loss of the cytoplasmic epitope coincided with movement to the cell body and preceded phagosome–lysosome fusion and disc degradation. Loss of the intradiscal rhodopsin epitope and disc digestion occurred upon fusion with cathepsin-D-positive lysosomes. The same sequential stages of phagosome maturation were identified in cultured RPE and macrophages challenged with isolated POS. Loss of the cytoplasmic rhodopsin epitope was insensitive to pH but sensitive to protease inhibition and coincided with the interaction of phagosomes with endosomes. Thus, during pre-lysosomal maturation of ROS-containing phagosomes, limited rhodopsin processing occurs upon interaction with endosomes. This potentially provides a sensitive readout of phagosome–endosome interactions that is applicable to multiple phagocytes. PMID:25074813

  11. [Phototaxis of the green algae: the new class of rhodopsin receptors].

    PubMed

    Govorunova, E G; Jung, K H; Sineshchekov, O A

    2004-01-01

    Photomotility behavior in green flagellate algae is mediated by rhodopsin-like receptors, which was initially suggested on the basis of physiological evidence. The cascade of rapid Ca(2+)-dependent electrical responses in the plasma membrane plays a key role in the signal transduction chain during both phototaxis and the photophobic response. The photoreceptor current through the plasma membrane is the earliest detectable event upon photoexcitation of the photoreceptors. Analysis of this current revealed that it consists of at least two components with different characteristics. Genes encoding two archaeal-type rhodopsins (type I rhodopsins) were recently identified in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and named (Chlamydomonas Sensory Rhodopsins A and B CSRA and CSRB). The measurements of photoelectric and motor responses in genetic transformants of C. reinhardtii enriched in each of these receptor proteins showed that the two components of the photoreceptor current are mediated by the two rhodopsins, and that both CSRA and CSRB are involved in phototaxis and the photophobic response. The CSRA-mediated current dominates at high light intensities and contributes primarily to the photophobic response. The CSRB-initiated transduction involves an efficient amplification cascade and mediates the highly sensitive phototaxis at low light intensities. CSRA and CSRB expressed heterologously in oocytes of Xenopus laevis act as light-gated proton channels, although it is unclear whether this channel activity plays a functional role in the initiation of motor responses and/or occurs in the native system. PMID:15129628

  12. Rhodopsin Gene Expression Determines Rod Outer Segment Size and Rod Cell Resistance to a Dominant-Negative Neurodegeneration Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Price, Brandee A.; Sandoval, Ivette M.; Chan, Fung; Nichols, Ralph; Roman-Sanchez, Ramon; Wensel, Theodore G.; Wilson, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Two outstanding unknowns in the biology of photoreceptors are the molecular determinants of cell size, which is remarkably uniform among mammalian species, and the mechanisms of rod cell death associated with inherited neurodegenerative blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. We have addressed both questions by performing an in vivo titration with rhodopsin gene copies in genetically engineered mice that express only normal rhodopsin or an autosomal dominant allele, encoding rhodopsin with a disease-causing P23H substitution. The results reveal that the volume of the rod outer segment is proportional to rhodopsin gene expression; that P23H-rhodopsin, the most common rhodopsin gene disease allele, causes cell death via a dominant-negative mechanism; and that long term survival of rod cells carrying P23H-rhodopsin can be achieved by increasing the levels of wild type rhodopsin. These results point to promising directions in gene therapy for autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases caused by dominant-negative mutations. PMID:23185477

  13. Molecular analysis and genetic mapping of the rhodopsin gene in families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Bunge, S.; Wedemann, H.; Samanns, C.; Horn, M.; Schwinger, E.; Gal, A. ); David, D. ); Terwilliger, D.J.; Ott, J. ); Born, L.I. van den )

    1993-07-01

    Eighty-eight patients/families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were screened for rhodopsin mutations. Direct sequencing revealed 13 different mutations in a total of 14 (i.e., 16%) unrelated patients. Five of these mutations (T4K, Q28H, R135G, F220C, and C222R) have not been reported so far. In addition, multipoint linkage analysis was performed on two large families with autosomal dominant RP due to rhodopsin mutations by using five DNA probes from 3q21-q24. No tight linkage was found between the rhodopsin locus (RHO) and D3S47 ([theta][sub max] = 0.08). By six-point analysis, RHO was localized in the region between D3S21 and D3S47, with a maximum lod score of 13.447 directly at D3S20. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. The kinetics of regeneration of rhodopsin under enzyme-limited availability of 11-cis retinoid.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Trevor D; Corless, Robert M; Pananos, A Demetri

    2015-05-01

    In order to describe the regeneration of rhodopsin and the recovery of visual sensitivity following exposure of the eye to intense bleaching illumination, two models have been proposed, in which there is either a "resistive" or an "enzymatic" limit to the supply of retinoid. A solution has previously been derived for the resistive model, and here we derive an analytical solution for the enzymatic model and we investigate the form of this solution as a function of parameter values. We demonstrate that this enzymatic model provides a good fit to human post-bleach recovery, for four cases: for rhodopsin regeneration in normal subjects; for psychophysical scotopic dark adaptation in normal subjects; for rhodopsin regeneration and scotopic dark adaptation in fundus albipunctatus patients; and for cone pigment regeneration in normal subjects. Finally, we present arguments favouring the enzymatic model as the cellular basis for normal human rod and cone pigment regeneration. PMID:25769401

  15. Structure and dynamics of retinal in rhodopsin elucidated by deuterium solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Gilmar Fernandes De Jesus

    Rhodopsin is a seven transmembrane helix GPCR found which mediates dim light vision, in which the binding pocket is occupied by the ligand 11- cis-retinal. A site-directed 2H-labeling approach utilizing solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the structure and dynamics of retinal within its binding pocket in the dark state of rhodopsin, and as well the MetaI and MetaII. 11-cis-[5-C 2H3]-, 11-cis-[9-C 2H3]-, and 11-cis-[13-C2H 3]-retinal were used to regenerate bleached rhodopsin. Recombinant membranes comprising purified rhodopsin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were prepared (1:50 molar ratio). Solid-state 2H NMR spectra were obtained for the aligned rhodopsin/POPC recombinant membranes at temperatures below the order-disorder phase transition temperature of POPC. The solid-state NMR studies of aligned samples, give the orientations of the 2H nuclear coupling tensor relative to the membrane frame, which involve both the conformation and orientation of the bound retinal chromophore. Theoretical simulations of the experimental 2H NMR spectra employed a new lineshape treatment for a semi-random distribution due to static uniaxial disorder. The analysis gives the orientation of the 2H-labeled C-C2H3 methyl bond axes relative to the membrane plane as well as the extent of three-dimensional alignment disorder (mosaic spread). These results clearly demonstrate the applicability of site-directed 2H NMR methods for investigating conformational changes and dynamics of ligands bound to rhodopsin and other GPCRs in relation to their characteristic mechanisms of action.

  16. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  17. Phoneme Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, Arthur

    1996-01-01

    Notes that phonemic restoration is a powerful auditory illusion. Points out that when part of an utterance is replaced by another sound, listeners perceptually restore the missing speech. Several paradigms measure this illusion and explore its bottom-up and top-down bases. Findings reveal that acoustic properties of the replacement sound strongly…

  18. Stimulatory effect of cyanidin 3-glycosides on the regeneration of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Yuko; Tachibanaki, Shuji; Kawamura, Satoru; Hirayama, Masao

    2003-06-01

    Anthocyanins have been suggested to improve visual functions. This study examined the effect of four anthocyanins in black currant fruits on the regeneration of rhodopsin using frog rod outer segment (ROS) membranes. Cyanidin 3-glycosides, glucoside and rutinoside, stimulated the regeneration, but the corresponding delphinidins showed no significant effect. The formation of a regeneration intermediate was suggested to be accelerated by cyanidin 3-rutinoside. Their effects on the cGMP-phosphodiesterase activity in the ROS membranes were also investigated but found to be negligible. It was concluded that the major effect of anthocyanins in rod photoreceptors is on the regeneration of rhodopsin. PMID:12769524

  19. Low-Temperature Trapping of Photointermediates of the Rhodopsin E181Q Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Megan N.; Greco, Jordan A.; Wagner, Nicole L.; Amora, Tabitha L.; Ramos, Lavoisier A.; Chen, Min-Hsuan; Knox, Barry E.; Birge, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Three active-site components in rhodopsin play a key role in the stability and function of the protein: 1) the counter-ion residues which stabilize the protonated Schiff base, 2) water molecules, and 3) the hydrogen-bonding network. The ionizable residue Glu-181, which is involved in an extended hydrogen-bonding network with Ser-186, Tyr-268, Tyr-192, and key water molecules within the active site of rhodopsin, has been shown to be involved in a complex counter-ion switch mechanism with Glu-113 during the photobleaching sequence of the protein. Herein, we examine the photobleaching sequence of the E181Q rhodopsin mutant by using cryogenic UV-visible spectroscopy to further elucidate the role of Glu-181 during photoactivation of the protein. We find that lower temperatures are required to trap the early photostationary states of the E181Q mutant compared to native rhodopsin. Additionally, a Blue Shifted Intermediate (BSI, λmax = 498 nm, 100 K) is observed after the formation of E181Q Bathorhodopsin (Batho, λmax = 556 nm, 10 K) but prior to formation of E181Q Lumirhodopsin (Lumi, λmax = 506 nm, 220 K). A potential energy diagram of the observed photointermediates suggests the E181Q Batho intermediate has an enthalpy value 7.99 KJ/mol higher than E181Q BSI, whereas in rhodopsin, the BSI is 10.02 KJ/mol higher in enthalpy than Batho. Thus, the Batho to BSI transition is enthalpically driven in E181Q and entropically driven in native rhodopsin. We conclude that the substitution of Glu-181 with Gln-181 results in a significant perturbation of the hydrogen-bonding network within the active site of rhodopsin. In addition, the removal of a key electrostatic interaction between the chromophore and the protein destabilizes the protein in both the dark state and Batho intermediate conformations while having a stabilizing effect on the BSI conformation. The observed destabilization upon this substitution further supports that Glu-181 is negatively charged in the early

  20. Primary photoinduced protein response in bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin II.

    PubMed

    Gross, Ruth; Wolf, Matthias M N; Schumann, Christian; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai; Li, Lin; Engelhard, Martin; Trentmann, Oliver; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Diller, Rolf

    2009-10-21

    Essential for the biological function of the light-driven proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin (BR), and the light sensor, sensory rhodopsin II (SRII), is the coupling of the activated retinal chromophore to the hosting protein moiety. In order to explore the dynamics of this process we have performed ultrafast transient mid-infrared spectroscopy on isotopically labeled BR and SRII samples. These include SRII in D(2)O buffer, BR in H(2)(18)O medium, SRII with (15)N-labeled protein, and BR with (13)C(14)(13)C(15)-labeled retinal chromophore. Via observed shifts of infrared difference bands after photoexcitation and their kinetics we provide evidence for nonchromophore bands in the amide I and the amide II region of BR and SRII. A band around 1550 cm(-1) is very likely due to an amide II vibration. In the amide I region, contributions of modes involving exchangeable protons and modes not involving exchangeable protons can be discerned. Observed bands in the amide I region of BR are not due to bending vibrations of protein-bound water molecules. The observed protein bands appear in the amide I region within the system response of ca. 0.3 ps and in the amide II region within 3 ps, and decay partially in both regions on a slower time scale of 9-18 ps. Similar observations have been presented earlier for BR5.12, containing a nonisomerizable chromophore (R. Gross et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 7851-7860). Thus, the results suggest a common mechanism for ultrafast protein response in the artificial and the native system besides isomerization, which could be induced by initial chromophore polarization. PMID:19778046

  1. All-optical electrophysiology in mammalian neurons using engineered microbial rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Hochbaum, Daniel R.; Zhao, Yongxin; Farhi, Samouil L.; Klapoetke, Nathan; Werley, Christopher A.; Kapoor, Vikrant; Zou, Peng; Kralj, Joel M.; Maclaurin, Dougal; Smedemark-Margulies, Niklas; Saulnier, Jessica L.; Boulting, Gabriella L.; Straub, Christoph; Cho, Yong Ku; Melkonian, Michael; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Harrison, D. Jed; Murthy, Venkatesh N.; Sabatini, Bernardo; Boyden, Edward S.; Campbell, Robert E.; Cohen, Adam E.

    2014-01-01

    All-optical electrophysiology—spatially resolved simultaneous optical perturbation and measurement of membrane voltage—would open new vistas in neuroscience research. We evolved two archaerhodopsin-based voltage indicators, QuasAr1 and 2, which show improved brightness and voltage sensitivity, microsecond response times, and produce no photocurrent. We engineered a novel channelrhodopsin actuator, CheRiff, which shows improved light sensitivity and kinetics, and spectral orthogonality to the QuasArs. A co-expression vector, Optopatch, enabled crosstalk-free genetically targeted all-optical electrophysiology. In cultured neurons, we combined Optopatch with patterned optical excitation to probe back-propagating action potentials in dendritic spines, synaptic transmission, sub-cellular microsecond-timescale details of action potential propagation, and simultaneous firing of many neurons in a network. Optopatch measurements revealed homeostatic tuning of intrinsic excitability in human stem cell-derived neurons. In brain slice, Optopatch induced and reported action potentials and subthreshold events, with high signal-to-noise ratios. The Optopatch platform enables high-throughput, spatially resolved electrophysiology without use of conventional electrodes. PMID:24952910

  2. All-optical electrophysiology in mammalian neurons using engineered microbial rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Hochbaum, Daniel R; Zhao, Yongxin; Farhi, Samouil L; Klapoetke, Nathan; Werley, Christopher A; Kapoor, Vikrant; Zou, Peng; Kralj, Joel M; Maclaurin, Dougal; Smedemark-Margulies, Niklas; Saulnier, Jessica L; Boulting, Gabriella L; Straub, Christoph; Cho, Yong Ku; Melkonian, Michael; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Harrison, D Jed; Murthy, Venkatesh N; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Boyden, Edward S; Campbell, Robert E; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-08-01

    All-optical electrophysiology-spatially resolved simultaneous optical perturbation and measurement of membrane voltage-would open new vistas in neuroscience research. We evolved two archaerhodopsin-based voltage indicators, QuasAr1 and QuasAr2, which show improved brightness and voltage sensitivity, have microsecond response times and produce no photocurrent. We engineered a channelrhodopsin actuator, CheRiff, which shows high light sensitivity and rapid kinetics and is spectrally orthogonal to the QuasArs. A coexpression vector, Optopatch, enabled cross-talk-free genetically targeted all-optical electrophysiology. In cultured rat neurons, we combined Optopatch with patterned optical excitation to probe back-propagating action potentials (APs) in dendritic spines, synaptic transmission, subcellular microsecond-timescale details of AP propagation, and simultaneous firing of many neurons in a network. Optopatch measurements revealed homeostatic tuning of intrinsic excitability in human stem cell-derived neurons. In rat brain slices, Optopatch induced and reported APs and subthreshold events with high signal-to-noise ratios. The Optopatch platform enables high-throughput, spatially resolved electrophysiology without the use of conventional electrodes. PMID:24952910

  3. Evidence that the Rhodopsin Kinase (GRK1) N-Terminus and the Transducin Gα C-Terminus Interact with the Same "Hydrophobic Patch" on Rhodopsin TM5.

    PubMed

    Jones Brunette, Amber M; Sinha, Abhinav; David, Larry; Farrens, David L

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) terminates their ability to couple with and activate G proteins by increasing their affinity for arrestins. Unfortunately, detailed information regarding how GPCRs interact with the kinases responsible for their phosphorylation is still limited. Here, we purified fully functional GPCR kinase 1 (GRK1) using a rapid method and used it to gain insights into how this important kinase interacts with the GPCR rhodopsin. Specifically, we find that GRK1 uses the same site on rhodopsin as the transducin (Gt) Gtα C-terminal tail and the arrestin "finger loop", a cleft formed in the cytoplasmic face of the receptor upon activation. Our studies also show GRK1 requires two conserved residues located in this cleft (L226 and V230) that have been shown to be required for Gt activation due to their direct interactions with hydrophobic residues on the Gα C-terminal tail. Our data and modeling studies are consistent with the idea that all three proteins (Gt, GRK1, and visual arrestin) bind, at least in part, in the same site on rhodopsin and interact with the receptor through a similar hydrophobic contact-driven mechanism. PMID:27078130

  4. Cyclic AMP-dependent activation of rhodopsin gene transcription in cultured retinal precursor cells of chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Voisin, Pierre; Bernard, Marianne

    2009-07-01

    The present study describes a robust 50-fold increase in rhodopsin gene transcription by cAMP in cultured retinal precursor cells of chicken embryo. Retinal cells isolated at embryonic day 8 (E8) and cultured for 3 days in serum-supplemented medium differentiated mostly into red-sensitive cones and to a lesser degree into green-sensitive cones, as indicated by real-time RT-PCR quantification of each specific opsin mRNA. In contrast, both rhodopsin mRNA concentration and rhodopsin gene promoter activity required the presence of cAMP-increasing agents [forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)] to reach significant levels. This response was rod-specific and was sufficient to activate rhodopsin gene transcription in serum-free medium. The increase in rhodopsin mRNA levels evoked by a series of cAMP analogs suggested the response was mediated by protein kinase A, not by EPAC. Membrane depolarization by high KCl concentration also increased rhodopsin mRNA levels and this response was strongly potentiated by IBMX. The rhodopsin gene response to cAMP-increasing agents was developmentally gated between E6 and E7. Rod-specific transducin alpha subunit mRNA levels also increased up to 50-fold in response to forskolin and IBMX, while rod-specific phosphodiesterase-VI and rod arrestin transcripts increased 3- to 10-fold. These results suggest a cAMP-mediated signaling pathway may play a role in rod differentiation. PMID:19457115

  5. Absolute absorption spectra of batho- and photorhodopsins at room temperature. Picosecond laser photolysis of rhodopsin in polyacrylamide.

    PubMed Central

    Kandori, H; Shichida, Y; Yoshizawa, T

    1989-01-01

    Picosecond laser photolysis of rhodopsin in 15% polyacrylamide gel was performed for estimating absolute absorption spectra of the primary intermediates of cattle rhodopsin (bathorhodopsin and photorhodopsin). Using a rhodopsin digitonin extract embedded in 15% polyacrylamide gel, a precise percentage of bleaching of rhodopsin after excitation of a picosecond laser pulse was measured. Using this value, the absolute absorption spectrum of bathorhodopsin was calculated from the spectral change before and 1 ns after the picosecond laser excitation (corresponding to the difference spectrum between rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin). The absorption spectrum of bathorhodopsin thus obtained displayed a lambda max at 535 nm, which was shorter than that at low temperature (543 nm) and a half band-width broader than that measured at low temperature. The oscillator strength of bathorhodopsin at room temperature was smaller than that at low temperature. The absolute absorption spectrum of photorhodopsin was also estimated from the difference spectrum measured at 15 ps after the excitation of rhodopsin (Shichida, Y., S. Matuoka, and T. Yoshizawa. 1984. Photobiochem. Photobiophys. 7:221-228), assuming a sequential conversion of photorhodopsin to bathorhodopsin. Its lambda max was located at approximately 570 nm, and the oscillator strength was smaller than those of rhodopsin and bathorhodopsin. PMID:2790133

  6. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yanyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Ke, Jiyuan; Eileen Tan, M. H.; Zhang, Chenghai; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Pascal, Bruce; Van Eps, Ned; Caro, Lydia N.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Lee, Regina J.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Gu, Xin; Pal, Kuntal; Ma, Jinming; Zhi, Xiaoyong; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Basu, Shibom; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Liu, Haiguang; Lisova, Stella; Kupitz, Christopher; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Raimund; Jiang, Yi; Tan, Minjia; Yang, Huaiyu; Li, Jun; Wang, Meitian; Zheng, Zhong; Li, Dianfan; Howe, Nicole; Zhao, Yingming; Standfuss, Jörg; Diederichs, Kay; Dong, Yuhui; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Caffrey, Martin; Jiang, Hualiang; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Ernst, Oliver P.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signaling to numerous G protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly, in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including TM7 and Helix 8 to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a ~20° rotation between the N- and C- domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. This structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signaling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology. PMID:26200343

  7. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  8. A model for the recovery kinetics of rod phototransduction, based on the enzymatic deactivation of rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Laitko, U; Hofmann, K P

    1998-01-01

    We propose a model for the recovery of the retinal rod photoresponse after a short stimulus. The approach describes the enzymatic deactivation of the photoactivated receptor, rhodopsin, by simple enzyme kinetics. An important feature of this description is that the R* deactivation obeys different time laws, depending on the numbers of R* formed per disc membrane and available enzyme molecules. If the enzyme works below substrate saturation, the rate of deactivation depends linearly on the number of R*, whereas for substrate saturation a hyperbolic relation--the well-known Michaelis-Menten equation--applies. This dichotomy is used to explain experimental finding that the relation between the saturation time of the photoresponse after short illumination and the flash strength has two sharply separated branches for low and high flash intensities (up to approximately 10% bleaching). By relating both branches to properties of the enzymatic rhodopsin deactivation, the new model transcends the classical notion of a constant characteristic lifetime of activated rhodopsin. With parameters that are plausible in the light of the available data and the additional information that the deactivating enzyme, rhodopsin kinase, and the signaling G-protein, transducin, compete for the active receptor, the slopes of the saturation function are correctly reproduced. PMID:9533693

  9. Functional role of positively selected amino acid substitutions in mammalian rhodopsin evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A.; Invergo, Brandon M.; Ramon, Eva; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Garriga, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Visual rhodopsins are membrane proteins that function as light photoreceptors in the vertebrate retina. Specific amino acids have been positively selected in visual pigments during mammal evolution, which, as products of adaptive selection, would be at the base of important functional innovations. We have analyzed the top candidates for positive selection at the specific amino acids and the corresponding reverse changes (F13M, Q225R and A346S) in order to unravel the structural and functional consequences of these important sites in rhodopsin evolution. We have constructed, expressed and immunopurified the corresponding mutated pigments and analyzed their molecular phenotypes. We find that position 13 is very important for the folding of the receptor and also for proper protein glycosylation. Position 225 appears to be important for the function of the protein affecting the G-protein activation process, and position 346 would also regulate functionality of the receptor by enhancing G-protein activation and presumably affecting protein phosphorylation by rhodopsin kinase. Our results represent a link between the evolutionary analysis, which pinpoints the specific amino acid positions in the adaptive process, and the structural and functional analysis, closer to the phenotype, making biochemical sense of specific selected genetic sequences in rhodopsin evolution. PMID:26865329

  10. Formation and Decay of the Arrestin·Rhodopsin Complex in Native Disc Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Beyrière, Florent; Sommer, Martha E.; Szczepek, Michal; Bartl, Franz J.; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Heck, Martin; Ritter, Eglof

    2015-01-01

    In the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin, light-induced cis/trans isomerization of the retinal ligand triggers a series of distinct receptor states culminating in the active Metarhodopsin II (Meta II) state, which binds and activates the G protein transducin (Gt). Long before Meta II decays into the aporeceptor opsin and free all-trans-retinal, its signaling is quenched by receptor phosphorylation and binding of the protein arrestin-1, which blocks further access of Gt to Meta II. Although recent crystal structures of arrestin indicate how it might look in a precomplex with the phosphorylated receptor, the transition into the high affinity complex is not understood. Here we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to monitor the interaction of arrestin-1 and phosphorylated rhodopsin in native disc membranes. By isolating the unique infrared signature of arrestin binding, we directly observed the structural alterations in both reaction partners. In the high affinity complex, rhodopsin adopts a structure similar to Gt-bound Meta II. In arrestin, a modest loss of β-sheet structure indicates an increase in flexibility but is inconsistent with a large scale structural change. During Meta II decay, the arrestin-rhodopsin stoichiometry shifts from 1:1 to 1:2. Arrestin stabilizes half of the receptor population in a specific Meta II protein conformation, whereas the other half decays to inactive opsin. Altogether these results illustrate the distinct binding modes used by arrestin to interact with different functional forms of the receptor. PMID:25847250

  11. The density and photosensitivity of human rhodopsin in the living retina

    PubMed Central

    Alpern, M.; Pugh, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    1. The visual pigment in a 5° circular patch of the living human retina 18° temporal from the fovea was studied with the Rushton retinal densitometer. The measuring light (570 nm) was selected to obviate artifacts from colour photoproducts. 2. The action spectrum of a 10% bleach agrees well with the action spectrum at absolute threshold for the same patch of retina. The quantized C.I.E. scotopic spectral sensitivity curve is a good description of both spectra. Therefore, the visual pigment studied must be human rhodopsin. 3. Its density has been estimated in five different ways. The results are in reasonable agreement. The optical density of human rhodopsin in vivo is about 0·35 (common logarithmic units) at its γmax. 4. The photosensitivity of human rhodopsin in vivo was determined by studying its rate of bleaching in response to steps of monochromatic light exposed to the dark adapted eye, by measuring the amount bleached in the steady state by monochromatic lights as well as the amount bleached by 10 sec flashes of white light. 5. The results obtained by the different methods are in good agreement with each other and with previous estimates made by others using white light. 6. The photosensitivity of human rhodopsin in vivo [εγmax = 62,000 to 120,000 l./cm mole] is much higher than expected from in vitro measurements. PMID:4825455

  12. The density and photosensitivity of human rhodopsin in the living retina.

    PubMed

    Alpern, M; Pugh, E N

    1974-03-01

    1. The visual pigment in a 5 degrees circular patch of the living human retina 18 degrees temporal from the fovea was studied with the Rushton retinal densitometer. The measuring light (570 nm) was selected to obviate artifacts from colour photoproducts.2. The action spectrum of a 10% bleach agrees well with the action spectrum at absolute threshold for the same patch of retina. The quantized C.I.E. scotopic spectral sensitivity curve is a good description of both spectra. Therefore, the visual pigment studied must be human rhodopsin.3. Its density has been estimated in five different ways. The results are in reasonable agreement. The optical density of human rhodopsin in vivo is about 0.35 (common logarithmic units) at its gamma(max.)4. The photosensitivity of human rhodopsin in vivo was determined by studying its rate of bleaching in response to steps of monochromatic light exposed to the dark adapted eye, by measuring the amount bleached in the steady state by monochromatic lights as well as the amount bleached by 10 sec flashes of white light.5. The results obtained by the different methods are in good agreement with each other and with previous estimates made by others using white light.6. The photosensitivity of human rhodopsin in vivo [epsilongamma(max) = 62,000 to 120,000 l./cm mole] is much higher than expected from in vitro measurements. PMID:4825455

  13. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yanyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Ke, Jiyuan; Tan, M. H. Eileen; Zhang, Chenghai; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Van Eps, Ned; Caro, Lydia N.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Lee, Regina J.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Gu, Xin; Pal, Kuntal; Ma, Jinming; Zhi, Xiaoyong; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Gati, Cornelius; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Wang, Dingjie; James, Daniel; Basu, Shibom; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Coe, Jesse; Liu, Haiguang; Lisova, Stella; Kupitz, Christopher; Grotjohann, Ingo; Fromme, Raimund; Jiang, Yi; Tan, Minjia; Yang, Huaiyu; Li, Jun; Wang, Meitian; Zheng, Zhong; Li, Dianfan; Howe, Nicole; Zhao, Yingming; Standfuss, Jörg; Diederichs, Kay; Dong, Yuhui; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Caffrey, Martin; Jiang, Hualiang; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Ernst, Oliver P.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-07-22

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a ~20° rotation between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. In conclusion, this structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.

  14. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kang, Yanyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; et al

    2015-07-22

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a ~20° rotationmore » between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. In conclusion, this structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.« less

  15. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  16. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  17. Evidence against a second autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa locus close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Inglehearn, C.; Bhattacharya, S. ); Farrar, J.; Humphries, P. ); Denton, M. ); Gal, A. )

    1993-08-01

    In 1989 McWilliam et al. reported close linkage of the autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) locus to chromosome 3q marker D3S47 in a large Irish pedigree (McWilliam et al 1989). Subsequent studies confirmed linkage in two other adRP families (Lester et al 1990; Olsson et al. 1990). Shortly afterward, utations in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, mapping to 3q21-24, were implicated in disease causation, and it is now known that around one-third of adRP results from such mutations (Dryja et al. 1991; Sung et al. 1991; Inglchearn et al. 1992a). At that time, sequencing studies had failed to find rhodopsin mutations in the three families first linked to 3q. Several adRP families in which rhodopsin mutations had been found gave lod scores that, when pooled, had a peak of 4.47 at a theta of .12 (Inglehearn et al. 1992b). The apparent lack of mutations in families TCDM1, adRP3, and 20 together with the linkage data in these and the proved RHO-RP families, led to speculation that two adRP loci existed on chromosome 3q (Olsson et al. 1990; Inglehearn et al. 1992b). However this situation has been reversed by more recent analysis, since rhodopsin mutations have now been found in all three families. There is therefore no longer any evidence to support the hypothesis that a second adRP locus exists close to rhodopsin on chromosome 3q.

  18. Mislocalization and Degradation of Human P23H-Rhodopsin-GFP in a Knockin Mouse Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Price, Brandee A.; Sandoval, Ivette M.; Chan, Fung; Simons, David L.; Wu, Samuel M.; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To engineer a knockin mouse model that can be used to monitor the effects of treatments on degradation and mislocalization of proline-to-histidine change at codon 23 (P23H) rhodopsin, a common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). The goal was to introduce a gene that expressed rhodopsin at low levels to avoid rapid retinal degeneration, and with a readily visible tag to make it easy to distinguish from wild type rhodopsin. Methods. One copy of the endogenous mouse rhodopsin gene was replaced with a mutant human rhodopsin gene that encodes P23H-rhodopsin fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) at its C terminus. The gene includes a LoxP site in the sequence corresponding to the 5′-untranslated region, which greatly reduces translation efficiency. Characterized are the resulting heterozygous and homozygous P23H-hRho-GFP mouse lines for mRNA and protein expression, P23H-rhodopsin localization in rod cells, effects on visual function, and retinal degeneration. Results. The retinas of heterozygous P23H-hRho-GFP mice are morphologically and functionally very similar to those of wild type mice, and they display little cell death over time. P23H-hRho-GFP mice transcribe the knockin gene as efficiently as the endogenous mouse allele, but they contain much less of the protein product than do knockin mice expressing nonmutant hRho-GFP, indicating that substantial degradation of P23H-rRho-GFP occurs in mouse rod cells. The remaining P23H-hRho-GFP mislocalizes to the inner segment and outer nuclear layer, with only approximately 20% in rod outer segments. Conclusions. P23H-hRho-GFP mice provide a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of potential therapies for ADRP that influence the levels or localization of P23H-rhodopsin. PMID:22110080

  19. Light-Induced Conformational Changes of Rhodopsin Probed by Fluorescent Alexa594 Immobilized on the Cytoplasmic Surface†

    PubMed Central

    Imamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio; Tokunaga, Fumio; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    A novel fluorescence method has been developed for detecting the light-induced conformational changes of rhodopsin and for monitoring the interaction between photolyzed rhodopsin and G-protein or arrestin. Rhodopsin in native membranes was selectively modified with fluorescent Alexa594–maleimide at the Cys316 position, with a large excess of the reagent Cys140 that was also derivatized. Modification with Alexa594 allowed the monitoring of fluorescence changes at a red excitation light wavelength of 605 nm, thus avoiding significant rhodopsin bleaching. Upon absorption of a photon by rhodopsin, the fluorescence intensity increased as much as 20% at acidic pH with an apparent pKa of ∼6.8 at 4 °C, and was sensitive to the presence of hydroxylamine. These findings indicated that the increase in fluorescence is specific for metarhodopsin II. In the presence of transducin, a significant increase in fluorescence was observed. This increase of fluorescence emission intensity was reduced by addition of GTP, in agreement with the fact that transducin enhances the formation of metarhodopsin II. Under conditions that favored the formation of a metarhodopsin II–Alexa594 complex, transducin slightly decreased the fluorescence. In the presence of arrestin, under conditions that favored the formation of metarhodopsin I or II, a phosphorylated, photolyzed rhodopsin–Alexa594 complex only slightly decreased the fluorescence intensity, suggesting that the cytoplasmic surface structure of metarhodopsin II is different in the complex with arrestin and transducin. These results demonstrate the application of Alexa594-modified rhodopsin (Alexa594–rhodopsin) to continuously monitor the conformational changes in rhodopsin during light-induced transformations and its interactions with other proteins. PMID:11106502

  20. Volume and enthalpy changes after photoexcitation of bovine rhodopsin: laser-induced optoacoustic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Strassburger, J M; Gärtner, W; Braslavsky, S E

    1997-01-01

    Laser-induced optoacoustic measurements were performed with bovine rhodopsin in the temperature range 5-32 degrees C in its natural environment (i.e., in washed membranes) as well as solubilized in dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside. A signal deconvolution procedure using a simple sequential kinetic scheme for the photobaric time evolution revealed, in the case of the washed membranes, the presence of an intermediate with a 14-ns lifetime at 25 degrees C, of the same order as that reported for the BSI intermediate in solubilized rhodopsin (Hug, S. J., W. J. Lewis, C. M. Einterz, T. E. Thorgeirsson, and D. S. Kliger. 1990. Nanosecond photolysis of rhodopsin: evidence for a new, blue-shifted intermediate. Biochemistry. 29:1475-1485), with an energy content of (85 +/- 20) kJ/mol, and accompanied by an expansion of 26 +/- 3 ml/mol. The difference in energy content between BSI and the next transient lumi was estimated in only -1 +/- 5 kJ/mol, concomitant with an expansion of 9 +/- 3 ml/mol. Thus, this transition, which according to literature involves an equilibrium, should be controlled by an entropic change, rather than by an enthalpic difference. This is supported by the fact that both activation parameters for the decay of batho and BSI decrease upon solubilization. For detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, two time constants were enough to fit the sample signal. A short lifetime ascribable to BSI was not detected in this case. For the first intermediate (probably batho in equilibrium with BSI), an energy content of 50 +/- 20 kJ/mol and an expansion of 20 +/- 1 ml/mol, and for lumi an energy content of 11 +/- 20 kJ/mol and a further expansion of 11 +/- 2 ml/mol were determined. Thus, the intermediates of the membrane-embedded form of rhodopsin (in contrast to solubilized samples) are kept in a higher energy level, although the total expansion from rhodopsin to lumi is similar for both conditions (35 +/- 6 and 31 +/- 3 ml/mol). The expansions are interpreted as protein

  1. Structural Mechanism for Light-driven Transport by a New Type of Chloride Ion Pump, Nonlabens marinus Rhodopsin-3.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Toshiaki; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Nakajima, Yu; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hato, Masakatsu; DeLong, Edward F; Kogure, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Iwasaki, Wataru; Shirouzu, Mikako

    2016-08-19

    The light-driven inward chloride ion-pumping rhodopsin Nonlabens marinus rhodopsin-3 (NM-R3), from a marine flavobacterium, belongs to a phylogenetic lineage distinct from the halorhodopsins known as archaeal inward chloride ion-pumping rhodopsins. NM-R3 and halorhodopsin have distinct motif sequences that are important for chloride ion binding and transport. In this study, we present the crystal structure of a new type of light-driven chloride ion pump, NM-R3, at 1.58 Å resolution. The structure revealed the chloride ion translocation pathway and showed that a single chloride ion resides near the Schiff base. The overall structure, chloride ion-binding site, and translocation pathway of NM-R3 are different from those of halorhodopsin. Unexpectedly, this NM-R3 structure is similar to the crystal structure of the light-driven outward sodium ion pump, Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2. Structural and mutational analyses of NM-R3 revealed that most of the important amino acid residues for chloride ion pumping exist in the ion influx region, located on the extracellular side of NM-R3. In contrast, on the opposite side, the cytoplasmic regions of K. eikastus rhodopsin 2 were reportedly important for sodium ion pumping. These results provide new insight into ion selection mechanisms in ion pumping rhodopsins, in which the ion influx regions of both the inward and outward pumps are important for their ion selectivities. PMID:27365396

  2. Expression of Drosophila rhodopsins during photoreceptor cell differentiation: insights into R7 and R8 cell subtype commitment.

    PubMed

    Earl, James B; Britt, Steven G

    2006-10-01

    The R7 and R8 photoreceptor cells of the Drosophila retina are thought to mediate color discrimination and polarized light detection. This is based on the patterned expression of different visual pigments, rhodopsins, in different photoreceptor cells. In this report, we examined the developmental timing of retinal patterning. There is genetic evidence that over the majority of the eye, patterned expression of opsin genes is regulated by a signal from one subtype of R7 cells to adjacent R8 cells. We examined the onset of expression of the rhodopsin genes to determine the latest time point by which photoreceptor subtype commitment must have occurred. We found that the onset of rhodopsin expression in all photoreceptors of the compound eye occurs during a narrow window from 79% to 84% of pupal development (approximately 8 h), pupal stages P12-P14. Rhodopsin 1 has the earliest onset, followed by Rhodopsins 3, 4, and 5 at approximately the same time, and finally Rhodopsin 6. This sequence mimics the model for how R7 and R8 photoreceptor cells are specified, and defines the timing of photoreceptor cell fate decisions with respect to other events in eye development. PMID:16495161

  3. Natural restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, K.S.

    1993-02-01

    After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

  4. Antisera to synthetic peptides of bovine rhodopsin: use as site-specific probes of disc membrane changes in retinal dystrophic dogs.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, D J; Spooner, B; Takemoto, L J

    1985-10-15

    Based on the amino acid sequence of bovine rhodopsin, five peptides corresponding to the carboxyl terminus and one loop region have been synthesized. Rabbit antisera to these peptides recognize rhodopsin in whole bovine and dog retinas. Antisera were used to detect differences in specific regions of rhodopsin in dystrophic vs normal dog retinas. As detected on both "dot blots" and Western blots, rhodopsin from retinas of dystrophic dogs has a reduced reaction with antisera to peptides, Rhod-4 and Rhod-10 (# 341-348 and 232-239, respectively). Since these sites on rhodopsin are possible binding sites for transducin and rhodopsin kinase, an alteration in these regions would have profound effects in the dystrophic state. PMID:3864443

  5. Response of soil microbial communities during changes in land management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The response of soil microbial communities to restoration following disturbances is poorly understood. We studied the soil microbial communities in a forest disturbance-restoration series comprising a native deciduous forest (DF), conventionally tilled cropland (CT) and mid-succession forest (SF) re...

  6. Na+-Translocating Rhodopsin from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 Does Not Contain Carotenoid Antenna.

    PubMed

    Bertsova, Y V; Arutyunyan, A M; Bogachev, A V

    2016-04-01

    Carotenoid-binding properties of Na+-translocating rhodopsin (NaR) from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 were studied. Carotenoids were extracted from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 cells. It was found that zeaxanthin is the predominant carotenoid of this bacterium. Incubation of recombinant NaR purified from Escherichia coli cells with carotenoids from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 did not result in any changes in optical absorption or circular dichroism spectra, indicating the absence of binding of the carotenoids by NaR. The same results were obtained using salinixanthin as the carotenoid. These data along with genome analysis of Dokdonia sp. PRO95 and other flavobacteria indicate that NaR from Dokdonia sp. PRO95 and possibly the other flavobacterial Na+-translocating rhodopsins do not contain a carotenoid antenna. PMID:27293099

  7. Single base pair differences in a shared motif determine differential Rhodopsin expression

    PubMed Central

    Rister, Jens; Razzaq, Ansa; Boodram, Pamela; Desai, Nisha; Tsanis, Cleopatra; Chen, Hongtao; Jukam, David; Desplan, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The final identity and functional properties of a neuron are specified by terminal differentiation genes, which are controlled by specific motifs in compact regulatory regions. To determine how these sequences integrate inputs from transcription factors that specify cell types, we compared the regulatory mechanism of Drosophila Rhodopsin genes that are expressed in subsets of photoreceptors to that of phototransduction genes that are expressed broadly, in all photoreceptors. Both sets of genes share an 11bp activator motif. Broadly expressed genes contain a palindromic version that mediates expression in all photoreceptors. In contrast, each Rhodopsin exhibits unique single bp substitutions that break the symmetry of the palindrome and generate activator or repressor motifs critical for restricting expression to photoreceptor subsets. Novel sensory neuron subtypes can therefore evolve through single base pair changes in short regulatory motifs, allowing the discrimination of a wide spectrum of stimuli. PMID:26785491

  8. Restoring Ancestral Language, Restoring Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Kay T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Cherokee Language Renewal Program that was designed to help Cherokee elementary school children learn to function in the dominant culture without sacrificing their own cultural heritage. Explains how the program got started, and reports on how it helps restore a cultural identify to a people who are at risk of losing their identity.…

  9. Feeding and the rhodopsin family g-protein coupled receptors in nematodes and arthropods.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Fonseca, Vera G; Power, Deborah M

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs) play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologs of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster), suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologs of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR) that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors. PMID:23264768

  10. The origin of GPCRs: identification of mammalian like Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Glutamate and Frizzled GPCRs in fungi.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Almén, Markus Sällman; Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in humans are classified into the five main families named Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled and Secretin according to the GRAFS classification. Previous results show that these mammalian GRAFS families are well represented in the Metazoan lineages, but they have not been shown to be present in Fungi. Here, we systematically mined 79 fungal genomes and provide the first evidence that four of the five main mammalian families of GPCRs, namely Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Glutamate and Frizzled, are present in Fungi and found 142 novel sequences between them. Significantly, we provide strong evidence that the Rhodopsin family emerged from the cAMP receptor family in an event close to the split of Opisthokonts and not in Placozoa, as earlier assumed. The Rhodopsin family then expanded greatly in Metazoans while the cAMP receptor family is found in 3 invertebrate species and lost in the vertebrates. We estimate that the Adhesion and Frizzled families evolved before the split of Unikonts from a common ancestor of all major eukaryotic lineages. Also, the study highlights that the fungal Adhesion receptors do not have N-terminal domains whereas the fungal Glutamate receptors have a broad repertoire of mammalian-like N-terminal domains. Further, mining of the close unicellular relatives of the Metazoan lineage, Salpingoeca rosetta and Capsaspora owczarzaki, obtained a rich group of both the Adhesion and Glutamate families, which in particular provided insight to the early emergence of the N-terminal domains of the Adhesion family. We identified 619 Fungi specific GPCRs across 79 genomes and revealed that Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota phylum have Metazoan-like GPCRs rather than the GPCRs specific for Fungi. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of the presence of four of the five main GRAFS families in Fungi and clarifies the early evolutionary history of the GPCR superfamily. PMID:22238661

  11. The Origin of GPCRs: Identification of Mammalian like Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Glutamate and Frizzled GPCRs in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in humans are classified into the five main families named Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled and Secretin according to the GRAFS classification. Previous results show that these mammalian GRAFS families are well represented in the Metazoan lineages, but they have not been shown to be present in Fungi. Here, we systematically mined 79 fungal genomes and provide the first evidence that four of the five main mammalian families of GPCRs, namely Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Glutamate and Frizzled, are present in Fungi and found 142 novel sequences between them. Significantly, we provide strong evidence that the Rhodopsin family emerged from the cAMP receptor family in an event close to the split of Opisthokonts and not in Placozoa, as earlier assumed. The Rhodopsin family then expanded greatly in Metazoans while the cAMP receptor family is found in 3 invertebrate species and lost in the vertebrates. We estimate that the Adhesion and Frizzled families evolved before the split of Unikonts from a common ancestor of all major eukaryotic lineages. Also, the study highlights that the fungal Adhesion receptors do not have N-terminal domains whereas the fungal Glutamate receptors have a broad repertoire of mammalian-like N-terminal domains. Further, mining of the close unicellular relatives of the Metazoan lineage, Salpingoeca rosetta and Capsaspora owczarzaki, obtained a rich group of both the Adhesion and Glutamate families, which in particular provided insight to the early emergence of the N-terminal domains of the Adhesion family. We identified 619 Fungi specific GPCRs across 79 genomes and revealed that Blastocladiomycota and Chytridiomycota phylum have Metazoan-like GPCRs rather than the GPCRs specific for Fungi. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of the presence of four of the five main GRAFS families in Fungi and clarifies the early evolutionary history of the GPCR superfamily. PMID:22238661

  12. Feeding and the Rhodopsin Family G-Protein Coupled Receptors in Nematodes and Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, João C.R.; Félix, Rute C.; Fonseca, Vera G.; Power, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs) play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologs of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster), suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologs of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR) that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors. PMID:23264768

  13. Reconstitution of Gloeobacter Rhodopsin with Echinenone: Role of the 4-keto Group†

    PubMed Central

    Balashov, Sergei P.; Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Choi, Ah Reum; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Liaaen-Jensen, Synnøve; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2010-01-01

    In previous work we reconstituted salinixanthin, the C40-carotenoid acyl glycoside that serves as a light-harvesting antenna to light-driven proton pump xanthorhodopsin, into a different protein, gloeobacter rhodopsin expressed in E. coli, and demonstrated that it transfers energy to the retinal chromophore (Imasheva et al. 2009. Biochemistry 48, 10948). The key to binding of salinixanthin was the accommodation of its ring near the retinal β-ionone ring. Here we examine two questions: do any of the native Gloeobacter carotenoids bind to gloeobacter rhodopsin, and does the 4-keto group of the ring play a role in binding. There is no salinixanthin in Gloeobacter violaceous, but a simpler carotenoid, echinenone, also with a 4-keto group that lacks the acyl glycoside, is present in addition to β-carotene and oscillol. We show that β-carotene does not bind to gloeobacter rhodopsin, but its 4-keto derivative, echinenone, does and functions as a light-harvesting antenna. This indicates that the 4-keto group is critical for the carotenoid binding. Further evidence for this is that salinixanthol, an analogue of salinixanthin in which the 4-keto group is reduced to hydroxyl, does not bind and is not engaged in energy transfer. According to the crystal structure of xanthorhodopsin, the ring of salinixanthin in the binding site is turned out of the plane of the polyene conjugated chain. Similar conformation is expected for echinenone in the gloeobacter rhodopsin. We suggest that the 4-keto group in salinixanthin and echinenone allows for the twisted conformation of the ring around C6-C7 bond and probably is engaged in interaction that locks the carotenoid in the binding site. PMID:20942439

  14. Restoration Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the accompanying photos, a laboratory technician is restoring the once-obliterated serial number of a revolver. The four-photo sequence shows the gradual progression from total invisibility to clear readability. The technician is using a new process developed in an applications engineering project conducted by NASA's Lewis Research Center in conjunction with Chicago State University. Serial numbers and other markings are frequently eliminated from metal objects to prevent tracing ownership of guns, motor vehicles, bicycles, cameras, appliances and jewelry. To restore obliterated numbers, crime laboratory investigators most often employ a chemical etching technique. It is effective, but it may cause metal corrosion and it requires extensive preparatory grinding and polishing. The NASA-Chicago State process is advantageous because it can be applied without variation to any kind of metal, it needs no preparatory work and number recovery can be accomplished without corrosive chemicals; the liquid used is water.

  15. Mutation spectrum of the rhodopsin gene among patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Dryja, T.P.; Han, L.B.; Cowley, G.S.; McGee, T.L.; Berson, E.L. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors searched for point mutations in every exon of the rhodopsin gene in 150 patients from separate families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Including the 4 mutations the authors reported previously, they found a total of 17 different mutations that correlate with the disease. Each of these mutations is a single-base substitution corresponding to a single amino acid substitution. Based on current models for the structure of rhodopsin, 3 of the 17 mutant amino acids are normally located on the cytoplasmic side of the protein, 6 in transmembrane domains, and 8 on the intradiscal side. Forty-three of the 150 patients (29%) carry 1 of these mutations, and no patient has more than 1 mutation. In every family with a mutation so far analyzed, the mutation cosegregates with the disease. They found one instance of a mutation in an affected patient that was absent in both unaffected parents (i.e., a new germ-line mutation), indicating that some isolate cases of retinitis pigmentosa carry a mutation of the rhodopsin gene.

  16. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Robson F; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2009-01-01

    The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan. PMID:19682383

  17. The effect of phosphorylation on arrestin-rhodopsin interaction in the squid visual system.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kelly A; Ou, Wei-Lin; Guan, Xinyu; Sugamori, Kim S; Bandyopadhyay, Abhishek; Ernst, Oliver P; Mitchell, Jane

    2015-12-01

    Invertebrate visual opsins are G protein-coupled receptors coupled to retinoid chromophores that isomerize reversibly between inactive rhodopsin and active metarhodopsin upon absorption of photons of light. The squid visual system has an arrestin protein that binds to metarhodopsin to block signaling to Gq and activation of phospholipase C. Squid rhodopsin kinase (SQRK) can phosphorylate both metarhodopsin and arrestin, a dual role that is unique among the G protein-coupled receptor kinases. The sites and role of arrestin phosphorylation by SQRK were investigated here using recombinant proteins. Arrestin was phosphorylated on serine 392 and serine 397 in the C-terminus. Unphosphorylated arrestin bound to metarhodopsin and phosphorylated metarhodopsin with similar high affinities (Kd 33 and 21 nM respectively), while phosphorylation of arrestin reduced the affinity 3- to 5-fold (Kd 104 nM). Phosphorylation of metarhodopsin slightly increased the dissociation of arrestin observed during a 1 hour incubation. Together these studies suggest a unique role for SQRK in phosphorylating both receptor and arrestin and inhibiting the binding of these two proteins in the squid visual system. Invertebrate visual systems are inactivated by arrestin binding to metarhodopsin that does not require receptor phosphorylation. Here we show that squid rhodopsin kinase phosphorylates arrestin on two serines (S392,S397) in the C-terminus and phosphorylation decreases the affinity of arrestin for squid metarhodopsin. Metarhodopsin phosphorylation has very little effect on arrestin binding but does increase arrestin dissociation. PMID:26375013

  18. Relationship between the excited state relaxation paths of rhodopsin and isorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Strambi, Angela; Coto, Pedro B; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2008-03-19

    The pigment Isorhodopsin, an analogue of the visual pigment Rhodopsin, is investigated via quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics computations based on an ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemical treatment. The limited <5 kcal mol(-1) error found for the spectral parameters allows for a nearly quantitative analysis of the excited-state structure and reactivity of its 9-cis-retinal chromophore. We demonstrate that, similar to Rhodopsin, Isorhodopsin features a shallow photoisomerization path. However, the structure of the reaction coordinate appears to be reversed. In fact, while the coordinate still corresponds to an asynchronous crankshaft motion, the dominant isomerization component involves a counterclockwise, rather than clockwise, twisting of the 9-cis bond. Similarly, the minor component involves a clockwise, rather than counterclockwise, twisting of the 11-trans bond. Ultimately, these results indicate that Rhodopsin and Isorhodopsin relax along a common excited-state potential energy valley starting from opposite ends. The fact that the central and lowest energy region of such valley runs along a segment of the intersection space between the ground and excited states of the protein explains why the pigments decay at distinctive conical intersection structures. PMID:18302369

  19. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie

    2015-07-01

    Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup. PMID:26144230

  20. Nonsense mutations in the rhodopsin gene that give rise to mild phenotypes trigger mRNA degradation in human cells by nonsense-mediated decay.

    PubMed

    Roman-Sanchez, Ramon; Wensel, Theodore G; Wilson, John H

    2016-04-01

    Eight different nonsense mutations in the human rhodopsin gene cause retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited degenerative disease of the retina that can lead to complete blindness. Although all these nonsense mutations lead to premature termination codons (PTCs) in rhodopsin mRNA, some display dominant inheritance, while others are recessive. Because nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) can degrade mRNAs containing PTCs and modulate the inheritance patterns of genetic diseases, we asked whether any of the nonsense mutations in the rhodopsin gene generated mRNAs that were susceptible to degradation by NMD. We hypothesized that nonsense mutations that caused mild RP phenotypes would trigger NMD, whereas those that did not engage NMD would cause more severe RP phenotypes-presumably due to the toxicity of the truncated protein. To test our hypothesis, we transfected human rhodopsin nonsense mutants into HEK293 and HT1080 human cells and measured transcript levels by qRT-PCR. In both cell lines, rhodopsin mutations Q64X and Q344X, which cause severe phenotypes that are dominantly inherited, yielded the same levels of rhodopsin mRNA as wild type. By contrast, rhodopsin mutations W161X and E249X, which cause recessive RP, showed decreased rhodopsin mRNA levels, consistent with NMD. Rhodopsin mutant Y136X, a dominant mutation that causes late-onset RP with a very mild pathology, also gave lower mRNA levels. Treatment of cells with Wortmannin, an inhibitor of NMD, eliminated the degradation of Y136X, W161X, and E249X rhodopsin mRNAs. These results suggest that NMD modulates the severity of RP in patients with nonsense mutations in the rhodopsin gene. PMID:26416182

  1. JGI's Carbon Cycling Studies on Restored Marshes

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Theroux, Susanna

    2015-06-02

    DOE Joint Genome Institute Metagenome Program Head, Susannah Tringe, and postdoc, Susie Theroux, discuss the lessons to be learned from studying the microbial diversity of marshes that have been converted to other uses, and are now being restored, as well as the potential impacts on the global carbon cycle.

  2. Modeling Photo-Bleaching Kinetics to Create High Resolution Maps of Rod Rhodopsin in the Human Retina.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Martin; Dobrosotskaya, Julia; Cunningham, Denise; Wong, Wai T; Chew, Emily Y; Czaja, Wojtek; Bonner, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and describe a novel non-invasive in-vivo method for mapping local rod rhodopsin distribution in the human retina over a 30-degree field. Our approach is based on analyzing the brightening of detected lipofuscin autofluorescence within small pixel clusters in registered imaging sequences taken with a commercial 488nm confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) over a 1 minute period. We modeled the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching by applying variational optimization techniques from applied mathematics. The physical model and the numerical analysis with its implementation are outlined in detail. This new technique enables the creation of spatial maps of the retinal rhodopsin and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) bisretinoid distribution with an ≈ 50μm resolution. PMID:26196397

  3. Light activation of rhodopsin: insights from molecular dynamics simulations guided by solid-state NMR distance restraints

    PubMed Central

    Hornak, Viktor; Ahuja, Shivani; Eilers, Markus; Goncalves, Joseph A.; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2009-01-01

    Structural restraints provided by solid-state NMR measurements of the metarhodopsin II intermediate are combined with molecular dynamics simulations to help visualize the structural changes in the light activation of rhodopsin. Since the time scale for the formation of the metarhodopsin II intermediate (> 1 ms) is beyond that readily accessible by molecular dynamics, we use NMR distance restraints derived from 13C dipolar recoupling measurements to guide the simulations. The simulations yield a working model for how photoisomerization of the 11-cis retinylidene chromophore bound within the interior of rhodopsin is coupled to transmembrane helix motion and receptor activation. The mechanism of activation that emerges is that multiple switches on the extracellular (or intradiscal) side of rhodopsin trigger structural changes that converge to disrupt the ionic lock between helices H3 and H6 on the intracellular side of the receptor. PMID:20004206

  4. A role for the cytoplasmic DEAD box helicase Dbp21E2 in rhodopsin maturation and photoreceptor viability

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, Karen L.; O’Tousa, Joseph. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Dbp21E2 (Dead box protein 21E2) is a member of a family of DEAD box helicases active in RNA processing and stability. We used genetic mosaics to identify mutants in Dbp21E2 that affect rhodopsin biogenesis and the maintenance of photoreceptor structure. Analysis of a GFP-tagged Rh1 rhodopsin construct placed under control of a heat shock promoter showed that Dbp21E21 fails to efficiently transport Rh1 from the photoreceptor cell body to the rhabdomere. Retinal degeneration is not dependent on the Rh1 transport defects. We also show that GFP- and RFP-tagged Dbp21E2 proteins are localized to discrete cytoplasmic structures that are not associated with organelles known to be active in rhodopsin transport. The molecular genetic analysis described here reveals an unexpected role for the Dbp21E2 helicase and provides an experimental system to further characterize its function. PMID:22794106

  5. Modeling Photo-Bleaching Kinetics to Create High Resolution Maps of Rod Rhodopsin in the Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Martin; Dobrosotskaya, Julia; Cunningham, Denise; Wong, Wai T.; Chew, Emily Y.; Czaja, Wojtek; Bonner, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and describe a novel non-invasive in-vivo method for mapping local rod rhodopsin distribution in the human retina over a 30-degree field. Our approach is based on analyzing the brightening of detected lipofuscin autofluorescence within small pixel clusters in registered imaging sequences taken with a commercial 488nm confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) over a 1 minute period. We modeled the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching by applying variational optimization techniques from applied mathematics. The physical model and the numerical analysis with its implementation are outlined in detail. This new technique enables the creation of spatial maps of the retinal rhodopsin and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) bisretinoid distribution with an ≈ 50μm resolution. PMID:26196397

  6. Rhodopsin in the Dark Hot Sea: Molecular Analysis of Rhodopsin in a Snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, Living near the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Rie; Kabutomori, Ryo; Okano, Keiko; Mitsui, Hiromasa; Takemura, Akihiro; Miwa, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Visual systems in deep-sea fishes have been previously studied from a photobiological aspect; however, those of deep-sea fish inhabiting the hydrothermal vents are far less understood due to sampling difficulties. In this study, we analyzed the visual pigment of a deep-sea snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, discovered and collected only near the hydrothermal vents of oceans around Japan. Proteins were solubilized from the C. rhodomelas eyeball and subjected to spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the presence of a pigment characterized by an absorption maximum (λmax) at 480 nm. Immunoblot analysis of the ocular protein showed a rhodopsin-like immunoreactivity. We also isolated a retinal cDNA encoding the entire coding sequence of putative C. rhodomelas rhodopsin (CrRh). HEK293EBNA cells were transfected with the CrRh cDNA and the proteins extracted from the cells were subjected to spectroscopic analysis. The recombinant CrRh showed the absorption maximum at 480 nm in the presence of 11-cis retinal. Comparison of the results from the eyeball extract and the recombinant CrRh strongly suggests that CrRh has an A1-based 11-cis-retinal chromophore and works as a photoreceptor in the C. rhodomelas retina, and hence that C. rhodomelas responds to dim blue light much the same as other deep-sea fishes. Because hydrothermal vent is a huge supply of viable food, C. rhodomelas likely do not need to participate diel vertical migration and may recognize the bioluminescence produced by aquatic animals living near the hydrothermal vents. PMID:26275172

  7. Rhodopsin in the Dark Hot Sea: Molecular Analysis of Rhodopsin in a Snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, Living near the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Rie; Kabutomori, Ryo; Okano, Keiko; Mitsui, Hiromasa; Takemura, Akihiro; Miwa, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Visual systems in deep-sea fishes have been previously studied from a photobiological aspect; however, those of deep-sea fish inhabiting the hydrothermal vents are far less understood due to sampling difficulties. In this study, we analyzed the visual pigment of a deep-sea snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, discovered and collected only near the hydrothermal vents of oceans around Japan. Proteins were solubilized from the C. rhodomelas eyeball and subjected to spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the presence of a pigment characterized by an absorption maximum (λmax) at 480 nm. Immunoblot analysis of the ocular protein showed a rhodopsin-like immunoreactivity. We also isolated a retinal cDNA encoding the entire coding sequence of putative C. rhodomelas rhodopsin (CrRh). HEK293EBNA cells were transfected with the CrRh cDNA and the proteins extracted from the cells were subjected to spectroscopic analysis. The recombinant CrRh showed the absorption maximum at 480 nm in the presence of 11-cis retinal. Comparison of the results from the eyeball extract and the recombinant CrRh strongly suggests that CrRh has an A1-based 11-cis-retinal chromophore and works as a photoreceptor in the C. rhodomelas retina, and hence that C. rhodomelas responds to dim blue light much the same as other deep-sea fishes. Because hydrothermal vent is a huge supply of viable food, C. rhodomelas likely do not need to participate diel vertical migration and may recognize the bioluminescence produced by aquatic animals living near the hydrothermal vents. PMID:26275172

  8. Activation of rhodopsin gene transcription in cultured retinal precursors of chicken embryo: role of Ca(2+) signaling and hyperpolarization-activated cation channels.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Marianne; Dejos, Camille; Bergès, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu; Voisin, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    This study reports that the spontaneous 50-fold activation of rhodopsin gene transcription, observed in cultured retinal precursors from 13-day chicken embryo, relies on a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. Activation of a transiently transfected rhodopsin promoter (luciferase reporter) in these cells was inhibited (60%) by cotransfection of a dominant-negative form of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein. Both rhodopsin promoter activity and rhodopsin mRNA accumulation were blocked by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II inhibitors, but not by protein kinase A inhibitors, suggesting a role of Ca(2+) rather than cAMP. This was confirmed by the inhibitory effect of general and T-type selective Ca(2+) channel blockers. Oscillations in Ca(2+) fluorescence (Fluo8) could be observed in 1/10 cells that activated the rhodopsin promoter (DsRed reporter). A robust and reversible inhibition of rhodopsin gene transcription by ZD7288 indicated a role of hyperpolarization-activated channels (HCN). Cellular localization and developmental expression of HCN1 were compatible with a role in the onset of rhodopsin gene transcription. Together, the data suggest that the spontaneous activation of rhodopsin gene transcription in cultured retinal precursors results from a signaling cascade that involves the pacemaker activity of HCN channels, the opening of voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channels, activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein. Rhodopsin gene expression in cultured retinal precursors from chicken embryo relies on a Ca2+-dependent mechanism whereby hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) activate T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCC) through membrane depolarization, causing calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) to phosphorylate the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and leading to activation of rhodopsin gene transcription. Photoreceptor localization and development

  9. A comparative study of rhodopsin function in the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis): Spectral tuning and light-activated kinetics.

    PubMed

    van Hazel, Ilke; Dungan, Sarah Z; Hauser, Frances E; Morrow, James M; Endler, John A; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-07-01

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment responsible for initiating the phototransduction cascade in vertebrate rod photoreceptors. Although well-characterized in a few model systems, comparative studies of rhodopsin function, particularly for nonmammalian vertebrates are comparatively lacking. Bowerbirds are rare among passerines in possessing a key substitution, D83N, at a site that is otherwise highly conserved among G protein-coupled receptors. While this substitution is present in some dim-light adapted vertebrates, often accompanying another unusual substitution, A292S, its functional relevance in birds is uncertain. To investigate functional effects associated with these two substitutions, we use the rhodopsin gene from the great bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis) as a background for site-directed mutagenesis, in vitro expression and functional characterization. We also mutated these sites in two additional rhodopsins that do not naturally possess N83, chicken and bovine, for comparison. Both sites were found to contribute to spectral blue-shifts, but had opposing effects on kinetic rates. Substitutions at site 83 were found to primarily affect the kinetics of light-activated rhodopsin, while substitutions at site 292 had a larger impact on spectral tuning. The contribution of substitutions at site 83 to spectral tuning in particular depended on genetic background, but overall, the effects of substitutions were otherwise surprisingly additive, and the magnitudes of functional shifts were roughly similar across all three genetic backgrounds. By employing a comparative approach with multiple species, our study provides new insight into the joint impact of sites 83 and 292 on rhodopsin structure-function as well as their evolutionary significance for dim-light vision across vertebrates. PMID:26889650

  10. Spectral Tuning of Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Rhodopsin: Evidence for Positive Selection and Functional Adaptation in a Cetacean Visual Pigment.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Kosyakov, Alexander; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-02-01

    Cetaceans have undergone a remarkable evolutionary transition that was accompanied by many sensory adaptations, including modification of the visual system for underwater environments. Recent sequencing of cetacean genomes has made it possible to begin exploring the molecular basis of these adaptations. In this study we use in vitro expression methods to experimentally characterize the first step of the visual transduction cascade, the light activation of rhodopsin, for the killer whale. To investigate the spectral effects of amino acid substitutions thought to correspond with absorbance shifts relative to terrestrial mammals, we used the orca gene as a background for the first site-directed mutagenesis experiments in a cetacean rhodopsin. The S292A mutation had the largest effect, and was responsible for the majority of the spectral difference between killer whale and bovine (terrestrial) rhodopsin. Using codon-based likelihood models, we also found significant evidence for positive selection in cetacean rhodopsin sequences, including on spectral tuning sites we experimentally mutated. We then investigated patterns of ecological divergence that may be correlated with rhodopsin functional variation by using a series of clade models that partitioned the data set according to phylogeny, habitat, and foraging depth zone. Only the model partitioning according to depth was significant. This suggests that foraging dives might be a selective regime influencing cetacean rhodopsin divergence, and our experimental results indicate that spectral tuning may be playing an adaptive role in this process. Our study demonstrates that combining computational and experimental methods is crucial for gaining insight into the selection pressures underlying molecular evolution. PMID:26486871

  11. Reconstitution of Gloeobacter violaceus Rhodopsin with a Light-Harvesting Carotenoid Antenna†

    PubMed Central

    Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Balashov, Sergei P.; Choi, Ah Reum; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2009-01-01

    We show that salinixanthin, the light-harvesting carotenoid antenna of xanthorhodopsin, can be reconstituted into the retinal protein from Gloeobacter violaceus expressed in E. coli. Reconstitution of gloeobacter rhodopsin with the carotenoid is accompanied by characteristic absorption changes and the appearance of CD bands similar to those observed for xanthorhodopsin that indicate immobilization and twist of the carotenoid in the binding site. As in xanthorhodopsin, the carotenoid functions as a light-harvesting antenna. The excitation spectrum for retinal fluorescence emission shows that ca. 36% of the energy absorbed by the carotenoid is transferred to the retinal. From excitation anisotropy, we calculate the angle between the two chromophores as ca. 50°, similar to that in xanthorhodopsin. The results indicate that gloeobacter rhodopsin binds salinixanthin in a similar way as xanthorhodopsin, and suggest that it might bind a carotenoid also in vivo. In the crystallographic structure of xanthorhodopsin, the conjugated chain of the carotenoid lies on the surface of helices E and F, and the 4-keto-ring is immersed in the protein at van der Waals distance from the ionone ring of the retinal. The 4-keto-ring is in the space occupied by a tryptophan in bacteriorhodopsin, which is replaced by the smaller glycine in xanthorhodopsin and gloeobacter rhodopsin. Specific binding of the carotenoid and its light-harvesting function are eliminated by a single mutation of the gloeobacter protein that replaces this glycine with a tryptophan. This indicates that the 4-keto-ring is critically involved in carotenoid binding, and suggests that a number of other recently identified retinal proteins, from a diverse group of organisms, could also contain carotenoid antenna since they carry the homologous glycine near the retinal. PMID:19842712

  12. Retinal dynamics underlie its switch from inverse agonist to agonist during rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Struts, Andrey V; Salgado, Gilmar F J; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Brown, Michael F

    2011-03-01

    X-ray and magnetic resonance approaches, though central to studies of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signaling, cannot address GPCR protein dynamics or plasticity. Here we show that solid-state (2)H NMR relaxation elucidates picosecond-to-nanosecond-timescale motions of the retinal ligand that influence larger-scale functional dynamics of rhodopsin in membranes. We propose a multiscale activation mechanism whereby retinal initiates collective helix fluctuations in the meta I-meta II equilibrium on the microsecond-to-millisecond timescale. PMID:21278756

  13. Independent and synergistic interaction of retinal G-protein subunits with bovine rhodopsin measured by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W A; Jian, X; Chen, L; Northup, J K

    2001-01-01

    We have used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements for the kinetic analysis of G-protein-receptor interaction monitored in real time. Functionally active rhodopsin was immobilized on an SPR surface, with full retention of biochemical specific activity for catalysis of nucleotide exchange on the retinal G-protein alpha subunit, via binding to immobilized concanavalin A. The binding interactions of bovine retinal alpha(t) and beta(1)gamma(1) subunits with rhodopsin measured by SPR were profoundly synergistic. Synergistic binding of the retinal G-protein subunits to rhodopsin was not observed for guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate-bound Galpha(t), nor was binding observed with squid retinal Galpha(q), which is not activated by bovine rhodopsin. The binding affinity (336+/-171 nM; mean value+/-S.D.) of retinal betagamma for rhodopsin in the presence of retinal alpha subunit measured by SPR confirmed the apparent affinity of 254 nM determined previously by nucleotide exchange assays. Binding of beta(1)gamma(1), beta(1)gamma(2), and beta(1)gamma(8-olf) dimers to rhodopsin, independently of the alpha subunit, was readily observable by SPR. Further, these dimers, differing only in their gamma subunit compositions, displayed markedly distinct binding affinities and kinetics. The beta(1)gamma(2) dimer bound with a kinetically determined K(d) of 13+/-3 nM, a value nearly identical with the biochemically determined K(1/2) of 10 nM. The physiologically appropriate beta(1)gamma(1) displayed rapid association and dissociation kinetics, whereas the other beta(1)gamma dimers dissociated at a rate less than 1/100 as fast. Thus rhodopsin interaction with its native signalling partners is both rapid and transient, whereas the interaction of rhodopsin with heterologous Gbetagamma dimers is markedly prolonged. These results suggest that the duration of a G-protein-coupled receptor signalling event is an intrinsic property of the G-protein coupling partners; in particular, the

  14. Frequency-rank correlations of rhodopsin mutations with tuned hydropathic roughness based on self-organized criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2012-11-01

    The behavior of disease-linked mutations of membrane proteins is especially simple in rhodopsin, where they are well-studied, as they are responsible for retinitis pigmentosa, RP (retinal degeneration). Here we show that the frequency of occurrence of single RP mutations is strongly influenced by their transportational survival rates, and that this survival correlates well (82%) with a long-range, non-local hydropathic measure of the roughness of the water interfaces of ex-membrane rhodopsin based on self-organized criticality (SOC). It is speculated that this concept may be generally useful in studying survival rates of many mutated proteins.

  15. His166 is critical for active-site proton transfer and phototaxis signaling by sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X N; Spudich, J L

    1997-01-01

    Photoinduced deprotonation of the retinylidene Schiff base in the sensory rhodopsin I transducer (SRI-Htrl) complex results in formation of the phototaxis signaling state S373. Here we report identification of a residue, His166, critical to this process, as well as to reprotonation of the Schiff base during the recovery phase of the SRI photocycle. Each of the residue substitutions A, D, G, L, S, V, or Y at position 166 reduces the flash yield of S373, to values ranging from 2% of wild type for H166Y to 23% for H166V. The yield of S373 is restored to wild-type levels in Htrl-free H166L by alkaline deprotonation of Asp76, a Schiff base proton acceptor normally not ionized in the SRI-Htrl complex, showing that proton transfer from the Schiff base in H166L occurs when an acceptor is made available. The flash yield and rate of decay of S373 of the mutants are pH dependent, even when complexed with Htrl, which confers pH insensitivity to wild-type SRI, suggesting that partial disruption of the complex has occurred. The rates of S373 reprotonation at neutral pH are also prolonged in all H166X mutants, with half-times from 5 s to 160 s (wild type, 1 s). All mutations of His166 tested disrupt phototaxis signaling. No response (H166D, H166L), dramatically reduced responses (H166V), or inverted responses to orange light (H166A, H166G, H166S, and H166Y) or to both orange and near-UV light (H166Y) are observed. Our conclusions are that His166 1) plays a role in the pathways of proton transfer both to and from the Schiff base in the SRI-Htrl complex, either as a structurally important residue or possibly as a participant in proton transfers; 2) is involved in the modulation of SRI photoreaction kinetics by Htrl; and 3) is important in phototaxis signaling. Consistent with the involvement of the His imidazole moiety, the addition of 10 mM imidazole to membrane suspensions containing H166A receptors accelerates S373 decay 10-fold at neutral pH, and a negligible effect is seen on

  16. Quantitation of photochromism of sensory rhodopsin-I by computerized tracking of Halobacterium halobium cells.

    PubMed

    Marwan, W; Oesterhelt, D

    1990-09-20

    The swimming behavior of Halobacterium halobium is controlled by light which acts through retinal photoreceptor proteins. The sensing of near-ultraviolet (u.v.) was proposed to be mediated by the thermally metastable intermediate SR-I373 that is formed upon orange light absorption by sensory rhodopsin-I (SR-I). In order to test the validity of this proposal, we analyzed the photochromic behavior of the functional near-u.v. receptor in situ by use of an automated cell tracking system. The system was specifically designed for detection of swimming reversals in individual cells and calibrated with a straight-swimming mutant of H. halobium. Quantitative analysis of the response of the cells to near-u.v. revealed that orange background light increased the number of active near-u.v. receptor molecules. The intensity-dependence of this effect fitted into the kinetic scheme of a photochromic receptor pigment. The half-life of the functional near-u.v. receptor species was determined under continuous orange background light and found to be similar to that of the SR-I373 intermediate of sensory rhodopsin-I in intact cells. These results clearly support the assignment of the near-u.v. receptor to SR-I373. The kind of kinetic analysis described here, might be a useful tool in assigning spectroscopic data of pigments to photoreceptor function also in other organisms. PMID:2213884

  17. Small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering reveal conformational changes in rhodopsin activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Perera, Suchitrhanga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey V.; Graziono, Vito; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Heller, William T.; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Understanding G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation plays a crucial role in the development of novel improved molecular drugs. During photo-activation, the retinal chromophore of the visual GPCR rhodopsin isomerizes from 11-cis to all-trans conformation, yielding an equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. The principal goals of this work are to address whether the activation of rhodopsin leads to a single state or a conformational ensemble, and how protein organizational structure changes with detergent environment in solution. We use both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques to answer the above questions. For the first time we observe the change in protein conformational ensemble upon photo-activation by SANS with contrast variation, which enables the separate study of the protein structure within the detergent assembly. In addition, SAXS study of protein structure within detergent assembly suggests that the detergent molecules form a belt of monolayer (micelle) around protein with different geometrical shapes to keep the protein in folded state.

  18. Initial excited-state dynamics of an N-alkylated indanylidene-pyrroline (NAIP) rhodopsin analog.

    PubMed

    Schapiro, Igor; Fusi, Stefania; Olivucci, Massimo; Andruniów, Tadeusz; Sasidharanpillai, Swaroop; Loppnow, Glen R

    2014-10-23

    N-Alkylated indanylidene-pyrroline-based molecular switches mimic different aspects of the light-induced retinal chromophore isomerization in rhodopsin: the vertebrate dim-light visual pigment. In particular, they display a similar ultrashort excited-state lifetime, subpicosecond photoproduct appearance time, and photoproduct vibrational coherence. To better understand the early light-induced dynamics of such systems, we measured and modeled the resonance Raman spectra of the Z-isomer of the N-methyl-4-(5'-methoxy-2',2'-dimethyl-indan-1'-ylidene)-5-methyl-2,3-dihydro-2H-pyrrolium (NAIP) switch in methanol solution. It is shown that the data, complemented with a <70 fs excited-state trajectory computation, demonstrate initial excited-state structural dynamics dominated by double-bond expansion and single-bond contraction stretches. This mode subsequently couples with the five-membered ring inversion and double-bond torsion. These results are discussed in the context of the mechanism of the excited-state photoisomerization of NAIP switches in solution and the 11-cis retinal in rhodopsin. PMID:25255466

  19. TRP and Rhodopsin Transport Depends on Dual XPORT ER Chaperones Encoded by an Operon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zijing; Chen, Hsiang-Chin; Montell, Craig

    2015-10-20

    TRP channels and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play critical roles in sensory reception. However, the identities of the chaperones that assist GPCRs in translocating from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are limited, and TRP ER chaperones are virtually unknown. The one exception for TRPs is Drosophila XPORT. Here, we show that the xport locus is bicistronic and encodes unrelated transmembrane proteins, which enable the signaling proteins that initiate and culminate phototransduction, rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) and TRP, to traffic to the plasma membrane. XPORT-A and XPORT-B are ER proteins, and loss of either has a profound impact on TRP and Rh1 targeting to the light-sensing compartment of photoreceptor cells. XPORT-B complexed in vivo with the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian HSP70 protein, GRP78/BiP, which, in turn, associated with Rh1. Our work highlights a coordinated network of chaperones required for the biosynthesis of the TRP channel and rhodopsin in Drosophila photoreceptor cells. PMID:26456832

  20. Dephosphorylation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin by latent phosphatase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.D.; Fong, Y.L.; Benovic, J.L.; Sibley, D.R.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1988-06-25

    Recent evidence suggests that the function of receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins may be controlled by highly specific protein kinases, e.g. rhodopsin kinase and the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. In order to investigate the nature of the phosphatases which might be involved in controlling the state of receptor phosphorylation we studied the ability of four highly purified well characterized protein phosphatases to dephosphorylate preparations of rhodopsin or beta 2-adrenergic receptor which had been highly phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. These included: type 1 phosphatase, calcineurin phosphatase, type 2A phosphatase, and the high molecular weight latent phosphatase 2. Under conditions in which all the phosphatases could dephosphorylate such common substrates as (/sup 32/P)phosphorylase a and (/sup 32/P)myelin basic protein at similar rates only the latent phosphatase 2 was active on the phosphorylated receptors. Moreover, a latent phosphatase activity was found predominantly in a sequestered membrane fraction of frog erythrocytes. This parallels the distribution of a beta-adrenergic receptor phosphatase activity recently described in these cells. These data suggest a potential role for the latent phosphatase 2 as a specific receptor phosphatase.

  1. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin. II. Magnetic resonance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2016-02-01

    This article continues our review of spectroscopic studies of G-protein-coupled receptors. Magnetic resonance methods including electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide specific structural and dynamical data for the protein in conjunction with optical methods (vibrational, electronic spectroscopy) as discussed in the accompanying article. An additional advantage is the opportunity to explore the receptor proteins in the natural membrane lipid environment. Solid-state 2H and 13C NMR methods yield information about both the local structure and dynamics of the cofactor bound to the protein and its light-induced changes. Complementary site-directed spin-labeling studies monitor the structural alterations over larger distances and correspondingly longer time scales. A multiscale reaction mechanism describes how local changes of the retinal cofactor unlock the receptor to initiate large-scale conformational changes of rhodopsin. Activation of the G-protein-coupled receptor involves an ensemble of conformational substates within the rhodopsin manifold that characterize the dynamically active receptor.

  2. Rhodopsin and retinochrome in the retina of a marine gastropod, Conomulex luhuanus.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, K; Terakita, A; Hara, R; Hara, T

    1986-01-01

    Photopigments in the conch retina were examined with special attention given to the photic vesicles characteristic of gastropod photoreceptors. Three different fractions of visual cell fragments were prepared from the retina: the MV-fraction containing the rhabdomal microvilli, and the PVH- and PVL-fractions containing the photic vesicles located in the visual cell body. Rhodopsin was found in the MV-fraction (lambda max = 474 nm), and yielded a photoequilibrium mixture with metarhodopsin (lambda max = 512 nm) on irradiation with blue light. Retinochrome was found in both of the PVH- and PVL-fractions (lambda max = approximately 510 nm), and was bleached into metaretinochrome by exposure to orange light, showing no marked shift of the absorption peak. Unlike the PVH-fraction, the PVL-fraction contains much aporetinochrome in addition to retinochrome, suggesting that the large mass of photic vesicles around the nucleus may serve as storage for retinal in retinochrome and for newly synthesized aporetinochrome. The total amount of retinochrome in the retina was several times higher than that of rhodopsin, distinguishing the gastropod eye from the cephalopod eye. PMID:3750849

  3. CULD is required for rhodopsin and TRPL channel endocytic trafficking and survival of photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endocytosis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and associated channels contributes to desensitization and adaptation of a variety of signaling cascades. In Drosophila melanogaster, the main light-sensing rhodopsin (Rh1; encoded by ninaE) and the downstream ion channel, transient receptor potential like (TRPL), are endocytosed in response to light, but the mechanism is unclear. By using an RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) approach, we discovered a protein we named CULD, a photoreceptor-cell enriched CUB- and LDLa-domain transmembrane protein, that is required for endocytic trafficking of Rh1 and TRPL. CULD localized to endocytic Rh1-positive or TRPL-positive vesicles. Mutations in culd resulted in the accumulation of Rh1 and TRPL within endocytic vesicles, and disrupted the regular turnover of endocytic Rh1 and TRPL. In addition, loss of CULD induced light- and age-dependent retinal degeneration, and reduced levels of Rh1, but not of TRPL, suppressed retinal degeneration in culd-null mutant flies. Our data demonstrate that CULD plays an important role in the endocytic turnover of Rh1 and TRPL, and suggest that CULD-dependent rhodopsin endocytic trafficking is required for maintaining photoreceptor integrity. PMID:26598556

  4. TRP and rhodopsin transport depends on dual XPORT ER chaperones encoded by an operon

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zijing; Chen, Hsiang-Chin; Montell, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Summary TRP channels and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) play critical roles in sensory reception. However, the identities of the chaperones that assist GPCRs in translocating from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are limited, and TRP ER chaperones are virtually unknown. The one exception for TRPs is Drosophila XPORT. Here, we show that the xport locus is bicistronic, and encodes unrelated transmembrane proteins, which enable the signaling proteins that initiate and culminate phototransduction, rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) and TRP, to traffic to the plasma membrane. XPORT-A and XPORT-B are ER proteins, and loss of either has a profound impact on TRP and Rh1 targeting to the light-sensing compartment of photoreceptor cells. XPORT-B complexed in vivo with the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian HSP70 protein, GRP78/BiP, which in turn associated with Rh1. Our work highlights a coordinated network of chaperones required for the biosynthesis of the TRP channel and rhodopsin in Drosophila photoreceptor cells. PMID:26456832

  5. Retinal orientation and interactions in rhodopsin reveal a two-stage trigger mechanism for activation.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Zaitseva, Ekaterina; Vogel, Reiner; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-01-01

    The 11-cis retinal chromophore is tightly packed within the interior of the visual receptor rhodopsin and isomerizes to the all-trans configuration following absorption of light. The mechanism by which this isomerization event drives the outward rotation of transmembrane helix H6, a hallmark of activated G protein-coupled receptors, is not well established. To address this question, we use solid-state NMR and FTIR spectroscopy to define the orientation and interactions of the retinal chromophore in the active metarhodopsin II intermediate. Here we show that isomerization of the 11-cis retinal chromophore generates strong steric interactions between its β-ionone ring and transmembrane helices H5 and H6, while deprotonation of its protonated Schiff's base triggers the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bonding network involving residues on H6 and within the second extracellular loop. We integrate these observations with previous structural and functional studies to propose a two-stage mechanism for rhodopsin activation. PMID:27585742

  6. In Situ Structural Studies of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin in the E. coli Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Wang, Shenlin; Munro, Rachel; Ritz, Emily; Hung, Ivan; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Jiang, Yunjiang; Liang, Hongjun; Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance is well suited for the study of membrane proteins in the nativelike lipid environment. However, the natural cellular membrane is invariably more complex than the proteoliposomes most often used for solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies, and differences may affect the structure and dynamics of the proteins under examination. In this work we use SSNMR and other biochemical and biophysical methods to probe the structure of a seven-transmembrane helical photoreceptor, Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), prepared in the Escherichia coli inner membrane, and compare it to that in a bilayer formed by DMPC/DMPA lipids. We find that ASR is organized into trimers in both environments but forms two-dimensional crystal lattices of different symmetries. It favors hexagonal packing in liposomes, but may form a square lattice in the E. coli membrane. To examine possible changes in structure site-specifically, we perform two- and three-dimensional SSNMR experiments and analyze the differences in chemical shifts and peak intensities. Overall, this analysis reveals that the structure of ASR is largely conserved in the inner membrane of E. coli, with many of the important structural features of rhodopsins previously observed in ASR in proteoliposomes being preserved. Small, site-specific perturbations in protein structure that occur as a result of the membrane changes indicate that the protein can subtly adapt to its environment without large structural rearrangement. PMID:25863060

  7. Constraints on the conformation of the cytoplasmic face of dark-adapted and light-excited rhodopsin inferred from antirhodopsin antibody imprints

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Brian W.; Mumey, Brendan; Hargrave, Paul A.; Arendt, Anatol; Ernst, Oliver P.; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Callis, Patrik R.; Burritt, James B.; Jesaitis, Algirdas J.; Dratz, Edward A.

    2003-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the best-understood member of the large G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The G-protein amplification cascade is triggered by poorly understood light-induced conformational changes in rhodopsin that are homologous to changes caused by agonists in other GPCRs. We have applied the "antibody imprint" method to light-activated rhodopsin in native membranes by using nine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against aqueous faces of rhodopsin. Epitopes recognized by these mAbs were found by selection from random peptide libraries displayed on phage. A new computer algorithm, FINDMAP, was used to map the epitopes to discontinuous segments of rhodopsin that are distant in the primary sequence but are in close spatial proximity in the structure. The proximity of a segment of the N-terminal and the loop between helices VI and VIII found by FINDMAP is consistent with the X-ray structure of the dark-adapted rhodopsin. Epitopes to the cytoplasmic face segregated into two classes with different predicted spatial proximities of protein segments that correlate with different preferences of the antibodies for stabilizing the metarhodopsin I or metarhodopsin II conformations of light-excited rhodopsin. Epitopes of antibodies that stabilize metarhodopsin II indicate conformational changes from dark-adapted rhodopsin, including rearrangements of the C-terminal tail and altered exposure of the cytoplasmic end of helix VI, a portion of the C-3 loop, and helix VIII. As additional antibodies are subjected to antibody imprinting, this approach should provide increasingly detailed information on the conformation of light-excited rhodopsin and be applicable to structural studies of other challenging protein targets. PMID:14573859

  8. Impacts of retinal polyene (de)methylation on the photoisomerization mechanism and photon energy storage of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Elżbieta; Andruniów, Tadeusz

    2015-07-14

    Ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemical methodology combined with molecular mechanics (CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER) was applied to probe impacts of retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB) polyene methylation and/or demethylation on the mechanism of photochemical isomerization in bovine rhodopsin. We have examined structural and spectroscopic properties of wild-type rhodopsin (with 11-cis-9,13-dimethyl-RPSB) and artificial rhodopsins, hosting four 11-cis-RPSB derivatives, 13-demethyl-, 9-demethyl-, 10-methyl-13-demethyl-, and 10-methyl-RPSB, evolving along the photoisomerization coordinate. It is found that the addition of 10-methyl or/and deletion of 9-/13-methyl groups do not appear to interfere structurally with the photoisomerization pathway in the S1 excited state. Remarkably, the two-mode space-saving mechanism initiated by bond order inversion and followed by asynchronous bicycle-pedal distortion in the RPSB backbone drives the photoreaction in all rhodopsin analogues studied here. However, methylation and/or demethylation is responsible for perturbation of excess energy deposited in the conical intersection structures. The analysis of photon energy stored by bathorhodopsin in synthetic pigments reveals that it is affected by steric crowding of methyl substituents in the RPSB backbone. PMID:26074351

  9. Influence of GDP on interaction of transducin with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and rhodopsin from bovine retinal rods

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.O.

    1986-12-20

    In the presence of guanine nucleotides and rhodopsin-containing membranes from bovine retinal rod outer segments transducin stimulates light-sensitive cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 5.5- to 7-fold. The activation constant (K/sub act/) for GTP and Gpp(NH)p is equal to 0.25 ..mu..M, while that for GDP and GDP..beta..S is 14 and 110 ..mu..M, respectively. GDP free of admixtures of other nucleotides does not activate phosphodiesterase at concentrations up to 1 mM, but is bound to transducin and inhibits the Gpp(NH)p-dependent activation of phosphodiesterase. The nature of the interaction of transducin with depolarized rhodopsin also depends on the type of guanine nucleotide bound: in the presence of GDP rhodopsin-containing membranes bind 70-100% of the transducin, whereas in the presence of Gpp(NH)p only 13% of the protein is bound. The data obtained indicate that GDP and GTP convert transducin to two different functional states: the transducin-GTP complex is bound to phosphodiesterase and activates it, while the transducin-GDP complex is bound primarily to rhodopsin.

  10. Excited-state structure and isomerization dynamics of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin from resonance Raman intensities.

    PubMed Central

    Loppnow, G R; Mathies, R A

    1988-01-01

    Resonance Raman excitation profiles have been measured for the bovine visual pigment rhodopsin using excitation wavelengths ranging from 457.9 to 647.1 nm. A complete Franck-Condon analysis of the absorption spectrum and resonance Raman excitation profiles has been performed using an excited-state, time-dependent wavepacket propagation technique. This has enabled us to determine the change in geometry upon electronic excitation of rhodopsin's 11-cis-retinal protonated Schiff base chromophore along 25 normal coordinates. Intense low-frequency Raman lines are observed at 98, 135, 249, 336, and 461 cm-1 whose intensities provide quantitative, mode-specific information about the excited-state torsional deformations that lead to isomerization. The dominant contribution to the width of the absorption band in rhodopsin results from Franck-Condon progressions in the 1,549 cm-1 ethylenic normal mode. The lack of vibronic structure in the absorption spectrum is shown to be caused by extensive progressions in low-frequency torsional modes and a large homogeneous linewidth (170 cm-1 half-width) together with thermal population of low-frequency modes and inhomogeneous site distribution effects. The resonance Raman cross-sections of rhodopsin are unusually weak because the excited-state wavepacket moves rapidly (approximately 35 fs) and permanently away from the Franck-Condon geometry along skeletal stretching and torsional coordinates. PMID:3416032

  11. NMR spectroscopy in studies of light-induced structural changes in mammalian rhodopsin: applicability of solution (19)F NMR.

    PubMed

    Klein-Seetharaman, J; Getmanova, E V; Loewen, M C; Reeves, P J; Khorana, H G

    1999-11-23

    We report high resolution solution (19)F NMR spectra of fluorine-labeled rhodopsin mutants in detergent micelles. Single cysteine substitution mutants in the cytoplasmic face of rhodopsin were labeled by attachment of the trifluoroethylthio (TET), CF(3)-CH(2)-S, group through a disulfide linkage. TET-labeled cysteine mutants at amino acid positions 67, 140, 245, 248, 311, and 316 in rhodopsin were thus prepared. Purified mutant rhodopsins (6-10 mg), in dodecylmaltoside, were analyzed at 20 degrees C by solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. The spectra recorded in the dark showed the following chemical shifts relative to trifluoroacetate: Cys-67, 9.8 ppm; Cys-140, 10.6 ppm; Cys-245, 9.9 ppm; Cys-248, 9.5 ppm; Cys-311, 9.9 ppm; and Cys-316, 10.0 ppm. Thus, all mutants showed chemical shifts downfield that of free TET (6.5 ppm). On illumination to form metarhodopsin II, upfield changes in chemical shift were observed for (19)F labels at positions 67 (-0.2 ppm) and 140 (-0.4 ppm) and downfield changes for positions 248 (+0.1 ppm) and 316 (+0.1 ppm) whereas little or no change was observed at positions 311 and 245. On decay of metarhodopsin II, the chemical shifts reverted largely to those originally observed in the dark. The results demonstrate the applicability of solution (19)F NMR spectroscopy to studies of the tertiary structures in the cytoplasmic face of intact rhodopsin in the dark and on light activation. PMID:10570143

  12. Drosophila Fatty Acid Transport Protein Regulates Rhodopsin-1 Metabolism and Is Required for Photoreceptor Neuron Survival

    PubMed Central

    Dourlen, Pierre; Bertin, Benjamin; Chatelain, Gilles; Robin, Marion; Napoletano, Francesco; Roux, Michel J.; Mollereau, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of the visual response is essential for photoreceptor function and survival. Visual response dysregulation often leads to photoreceptor cell degeneration, but the causes of such cell death are not well understood. In this study, we investigated a fatty acid transport protein (fatp) null mutation that caused adult-onset and progressive photoreceptor cell death. Consistent with fatp having a role in the retina, we showed that fatp is expressed in adult photoreceptors and accessory cells and that its re-expression in photoreceptors rescued photoreceptor viability in fatp mutants. The visual response in young fatp-mutant flies was abnormal with elevated electroretinogram amplitudes associated with high levels of Rhodopsin-1 (Rh1). Reducing Rh1 levels in rh1 mutants or depriving flies of vitamin A rescued photoreceptor cell death in fatp mutant flies. Our results indicate that fatp promotes photoreceptor survival by regulating Rh1 abundance. PMID:22844251

  13. Spectrum of rhodopsin gene mutations in Chinese patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guoxing; Xie, Shipeng; Feng, Na; Yuan, Zhifeng; Zhang, Minglian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was to analyze the spectrum and frequency of rhodopsin gene (RHO) mutations in Chinese patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Patients were given physical examinations, and blood samples were collected for DNA extraction. The RHO mutations were screened with direct sequencing. Results Eight heterozygous nucleotide changes were detected in eight of 300 probands with RP, including six novel mutations and two known mutations. p.R21C, p.C110S, p.G182V, p.C187G, c.409–426delGTGGTGGTGTGTAAGCCC, and p.P347L were found in six autosomal dominant families. p.T92I and p.Y178C were found in two isolated cases. Conclusions The results reveal the spectrum and frequency of RHO mutations in Chinese patients with different forms of RP and demonstrate that RHO mutations account for a high proportion of autosomal dominant RP (adRP) cases. PMID:25221422

  14. Wavelength Discrimination in Drosophila Suggests a Role of Rhodopsin 1 in Color Vision

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, Christian; Wachtler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Among the five photoreceptor opsins in the eye of Drosophila, Rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) is expressed in the six outer photoreceptors. In a previous study that combined behavioral genetics with computational modeling, we demonstrated that flies can use the signals from Rh1 for color vision. Here, we provide an in-depth computational analysis of wildtype Drosophila wavelength discrimination specifically considering the consequences of different choices of computations in the preprocessing of the behavioral data. The results support the conclusion that Drosophila wavelength discrimination behavior can best be explained by a contribution of Rh1. These findings are corroborated by results of an information-theoretical analysis that shows that Rh1 provides information for discrimination of natural reflectance spectra. PMID:27258000

  15. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C.H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes. PMID:27070998

  16. Color regulation in the archaebacterial phototaxis receptor phoborhodopsin (sensory rhodopsin II)

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, T.; Yan, B.; Mazur, P.; Derguini, F.; Nakanishi, K.; Spudich, J.L. )

    1990-09-11

    Phoborhodopsin, a repellent phototaxis receptor in Halobacterium halobium, exhibits vibrational fine structure, a feature that has not been identified for any other rhodopsin pigment at physiological temperatures. This conclusion follows form analysis of the absorption properties of the pigment in H. halobium membranes containing native retinal and an array of retinal analogues. The absorption spectrum of the native pigment has a maximum at 487 nm with a pronounced shoulder at 460 nm; however, the bandwidth is that expected for a single retinylidene species. Gaussian band-shape simulation with a spacing corresponding to the vibrational frequencies of polyene stretching modes reproduces the structured absorption spectra of native pigment as well as of analogue phoborhodopsin. Absorption shifts produced by a series of dihydroretinal and other retinal analogues strongly indicate that the dominant factor regulating the color of the pigment is planarization of the retinal ring with respect to the polyene chain.

  17. The rhodopsin-like pigments of halobacteria - Light-energy and signal transducers in an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeckenius, W.

    1985-01-01

    Three, small retinylidene proteins observed in halobacteria are described. The characteristics of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), which is synthesized during low O2 tension and intense illumination, and the role of bR in the cyclic photoreactions that translocate protons are examined. The detected light-driven chloride influx pigment, halorhodopsin (hR), is also capable of light-driven ion translocation; the hR transport reactions which are chloride dependent and involve isomerization are studied. The sensory photosystem of halobacteria and the receptor functions of the retinal pigment slow rhodopsin are discussed. The similarity of the choromphore structure and photoreactions, and the evolutionary relation between halobacteria and animal pigments are considered.

  18. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N; Spence, John C H; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes. PMID:27070998

  19. Characterization of Ribozymes Targeting a Congenital Night Blindness Mutation in Rhodopsin Mutation.

    PubMed

    Conley, Shannon M; Whalen, Patrick; Lewin, Alfred S; Naash, Muna I

    2016-01-01

    The G90D mutation in the rhodopsin gene leads to autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) in patients. This occurs because the G90D mutant protein cannot efficiently bind chromophore and is constitutively active. To combat this mutation, we designed and characterized two different hammerhead ribozymes to cleave G90D transcript. In vitro testing showed that the G90D1 ribozyme efficiently and specifically cleaved the mutant transcript while G90D2 cleaved both WT and mutant transcript. AAV-mediated delivery of G90D1 under the control of the mouse opsin promoter (MOP500) to G90D transgenic eyes showed that the ribozyme partially retarded the functional degeneration (as measured by electroretinography [ERG]) associated with this mutation. These results suggest that with additional optimization, ribozymes may be a useful part of the gene therapy knockdown strategy for dominant retinal disease. PMID:26427453

  20. Principles of restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Banker, T

    1993-08-01

    A great deal of information regarding materials, instrumentation, and techniques used for restorative dentistry can be borrowed from the human dental field. Veterinary restorative dentistry is in its infancy. A thorough knowledge of the commonly used materials and how they can be effectively applied is important. Treatment planning is probably one of the most critical phases of restorative dentistry as is painstaking attention to detail. If the guidelines for restorative dental techniques are followed, failures will be minimal. However, one of the most important points to remember is that the success of a restoration is not determined at the completion of the procedure. A restoration, if properly planned and performed, should last the lifetime of the animal patient. It is very important that veterinary dentists continue to evaluate and assess their restorative work at regular intervals so that restorative failures can be detected early, and so that restorative techniques and materials can be critically evaluated in veterinary patients. PMID:8210800

  1. Further screening of the rhodopsin gene in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Vaithinathan, R.; Berson, E.L.; Dryja, T.P. )

    1994-05-15

    Here the authors report 8 novel mutations and 8 previously reported mutations found from further analysis of the rhodopsin gene in a large set of additional patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Leukocyte DNA was purified from 122 unrelated patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa who were not included in previous analyses. The coding region and splice donor and acceptor sites of the rhodopsin gene were screened for mutations using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct genomic sequencing. They found 29 patients with varient bands that were due to mutations. Sequence analysis showed that 20 cases each had 1 of 9 previously published mutations: Pro23His, Thr58Arg, Gly89Asp, Pro171Leu, Glu181Lys, Pro347Leu, Phe45Leu, Arg135Trp, and Lys296Glu. In 9 other cases, they found 8 novel mutations. One was a 3-bp deletion (Cys264-del), and the rest were point mutations resulting in an altered amino acid: Gly51Arg (GGC [yields] CGC), Cys110Tyr (TCG [yields] TAC), Gly114Asp (GGC [yields] GAC), Ala164Glu (GCG [yields] GAG), Pro171Ser (CCA [yields] TCA), Val345Leu (GTG [yields] CTG), and Pro347Gln (CCG [yields] CAG). Each of these novel mutations was found in only one family except for Gly51Arg, which was found in two. In every family tested, the mutation cosegregated with the disease. However, in pedigree D865 only one affected member was available for analysis. About two-thirds of the mutations affect amino acids in transmembrane domains, yet only one-half of opsin's residues are in these regions. One-third of the mutations alter residues in the extracellular/intradiscal space, which includes only 25% of the protein.

  2. Sensory rhodopsins I and II modulate a methylation/demethylation system in Halobacterium halobium phototaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Spudich, E.N.; Takahashi, T.; Spudich, J.L. )

    1989-10-01

    This work demonstrates that phototaxis stimuli in the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium control a methylation/demethylation system in vivo through photoactivation of sensory rhodopsin I (SR-I) in either its attractant or repellent signaling form as well as through the repellent receptor sensory rhodopsin II (SR-II, also called phoborhodopsin). The effects of positive stimuli that suppress swimming reversals (i.e., an increase in attractant or decrease in repellent light) and negative stimuli that induce swimming reversals (i.e., a decrease in attractant or increase in repellent light) through each photoreceptor were monitored by assaying release of volatile (3H)methyl groups. This assay has been used to measure (3H)methanol produced during the process of adaptation to chemotactic stimuli in eubacteria. In H. halobium positive photostimuli produce a transient increase in the rate of demethylation followed by a decrease below the unstimulated value, whereas negative photostimuli cause an increase followed by a rate similar to that of the unstimulated value. Photoactivation of the SR-I attractant and simultaneous photoactivation of the SR-II repellent receptors cancel in their effects on demethylation, demonstrating the methylation system is regulated by an integrated signal. Analysis of mutants indicates that the source for the volatile methyl groups is intrinsic membrane proteins distinct from the chromoproteins that share the membrane. A methyl-accepting protein (94 kDa) previously correlated in amount with the SR-I chromoprotein (25 kDa) is shown here to be missing in a recently isolated SR-I-SR-II+ mutant (Flx3b), thus confirming the association of this protein with SR-I. Photoactivated SR-II in mutant Flx3b controls demethylation, predicting the existence of a photomodulated methyl-accepting component distinct from the 94-kDa protein of SR-I.

  3. Resonance Raman Structural Evidence that the Cis-to-Trans Isomerization in Rhodopsin Occurs in Femtoseconds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Judy E.; McCamant, David W.; Zhu, Leyun; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy is used to probe the structural changes of rhodopsin's retinal chromophore as the cis-to-trans isomerization reaction occurs that initiates vision. Room-temperature resonance Raman spectra of rhodopsin's photoproduct with time delays from −0.7 to 20.8 ps are measured using 2.2 ps, 480 nm pump and 1.5 ps, 600 nm probe pulses. Hydrogen-out-of-plane (HOOP) modes at 852, 871, and 919 cm−1, fingerprint peaks at 1272, 1236, 1211, and 1166 cm−1, and a broad red-shifted ethylenic band at 1530 cm−1 are present at the earliest positive pump−probe time delay of 0.8 ps, indicating that the chromophore is already in a strained, all-trans configuration. Kinetic analyses of both the HOOP and ethylenic regions of the photoproduct spectra reveal that these features grow in with fast (∼ 200 fs) and slow (∼ 2–3 ps) components. These data provide the first structural evidence that photorhodopsin has a thermally unrelaxed, torsionally strained all-trans chromophore within ∼1 ps, and possibly within 200 fs, of photon absorption. Following this ultrafast product formation, the all-trans chromophore cools and conformationally relaxes within a few picoseconds to form bathorhodopsin. This cooling process is revealed as an ethylenic frequency blue-shift of 6 cm−1 (τ ∼ 3.5 ps) as well as an ethylenic width narrowing (τ ∼ 2 ps). The ultrafast production of photorhodopsin is likely accompanied by an impulsively driven, localized protein response. More delocalized protein modes are unable to relax on this ultrafast time scale enabling the chromophore-protein complex to store the large amounts of photon energy (30–35 kcal/mol) that are subsequently used to drive activating protein conformational changes. PMID:16755302

  4. Comparison of the isomerization mechanisms of human melanopsin and invertebrate and vertebrate rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Silvia; Melaccio, Federico; Gozem, Samer; Fanelli, Francesca; Olivucci, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Comparative modeling and ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemistry are combined to investigate the reactivity of the human nonvisual photoreceptor melanopsin. It is found that both the thermal and photochemical isomerization of the melanopsin 11-cis retinal chromophore occur via a space-saving mechanism involving the unidirectional, counterclockwise twisting of the =C11H-C12H= moiety with respect to its Lys340-linked frame as proposed by Warshel for visual pigments [Warshel A (1976) Nature 260(5553):679–683]. A comparison with the mechanisms documented for vertebrate (bovine) and invertebrate (squid) visual photoreceptors shows that such a mechanism is not affected by the diversity of the three chromophore cavities. Despite such invariance, trajectory computations indicate that although all receptors display less than 100 fs excited state dynamics, human melanopsin decays from the excited state ∼40 fs earlier than bovine rhodopsin. Some diversity is also found in the energy barriers controlling thermal isomerization. Human melanopsin features the highest computed barrier which appears to be ∼2.5 kcal mol−1 higher than that of bovine rhodopsin. When assuming the validity of both the reaction speed/quantum yield correlation discussed by Warshel, Mathies and coworkers [Weiss RM, Warshel A (1979) J Am Chem Soc 101:6131–6133; Schoenlein RW, Peteanu LA, Mathies RA, Shank CV (1991) Science 254(5030):412–415] and of a relationship between thermal isomerization rate and thermal activation of the photocycle, melanopsin turns out to be a highly sensitive pigment consistent with the low number of melanopsin-containing cells found in the retina and with the extraretina location of melanopsin in nonmammalian vertebrates. PMID:24449866

  5. Rhodopsin mutations in a Scottish retinitis pigmentosa population, including a novel splice site mutation in intron four.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C; Converse, C A; Hammer, H M; Osborne, A; Haites, N E

    1994-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the name given to a group of disorders, both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, that primarily affect the photoreceptor function of the eye. Mutations in the genes encoding for rhodopsin, RDS-peripherin, or the beta subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase enzyme can be responsible for the phenotype. In this study the rhodopsin gene has been screened for mutations in a panel of RP individuals and five different sequence changes have been detected to date in three dominantly inherited and two unclassified families. One of these, a base substitution in the 3'UTR, has not yet been confirmed as disease specific, while three missense substitutions have previously been reported and are likely to be responsible for the phenotype. The fifth change, a base substitution at the intron 4 acceptor splice site, represents a novel mutation and is assumed to be the causative mutation. Images PMID:7819178

  6. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  7. Rhodopsin gene expression regulated by the light dark cycle, light spectrum and light intensity in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinguo; Li, Ling; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Xin; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    The proton pump rhodopsin is widely found in marine bacteria and archaea, where it functions to capture light energy and convert it to ATP. While found in several lineages of dinoflagellates, this gene has not been studied in Prorocentrales species and whether it functionally tunes to light spectra and intensities as in bacteria remains unclear. Here we identified and characterized this gene in the bloom-forming Prorocentrum donghaiense. It is a 7-helix transmembrane polypeptide containing conserved domains and critical amino acid residues of PPR. This gene is phylogenetically affiliated to the xanthorhodopsin clade, but seems to have a distinct evolutionary origin. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR showed that in regular cultures, the transcript abundance of the gene exhibited a clear diel pattern, high abundance in the light period and low in the dark. The same diel pattern was observed for protein abundance with a Western blot using specific antiserum. The rhythm was dampened when the cultures were shifted to continuous dark or light condition, suggesting that this gene is not under circadian clock control. Rhodopsin transcript and protein abundances varied with light intensity, both being highest at a moderate illumination level. Furthermore, the expression of this gene responded to different light spectra, with slightly higher transcript abundance under green than blue light, and lowest abundance under red light. Transformed Escherichia coli over-expressing this rhodopsin gene also exhibited an absorption maximum in the blue–green region with slightly higher absorption in the green. These rhodopsin-promoting light conditions are similar to the relatively turbid marine habitat where the species forms blooms, suggesting that this gene may function to compensate for the light-limited photosynthesis in the dim environment. PMID:26082770

  8. Small GTPases Rab8a and Rab11a Are Dispensable for Rhodopsin Transport in Mouse Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Guoxin; Gerstner, Cecilia D.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Boye, Sanford L.; Hauswirth, William W.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Rab11a and Rab8a are ubiquitous small GTPases shown as required for rhodopsin transport in Xenopus laevis and zebrafish photoreceptors by dominant negative (dn) disruption of function. Here, we generated retina-specific Rab11a (retRab11a) and Rab8a (retRab8a) single and double knockout mice to explore the consequences in mouse photoreceptors. Rhodopsin and other outer segment (OS) membrane proteins targeted correctly to OS and electroretinogram (ERG) responses in all three mutant mouse lines were indistinguishable from wild-type (WT). Further, AAV (adeno-associated virus)-mediated expression of dnRab11b in retRab11a-/- retina, or expression of dnRab8b in retRab8a-/- retina did not cause OS protein mislocalization. Finally, a retRab8a-/- retina injected at one month of age with AAVs expressing dnRab11a, dnRab11b, dnRab8b, and dnRab10 (four dn viruses on Rab8a-/- background) and harvested three months later exhibited normal OS protein localization. In contrast to results obtained with dnRab GTPases in Xenopus and zebrafish, mouse Rab11a and Rab8a are dispensable for proper rhodopsin and outer segment membrane protein targeting. Absence of phenotype after expression of four dn Rab GTPases in a Rab8a-/- retina suggests that Rab8b and Rab11b paralogs maybe dispensable as well. Our data thus demonstrate significant interspecies variation in photoreceptor membrane protein and rhodopsin trafficking. PMID:27529348

  9. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin: I. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2015-05-01

    Here we review the application of modern spectral methods for the study of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using rhodopsin as a prototype. Because X-ray analysis gives us immobile snapshots of protein conformations, it is imperative to apply spectroscopic methods for elucidating their function: vibrational (Raman, FTIR), electronic (UV-visible absorption, fluorescence) spectroscopies, and magnetic resonance (electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In the first of the two companion articles, we discuss the application of optical spectroscopy for studying rhodopsin in a membrane environment. Information is obtained regarding the time-ordered sequence of events in rhodopsin activation. Isomerization of the chromophore and deprotonation of the retinal Schiff base leads to a structural change of the protein involving the motion of helices H5 and H6 in a pH-dependent process. Information is obtained that is unavailable from X-ray crystallography, which can be combined with spectroscopic studies to achieve a more complete understanding of GPCR function.

  10. A second rhodopsin-like protein in Cyanophora paradoxa: gene sequence and protein expression in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Frassanito, Anna Maria; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    Here we report the identification and expression of a second rhodopsin-like protein in the alga Cyanophora paradoxa (Glaucophyta), named Cyanophopsin_2. This new protein was identified due to a serendipity event, since the RACE reaction performed to complete the sequence of Cyanophopsin_1, (the first rhodopsin-like protein of C. paradoxa identified in 2009 by our group), amplified a 619 bp sequence corresponding to a portion of a new gene of the same protein family. The full sequence consists of 1175 bp consisting of 849 bp coding DNA sequence and 4 introns of 326 bp. The protein is characterized by an N-terminal region of 47 amino acids, followed by a region with 7 α-helices of 213 amino acids and a C-terminal region of 22 amino acids. This protein showed high identity with Cyanophopsin_1 and other rhodopsin-like proteins of Archea, Bacteria, Fungi and Algae. Cyanophosin_2 (CpR2) was expressed in a cell-free expression system, and characterized by means of absorption spectroscopy. PMID:23851421

  11. Low-temperature solid-state /sup 13/C NMR studies of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.O.; Palings, I.; Copie, V.; Raleigh, D.P.; Courtin, J.; Pardoen, J.A.; Lugtenburg, J.; Mathies, R.A.; Griffin, R.G.

    1987-03-24

    Magic angle sample spinning (MASS) /sup 13/C NMR spectra have been obtained of bovine rhodopsin regenerated with retinal prosthetic groups isotopically enriched with /sup 13/C at C-5 and C-14. In order to observe the /sup 13/C retinal chromophore resonances, it was necessary to employ low temperatures (-15 ..-->.. -35/sup 0/C) to restrict rotational diffusion of the protein. The isotropic chemical shift and principal values of the chemical shift tensor of the /sup 13/C-5 label indicate that the retinal chromophore is in the twisted 6-s-cis conformation in rhodopsin, in contrast to the planar 6-s-trans confirmation found in bacteriorhodopsin. The /sup 13/C-14 isotropic shift and shift tensor principal values show that the Schiff base C=N bond is anti. Furthermore, the /sup 13/C-14 chemical shift (121.2 ppm) is within the range of values (120-123 ppm) exhibited by protonated (C=N anti) Schiff base model compounds, indicating that the C=N linkage is protonated. The results are discussed with regard to the mechanism of wavelength regulation in rhodopsin.

  12. Analysis of Conserved Glutamate and Aspartate Residues in Drosophila Rhodopsin 1 and Their Influence on Spectral Tuning*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lijun; Farrell, David M.; Fulton, Ruth M.; Bagg, Eve E.; Salcedo, Ernesto; Manino, Meridee; Britt, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate invertebrate visual pigment absorption are poorly understood. Studies of amphioxus Go-opsin have demonstrated that Glu-181 functions as the counterion in this pigment. This finding has led to the proposal that Glu-181 may function as the counterion in other invertebrate visual pigments as well. Here we describe a series of mutagenesis experiments to test this hypothesis and to also test whether other conserved acidic amino acids in Drosophila Rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) may serve as the counterion of this visual pigment. Of the 5 Glu and Asp residues replaced by Gln or Asn in our experiments, none of the mutant pigments shift the absorption of Rh1 by more than 6 nm. In combination with prior studies, these results suggest that the counterion in Drosophila Rh1 may not be located at Glu-181 as in amphioxus, or at Glu-113 as in bovine rhodopsin. Conversely, the extremely low steady state levels of the E194Q mutant pigment (bovine opsin site Glu-181), and the rhabdomere degeneration observed in flies expressing this mutant demonstrate that a negatively charged residueat this position is essential for normal rhodopsin function in vivo. This work also raises the possibility that another residue or physiologic anion may compensate for the missing counterion in the E194Q mutant. PMID:26195627

  13. Rhodopsin and Melanopsin Contributions to the Early Redilation Phase of the Post-Illumination Pupil Response (PIPR)

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prakash; Feigl, Beatrix; Zele, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Melanopsin expressing intrinsically photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells (ipRGCs) entirely control the post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) from 6 s post-stimulus to the plateau during redilation after light offset. However, the photoreceptor contributions to the early redilation phase of the PIPR (< 6 s post-stimulus) have not been reported. Here, we evaluated the photoreceptor contributions to the early phase PIPR (0.6 s to 5.0 s) by measuring the spectral sensitivity of the criterion PIPR amplitude in response to 1 s light pulses at five narrowband stimulus wavelengths (409, 464, 508, 531 and 592 nm). The retinal irradiance producing a criterion PIPR was normalised to the peak and fitted by either a single photopigment nomogram or the combined melanopsin and rhodopsin spectral nomograms with the +L+M cone photopic luminous efficiency (Vλ) function. We show that the PIPR spectral sensitivity at times ≥ 1.7 s after light offset is best described by the melanopsin nomogram. At times < 1.7 s, the peak PIPR sensitivity shifts to longer wavelengths (range: 482 to 498 nm) and is best described by the combined photoreceptor nomogram, with major contributions from melanopsin and rhodopsin. This first report of melanopsin and rhodopsin contributions to the early phase PIPR is in line with the electrophysiological findings of ipRGC and rod signalling after the cessation of light stimuli and provides a cut-off time for isolating photoreceptor specific function in healthy and diseased eyes. PMID:27548480

  14. Analysis of the Mode-Specific Excited-State Energy Distribution and Wavelength-Dependent Photoreaction Quantum Yield in Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Judy E.; Tauber, Michael J.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    The photoreaction quantum yield of rhodopsin is wavelength dependent: φ(λ) is reduced by up to 5% at wavelengths to the red of 500 nm but is invariant (φ = 0.65 ± 0.01) between 450 and 500 nm (Kim et al., 2001). To understand this nonstatistical internal conversion process, these results are compared with predictions of a Landau-Zener model for dynamic curve crossing. The initial distribution of excess photon energy in the 28 Franck-Condon active vibrational modes of rhodopsin is defined by a fully thermalized sum-over-states vibronic calculation. This calculation reveals that absorption by high-frequency unreactive modes (e.g., C=C stretches) increases as the excitation wavelength is shifted from 570 to 450 nm whereas relatively less energy is deposited into reactive low-frequency modes. This result qualitatively explains the experimentally observed wavelength dependence of φ(λ) for rhodopsin and reveals the importance of delocalized, torsional modes in the reactive pathway. PMID:12668457

  15. Analysis of Conserved Glutamate and Aspartate Residues in Drosophila Rhodopsin 1 and Their Influence on Spectral Tuning.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lijun; Farrell, David M; Fulton, Ruth M; Bagg, Eve E; Salcedo, Ernesto; Manino, Meridee; Britt, Steven G

    2015-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate invertebrate visual pigment absorption are poorly understood. Studies of amphioxus Go-opsin have demonstrated that Glu-181 functions as the counterion in this pigment. This finding has led to the proposal that Glu-181 may function as the counterion in other invertebrate visual pigments as well. Here we describe a series of mutagenesis experiments to test this hypothesis and to also test whether other conserved acidic amino acids in Drosophila Rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) may serve as the counterion of this visual pigment. Of the 5 Glu and Asp residues replaced by Gln or Asn in our experiments, none of the mutant pigments shift the absorption of Rh1 by more than 6 nm. In combination with prior studies, these results suggest that the counterion in Drosophila Rh1 may not be located at Glu-181 as in amphioxus, or at Glu-113 as in bovine rhodopsin. Conversely, the extremely low steady state levels of the E194Q mutant pigment (bovine opsin site Glu-181), and the rhabdomere degeneration observed in flies expressing this mutant demonstrate that a negatively charged residue at this position is essential for normal rhodopsin function in vivo. This work also raises the possibility that another residue or physiologic anion may compensate for the missing counterion in the E194Q mutant. PMID:26195627

  16. Measurement of activation of rhodopsine with heavy ions irradiation in the ALTEA program: a possible mechanism responsible for light flash perceptions in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio; Rinaldi, Adele; Sannita, Walter, , Prof; Paci, Maurizio; Brunetti, Valentina; de Martino, Angelo; Picozza, Piergiorgio

    Since late 60s astronauts in space have reported seeing flashes of light, more frequently when dark adapted. Experiments have been performed to characterize these phenomena, and to suggest possible mechanisms. High Z ions have been shown to be the most likely cause of these perceptions: when ionizing radiation hits the eye there is a high probability of a light flash perception. However the mechanisms behind this phenomenon are not fully understood yet. We show that one of these mechanisms is the activation of the rhodopsin (bleaching) by heavy ions. Rhodopsin is at the start of the photo-electronic cascade in the process of vision. It is one of the best molecular transducer to convert a visible photon into an electric signal. In this work we show that rhodopsine can also be activated by irradiation with 12C nuclei. In the frame of ALTEA program, aimed at studying the effects of cosmic radiation on brain functions, an investigation on the interaction between heavy ions and rhodopsin has been performed. Intact Rod Outer Segment (ROS) containing rhodopsin were isolated from bovine retina. Suspended rods were irradiated with 12C (200 MeV/n, well below the Cherenkov threshold) at GSI (Darmstadt FRG) with doses ranging from few mrem to several rem. Spectrophotometric measurements investigated the presence of non activated and activated rhodopsin. The functionality of the purified rods were checked by previous light irradiation and subsequent regeneration by the addition of external 11-cis-retinal, to confirm the reversibility of the process in vitro. We can show effective and reversible bleaching also following irradiation, thus proving that the rhodopsin was not damaged by radiation. Works are in progress to model this interaction. Latest analysis results and considerations about the underlying mechanism will be presented.

  17. Vibrational spectrum of the lumi intermediate in the room temperature rhodopsin photo-reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ujj, L; Jäger, F; Atkinson, G H

    1998-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum (650-1750 cm(-1)) of the lumi-rhodopsin (lumi) intermediate formed in the microsecond time regime of the room-temperature rhodopsin (RhRT) photoreaction is measured for the first time using picosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (PTR/CARS). The vibrational spectrum of lumi is recorded 2.5 micros after the 3-ps, 500-nm excitation of RhRT. Complementary to Fourier transform infrared spectra recorded at Rh sample temperatures low enough to freeze lumi, these PTR/CARS results provide the first detailed view of the vibrational degrees of freedom of room-temperature lumi (lumiRT) through the identification of 21 bands. The exceptionally low intensity (compared to those observed in bathoRT) of the hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) bands, the moderate intensity and absolute positions of C-C stretching bands, and the presence of high-intensity C==C stretching bands suggest that lumiRT contains an almost planar (nontwisting), all-trans retinal geometry. Independently, the 944-cm(-1) position of the most intense HOOP band implies that a resonance coupling exists between the out-of-plane retinal vibrations and at least one group among the amino acids comprising the retinal binding pocket. The formation of lumiRT, monitored via PTR/CARS spectra recorded on the nanosecond time scale, can be associated with the decay of the blue-shifted intermediate (BSI(RT)) formed in equilibrium with the bathoRT intermediate. PTR/CARS spectra measured at a 210-ns delay contain distinct vibrational features attributable to BSI(RT), which suggest that the all-trans retinal in both BSI(RT) and lumiRT is strongly coupled to part of the retinal binding pocket. With regard to the energy storage/transduction mechanism in RhRT, these results support the hypothesis that during the formation of lumiRT, the majority of the photon energy absorbed by RhRT transfers to the apoprotein opsin. PMID:9512045

  18. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-03-19

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  19. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-05-15

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  20. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses. PMID:26794436

  1. Electrophysiological characterization of specific interactions between bacterial sensory rhodopsins and their transducers

    PubMed Central

    Schmies, G.; Engelhard, M.; Wood, P. G.; Nagel, G.; Bamberg, E.

    2001-01-01

    The halobacterial phototaxis receptors sensory rhodopsin I and II (SRI, SRII) enable the bacteria to seek optimal light conditions for ion pumping by bacteriorhodopsin and/or halorhodopsin. The incoming signal is transferred across the plasma membrane by means of receptor-specific transducer proteins that bind tightly to their corresponding photoreceptors. To investigate the receptor/transducer interaction, advantage is taken of the observation that both SRI and SRII can function as proton pumps. SRI from Halobacterium salinarum, which triggers the positive phototaxis, the photophobic receptor SRII from Natronobacterium pharaonis (pSRII), as well as the mutant pSRII-F86D were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Voltage-clamp studies confirm that SRI and pSRII function as light-driven, outwardly directed proton pumps with a much stronger voltage dependence than the ion pumps bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin. Coexpression of SRI and pSRII-F86D with their corresponding transducers suppresses the proton transport, revealing a tight binding and specific interaction of the two proteins. These latter results may be exploited to further analyze the binding interaction of the photoreceptors with their downstream effectors. PMID:11171989

  2. Modelling Time-Resolved Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of the Primary Photoisomerization Event in Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra (ES) tracking the evolution of the excited state manifolds of the retinal chromophore have been simulated along the photoisomerization pathway in bovine rhodopsin, using a state-of-the-art hybrid QM/MM approach based on multiconfigurational methods. Simulations of broadband 2D spectra provide a useful picture of the overall detectable 2D signals from the near-infrared (NIR) to the near-ultraviolet (UV). Evolution of the stimulated emission (SE) and excited state absorption (ESA) 2D signals indicates that the S1 → SN (with N ≥ 2) ESAs feature a substantial blue-shift only after bond inversion and partial rotation along the cis → trans isomerization angle, while the SE rapidly red-shifts during the photoinduced skeletal relaxation of the polyene chain. Different combinations of pulse frequencies are proposed in order to follow the evolution of specific ESA signals. These include a two-color 2DVis/NIR setup especially suited for tracking the evolution of the S1 → S2 transitions that can be used to discriminate between different photochemical mechanisms of retinal photoisomerization as a function of the environment. The reported results are consistent with the available time-resolved pump–probe experimental data, and may be used for the design of more elaborate transient 2D electronic spectroscopy techniques. PMID:24794143

  3. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-03-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-Methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al. We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C =C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities; Robert A. Welch Foundation; National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  4. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li; Allen, Roland E.

    2015-02-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C=C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Perhaps remarkably, but apparently because of electrostatic repulsion, the direction of rotation is the same for both reactions.

  5. Transient Conformational Changes of Sensory Rhodopsin II Investigated by Vibrational Stark Effect Probes.

    PubMed

    Mohrmann, Hendrik; Kube, Ines; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Engelhard, Martin; Heberle, Joachim

    2016-05-19

    Sensory rhodopsin II (SRII) is the primary light sensor in the photophobic reaction of the halobacterium Natronomonas pharaonis. Photoactivation of SRII results in a movement of helices F and G of this seven-helical transmembrane protein. This conformational change is conveyed to the transducer protein (HtrII). Global changes in the protein backbone have been monitored by IR difference spectroscopy by recording frequency shifts in the amide bands. Here we investigate local structural changes by judiciously inserting thiocyanides at different locations of SRII. These vibrational Stark probes absorb in a frequency range devoid of any protein vibrations and respond to local changes in the dielectric, electrostatics, and hydrogen bonding. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate the use of Stark probes to test the conformational changes occurring in SRII 12 ms after photoexcitation and later. Thus, a methodology is provided to trace local conformational changes in membrane proteins by a minimal invasive probe at the high temporal resolution inherent to IR spectroscopy. PMID:27111635

  6. Structural and functional protein network analyses predict novel signaling functions for rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Christina; Vogt, Andreas; Campagna, Anne; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Swiatek-de Lange, Magdalena; Beer, Monika; Bolz, Sylvia; Mack, Andreas F; Kinkl, Norbert; Cesareni, Gianni; Serrano, Luis; Ueffing, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Orchestration of signaling, photoreceptor structural integrity, and maintenance needed for mammalian vision remain enigmatic. By integrating three proteomic data sets, literature mining, computational analyses, and structural information, we have generated a multiscale signal transduction network linked to the visual G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin, the major protein component of rod outer segments. This network was complemented by domain decomposition of protein–protein interactions and then qualified for mutually exclusive or mutually compatible interactions and ternary complex formation using structural data. The resulting information not only offers a comprehensive view of signal transduction induced by this GPCR but also suggests novel signaling routes to cytoskeleton dynamics and vesicular trafficking, predicting an important level of regulation through small GTPases. Further, it demonstrates a specific disease susceptibility of the core visual pathway due to the uniqueness of its components present mainly in the eye. As a comprehensive multiscale network, it can serve as a basis to elucidate the physiological principles of photoreceptor function, identify potential disease-associated genes and proteins, and guide the development of therapies that target specific branches of the signaling pathway. PMID:22108793

  7. Identification of a rhodopsin gene mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinping; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Chen, Ding; Hu, Xuting; Xu, Jinling; Xu, Limin; Wu, Yaming; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically highly heterogeneous retinal disease and one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Next-generation sequencing technology has enormous potential for determining the genetic etiology of RP. We sought to identify the underlying genetic defect in a 35-year-old male from an autosomal-dominant RP family with 14 affected individuals. By capturing next-generation sequencing (CNGS) of 144 genes associated with retinal diseases, we identified eight novel DNA variants; however, none of them cosegregated for all the members of the family. Further analysis of the CNGS data led to identification of a recurrent missense mutation (c.403C > T, p.R135W) in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene, which cosegregated with all affected individuals in the family and was not observed in any of the unaffected family members. The p.R135W mutation has a reference single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ID (rs104893775), and it appears to be responsible for the disease in this large family. This study highlights the importance of examining NGS data with reference SNP IDs. Thus, our study is important for data analysis of NGS-based clinical genetic diagnoses. PMID:26794436

  8. The photochemistry of sodium ion pump rhodopsin observed by watermarked femto- to submillisecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hontani, Yusaku; Inoue, Keiichi; Kloz, Miroslav; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kandori, Hideki; Kennis, John T M

    2016-09-21

    Krokinobacter rhodopsin 2 (KR2) is a recently discovered light-driven Na(+) pump that holds significant promise for application as a neural silencer in optogenetics. KR2 transports Na(+) (in NaCl solution) or H(+) (in larger cation solution, e.g. in CsCl) during its photocycle. Here, we investigate the photochemistry of KR2 with the recently developed watermarked, baseline-free femto- to submillisecond transient stimulated Raman spectroscopy (TSRS), which enables us to investigate retinal chromophore dynamics in real time with high spectral resolution over a large time range. We propose a new photocycle from femtoseconds to submilliseconds: J (formed in ∼200 fs) → K (∼3 ps) → K/L1 (∼20 ps) → K/L2 (∼30 ns) → L/M (∼20 μs). KR2 binds a Na(+) ion that is not transported on the extracellular side, of which the function is unclear. We demonstrate with TSRS that for the D102N mutant in NaCl (with Na(+) unbound, Na(+) transport) and for WT KR2 in CsCl (with Na(+) unbound, H(+) transport), the extracellular Na(+) binding significantly influences the intermediate K/L/M state equilibrium on the photocycle, while the identity of the transported ion, Na(+) or H(+), does not affect the photocycle. Our findings will contribute to further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of KR2. PMID:27550793

  9. Molecular dynamics investigation of primary photoinduced events in the activation of rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Saam, Jan; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Schulten, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Retinal cis-trans isomerization and early relaxation steps have been studied in a 10-ns molecular dynamics simulation of a fully hydrated model of membrane-embedded rhodopsin. The isomerization, induced by transiently switching the potential energy function governing the C(11)==C(12) dihedral angle of retinal, completes within 150 fs and yields a strongly distorted retinal. The most significant conformational changes in the binding pocket are straightening of retinal's polyene chain and separation of its beta-ionone ring from Trp-265. In the following 500 ps, transition of 6s-cis to 6s-trans retinal and dramatic changes in the hydrogen bonding network of the binding pocket involving the counterion for the protonated Schiff base, Glu-113, occur. Furthermore, the energy initially stored internally in the distorted retinal is transformed into nonbonding interactions of retinal with its environment. During the following 10 ns, increased mobilities of some parts of the protein, such as the kinked regions of the helices, mainly helix VI, and the intracellular loop I2, were observed, as well as transient structural changes involving the conserved salt bridge between Glu-134 and Arg-135. These features prepare the protein for major structural transformations achieved later in the photocycle. Retinal's motion, in particular, can be compared to an opening turnstile freeing the way for the proposed rotation of helix VI. This was demonstrated by a steered molecular dynamics simulation in which an applied torque enforced the rotation of helix VI. PMID:12496081

  10. Gene Therapy to Rescue Retinal Degeneration Caused by Mutations in Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Rossmiller, Brian P.; Ryals, Renee C.; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal gene therapy has proven safe and at least partially successful in clinical trials and in numerous animal models. Gene therapy requires characterization of the progression of the disease and understanding of its genetic cause. Testing gene therapies usually requires an animal model that recapitulates the key features of the human disease, though photoreceptors and cells of the retinal pigment epithelium produced from patient-derived stem cells may provide an alternative test system for retinal gene therapy. Gene therapy also requires a delivery system that introduces the therapeutic gene to the correct cell type and does not cause unintended damage to the tissue. Current systems being tested in the eye are nanoparticles, pseudotyped lentiviruses, and adeno-associated virus (AAV) of various serotypes. Here, we describe the techniques of AAV vector design as well as the in vivo and ex vivo tests necessary for assessing the efficacy of retinal gene therapy to treat retinal degeneration caused by mutations in the rhodopsin gene. PMID:25697537

  11. Crumbs regulates rhodopsin transport by interacting with and stabilizing myosin V

    PubMed Central

    Shevchenko, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Crumbs (Crb) complex is crucial for photoreceptor morphogenesis and homeostasis. Loss of Crb results in light-dependent retinal degeneration, which is prevented by feeding mutant flies carotenoid-deficient medium. This suggests a defect in rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) processing, transport, and/or signaling, causing degeneration; however, the molecular mechanism of this remained elusive. In this paper, we show that myosin V (MyoV) coimmunoprecipitated with the Crb complex and that loss of crb led to severe reduction in MyoV levels, which could be rescued by proteasomal inhibition. Loss of MyoV in crb mutant photoreceptors was accompanied by defective transport of the MyoV cargo Rh1 to the light-sensing organelle, the rhabdomere. This resulted in an age-dependent accumulation of Rh1 in the photoreceptor cell (PRC) body, a well-documented trigger of degeneration. We conclude that Crb protects against degeneration by interacting with and stabilizing MyoV, thereby ensuring correct Rh1 trafficking. Our data provide, for the first time, a molecular mechanism for the light-dependent degeneration of PRCs observed in crb mutant retinas. PMID:22105348

  12. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; et al

    2016-04-12

    Here, serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solvedmore » with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.« less

  13. The CarO rhodopsin of the fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is a light-driven proton pump that retards spore germination

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Jorge; Brunk, Michael; Avalos, Javier; Terpitz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsins are membrane-embedded photoreceptors found in all major taxonomic kingdoms using retinal as their chromophore. They play well-known functions in different biological systems, but their roles in fungi remain unknown. The filamentous fungus Fusarium fujikuroi contains two putative rhodopsins, CarO and OpsA. The gene carO is light-regulated, and the predicted polypeptide contains all conserved residues required for proton pumping. We aimed to elucidate the expression and cellular location of the fungal rhodopsin CarO, its presumed proton-pumping activity and the possible effect of such function on F. fujikuroi growth. In electrophysiology experiments we confirmed that CarO is a green-light driven proton pump. Visualization of fluorescent CarO-YFP expressed in F. fujikuroi under control of its native promoter revealed higher accumulation in spores (conidia) produced by light-exposed mycelia. Germination analyses of conidia from carO− mutant and carO+ control strains showed a faster development of light-exposed carO− germlings. In conclusion, CarO is an active proton pump, abundant in light-formed conidia, whose activity slows down early hyphal development under light. Interestingly, CarO-related rhodopsins are typically found in plant-associated fungi, where green light dominates the phyllosphere. Our data provide the first reliable clue on a possible biological role of a fungal rhodopsin. PMID:25589426

  14. Watershed Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  15. Restoring the smile: Inexpensive biologic restorations

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Neeti P.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive breakdown of primary teeth to the cervical level and their loss in very young children is not uncommon. Owing to increasing concerns over self-appearance, due considerations to esthetic aspects in addition to restoring function are necessary aspects of rehabilitation of mutilated teeth to help children grow into a psychologically balanced personality. The present article describes rehabilitation of grossly decayed teeth with biologic restorations such as dentine posts, dentine post and core and biologic shell crown. This treatment modality provided a cost-effective esthetic solution. PMID:25097656

  16. Plant and Soil Responses to High and Low Diversity Grassland Restoration Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Elizabeth M.; Baer, Sara G.; Six, Johan

    2012-02-01

    The USDA's Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) has predominantly used only a few species of dominant prairie grasses (CP2 practice) to reduce soil erosion, but recently has offered a higher diversity planting practice (CP25) to increase grassland habitat quality. We quantified plant community composition in CP25 and CP2 plantings restored for 4 or 8 years and compared belowground properties and processes among restorations and continuously cultivated soils in southeastern Nebraska, USA. Relative to cultivated soils, restoration increased soil microbial biomass ( P = 0.033), specifically fungi ( P < 0.001), and restored soils exhibited higher rates of carbon (C) mineralization ( P = 0.010). High and low diversity plantings had equally diverse plant communities; however, CP25 plantings had greater frequency of cool-season (C3) grasses ( P = 0.007). Older (8 year) high diversity restorations contained lower microbial biomass ( P = 0.026), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) biomass ( P = 0.003), and C mineralization rates ( P = 0.028) relative to 8 year low diversity restorations; older plantings had greater root biomass than 4 year plantings in all restorations ( P = 0.001). Low diversity 8 year plantings contained wider root C:N ratios, and higher soil microbial biomass, microbial community richness, AMF biomass, and C mineralization rate relative to 4 year restorations ( P < 0.050). Net N mineralization and nitrification rates were lower in 8 year than 4 year high diversity plantings ( P = 0.005). We attributed changes in soil C and N pools and fluxes to increased AMF associated with C4 grasses in low diversity plantings. Thus, reduced recovery of AMF in high diversity plantings restricted restoration of belowground microbial diversity and microbially-mediated soil processes over time.

  17. Utah Paiute Tribal Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Allen C.

    The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Restoration Act (1980) restored federal recognition of the tribe after a quarter century of ambiguous political status, and resulted in significant improvements of educational status of tribal members and intensification of the political presence of Southern Paiutes. Following the Paiute Indian Termination Act…

  18. Restoration of bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Hanau, H.

    1977-01-01

    Process consisting of grinding raceways to oversize but original quality condition and installing new oversize balls or bearings restores wornout ball and roller bearings to original quality, thereby doubling their operating life. Evaluations reveal process results in restoration of 90% of replaced bearings at less than 50% of new-bearing costs.

  19. Gill's 'History' restored

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Note about the restoration of the copy of Sir David Gill's 'A History and Description of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope' in the Library of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge. The book was restored with funds provided by the SHA in thanks for facilities for meetings provided to the Institute.

  20. Power system restoration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Kafka, R.J. )

    1991-04-01

    This article describes some of the problems encountered in the three phases of power system restoration (PSR). The three phases of PSR are: Planning for restart and reintegration of the bulk power supply; Actions during system degradation for saving and retaining critical sources of power; Restoration when the power system has stabilized at some degraded level.

  1. Retributive and restorative justice.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michael; Okimoto, Tyler G; Feather, Norman T; Platow, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    The emergence of restorative justice as an alternative model to Western, court-based criminal justice may have important implications for the psychology of justice. It is proposed that two different notions of justice affect responses to rule-breaking: restorative and retributive justice. Retributive justice essentially refers to the repair of justice through unilateral imposition of punishment, whereas restorative justice means the repair of justice through reaffirming a shared value-consensus in a bilateral process. Among the symbolic implications of transgressions, concerns about status and power are primarily related to retributive justice and concerns about shared values are primarily related to restorative justice. At the core of these processes, however, lies the parties' construal of their identity relation, specifically whether or not respondents perceive to share an identity with the offender. The specific case of intergroup transgressions is discussed, as are implications for future research on restoring a sense of justice after rule-breaking. PMID:17957457

  2. Histochemical demonstration of a rhodopsin-like substance in the eye of the arrow-worm, Spadella schizoptera (Chaetognatha).

    PubMed

    Goto, T; Yoshida, M

    1988-01-01

    The presumed photoreceptive region of the arrow-worms of the species Sagitta crassa and Spadella schizoptera consists of perforated lamellae which are unique as the photoreceptive structure. The existence of a visual pigment in this region was demonstrated by a histofluorescent technique using Spadella schizoptera, whose presumed photoreceptive region was much larger than in Sagitta crassa. A specific fluorescence, indicative of the presence of retinal-based proteins, appeared only in the perforated lamellar region. The result suggests that the perforated lamellae contain a rhodopsin-like substance and could be the primary photoreceptive site. PMID:3268423

  3. Sequence-structure based phylogeny of GPCR Class A Rhodopsin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kakarala, Kavita Kumari; Jamil, Kaiser

    2014-05-01

    Current methods of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) phylogenetic classification are sequence based and therefore inappropriate for highly divergent sequences, sharing low sequence identity. In this study, sequence structure profile based alignment generated by PROMALS3D was used to understand the GPCR Class A Rhodopsin superfamily evolution using the MEGA 5 software. Phylogenetic analysis included a combination of Neighbor-Joining method and Maximum Likelihood method, with 1000 bootstrap replicates. Our study was able to identify potential ligand association for Class A Orphans and putative/unclassified Class A receptors with no cognate ligand information: GPR21 and GPR52 with fatty acids; GPR75 with Neuropeptide Y; GPR82, GPR18, GPR141 with N-arachidonylglycine; GPR176 with Free fatty acids, GPR10 with Tachykinin & Neuropeptide Y; GPR85 with ATP, ADP & UDP glucose; GPR151 with Galanin; GPR153 and GPR162 with Adrenalin, Noradrenalin; GPR146, GPR139, GPR142 with Neuromedin, Ghrelin, Neuromedin U-25 & Thyrotropin-releasing hormone; GPR171 with ATP, ADP & UDP Glucose; GPR88, GPR135, GPR161, GPR101with 11-cis-retinal; GPR83 with Tackykinin; GPR148 with Prostanoids, GPR109b, GPR81, GPR31with ATP & UTP and GPR150 with GnRH I & GnRHII. Furthermore, we suggest that this study would prove useful in re-classification of receptors, selecting templates for homology modeling and identifying ligands which may show cross reactivity with other GPCRs as signaling via multiple ligands play a significant role in disease modulation. PMID:24503482

  4. Role of rhodopsin and arrestin phosphorylation in retinal degeneration of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kristaponyte, Inga; Hong, Yuan; Lu, Haiqin; Shieh, Bih-Hwa

    2012-08-01

    Arrestins belong to a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that regulate internalization of diverse receptors including G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Defects associated with endocytosis of GPCRs have been linked to human diseases. We used enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged arrestin 2 (Arr2) to monitor the turnover of the major rhodopsin (Rh1) in live Drosophila. We demonstrate that during degeneration of norpA(P24) photoreceptors the loss of Rh1 is parallel to the disappearance of rhabdomeres, the specialized visual organelle that houses Rh1. The cause of degeneration in norpA(P24) is the failure to activate CaMKII (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) and retinal degeneration C (RDGC) because of a loss of light-dependent Ca(2+) entry. A lack of activation in CaMKII, which phosphorylates Arr2, leads to hypophosphorylated Arr2, while a lack of activation of RDGC, which dephosphorylates Rh1, results in hyperphosphorylated Rh1. We investigated how reversible phosphorylation of Rh1 and Arr2 contributes to photoreceptor degeneration. To uncover the consequence underlying a lack of CaMKII activation, we characterized ala(1) flies in which CaMKII was suppressed by an inhibitory peptide, and showed that morphology of rhabdomeres was not affected. In contrast, we found that expression of phosphorylation-deficient Rh1s, which either lack the C terminus or contain Ala substitution in the phosphorylation sites, was able to prevent degeneration of norpA(P24) photoreceptors. This suppression is not due to a loss of Arr2 interaction. Importantly, co-expression of these modified Rh1s offered protective effects, which greatly delayed photoreceptor degeneration. Together, we conclude that phosphorylation of Rh1 is the major determinant that orchestrates its internalization leading to retinal degeneration. PMID:22855823

  5. Functional Characterization of Rhodopsin Monomers and Dimers in Detergents*S

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Maeda, Tadao; Zhu, Li; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Filipek, Slawomir; Engel, Andreas; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2005-01-01

    Rhodopsin (Rho) is a G protein-coupled receptor that initiates phototransduction in rod photoreceptors. High expression levels of Rho in the disc membranes of rod outer segments and the propensity of Rho to form higher oligomeric structures are evident from atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and chemical cross-linking experiments. To explore the structural and functional properties of Rho in n-dodecyl-β-maltoside, frequently used to purify heterologously expressed Rho and its mutants, we used gel filtration techniques, blue native gel electrophoresis, and functional assays. Here, we show that in micelles containing n-dodecyl-β-maltoside at concentrations greater than 3 mm, Rho is present as a single monomer per detergent micelle. In contrast, in 12 mm 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethyl-ammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS), micelles contain mostly dimeric Rho. The cognate G protein transducin (Gt) appears to have a preference for binding to the Rho dimer, and the complexes fall apart in the presence of guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate. Cross-linked Rho dimers release the chromophore at a slower rate than monomers and are much more resistant to heat denaturation. Both Rho* monomers and dimers are capable of activating Gt, and both of them are phosphorylated by Rho kinase. Rho expressed in HEK293 cells is also readily cross-linked by a bifunctional reagent. These studies provide an explanation of how detergent influences the oligomer-dimer-monomer equilibrium of Rho and describe the functional characterization of Rho monomers and dimers in detergent. PMID:15489507

  6. Imaging rhodopsin degeneration in vivo in a new model of ocular ischemia in living mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiaqian; Chen, Yinching I; Mackey, Ashley M; Liu, Philip K

    2016-02-01

    Delivery of antibodies to monitor key biomarkers of retinopathy in vivo represents a significant challenge because living cells do not take up immunoglobulins to cellular antigens. We met this challenge by developing novel contrast agents for retinopathy, which we used with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Biotinylated rabbit polyclonal to chick IgY (rIgPxcIgY) and phosphorylthioate-modified oligoDNA (sODN) with random sequence (bio-sODN-Ran) were conjugated with NeutrAvidin-activated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). The resulting Ran-SPION-rIgPxcIgY carries chick polyclonal to microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) as Ran-SPION-rIgP/cIgY-MAP2, or to rhodopsin (Rho) as anti-Rho-SPION-Ran. We examined the uptake of Ran-SPION-rIgP/cIgY-MAP2 or SPION-rIgP/cIgY-MAP2 in normal C57black6 mice (n = 3 each, 40 μg/kg, i.c.v.); we found retention of Ran-SPION-rIgP/cIgY-MAP2 using molecular contrast-enhanced MRI in vivo and validated neuronal uptake using Cy5-goat IgPxcIgY ex vivo. Applying this novel method to monitor retinopathy in a bilateral carotid artery occlusion-induced ocular ischemia, we observed pericytes (at d 2, using Gd-nestin, by eyedrop solution), significant photoreceptor degeneration (at d 20, using anti-Rho-SPION-Ran, eyedrops, P = 0.03, Student's t test), and gliosis in Müller cells (at 6 mo, using SPION-glial fibrillary acidic protein administered by intraperitoneal injection) in surviving mice (n ≥ 5). Molecular contrast-enhanced MRI results were confirmed by optical and electron microscopy. We conclude that chimera and molecular contrast-enhanced MRI provide sufficient sensitivity for monitoring retinopathy and for theranostic applications. PMID:26443823

  7. Microbial Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Microbial metabolomics constitutes an integrated component of systems biology. By studying the complete set of metabolites within a microorganism and monitoring the global outcome of interactions between its development processes and the environment, metabolomics can potentially provide a more accurate snap shot of the actual physiological state of the cell. Recent advancement of technologies and post-genomic developments enable the study and analysis of metabolome. This unique contribution resulted in many scientific disciplines incorporating metabolomics as one of their “omics” platforms. This review focuses on metabolomics in microorganisms and utilizes selected topics to illustrate its impact on the understanding of systems microbiology. PMID:22379393

  8. Microbial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Demain, A L

    2000-01-01

    For thousands of years, microorganisms have been used to supply products such as bread, beer and wine. A second phase of traditional microbial biotechnology began during World War I and resulted in the development of the acetone-butanol and glycerol fermentations, followed by processes yielding, for example, citric acid, vitamins and antibiotics. In the early 1970s, traditional industrial microbiology was merged with molecular biology to yield more than 40 biopharmaceutical products, such as erythropoietin, human growth hormone and interferons. Today, microbiology is a major participant in global industry, especially in the pharmaceutical, food and chemical industries. PMID:10631778

  9. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  10. Fracture resistance of posterior teeth restored with modern restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M.; Shehata, Salah H.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars restored with recent restorative materials. Fifty maxillary premolars were divided into five groups: Group 1 were unprepared teeth; Group 2 were teeth prepared without restoration; Group 3 were teeth restored with tetric ceram HB; Group 4 were teeth restored with InTen S; and Group 5 were teeth restored with Admira. The samples were tested using a universal testing machine. Peak loads at fracture were recorded. The teeth restored with Admira had the highest fracture resistance followed by those restored with InTen-S and tetric ceram HB. Prepared, unrestored teeth were the weakest group. There was a significant difference between the fracture resistance of intact teeth and the prepared, unrestored teeth. There was also a significant difference among the tested restorative materials. Teeth restored with Admira showed no significant difference when compared with the unprepared teeth. It was concluded that the teeth restored with Admira exhibited the highest fracture resistance. PMID:23554719

  11. Naturally occurring rhodopsin mutation in the dog causes retinal dysfunction and degeneration mimicking human dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kijas, James W.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Pianta, Michael J.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Miller, Brian J.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.

    2002-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by light and initiates the transduction cascade leading to night (rod) vision. Naturally occurring pathogenic rhodopsin (RHO) mutations have been previously identified only in humans and are a common cause of dominantly inherited blindness from retinal degeneration. We identified English Mastiff dogs with a naturally occurring dominant retinal degeneration and determined the cause to be a point mutation in the RHO gene (Thr4Arg). Dogs with this mutant allele manifest a retinal phenotype that closely mimics that in humans with RHO mutations. The phenotypic features shared by dog and man include a dramatically slowed time course of recovery of rod photoreceptor function after light exposure and a distinctive topographic pattern to the retinal degeneration. The canine disease offers opportunities to explore the basis of prolonged photoreceptor recovery after light in RHO mutations and determine whether there are links between the dysfunction and apoptotic retinal cell death. The RHO mutant dog also becomes the large animal needed for preclinical trials of therapies for a major subset of human retinopathies. PMID:11972042

  12. Optogenetic Control of Motor Coordination by Gi/o Protein-coupled Vertebrate Rhodopsin in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Davina V.; Mark, Melanie D.; Masseck, Olivia; Maejima, Takashi; Kuckelsberg, Denise; Hyde, Robert A.; Krause, Martin; Kruse, Wolfgang; Herlitze, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are involved in the modulation of complex neuronal networks in the brain. To investigate the impact of a cell-specific Gi/o protein-mediated signaling pathway on brain function, we created a new optogenetic mouse model in which the Gi/o protein-coupled receptor vertebrate rhodopsin can be cell-specifically expressed with the aid of Cre recombinase. Here we use this mouse model to study the functional impact of Gi/o modulation in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). We show that in vivo light activation of vertebrate rhodopsin specifically expressed in PCs reduces simple spike firing that is comparable with the reduction in firing observed for the activation of cerebellar Gi/o-coupled GABAB receptors. Notably, the light exposure of the cerebellar vermis in freely moving mice changes the motor behavior. Thus, our studies directly demonstrate that spike modulation via Gi/o-mediated signaling in cerebellar PCs affects motor coordination and show a new promising approach for studying the physiological function of G protein-coupled receptor-mediated signaling in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:21628464

  13. Molecular mechanism of long-range synergetic color tuning between multiple amino acid residues in conger rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hiroshi C.; Mori, Yoshiharu; Tada, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shozo; Yamato, Takahisa

    2011-01-01

    The synergetic effects of multiple rhodopsin mutations on color tuning need to be completely elucidated. Systematic genetic studies and spectroscopy have demonstrated an interesting example of synergetic color tuning between two amino acid residues in conger rhodopsin's ancestral pigment (p501): —a double mutation at one nearby and one distant residue led to a significant λmax blue shift of 13 nm, whereas neither of the single mutations at these two sites led to meaningful shifts. To analyze the molecular mechanisms of this synergetic color tuning, we performed homology modeling, molecular simulations, and electronic state calculations. For the double mutant, N195A/A292S, in silico mutation analysis demonstrated conspicuous structural changes in the retinal chromophore, whereas that of the single mutant, A292S, was almost unchanged. Using statistical ensembles of QM/MM optimized structures, the excitation energy of retinal chromophore was evaluated for the three visual pigments. As a result, the λmax shift of double mutant (DM) from p501 was –8 nm, while that of single mutant (SM) from p501 was +1 nm. Molecular dynamics simulation for DM demonstrated frequent isomerization between 6-s-cis and 6-s-trans conformers. Unexpectedly, however, the two conformers exhibited almost identical excitation energy, whereas principal component analysis (PCA) identified the retinal-counterion cooperative change of BLA (bond length alternation) and retinal-counterion interaction lead to the shift. PMID:21297892

  14. Photoisomerization mechanism of the rhodopsin chromophore: picosecond photolysis of pigment containing 11-cis-locked eight-membered ring retinal.

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, T; Kandori, H; Shichida, Y; Chen, A H; Derguini, F; Caldwell, C G; Biffe, C F; Nakanishi, K; Yoshizawa, T

    1993-01-01

    The primary photochemical event in rhodopsin is an 11-cis to 11-trans photoisomerization of its retinylidene chromophore to form the primary intermediate photorhodopsin. Earlier picosecond studies have shown that no intermediate is formed when the retinal 11-ene is fixed through a bridging five-membered ring, whereas a photorhodopsin-like intermediate is formed when it is fixed through a flexible seven-membered ring. Results from a rhodopsin analog formed from a retinal with locked 11-ene structure through the more flexible eight-membered ring (Ret8) are described. Incubation of bovine opsin with Ret8 formed two pigments absorbing at 425 nm (P425) and 500 nm (P500). P425, however, is an artifact because it formed from thermally denatured opsin or other proteins and Ret8. Excitation of P500 with a picosecond green pulse led to formation of two intermediates corresponding to photo- and bathorhodopsins. These results demonstrate that an appearance of early intermediates is dependent on the flexibility of the 11-ene and that the photoisomerization of P500 proceeds by stepwise changes of chromophore-protein interaction, which in turn leads to a relaxation of the highly twisted all-trans-retinylidene chromophore in photorhodopsin. PMID:8483923

  15. Calpain and PARP Activation during Photoreceptor Cell Death in P23H and S334ter Rhodopsin Mutant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jasvir; Mencl, Stine; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Farinelli, Pietro; van Veen, Theo; Zrenner, Eberhart; Ekström, Per; Paquet-Durand, François; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases affecting photoreceptors and causing blindness. Many human cases are caused by mutations in the rhodopsin gene. An important question regarding RP pathology is whether different genetic defects trigger the same or different cell death mechanisms. To answer this question, we analysed photoreceptor degeneration in P23H and S334ter transgenic rats carrying rhodopsin mutations that affect protein folding and sorting respectively. We found strong activation of calpain and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in both mutants, concomitant with calpastatin down-regulation, increased oxidative DNA damage and accumulation of PAR polymers. These parameters were strictly correlated with the temporal progression of photoreceptor degeneration, mirroring earlier findings in the phosphodiesterase-6 mutant rd1 mouse, and suggesting execution of non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms. Interestingly, activation of caspases-3 and -9 and cytochrome c leakage—key events in apoptotic cell death—were observed only in the S334ter mutant, which also showed increased expression of PARP-1. The identification of the same metabolic markers triggered by different mutations in two different species suggests the existence of common cell death mechanisms, which is a major consideration for any mutation independent treatment. PMID:21765948

  16. Restoration of Ailing Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide. PMID:22291573

  17. Left ventricular restoration devices.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Guilherme H; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Bezerra, Hiram G; Costa, Marco A

    2014-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) remodeling results in continuous cardiac chamber enlargement and contractile dysfunction, perpetuating the syndrome of heart failure. With current exhaustion of the neurohormonal medical paradigm, surgical and device-based therapies have been increasingly investigated as a way to restore LV chamber architecture and function. Left ventricular restoration has been attempted with surgical procedures, such as partial left ventriculectomy, surgical ventricular restoration with or without revascularization, and devices, such as the Acorn CorCap, the Paracor HeartNet, and the Myocor Myosplint. Whereas all these techniques require surgical access, with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, a newer ventricular partitioning device (VPD) called Parachute, can be delivered percutaneously through the aortic valve. Designed to achieve LV restoration from within the ventricle, this VPD partitions the LV by isolating aneurysmal from normal myocardium thereby diminishing the functioning cavity. This review aims to critically appraise the above methods, with particular attention to device-based therapies. PMID:24574107

  18. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen. PMID:12412967

  19. Soil microbial communities and metabolic function of a Northern Alabama forest ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thinning, prescribed burning, and their combinations, are common forest management practices to restore degraded forest communities and to prevent uncontrollable wildfires. However, their impacts on soil microbial communities, which are vital to global element cycling, are traditionally overlooked. ...

  20. Mechanism of Rhodopsin Activation as Examined with Ring-constrained Retinal Analogs and the Crystal Structure of the Ground State Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Geeng-Fu; Kuksa, Vladimir; Filipek, Stawomir; Bartl||, Franz; Ritter, Eglof; Gelb, Michael H.; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein)-coupled receptor superfamily (GPCR) is comprised of a large group of membrane proteins involved in a wide range of physiological signaling processes. The functional switch from a quiescent to an active conformation is at the heart of GPCR action. The GPCR rhodopsin has been studied extensively because of its key role in scotopic vision. The ground state chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, holds the transmembrane region of the protein in the inactive conformation. Light induces cis-trans isomerization and rhodopsin activation. Here we show that rhodopsin regenerated with a ring-constrained 11-cis-retinal analog undergoes photoisomerization; however, it remains marginally active because isomerization occurs without the chromophore-induced conformational change of the opsin moiety. Modeling the locked chromophore analogs in the active site of rhodopsin suggests that the β-ionone ring rotates but is largely confined within the binding site of the natural 11-cis-retinal chromophore. This constraint is a result of the geometry of the stable 11-cis-locked configuration of the chromophore analogs. These results suggest that the native chromophore cis-trans isomerization is merely a mechanism for repositioning of the β-ionone ring which ultimately leads to helix movements and determines receptor activation. PMID:11316815

  1. Regulation of Membrane Proteins by Dietary Lipids: Effects of Cholesterol and Docosahexaenoic Acid Acyl Chain-Containing Phospholipids on Rhodopsin Stability and Function

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael P.; Mitchell, Drake C.

    2008-01-01

    Purified bovine rhodopsin was reconstituted into vesicles consisting of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine or 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl phosphatidylcholine with and without 30 mol % cholesterol. Rhodopsin stability was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal unfolding transition temperature (Tm) of rhodopsin was scan rate-dependent, demonstrating the presence of a rate-limited component of denaturation. The activation energy of this kinetically controlled process (Ea) was determined from DSC thermograms by four separate methods. Both Tm and Ea varied with bilayer composition. Cholesterol increased the Tm both the presence and absence of docosahexaenoic acid acyl chains (DHA). In contrast, cholesterol lowered Ea in the absence of DHA, but raised Ea in the presence of 20 mol % DHA-containing phospholipid. The relative acyl chain packing order was determined from measurements of diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy decay. The Tm for thermal unfolding was inversely related to acyl chain packing order. Rhodopsin kinetic stability (Ea) was reduced in highly ordered or disordered membranes. Maximal kinetic stability was found within the range of acyl chain order found in native bovine rod outer segment disk membranes. The results demonstrate that membrane composition has distinct effects on the thermal versus kinetic stabilities of membrane proteins, and suggests that a balance between membrane constituents with opposite effects on acyl chain packing, such as DHA and cholesterol, may be required for maximum protein stability. PMID:18424497

  2. Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin. Implications for chromophore-protein interaction, transducin activation, and the reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Ganter, U M; Longstaff, C; Pajares, M A; Rando, R R; Siebert, F

    1991-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin (ASMR) show that, as compared to unmodified rhodopsin, the photoreaction is almost unchanged up to the formation of lumirhodopsin. Especially, the deviations are much smaller than those observed for the corresponding intermediates of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. In metarhodopsin-I, larger alterations are present with respect to the three internal carboxyl groups. Similar deviations have been observed in meta-I of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. This indicates that, in agreement with our previous investigations, these carboxyl groups are located in close proximity to the chromophore. Because this latter pigment is capable, when bleached, of activating transducin, our data provide support for the earlier conclusion that deprotonation of the Schiff base is a prerequisite for transducin activation. The positions of the C = C and C - C stretching modes of the retinal suggest that the redshift observed in ASMR and its photoproducts can be explained by an increased distance of the Schiff base from the counterion(s). It is further shown that the photoreaction does not stop at metarhodopsin-I, but that this intermediate directly decays to a metarhodopsin-III-like species. PMID:2049524

  3. Mapping of contact sites in complex formation between transducin and light-activated rhodopsin by covalent crosslinking: use of a photoactivatable reagent.

    PubMed

    Cai, K; Itoh, Y; Khorana, H G

    2001-04-24

    Interaction of light-activated rhodopsin with transducin (T) is the first event in visual signal transduction. We use covalent crosslinking approaches to map the contact sites in interaction between the two proteins. Here we use a photoactivatable reagent, N-[(2-pyridyldithio)-ethyl], 4-azido salicylamide. The reagent is attached to the SH group of cytoplasmic monocysteine rhodopsin mutants by a disulfide-exchange reaction with the pyridylthio group, and the derivatized rhodopsin then is complexed with T by illumination at lambda >495 nm. Subsequent irradiation of the complex at lambda310 nm generates covalent crosslinks between the two proteins. Crosslinking was demonstrated between T and a number of single cysteine rhodopsin mutants. However, sites of crosslinks were investigated in detail only between T and the rhodopsin mutant S240C (cytoplasmic loop V-VI). Crosslinking occurred predominantly with T(alpha). For identification of the sites of crosslinks in T(alpha), the strategy used involved: (i) derivatization of all of the free cysteines in the crosslinked proteins with N-ethylmaleimide; (ii) reduction of the disulfide bond linking the two proteins and isolation of all of the T(alpha) species carrying the crosslinked moiety with a free SH group; (iii) adduct formation of the latter with the N-maleimide moiety of the reagent, maleimido-butyryl-biocytin, containing a biotinyl group; (iv) trypsin degradation of the resulting T(alpha) derivatives and isolation of T(alpha) peptides carrying maleimido-butyryl-biocytin by avidin-agarose chromatography; and (v) identification of the isolated peptides by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We found that crosslinking occurred mainly to two C-terminal peptides in T(alpha) containing the amino acid sequences 310-313 and 342-345. PMID:11320237

  4. Functional interaction of transmembrane helices 3 and 6 in rhodopsin. Replacement of phenylalanine 261 by alanine causes reversion of phenotype of a glycine 121 replacement mutant.

    PubMed

    Han, M; Lin, S W; Minkova, M; Smith, S O; Sakmar, T P

    1996-12-13

    Replacement of a highly conserved glycine residue on transmembrane (TM) helix 3 of bovine rhodopsin (Gly121) by amino acid residues with larger side chains causes a progressive blue-shift in the lambdamax value of the pigment, a decrease in thermal stability, and an increase in reactivity with hydroxylamine. In addition, mutation of Gly121 causes a relative reversal in the selectivity of opsin for 11-cis-retinal over all-trans-retinal. It was suggested that Gly121 plays an important role in defining the 11-cis-retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin (Han, M., Lin, S. W., Smith, S. O., and Sakmar, T. P. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 32330-32336). Here, we combined the mutant opsin G121L with second site replacements of four different amino acid residues on TM helix 6: Met257, Val258, Phe261, or Trp265. We show that the loss of function phenotypes of the G121L mutant described above can be partially reverted specifically by the mutation of Phe261, a residue highly conserved in all G protein-coupled receptors. For example, the double-replacement mutant G121L/F261A has spectral, chromophore-binding, and transducin-activating properties intermediate between those of G121L and rhodopsin. This rescue of the G121L defects did not occur with the other second site mutations tested. We conclude that specific portions of TM helices 3 and 6, which include Gly121 and Phe261, respectively, define the chromophore-binding pocket in rhodopsin. Finally, the results are placed in the context of a molecular graphics model of the TM domain of rhodopsin, which includes the retinal-binding pocket. PMID:8943296

  5. Fatigue of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Baran, G; Boberick, K; McCool, J

    2001-01-01

    Failure due to fatigue manifests itself in dental prostheses and restorations as wear, fractured margins, delaminated coatings, and bulk fracture. Mechanisms responsible for fatigue-induced failure depend on material ductility: Brittle materials are susceptible to catastrophic failure, while ductile materials utilize their plasticity to reduce stress concentrations at the crack tip. Because of the expense associated with the replacement of failed restorations, there is a strong desire on the part of basic scientists and clinicians to evaluate the resistance of materials to fatigue in laboratory tests. Test variables include fatigue-loading mode and test environment, such as soaking in water. The outcome variable is typically fracture strength, and these data typically fit the Weibull distribution. Analysis of fatigue data permits predictive inferences to be made concerning the survival of structures fabricated from restorative materials under specified loading conditions. Although many dental-restorative materials are routinely evaluated, only limited use has been made of fatigue data collected in vitro: Wear of materials and the survival of porcelain restorations has been modeled by both fracture mechanics and probabilistic approaches. A need still exists for a clinical failure database and for the development of valid test methods for the evaluation of composite materials. PMID:11603506

  6. Technical framework for groundwater restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This document provides the technical framework for groundwater restoration under Phase II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. A preliminary management plan for Phase II has been set forth in a companion document titled ``Preplanning Guidance Document for Groundwater Restoration``. General principles of site characterization for groundwater restoration, restoration methods, and treatment are discussed in this document to provide an overview of standard technical approaches to groundwater restoration.

  7. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION THROUGH BIOREMEDIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS, A.J.

    2006-09-29

    Treatment of waste streams containing radionuclides, the remediation of contaminated materials, soils, and water, and the safe and economical disposal of radionuclides and toxic metals containing wastes is a major concern. Radionuclides may exist in various oxidation states and may be present as oxide, coprecipitates, inorganic, and organic complexes depending on the process and waste stream. Unlike organic contaminants, the metals cannot be destroyed, but must either be converted to a stable form or removed. Microorganisms present in the natural environment play a major role in the mobilization and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals by direct enzymatic or indirect non-enzymatic actions and could affect the chemical nature of the radionuclides by altering the speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of microbiological transformations of various chemical forms of uranium present in wastes and contaminated soils and water has led to the development of novel bioremediation processes. One process uses anaerobic bacteria to stabilize the radionuclides by reductive precipitation from higher to lower oxidation state with a concurrent reduction in volume due to the dissolution and removal of nontoxic elements from the waste matrix. In an another process, uranium and other toxic metals are removed from contaminated surfaces, soils, and wastes by extracting with the chelating agent citric acid. Uranium is recovered from the citric acid extract after biodegradation followed by photodegradation in a concentrated form as UO{sub 3} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O for recycling or appropriate disposal. These processes use all naturally occurring materials, common soil bacteria, naturally occurring organic compound citric acid and sunlight.

  8. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF URANIUM AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION THROUGH BIOREMEDIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS,A.J.

    2002-09-10

    Microorganisms present in the natural environment play a significant role in the mobilization and immobilization of uranium. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of microbiological transformations of various chemical forms of uranium present in wastes and contaminated soils and water has led to the development of novel bioremediation processes. One process uses anaerobic bacteria to stabilize the radionuclides and toxic metals from the waste, with a concurrent reduction in volume due to the dissolution and removal of nontoxic elements from the waste matrix. In an another process, uranium and other toxic metals are removed from contaminated soils and wastes by extracting with the chelating agent citric acid. Uranium is recovered from the citric acid extract after biodegradation/photodegradation in a concentrated form as UO{sub 3} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O for recycling or appropriate disposal.

  9. Restoring the prairie

    SciTech Connect

    Mlot, C.

    1990-12-01

    The US DOE at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, prairie restoration is taking place in order to conserve the rich topsoil. This is the largest of many prairie restoration experiments. Big bluestem grass (Andropogon gerardi), blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and buffalo grass (Buchloe dactyloides) are the main initial grasses grown. After their growth reaches enough biomass to sustain a fire, other prairie plants such as purple prairie clover and dropseed grass appear. The goal of this is to provide a generous refuge for disappearing native plants and animals, a site for scientific research, and a storehouse of genes adapted to a region that produces much of the worlds food. Plans for restoring the marsh and oak savanna, also native to the Fermilab site are also in the works.

  10. Earthquake funding restored

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    Funding levels for the U.S. Geological Survey's part of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program for FY92 have been restored by the House and a Senate subcommittee. The president's budget request for FY92 was only $37.3 million, lower than the $54.5 million authorized by Congress for FY91. Earlier this year the House agreed on restoring $10 million to the program. Some AGU members have been trying to see the full $17.2 million difference restored. It is reported that the Senate will agree to give $15 million to the program.When Congress reconvenes in September the full Senate will vote on the Department of Interior and Related Agencies appropriations bill (HR2686). After that, the bill will go to a joint conference committee, where differences between the House and Senate will be resolved before the bill is passed along to the president.

  11. Restoration of Shoulder Function.

    PubMed

    Boe, Chelsea C; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-08-01

    Restoration of shoulder function in patients with brachial plexus injury can be challenging. Initial reported efforts were focused on stabilizing the shoulder, improving inferior subluxation and restoring abduction and flexion of the joint. Recent advancements and improved understanding of coordinated shoulder motion and the biomechanical properties of the muscles around the shoulder applicable to tendon transfer have expanded available surgical options to improve shoulder function, specifically external rotation. Despite the advances in reconstructive options, brachial plexus injury remains a serious problem that requires complex surgical solutions, prolonged recovery, and acceptance of functional loss. PMID:27387074

  12. NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Lelie, D.; Reid-Green, J. D.; Stern, E. A.

    2003-12-31

    We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

  13. Microbial effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lamborg, M.R.; Hardy, R.W.F.; Paul, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    The postulated doubling of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ is not likely to have direct effect on soil microbial activity because during the growing season, the concentration of CO/sub 2/ in the soil atmosphere is already ten to fifty times higher than existing atmospheric CO/sub 2/. Based on all available experimental information, it is estimated that a doubling of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ will cause an increase in primary productivity of 10 to 40% depending on locale. The increase in biomass will, in turn, produce a limitation of available soil nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus. Increased organic carbon together with nitrogen and/or phosphorus limitation will result in a preferential increase in nitrogen fixation and mycorrhizal activities as the expedient means for supplying required nutrients to sustain the predicted increase in primary productivity. Therefore, increased emphasis should be placed on fundamental research related to soil microbiology with special reference to nitrogen-fixing, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria, and to the mycorrhizal fungi. 111 references, 2 figures.

  14. Arid soil microbial enzymatic activity profile as affected by geographical location and soil degradation status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating soil health is critical for any successful remediation effort. Arid lands, with their minimal carbon and water contents, low nutritional status and restricted, seasonal microbial activity pose specific challenges to soil health restoration and by extension, restoration of ecosystem repr...

  15. Steady state emission of the fluorescent intermediate of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin as a function of light adaptation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheminal, A.; Léonard, J.; Kim, S. Y.; Jung, K.-H.; Kandori, H.; Haacke, S.

    2013-11-01

    Steady-state fluorescence measurements of the first excited state of the anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), and Bacteriorhodopsin are reported for different light stabilization conditions, including the dark-adapted state. We determine the fluorescence spectra of both all-trans (AT), and 13-cis (13C) protonated Schiff base of retinal, and compare the effect of the proteins. Referenced against the fluorescence quantum yield of AT-bR (2.5 × 10-4) we find for AT-ASR, 13C-ASR, and 13C-bR the values of 3.3 × 10-4, 0.8 × 10-4, and 1.7 × 10-4, respectively. Using reported excited state lifetimes, the radiative rates are deduced, and their differences discussed on the basis of a configuration-dependent oscillator strength.

  16. Calcium Feedback to cGMP Synthesis Strongly Attenuates Single-Photon Responses Driven by Long Rhodopsin Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Owen P.; Pugh, Edward N.; Burns, Marie E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Rod photoreceptors generate amplified, reproducible responses to single photons via a G protein signaling cascade. Surprisingly, genetic perturbations that dramatically alter the deactivation of the principal signal amplifier, the GPCR rhodopsin (R*), do not much alter the amplitude of single-photon responses (SPRs). These same perturbations, when crossed into a line lacking calcium feedback regulation of cGMP synthesis, produced much larger alterations in SPR amplitudes. Analysis of SPRs from rods with and without feedback reveal that the consequences of trial-to-trial fluctuations in R* lifetime in normal rods are also dampened by feedback regulation of cGMP synthesis. Thus, calcium feedback trumps the mechanisms of R* deactivation in determining the SPR amplitude, attenuating responses arising from longer R* lifetimes to a greater extent than those arising from shorter ones. As a result, rod SPRs achieve a more stereotyped amplitude, a characteristic considered important for reliable transmission through the visual system. PMID:23083739

  17. The role of membrane curvature elastic stress for function of rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Soubias, Olivier; Teague, Walter E.; Hines, Kirk G.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 800 different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). They are key molecules in signal transduction pathways that transmit signals of a variety of ligands such as hormones and neurotransmitters to the cell interior. Upon ligand binding, the receptors undergo structural transitions that either enhance or inhibit transmission of a specific signal to the cell interior. Here we discuss results which indicate that transmission of such signals can be strongly modulated by the composition of the lipid matrix into which GPCR are imbedded. Experimental results have been obtained on rhodopsin, a prototype GPCR whose structure and function is representative for the great majority of GPCR in humans. The data shed light on the importance of curvature elastic stress in the lipid domain for function of GPCR. PMID:25447139

  18. Quantitative modeling of the molecular steps underlying shut-off of rhodopsin activity in rod phototransduction

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the predictions of alternative models for the stochastic shut-off of activated rhodopsin (R*) and their implications for the interpretation of experimentally recorded single-photon responses (SPRs) in mammalian rods. Theory We analyze the transitions that an activated R* molecule undergoes as a result of successive phosphorylation steps and arrestin binding. We consider certain simplifying cases for the relative magnitudes of the reaction rate constants and derive the probability distributions for the time to arrestin binding. In addition to the conventional model in which R* catalytic activity declines in a graded manner with successive phosphorylations, we analyze two cases in which the activity is assumed to occur not via multiple small steps upon each phosphorylation but via a single large step. We refer to these latter two cases as the binary R* shut-off and three-state R* shut-off models. Methods We simulate R*’s stochastic reactions numerically for the three models. In the simplifying cases for the ratio of rate constants in the binary and three-state models, we show that the probability distribution of the time to arrestin binding is accurately predicted. To simulate SPRs, we then integrate the differential equations for the downstream reactions using a standard model of the rod outer segment that includes longitudinal diffusion of cGMP and Ca2+. Results Our simulations of SPRs in the conventional model of graded shut-off of R* conform closely to the simulations in a recent study. However, the gain factor required to account for the observed mean SPR amplitude is higher than can be accounted for from biochemical experiments. In addition, a substantial minority of the simulated SPRs exhibit features that have not been reported in published experiments. Our simulations of SPRs using the model of binary R* shut-off appear to conform closely to experimental results for wild type (WT) mouse rods, and the required gain factor conforms to

  19. Inevitability of Balance Restoration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged imbalance between input and output of any element in a living organism is incompatible with life. The duration of imbalance varies, but eventually balance is achieved. This rule applies to any quantifiable element in a compartment of finite capacity. Transient discrepancies occur regularly, but given sufficient time, balance is always achieved, because permanent imbalance is impossible, and the mechanism for eventual restoration of balance is foolproof. The kidney is a central player for balance restoration of fluid and electrolytes, but the smartness of the kidney is not the reason for perfect balance. The kidney merely accelerates the process. The most crucial element of the control system is that discrepancy between intake and output inevitably leads to a change in total content of the element in the system, and uncorrected balance has a cumulative effect on the overall content of the element. In a living organism, the speed of restoration of balance depends on the permissible duration of imbalance without death or severe disability. The three main factors that influence the speed of balance restoration are: magnitude of flux, basal store, and capacity for additional storage. For most electrolytes, total capacity is such that a substantial discrepancy is not possible for more than a week or two. Most control mechanisms correct abnormality partially. The infinite gain control mechanism is unique in that abnormality is completely corrected upon completion of compensation. PMID:21468193

  20. BALTIMORE STREAM RESTORATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    26 Feb 2003



    Approach - We will employ a 4-tiered research approach to investigate restoration effects on hydrology and stream water quality: 1) monitoring ground water and surface water, 2) quantifying denitrification activity, 3) measuring carbon supply and rete...

  1. Restoration of face images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Aparna

    2012-01-01

    Restoration techniques are applied to degraded face samples. The techniques considered are those of Wiener Filtering, Lucy Richardson deconvolution, Blind deconvolution and Constrained least squares filtering (CLSF). Images degraded by low blur, high blur and low blur with noise are experimented with and the results are expounded.

  2. Restoration of face images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Aparna

    2011-12-01

    Restoration techniques are applied to degraded face samples. The techniques considered are those of Wiener Filtering, Lucy Richardson deconvolution, Blind deconvolution and Constrained least squares filtering (CLSF). Images degraded by low blur, high blur and low blur with noise are experimented with and the results are expounded.

  3. ECOLOGICAL PROTECTION AND RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    To carry out this mission, GLNPO established its Ecological Protection and Restoration Team (the E Team), consisting of a staff plus extended team members from EPA Regions 2, 3, and 5, other federal and state agencies, and non-governmental organizations. GLNPO expect...

  4. Restoring Fossil Creek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

    2004-01-01

    Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

  5. Model for Coastal Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Judd, Chaeli

    2007-07-27

    Successful restoration of wetland habitats depends on both our understanding of our system and our ability to characterize it. By developing a conceptual model, looking at different spatial scales and integrating diverse data streams: GIS datasets and NASA products, we were able to develop a dynamic model for site prioritization based on both qualitative and quantitative relationships found in the coastal environment.

  6. Photoactivation-Induced Instability of Rhodopsin Mutants T4K and T17M in Rod Outer Segments Underlies Retinal Degeneration in X. laevis Transgenic Models of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Beatrice M.; Noorwez, Syed M.; Kaushal, Shalesh; Kono, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease involving progressive vision loss, and is often linked to mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Mutations that abolish N-terminal glycosylation of rhodopsin (T4K and T17M) cause sector RP in which the inferior retina preferentially degenerates, possibly due to greater light exposure of this region. Transgenic animal models expressing rhodopsin glycosylation mutants also exhibit light exacerbated retinal degeneration (RD). In this study, we used transgenic Xenopus laevis to investigate the pathogenic mechanism connecting light exposure and RD in photoreceptors expressing T4K or T17M rhodopsin. We demonstrate that increasing the thermal stability of these rhodopsins via a novel disulfide bond resulted in significantly less RD. Furthermore, T4K or T17M rhodopsins that were constitutively inactive (due to lack of the chromophore-binding site or dietary deprivation of the chromophore precursor vitamin A) induced less toxicity. In contrast, variants in the active conformation accumulated in the ER and caused RD even in the absence of light. In vitro, T4K and T17M rhodopsins showed reduced ability to regenerate pigment after light exposure. Finally, although multiple amino acid substitutions of T4 abolished glycosylation at N2 but were not toxic, similar substitutions of T17 were not tolerated, suggesting that the carbohydrate moiety at N15 is critical for cell viability. Our results identify a novel pathogenic mechanism in which the glycosylation-deficient rhodopsins are destabilized by light activation. These results have important implications for proposed RP therapies, such as vitamin A supplementation, which may be ineffective or even detrimental for certain RP genotypes. PMID:25274813

  7. Photoactivation-induced instability of rhodopsin mutants T4K and T17M in rod outer segments underlies retinal degeneration in X. laevis transgenic models of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Tam, Beatrice M; Noorwez, Syed M; Kaushal, Shalesh; Kono, Masahiro; Moritz, Orson L

    2014-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease involving progressive vision loss, and is often linked to mutations in the rhodopsin gene. Mutations that abolish N-terminal glycosylation of rhodopsin (T4K and T17M) cause sector RP in which the inferior retina preferentially degenerates, possibly due to greater light exposure of this region. Transgenic animal models expressing rhodopsin glycosylation mutants also exhibit light exacerbated retinal degeneration (RD). In this study, we used transgenic Xenopus laevis to investigate the pathogenic mechanism connecting light exposure and RD in photoreceptors expressing T4K or T17M rhodopsin. We demonstrate that increasing the thermal stability of these rhodopsins via a novel disulfide bond resulted in significantly less RD. Furthermore, T4K or T17M rhodopsins that were constitutively inactive (due to lack of the chromophore-binding site or dietary deprivation of the chromophore precursor vitamin A) induced less toxicity. In contrast, variants in the active conformation accumulated in the ER and caused RD even in the absence of light. In vitro, T4K and T17M rhodopsins showed reduced ability to regenerate pigment after light exposure. Finally, although multiple amino acid substitutions of T4 abolished glycosylation at N2 but were not toxic, similar substitutions of T17 were not tolerated, suggesting that the carbohydrate moiety at N15 is critical for cell viability. Our results identify a novel pathogenic mechanism in which the glycosylation-deficient rhodopsins are destabilized by light activation. These results have important implications for proposed RP therapies, such as vitamin A supplementation, which may be ineffective or even detrimental for certain RP genotypes. PMID:25274813

  8. 14. EAST ELEVATION, COTTAGE. EXTERIOR NEARLY RESTORED. INTERIOR UNDERGOING RESTORATION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. EAST ELEVATION, COTTAGE. EXTERIOR NEARLY RESTORED. INTERIOR UNDERGOING RESTORATION. EUCALYPTUS TREE PLANTED BY GERTRUDE KEIL PLANNED FOR REMOVAL. - Gold Ridge Farm, 7777 Bodega Avenue, Sebastopol, Sonoma County, CA

  9. Restoration of rare earth mine areas: organic amendments and phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingyan; Li, Zhaolong; Liu, Wen; Liu, Shenghong; Zhang, Limin; Zhong, Liyan; Luo, Ximei; Liang, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Overexploitation of rare earth mine has caused serious desertification and various environmental issues, and ecological restoration of a mining area is an important concern in China. In this study, experiments involving dry grass landfilling, chicken manure broadcasting, and plant cultivation were carried out to reclaim a rare earth mine area located in Heping County, Guangdong Province, China. The prime focus was to improve soil quality in terms of nutrients, microbial community, enzyme activity, and physicochemical properties so as to reclaim the land. After 2 years of restoration, an increase of organic matter (OM), available potassium (K), available phosphorus (P) levels, and acid phosphatase (ACP) activity and a reduction of the available nitrogen (N) level and urease (URE) activity in soil were achieved compared to the original mined land. The nutrients and enzyme activities in soil with 5 years of restoration were close to or surpass those in the unexploited land as control. The bulk density, total porosity, water holding capacity, pH, and electrical conductivity (EC) of soil were improved, and the number of cultivable microorganisms and the bacterial diversity in soil were greatly increased with time during ecological restoration, especially for surface soil. Furthermore, the artificial vegetation stably grew at the restored mining sites. The results indicated that organic amendments and phytoremediation could ecologically restore the rare earth mining sites and the mined land could finally be planted as farmland. PMID:26139395

  10. Digital restoration of multichannel images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galatsanos, Nikolas P.; Chin, Roland T.

    1989-01-01

    The Wiener solution of a multichannel restoration scheme is presented. Using matrix diagonalization and block-Toeplitz to block-circulant approximation, the inversion of the multichannel, linear space-invariant imaging system becomes feasible by utilizing a fast iterative matrix inversion procedure. The restoration uses both the within-channel (spatial) and between-channel (spectral) correlation; hence, the restored result is a better estimate than that produced by independent channel restoration. Simulations are also presented.

  11. Prairie Restoration for Wisconsin Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Molly Fifield; Greenler, Robin McC.

    This packet is composed of several resources for teachers interested in prairie ecology and restoration. "A Guide to Restoration from Site Analysis to Management" focuses on the Prairie/Oak Savanna communities of Wisconsin and takes teachers through the planning and design process for a restoration project on school grounds including site…

  12. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  13. Engineering approaches to ecosystem restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings CD ROM contains 127 papers on developing and evaluating engineering approaches to wetlands and river restoration. The latest engineering developments are discussed, providing valuable insights to successful approaches for river restoration, wetlands restoration, watershed management, and constructed wetlands for stormwater and wastewater treatment. Potential solutions to a wide variety of ecosystem concerns in urban, suburban, and coastal environments are presented.

  14. Restoration of longitudinal images.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Frieden, B R

    1988-01-15

    In this paper, a method of restoring longitudinal images is developed. By using the transfer function for longitudinal objects, and inverse filtering, a longitudinal image may be restored. The Fourier theory and sampling theorems for transverse images cannot be used directly in the longitudinal case. A modification and reasonable approximation are introduced. We have numerically established a necessary relationship between just-resolved longitudinal separation (after inverse filtering), noise level, and the taking conditions of object distance and lens diameter. An empirical formula is also found to well-fit the computed results. This formula may be of use for designing optical systems which are to image longitudinal details, such as in robotics or microscopy. PMID:20523607

  15. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  16. Restoration of Elbow Flexion.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Bryan J; Lewis, Daniel R

    2016-08-01

    Active elbow flexion is required to position the hand in space, and loss of this function is debilitating. Nerve transfers or nerve grafts to restore elbow flexion may be options when the target muscle is viable, but in delayed reconstruction when the biceps and brachialis are atrophied or damaged, muscle transfer options should be considered. Muscle transfer options are discussed with attention to the advantages and disadvantages of each transfer option. PMID:27387075

  17. Long-Term Rescue of Retinal Structure and Function by Rhodopsin RNA Replacement with a Single Adeno-Associated Viral Vector in P23H RHO Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Haoyu; Gorbatyuk, Marina S.; Rossmiller, Brian; Hauswirth, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Many mutations in the human rhodopsin gene (RHO) cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP). Our previous studies with a P23H (proline-23 substituted by histidine) RHO transgenic mouse model of ADRP demonstrated significant improvement of retinal function and preservation of retinal structure after transfer of wild-type rhodopsin by AAV. In this study we demonstrate long-term rescue of retinal structure and function by a single virus expressing both RHO replacement cDNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) to digest mouse Rho and human P23H RHO mRNA. This combination should prevent overexpression of rhodopsin, which can be deleterious to photoreceptors. On the basis of the electroretinogram (ERG) response, degeneration of retinal function was arrested at 2 months postinjection, and the response was maintained at this level until termination at 9 months. Preservation of the ERG response in P23H RHO mice reflected survival of photoreceptors: both the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and outer segments of photoreceptor cells maintained the same thickness as in nontransgenic mice, whereas the control injected P23H eyes exhibited severe thinning of the ONL and outer segments. These findings suggest that delivery of both a modified cDNA and an siRNA by a single adeno-associated viral vector provided long-term rescue of ADRP in this model. Because the siRNA targets human as well as mouse rhodopsin mRNAs, the combination vector may be useful for the treatment of human disease. PMID:22289036

  18. Normal Light Response, Photoreceptor Integrity, and Rhodopsin Dephosphorylation in Mice Lacking Both Protein Phosphatases with EF Hands (PPEF-1 and PPEF-2)

    PubMed Central

    Ramulu, Pradeep; Kennedy, Matthew; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Williams, John; Cowan, Mitra; Blesh, Diane; Yau, King-Wai; Hurley, James B.; Nathans, Jeremy

    2001-01-01

    Rhodopsin dephosphorylation in Drosophila is a calcium-dependent process that appears to be catalyzed by the protein product of the rdgC gene. Two vertebrate rdgC homologs, PPEF-1 and PPEF-2, have been identified. PPEF-1 transcripts are present at low levels in the retina, while PPEF-2 transcripts and PPEF-2 protein are abundant in photoreceptors. To determine if PPEF-2 alone or in combination with PPEF-1 plays a role in rhodopsin dephosphorylation and to determine if retinal degeneration accompanies mutation of PPEF-1 and/or PPEF-2, we have produced mice carrying targeted disruptions in the PPEF-1 and PPEF-2 genes. Loss of either or both PPEFs has little or no effect on rod function, as mice lacking both PPEF-1 and PPEF-2 show little or no changes in the electroretinogram and PPEF-2−/− mice show normal single-cell responses to light in suction pipette recordings. Light-dependent rhodopsin phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are also normal or nearly normal as determined by (i) immunostaining of PPEF-2−/− retinas with the phosphorhodopsin-specific antibody RT-97 and (ii) mass spectrometry of C-terminal rhodopsin peptides from mice lacking both PPEF-1 and PPEF-2. Finally, PPEF-2−/− retinas show normal histology at 1 year of age, and retinas from mice lacking both PPEF-1 and PPEF-2 show normal histology at 3 months of age, the latest time examined. These data indicate that, in contrast to loss of rdgC function in Drosophila, elimination of PPEF function does not cause retinal degeneration in vertebrates. PMID:11713293

  19. Microbial mineral recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, H.L.; Brierly, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents the scientific basis for using microbial biomass to remove metals from solution. Reports on current and potential microbial technology, including bioleaching of ores, bio-benefication of ores and fossil fuels, metal recovery from solution, and microbial EOR. Examines how microorganisms used in these technologies might improve through genetic engineering.

  20. Ablation of Chop Transiently Enhances Photoreceptor Survival but Does Not Prevent Retinal Degeneration in Transgenic Mice Expressing Human P23H Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Joseph, Victory; Matthes, Michael T.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Gorbatyuk, Marina S.; Ahern, Kelly; LaVail, Matthew M.

    2016-01-01

    RHO (Rod opsin) encodes a G-protein coupled receptor that is expressed exclusively by rod photoreceptors of the retina and forms the essential photopigment, rhodopsin, when coupled with 11-cis-retinal. Many rod opsin disease mutations cause rod opsin protein misfolding and trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, leading to activation of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signal transduction network. Chop is a transcriptional activator that is induced by ER stress and promotes cell death in response to chronic ER stress. Here, we examined the role of Chop in transgenic mice expressing human P23H rhodopsin (hP23H Rho Tg) that undergo retinal degeneration. With the exception of one time point, we found no significant induction of Chop in these animals and no significant change in retinal degeneration by histology and electrophysiology when hP23H Rho Tg animals were bred into a Chop−/− background. Our results indicate that Chop does not play a significant causal role during retinal degeneration in these animals. We suggest that other modules of the ER stress-induced UPR signaling network may be involved photoreceptor disease induced by P23H rhodopsin. PMID:26427410

  1. Filling cavities or restoring teeth?

    PubMed

    Versluis, Antheunis; Versluis-Tantbirojn, Daranee

    2011-01-01

    Teeth seldom fracture under normal functional loading. This indicates that the natural tooth design is optimized for the distribution of regular masticatory forces by means of its properties and structure. When a tooth is restored with an intracoronal restoration, however, the incidence of tooth fracture increases. Since remaining tissues do not change, the restorative actions apparently alter the original stress distributions. In this study, the effect of different restoration types (unbonded amalgam and bonded composite restorations) were compared with the original stress conditions of the intact tooth, using finite element analysis. It was shown that an unbonded amalgam restoration did not restore the original stress conditions but led to much higher stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel and to higher tensile stresses in the cavity floor. The unbonded amalgam thus filled the cavity but did not restore the tooth. In contrast, a bonded composite restoration restored the original stress pattern in the tooth if there was no polymerization shrinkage. Polymerization shrinkage causes residual tensile stresses in the dentin around the cavity and in the buccal and lingual enamel. Residual tensile stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel are momentary compensated by compressive stress components during occlusal loading. It was concluded that bonding and elimination of residual stresses are prerequisites for restoring the original tooth integrity. PMID:21748978

  2. Image restoration, uncertainty, and information.

    PubMed

    Yu, F T

    1969-01-01

    Some of the physical interpretations about image restoration are discussed. From the theory of information the unrealizability of an inverse filter can be explained by degradation of information, which is due to distortion on the recorded image. The image restoration is a time and space problem, which can be recognized from the theory of relativity (the problem of image restoration is related to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics). A detailed discussion of the relationship between information and energy is given. Two general results may be stated: (1) the restoration of the image from the distorted signal is possible only if it satisfies the detectability condition. However, the restored image, at the best, can only approach to the maximum allowable time criterion. (2) The restoration of an image by superimposing the distorted signal (due to smearing) is a physically unrealizable method. However, this restoration procedure may be achieved by the expenditure of an infinite amount of energy. PMID:20072171

  3. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Mei, May L; Cheung, Chloe; Nalliah, Romesh P

    2013-01-01

    The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slot preparation includes being more conservative and increasing tooth integrity and strength by preserving the marginal ridge. However, tunnel restoration is technique-sensitive and can be particularly challenging for inexperienced restorative dentists. Recent advances in technology, such as the contemporary design of dental handpieces with advanced light-emitting diode (LED) and handheld comfort, offer operative dentists better vision, illumination, and maneuverability. The use of magnifying loupes also enhances the visibility of the preparation. The advent of digital radiographic imaging has improved dental imaging and reduced radiation. The new generation of restorative materials has improved mechanical properties. Tunnel restoration can be an option to restore proximal caries if the dentist performs proper case selection and pays attention to the details of the restorative procedures. This paper describes the clinical technique of tunnel restoration and reviews the studies of tunnel restorations. PMID:24019754

  4. Complications in hair restoration.

    PubMed

    Lam, Samuel M

    2013-11-01

    Hair restoration requires a high level of specialized skill on the part of both the surgeon and the assistant team. Recipient-site problems can manifest from either surgeon or assistant error. The surgeon can create an unnatural hairline due to lack of knowledge of natural hair-loss patterns or badly executed recipient sites. He must also be cognizant of how hairs naturally are angled on the scalp to re-create a pattern that appears natural when making recipient sites. Assistants can also greatly contribute to the success or failure of surgery in their task of graft dissection and graft placement. PMID:24200385

  5. Robotic hair restoration.

    PubMed

    Rose, Paul T; Nusbaum, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The latest innovation to hair restoration surgery has been the introduction of a robotic system for harvesting grafts. This system uses the follicular unit extraction/follicular isolation technique method for harvesting follicular units, which is particularly well suited to the abilities of a robotic technology. The ARTAS system analyzes images of the donor area and then a dual-chamber needle and blunt dissecting punch are used to harvest the follicular units. The robotic technology is now being used in various locations around the world. This article discusses the use of the robotic system, its capabilities, and the advantages and disadvantages of the system. PMID:24267426

  6. Percutaneous left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Ige, Mobolaji; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Attizzani, Guilherme; Costa, Marco; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2015-04-01

    The ventricular partitioning device known as Parachute is the first and only percutaneously implantable device aimed at restoration of normal left ventricular geometry in humans. Since its conception, this technology has undergone extensive animal and human testing, with proved feasibility and safety, and is currently being studied in a pivotal randomized clinical trial. This article discusses ventricular remodeling and therapies attempted in the past, details the components of the ventricular partitioning device, describes the implanting technique, and reviews the most current experience of this device in humans. PMID:25834974

  7. Land-use history has a stronger impact on soil microbial community composition than aboveground vegetation and soil properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The response of soil microbial communities following soil disturbances is poorly understood. The development of soil microbial communities in two restoration gradients was studied to investigate the impact of land-management regime at the W. K. Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan. The first restora...

  8. Reparative dentistry or restorative dentistry?

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2008-01-01

    The real definition of restorative dentistry is found in the heart and hands of each individual restorative dentist. His or her training, continuing dental education, mentors, needs (financial and emotional), and style of practice all help to develop a philosophy of dental practice that affects daily restorative decisions. Depending on the factors described above, the decision to repair a tooth or change the environment and restore the tooth to a different shape, size, or color also may change. In recent years, patients' esthetic desires have become more of a factor than they were in previous decades. There are no exact written-tn-stone definitions of restorative dentistry, since the answers are operator-dependent and can vary. This column is meant to be food for thought and perhaps inspire discussion when dentists assemble for meetings or study clubs with the goal of delivering longer-lasting dentistry through a restorative dental practice. PMID:18348367

  9. Gut Microbial Metabolites Fuel Host Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myunghoo; Qie, Yaqing; Park, Jeongho; Kim, Chang H

    2016-08-10

    Antibody production is a metabolically demanding process that is regulated by gut microbiota, but the microbial products supporting B cell responses remain incompletely identified. We report that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), produced by gut microbiota as fermentation products of dietary fiber, support host antibody responses. In B cells, SCFAs increase acetyl-CoA and regulate metabolic sensors to increase oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, and fatty acid synthesis, which produce energy and building blocks supporting antibody production. In parallel, SCFAs control gene expression to express molecules necessary for plasma B cell differentiation. Mice with low SCFA production due to reduced dietary fiber consumption or microbial insufficiency are defective in homeostatic and pathogen-specific antibody responses, resulting in greater pathogen susceptibility. However, SCFA or dietary fiber intake restores this immune deficiency. This B cell-helping function of SCFAs is detected from the intestines to systemic tissues and conserved among mouse and human B cells, highlighting its importance. PMID:27476413

  10. Topological change and impedance spectrum of rat olfactory receptor I7: A comparative analysis with bovine rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfinito, Eleonora; Pennetta, Cecilia; Reggiani, Lino

    2009-04-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on possible selection of olfactory receptors (ORs) as sensing components of nanobiosensors. Accordingly, we generate the impedance spectra of the rat OR I7 in the native and activated states and analyze their differences. In this way, we connect the protein morphological transformation, caused by the sensing action, with its change in electrical impedance. The results are compared with those obtained by studying the best known protein of the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family: bovine rhodopsin. Our investigations indicate that a change in morphology goes with a change in impedance spectrum mostly associated with a decrease in the static impedance up to about 60% of the initial value, in qualitative agreement with existing experiments on rat OR I7. The predictiveness of the model is tested successfully for the case of recent experiments on bacteriorhodopsin. The present results point to a promising development of a new class of nanobiosensors based on the electrical properties of GPCR and other sensing proteins.

  11. Real-time kinetics of electrogenic Na+ transport by rhodopsin from the marine flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. PRO95

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev, Alexander V.; Bertsova, Yulia V.; Verkhovskaya, Marina L.; Mamedov, Mahir D.; Skulachev, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of the light-driven sodium-motive pump Na+-rhodopsin (NaR) has initiated studies of the molecular mechanism of this novel membrane-linked energy transducer. In this paper, we investigated the photocycle of NaR from the marine flavobacterium Dokdonia sp. PRO95 and identified electrogenic and Na+-dependent steps of this cycle. We found that the NaR photocycle is composed of at least four steps: NaR519 + hv → K585 → (L450↔M495) → O585 → NaR519. The third step is the only step that depends on the Na+ concentration inside right-side-out NaR-containing proteoliposomes, indicating that this step is coupled with Na+ binding to NaR. For steps 2, 3, and 4, the values of the rate constants are 4×104 s–1, 4.7 × 103 M–1 s–1, and 150 s–1, respectively. These steps contributed 15, 15, and 70% of the total membrane electric potential (Δψ ~ 200 mV) generated by a single turnover of NaR incorporated into liposomes and attached to phospholipid-impregnated collodion film. On the basis of these observations, a mechanism of light-driven Na+ pumping by NaR is suggested. PMID:26864904

  12. A comparison of the efficiency of G protein activation by ligand-free and light-activated forms of rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Melia, T J; Cowan, C W; Angleson, J K; Wensel, T G

    1997-01-01

    Activation of the photoreceptor G protein transducin (Gt) by opsin, the ligand-free form of rhodopsin, was measured using rod outer segment membranes with densities of opsin and Gt similar to those found in rod cells. When GTPgammaS was used as the activating nucleotide, opsin catalyzed transducin activation with an exponential time course with a rate constant k(act) on the order of 2 x 10(-3)s(-1). Comparison under these conditions to activation by flash-generated metarhodopsin II (MII) revealed that opsin- and R*-catalyzed activation showed similar kinetics when MII was present at a surface density approximately 10(-6) lower than that of opsin. Thus, in contrast to some previous reports, we find that the catalytic potency of opsin is only approximately 10(-6) that of MII. In the presence of residual retinaldehyde-derived species present in membranes treated with hydroxylamine after bleaching, the apparent k(act) observed was much higher than that for opsin, suggesting a possible explanation for previous reports of more efficient activation by opsin. These results are important for considering the possible role of opsin in the diverse phenomena in which it has been suggested to play a key role, such as bleaching desensitization and retinal degeneration induced by continuous light or vitamin A deprivation. PMID:9414230

  13. An estimate of the number of G regulator proteins activated per excited rhodopsin in living Limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, A; Weiner, D; Lisman, J E

    1989-01-01

    Previous work by others on Limulus photoreceptors has shown that application of a variety of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein) activators produces discrete waves of depolarization similar to those generated by single photos, but smaller in size. We investigated whether these events might originate at a site other than the G protein. Initiation of the events did not depend on the state of the visual pigment, suggesting that the events do not originate at the pigment level. The events could be blocked by the G-protein blocker guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP[betaS]) and thus support the conclusion that these discrete events are due to the activation of G protein itself. Quantitative measurements indicate that the average size of these events is approximately 8 times smaller than that evoked by single photons under the same conditions. Given certain reasonable assumptions, these results imply that the gain of the first stage of transduction in vivo is approximately 8, a value considerably lower than that measured in vitro in vertebrate rods (gain, 100-500). Furthermore, independent evidence for a low first-stage gain in Limulus is derived from the observation that GDP[betaS] barely affects the size of the response to single photons, but greatly reduces the probability that a photon evokes a response. These results can be explained if rhodopsin normally activates only a few G proteins. PMID:2498877

  14. Age dependent sensitivity of two-photon isomerization of rhodopsin chromophores in the human retina (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtkowski, Maciej; Komar, Katarzyna; Palczewska, Grazyna; Zielinska, Agnieszka; Stremplewski, Patrycjusz; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    Light sensation relies on photoisomerization of chromophores in rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Spectral sensitivity of these photoreceptor cells in the retina is determined by the absorption spectra of their pigments which covers a range from 400 nm to above 700 nm. Regardless the mechanism leading to visual pigment isomerization, light sensation is triggered every time visual pigment molecules change their conformation. Thus, two-photon absorption (TPA) should produce the same result (visual sensation) as single photon absorption of light. This observation was positively verified and published by our group. During human psychophysics experiments, we found that humans can perceive light in the infrared (IR) range as colors that match half of the wavelength of the applied laser beam. Other experiments and theoretical research, such as mouse electrophysiology, biochemical studies of TPA in rhodopsin or molecular modeling studies, confirmed that visual sensation can be triggered by TPA. There are few publications describing human near infrared (NIR) perception and no formal proposals to use this phenomenon to improve ophthalmic diagnosis and monitor treatment. Here we report that the use of novel instrumentation revealed that the sensitivity threshold for NIR vision depends on age.

  15. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: Application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors.

  16. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to Gi/o and Gq signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Zheng, Maohua; Salom, David; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiates signal transduction cascades that affect many physiological responses. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans expresses >1000 of these receptors along with their cognate heterotrimeric G proteins. Here, we report properties of 9-cis-retinal regenerated bovine opsin [(b)isoRho] and human melanopsin [(h)Mo], two light-activated, heterologously expressed GPCRs in the nervous system of C. elegans with various genetically engineered alterations. Profound transient photoactivation of Gi/o signaling by (b)isoRho led to a sudden and transient loss of worm motility dependent on cyclic adenosine monophosphate, whereas transient photoactivation of Gq signaling by (h)Mo enhanced worm locomotion dependent on phospholipase Cβ. These transgenic C. elegans models provide a unique way to study the consequences of Gi/o and Gq signaling in vivo with temporal and spatial precision and, by analogy, their relationship to human neuromotor function.—Cao, P., Sun, W., Kramp, K., Zheng, M., Salom, D., Jastrzebska, B., Jin, H., Palczewski, K., Feng, Z. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to Gi/o and Gq signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:22090313

  17. Microbial diversity and carbon cycling in San Francisco Bay wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Theroux, Susanna; Hartman, Wyatt; He, Shaomei; Tringe, Susannah

    2014-03-21

    Wetland restoration efforts in San Francisco Bay aim to rebuild habitat for endangered species and provide an effective carbon storage solution, reversing land subsidence caused by a century of industrial and agricultural development. However, the benefits of carbon sequestration may be negated by increased methane production in newly constructed wetlands, making these wetlands net greenhouse gas (GHG) sources to the atmosphere. We investigated the effects of wetland restoration on below-ground microbial communities responsible for GHG cycling in a suite of historic and restored wetlands in SF Bay. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with real-time GHG monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of wetland soil microbial communities. The wetland soils harbor diverse communities of bacteria and archaea whose membership varies with sampling location, proximity to plant roots and sampling depth. Our results also highlight the dramatic differences in GHG production between historic and restored wetlands and allow us to link microbial community composition and GHG cycling with key environmental variables including salinity, soil carbon and plant species.

  18. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  19. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  20. Soil bacterial diversity in degraded and restored lands of Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira; Borges, Clovis Daniel; Tsai, Siu Mui; Cesarz, Simone; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2014-11-01

    Land degradation deteriorates biological productivity and affects environmental, social, and economic sustainability, particularly so in the semi-arid region of Northeast Brazil. Although some studies exist reporting gross measures of soil microbial parameters and processes, limited information is available on how land degradation and restoration strategies influence the diversity and composition of soil microbial communities. In this study we compare the structure and diversity of bacterial communities in degraded and restored lands in Northeast Brazil and determine the soil biological and chemical properties influencing bacterial communities. We found that land degradation decreased the diversity of soil bacteria as indicated by both reduced operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness and Shannon index. Soils under native vegetation and restoration had significantly higher bacterial richness and diversity than degraded soils. Redundancy analysis revealed that low soil bacterial diversity correlated with a high respiratory quotient, indicating stressed microbial communities. By contrast, soil bacterial communities in restored land positively correlated with high soil P levels. Importantly, however, we found significant differences in the soil bacterial community composition under native vegetation and in restored land, which may indicate differences in their functioning despite equal levels of bacterial diversity. PMID:25119246

  1. Why Microbial Communities?

    ScienceCinema

    Fredrickson, Jim (PNNL)

    2012-02-29

    The Microbial Communities Initiative is a 5-year investment by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that integrates biological/ecological experimentation, analytical chemistry, and simulation modeling. The objective is to create transforming technologies, elucidate mechanistic forces, and develop theoretical frameworks for the analysis and predictive understanding of microbial communities. Dr. Fredrickson introduces the symposium by defining microbial communities and describing their scientific relevance as they relate to solving problems in energy, climate, and sustainability.

  2. Restoring medical professionalism.

    PubMed

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity. PMID:22915177

  3. Restorative Justice in Children.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Katrin; Jensen, Keith; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-06-29

    An important, and perhaps uniquely human, mechanism for maintaining cooperation against free riders is third-party punishment. Our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, will not punish third parties even though they will do so when personally affected. Until recently, little attention has been paid to how punishment and a sense of justice develop in children. Children respond to norm violations. They are more likely to share with a puppet that helped another individual as opposed to one who behaved harmfully, and they show a preference for seeing a harmful doll rather than a victim punished. By 6 years of age, children will pay a cost to punish fictional and real peers, and the threat of punishment will lead preschoolers to behave more generously. However, little is known about what motivates a sense of justice in children. We gave 3- and 5-year-old children--the youngest ages yet tested--the opportunity to remove items and prevent a puppet from gaining a reward for second- and third-party violations (experiment 1), and we gave 3-year-olds the opportunity to restore items (experiment 2). Children were as likely to engage in third-party interventions as they were when personally affected, yet they did not discriminate among the different sources of harm for the victim. When given a range of options, 3-year-olds chose restoration over removal. It appears that a sense of justice centered on harm caused to victims emerges early in childhood and highlights the value of third-party interventions for human cooperation. PMID:26096976

  4. Microbial ecosystems therapeutics: a new paradigm in medicine?

    PubMed

    Petrof, E O; Claud, E C; Gloor, G B; Allen-Vercoe, E

    2013-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the complex microbial ecosystem of the human intestine plays a critical role in protecting the host against disease. This review discusses gut dysbiosis (here defined as a state of imbalance in the gut microbial ecosystem, including overgrowth of some organisms and loss of others) as the foundation for several diseases, and the applicability of refined microbial ecosystem replacement therapies as a future treatment modality. Consistent with the concept of a 'core' microbiome encompassing key functions required for normal intestinal homeostasis, 'Microbial Ecosystem Therapeutics' (MET) would entail replacing a dysfunctional, damaged ecosystem with a fully developed and healthy ecosystem of 'native' intestinal bacteria. Its application in treating Clostridium difficile infection is discussed and possible applications to other diseases such as ulcerative colitis, obesity, necrotising enterocolitis, and regressive-type autism are reviewed. Unlike conventional probiotic therapies that are generally limited to a single strain or at most a few strains of bacteria 'Microbial Ecosystem Therapeutics' would utilise whole bacterial communities derived directly from the human gastrointestinal tract. By taking into account the intrinsic needs of the entire microbial ecosystem, MET would emphasise the rational design of healthy, resilient and robust microbial communities that could be used to maintain or restore human health. More than simply a new probiotic treatment, this emerging paradigm in medicine may lead to novel strategies in treating and managing a wide variety of human diseases. PMID:23257018

  5. 15 CFR 990.56 - Restoration selection-use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restoration selection-use of a..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.56 Restoration selection—use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration...

  6. 15 CFR 990.56 - Restoration selection-use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restoration selection-use of a..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.56 Restoration selection—use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration...

  7. 15 CFR 990.56 - Restoration selection-use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration selection-use of a..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.56 Restoration selection—use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration...

  8. 15 CFR 990.56 - Restoration selection-use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restoration selection-use of a..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.56 Restoration selection—use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration...

  9. 15 CFR 990.56 - Restoration selection-use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restoration selection-use of a..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.56 Restoration selection—use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration...

  10. Restorative Justice in School Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, David R.; Breslin, Beau

    2001-01-01

    Explores the recent implementation of restorative justice practices in Minnesota, Colorado, and Pennsylvania school communities, examining how their approaches can address substance abuse problems and offer alternatives to zero-tolerance policies. The three programs are committed to the idea that restoration is a more appropriate educational tool…

  11. Restorative Nurse Assistant. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum material covers the basic orientation and necessary skills which would enable the practicing Certified Nurse Assistant to be trained as a Restorative Nurse Assistant. The shift in emphasis from maintenance care to restorative care in the long-term care setting has created a need for trained paraprofessionals who are competent in…

  12. Restorative biological processes and health

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Theodore F.; Carroll, Judith E.

    2011-01-01

    Research on psychological influences on physiology primarily focuses on biological responses during stressful challenges, and how those responses can become dysregulated with prolonged or repeated exposure to stressful circumstances. At the same time, humans spend considerable time recovering from those challenges, and a host of biological processes involved in restoration and repair take place during normal, non-stressed activities. We review restorative biological processes and evidence for links between psychosocial factors and several restorative processes including sleep, wound healing, antioxidant production, DNA repair, and telomerase function. Across these biological processes, a growing body of evidence suggests that experiencing negative emotional states, including acute and chronic stress, depressive symptoms, and individual differences in negative affectivity and hostility, can influence these restorative processes. This review calls attention to restorative processes as fruitful mechanisms and outcomes for future biobehavioral research. PMID:21927619

  13. Degraded Land Restoration in Reinstating CH4 Sink.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Gupta, Vijai K

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, contributes about one third to the global green house gas emissions. CH4-assimilating microbes (mostly methanotrophs) in upland soils play very crucial role in mitigating the CH4 release into the atmosphere. Agricultural, environmental, and climatic shifts can alter CH4 sink profiles of soils, likely through shifts in CH4-assimilating microbial community structure and function. Landuse change, as forest and grassland ecosystems altered to agro-ecosystems, has already attenuated the soil CH4 sink potential, and are expected to be continued in the future. We hypothesized that variations in CH4 uptake rates in soils under different landuse practices could be an indicative of alterations in the abundance and/or type of methanotrophic communities in such soils. However, only a few studies have addressed to number and methanotrophs diversity and their correlation with the CH4 sink potential in soils of rehabilitated/restored lands. We focus on landuse practices that can potentially mitigate CH4 gas emissions, the most prominent of which are improved cropland, grazing land management, use of bio-fertilizers, and restoration of degraded lands. In this perspective paper, it is proposed that restoration of degraded lands can contribute considerably to improved soil CH4 sink strength by retrieving/conserving abundance and assortment of efficient methanotrophic communities. We believe that this report can assist in identifying future experimental directions to the relationships between landuse changes, methane-assimilating microbial communities and soil CH4 sinks. The exploitation of microbial communities other than methanotrophs can contribute significantly to the global CH4 sink potential and can add value in mitigating the CH4 problems. PMID:27379053

  14. Degraded Land Restoration in Reinstating CH4 Sink

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Gupta, Vijai K.

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, contributes about one third to the global green house gas emissions. CH4-assimilating microbes (mostly methanotrophs) in upland soils play very crucial role in mitigating the CH4 release into the atmosphere. Agricultural, environmental, and climatic shifts can alter CH4 sink profiles of soils, likely through shifts in CH4-assimilating microbial community structure and function. Landuse change, as forest and grassland ecosystems altered to agro-ecosystems, has already attenuated the soil CH4 sink potential, and are expected to be continued in the future. We hypothesized that variations in CH4 uptake rates in soils under different landuse practices could be an indicative of alterations in the abundance and/or type of methanotrophic communities in such soils. However, only a few studies have addressed to number and methanotrophs diversity and their correlation with the CH4 sink potential in soils of rehabilitated/restored lands. We focus on landuse practices that can potentially mitigate CH4 gas emissions, the most prominent of which are improved cropland, grazing land management, use of bio-fertilizers, and restoration of degraded lands. In this perspective paper, it is proposed that restoration of degraded lands can contribute considerably to improved soil CH4 sink strength by retrieving/conserving abundance and assortment of efficient methanotrophic communities. We believe that this report can assist in identifying future experimental directions to the relationships between landuse changes, methane-assimilating microbial communities and soil CH4 sinks. The exploitation of microbial communities other than methanotrophs can contribute significantly to the global CH4 sink potential and can add value in mitigating the CH4 problems. PMID:27379053

  15. Characterization and mapping of the human rhodopsin kinase gene and screening of the gene for mutations in patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, S.C.; Lin, D.; Magovcevic, I.

    1994-09-01

    Rhodopsin kinase (RK) is a cytosolic enzyme in rod photoreceptors that initiates the deactivation of the phototransductions cascade by phosphorylating photoactivated rhodopsin. Although the cDNA sequence of bovine RK has been determined previously, no human cDNA or genomic sequence has thus far been available for genetic studies. In order to investigate the possible role of this candidate gene in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and allied diseases, we have isolated and characterized human cDNA and genomic clones derived from the RK locus. The coding sequence of the human gene is 1692 nucleotides in length and is split into seven exons. The human and the bovine sequence show 84% identity at the nucleotide level and 92% identity at the amino acid level. Thus far, the intronic sequences flanking each exon except for one have been determined. We have also mapped the human RK gene to chromosome 13q34 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. To our knowledge, no RP gene has as yet been linked to this region. However, since the substrate for RK (rhodopsin) and other members of the phototransduction cascade have been implicated in the pathogenesis of RP, it is conceivable that defects in RK can also cause some forms of this disease. We are evaluating this possibility by screening DNA from 173 patients with autosomal recessive RP and 190 patients with autosomal dominant RP. So far, we have found 11 patients with variant bands. In one patient with autosomal dominant RP we discovered the missense change Ser536Leu. Cosegregation studies and further sequencing of the variant bands are currently underway.

  16. Constitutive excitation by Gly90Asp rhodopsin rescues rods from degeneration caused by elevated production of cGMP in the dark.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Michael L; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Savchenko, Andrey B; Peshenko, Igor V; Barrett, Ronald; Bush, Ronald A; Sieving, Paul A; Fain, Gordon L; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2007-08-15

    Previous experiments indicate that congenital human retinal degeneration caused by genetic mutations that change the Ca(2+) sensitivity of retinal guanylyl cyclase (retGC) can result from an increase in concentration of free intracellular cGMP and Ca(2+) in the photoreceptors. To rescue degeneration in transgenic mouse models having either the Y99C or E155G mutations of the retGC modulator guanylyl cyclase-activating protein 1 (GCAP-1), which produce elevated cGMP synthesis in the dark, we used the G90D rhodopsin mutation, which produces constitutive stimulation of cGMP hydrolysis. The effects of the G90D transgene were evaluated by measuring retGC activity biochemically, by recording single rod and electroretinogram (ERG) responses, by intracellular free Ca(2+) measurement, and by retinal morphological analysis. Although the G90D rhodopsin did not alter the abnormal Ca(2+) sensitivity of retGC in the double-mutant animals, the intracellular free cGMP and Ca(2+) concentrations returned close to normal levels, consistent with constitutive activation of the phosphodiesterase PDE6 cascade in darkness. G90D decreased the light sensitivity of rods but spared them from severe retinal degeneration in Y99C and E155G GCAP-1 mice. More than half of the photoreceptors remained alive, appeared morphologically normal, and produced electrical responses, at the time when their siblings lacking the G90D rhodopsin transgene lost the entire retinal outer nuclear layer and no longer responded to illumination. These experiments indicate that mutations that lead to increases in cGMP and Ca(2+) can trigger photoreceptor degeneration but that constitutive activation of the transduction cascade in these animals can greatly enhance cell survival. PMID:17699662

  17. Light Induces Ultrastructural Changes in Rod Outer and Inner Segments, Including Autophagy, in a Transgenic Xenopus laevis P23H Rhodopsin Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bogéa, Tami H.; Wen, Runxia H.; Moritz, Orson L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported a transgenic Xenopus laevis model of retinitis pigmentosa in which tadpoles express the bovine form of P23H rhodopsin (bP23H) in rod photoreceptors. In this model, retinal degeneration was dependent on light exposure. Here, we investigated ultrastructural changes that occurred in the rod photoreceptors of these retinas when exposed to light. Methods Tadpoles expressing bP23H in rods were transferred from constant darkness to a 12-hour light:12-hour dark (12L:12D) regimen. For comparison, transgenic tadpoles expressing an inducible form of caspase 9 (iCasp9) were reared in a 12L:12D regimen, and retinal degeneration was induced by administration of the drug AP20187. Tadpoles were euthanized at various time points, and eyes were processed for confocal light and transmission electron microscopy. Results We observed defects in outer and inner segments of rods expressing bP23H that were aggravated by light exposure. Rod outer segments exhibited vesiculations throughout and were rapidly phagocytosed by the retinal pigment epithelium. In rod inner segments, we observed autophagic compartments adjacent to the endoplasmic reticulum and extensive vesiculation at later time points. These defects were not found in rods expressing iCasp9, which completely degenerated within 36 hours after drug administration. Conclusions Our results indicate that ultrastructural defects in outer and inner segment membranes of bP23H expressing rods differ from those observed in drug-induced apoptosis. We suggest that light-induced retinal degeneration caused by P23H rhodopsin occurs via cell death with autophagy, which may represent an attempt to eliminate the mutant rhodopsin and/or damaged cellular compartments from the secretory pathway. PMID:26720441

  18. Biofilms: A microbial home

    PubMed Central

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  19. Inflight microbial analysis technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Brown, Harlan D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of functional characteristics needed in the microbial water analysis system being developed for Space Station. Available technology is reviewed with respect to performing microbial monitoring, isolation, or identification functions. An integrated system composed of three different technologies is presented.

  20. Microbial surface thermodynamics and applications.

    PubMed

    Strevett, Keith A; Chen, Gang

    2003-06-01

    Microbial surface thermodynamics is the reflection of microbial physicochemical and biological characteristics and it bridges micro-scale structures with macro-scale biological functions. Microbial surface thermodynamics is theoretically based on colloid surface thermodynamics using the classical theory of colloidal stability, Derjauin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. An extended DLVO theory is applied to for the hydration forces not considered in the classical DLVO theory. Herein, a review of current application of microbial surface thermodynamic theory is presented. Microbial surface thermodynamic theory is the fundamental theory in interpreting microbial hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity, microbial attachment, and microbial biofilm development. PMID:12837508

  1. Synthetic microbial communities☆

    PubMed Central

    Großkopf, Tobias; Soyer, Orkun S

    2014-01-01

    While natural microbial communities are composed of a mix of microbes with often unknown functions, the construction of synthetic microbial communities allows for the generation of defined systems with reduced complexity. Used in a top-down approach, synthetic communities serve as model systems to ask questions about the performance and stability of microbial communities. In a second, bottom-up approach, synthetic microbial communities are used to study which conditions are necessary to generate interaction patterns like symbiosis or competition, and how higher order community structure can emerge from these. Besides their obvious value as model systems to understand the structure, function and evolution of microbial communities as complex dynamical systems, synthetic communities can also open up new avenues for biotechnological applications. PMID:24632350

  2. "I Was Dead Restorative Today": From Restorative Justice to Restorative Approaches in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, G.; Lloyd, G.; Stead, J.; Kane, J.; Riddell, S.; Weedon, E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores definitions and understandings of restorative practices in education. It offers a critique of current theoretical models of restorative justice originally derived from the criminal justice system and now becoming popular in educational settings. It questions the appropriateness of these concepts as they are being introduced to…

  3. Optogenetic determination of the myocardial requirements for extrasystoles by cell type-specific targeting of ChannelRhodopsin-2

    PubMed Central

    Zaglia, Tania; Pianca, Nicola; Borile, Giulia; Da Broi, Francesca; Richter, Claudia; Campione, Marina; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Luther, Stefan; Corrado, Domenico; Miquerol, Lucile; Mongillo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Extrasystoles lead to several consequences, ranging from uneventful palpitations to lethal ventricular arrhythmias, in the presence of pathologies, such as myocardial ischemia. The role of working versus conducting cardiomyocytes, as well as the tissue requirements (minimal cell number) for the generation of extrasystoles, and the properties leading ectopies to become arrhythmia triggers (topology), in the normal and diseased heart, have not been determined directly in vivo. Here, we used optogenetics in transgenic mice expressing ChannelRhodopsin-2 selectively in either cardiomyocytes or the conduction system to achieve cell type-specific, noninvasive control of heart activity with high spatial and temporal resolution. By combining measurement of optogenetic tissue activation in vivo and epicardial voltage mapping in Langendorff-perfused hearts, we demonstrated that focal ectopies require, in the normal mouse heart, the simultaneous depolarization of at least 1,300–1,800 working cardiomyocytes or 90–160 Purkinje fibers. The optogenetic assay identified specific areas in the heart that were highly susceptible to forming extrasystolic foci, and such properties were correlated to the local organization of the Purkinje fiber network, which was imaged in three dimensions using optical projection tomography. Interestingly, during the acute phase of myocardial ischemia, focal ectopies arising from this location, and including both Purkinje fibers and the surrounding working cardiomyocytes, have the highest propensity to trigger sustained arrhythmias. In conclusion, we used cell-specific optogenetics to determine with high spatial resolution and cell type specificity the requirements for the generation of extrasystoles and the factors causing ectopies to be arrhythmia triggers during myocardial ischemia. PMID:26204914

  4. NLRP3 inflammasome activation drives bystander cone photoreceptor cell death in a P23H rhodopsin model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A; Metcalfe, Andrew L; Bashar, Abu E; Sivak, Olena; Yanai, Anat; Mohammadi, Zeinabsadat; Moritz, Orson L; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2016-04-15

    The molecular signaling leading to cell death in hereditary neurological diseases such as retinal degeneration is incompletely understood. Previous neuroprotective studies have focused on apoptotic pathways; however, incomplete suppression of cell death with apoptosis inhibitors suggests that other mechanisms are at play. Here, we report that different signaling pathways are activated in rod and cone photoreceptors in the P23H rhodopsin mutant rat, a model representing one of the commonest forms of retinal degeneration. Up-regulation of the RIP1/RIP3/DRP1 axis and markedly improved survival with necrostatin-1 treatment highlighted necroptosis as a major cell-death pathway in degenerating rod photoreceptors. Conversely, up-regulation of NLRP3 and caspase-1, expression of mature IL-1β and IL-18 and improved cell survival with N-acetylcysteine treatment suggested that inflammasome activation and pyroptosis was the major cause of cone cell death. This was confirmed by generation of the P23H mutation on an Nlrp3-deficient background, which preserved cone viability. Furthermore, Brilliant Blue G treatment inhibited inflammasome activation, indicating that the 'bystander cell death' phenomenon was mediated through the P2RX7 cell-surface receptor. Here, we identify a new pathway in cones for bystander cell death, a phenomenon important in development and disease in many biological systems. In other retinal degeneration models different cell-death pathways are activated, which suggests that the particular pathways that are triggered are to some extent genotype-specific. This also implies that neuroprotective strategies to limit retinal degeneration need to be customized; thus, different combinations of inhibitors will be needed to target the specific pathways in any given disease. PMID:27008885

  5. Comparative sequence analyses of rhodopsin and RPE65 reveal patterns of selective constraint across hereditary retinal disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Frances E; Schott, Ryan K; Castiglione, Gianni M; Van Nynatten, Alexander; Kosyakov, Alexander; Tang, Portia L; Gow, Daniel A; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comprises several heritable diseases that involve photoreceptor, and ultimately retinal, degeneration. Currently, mutations in over 50 genes have known links to RP. Despite advances in clinical characterization, molecular characterization of RP remains challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of causal genes, mutations, and clinical phenotypes. In this study, we compiled large datasets of two important visual genes associated with RP: rhodopsin, which initiates the phototransduction cascade, and the retinoid isomerase RPE65, which regenerates the visual cycle. We used a comparative evolutionary approach to investigate the relationship between interspecific sequence variation and pathogenic mutations that lead to degenerative retinal disease. Using codon-based likelihood methods, we estimated evolutionary rates (d N/d S) across both genes in a phylogenetic context to investigate differences between pathogenic and nonpathogenic amino acid sites. In both genes, disease-associated sites showed significantly lower evolutionary rates compared to nondisease sites, and were more likely to occur in functionally critical areas of the proteins. The nature of the dataset (e.g., vertebrate or mammalian sequences), as well as selection of pathogenic sites, affected the differences observed between pathogenic and nonpathogenic sites. Our results illustrate that these methods can serve as an intermediate step in understanding protein structure and function in a clinical context, particularly in predicting the relative pathogenicity (i.e., functional impact) of point mutations and their downstream phenotypic effects. Extensions of this approach may also contribute to current methods for predicting the deleterious effects of candidate mutations and to the identification of protein regions under strong constraint where we expect pathogenic mutations to occur. PMID:26750628

  6. Conformational dynamics of a seven transmembrane helical protein Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin probed by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Good, Daryl B; Wang, Shenlin; Ward, Meaghan E; Struppe, Jochem; Brown, Leonid S; Lewandowski, Józef R; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2014-02-19

    The ability to detect and characterize molecular motions represents one of the unique strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this study, we report solid-state NMR site-specific measurements of the dipolar order parameters and (15)N rotating frame spin-lattice (R1ρ) relaxation rates in a seven transmembrane helical protein Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin reconstituted in lipids. The magnitudes of the observed order parameters indicate that both the well-defined transmembrane regions and the less structured intramembrane loops undergo restricted submicrosecond time scale motions. In contrast, the R1ρ rates, which were measured under fast magic angle spinning conditions, vary by an order of magnitude between the TM and exposed regions and suggest the presence of intermediate time scale motions. Using a simple model, which assumes a single exponential autocorrelation function, we estimated the time scales of dominant stochastic motions to be on the order of low tens of nanoseconds for most residues within the TM helices and tens to hundreds of nanoseconds for the extracellular B-C and F-G loops. These relatively slow time scales could be attributed to collective anisotropic motions. We used the 3D Gaussian axial fluctuations model to estimate amplitudes, directions, and time scales of overall motions for helices and the extracellular B-C and F-G loops. Within this model, the TM helices A,B,C,D,E,F undergo rigid body motions on a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, while the time scale for the seventh helix G approaches 100 ns. Similar time scales of roughly 100-200 ns are estimated for the B-C and F-G loops. PMID:24467417

  7. Pins for direct restorations.

    PubMed

    Papa, J; Wilson, P R; Tyas, M J

    1993-10-01

    Self-threading dentine pins permit the retention of large complex direct restorations but there are problems associated with their placement. Strain and crazing of dentine following pin insertion and pulpal and lateral perforations are common. Perforations can be avoided by operator awareness of tooth morphology. Strain and crazing has been found to be minimized by unscrewing the pin slightly after insertion, by using pins with a tap thread, and by using the smallest pin possible. Twist drill form and dulling affects the pin channel shape which in turn influences pin seating. A lack of standardization of pin and twist drill diameter and length has been implicated as the cause of poor pin retention. Manufacturers, in an attempt to standardize the depth of penetration of pins, have incorporated shoulders at the midpoint of the pin, which has met with varying success. More research in the area of limiting pin penetration is necessary, as well as attempts to improve the quality control of pin and twist drill manufacture. PMID:8227686

  8. Adaptively Addressing Uncertainty in Estuarine and Near Coastal Restoration Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Williams, Greg D.; Borde, Amy B.; Southard, John A.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Laufle, Jeffrey C.; Glasoe, Stuart

    2005-03-01

    Act; CWPPRA) have incorporated very specific and detailed elements in a more active adaptive management effort. In Puget Sound, the Puget Sound Action Team uses site-specific case studies, monitoring, and public involvement to direct actions to reduce microbial contamination of harvestable shellfish. Small-scale projects can also be improved through application of adaptive management. For example, directed research and site assessments resulted in successful restoration of seagrasses near a ferry terminal in Puget Sound. It is recommended that all restoration programs be conducted in an adaptive management framework, and where appropriate, a more active adaptive management approach be applied. The net effect should be less uncertainty, improved project success, advancement of the science of restoration, and cost savings.

  9. CRITERIA FOR PRIORITIZATION OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prioritization of ecosystem restoration measures is important for state and federal agencies, watershed coalitions, science advisory boards and other groups responsible for decision-making regarding restoration activities. Although widely utilized, the term "restoration prioriti...

  10. Microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizosphere: potential application to biological remediation of waste sites.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, B T; Anderson, T A

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that vegetation may be used to actively promote microbial restoration of chemically contaminated soils was tested by using rhizosphere and nonvegetated soils collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated field site. Biomass determinations, disappearance of TCE from the headspace of spiked soil slurries, and mineralization of [14C]TCE to 14CO2 all showed that microbial activity is greater in rhizosphere soils and that TCE degradation occurs faster in the rhizosphere than in the edaphosphere. Thus, vegetation may be an important variable in the biological restoration of surface and near-surface soils. PMID:2339867

  11. Fernald restoration: ecologists and engineers integrate restoration and cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Eric; Homer, John

    2002-07-15

    As cleanup workers excavate pits and tear down buildings at the Fernald site in southwest Ohio, site ecologists are working side-by-side to create thriving wetlands and develop the early stages of forest, prairie, and savanna ecosystems to restore natural resources that were impacted by years of site operations. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy-Fernald Office (DOE-FN) and its cleanup contractor, Fluor Fernald, Inc., initiated several ecological restoration projects in perimeter areas of the site (e.g., areas not used for or impacted by uranium processing or waste management). The projects are part of Fernald's final land use plan to restore natural resources over 904 acres of the 1,050-acre site. Pete Yerace, the DOE-FN Natural Resource Trustee representative is working with the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees in an oversight role to resolve the state of Ohio's 1986 claim against DOE for injuries to natural resources. Fluor Fernald, Inc., and DOE-FN developed the ''Natural Resource Restoration Plan'', which outlines 15 major restoration projects for the site and will restore injured natural resources at the site. In general, Fernald's plan includes grading to maximize the formation of wetlands or expanded floodplain, amending soil where topsoil has been removed during excavation, and establishing native vegetation throughout the site. Today, with cleanup over 35 percent complete and site closure targeted for 2006, Fernald is entering a new phase of restoration that involves heavily remediated areas. By working closely with engineers and cleanup crews, site ecologists can take advantage of remediation fieldwork (e.g., convert an excavated depression into a wetland) and avoid unnecessary costs and duplication. This collaboration has also created opportunities for relatively simple and inexpensive restoration of areas that were discovered during ongoing remediation. To ensure the survival of the plant material in heavily disturbed soils, Fernald will use

  12. Biological restorations using tooth fragments.

    PubMed

    Busato, A L; Loguercio, A D; Barbosa, A N; Sanseverino, M do C; Macedo, R P; Baldissera, R A

    1998-02-01

    A "biological" restoration technique using dental fragments and adhesive materials is described. These fragments were obtained from extracted human teeth which had been previously sterilized and stored in a tooth bank. The advantages are: the use of extracted teeth as restorative material, esthetics, and treatment cost. The positive sensation of having back the missing tooth was the most mentioned comment among patients. The disadvantages are: the difficulty of obtaining teeth with the needed characteristics, problems of making an indirect restoration, matching the original color, and the non-acceptance by some patients who consider it strange to have other people's teeth placed in their mouths. PMID:9823086

  13. Expansion of Microbial Forensics.

    PubMed

    Schmedes, Sarah E; Sajantila, Antti; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Microbial forensics has been defined as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of evidence related to bioterrorism, biocrimes, hoaxes, or the accidental release of a biological agent or toxin for attribution purposes. Over the past 15 years, technology, particularly massively parallel sequencing, and bioinformatics advances now allow the characterization of microorganisms for a variety of human forensic applications, such as human identification, body fluid characterization, postmortem interval estimation, and biocrimes involving tracking of infectious agents. Thus, microbial forensics should be more broadly described as the discipline of applying scientific methods to the analysis of microbial evidence in criminal and civil cases for investigative purposes. PMID:26912746

  14. Soil microbial communities following bush removal in a Namibian savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyer, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Nghikembua, Matti; Maul, Jude E.; Marker, Laurie

    2016-03-01

    Savanna ecosystems are subject to desertification and bush encroachment, which reduce the carrying capacity for wildlife and livestock. Bush thinning is a management approach that can, at least temporarily, restore grasslands and raise the grazing value of the land. In this study we examined the soil microbial communities under bush and grass in Namibia. We analyzed the soil through a chronosequence where bush was thinned at 9, 5, or 3 years before sampling. Soil microbial biomass, the biomass of specific taxonomic groups, and overall microbial community structure was determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis, while the community structure of Bacteria, Archaea, and fungi was determined by multiplex terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Soil under bush had higher pH, C, N, and microbial biomass than under grass, and the microbial community structure was also altered under bush compared to grass. A major disturbance to the ecosystem, bush thinning, resulted in an altered microbial community structure compared to control plots, but the magnitude of this perturbation gradually declined with time. Community structure was primarily driven by pH, C, and N, while vegetation type, bush thinning, and time since bush thinning were of secondary importance.

  15. Soil microbial communities following bush removal in a Namibian savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyer, J. S.; Schmidt-Küntzel, A.; Nghikembua, M.; Maul, J. E.; Marker, L.

    2015-12-01

    Savanna ecosystems are subject to desertification and bush encroachment, which reduce the carrying capacity for wildlife and livestock. Bush thinning is a management approach that can, at least temporarily, restore grasslands and raise the grazing value of the land. In this study we examined the soil microbial communities under bush and grass in Namibia. We analyzed the soil through a chronosequence where bush was thinned at 9, 5, or 3 years before sampling. Soil microbial biomass, the biomass of specific taxonomic groups, and overall microbial community structure was determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis, while the community structure of Bacteria, Archaea, and fungi was determined by multiplex terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Soil under bush had higher pH, C, N, and microbial biomass than under grass, and the microbial community structure was also altered under bush compared to grass. A major disturbance to the ecosystem, bush thinning, resulted in an altered microbial community structure compared to control plots, but the magnitude of this perturbation gradually declined with time. Community structure was primarily driven by pH, C, and N, while vegetation type, bush thinning, and time since bush thinning were of secondary importance.

  16. Before and After (Dental Restorations)

    MedlinePlus

    FAQs | Common Questions Why see a prosthodontist? Dentures Dental Implants Board Certification Improving Your Smile Conditions & Symptoms | ... of Care in the Restoration and Replacement of Teeth This site brought to you by: American College ...

  17. [Combined orthodontic and restorative treatment].

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, M A R; Loomans, B

    2015-11-01

    In patients with agenesis or enamel anomalies in anterior teeth combined orthodontic and restorative treatment is often necessary to achieve an optimal aesthetic result. How both can best be achieved, but also how to maintain the result, requires communication between the dentist and the orthodontist. The orthodontic treatment plan needs to be established in cooperation with the dentist who will carry out the restorative treatment while the patient is at a young age. Since with these young patients, who are still growing craniofacially and whose teeth are still developing, possible future restorative and/or orthodontic treatment, as well as the means of orthodontic retention, need to be included in the treatment plan. In cleft palate patients, it is also important that methods of orthodontic retention of maxillary arch width are given timely attention in the restorative treatment plan because it is especially vulnerable to relapse. PMID:26568998

  18. Kondolf Diagram for River Restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rehabilitation, protection, and management of riverine backwaters (floodplain aquatic habitats that are seasonally or periodically connected to the main channel) are becoming increasingly common. General criteria for selecting restoration goals and evaluating alternative designs are lacking. An app...

  19. Esthetic restoration of primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Carranza, F; García-Godoy, F

    1999-04-01

    A simple and esthetic technique for restoring cariously involved primary maxillary incisors is described. The technique includes mini-pins, a preformed celluloid crown and resin-based composite. PMID:10477982

  20. Basic research for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Optimum constrained image restoration filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    The filter was developed in Hilbert space by minimizing the radius of gyration of the overall or composite system point-spread function subject to constraints on the radius of gyration of the restoration filter point-spread function, the total noise power in the restored image, and the shape of the composite system frequency spectrum. An iterative technique is introduced which alters the shape of the optimum composite system point-spread function, producing a suboptimal restoration filter which suppresses undesirable secondary oscillations. Finally this technique is applied to multispectral scanner data obtained from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite to provide resolution enhancement. An experimental approach to the problems involving estimation of the effective scanner aperture and matching the ERTS data to available restoration functions is presented.

  2. Temperature-compensating dc restorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit provides stable references restoration in addition to temperature compensation. Possible TV monitor applications include traffic and security surveillance systems, where cameras are subject to environmental extremes, as in unheated warehouses or outdoors.

  3. Intraoral repair of cosmetic restorations.

    PubMed

    Denehy, G; Bouschlicher, M; Vargas, M

    1998-10-01

    The longevity of porcelain and composite resin restorations can often be prolonged by using sound principles, up-to-date materials, and judicious attention to repair when fracture problems arise. Careful case selection and correct usage of surface treatment agents, followed by the use of a quality bonding system and restorative materials, can result in a repair that exhibits excellent retention and natural color blending. This article outlines procedures and materials to repair both resin composite and porcelain intraorally. PMID:9891653

  4. Control of microbial contamination.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdade, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Two specific applications are discussed of microbial contamination control in planetary quarantine. Under the first concept, using the clean room to control environmental microorganisms, the objective is to reduce the microbial species and keep the numbers of microorganisms within an enclosure at a low level. The clean room concept is aimed at obtaining a product that has a controlled and reduced level of microbial contamination. Under the second concept, using the microbiological barrier to control microbial contamination of a specific product, the barrier techniques are designed to prevent the entry of any microorganisms into a sterile work area. Thus the assembly of space flight hardware within the confines of a microbiological barrier is aimed at obtaining a sterile product. In theory and practice, both approaches are shown to be applicable to the planetary quarantine program.

  5. Microbial safety in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krooneman, Janneke; Harmsen, Hermie; Landini, Paolo; Zinn, Manfred; Munaut, Françoise; van der Meer, Walter; Beimfohr, Claudia; Reichert, Bas; Preuß, Andrea

    2005-10-01

    Microbial hygiene is important in our daily lives; preventing and combating microbial infections is increasingly important in society. In hospitals, strict monitoring and control is exercised for people and infrastructure alike. In modern buildings, air-conditioning system are screened for harmful bacteria such as Legionella. More recently, concerns about SARS (virus) and anthrax (bacteria) have added pressure on the scientific community to come up with adequate monitoring and control techniques to assure microbial hygiene. Additionally, the use of biotechnological recycling and cleaning processes for sustainability brings the need for reliable monitoring tools and preventive or riks-reducing strategies. In the manned space environment, similar problems need to be solved and efforts have already been made to study the behaviour of micro-organisms and microbial hygiene onboard space stations.

  6. Microbial dysbiosis in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sameera G.; Raveendran, Ranjith

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is a biofilm-associated inflammatory disease of the periodontium. This disease appears to have multiple etiologies with microbial factor contributing to initiation of the disease and immunological factor of the host propagating the disease. This review is on the concept of “microbial dysbiosis” and molecular nature of periodontitis, and the scope of traditional and emerging technologies for treating this disease. PMID:24174742

  7. Ocean microbial metagenomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhof, Lee J.; Goodman, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    Technology for accessing the genomic DNA of microorganisms, directly from environmental samples without prior cultivation, has opened new vistas to understanding microbial diversity and functions. Especially as applied to soils and the oceans, environments on Earth where microbial diversity is vast, metagenomics and its emergent approaches have the power to transform rapidly our understanding of environmental microbiology. Here we explore select recent applications of the metagenomic suite to ocean microbiology.

  8. Microbial Fuel Cells and Microbial Electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P

    2015-01-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells and microbial electrolyzers represent an upcoming technology for production of electricity and hydrogen using a hybrid electrocatalytic-biocatalytic approach. The combined catalytic efficiency of these processes has potential to make this technology highly efficient among the various renewable energy production alternatives. This field has attracted electrochemists, biologists and many other disciplines due to its potential to contribute to the energy, water and environment sectors. A brief introduction to the technology is provided followed by current research needs from a bioelectrochemical perspective. Insights into the operation and limitations of these systems achieved via cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy are discussed along with the power management needs to develop the application aspects. Besides energy production, other potential applications in bioenergy, bioelectronics, chemical production and remediation are also highlighted.

  9. Nitrate-transformations during simulated drought on a restored floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, B.; Russo, T. A.; Schmidt, C. M.; Tran, D.

    2015-12-01

    Water resources in the California Central Valley face challenges due to recurring drought, aging levee systems, and nitrate contamination. As decisions are made to restore floodplain connectivity, soil microbial metabolic pathways such as denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) transform nitrate under saturated soil conditions and may each affect downstream water quality. However, few studies have quantified the contribution of all three pathways to nitrate retention in freshwater systems, and specifically in restored floodplains. Additionally, no former studies quantify the rates of these microbial nitrate transformations during floods after prolonged periods of drought. To test how flood duration impacts nitrogen cycling we added 15N-enriched tracer to soil mesocosms to measure denitrification, anammox, and DNRA transformation rates. In July 2015, we extracted seven soil mesocosms from the floodplain and riverbed of the Lower Cosumnes River in the San Joaquin Basin of California. Cosumnes River water enriched with 15N-NO3- tracer was pumped into each mesocosm at a constant rate simulating flood durations of 20 h, 30 h, and 96 h. Samples were collected from the surface water, soil pore water, drain water, and sediment for measurements of NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, gas isotopes, and DNA extraction. This study aims to demonstrate the relevance of anammox and DNRA to total nitrate retention and characterize the hydrologic conditions most favorable to each pathway.

  10. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a ``entral Environmental Restoration Division`` to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization`s objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  11. Shifts in Fungal and Bacterial Community Structure During Tallgrass Prairie Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutthanandan, J.; Bailey, V. L.; Bolton, H.; Brockman, F. J.

    2002-12-01

    The cycling of carbon through the microbial community of soils results in both the storage of freshly added carbon in the soil and the release of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. It is hypothesized that fungi and bacteria cycle carbon differently, and result in different proportions of carbon stored and evolved. The intensive management of a soil will affect these proportions and thus, may also affect the terrestrial carbon cycle. The soil microbial community was monitored in four soils that form a tallgrass prairie restoration chronosequence. The chronosequence was composed of: 1) native tallgrass prairie, 2) farmland restored to tallgrass prairie in 1979, 3) farmland restored to prairie in 1993, and 4) farmland still in production with row crops. The structure of the microbial community was determined by terminal restriction fragment length analysis (T-RFLP) and we focus here on comparing bacterial and fungal domains from agriculture to native conditions. Shifts in the fungal and bacterial communities were detected that indicate that the bacteria recovered faster from changing the land use from farmland back to prairie, while the fungi are more sensitive to the perturbations of invasive agriculture and appear to be taking longer to revert to their original prairie composition. However, it must also be considered that assays of the activities of these two communities indicate that as the restoration progresses, the fungi dominate the degradation of freshly added carbon (the ratio of fungal-to-bacterial activity was 13.5:1 in the 1979 restoration, but only 0.85:1 in the farmland). Identification of this shift in community structure offers insights into monitoring ecosystem restoration and may also suggest opportunities for enhancing carbon storage by allowing marginal lands to revert to a natural condition.

  12. 7 CFR 1415.11 - Restoration agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... required, NRCS will set the terms of the restoration agreement. The restoration plan component of the... to determine the terms of the restoration plan. The conservation district may assist NRCS with... specifications. (j) Conservation practices and activities identified in the restoration plan may be...

  13. 7 CFR 1415.11 - Restoration agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... required, NRCS will set the terms of the restoration agreement. The restoration plan component of the... to determine the terms of the restoration plan. The conservation district may assist NRCS with... specifications. (j) Conservation practices and activities identified in the restoration plan may be...

  14. 7 CFR 1415.11 - Restoration agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... required, NRCS will set the terms of the restoration agreement. The restoration plan component of the... to determine the terms of the restoration plan. The conservation district may assist NRCS with... restoration plan may be implemented by the participant or other designee. (j) Cost-share payments will not...

  15. 7 CFR 1415.11 - Restoration agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... required, NRCS will set the terms of the restoration agreement. The restoration plan component of the... to determine the terms of the restoration plan. The conservation district may assist NRCS with... specifications. (j) Conservation practices and activities identified in the restoration plan may be...

  16. Monitoring Ecological Processes for Restoration Projects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restoration of ecological processes is key to restoring the capacity of ecosystems to support social, economic, cultural and aesthetic values. The sustainability of the restored system also depends on processes associated with carbon, nutrient and hydrologic cycles, yet most restoration monitoring i...

  17. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a entral Environmental Restoration Division'' to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization's objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  18. Microbial indicators of soil quality

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, R.F.; Kennedy, A.C.; Jawson, M.

    1992-01-01

    Soil quality is an elusive term; however, the quality of a soil can greatly impact land use, sustainability, and productivity. Soil microbial processes are an integral part of soil quality and a better understanding of these processes and microbial community structure is needed. Microbial biomass, respiration, and labile nutrient pool size have generally been used as intrinsic parameters of a soil's microbial status. These analyses may not fully identify inherent differences in soil quality, especially if environmental conditions or manmade pertubations alter microbial community structure. Assessment of microbial community structure is necessary to determine the long-term effects of stress on soil quality. Measurement of microbial diversity should include nucleic acid and fatty acid phospholipid profiles as well as substrate utilization patterns. Microbial indicators will allow us to characterize the ecological status of the soil microbial community. For soil quality indicators to be successful, integration with other soil parameters is essential.

  19. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  20. Sound strategies for hearing restoration.

    PubMed

    Géléoc, Gwenaëlle S G; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2014-05-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans, with some estimates suggesting up to 300 million affected individuals worldwide. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to hearing loss and can cause death of sensory cells and neurons. Because these cells do not regenerate, the damage tends to accumulate, leading to profound deafness. Several biological strategies to restore auditory function are currently under investigation. Owing to the success of cochlear implants, which offer partial recovery of auditory function for some profoundly deaf patients, potential biological therapies must extend hearing restoration to include greater auditory acuity and larger patient populations. Here, we review the latest gene, stem-cell, and molecular strategies for restoring auditory function in animal models and the prospects for translating these approaches into viable clinical therapies. PMID:24812404

  1. Sound Strategies for Hearing Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Géléoc, Gwenaëlle S.G.; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans with some estimates suggesting up to 300 million affected individuals worldwide. Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to hearing loss and can cause death of sensory cells and neurons. Since these cells do not regenerate, the damage tends to accumulate leading to profound deafness. Several biological strategies to restore auditory function are currently under investigation. Due to the success of cochlear implants, which offer partial recovery of auditory function for some profoundly deaf patients, potential biological therapies must extend hearing restoration to include greater auditory acuity and larger patient populations. Here we review the latest gene, stem-cell, and molecular strategies for restoring auditory function in animal models and the prospects for translating these approaches into viable clinical therapies. PMID:24812404

  2. PBN (Phenyl-N-Tert-Butylnitrone)-Derivatives Are Effective in Slowing the Visual Cycle and Rhodopsin Regeneration and in Protecting the Retina from Light-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Megan; Moiseyev, Gennadiy P.; Budda, Madeline L.; Linens, Annette; Brush, Richard S.; Qi, Hui; White, Gary L.; Wolf, Roman F.; Ma, Jian-xing; Floyd, Robert; Anderson, Robert E.; Mandal, Nawajes A.

    2015-01-01

    A2E and related toxic molecules are part of lipofuscin found in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in eyes affected by Stargardt’s disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and other retinal degenerations. A novel therapeutic approach for treating such degenerations involves slowing down the visual cycle, which could reduce the amount of A2E in the RPE. This can be accomplished by inhibiting RPE65, which produces 11-cis-retinol from all-trans-retinyl esters. We recently showed that phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) inhibits RPE65 enzyme activity in RPE cells. In this study we show that like PBN, certain PBN-derivatives (PBNDs) such as 4-F-PBN, 4-CF3-PBN, 3,4-di-F-PBN, and 4-CH3-PBN can inhibit RPE65 and synthesis of 11-cis-retinol in in vitro assays using bovine RPE microsomes. We further demonstrate that systemic (intraperitoneal, IP) administration of these PBNDs protect the rat retina from light damage. Electroretinography (ERG) and histological analysis showed that rats treated with PBNDs retained ~90% of their photoreceptor cells compared to a complete loss of function and 90% loss of photoreceptors in the central retina in rats treated with vehicle/control injections. Topically applied PBN and PBNDs also significantly slowed the rate of the visual cycle in mouse and baboon eyes. One hour dark adaptation resulted in 75–80% recovery of bleachable rhodopsin in control/vehicle treated mice. Eye drops of 5% 4-CH3-PBN were most effective, inhibiting the regeneration of bleachable rhodopsin significantly (60% compared to vehicle control). In addition, a 10% concentration of PBN and 5% concentration of 4-CH3-PBN in baboon eyes inhibited the visual cycle by 60% and by 30%, respectively. We have identified a group of PBN related nitrones that can reach the target tissue (RPE) by systemic and topical application and slow the rate of rhodopsin regeneration and therefore the visual cycle in mouse and baboon eyes. PBNDs can also protect the rat retina

  3. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Del Tufo, Stephanie N; Myers, Emily B

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of fluent speech in one's native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is "restored" via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read at the level of one's peers without any clear failure due to environmental influences. In the current study we utilized the phonemic restoration illusion paradigm to examine individual differences in phonemic restoration across a range of reading ability, from very good to dyslexic readers. Results demonstrate that restoration occurs less in those who have high scores on measures of phonological processing. Based on these results, we suggest that the processing or representation of acoustic detail may not be as reliable in poor and dyslexic readers, with the result that lexical information is more likely to override acoustic properties of the stimuli. This pattern of increased restoration could result from a failure of perceptual tuning, in which unstable representations of speech sounds result in the acceptance of non-speech sounds as speech. An additional or alternative theory is that degraded or impaired phonological processing at the speech sound level may reflect architecture that is overly plastic and consequently fails to stabilize appropriately for speech sound representations. Therefore, the inability to separate speech and noise may result as a deficit in separating noise from the acoustic signal. PMID:24926230

  4. Microbial bioinformatics 2020.

    PubMed

    Pallen, Mark J

    2016-09-01

    Microbial bioinformatics in 2020 will remain a vibrant, creative discipline, adding value to the ever-growing flood of new sequence data, while embracing novel technologies and fresh approaches. Databases and search strategies will struggle to cope and manual curation will not be sustainable during the scale-up to the million-microbial-genome era. Microbial taxonomy will have to adapt to a situation in which most microorganisms are discovered and characterised through the analysis of sequences. Genome sequencing will become a routine approach in clinical and research laboratories, with fresh demands for interpretable user-friendly outputs. The "internet of things" will penetrate healthcare systems, so that even a piece of hospital plumbing might have its own IP address that can be integrated with pathogen genome sequences. Microbiome mania will continue, but the tide will turn from molecular barcoding towards metagenomics. Crowd-sourced analyses will collide with cloud computing, but eternal vigilance will be the price of preventing the misinterpretation and overselling of microbial sequence data. Output from hand-held sequencers will be analysed on mobile devices. Open-source training materials will address the need for the development of a skilled labour force. As we boldly go into the third decade of the twenty-first century, microbial sequence space will remain the final frontier! PMID:27471065

  5. Influence of Herbicide on Microbial Resilience in Soils Under Contrasting Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to examine soil microbial resilience in response to herbicide application on soils from prairie and row crop management. The management treatments were: native prairie (TP), restored prairie (PF), conservation reserve program (CRP), and corn-soybean rotation (CS) man...

  6. Minimizing waste in environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, L.; Thuot, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning and facility dismantelment projects are not typically known for their waste minimization and pollution prevention efforts. Typical projects are driven by schedules and milestones with little attention given to cost or waste minimization. Conventional wisdom in these projects is that the waste already exists and cannot be reduced or minimized. In fact, however, there are three significant areas where waste and cost can be reduced. Waste reduction can occur in three ways: beneficial reuse or recycling; segregation of waste types; and reducing generation of secondary waste. This paper will discuss several examples of reuse, recycle, segregation, and secondary waste reduction at ANL restoration programs.

  7. Restoring Detroit's Street Lighting System

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2015-10-21

    The City of Detroit is undertaking a comprehensive restoration of its street lighting system that includes transitioning the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) sources to light-emitting diode (LED). Detroit’s well-publicized financial troubles over the last several years have added many hurdles and constraints to this process. Strategies to overcome these issues have largely been successful, but have also brought some mixed results. This document provides an objective review of the circumstances surrounding the system restoration, the processes undertaken and decisions made, and the results so far.

  8. Treatment planning for restorative implantology.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Ricardo A; Klemons, Gary

    2015-04-01

    In this article, current literature on fixed and removable prosthodontics is reviewed along with evidence-based systematic reviews, including advice from those in the dental profession with years of experience, which help restorative dentists manage and treat their cases successfully. Treatment planning for restorative implantology should be looked at in 4 sections: (1) review of past medical history, (2) oral examination and occlusion, (3) dental imaging (ie, cone-beam computed tomography), and (4) fixed versus removable prosthodontics. These 4 concepts of treatment planning, along with proper surgical placements of the implant(s), result in successful cases. PMID:25835794

  9. Call to Restore Mesopotamian Marshlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Call to restore Mesopotamian marshlands When the current military conflict in Iraq has concluded, a rehabilitation of that country should include a full assessment and action plan for restoring the marshlands of Mesopotamia, the United Nations Environment Programme said on 22 March. The marshlands, also known as the Fertile Crescent, could disappear within three to five years, according to UNEP. UNEP Executive Director Klaus Toepfer said the loss of the marshlands ``is an environmental catastrophe for this region and underscores the huge pressures facing wetlands and freshwater ecosystems across the world.''

  10. Microbial Scout Hypothesis and Microbial Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Buerger, S.; Spoering, A.; Gavrish, E.; Leslin, C.; Ling, L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine the temporal pattern of colony appearance during cultivation experiments, and whether this pattern could inform on optimizing the process of microbial discovery. In a series of long-term cultivation experiments, we observed an expected gradual increase over time of the total number of microbial isolates, culminating in a 700-fold colony count increase at 18 months. Conventional thought suggests that long-term incubations result in a culture collection enriched with species that are slow growing or rare, may be unavailable from short-term experiments, and likely are novel. However, after we examined the phylogenetic novelty of the isolates as a function of the time of their isolation, we found no correlation between the two. The probability of discovering either a new or rare species late in the incubation matched that of species isolated earlier. These outcomes are especially notable because of their generality: observations were essentially identical for marine and soil bacteria as well as for spore formers and non-spore formers. These findings are consistent with the idea of the stochastic awakening of dormant cells, thus lending support to the scout model. The process of microbial discovery is central to the study of environmental microorganisms and the human microbiome. While long-term incubation does not appear to increase the probability of discovering novel species, the technology enabling such incubations, i.e., single-cell cultivation, may still be the method of choice. While it does not necessarily allow more species to grow from a given inoculum, it minimizes the overall isolation effort and supplies needed. PMID:22367084

  11. Patterns in Wetland Microbial Community Composition and Functional Gene Repertoire Associated with Methane Emissions

    PubMed Central

    He, Shaomei; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; McFarland, Jack W.; Anderson, Frank E.; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Tremblay, Julien; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Waldrop, Mark P.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Wetland restoration on peat islands previously drained for agriculture has potential to reverse land subsidence and sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide as peat accretes. However, the emission of methane could potentially offset the greenhouse gas benefits of captured carbon. As microbial communities play a key role in governing wetland greenhouse gas fluxes, we are interested in how microbial community composition and functions are associated with wetland hydrology, biogeochemistry, and methane emission, which is critical to modeling the microbial component in wetland methane fluxes and to managing restoration projects for maximal carbon sequestration. Here, we couple sequence-based methods with biogeochemical and greenhouse gas measurements to interrogate microbial communities from a pilot-scale restored wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, revealing considerable spatial heterogeneity even within this relatively small site. A number of microbial populations and functions showed strong correlations with electron acceptor availability and methane production; some also showed a preference for association with plant roots. Marker gene phylogenies revealed a diversity of major methane-producing and -consuming populations and suggested novel diversity within methanotrophs. Methanogenic archaea were observed in all samples, as were nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria, indicating that no single terminal electron acceptor was preferred despite differences in energetic favorability and suggesting spatial microheterogeneity and microniches. Notably, methanogens were negatively correlated with nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria and were most abundant at sampling sites with high peat accretion and low electron acceptor availability, where methane production was highest. PMID:25991679

  12. The Microbial Olympics.

    PubMed

    Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest; Stacy, Apollo; Whiteley, Marvin; Steel, Bradley C; Delalez, Nicolas J; Nord, Ashley L; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P; Kamoun, Sophien; Hogenhout, Saskia; Diggle, Stephen P; Gurney, James; Pollitt, Eric J G; Boetius, Antje; Cary, S Craig

    2012-08-01

    Every four years, the Olympic Games plays host to competitors who have built on their natural talent by training for many years to become the best in their chosen discipline. Similar spirit and endeavour can be found throughout the microbial world, in which every day is a competition to survive and thrive. Microorganisms are trained through evolution to become the fittest and the best adapted to a particular environmental niche or lifestyle, and to innovate when the 'rules of the game' are changed by alterations to their natural habitats. In this Essay, we honour the best competitors in the microbial world by inviting them to take part in the inaugural Microbial Olympics. PMID:22796885

  13. Microbial Load Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. F.; Royer, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    The Microbial Load Monitor (MLM) is an automated and computerized system for detection and identification of microorganisms. Additionally, the system is designed to enumerate and provide antimicrobic susceptibility profiles for medically significant bacteria. The system is designed to accomplish these tasks in a time of 13 hours or less versus the traditional time of 24 hours for negatives and 72 hours or more for positives usually required for standard microbiological analysis. The MLM concept differs from other methods of microbial detection in that the system is designed to accept raw untreated clinical samples and to selectively identify each group or species that may be present in a polymicrobic sample.

  14. Microbial Control News - November 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first of a column in the Society for Invertebrate Pathology Newsletter. Entitled "Microbial Control News" this article summarizes regulatory actions in the U.S. and Canada regarding microbial insect pest control agents....

  15. Membrane Protein Incorporation into Nano-Bioelectronics: An insight into Rhodopsin Controlled SiNW-FET Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Ramya

    that the manipulation of lipid composition can indeed control orientation of an asymmetrically charged membrane protein, proteorhodopsin, in liposomes. One-dimensional inorganic nanostructures, which have critical dimensions comparable to the sizes of biological molecules, form an excellent materials platform for building such integrated structures. Researchers already use silicon nanowire-based field effect transistors functionalized with molecular recognition sites in a diverse array of biosensors. In our group, we have been developing a platform for integration of membrane protein functionality and electronic devices using a 1-D phospholipid bilayer device architecture. In these devices, the membrane proteins reside within the lipid bilayer that covers a nanowire channel of a field-effect transistor. This lipid bilayer performs several functions: it shields the nanowire from the solution species; it serves as a native-like environment for membrane proteins and preserves their functionality, integrity, and even vectorality. In this work, we show that a 1-D bilayer device incorporating a rhodopsin proton pump allows us to couple light-driven proton transport to a bioelectronic circuit. We also report that we were able to adapt another distinctive feature of biological signal processing---their widespread use of modifiers, co-factors, and mediator molecules---to regulate and fine-tune the operational characteristics of the bioelectronic device. In our example, we use co-assembly of protein channels and ionophores in the 1-D bilayer to modify the device output levels and response time.

  16. PERFORMANCE CRITERIA FOR WETLAND RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new publication from EPA Wetland Research Program called An Approach to Improving Decision Making in Wetland Restoration and Creation is a synthesis of five years of research done under the program. ach book chapter takes an aspect of the approach and develops it. undamentally,...

  17. Service Lives Of Restored Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1988-01-01

    Rebuilt units last almost as long as new ones. Report describes theoretical and experiemental studies of lifetimes of restored ball and cylindrical-roller bearings. Results of this and related studies have implications of economy and safety in modern high-speed machinery, especially in aircraft industry, where inspection and rejection or replacing of bearings are new standard practice.

  18. The restorative management of microdontia.

    PubMed

    Laverty, D P; Thomas, M B M

    2016-08-26

    Microdontia is a dental abnormality that will often present to the dental practitioner due to the aesthetic concerns of the patient. Treatment is therefore aimed at addressing the aesthetics issue of the patient and this can present a number of challenges which may require a multidisciplinary approach in its management. This article presents the restorative management of localised and generalised microdontia. PMID:27561572

  19. Recent advances in hearing restoration.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Kunal; Hartley, Douglas Eh

    2008-03-01

    This review is based on Pubmed, Medline and Internet literature searches, supplemented by knowledge from textbooks, conference presentations, and personal communications with experts in the field of hearing restoration and patients. We have not specifically selected a time limit for our literature searches; however, the majority are articles from the past 5 years. PMID:18344468

  20. Weed Biocontrol in Landscape Restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed biological control programs in natural areas are often undertaken with the goal of restoring native plant communities and/or ecosystem services to a pre-invasion level. These objectives may be achieved in some areas with biological control alone; however, in other sites integration of biologica...

  1. Speech Restoration: An Interactive Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grataloup, Claire; Hoen, Michael; Veuillet, Evelyne; Collet, Lionel; Pellegrino, Francois; Meunier, Fanny

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the ability to understand degraded speech signals and explores the correlation between this capacity and the functional characteristics of the peripheral auditory system. Method: The authors evaluated the capability of 50 normal-hearing native French speakers to restore time-reversed speech. The task required them…

  2. Origins of the Restoration Playhouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dennis D.

    Contrary to the popular theory that the proscenium type of playhouse was imported from France by the Court of Charles II in 1660, the Restoration playhouse in fact developed from Elizabethan theatres and court masques. These Elizabethan theatres were the private theatres, and were generally small, rectangular, roofed structures where aristocratic…

  3. Weed biocontrol in landscape restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed biological control programs in natural areas are often undertaken with the goal of restoring native plant communities and/or ecosystem services to a pre-invasion level. These objectives may be achieved in some areas with biological control alone; however, in other sites integration of biologica...

  4. Soil restoration with organic amendments: linking cellular functionality and ecosystem processes

    PubMed Central

    Bastida, F.; Selevsek, N.; Torres, I. F.; Hernández, T.; García, C.

    2015-01-01

    A hot topic in recent decades, the application of organic amendments to arid-degraded soils has been shown to benefit microbially-mediated processes. However, despite the importance of soils for global sustainability, a gap has not been addressed yet in soil science: is there any connection between ecosystem-community processes, cellular functionality, and microbial lifestyles (i.e. oligotrophy-copiotrophy) in restored soils? Together with classical ecosystem indicators (fatty-acids, extracellular-enzyme activities, basal respiration), state-of-the-art metaproteomics was applied to fill this gap in a model-restoration experiment initiated 10-years ago by the addition of sewage-sludge and compost. Organic amendment strongly impacted ecosystem processes. Furthermore, the type of material used induced differences in the cellular functionalities through variations in the percentages of proteins involved in translation, transcription, energy production and C-fixation. We conclude that the long-term impact of organic restoration goes beyond ecosystem processes and affects cellular functionalities and phyla-lifestyles coupled with differences in microbial-community structures. PMID:26503516

  5. Soil restoration with organic amendments: linking cellular functionality and ecosystem processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida, F.; Selevsek, N.; Torres, I. F.; Hernández, T.; García, C.

    2015-10-01

    A hot topic in recent decades, the application of organic amendments to arid-degraded soils has been shown to benefit microbially-mediated processes. However, despite the importance of soils for global sustainability, a gap has not been addressed yet in soil science: is there any connection between ecosystem-community processes, cellular functionality, and microbial lifestyles (i.e. oligotrophy-copiotrophy) in restored soils? Together with classical ecosystem indicators (fatty-acids, extracellular-enzyme activities, basal respiration), state-of-the-art metaproteomics was applied to fill this gap in a model-restoration experiment initiated 10-years ago by the addition of sewage-sludge and compost. Organic amendment strongly impacted ecosystem processes. Furthermore, the type of material used induced differences in the cellular functionalities through variations in the percentages of proteins involved in translation, transcription, energy production and C-fixation. We conclude that the long-term impact of organic restoration goes beyond ecosystem processes and affects cellular functionalities and phyla-lifestyles coupled with differences in microbial-community structures.

  6. Soil restoration with organic amendments: linking cellular functionality and ecosystem processes.

    PubMed

    Bastida, F; Selevsek, N; Torres, I F; Hernández, T; García, C

    2015-01-01

    A hot topic in recent decades, the application of organic amendments to arid-degraded soils has been shown to benefit microbially-mediated processes. However, despite the importance of soils for global sustainability, a gap has not been addressed yet in soil science: is there any connection between ecosystem-community processes, cellular functionality, and microbial lifestyles (i.e. oligotrophy-copiotrophy) in restored soils? Together with classical ecosystem indicators (fatty-acids, extracellular-enzyme activities, basal respiration), state-of-the-art metaproteomics was applied to fill this gap in a model-restoration experiment initiated 10-years ago by the addition of sewage-sludge and compost. Organic amendment strongly impacted ecosystem processes. Furthermore, the type of material used induced differences in the cellular functionalities through variations in the percentages of proteins involved in translation, transcription, energy production and C-fixation. We conclude that the long-term impact of organic restoration goes beyond ecosystem processes and affects cellular functionalities and phyla-lifestyles coupled with differences in microbial-community structures. PMID:26503516

  7. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Del Tufo, Stephanie N.; Myers, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of fluent speech in one's native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is “restored” via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read at the level of one's peers without any clear failure due to environmental influences. In the current study we utilized the phonemic restoration illusion paradigm to examine individual differences in phonemic restoration across a range of reading ability, from very good to dyslexic readers. Results demonstrate that restoration occurs less in those who have high scores on measures of phonological processing. Based on these results, we suggest that the processing or representation of acoustic detail may not be as reliable in poor and dyslexic readers, with the result that lexical information is more likely to override acoustic properties of the stimuli. This pattern of increased restoration could result from a failure of perceptual tuning, in which unstable representations of speech sounds result in the acceptance of non-speech sounds as speech. An additional or alternative theory is that degraded or impaired phonological processing at the speech sound level may reflect architecture that is overly plastic and consequently fails to stabilize appropriately for speech sound representations. Therefore, the inability to separate speech and noise may result as a deficit in separating noise from the acoustic signal. PMID:24926230

  8. The state of microbial complexes in soils of forest ecosystems after fires and defoliation of stands by gypsy moths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorodskaya, A. V.; Baranchikov, Yu. N.; Ivanova, G. A.

    2009-03-01

    The state of microbial cenoses in the soils of forest ecosystems damaged by fires of different strengths and gypsy moth outbreaks (Central Siberia) was assessed by the intensity of the basal respiration, the content of carbon of the microbial biomass, and the microbial metabolic quotient. The degree of the disturbance of the microbial cenoses in the soils under pine forests after fires was higher than that in the soils under the forests defoliated by gypsy moths. The greatest changes of the microbial complexes were recorded after the fires of high and medium intensity. In the litters, the content of the microbial biomass, the intensity of basal respiration, and the microbial metabolic quotient value were restored on the fifth year after the fires, whereas in the upper (0-10 cm) soil layer, these parameters still differed from those in the control variant, especially after the highly intense fires. After the weak fires, the ecophysiological state of the microbial complexes was restored within two-three years.

  9. Microbial load monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, R. S.; Royer, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Design analysis of a microbial load monitor system flight engineering model was presented. Checkout of the card taper and media pump system was fabricated as well as the final two incubating reading heads, the sample receiving and card loading device assembly, related sterility testing, and software. Progress in these areas was summarized.

  10. Microbial Endophytes of Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing recognition is being given to the impact of microbial population dynamics on the general health of biological systems. Building on previous mycological and bacteriological research on agricultural commodities, more advanced technology is expanding our understanding of the “endophytic habi...

  11. Indirect microbial detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The growth of microorganisms in a sample is detected and monitored by culturing microorganisms in a growth medium and detecting a change in potential between two electrodes, separated from the microbial growth by a barrier which is permeable to charged paticles but microorganism impermeable.

  12. Pretreatment of microbial sludges

    DOEpatents

    Rivard, Christopher J.; Nagle, Nicholas J.

    1995-01-01

    Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

  13. Microbial Weathering of Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D. S.; Longazo, T. G.; Wentworth, S. J.; Southam, G.

    2002-01-01

    Controlled microbial weathering of olivine experiments displays a unique style of nanoetching caused by biofilm attachment to mineral surfaces. We are investigating whether the morphology of biotic nanoetching can be used as a biosignature. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Introduction to Microbial Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many insect specific pathogens have been exploited as microbial control agents for the management of pest insects. Successes have been reported for a few insect pathogens as classical biological control agents, but they are mostly used as inundatively appled biopesticides. A number of them have be...

  15. SEAGRASS RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Devereux, Richard. 2005. Seagrass Rhizosphere Microbial Communities. In: Interactions Between Macro- and Microorganisms in Marine Sediments. E. Kristense, J.E. Kostka and R.H. Haese, Editors. American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC. p199-216. (ERL,GB 1213).

    Seagrasses ...

  16. Indirect microbial detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Indirect method for detection of microbial growth utilizes flow of charged particles across barrier that physically separated growing cells from electrodes and measures resulting difference in potential between two platinum electrodes. Technique allows simplified noncontact monitoring of all growth in highly infectious cultures or in critical biochemical studies.

  17. Microbial solubilization of coal

    DOEpatents

    Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

    1988-01-21

    The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

  18. Mapping Microbial Biodiversity

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Daphne Lisabet; Micah C. Geary; White, Luke James; Lee, Randy Dean; Brizzee, Julie Ann; Rodman, A. C.; Rope, Ronald C

    2001-09-01

    We report the development of a prototype database that "maps" microbial diversity in the context of the geochemical and geological environment and geographic location. When it is fully implemented, scientists will be able to conduct database searches, construct maps containing the information of interest, download files, and enter data over the Internet.

  19. Pretreatment of microbial sludges

    DOEpatents

    Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

    1995-01-10

    Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

  20. A Microbial Murder Mystery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Melissa A.; Mitchell, James K.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a microbial mystery activity to test students' knowledge of human anatomy and their ability to identify microbes. Provides an opportunity for students to develop logical deductive reasoning. Includes national science education standards related to this activity, activity sheets with whole procedures, and Internet resources. (KHR)