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Sample records for microcomputed tomography comparison

  1. Assessment of BoneTtissue Mineralization by Conventional X-ray Microcomputed tomography: Comparison with Synchrotron Radiation Microcomputed Tomography and Ash Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakia,G.; Burghardt, A.; Cheung, S.; Majumdar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of bone tissue mineral density (TMD) may provide information critical to the understanding of mineralization processes and bone biomechanics. High-resolution three-dimensional assessment of TMD has recently been demonstrated using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography (SR{mu}CT); however, this imaging modality is relatively inaccessible due to the scarcity of SR facilities. Conventional desktop {mu}CT systems are widely available and have been used extensively to assess bone microarchitecture. However, the polychromatic source and cone-shaped beam geometry complicate assessment of TMD by conventional {mu}CT. The goal of this study was to evaluate {mu}CT-based measurement of degree and distribution of tissue mineralization in a quantitative, spatially resolved manner. Specifically, {mu}CT measures of bone mineral content (BMC) and TMD were compared to those obtained by SR{mu}CT and gravimetric methods. Cylinders of trabecular bone were machined from human femoral heads (n=5), vertebrae (n=5), and proximal tibiae (n=4). Cylinders were imaged in saline on a polychromatic {mu}CT system at an isotropic voxel size of 8 {mu}m. Volumes were reconstructed using beam hardening correction algorithms based on hydroxyapatite (HA)-resin wedge phantoms of 200 and 1200 mgHA/cm3. SR{mu}CT imaging was performed at an isotropic voxel size of 7.50 {mu}m at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Attenuation values were converted to HA concentration using a linear regression derived by imaging a calibration phantom. Architecture and mineralization parameters were calculated from the image data. Specimens were processed using gravimetric methods to determine ash mass and density. {mu}CT-based BMC values were not affected by altering the beam hardening correction. Volume-averaged TMD values calculated by the two corrections were significantly different (p=0.008) in high volume fraction specimens only, with the 1200 mgHA/cm3 correction resulting in a 4.7% higher TMD

  2. Nondestructive observation of teeth post core-space using optical coherence tomography: comparison with microcomputed tomography and live images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamino, Takuya; Mine, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Mariko; Sugawa, Yoshihiko; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Higashi, Mami; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Ohmi, Masato; Awazu, Kunio; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-10-01

    No previous reports have observed inside the root canal using both optical coherence tomography (OCT) and x-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) for the same sample. The purpose of this study was to clarify both OCT and μCT image properties from observations of the same root canal after resin core build-up treatment. As OCT allows real-time observation of samples, gap formation may be able to be shown in real time. A dual-cure, one-step, self-etch adhesive system bonding agent, and dual-cure resin composite core material were used in root canals in accordance with instructions from the manufacturer. The resulting OCT images were superior for identifying gap formation at the interface, while μCT images were better to grasp the tooth form. Continuous tomographic images from real-time OCT observation allowed successful construction of a video of the resin core build-up procedure. After 10 to 12 s of light curing, a gap with a clear new signal occurred at the root-core material interface, proceeding from the coronal side (6 mm from the cemento-enamel junction) to the apical side of the root.

  3. X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of the Buzzard Coulee Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, D.; Samson, C.; Herd, R. K.; Fry, C.; McCausland, P. J. A.; Umoh, J.; Holdsworth, D. W.

    2012-03-01

    This abstract outlines research and some results of X-ray micro-computed tomography imaging of the Buzzard Coulee H4 chondrite. A comparison of bulk density results and an analysis of radio-density profile curves are discussed.

  4. Comparison of two techniques for selection of master gutta-percha cone using micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Silva-Filho, João Manoel; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Leoni, Graziela Bianchi; De-Bem, Samuel Henrique Câmara; Alfredo, Edson; Silva, Ricardo Gariba

    2013-01-01

    This study used micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to evaluate the fit of the master gutta-percha cone at time of cone fit, gutta-percha volume in the filling material, and the filling material volume in relation to the canal at the apical limit of the working length. Root canals of 20 maxillary central incisors were prepared with rotary instruments and distributed into two groups (n=10). The gutta-percha cone tip was either plasticized (apical thermal impression technique - ATI) or not (conventional technique - CT), and its apical fit was checked. The apical 1 mm of working length was examined with a micro-CT, canals were filled with gutta-percha and sealer, and new micro-CT scans were obtained. In CT, gutta-percha filled 35.83 ± 15.05% of the canal at cone selection and 38.72 ± 11.64% after filling. In ATI, these values were 23.14 ± 7.74% and 26.98 ± 20.40%, respectively. Gutta-percha volume in the filling material, and filling material volume in relation to the canal were, respectively, 61.28 ± 11.64% and 87.76 ± 9.98% for CT, and 73.00 ± 20.41% and 89.96 ± 9.08% for ATI. No significant difference was found between cone selection and after canal filling, for either CT (p=0.593) or ATI (p=0.4975). The techniques did not differ significantly with respect to gutta-percha volume in the filling material (p=0.132) and filling material volume in relation to the canal (p=0.612). An ideal fit of the master gutta-percha cone at working length was not achieved regardless of the cone selection technique, and the material-filled area was similar for both techniques. PMID:24173258

  5. Comparison of synchrotron radiation and conventional x-ray microcomputed tomography for assessing trabecular bone microarchitecture of human femoral heads

    SciTech Connect

    Chappard, Christine; Basillais, Armelle; Benhamou, Laurent; Bonassie, Alexandra; Brunet-Imbault, Barbara; Bonnet, Nicolas; Peyrin, Francoise

    2006-09-15

    Microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) produces three-dimensional (3D) images of trabecular bone. We compared conventional {mu}CT (C{mu}CT) with a polychromatic x-ray cone beam to synchrotron radiation (SR) {mu}CT with a monochromatic parallel beam for assessing trabecular bone microarchitecture of 14 subchondral femoral head specimens from patients with osteoarthritis (n=10) or osteoporosis (n=4). SR{mu}CT images with a voxel size of 10.13 {mu}m were reconstructed from 900 2D radiographic projections (angular step, 0.2 deg. ). C{mu}CT images with a voxel size of 10.77 {mu}m were reconstructed from 205, 413, and 825 projections obtained using angular steps of 0.9 deg., 0.45 deg., and 0.23 deg., respectively. A single threshold was used to binarize the images. We computed bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV), bone surface/bone volume (BS/BV), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th and Tb.Th*), trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp), degree of anisotropy (DA), and Euler density. With the 0.9 deg. angular step, all C{mu}CT values were significantly different from SR{mu}CT values. With the 0.23 deg. and 0.45 deg. rotation steps, BV/TV, Tb.Th, and BS/BV by C{mu}CT differed significantly from the values by SR{mu}CT. The error due to slice matching (visual site matching {+-}10 slices) was within 1% for most parameters. Compared to SR{mu}CT, BV/TV, Tb.Sp, and Tb.Th by C{mu}CT were underestimated, whereas Tb.N and Tb.Th* were overestimated. A Bland and Altman plot showed no bias for Tb.N or DA. Bias was -0.8{+-}1.0%, +5.0{+-}1.1 {mu}m, -5.9{+-}6.3 {mu}m, and -5.7{+-}29.1 {mu}m for BV/TV, Tb.Th*, Tb.Th, and Tb.Sp, respectively, and the differences did not vary over the range of values. Although systematic differences were noted between SR{mu}CT and C{mu}CT values, correlations between the techniques were high and the differences would probably not change the discrimination between study groups. C{mu}CT provides a reliable 3D assessment of human defatted bone when working at the 0

  6. Micro-computed tomography: an alternative method for shark ageing.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, P T; Jones, A S; Stewart, J; Macbeth, W G

    2012-04-01

    Micro-computed tomography (microCT) produced 3D reconstructions of shark Carcharhinus brevipinna vertebrae that could be virtually sectioned along any desired plane, and upon which growth bands were readily visible. When compared to manual sectioning, it proved to be a valid and repeatable means of ageing and offers several distinct advantages over other ageing methods. PMID:22497384

  7. Microcomputed tomography and shock microdeformation studies on shatter cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaag, Patrice Tristan; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Hipsley, Christy Anna

    2016-08-01

    One of the aspects of impact cratering that are still not fully understood is the formation of shatter cones and related fracturing phenomena. Yet, shatter cones have been applied as an impact-diagnostic criterion for decades without the role of shock waves and target rock defects in their formation having been elucidated ever. We have tested the application of the nondestructive microcomputed tomography (μCT) method to visualize the interior of shatter cones in order to possibly resolve links between fracture patterns and shatter cone surface features (striations and intervening "valleys"). Shatter-coned samples from different impact sites and in different lithologies were investigated for their μCT suitability, with a shatter cone in sandstone from the Serra da Cangalha impact structure (Brazil) remaining as the most promising candidate because of the fracture resolution achieved. To validate the obtained CT data, the scanned specimen was cut into three orthogonal sets of thin sections. Scans with 13 μm resolution were obtained. μCT scans and microscopic analysis unraveled an orientation of subplanar fractures and related fluid inclusion trails, and planar fracture (PF) orientations in the interior of shatter cones. Planar deformation features (PDF) were observed predominantly near the shatter cone surface. Previously undescribed varieties of feather features (FF), in the form of lamellae emanating from curviplanar and curved fractures, as well as an "arrowhead"-like FF development with microlamellae originating from both sides of a PF, were observed. The timing of shatter cone formation was investigated by establishing temporal relations to the generation of various shock microscopic effects. Shatter cones are, thus, generated post- or syn-formation of PF, FF, subplanar fractures, and PDF. The earliest possible time for shatter cone formation is during the late stage of the compressional phase, that is, shock wave passage, of an impact event.

  8. Visualization of Three-Dimensional Nephron Structure With Microcomputed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley,M.; Jorgensen, S.; Lerman, L.; Ritman, E.; Romero, J.

    2007-01-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of nephrons in situ and their interrelationship with other nephrons are difficult to visualize by microscopic methods. The present study uses microcomputed X-ray tomography (micro-CT) to visualize intact nephrons in situ. Rat kidneys were perfusion-fixed with buffered formalin and their vasculature was subsequently perfused with radiopaque silicone. Cortical tissue was stained en bloc with osmium tetroxide, embedded in plastic, scanned, and reconstructed at voxel resolutions of 6, 2, and 1 {mu}m. At 6 {mu}m resolution, large blood vessels and glomeruli could be visualized but nephrons and their lumens were small and difficult to visualize. Optimal images were obtained using a synchrotron radiation source at 2 {mu}m resolution where nephron components could be identified, correlated with histological sections, and traced. Proximal tubules had large diameters and opaque walls, whereas distal tubules, connecting tubules, and collecting ducts had smaller diameters and less opaque walls. Blood vessels could be distinguished from nephrons by the luminal presence of radiopaque silicone. Proximal tubules were three times longer than distal tubules. Proximal and distal tubules were tightly coiled in the outer cortex but were loosely coiled in the middle and inner cortex. The connecting tubules had the narrowest diameters of the tubules and converged to form arcades that paralleled the radial vessels as they extended to the outer cortex. These results illustrate a potential use of micro-CT to obtain three-dimensional information about nephron architecture and nephron interrelationships, which could be useful in evaluating experimental tubular hypertrophy, atrophy, and necrosis.

  9. A skeleton-tree-based approach to acinar morphometric analysis using microcomputed tomography with comparison of acini in young and old C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Kizhakke Puliyakote, Abhilash S; Vasilescu, Dragoş M; Sen Sharma, Kriti; Wang, Ge; Hoffman, Eric A

    2016-06-15

    We seek to establish a method using interior tomographic techniques (Xradia MicroXCT-400) for acinar morphometric analysis using the pathway center lines from micro X-ray computed tomographic (Micro-CT) images as the road map. Through the application of these techniques, we present a method to extend the atlas of murine lungs to acinar levels and present a comparison between two age groups of the C57BL/6 strain. Lungs fixed via vascular perfusion were scanned using high-resolution Micro-CT protocols. Individual acini were segmented, and skeletonized paths to alveolar sacs from the entrance to the acinus were formed. Morphometric parameters, including branch lengths, diameters, and branching angles, were generated. Six mice each, at two age groups (∼20 and ∼90 wk of age), were studied. Additive Gaussian noise (0 mean and SD 1, 2, 5, and 10) was used to test the robustness of the analytical method. Noise-based variations were within ±6 μm for branch lengths and ±5 μm for diameters. At a noise level of 10, errors increased. Branch diameters were less susceptible to noise than lengths. There was >95% center line overlap across all noise levels. The measurements obtained using the center lines as a road map were not affected by added noise. Acini from younger mice had smaller branch diameters and lengths at all generations without significant differences in branching angles. The relative distribution of volume in the alveolar ducts was similar across both age groups. The method has been demonstrated to be repeatable and robust to image noise and provides a new, nondestructive technique to assess and compare acinar morphometry quantitatively. PMID:26940656

  10. Three-dimensional X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis of polymerization shrinkage vectors in flowable composite.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yukihiko; Hanaoka, Koji; Kawamata, Ryota; Sakurai, Takashi; Teranaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin composites was evaluated using air bubbles as traceable markers. Three different surface treatments i.e. an adhesive silane coupling agent, a separating silane coupling agent, and a combination of both, were applied to standard cavities. Before and after polymerization, X-ray micro-computed tomography images were recorded. Their superimposition and comparison allowed position changes of the markers to be visualized as vectors. The movement of the markers in the resin composite was, therefore, quantitatively evaluated from the tomographic images. Adhesion was found to significantly influence shrinkage patterns. The method used here could be employed to visualize shrinkage vectors and shrinkage volume. PMID:24988881

  11. A microcomputed tomography guided fluorescence tomography system for small animal molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepshire, Dax; Mincu, Niculae; Hutchins, Michael; Gruber, Josiah; Dehghani, Hamid; Hypnarowski, Justin; Leblond, Frederic; Khayat, Mario; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-04-01

    A prototype small animal imaging system was created for coupling fluorescence tomography (FT) with x-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT). The FT system has the potential to provide synergistic information content resultant from using microCT images as prior spatial information and then allows overlay of the FT image onto the original microCT image. The FT system was designed to use single photon counting to provide maximal sensitivity measurements in a noncontact geometry. Five parallel detector locations are used, each allowing simultaneous sampling of the fluorescence and transmitted excitation signals through the tissue. The calibration and linearity range performance of the system are outlined in a series of basic performance tests and phantom studies. The ability to image protoporphyrin IX in mouse phantoms was assessed and the system is ready for in vivo use to study biological production of this endogenous marker of tumors. This multimodality imaging system will have a wide range of applications in preclinical cancer research ranging from studies of the tumor microenvironment and treatment efficacy for emerging cancer therapeutics.

  12. A microcomputed tomography guided fluorescence tomography system for small animal molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kepshire, Dax; Gruber, Josiah; Hypnarowski, Justin; Leblond, Frederic; Pogue, Brian W.; Mincu, Niculae; Hutchins, Michael; Khayat, Mario; Dehghani, Hamid

    2009-04-15

    A prototype small animal imaging system was created for coupling fluorescence tomography (FT) with x-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT). The FT system has the potential to provide synergistic information content resultant from using microCT images as prior spatial information and then allows overlay of the FT image onto the original microCT image. The FT system was designed to use single photon counting to provide maximal sensitivity measurements in a noncontact geometry. Five parallel detector locations are used, each allowing simultaneous sampling of the fluorescence and transmitted excitation signals through the tissue. The calibration and linearity range performance of the system are outlined in a series of basic performance tests and phantom studies. The ability to image protoporphyrin IX in mouse phantoms was assessed and the system is ready for in vivo use to study biological production of this endogenous marker of tumors. This multimodality imaging system will have a wide range of applications in preclinical cancer research ranging from studies of the tumor microenvironment and treatment efficacy for emerging cancer therapeutics.

  13. Geometric classification of open-cell metal foams using X-ray micro-computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, Jessica Jacobi, Anthony M.

    2013-01-15

    The geometry of foams has long been an area of interest, and a number of idealized geometric descriptions have been proposed. In order to acquire detailed, quantitative, geometric data for aluminum open-cell metal foams, X-ray {mu}CT is employed. The X-ray {mu}CT images are analyzed using specialized software, FoamView Registered-Sign , from which geometric information including strut length and pore shapes are extracted. The X-ray {mu}CT analysis allows comparison of the ideal geometric models to the actual geometric characteristics of the metal foam samples. The results reveal a high variability in ligament length, as well as features supporting the ideal geometry known as the Weaire-Phelan unit cell. The geometric findings provide information useful for improving current models of open-cell metal foam. Applications can range from predicting heat transfer or load failure to predicting liquid retention. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum open-cell metal foams are geometrically classified Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray micro-computed tomography and specialized software are used to gather geometric data Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The foams are shown to have a high variability in strut length Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Weaire-Phelan unit cell is shown to be a better representative of these foams.

  14. Ceramic and polymeric dental onlays evaluated by photo-elasticity, optical coherence tomography, and micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Topala, Florin; Ionita, Ciprian; Negru, Radu; Fabriky, Mihai; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Marsavina, Liviu; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Dental onlays are restorations used to repair rear teeth that have a mild to moderate amount of decay. They can also be used to restore teeth that are cracked or fractured if the damage is not severe enough to require a dental crown. The use of onlays requires less tooth reduction than does the use of metal fillings. This allows dentists to conserve more of a patient's natural tooth structure in the treatment process. The aims of this study are to evaluate the biomechanical comportment of the dental onlays, by using the 3D photo elasticity method and to investigate the integrity of the structures and their fitting to the dental support. For this optical coherence tomography and micro-computed tomography were employed. Both methods were used to investigate 37 dental onlays, 17 integral polymeric and 20 integral ceramic. The results permit to observe materials defects inside the ceramic or polymeric onlays situate in the biomechanically tensioned areas that could lead to fracture of the prosthetic structure. Marginal fitting problems of the onlays related to the teeth preparations were presented in order to observe the possibility of secondary cavities. The resulted images from the optical coherence tomography were verified by the micro-computed tomography. In conclusion, the optical coherence tomography can be used as a clinical method in order to evaluate the integrity of the dental ceramic and polymeric onlays and to investigate the quality of the marginal fitting to the teeth preparations.

  15. Combined system of fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and microcomputed tomography for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoquan; Gong, Hui; Quan, Guotao; Deng, Yong; Luo, Qingming

    2010-05-01

    We developed a dual-modality system that combines fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) and flat panel detector-based microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) to simultaneously reveal molecular and structural information in small animals. In fDOT, a 748 nm diode laser was used as an excitation source, while a cooled charge coupled device camera was adopted to collect transmission fluorescence. In micro-CT, a flat panel detector based on amorphous silicon, with active area of 13×13 cm2, and a microfocus x-ray tube were used. The fDOT system was mounted orthogonally to the micro-CT and the projection images were acquired without rotation of the sample, which is different from the method used for micro-CT alone. Both the finite element method and the algebraic reconstruction technique were used to reconstruct images from the fDOT. Phantom data showed that the resolution of the fDOT system was about 3 mm at an imaging depth of 7 mm. Quantitative error was no more than 5% and imaging sensitivity for 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-etramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide bis-oleate (DiR-BOA) was estimated to be higher than 100 nM at a depth of 7 mm. Calculations of the phantom's center of mass showed that the location accuracy of fDOT was about 0.7 mm. We applied a Feldkamp algorithm to reconstruct the micro-CT image. By measuring the presampled modulation transfer function with a 30 μm tungsten thread, we estimated that the micro-CT has a resolution of 5 mm-1 when the field of view was 6.5 cm. Our results indicate the uniformity of the transaxial micro-CT image and the contrast-to-noise ratio was measured as 1.95 for a radiation dose of 1 cGy. A non-image-based method was employed for merging images from the two imaging modalities. A nude mouse with DiR-BOA, imaged ex vivo, was used to validate the feasibility of the dual-modality system.

  16. Three-dimensional registration of synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography images with advanced laboratory micro-computed tomography data from murine kidney casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, Peter; Hieber, Simone E.; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Khimchenko, Anna; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Olgac, Ufuk; Marmaras, Anastasios; Kuo, Willy; Meyer, Eric P.; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia; Ehrbar, Stefanie; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Malfunction of oxygen regulation in kidney and liver may lead to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In kidney, it is hypothesized that renal gas shunting from arteries to veins eliminates excess oxygen. Such shunting is highly dependent on the structure of the renal vascular network. The vascular tree has so far not been quantified under maintenance of its connectivity as three-dimensional imaging of the vessel tree down to the smallest capillaries, which in mouse model are smaller than 5 μm in diameter, is a challenging task. An established protocol uses corrosion casts and applies synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography (SRμCT), which provides the desired spatial resolution with the necessary contrast. However, SRμCT is expensive and beamtime access is limited. We show here that measurements with a phoenix nanotomrm (General Electric, Wunstorf, Germany) can provide comparable results to those obtained with SRμCT, except for regions with small vessel structures, where the signal-to-noise level was significantly reduced. For this purpose the nanotom®m measurement was compared with its corresponding measurement acquired at the beamline P05 at PETRA III at DESY, Hamburg, Germany.

  17. Micro-Computed Tomography for Visualizing Limb Skeletal Regeneration in Young Xenopus Frogs

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YING; LIN, GUFA; CHEN, YUNGCHUNG; FOK, ALEX; SLACK, JONATHAN M.W.

    2012-01-01

    For studies of vertebrate limb regeneration it is often desirable to visualize the regenerated skeleton, which is mostly cartilage, and also section the specimen for histological or immunohistochemical visualization of other tissues. However, the normal skeletal staining techniques are incompatible with immunohistochemistry. Here, we describe a contrast-based micro-computed tomography (microCT) method for direct and nondestructive observation of regenerated cartilage spikes in Xenopus frog limbs. In addition, we show that contrast based microCT imaging is compatible with immunohistochemistry protocols. This approach provides versatile and high contrast images of the cartilage allowing us to measure the regenerated skeletal structure in detail as well as carrying out the other types of analysis. It opens a wide range of potential microCT applications in research on vertebrate limb regeneration. PMID:22933461

  18. Application of micro-computed tomography to microstructure studies of the medicinal fungus Hericium coralloides.

    PubMed

    Pallua, Johannes D; Kuhn, Volker; Pallua, Anton F; Pfaller, Kristian; Pallua, Anton K; Recheis, Wolfgang; Pöder, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    The potential of 3-D nondestructive imaging techniques such as micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was evaluated to study morphological patterns of the potential medicinal fungus Hericium coralloides (Basidiomycota). Micro-CT results were correlated with histological information gained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy (LM). It is demonstrated that the combination of these imaging methods results in a more distinct picture of the morphology of the edible and potentially medicinal Hericium coralloides basidiomata. In addition we have created 3-D reconstructions and visualizations based on micro-CT imagery from a randomly selected part of the upper region of a fresh H. coralloides basidioma: Analyses for the first time allowed an approximation of the evolutionary effectiveness of this bizarrely formed basidioma type in terms of the investment of tissue biomass and its reproductive output (production of basidiospores). PMID:25376797

  19. Resolution effect in X-ray microcomputed tomography imaging and small pore's contribution to permeability for a Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Sheng; Marone, Federica; Dultz, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Resolution selection when using X-ray microcomputed tomography should be made based on the compromise between accuracy and representativeness. The question is then how accurate is accurate enough, that is, how small a pore is small enough to be ignored without generating misleading results on pore representation and subsequent flow properties such as permeability. In this study, synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomographic scans of a Berea sandstone sample were acquired for two resolutions (with 1.85 and 5.92 μm pixel width). Higher resolution images resolve more small pores, and have similar large pores as the lower resolution images. Pore characterization and permeability estimation were conducted based on these two sets of images. The pore parameters and permeability were also measured for another larger sample from the same rock fragment through laboratory experiments. The comparison between the different resolution image analyses and the laboratory measurement indicates that small pores contribute to larger porosity, smaller tortuosity, and larger surface area, but do not influence permeability significantly. Therefore, relatively low resolution (pixel width up to 5.92 μm) can be used for Berea sandstone when permeability is the focus. However, use of even lower resolution needs to be careful since lower resolution not only excludes more small pores, but also has the potential to overestimate the pore size and thereby the permeability. Kozeny-Carman equation was used to estimate the permeability with geometric and diffusional tortuosity. The results indicate that the latter tortuosity can serve better for the permeability estimation than the former.

  20. Micro-computed tomography: Introducing new dimensions to taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Faulwetter, Sarah; Vasileiadou, Aikaterini; Kouratoras, Michail; Thanos Dailianis; Arvanitidis,  Christos

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Continuous improvements in the resolution of three-dimensional imaging have led to an increased application of these techniques in conventional taxonomic research in recent years. Coupled with an ever increasing research effort in cybertaxonomy, three-dimensional imaging could give a boost to the development of virtual specimen collections, allowing rapid and simultaneous access to accurate virtual representations of type material. This paper explores the potential of micro-computed tomography (X-ray micro-tomography), a non-destructive three-dimensional imaging technique based on mapping X-ray attenuation in the scanned object, for supporting research in systematics and taxonomy. The subsequent use of these data as virtual type material, so-called “cybertypes”, and the creation of virtual collections lie at the core of this potential. Sample preparation, image acquisition, data processing and presentation of results are demonstrated using polychaetes (bristle worms), a representative taxon of macro-invertebrates, as a study object. Effects of the technique on the morphological, anatomical and molecular identity of the specimens are investigated. The paper evaluates the results and discusses the potential and the limitations of the technique for creating cybertypes. It also discusses the challenges that the community might face to establish virtual collections. Potential future applications of three-dimensional information in taxonomic research are outlined, including an outlook to new ways of producing, disseminating and publishing taxonomic information. PMID:23653515

  1. Micro-computed tomography: Introducing new dimensions to taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Faulwetter, Sarah; Vasileiadou, Aikaterini; Kouratoras, Michail; Thanos Dailianis; Arvanitidis, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Continuous improvements in the resolution of three-dimensional imaging have led to an increased application of these techniques in conventional taxonomic research in recent years. Coupled with an ever increasing research effort in cybertaxonomy, three-dimensional imaging could give a boost to the development of virtual specimen collections, allowing rapid and simultaneous access to accurate virtual representations of type material. This paper explores the potential of micro-computed tomography (X-ray micro-tomography), a non-destructive three-dimensional imaging technique based on mapping X-ray attenuation in the scanned object, for supporting research in systematics and taxonomy. The subsequent use of these data as virtual type material, so-called "cybertypes", and the creation of virtual collections lie at the core of this potential. Sample preparation, image acquisition, data processing and presentation of results are demonstrated using polychaetes (bristle worms), a representative taxon of macro-invertebrates, as a study object. Effects of the technique on the morphological, anatomical and molecular identity of the specimens are investigated. The paper evaluates the results and discusses the potential and the limitations of the technique for creating cybertypes. It also discusses the challenges that the community might face to establish virtual collections. Potential future applications of three-dimensional information in taxonomic research are outlined, including an outlook to new ways of producing, disseminating and publishing taxonomic information. PMID:23653515

  2. Evaluation of Root Canal Preparation Using Rotary System and Hand Instruments Assessed by Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Stavileci, Miranda; Hoxha, Veton; Görduysus, Ömer; Tatar, Ilkan; Laperre, Kjell; Hostens, Jeroen; Küçükkaya, Selen; Muhaxheri, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete mechanical preparation of the root canal system is rarely achieved. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the root canal shaping efficacy of ProTaper rotary files and standard stainless steel K-files using micro-computed tomography. Material/Methods Sixty extracted upper second premolars were selected and divided into 2 groups of 30 teeth each. Before preparation, all samples were scanned by micro-computed tomography. Thirty teeth were prepared with the ProTaper system and the other 30 with stainless steel files. After preparation, the untouched surface and root canal straightening were evaluated with micro-computed tomography. The percentage of untouched root canal surface was calculated in the coronal, middle, and apical parts of the canal. We also calculated straightening of the canal after root canal preparation. Results from the 2 groups were statistically compared using the Minitab statistical package. Results ProTaper rotary files left less untouched root canal surface compared with manual preparation in coronal, middle, and apical sector (p<0.001). Similarly, there was a statistically significant difference in root canal straightening after preparation between the techniques (p<0.001). Conclusions Neither manual nor rotary techniques completely prepared the root canal, and both techniques caused slight straightening of the root canal. PMID:26092929

  3. Radiographic, microcomputer tomography, and optical coherence tomography investigations of ceramic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Ionita, Ciprian; Topala, Florin; Petrescu, Emanuela; Rominu, Roxana; Pop, Daniela Maria; Marsavina, Liviu; Negru, Radu; Bradu, Adrian; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2010-12-01

    Imagistic investigation of the metal-ceramic crowns and fixed partial prostheses represent a very important issue in nowadays dentistry. At this time, in dental office, it is difficult or even impossible to evaluate a metal ceramic crown or bridge before setting it in the oral cavity. The possibilities of ceramic fractures are due to small fracture lines or material defects inside the esthetic layers. Material and methods: In this study 25 metal ceramic crowns and fixed partial prostheses were investigated by radiographic method (Rx), micro computer tomography (MicroCT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) working in Time Domain, at 1300 nm. The OCT system contains two interferometers and one scanner. For each incident analysis a stuck made of 100 slices was obtain. These slices were used in order to obtain a 3D model of the ceramic interface. Results: RX and MicroCT are very powerful instruments that provide a good characterization of the dental construct. It is important to observe the reflections due to the metal infrastructure that could affect the evaluation of the metal ceramic crowns and bridges. The OCT investigations could complete the imagistic evaluation of the dental construct by offering important information when it is need it.

  4. Effect of different desensitizers on inhibition of bovine dentin demineralization: micro-computed tomography assessment.

    PubMed

    Lodha, Ena; Hamba, Hidenori; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two desensitizers on inhibition of dentin demineralization, after immersion in artificial saliva using micro-computed tomography (μCT). Dentin blocks cut from bovine incisors were treated with deionized water (DW, a negative control) or one of three desensitizers: a fluoride varnish (Duraphat, a positive control), a calcium phosphate desensitizer (Teethmate Desensitizer), and a fluoro-alumino-calcium silicate-based desensitizer (Nanoseal). After each treatment, the specimens in Duraphat, Nanoseal, and Teethmate Desensitizer groups were pre-immersed in artificial saliva (pH 6.5) for either 1 d or 1 wk. The mineral loss of the specimens after demineralization (pH 5.0, 3 h) was evaluated by μCT. The treated surface was investigated with scanning electron microscopy. Mineral loss in all treatment groups was significantly lower than that in DW. Duraphat was the most effective treatment against demineralization, followed by Nanoseal. Nanoseal showed significantly better reduction in mineral loss following immersion for 1 wk in artificial saliva than for 1 d. However, Teethmate Desensitizer and Duraphat did not exhibit enhanced inhibition of demineralization over a longer period of immersion in artificial saliva. Scanning electron microscopy images showed deposition of particles on the dentin in both Teethmate Desensitizer. The application of Teethmate Desensitizer and Nanoseal to the exposed dentin surface resulted in inhibition of demineralization, with Nanoseal resulting in improved inhibition after prolonged immersion in artificial saliva. PMID:25363830

  5. Effects of preparation techniques on root canal shaping assessed by micro-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Stavileci, Miranda; Hoxha, Veton; Görduysus, Ömer; Tatar, Ilkan; Laperre, Kjell; Hostens, Jeroen; Küçükkaya, Selen; Berisha, Merita

    2013-01-01

    Background Root canal shaping without any procedural error is of the utmost preference. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use micro-computed tomography to evaluate and compare the root canal shaping efficacy of ProTaper rotary files and standard stainless steel K-files. Material/Methods Sixty extracted upper second premolars were selected and were divided into 2 groups of 30. Before preparation, all samples were scanned by micro-CT. Then, 30 teeth were prepared with stainless steel files and the remaining 30 with ProTaper rotary files. Canal transportation and centering ability before and after root canal shaping were assessed using micro-CT. The amount and direction of canal transportation and the centering ratio of each instrument were determined in the coronal, middle, and apical parts of the canal. The 2 groups were statistically compared using one-way ANOVA. Results ProTaper rotary files gave less transportation (p<0.001) and better centering ability (p<0.00001) compared with stainless steel files. Conclusions The manual technique for preparation of root canals with stainless steel files produces more canal transportation, whereas rotary files remain more centered in the canal. PMID:23760162

  6. Measurement of kidney stone formation in the rat model using micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umoh, Joseph U.; Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2012-03-01

    Kidney stones were induced in 5 rats by treating them with 1% ethylene glycol and 1% ammonium chloride through free drinking water for six weeks. The animals were anesthetized and imaged in vivo before the treatment at week 0, to obtain baseline data, then at weeks 2 and 6 to monitor the kidney stone formation. Micro-CT imaging was performed with x-ray tube voltage of 90 kV and a current of 40 mA. At week 2, kidney stone formation was observed. A micro-computed tomography methodology of estimating the volume and hydroxyapatite-equivalent mineral content of the kidney stone is presented. It determines the threshold CT number (390 HU) that separates the kidney stone from the tissue. The mean volume of the stones in the 10 kidneys significantly increased from 3.81+/-0.72 mm3 at week 2 to 23.96+/-9.12 mm3 at week 6 (p<0.05, r2=0.34). Measurement precision error was about 4%. This method allows analysis of the kidney stone formation to be carried out in vivo, with fewer experimental animals compared with other ex vivo methods, in which animals are sacrificed. It is precise, accurate, non-destructive, and could be used in pre-clinical research to study the formation of kidney stones in live small animals.

  7. Coronary wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, Megan; Donohue, Danielle; Chen, Marcus; Daniels, Mathew; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Clevenger, Randall; Wen, Han H.; Pai, Vinay M.

    2011-07-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major cause of death in the United States and results from the accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries of the heart. Plaques accumulate as the result of the retention of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles in the sub-endothelium of the arterial wall. In mouse aorta, these lesions form primarily at the branching sites or bifurcations. However, in the coronary system, data has shown that late-stage plaque formation occurs throughout the proximal segments of the arteries. In order to better understand plaque formation in the coronary arteries, we have developed an osmium tetroxide (OsO4) stained coronary wall imaging protocol performed using microcomputed tomography (microCT). OsO4 is a heavy metal contrast agent that readily binds to lipids. Our data in 3- to 25-week old C57BL6 wild-type mice shows that the coronary vessel walls are highlighted by the use of the contrast agent. We expect that this combination of OsO4 and microCT will allow us to investigate the coronary artery wall in atherogenesis models of mice to characterize plaque formation.

  8. Analysis of the fetal placental vascular tree by X-ray micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Langheinrich, A C; Wienhard, J; Vormann, S; Hau, B; Bohle, R M; Zygmunt, M

    2004-01-01

    The current understanding of the placental vascular tree largely derives from time-consuming morphometric analyses performed by conventional histology, electron microscopy of corrosion casts and three-dimensional reconstructions based on physical tissue sections. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) emerges as a new, non-destructive and fast tool for imaging and quantifying fetoplacental vasculature. Term placentae (n=5) were perfused with contrast agent consisting of barium-sulfate, gelatine and thymol shortly after Caesarean-section-delivery. Samples (1 cm(3)) from eight different regions of the placenta were subsequently scanned in a micro-CT. Using tomographic reconstruction algorithms, three dimensional images were obtained by micro-CT allowing total stereoscopic visualization and continuous quantitative analysis of the vascular structure of the investigated samples. These samples were compared regarding vascular surface (VS) and vascular density (vascular volume fraction, TCVF). Quantitative assessment showed an average vascular density of 16 per cent (SD+/-0.4) and a vascular surface of 475 mm(2)(SD+/-8) per total tissue volume (including intervillous space) of 125 mm(3). Micro-CT image-analysis showed no significant differences in the fetal vascularization among term placentae. Micro-CT imaging is feasible for imaging and analysis of the villous vascular tree, allows further morphologic studies and immunohistochemistry of the placental specimens and may emerge as an additional tool in the investigation of the physiology and pathophysiology of the placental vasculature. PMID:15013644

  9. Quantitative Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Vascular Dysfunction in Progressive Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ehling, Josef; Bábíčková, Janka; Gremse, Felix; Klinkhammer, Barbara M.; Baetke, Sarah; Knuechel, Ruth; Kiessling, Fabian; Floege, Jürgen; Lammers, Twan; Boor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Progressive kidney diseases and renal fibrosis are associated with endothelial injury and capillary rarefaction. However, our understanding of these processes has been hampered by the lack of tools enabling the quantitative and noninvasive monitoring of vessel functionality. Here, we used micro-computed tomography (μCT) for anatomical and functional imaging of vascular alterations in three murine models with distinct mechanisms of progressive kidney injury: ischemia-reperfusion (I/R, days 1–56), unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO, days 1–10), and Alport mice (6–8 weeks old). Contrast-enhanced in vivo μCT enabled robust, noninvasive, and longitudinal monitoring of vessel functionality and revealed a progressive decline of the renal relative blood volume in all models. This reduction ranged from −20% in early disease stages to −61% in late disease stages and preceded fibrosis. Upon Microfil perfusion, high-resolution ex vivo μCT allowed quantitative analyses of three-dimensional vascular networks in all three models. These analyses revealed significant and previously unrecognized alterations of preglomerular arteries: a reduction in vessel diameter, a prominent reduction in vessel branching, and increased vessel tortuosity. In summary, using μCT methodology, we revealed insights into macro-to-microvascular alterations in progressive renal disease and provide a platform that may serve as the basis to evaluate vascular therapeutics in renal disease. PMID:26195818

  10. Three-Dimensional Characterization of Cell Clusters Using Synchrotron-Radiation-Based Micro-Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ert; Riedel, Marco; Thurner, Philipp J.

    2006-04-01

    Micro-computed tomography with the highly intense, monochromatic X rays produced by the synchrotron is a superior method to nondestructively measure the local absorption in three-dimensional space. Because biological tissues and cells consist mainly of water as the surrounding medium, higher absorbing agents have to be incorporated into the structures of interest. Even without X-ray optics such as refractive lens, one can uncover the stain distribution with the spatial resolution of about 1 [mu]m. Incorporating the stain at selected cell compartments, for example, binding to the RNA/DNA, their density distribution becomes quantified. In this communication, we demonstrate that tomograms obtained at the beamlines BW2 and W2 (HASYLAB at DESY, Hamburg, Germany) and 4S (SLS, Villigen, Switzerland) clearly show that the RNA/DNA-stained HEK 293 cell clusters have a core of high density and a peripheral part of lower density, which correlate with results of optical microscopy. The inner part of the clusters is associated with nonvital cells as the result of insufficient oxygen and nutrition supply. This necrotic part is surrounded by (6 ± 1) layers of vital cells.

  11. Extracting multiple interacting root systems using X-ray microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Stefan; Sturrock, Craig J; Bennett, Malcolm J; Mooney, Sacha J; Pridmore, Tony P

    2015-12-01

    Root system interactions and competition for resources are active areas of research that contribute to our understanding of how roots perceive and react to environmental conditions. Recent research has shown this complex suite of processes can now be observed in a natural environment (i.e. soil) through the use of X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT), which allows non-destructive analysis of plant root systems. Due to their similar X-ray attenuation coefficients and densities, the roots of different plants appear as similar greyscale intensity values in μCT image data. Unless they are manually and carefully traced, it has not previously been possible to automatically label and separate different root systems grown in the same soil environment. We present a technique, based on a visual tracking approach, which exploits knowledge of the shape of root cross-sections to automatically recover from X-ray μCT data three-dimensional descriptions of multiple, interacting root architectures growing in soil. The method was evaluated on both simulated root data and real images of two interacting winter wheat Cordiale (Triticumaestivum L.) plants grown in a single soil column, demonstrating that it is possible to automatically segment different root systems from within the same soil sample. This work supports the automatic exploration of supportive and competitive foraging behaviour of plant root systems in natural soil environments. PMID:26461469

  12. A Comparison of Three LISP Interpreters for MS-DOS-Based Microcomputers

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Stephen N.; Johannes, Richard S.

    1985-01-01

    We report a comparison of three commercially available LISP interpreters running on MS-DOS-based microcomputers. Marked differences were found between the different products' memory addressing abilities, error handling and debugging facilities. Editing tools, tutoring environments, windowing, graphic capabilities, operating system and port call facilities are also contrasted. Speed was tested via a group of LISP functions (benchmarks) that attempt to isolate list manipulation, iteration, function calling, recursion and mathematical calculation performance.

  13. Determining collagen distribution in articular cartilage using contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, H.J.; Ylitalo, T.; Karhula, S.; Suuronen, J.-P.; Kauppinen, S.; Serimaa, R.; Hæggström, E.; Pritzker, K.P.H.; Valkealahti, M.; Lehenkari, P.; Finnilä, M.; Saarakkala, S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Collagen distribution within articular cartilage (AC) is typically evaluated from histological sections, e.g., using collagen staining and light microscopy (LM). Unfortunately, all techniques based on histological sections are time-consuming, destructive, and without extraordinary effort, limited to two dimensions. This study investigates whether phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA), two collagen-specific markers and X-ray absorbers, could (1) produce contrast for AC X-ray imaging or (2) be used to detect collagen distribution within AC. Method We labeled equine AC samples with PTA or PMA and imaged them with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) at pre-defined time points 0, 18, 36, 54, 72, 90, 180, 270 h during staining. The micro-CT image intensity was compared with collagen distributions obtained with a reference technique, i.e., Fourier-transform infrared imaging (FTIRI). The labeling time and contrast agent producing highest association (Pearson correlation, Bland–Altman analysis) between FTIRI collagen distribution and micro-CT -determined PTA distribution was selected for human AC. Results Both, PTA and PMA labeling permitted visualization of AC features using micro-CT in non-calcified cartilage. After labeling the samples for 36 h in PTA, the spatial distribution of X-ray attenuation correlated highly with the collagen distribution determined by FTIRI in both equine (mean ± S.D. of the Pearson correlation coefficients, r = 0.96 ± 0.03, n = 12) and human AC (r = 0.82 ± 0.15, n = 4). Conclusions PTA-induced X-ray attenuation is a potential marker for non-destructive detection of AC collagen distributions in 3D. This approach opens new possibilities in development of non-destructive 3D histopathological techniques for characterization of OA. PMID:26003951

  14. Longitudinal in vivo microcomputed tomography of mouse lungs: No evidence for radiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vande Velde, Greetje; De Langhe, Ellen; Poelmans, Jennifer; Bruyndonckx, Peter; d'Agostino, Emiliano; Verbeken, Erik; Bogaerts, Ria; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Before microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) can be exploited to its full potential for longitudinal monitoring of transgenic and experimental mouse models of lung diseases, radiotoxic side effects such as inflammation or fibrosis must be considered. We evaluated dose and potential radiotoxicity to the lungs for long-term respiratory-gated high-resolution micro-CT protocols. Free-breathing C57Bl/6 mice underwent four different retrospectively respiratory gated micro-CT imaging schedules of repeated scans during 5 or 12 wk, followed by ex vivo micro-CT and detailed histological and biochemical assessment of lung damage. Radiation exposure, dose, and absorbed dose were determined by ionization chamber, thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Despite the relatively large radiation dose delivered per micro-CT acquisition, mice did not show any signs of radiation-induced lung damage or fibrosis when scanned weekly during 5 and up to 12 wk. Doubling the scanning frequency and once tripling the radiation dose as to mimic the instant repetition of a failed scan also stayed without detectable toxicity after 5 wk of scanning. Histological analyses confirmed the absence of radiotoxic damage to the lungs, thereby demonstrating that long-term monitoring of mouse lungs using high-resolution micro-CT is safe. This opens perspectives for longitudinal monitoring of (transgenic) mouse models of lung diseases and therapeutic response on an individual basis with high spatial and temporal resolution, without concerns for radiation toxicity that could potentially influence the readout of micro-CT-derived lung biomarkers. This work further supports the introduction of micro-CT for routine use in the preclinical pulmonary research field where postmortem histological approaches are still the gold standard. PMID:26024893

  15. Accurate micro-computed tomography imaging of pore spaces in collagen-based scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zidek, Jan; Vojtova, Lucy; Abdel-Mohsen, A M; Chmelik, Jiri; Zikmund, Tomas; Brtnikova, Jana; Jakubicek, Roman; Zubal, Lukas; Jan, Jiri; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-06-01

    In this work we have used X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a method to observe the morphology of 3D porous pure collagen and collagen-composite scaffolds useful in tissue engineering. Two aspects of visualizations were taken into consideration: improvement of the scan and investigation of its sensitivity to the scan parameters. Due to the low material density some parts of collagen scaffolds are invisible in a μCT scan. Therefore, here we present different contrast agents, which increase the contrast of the scanned biopolymeric sample for μCT visualization. The increase of contrast of collagenous scaffolds was performed with ceramic hydroxyapatite microparticles (HAp), silver ions (Ag(+)) and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Since a relatively small change in imaging parameters (e.g. in 3D volume rendering, threshold value and μCT acquisition conditions) leads to a completely different visualized pattern, we have optimized these parameters to obtain the most realistic picture for visual and qualitative evaluation of the biopolymeric scaffold. Moreover, scaffold images were stereoscopically visualized in order to better see the 3D biopolymer composite scaffold morphology. However, the optimized visualization has some discontinuities in zoomed view, which can be problematic for further analysis of interconnected pores by commonly used numerical methods. Therefore, we applied the locally adaptive method to solve discontinuities issue. The combination of contrast agent and imaging techniques presented in this paper help us to better understand the structure and morphology of the biopolymeric scaffold that is crucial in the design of new biomaterials useful in tissue engineering. PMID:27153826

  16. Quantification of experimental venous thrombus resolution by longitudinal nanogold-enhanced micro-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Steven P.; Saha, Prakash; Jenkins, Julia; Mukkavilli, Arun; Lyons, Oliver T.; Patel, Ashish S.; Sunassee, Kavitha; Modarai, Bijan; Smith, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The assessment of thrombus size following treatments directed at preventing thrombosis or enhancing its resolution has generally relied on physical or histological methods. This cross-sectional design imposes the need for increased numbers of animals for experiments. Micro-computed tomography (microCT) has been used to detect the presence of venous thrombus in experimental models but has yet to be used in a quantitative manner. In this study, we investigate the use of contrast-enhanced microCT for the longitudinal assessment of experimental venous thrombus resolution. Materials and methods Thrombi induced by stenosis of the inferior vena cava in mice were imaged by contrast-enhanced microCT at 1, 7 and 14 days post-induction (n = 18). Thrombus volumes were determined longitudinally by segmentation and 3D volume reconstruction of microCT scans and by standard end-point histological analysis at day 14. An additional group of thrombi were analysed solely by histology at 1, 7 and 14 days post-induction (n = 15). Results IVC resident thrombus was readily detectable by contrast-enhanced microCT. MicroCT-derived measurements of thrombus volume correlated well with time-matched histological analyses (ICC = 0.75, P < 0.01). Thrombus volumes measured by microCT were significantly greater than those derived from histological analysis (P < 0.001). Intra- and inter-observer analyses were highly correlated (ICC = 0.99 and 0.91 respectively, P < 0.0001). Further histological analysis revealed noticeable levels of contrast agent extravasation into the thrombus that was associated with the presence of neovascular channels, macrophages and intracellular iron deposits. Conclusion Contrast-enhanced microCT represents a reliable and reproducible method for the longitudinal assessment of venous thrombus resolution providing powerful paired data. PMID:26489729

  17. Long-term macrobioerosion in the Mediterranean Sea assessed by micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Färber, Claudia; Titschack, Jürgen; Schönberg, Christine Hanna Lydia; Ehrig, Karsten; Boos, Karin; Baum, Daniel; Illerhaus, Bernhard; Asgaard, Ulla; Granville Bromley, Richard; Freiwald, André; Wisshak, Max

    2016-06-01

    Biological erosion is a key process for the recycling of carbonate and the formation of calcareous sediments in the oceans. Experimental studies showed that bioerosion is subject to distinct temporal variability, but previous long-term studies were restricted to tropical waters. Here, we present results from a 14-year bioerosion experiment that was carried out along the rocky limestone coast of the island of Rhodes, Greece, in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, in order to monitor the pace at which bioerosion affects carbonate substrate and the sequence of colonisation by bioeroding organisms. Internal macrobioerosion was visualised and quantified by micro-computed tomography and computer-algorithm-based segmentation procedures. Analysis of internal macrobioerosion traces revealed a dominance of bioeroding sponges producing eight types of characteristic Entobia cavity networks, which were matched to five different clionaid sponges by spicule identification in extracted tissue. The morphology of the entobians strongly varied depending on the species of the producing sponge, its ontogenetic stage, available space, and competition by other bioeroders. An early community developed during the first 5 years of exposure with initially very low macrobioerosion rates and was followed by an intermediate stage when sponges formed large and more diverse entobians and bioerosion rates increased. After 14 years, 30 % of the block volumes were occupied by boring sponges, yielding maximum bioerosion rates of 900 g m-2 yr-1. A high spatial variability in macrobioerosion prohibited clear conclusions about the onset of macrobioerosion equilibrium conditions. This highlights the necessity of even longer experimental exposures and higher replication at various factor levels in order to better understand and quantify temporal patterns of macrobioerosion in marine carbonate environments.

  18. Extraction and visualization of a fracture network using Micro-Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, A.; Voorn, M.; Exner, U.

    2012-04-01

    Micro-Computed Tomography (µCT) measurements were conducted on 3 cm dolomite drill core plugs to gain knowledge about the distribution and orientation of a fracture network inside such plugs. µCT produces a 3D-image stack of 2D-images and these are used to reconstruct a 3D-Model of the fracture network representing the main pore space. The measurements are performed on a Rayscan 250 E at the University of Applied Sciences of Upper Austria (Fachhochschule Oberösterreich, FHÖO) using optimal recording parameters, to ensure the best spatial resolution and image quality. The resolution of the performed scans is around 20 µm. Each scan is acquired five times and then averaged to increase contrast and decrease noise artifacts. Due to the fact that the fracture apertures can be far below 20 µm, noise can be a main drawback to be able to segment the fractures. To decrease a further impact of noise we filter the images after image acquisition, by means of image histogram equalization and edge enhanced diffusion. Segmenting the fractures and the fracture network is not trivial. Many different segmentation routines the one option giving by far the best results was the Frangi Filter 2D. This filter was written in the medical research field to trace blood vessels. From a data perspective blood vessels are rather similar structures to fractures. However, the results are intensity images so that we still have to use a global threshold. This step is done by the automatic Otsu threshold, which is not biased by any human input. From a segmented image it is possible to quantify the apertures, orientation and distribution of the fractures. Using this technique can provide deep insight into the deformation history and a geometrical dataset to calculate permeability of a fracture network, which is additionally calibrated with conventional thin section analysis.

  19. Micro-Computed Tomography of Fatigue Microdamage in Cortical Bone Using a Barium Sulfate Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Huijie; Wang, Xiang; Ross, Ryan D.; Niebur, Glen L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of microdamage during fatigue can lead to increased fracture susceptibility in bone. Current techniques for imaging microdamage in bone are inherently destructive and two-dimensional. Therefore, the objective of this study was to image the accumulation of fatigue microdamage in cortical bone using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) with a barium sulfate (BaSO4) contrast agent. Two symmetric notches were machined on the tensile surface of bovine cortical bone beams in order to generate damage ahead of the stress concentrations during four-point bending fatigue. Specimens were loaded to a specified number of cycles or until one notch fractured, such that the other notch exhibited the accumulation of microdamage prior to fracture. Microdamage ahead of the notch was stained in vitro by precipitation of BaSO4 and imaged using micro-CT. Reconstructed images showed a distinct region of bright voxels around the notch tip or along propagating cracks due to the presence of BaSO4, which was verified by backscattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The shape of the stained region ahead of the notch tip was consistent with principal strain contours calculated by finite element analysis. The relative volume of the stained region was correlated with the number of loading cycles by non-linear regression using a power-law. This study demonstrates new methods for the non-destructive and three-dimensional detection of fatigue microdamage accumulation in cortical bone in vitro, which may be useful to gain further understanding into the role of microdamage in bone fragility. PMID:18443659

  20. Dual-Energy Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Radiation-Induced Vascular Changes in Primary Mouse Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moding, Everett J.; Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi; Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan; Ghaghada, Ketan; Johnson, G. Allan; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4) with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4 (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between CT measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R{sup 2}=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R{sup 2}=0.63) on day 4, respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment.

  1. Automated segmentation of synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography biomedical images using Graph Cuts and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarenga de Moura Meneses, Anderson; Giusti, Alessandro; de Almeida, André Pereira; Parreira Nogueira, Liebert; Braz, Delson; Cely Barroso, Regina; deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    Synchrotron Radiation (SR) X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) enables magnified images to be used as a non-invasive and non-destructive technique with a high space resolution for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of biomedical samples. The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to SR-μCT is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images for visualization, such as the high resolution and the phase contrast effect. In this article, we describe and assess the application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm for the segmentation of SR-μCT biomedical images acquired at the Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beam line at the Elettra Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). We also propose a method using EMvGC with Artificial Neural Networks (EMANNs) for correcting misclassifications due to intensity variation of phase contrast, which are important effects and sometimes indispensable in certain biomedical applications, although they impair the segmentation provided by conventional techniques. Results demonstrate considerable success in the segmentation of SR-μCT biomedical images, with average Dice Similarity Coefficient 99.88% for bony tissue in Wistar Rats rib samples (EMvGC), as well as 98.95% and 98.02% for scans of Rhodnius prolixus insect samples (Chagas's disease vector) with EMANNs, in relation to manual segmentation. The techniques EMvGC and EMANNs cope with the task of performing segmentation in images with the intensity variation due to phase contrast effects, presenting a superior performance in comparison to conventional segmentation techniques based on thresholding and linear/nonlinear image filtering, which is also discussed in the present article.

  2. Quantitative analysis of bone and soft tissue by micro-computed tomography: applications to ex vivo and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Graeme M; Sophocleous, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a high-resolution imaging modality that is capable of analysing bone structure with a voxel size on the order of 10 μm. With the development of in vivo micro-CT, where disease progression and treatment can be monitored in a living animal over a period of time, this modality has become a standard tool for preclinical assessment of bone architecture during disease progression and treatment. For meaningful comparison between micro-CT studies, it is essential that the same parameters for data acquisition and analysis methods be used. This protocol outlines the common procedures that are currently used for sample preparation, scanning, reconstruction and analysis in micro-CT studies. Scan and analysis methods for trabecular and cortical bone are covered for the femur, tibia, vertebra and the full neonate body of small rodents. The analysis procedures using the software provided by ScancoMedical and Bruker are discussed, and the routinely used bone architectural parameters are outlined. This protocol also provides a section dedicated to in vivo scanning and analysis, which covers the topics of anaesthesia, radiation dose and image registration. Because of the expanding research using micro-CT to study other skeletal sites, as well as soft tissues, we also provide a review of current techniques to examine the skull and mandible, adipose tissue, vasculature, tumour severity and cartilage. Lists of recommended further reading and literature references are included to provide the reader with more detail on the methods described. PMID:25184037

  3. Bone Histology and Primary Growth Rates in Hatchling Titanosaurs from Madagascar: New Insights from Micro-Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, B. C.; Whitney, M.; Rogers, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Sauropods are the largest known terrestrial vertebrates and exhibit a greater ontogenetic variation in body size than any other taxon. More than 120 species of sauropods are known from the Jurassic and Cretaceous, and a wealth of specimens documents their enormous adult body sizes. Juvenile sauropods, in contrast, are rare. Though titanosaur eggs containing embryos have been recovered, to date the smallest known post-hatching juveniles are only a little less than half of known adult size, and details of the earliest stages of sauropod ontogeny remain particularly poorly understood. Here we report on two partial skeletons of hatchling Rapetosaurus krausei, a titanosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Maevarano Formation of Madagascar, and provide important new data on primary early stage growth rates in sauropods. The two partial skeletons come from different localities in the Anembalemba Member of the Maevarano Formation. There is no duplication of elements for either specimen. Comparison of greatest length ratios for appendicular elements to those of a complete sub-adult Rapetosaurus confirms that there are only two individuals present, that there is no significant allometry in Rapetosaurus postcranial ontogeny, and that each individual is less than 15% adult size. The smaller specimen includes a sacral neural arch, three caudal centra, three caudal neural arches, left pubis, right femur (maximum length [ml] = 19.3 cm), tibia (ml = 12.7 cm), and metacarpal III, left and right fibulae, humeri, and metatarsal I, and a phalanx. The larger specimen includes a caudal centrum and neural arch, right metacarpal I, right tibia (ml = 17.9 cm), and left metacarpal IV. In order to non-destructively sample these exceptional Rapetosaurus juvenile elements, we employed micro-computed tomography to garner bone histology data. The micro-computed tomography was carried out using an X5000 high-resolution microfocus X-ray CT system located in the Department of Earth Sciences, University of

  4. Investigation of spatial resolution characteristics of an in vivo microcomputed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Zhou, Zhongxing; Ren, Liqiang; Wong, Molly; Li, Yuhua; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Kai; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The spatial resolution characteristics of an in vivo microcomputed tomography (CT) system was investigated in the in-plane (x-y), cross plane (z) and projection imaging modes. The microCT system utilized in this study employs a flat panel detector with a 127 μm pixel pitch, a microfocus x-ray tube with a focal spot size ranging from 5-30 μm, and accommodates three geometric magnifications (M) of 1.72, 2.54 and 5.10. The in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) curves were measured as a function of the number of projections, geometric magnification (M), detector binning and reconstruction magnification (MRecon). The in plane cutoff frequency (10% MTF) ranged from 2.31 lp/mm (M=1.72, 2×2 binning) to 12.56 lp/mm (M=5.10, 1×1 binning) and a bar pattern phantom validated those measurements. A slight degradation in the spatial resolution was observed when comparing the image reconstruction with 511 and 918 projections, whose effect was visible at the lower frequencies. Small value of MRecon has little or no impact on the in-plane spatial resolution owning to a stable system. Large value of MRecon has implications on the spatial resolution and it was evident when comparing the bar pattern images reconstructed with MRecon=1.25 and 2.5. The cross plane MTF curves showed that the spatial resolution increased as the slice thickness decreased. The cutoff frequencies in the projection imaging mode yielded slightly higher values as compared to the in-plane and cross plane modes at all the geometric magnifications (M). At M=5.10, the cutoff resolution of the projection and cross plane on an ultra-high contrast resolution bar chip phantom were 14.9 lp/mm and 13-13.5 lp/mm. Due to the finite focal spot size of the x-ray tube, the detector blur and the reconstruction kernel functions, the system's spatial resolution does not reach the limiting spatial resolution as defined by the Nyquist's detector criteria with an ideal point source. The geometric magnification employed in

  5. Contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography of fatigue microdamage accumulation in human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Landrigan, Matthew D; Li, Jiliang; Turnbull, Travis L; Burr, David B; Niebur, Glen L; Roeder, Ryan K

    2011-03-01

    Conventional methods used to image and quantify microdamage accumulation in bone are limited to histological sections, which are inherently invasive, destructive, two-dimensional, and tedious. These limitations inhibit investigation of microdamage accumulation with respect to volumetric spatial variation in mechanical loading, bone mineral density, and microarchitecture. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate non-destructive, three-dimensional (3-D) detection of microdamage accumulation in human cortical bone using contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and to validate micro-CT measurements against conventional histological methods. Unloaded controls and specimens loaded in cyclic uniaxial tension to a 5% and 10% reduction in secant modulus were labeled with a precipitated BaSO₄ stain for micro-CT and basic fuchsin for histomorphometry. Linear microcracks were similarly labeled by BaSO₄ and basic fuchsin as shown by backscattered electron microscopy and light microscopy, respectively. The higher X-ray attenuation of BaSO₄ relative to the bone extracellular matrix provided enhanced contrast for the detection of damage that was otherwise not able to be detected by micro-CT prior to staining. Therefore, contrast-enhanced micro-CT was able to nondestructively detect the presence, 3-D spatial location, and accumulation of fatigue microdamage in human cortical bone specimens in vitro. Microdamage accumulation was quantified on segmented micro-CT reconstructions as the ratio of BaSO₄ stain volume (SV) to total bone volume (BV). The amount of microdamage measured by both micro-CT (SV/BV) and histomorphometry (Cr.N, Cr.Dn, Cr.S.Dn) progressively increased from unloaded controls to specimens loaded to a 5% and 10% reduction in secant modulus (p < 0.001). Group means for micro-CT measurements of damage accumulation were strongly correlated to those using histomorphometry (p < 0.05), validating the new methods. Limitations of the new

  6. Micro-Computed Tomography Evaluation of Human Fat Grafts in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Michael T.; Hyun, Jeong S.; Lo, David D.; Montoro, Daniel T.; Hasegawa, Masakazu; Levi, Benjamin; Januszyk, Michael; Longaker, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although autologous fat grafting has revolutionized the field of soft tissue reconstruction and augmentation, long-term maintenance of fat grafts is unpredictable. Recent studies have reported survival rates of fat grafts to vary anywhere between 10% and 80% over time. The present study evaluated the long-term viability of human fat grafts in a murine model using a novel imaging technique allowing for in vivo volumetric analysis. Methods Human fat grafts were prepared from lipoaspirate samples using the Coleman technique. Fat was injected subcutaneously into the scalp of 10 adult Crl:NU-Foxn1nu CD-1 male mice. Micro-computed tomography (CT) was performed immediately following injection and then weekly thereafter. Fat volume was rendered by reconstructing a three-dimensional (3D) surface through cubic-spline interpolation. Specimens were also harvested at various time points and sections were prepared and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), for macrophages using CD68 and for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). Finally, samples were explanted at 8- and 12-week time points to validate calculated micro-CT volumes. Results Weekly CT scanning demonstrated progressive volume loss over the time course. However, volumetric analysis at the 8- and 12-week time points stabilized, showing an average of 62.2% and 60.9% survival, respectively. Gross analysis showed the fat graft to be healthy and vascularized. H&E analysis and staining for CD68 showed minimal inflammatory reaction with viable adipocytes. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-human CB1 antibodies confirmed human origin of the adipocytes. Conclusions Studies assessing the fate of autologous fat grafts in animals have focused on nonimaging modalities, including histological and biochemical analyses, which require euthanasia of the animals. In this study, we have demonstrated the ability to employ micro-CT for 3D reconstruction and volumetric analysis of human fat grafts in a mouse model. Importantly

  7. Quantification and Characterization of Radiation-Induced Changes to Mandibular Vascularity using Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sagar Satish; Donneys, Alexis; Farberg, Aaron Samuel; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Felice, Peter A; Buchman, Steven Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective Perhaps the most vexing and exigent problem confronting head and neck cancer reconstruction is overcoming the impediments of collateral damage imposed by radiation therapy (XRT) on normal surrounding tissue. XRT is detrimental to bone and soft tissue repair resulting in an unacceptably high incidence of devastating wound healing complications as well as the associated morbidity of late pathologic fractures, reduced bone healing, and osteoradionecrosis. The consequences of XRT on bone vasculature, long known to be affected by radiation, have been poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze the degree by which irradiation degrades existing bone vascularity using a powerful micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) technique to attain highly precise quantitative metrics of the vascular tree. Methods Fourteen 400g male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 35 Gy of fractionated XRT at 7 Gy/day. The animals were euthanized after 28 days and the left ventricle was fixed and injected with Microfil contrast. Left hemimandibles were dissected and scanned using high-resolution micro-CT (18μ voxels). The vessel number, thickness, separation, connectivity and vessel volume fraction were analyzed for the region of interest (ROI), defined to be the volume behind the third molar spanning a total distance of 5.1 mm. Results Stereological analysis and subsequent ANOVA test demonstrated a significant and quantifiable diminution in the irradiated vasculature when compared to control animals. The vessel volume fraction (0.016 vs. 0.032, p≤0.003) and vessel thickness (0.042mm vs. 0.067mm, p≤0.001) were markedly reduced. Interestingly, further analysis demonstrated no significant differences between vessel separation and vessel number. Conclusion The results of our study specifically quantify the corrosive affects of XRT on the vasculature of the mandible. The data from this novel technique goes even further and implies retention of blood vessels, but a degradation of

  8. Analysis of cartilage matrix fixed charge density and three-dimensional morphology via contrast-enhanced microcomputed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Ashley W.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Levenston, Marc E.

    2006-01-01

    Small animal models of osteoarthritis are often used for evaluating the efficacy of pharmacologic treatments and cartilage repair strategies, but noninvasive techniques capable of monitoring matrix-level changes are limited by the joint size and the low radiopacity of soft tissues. Here we present a technique for the noninvasive imaging of cartilage at micrometer-level resolution based on detecting the equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microcomputed tomography. The approach exploits electrochemical interactions between the molecular charges present in the cartilage matrix and an ionic contrast agent, resulting in a nonuniform equilibrium partitioning of the ionic contrast agent reflecting the proteoglycan distribution. In an in vitro model of cartilage degeneration we observed changes in x-ray attenuation magnitude and distribution consistent with biochemical and histological analyses of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, and x-ray attenuation was found to be a strong predictor of sulfated glycosaminoglycan density. Equilibration with the contrast agent also permits direct in situ visualization and quantification of cartilage surface morphology. Equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microcomputed tomography thus provides a powerful approach to quantitatively assess 3D cartilage composition and morphology for studies of cartilage degradation and repair. PMID:17158799

  9. Micro-computed tomography assisted distal femur metaphyseal blunt punch compression for determining trabecular bone strength in mice.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Uma; Pritchard, Zachary J; Voor, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Shorter generation time and the power of genetic manipulation make mice an ideal model system to study bone biology as well as bone diseases. However their small size presents a challenge to perform strength measurements, particularly of the weight-bearing cancellous bone in the murine long bones. We recently developed an improved method to measure the axial compressive strength of the cancellous bone in the distal femur metaphysis in mice. Transverse micro-computed tomography image slices that are 7µm thick were used to locate the position where the epiphysis-metaphysis transition occurs. This enabled the removal of the distal femur epiphysis at the exact transition point exposing the full extent of metaphyseal trabecular bone, allowing more accurate and consistent measurement of its strength. When applied to a murine model system consisting of five month old male wild-type (WT) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) knockout (KO) Camkk2(-/-) mice that possess recorded differences in trabecular bone volume, data collected using this method showed good correlation between bone volume fraction and strength of trabecular bone. In combination with micro-computed tomography and histology, this method will provide a comprehensive and consistent assessment of the microarchitecture and tissue strength of the cancellous bone in murine mouse models. PMID:26947030

  10. Three-dimensional microstructural investigation of high magnetization nano-micro composite fluids using x-ray microcomputed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borbáth, T.; Borbáth, I.; Günther, S.; Marinica, O.; Vékás, L.; Odenbach, S.

    2014-05-01

    X-ray microcomputed tomography was used in a three-dimensional investigation of the microstructure of suspensions of multi-domain soft iron particles in magnetic nanofluids. The measurements were performed using two different approaches: with the sample kept frozen, and with the sample under the effect of an external magnetic field. Results show that even a relatively low magnetic field gradient drives the micron-sized iron particles towards the stronger field and thus leads to a redistribution of the ferromagnetic particles in the magnetic nanofluid. Three-dimensional images of the internal microstructure of the composite magnetizable fluid (CMF) were obtained not only for the nano-micro composite system placed in a closed sample holder, but also for the spikes formed at the CMF free surface. It was demonstrated that x-ray microcomputed tomography is an efficient way to investigate the distribution and chain formation of ferromagnetic microparticles in a magnetic nanofluid carrier allowing an analysis even at a single particle level.

  11. Micro-computed tomography based computational fluid dynamics for the determination of shear stresses in scaffolds within a perfusion bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zermatten, Emilie; Vetsch, Jolanda Rita; Ruffoni, Davide; Hofmann, Sandra; Müller, Ralph; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-05-01

    Perfusion bioreactors are known to exert shear stresses on cultured cells, leading to cell differentiation and enhanced extracellular matrix deposition on scaffolds. The influence of the scaffold's porous microstructure is investigated for a polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold with a regular microarchitecture and a silk fibroin (SF) scaffold with an irregular network of interconnected pores. Their complex 3D geometries are imaged by micro-computed tomography and used in direct pore-level simulations of the entire scaffold-bioreactor system to numerically solve the governing mass and momentum conservation equations for fluid flow through porous media. The velocity field and wall shear stress distribution are determined for both scaffolds. The PCL scaffold exhibited an asymmetric distribution with peak and plateau, while the SF scaffold exhibited a homogenous distribution and conditioned the flow more efficiently than the PCL scaffold. The methodology guides the design and optimization of the scaffold geometry. PMID:24492950

  12. A Micro-Computed Tomography Technique to Study the Quality of Fibre Optics Embedded in Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Chiesura, Gabriele; Luyckx, Geert; Voet, Eli; Lammens, Nicolas; Van Paepegem, Wim; Degrieck, Joris; Dierick, Manuel; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Vanderniepen, Pieter; Sulejmani, Sanne; Sonnenfeld, Camille; Geernaert, Thomas; Berghmans, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Quality of embedment of optical fibre sensors in carbon fibre-reinforced polymers plays an important role in the resultant properties of the composite, as well as for the correct monitoring of the structure. Therefore, availability of a tool able to check the optical fibre sensor-composite interaction becomes essential. High-resolution 3D X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography, or Micro-CT, is a relatively new non-destructive inspection technique which enables investigations of the internal structure of a sample without actually compromising its integrity. In this work the feasibility of inspecting the position, the orientation and, more generally, the quality of the embedment of an optical fibre sensor in a carbon fibre reinforced laminate at unit cell level have been proven. PMID:25961383

  13. Three-dimensional observation of the mouse embryo by micro-computed tomography: composition of the trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Hidekazu; Tsuchikawa, Kohzo; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a micro-computed tomography (CT) method for observations of the mouse embryo. At 13.0 days post-coitum, mouse embryos were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for 24 h and stained en bloc by osmium tetroxide overnight. The embryos were then embedded in paraffin using standard methods for 24 h. Specimens were analyzed by micro-CT and image processing was performed. Organs containing nervous and blood systems could be viewed as a result of different osmium-staining densities. The trigeminal ganglion was imaged using three-dimensional techniques. Observation of the embryo was possible by micro-CT with osmium tetroxide staining. PMID:20155504

  14. Vascular imaging with contrast agent in hard and soft tissues using microcomputed-tomography.

    PubMed

    Blery, P; Pilet, P; Bossche, A Vanden-; Thery, A; Guicheux, J; Amouriq, Y; Espitalier, F; Mathieu, N; Weiss, P

    2016-04-01

    Vascularization is essential for many tissues and is a main requisite for various tissue-engineering strategies. Different techniques are used for highlighting vasculature, in vivo and ex vivo, in 2-D or 3-D including histological staining, immunohistochemistry, radiography, angiography, microscopy, computed tomography (CT) or micro-CT, both stand-alone and synchrotron system. Vascularization can be studied with or without a contrast agent. This paper presents the results obtained with the latest Skyscan micro-CT (Skyscan 1272, Bruker, Belgium) following barium sulphate injection replacing the bloodstream in comparison with results obtained with a Skyscan In Vivo 1076. Different hard and soft tissues were perfused with contrast agent and were harvested. Samples were analysed using both forms of micro-CT, and improved results were shown using this new micro-CT. This study highlights the vasculature using micro-CT methods. The results obtained with the Skyscan 1272 are clearly defined compared to results obtained with Skyscan 1076. In particular, this instrument highlights the high number of small vessels, which were not seen before at lower resolution. This new micro-CT opens broader possibilities in detection and characterization of the 3-D vascular tree to assess vascular tissue engineering strategies. PMID:27002484

  15. Detection of mouse liver cancer via a parallel iterative shrinkage method in hybrid optical/microcomputed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Zhenwen; Li, Yongbao; Ning, Nannan; Yang, Xin; Li, Xingde; Tian, Jie

    2012-12-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. In order to enable the noninvasive detection of small liver tumors in mice, we present a parallel iterative shrinkage (PIS) algorithm for dual-modality tomography. It takes advantage of microcomputed tomography and multiview bioluminescence imaging, providing anatomical structure and bioluminescence intensity information to reconstruct the size and location of tumors. By incorporating prior knowledge of signal sparsity, we associate some mathematical strategies including specific smooth convex approximation, an iterative shrinkage operator, and affine subspace with the PIS method, which guarantees the accuracy, efficiency, and reliability for three-dimensional reconstruction. Then an in vivo experiment on the bead-implanted mouse has been performed to validate the feasibility of this method. The findings indicate that a tiny lesion less than 3 mm in diameter can be localized with a position bias no more than 1 mm the computational efficiency is one to three orders of magnitude faster than the existing algorithms; this approach is robust to the different regularization parameters and the lp norms. Finally, we have applied this algorithm to another in vivo experiment on an HCCLM3 orthotopic xenograft mouse model, which suggests the PIS method holds the promise for practical applications of whole-body cancer detection.

  16. Application of X-ray microcomputed tomography in the characterization of irradiated nuclear fuel and material specimens

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Silva, Chinthaka M.; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hunn, John D.; Specht, Eliot D.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-08-03

    X-ray microcomputed tomography (µCT) was applied in characterizing the internal structures of a number of irradiated materials, including carbon-carbon fibre composites, nuclear-grade graphite and tristructural isotropic-coated fuel particles. Local cracks in carbon-carbon fibre composites associated with their synthesis process were observed with µCT without any destructive sample preparation. Pore analysis of graphite samples was performed quantitatively, and qualitative analysis of pore distribution was accomplished. It was also shown that high-resolution µCT can be used to probe internal layer defects of tristructural isotropic-coated fuel particles to elucidate the resulting high release of radioisotopes. Layer defects of sizes ranging from 1 tomore » 5 µm and up could be isolated by to-mography. As an added advantage, µCT could also be used to identify regions with high densities of radioisotopes to deter-mine the proper plane and orientation of particle mounting for further analytical characterization, such as materialographic sectioning followed by optical and electron microscopy. Lastly, in fully ceramic matrix fuel forms, despite the highly absorbing matrix, characterization of tristructural isotropic-coated particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix was accomplished usingµCT and related advanced image analysis techniques.« less

  17. Application of X-ray microcomputed tomography in the characterization of irradiated nuclear fuel and material specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Chinthaka M.; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hunn, John D.; Specht, Eliot D.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-08-03

    X-ray microcomputed tomography (µCT) was applied in characterizing the internal structures of a number of irradiated materials, including carbon-carbon fibre composites, nuclear-grade graphite and tristructural isotropic-coated fuel particles. Local cracks in carbon-carbon fibre composites associated with their synthesis process were observed with µCT without any destructive sample preparation. Pore analysis of graphite samples was performed quantitatively, and qualitative analysis of pore distribution was accomplished. It was also shown that high-resolution µCT can be used to probe internal layer defects of tristructural isotropic-coated fuel particles to elucidate the resulting high release of radioisotopes. Layer defects of sizes ranging from 1 to 5 µm and up could be isolated by to-mography. As an added advantage, µCT could also be used to identify regions with high densities of radioisotopes to deter-mine the proper plane and orientation of particle mounting for further analytical characterization, such as materialographic sectioning followed by optical and electron microscopy. Lastly, in fully ceramic matrix fuel forms, despite the highly absorbing matrix, characterization of tristructural isotropic-coated particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix was accomplished usingµCT and related advanced image analysis techniques.

  18. Application of X-ray microcomputed tomography in the characterization of irradiated nuclear fuel and material specimens.

    PubMed

    Silva, C M; Snead, L L; Hunn, J D; Specht, E D; Terrani, K A; Katoh, Y

    2015-11-01

    X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) was applied in characterizing the internal structures of a number of irradiated materials, including carbon-carbon fibre composites, nuclear-grade graphite and tristructural isotropic-coated fuel particles. Local cracks in carbon-carbon fibre composites associated with their synthesis process were observed with μCT without any destructive sample preparation. Pore analysis of graphite samples was performed quantitatively, and qualitative analysis of pore distribution was accomplished. It was also shown that high-resolution μCT can be used to probe internal layer defects of tristructural isotropic-coated fuel particles to elucidate the resulting high release of radioisotopes. Layer defects of sizes ranging from 1 to 5 μm and up could be isolated by tomography. As an added advantage, μCT could also be used to identify regions with high densities of radioisotopes to determine the proper plane and orientation of particle mounting for further analytical characterization, such as materialographic sectioning followed by optical and electron microscopy. In fully ceramic matrix fuel forms, despite the highly absorbing matrix, characterization of tristructural isotropic-coated particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix was accomplished using μCT and related advanced image analysis techniques. PMID:26243381

  19. Detection of mouse liver cancer via a parallel iterative shrinkage method in hybrid optical/microcomputed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Zhenwen; Li, Yongbao; Ning, Nannan; Yang, Xin; Li, Xingde; Tian, Jie

    2012-12-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. In order to enable the noninvasive detection of small liver tumors in mice, we present a parallel iterative shrinkage (PIS) algorithm for dual-modality tomography. It takes advantage of microcomputed tomography and multiview bioluminescence imaging, providing anatomical structure and bioluminescence intensity information to reconstruct the size and location of tumors. By incorporating prior knowledge of signal sparsity, we associate some mathematical strategies including specific smooth convex approximation, an iterative shrinkage operator, and affine subspace with the PIS method, which guarantees the accuracy, efficiency, and reliability for three-dimensional reconstruction. Then an in vivo experiment on the bead-implanted mouse has been performed to validate the feasibility of this method. The findings indicate that a tiny lesion less than 3 mm in diameter can be localized with a position bias no more than 1 mm; the computational efficiency is one to three orders of magnitude faster than the existing algorithms; this approach is robust to the different regularization parameters and the lp norms. Finally, we have applied this algorithm to another in vivo experiment on an HCCLM3 orthotopic xenograft mouse model, which suggests the PIS method holds the promise for practical applications of whole-body cancer detection. PMID:23224049

  20. In vivo micro-computed tomography allows direct three-dimensional quantification of both bone formation and bone resorption parameters using time-lapsed imaging.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Friederike A; Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2011-03-01

    Bone is a living tissue able to adapt its structure to external influences such as altered mechanical loading. This adaptation process is governed by two distinct cell types: bone-forming cells called osteoblasts and bone-resorbing cells called osteoclasts. It is therefore of particular interest to have quantitative access to the outcomes of bone formation and resorption separately. This article presents a non-invasive three-dimensional technique to directly extract bone formation and resorption parameters from time-lapsed in vivo micro-computed tomography scans. This includes parameters such as Mineralizing Surface (MS), Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR), and Bone Formation Rate (BFR), which were defined in accordance to the current nomenclature of dynamic histomorphometry. Due to the time-lapsed and non-destructive nature of in vivo micro-computed tomography, not only formation but also resorption can now be assessed quantitatively and time-dependent parameters Eroded Surface (ES) as well as newly defined indices Mineral Resorption Rate (MRR) and Bone Resorption Rate (BRR) are introduced. For validation purposes, dynamic formation parameters were compared to the traditional quantitative measures of dynamic histomorphometry, where MAR correlated with R = 0.68 and MS with R = 0.78 (p < 0.05). Reproducibility was assessed in 8 samples that were scanned 5 times and errors ranged from 0.9% (MRR) to 6.6% (BRR). Furthermore, the new parameters were applied to a murine in vivo loading model. A comparison of directly extracted parameters between formation and resorption within each animal revealed that in the control group, i.e., during normal remodeling, MAR was significantly lower than MRR (p < 0.01), whereas MS compared to ES was significantly higher (p < 0.0001). This implies that normal remodeling seems to take place by many small formation packets and few but large resorption volumes. After 4 weeks of mechanical loading, newly extracted trabecular BFR and MS were

  1. If the skull fits: magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for combined analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Marissa C.; Roman, Brian B.; Henkelman, R. Mark; Millen, Kathleen J.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian brain and skull develop concurrently in a coordinated manner, consistently producing a brain and skull that fit tightly together. It is common that abnormalities in one are associated with related abnormalities in the other. However, this is not always the case. A complete characterization of the relationship between brain and skull phenotypes is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause them to be coordinated or divergent and to provide perspective on the potential diagnostic or prognostic significance of brain and skull phenotypes. We demonstrate the combined use of magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse. Co-registration of brain and skull images allows comparison of the relationship between phenotypes in the brain and those in the skull. We observe a close fit between the brain and skull of two genetic mouse models that both show abnormal brain and skull phenotypes. Application of these three-dimensional image analyses in a broader range of mouse mutants will provide a map of the relationships between brain and skull phenotypes generally and allow characterization of patterns of similarities and differences. PMID:22947655

  2. Comparative study on submillimeter flaws in stitched T-joint carbon fiber reinforced polymer by infrared thermography, microcomputed tomography, ultrasonic c-scan and microscopic inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Hassler, Ulf; Genest, Marc; Fernandes, Henrique; Robitaille, Francois; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Joncas, Simon; Maldague, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Stitching is used to reduce dry-core (incomplete infusion of T-joint core) and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it may cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. Microscopic inspection, ultrasonic c-scan, pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and laser spot thermography are used to investigate the internal flaws in a stitched T-joint carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) matrix composites. Then, a new microlaser line thermography is proposed. Microcomputed tomography (microCT) is used to validate the infrared results. A comparison between microlaser line thermography and microCT is performed. It was concluded that microlaser line thermography can detect the internal submillimeter defects. However, the depth and size of the defects can affect the detection results. The microporosities with a diameter of less than 54 μm are not detected in the microlaser line thermography results. Microlaser line thermography can detect the microporosity (a diameter of 0.162 mm) from a depth of 90 μm. However, it cannot detect the internal microporosity (a diameter of 0.216 mm) from a depth of 0.18 mm. The potential causes are given. Finally, a comparative study is conducted.

  3. Evaluating the microstructure of human brain tissues using synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Morel, Anne; Imholz, Martha S.; Deyhle, Hans; Weitkamp, Timm; Zanette, Irene; Pfeiffer, Franz; David, Christian; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Minimally invasive deep brain neurosurgical interventions require a profound knowledge of the morphology of the human brain. Generic brain atlases are based on histology including multiple preparation steps during the sectioning and staining. In order to correct the distortions induced in the anisotropic, inhomogeneous soft matter and therefore improve the accuracy of brain atlases, a non-destructive 3D imaging technique with the required spatial and density resolution is of great significance. Micro computed tomography provides true micrometer resolution. The application to post mortem human brain, however, is questionable because the differences of the components concerning X-ray absorption are weak. Therefore, magnetic resonance tomography has become the method of choice for three-dimensional imaging of human brain. Because the spatial resolution of this method is limited, an alternative has to be found for the three-dimensional imaging of cellular microstructures within the brain. Therefore, the present study relies on the synchrotron radiationbased micro computed tomography in the recently developed grating-based phase contrast mode. Using data acquired at the beamline ID 19 (ESRF, Grenoble, France) we demonstrate that grating-based tomography yields premium images of human thalamus, which can be used for the correction of histological distortions by 3D non-rigid registration.

  4. Contrast-Enhanced X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography as a Versatile Method for Anatomical Studies of Adult Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Fatemeh; Hong, Tony Liu Chi; Yeung, Kelvin; Cheng, Shuk Han; Lam, Yun Wah

    2016-08-01

    One attractive quality of zebrafish as a model organism for biological research is that transparency at early developmental stages allows the optical imaging of cellular and molecular events. However, this advantage cannot be applied to adult zebrafish. In this study, we explored the use of contrast-enhanced X-ray micro-computed tomography (microCT) on adult zebrafish in which the organism was stained with iodine, a simple and economical contrasting agent, after fixation. Tomographic reconstruction of the microCT data allowed the three-dimensional (3D) volumetric analyses of individual organs in adult zebrafish. Adipose tissues showed a higher affinity to iodine and were more strongly contrasted in microCT. As traditional histological techniques often involve dehydration steps that remove tissue lipids, iodine-contrasted microCT offers a convenient method for visualizing fat deposition in fish. Utilizing this advantage, we discovered a transient accumulation of lipids around the heart after ventricular amputation, suggesting a correlation between lipid distribution and heart regeneration. Taken together, microCT is a versatile technique that enables the 3D visualization of zebrafish organs, as well as other fish models, in their anatomical context. This simple method is a valuable new addition to the arsenal of techniques available to this model organism. PMID:27058023

  5. Physical characterization and performance evaluation of an x-ray micro-computed tomography system for dimensional metrology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Jochen; Maisl, Michael; Reindl, Leonard M.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents physical and metrological characterization measurements conducted for an industrial x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) system. As is well known in CT metrology, many factors, e.g., in the scanning and reconstruction process, the image processing, and the 3D data evaluation, influence the dimensional measurement properties of the system as a whole. Therefore, it is important to know what leads to, and what are the consequences of, e.g., a geometrical misalignment of the scanner system, image unsharpness (blurring), or noise or image artefacts. In our study, the two main components of a CT scanner, i.e. the x-ray tube and the flat-panel detector, are characterized. The contrast and noise transfer property of the scanner is obtained using image-processing methods based on linear systems theory. A long-term temperature measurement in the scanner cabinet has been carried out. The dimensional measurement property has been quantified by using a calibrated ball-bar and uncertainty budgeting. Information about the performance of a CT scanner system in terms of contrast and noise transmission and sources of geometrical errors will help plan CT scans more efficiently. In particular, it will minimize the user's influence by a systematic line of action, taking into account the physical and technical limitations and influences on dimensional measurements.

  6. Volumetric quantification of bone-implant contact using micro-computed tomography analysis based on region-based segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Won; Lee, Woo-Jin; Choi, Soon-Chul; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Huh, Kyung-Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have developed a new method of segmenting the areas of absorbable implants and bone using region-based segmentation of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images, which allowed us to quantify volumetric bone-implant contact (VBIC) and volumetric absorption (VA). Materials and Methods The simple threshold technique generally used in micro-CT analysis cannot be used to segment the areas of absorbable implants and bone. Instead, a region-based segmentation method, a region-labeling method, and subsequent morphological operations were successively applied to micro-CT images. The three-dimensional VBIC and VA of the absorbable implant were then calculated over the entire volume of the implant. Two-dimensional (2D) bone-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were also measured based on the conventional histomorphometric method. Results VA and VBIC increased significantly with as the healing period increased (p<0.05). VBIC values were significantly correlated with VA values (p<0.05) and with 2D BIC values (p<0.05). Conclusion It is possible to quantify VBIC and VA for absorbable implants using micro-CT analysis using a region-based segmentation method. PMID:25793178

  7. Novel Method to Track Soft Tissue Deformation by Micro-Computed Tomography: Application to the Mitral Valve.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Eric L; Bloodworth, Charles H; Naran, Ajay; Easley, Thomas F; Jensen, Morten O; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2016-07-01

    Increasing availability of micro-computed tomography (µCT) as a structural imaging gold-standard is bringing unprecedented geometric detail to soft tissue modeling. However, the utility of these advances is severely hindered without analogous enhancement to the associated kinematic detail. To this end, labeling and following discrete points on a tissue across various deformation states is a well-established approach. Still, existing techniques suffer limitations when applied to complex geometries and large deformations and strains. Therefore, we herein developed a non-destructive system for applying fiducial markers (minimum diameter: 500 µm) to soft tissue and tracking them through multiple loading conditions by µCT. Using a novel applicator to minimize adhesive usage, four distinct marker materials were resolvable from both tissue and one another, without image artifacts. No impact on tissue stiffness was observed. µCT addressed accuracy limitations of stereophotogrammetry (inter-method positional error 1.2 ± 0.3 mm, given marker diameter 1.9 ± 0.1 mm). Marker application to ovine mitral valves revealed leaflet Almansi areal strains (45 ± 4%) closely matching literature values, and provided radiographic access to previously inaccessible regions, such as the leaflet coaptation zone. This system may meaningfully support mechanical characterization of numerous tissues or biomaterials, as well as tissue-device interaction studies for regulatory standards purposes. PMID:26553575

  8. In Vivo Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial Structure, Function, Perfusion and Viability Using Cardiac Micro-computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    van Deel, Elza; Ridwan, Yanto; van Vliet, J. Nicole; Belenkov, Sasha; Essers, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The use of Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) for in vivo studies of small animals as models of human disease has risen tremendously due to the fact that MicroCT provides quantitative high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) anatomical data non-destructively and longitudinally. Most importantly, with the development of a novel preclinical iodinated contrast agent called eXIA160, functional and metabolic assessment of the heart became possible. However, prior to the advent of commercial MicroCT scanners equipped with X-ray flat-panel detector technology and easy-to-use cardio-respiratory gating, preclinical studies of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in small animals required a MicroCT technologist with advanced skills, and thus were impractical for widespread implementation. The goal of this work is to provide a practical guide to the use of the high-speed Quantum FX MicroCT system for comprehensive determination of myocardial global and regional function along with assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism and viability in healthy mice and in a cardiac ischemia mouse model induced by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). PMID:26967592

  9. In Vivo Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial Structure, Function, Perfusion and Viability Using Cardiac Micro-computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    van Deel, Elza; Ridwan, Yanto; van Vliet, J Nicole; Belenkov, Sasha; Essers, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The use of Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) for in vivo studies of small animals as models of human disease has risen tremendously due to the fact that MicroCT provides quantitative high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) anatomical data non-destructively and longitudinally. Most importantly, with the development of a novel preclinical iodinated contrast agent called eXIA160, functional and metabolic assessment of the heart became possible. However, prior to the advent of commercial MicroCT scanners equipped with X-ray flat-panel detector technology and easy-to-use cardio-respiratory gating, preclinical studies of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in small animals required a MicroCT technologist with advanced skills, and thus were impractical for widespread implementation. The goal of this work is to provide a practical guide to the use of the high-speed Quantum FX MicroCT system for comprehensive determination of myocardial global and regional function along with assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism and viability in healthy mice and in a cardiac ischemia mouse model induced by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). PMID:26967592

  10. Forensic microradiology: micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) and analysis of patterned injuries inside of bone.

    PubMed

    Thali, Michael J; Taubenreuther, Ulrike; Karolczak, Marek; Braun, Marcel; Brueschweiler, Walter; Kalender, Willi A; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2003-11-01

    When a knife is stabbed in bone, it leaves an impression in the bone. The characteristics (shape, size, etc.) may indicate the type of tool used to produce the patterned injury in bone. Until now it has been impossible in forensic sciences to document such damage precisely and non-destructively. Micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) offers an opportunity to analyze patterned injuries of tool marks made in bone. Using high-resolution Micro-CT and computer software, detailed analysis of three-dimensional (3D) architecture has recently become feasible and allows microstructural 3D bone information to be collected. With adequate viewing software, data from 2D slice of an arbitrary plane can be extracted from 3D datasets. Using such software as a "digital virtual knife," the examiner can interactively section and analyze the 3D sample. Analysis of the bone injury revealed that Micro-CT provides an opportunity to correlate a bone injury to an injury-causing instrument. Even broken knife tips can be graphically and non-destructively assigned to a suspect weapon. PMID:14640282

  11. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray micro-computed tomography reveals dental bur debris under dental composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, Assem; Nagy, Nicole; Packota, Garnet; Monteith, Judy; Allen, Darcy; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Zhu, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Dental burs are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for restorations (fillings), yet little has been reported on the bur debris left behind in the teeth, and whether it poses potential health risks to patients. Here it is aimed to image dental bur debris under dental fillings, and allude to the potential health hazards that can be caused by this debris when left in direct contact with the biological surroundings, specifically when the debris is made of a non-biocompatible material. Non-destructive micro-computed tomography using the BioMedical Imaging & Therapy facility 05ID-2 beamline at the Canadian Light Source was pursued at 50 keV and at a pixel size of 4 µm to image dental bur fragments under a composite resin dental filling. The bur's cutting edges that produced the fragment were also chemically analyzed. The technique revealed dental bur fragments of different sizes in different locations on the floor of the prepared surface of the teeth and under the filling, which places them in direct contact with the dentinal tubules and the dentinal fluid circulating within them. Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis of the dental bur edges revealed that the fragments are made of tungsten carbide-cobalt, which is bio-incompatible. PMID:27140158

  12. Potential and limitations of X-Ray micro-computed tomography in arthropod neuroanatomy: a methodological and comparative survey.

    PubMed

    Sombke, Andy; Lipke, Elisabeth; Michalik, Peter; Uhl, Gabriele; Harzsch, Steffen

    2015-06-01

    Classical histology or immunohistochemistry combined with fluorescence or confocal laser scanning microscopy are common techniques in arthropod neuroanatomy, and these methods often require time-consuming and difficult dissections and sample preparations. Moreover, these methods are prone to artifacts due to compression and distortion of tissues, which often result in information loss and especially affect the spatial relationships of the examined parts of the nervous system in their natural anatomical context. Noninvasive approaches such as X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) can overcome such limitations and have been shown to be a valuable tool for understanding and visualizing internal anatomy and structural complexity. Nevertheless, knowledge about the potential of this method for analyzing the anatomy and organization of nervous systems, especially of taxa with smaller body size (e.g., many arthropods), is limited. This study set out to analyze the brains of selected arthropods with micro-CT, and to compare these results with available histological and immunohistochemical data. Specifically, we explored the influence of different sample preparation procedures. Our study shows that micro-CT is highly suitable for analyzing arthropod neuroarchitecture in situ and allows specific neuropils to be distinguished within the brain to extract quantitative data such as neuropil volumes. Moreover, data acquisition is considerably faster compared with many classical histological techniques. Thus, we conclude that micro-CT is highly suitable for targeting neuroanatomy, as it reduces the risk of artifacts and is faster than classical techniques. PMID:25728683

  13. Morphometric differences between central vs. surface acini in A/J mice using high-resolution micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kizhakke Puliyakote, Abhilash S; Vasilescu, Dragoş M; Newell, John D; Wang, Ge; Weibel, Ewald R; Hoffman, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    Through interior tomography, high-resolution microcomputed tomography (μCT) systems provide the ability to nondestructively assess the pulmonary acinus at micron and submicron resolutions. With the application of systematic uniform random sampling (SURS) principles applied to in situ fixed, intact, ex vivo lungs, we have sought to characterize morphometric differences in central vs. surface acini to better understand how well surface acini reflect global acinar geometry. Lungs from six mice (A/J strain, 15-20 wk of age) were perfusion fixed in situ and imaged using a multiresolution μCT system (Micro XCT 400, Zeiss). With the use of lower-resolution whole lung images, SURS methods were used for identification of central and surface foci for high-resolution imaging. Acinar morphometric metrics included diameters, lengths, and branching angles for each alveolar duct and total path lengths from entrance of the acinus to the terminal alveolar sacs. In addition, acinar volume, alveolar surface area, and surface area/volume ratios were assessed. A generation-based analysis demonstrated that central acini have significantly smaller branch diameters at each generation with no significant increase in branch lengths. In addition to larger-diameter alveolar ducts, surface acini had significantly increased numbers of branches and terminal alveolar sacs. The total path lengths from the acinar entrance to the terminal nodes were found to be higher in the case of surface acini. Volumes and surface areas of surface acini are greater than central acini, but there were no differences in surface/volume ratios. In conclusion, there are significant structural differences between surface and central acini in the A/J mouse. PMID:27174924

  14. Development of a Micro-Computed Tomography-Based Image-Guided Conformal Radiotherapy System for Small Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hu; Rodriguez, Manuel; Haak, Fred van den; Nelson, Geoffrey; Jogani, Rahil

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To report on the physical aspects of a system in which radiotherapy functionality was added to a micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner, to evaluate the accuracy of this instrument, and to and demonstrate the application of this technology for irradiating tumors growing within the lungs of mice. Methods and Materials: A GE eXplore RS120 microCT scanner was modified by the addition of a two-dimensional subject translation stage and a variable aperture collimator. Quality assurance protocols for these devices, including measurement of translation stage positioning accuracy, collimator aperture accuracy, and collimator alignment with the X-ray beam, were devised. Use of this system for image-guided radiotherapy was assessed by irradiation of a solid water phantom as well as of two mice bearing spontaneous MYC-induced lung tumors. Radiation damage was assessed ex vivo by immunohistochemical detection of {gamma}H2AX foci. Results: The positioning error of the translation stage was found to be <0.05 mm, whereas after alignment of the collimator with the X-ray axis through adjustment of its displacement and rotation, the collimator aperture error was <0.1 mm measured at isocenter. Computed tomography image-guided treatment of a solid water phantom demonstrated target localization accuracy to within 0.1 mm. Gamma-H2AX foci were detected within irradiated lung tumors in mice, with contralateral lung tissue displaying background staining. Conclusions: Addition of radiotherapy functionality to a microCT scanner is an effective means of introducing image-guided radiation treatments into the preclinical setting. This approach has been shown to facilitate small-animal conformal radiotherapy while leveraging existing technology.

  15. Investigation of rock samples using X-ray-microcomputer-tomography before and after mercury intrusion porosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Klobes, P.; Riesemeier, H.; Meyer, K.; Goebbels, J.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Hellmuth, K.H.

    1997-12-31

    A new method for the physical characterization of rock matrices for use in site investigations of nuclear waste repositories has been developed. The method can provide information needed in the assessment of the performance of the geosphere working as a natural barrier retarding the migration of radionuclides by diffusion into the rock matrix. Most conventional methods for the physical characterization of rocks give only bulk information. The combination of mercury porosimetry and computer tomography can give 3-D data on mineral-specific porosity distributions with additional pore size information. Additionally, limits for mineral-specific internal surface areas can be estimated, which is essential for the assessment of water-rock interaction and reactive interaction with radionuclides (sorption). Results of measurements on granitic rock (granodiorite) from the Baltic shield are discussed and integrated with results by complementary methods.

  16. Characterization of the Distal Esophagus High-Pressure Zone with Manometry, Ultrasound and Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vegesna, Anil K.; Sloan, Joshua A.; Singh, Baltej; Phillips, Steven J; Braverman, Alan S.; Barbe, Mary F.; Ruggieri, Michael R.; Miller, Larry S.

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to determine how the individual components of the distal esophagus and proximal stomach form the gastroesophageal junction high-pressure zone (GEJHPZ) anti-reflux barrier. Methods An endoscopic ultrasound/manometry catheter was pulled through the proximal stomach and distal esophagus in 20 normal subjects. The axial length and width of individual structures on endoscopic ultrasound were measured. The anatomic orientation of gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) components was examined in two organ donor specimens using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Key Results The three distinct structures identified within the GEJHPZ, from distal to proximal, were: the gastric clasp and sling muscle fiber complex, crural diaphragm, and lower esophageal circular smooth muscle fibers (LEC). The LEC was statistically significantly thicker than adjacent esophageal muscles. These structures were associated with 3 pressure peaks. The pressure peak produced by the clasp/sling fiber complex often overlapped with the pressure peak from the crural diaphragm. The most proximal peak, associated with the LEC, was significantly greater and bimodal in 9 of 20 subjects. This bimodal LEC pressure peak correlated with two areas of thickened muscle observed with ultrasound. Micro-CT of GEJ from organ donors confirmed the two areas of thickened muscle. Conclusions and inferences Three distinct anatomic structures, the clasp and sling muscle fibers, crural diaphragm, and LEC combine to form the anti-reflux barrier of the proximal stomach and distal esophagus. The clasp and sling muscle fibers combine with the crural diaphragm to form a distal pressure profile. The more proximal LEC has a bimodal pressure profile in some patients. PMID:22998376

  17. Evaluation of the marginal fit of full ceramic crowns by the microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) technique

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Necla; Ozturk, Atiye Nilgun; Malkoc, Meral Arslan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the marginal gap (MG) and absolute marginal discrepancy (MD) of full ceramic crowns with two finish line designs, shoulder and chamfer, using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) before and after cementation. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were divided into two groups based on the finish line design: Group I: 90° shoulder and Group II: 135° chamfer. The specimens were further grouped based on the type of full ceramic crown they received: Group A: Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system, Group B: Cerec inLab aluminum oxide ceramic system and Group C: Lithium disilicate press ceramic system. Before cementation, five crowns from each group were scanned using micro-CT in two sections, sagittal and coronal, to determine the MG and MD values for four regions of the crown (sagittal buccal, sagittal lingual, coronal mesial and coronal distal). After cementation and thermal cycling, the scanning was repeated. Measurements were obtained from 10 points for each region, 80 points totally, to evaluate the MG and MD values. Files were processed using NRecon and CTAn software. Results were statistically analyzed using one- and two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (P = 0.05). Results: Full ceramic systems showed clinically acceptable marginal adaptation values. The Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system generally presented the lowest variance, except in the MG values of the coronal mesial region. The MG and MD values of all ceramics increased significantly after cementation, except in the shoulder preparation design (sagittal buccal region) for MG and in the chamfer preparation design (sagittal lingual region) for MD values. Conclusions: Full-ceramic crowns showed clinically acceptable marginal adaptation values. The Feldspathic Cerec inLab ceramic system (Vitablocs Mark II) generally presented the lowest variance when compared with the other ceramics, except for the MG values on the mesial surface of the coronal section

  18. Application of Micro-Computed Tomography with Iodine Staining to Cardiac Imaging, Segmentation and Computational Model Development

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidi, OV; Nikolaidou, T; Zhao, J; Smaill, BH; Gilbert, SH; Holden, AV; Lowe, T; Withers, PJ; Jarvis, JC; Stephenson, RS; Hart, G; Hancox, JC; Boyett, MR; Zhang, H

    2012-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has been widely used to generate high-resolution 3D tissue images from small animals non-destructively, especially for mineralized skeletal tissues. However, its application to the analysis of soft cardiovascular tissues has been limited by poor inter-tissue contrast. Recent ex vivo studies have shown that contrast between muscular and connective tissue in micro-CT images can be enhanced by staining with iodine. In the present study, we apply this novel technique for imaging of cardiovascular structures in canine hearts. We optimize the method to obtain high resolution X-ray micro-CT images of the canine atria and its distinctive regions - including the Bachmann’s bundle, atrioventricular node, pulmonary arteries and veins - with clear inter-tissue contrast. The imaging results are used to reconstruct and segment the detailed 3D geometry of the atria. Structure tensor analysis shows that the arrangement of atrial fibres can also be characterised using the enhanced micro-CT images, as iodine preferentially accumulates within the muscular fibres rather than in connective tissues. This novel technique can be particularly useful in non-destructive imaging of 3D cardiac architectures from large animals and humans, due to the combination of relatively high speed (~1 hour/scan of a large canine heart) and high voxel resolution (36 μm) provided. In summary, contrast micro-CT facilitates fast and non-destructive imaging and segmenting of detailed 3D cardiovascular geometries, as well as measuring fibre orientation, which are crucial in constructing biophysically detailed computational cardiac models. PMID:22829390

  19. Radiomorphometric quantitative analysis of vasculature utilizing micro-computed tomography and vessel perfusion in the murine mandible.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xi Lin; Farberg, Aaron S; Monson, Laura A; Donneys, Alexis; Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Buchman, Steven R

    2012-12-01

    Purpose Biomechanical, densitometric, and histological analyses have been the mainstay for reproducible outcome measures for investigation of new bone formation and osseous healing. Here we report the addition of radiomorphometric vascular analysis as a quantitative measure of vascularity in the murine mandible. To our knowledge this is the first description of using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to evaluate the temporal and spatial pattern of angiogenesis in the craniofacial skeleton. Methods The vessel perfusion technique was performed on 10 Sprague-Dawley rats using Microfil (MV-122, Flow Tech; Carver, MA). After decalcification, hemimandibles were imaged using high-resolution micro-CT. Six separate radiomorphometric vascular metrics were calculated. Results Radiomorphometric values were analyzed using three different thresholds on micro-CT. Experimentally, 1000 Hounsfield units was found to be the optimal threshold for analysis to capture the maximal vascular content of the bone. Data from seven hemimandibles were analyzed. Minimal statistical variance in each of the quantitative measures of vascularity resulted in reproducible metrics for each of the radiomorphometric parameters. Conclusions We have demonstrated that micro-CT vascular imaging provides a robust methodology for evaluation of vascular networks in the craniofacial skeleton. This technique provides 3D quantitative data analysis that differs significantly from laser Doppler and microsphere methods, which simply measure flow. This technique is advantageous over labor-intensive 2D conventional analyses using histology and X-ray microangiography. Our data establish the appropriate thresholding for optimal vascular analyses and provide baseline measurements that can be used to analyze the role of angiogenesis in bone regeneration and repair in the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:24294405

  20. Effect of micro-computed tomography voxel size and segmentation method on trabecular bone microstructure measures in mice.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Blaine A

    2016-12-01

    Micro-computed tomography (μCT) is currently the gold standard for determining trabecular bone microstructure in small animal models. Numerous parameters associated with scanning and evaluation of μCT scans can strongly affect morphologic results obtained from bone samples. However, the effect of these parameters on specific trabecular bone outcomes is not well understood. This study investigated the effect of μCT scanning with nominal voxel sizes between 6-30 μm on trabecular bone outcomes quantified in mouse vertebral body trabecular bone. Additionally, two methods for determining a global segmentation threshold were compared: based on qualitative assessment of 2D images, or based on quantitative assessment of image histograms. It was found that nominal voxel size had a strong effect on several commonly reported trabecular bone parameters, in particular connectivity density, trabecular thickness, and bone tissue mineral density. Additionally, the two segmentation methods provided similar trabecular bone outcomes for scans with small nominal voxel sizes, but considerably different outcomes for scans with larger voxel sizes. The Qualitatively Selected segmentation method more consistently estimated trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness across different voxel sizes, but the Histogram segmentation method more consistently estimated trabecular number, trabecular separation, and structure model index. Altogether, these results suggest that high-resolution scans be used whenever possible to provide the most accurate estimation of trabecular bone microstructure, and that the limitations of accurately determining trabecular bone outcomes should be considered when selecting scan parameters and making conclusions about inter-group variance or between-group differences in studies of trabecular bone microstructure in small animals. PMID:27430011

  1. Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han

    2012-05-10

    The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

  2. Using Micro-Computed Tomography to Evaluate the Dynamics of Orthodontically Induced Root Resorption Repair in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fengxue; Wei, Shicheng; Dai, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe dynamic changes in root resorption repair, tooth movement relapse and alveolar bone microstructure following the application of orthodontic force. Materials and Methods Forces of 20 g, 50 g or 100 g were delivered to the left maxillary first molars of fifteen 10-week-old rats for 14 days. Each rat was subjected to micro-computed tomography scanning at 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 28 and 42 days after force removal. The root resorption crater volume, tooth movement relapse and alveolar bone microarchitecture were measured at each time point. Results From day 3 to day 14, the root resorption volume decreased significantly in each group. In the 20-g force group, the root resorption volume gradually stabilized after 14 days, whereas in the 50-g and 100-g force groups, it stabilized after 28 days. In all groups, tooth movement relapsed significantly from day 0 to day 14 and then remained stable. From day 3 to day 10, the 20-g group exhibited faster relapse than the 50-g and 100-g groups. In all groups, the structure model index and trabecular separation decreased slowly from day 0 to day 10 and eventually stabilized. Trabecular number increased slowly from day 0 to day 7 and then stabilized. Conclusions The initial stage of root resorption repair did not change significantly and was followed by a dramatic repair period before stabilizing. The most serious tooth movement relapse occurred immediately after the appliance was removed, and then the tooth completely returned to the original position. PMID:26930605

  3. Potential and limitations of X-Ray micro-computed tomography in arthropod neuroanatomy: A methodological and comparative survey

    PubMed Central

    Sombke, Andy; Lipke, Elisabeth; Michalik, Peter; Uhl, Gabriele; Harzsch, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Classical histology or immunohistochemistry combined with fluorescence or confocal laser scanning microscopy are common techniques in arthropod neuroanatomy, and these methods often require time-consuming and difficult dissections and sample preparations. Moreover, these methods are prone to artifacts due to compression and distortion of tissues, which often result in information loss and especially affect the spatial relationships of the examined parts of the nervous system in their natural anatomical context. Noninvasive approaches such as X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) can overcome such limitations and have been shown to be a valuable tool for understanding and visualizing internal anatomy and structural complexity. Nevertheless, knowledge about the potential of this method for analyzing the anatomy and organization of nervous systems, especially of taxa with smaller body size (e.g., many arthropods), is limited. This study set out to analyze the brains of selected arthropods with micro-CT, and to compare these results with available histological and immunohistochemical data. Specifically, we explored the influence of different sample preparation procedures. Our study shows that micro-CT is highly suitable for analyzing arthropod neuroarchitecture in situ and allows specific neuropils to be distinguished within the brain to extract quantitative data such as neuropil volumes. Moreover, data acquisition is considerably faster compared with many classical histological techniques. Thus, we conclude that micro-CT is highly suitable for targeting neuroanatomy, as it reduces the risk of artifacts and is faster than classical techniques. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:1281–1295, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25728683

  4. 3D tissue-engineered construct analysis via conventional high-resolution microcomputed tomography without X-ray contrast.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Roman S; VanGordon, Samuel B; Shambaugh, Robert L; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I

    2013-05-01

    As the field of tissue engineering develops, researchers are faced with a large number of degrees of freedom regarding the choice of material, architecture, seeding, and culturing. To evaluate the effectiveness of a tissue-engineered strategy, histology is typically done by physically slicing and staining a construct (crude, time-consuming, and unreliable). However, due to recent advances in high-resolution biomedical imaging, microcomputed tomography (μCT) has arisen as a quick and effective way to evaluate samples, while preserving their structure in the original state. However, a major barrier for using μCT to do histology has been its inability to differentiate between materials with similar X-ray attenuation. Various contrasting strategies (hardware and chemical staining agents) have been proposed to address this problem, but at a cost of additional complexity and limited access. Instead, here we suggest a strategy for how virtual 3D histology in silico can be conducted using conventional μCT, and we provide an illustrative example from bone tissue engineering. The key to our methodology is an implementation of scaffold surface architecture that is ordered in relation to cells and tissue, in concert with straightforward image-processing techniques, to minimize the reliance on contrasting for material segmentation. In the case study reported, μCT was used to image and segment porous poly(lactic acid) nonwoven fiber mesh scaffolds that were seeded dynamically with mesenchymal stem cells and cultured to produce soft tissue and mineralized tissue in a flow perfusion bioreactor using an osteogenic medium. The methodology presented herein paves a new way for tissue engineers to identify and distinguish components of cell/tissue/scaffold constructs to easily and effectively evaluate the tissue-engineering strategies that generate them. PMID:23020551

  5. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mayka; Halisch, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia; Peres Fernandes, Celso

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behavior of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging, such as x-ray micro-computed tomography (µ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors (length, width, and thickness) and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. Two main pore components were identified from the analyzed volumes: pore networks and residual pore ganglia. A watershed algorithm was applied to preserve the pore morphology after separating the main pore networks, which is essential for the pore shape characterization. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2, and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like, ranging from 39.49 to 50.94 % and from 58.80 to 45.18 % when the Feret caliper descriptor was investigated in a 10003 voxel volume. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates, and cubes to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  6. Integration and evaluation of a needle-positioning robot with volumetric microcomputed tomography image guidance for small animal stereotactic interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Waspe, Adam C.; McErlain, David D.; Pitelka, Vasek; Holdsworth, David W.; Lacefield, James C.; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Preclinical research protocols often require insertion of needles to specific targets within small animal brains. To target biologically relevant locations in rodent brains more effectively, a robotic device has been developed that is capable of positioning a needle along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole in the skull under volumetric microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) guidance. Methods: An x-ray compatible stereotactic frame secures the head throughout the procedure using a bite bar, nose clamp, and ear bars. CT-to-robot registration enables structures identified in the image to be mapped to physical coordinates in the brain. Registration is accomplished by injecting a barium sulfate contrast agent as the robot withdraws the needle from predefined points in a phantom. Registration accuracy is affected by the robot-positioning error and is assessed by measuring the surface registration error for the fiducial and target needle tracks (FRE and TRE). This system was demonstrated in situ by injecting 200 {mu}m tungsten beads into rat brains along oblique trajectories through a single burr hole on the top of the skull under micro-CT image guidance. Postintervention micro-CT images of each skull were registered with preintervention high-field magnetic resonance images of the brain to infer the anatomical locations of the beads. Results: Registration using four fiducial needle tracks and one target track produced a FRE and a TRE of 96 and 210 {mu}m, respectively. Evaluation with tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms showed that locations could be targeted with a mean error of 154{+-}113 {mu}m. Conclusions: The integration of a robotic needle-positioning device with volumetric micro-CT image guidance should increase the accuracy and reduce the invasiveness of stereotactic needle interventions in small animals.

  7. Automated 3D-2D registration of X-ray microcomputed tomography with histological sections for dental implants in bone using chamfer matching and simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kathrin; Stauber, Martin; Schwarz, Frank; Beißbarth, Tim

    2015-09-01

    We propose a novel 3D-2D registration approach for micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histology (HI), constructed for dental implant biopsies, that finds the position and normal vector of the oblique slice from μCT that corresponds to HI. During image pre-processing, the implants and the bone tissue are segmented using a combination of thresholding, morphological filters and component labeling. After this, chamfer matching is employed to register the implant edges and fine registration of the bone tissues is achieved using simulated annealing. The method was tested on n=10 biopsies, obtained at 20 weeks after non-submerged healing in the canine mandible. The specimens were scanned with μCT 100 and processed for hard tissue sectioning. After registration, we assessed the agreement of bone to implant contact (BIC) using automated and manual measurements. Statistical analysis was conducted to test the agreement of the BIC measurements in the registered samples. Registration was successful for all specimens and agreement of the respective binary images was high (median: 0.90, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.89-0.91). Direct comparison of BIC yielded that automated (median 0.82, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.75-0.85) and manual (median 0.61, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.52-0.67) measures from μCT were significant positively correlated with HI (median 0.65, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.59-0.72) between μCT and HI groups (manual: R(2)=0.87, automated: R(2)=0.75, p<0.001). The results show that this method yields promising results and that μCT may become a valid alternative to assess osseointegration in three dimensions. PMID:26026659

  8. Imaging the Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathway in Human Eyes by Three-dimensional Micro-computed Tomography (3D micro-CT)

    SciTech Connect

    C Hann; M Bentley; A Vercnocke; E Ritman; M Fautsch

    2011-12-31

    The site of outflow resistance leading to elevated intraocular pressure in primary open-angle glaucoma is believed to be located in the region of Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelium, its basement membrane and the adjacent juxtacanalicular tissue. Evidence also suggests collector channels and intrascleral vessels may have a role in intraocular pressure in both normal and glaucoma eyes. Traditional imaging modalities limit the ability to view both proximal and distal portions of the trabecular outflow pathway as a single unit. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of three-dimensional micro-computed tomography (3D micro-CT) as a potential method to view the trabecular outflow pathway. Two normal human eyes were used: one immersion fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and one with anterior chamber perfusion at 10 mmHg followed by perfusion fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde/2% glutaraldehyde. Both eyes were postfixed in 1% osmium tetroxide and scanned with 3D micro-CT at 2 {mu}m or 5 {mu}m voxel resolution. In the immersion fixed eye, 24 collector channels were identified with an average orifice size of 27.5 {+-} 5 {mu}m. In comparison, the perfusion fixed eye had 29 collector channels with a mean orifice size of 40.5 {+-} 13 {mu}m. Collector channels were not evenly dispersed around the circumference of the eye. There was no significant difference in the length of Schlemm's canal in the immersed versus the perfused eye (33.2 versus 35.1 mm). Structures, locations and size measurements identified by 3D micro-CT were confirmed by correlative light microscopy. These findings confirm 3D micro-CT can be used effectively for the non-invasive examination of the trabecular meshwork, Schlemm's canal, collector channels and intrascleral vasculature that comprise the distal outflow pathway. This imaging modality will be useful for non-invasive study of the role of the trabecular outflow pathway as a whole unit.

  9. The dental cavities of equine cheek teeth: three-dimensional reconstructions based on high resolution micro-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies reported on the very complex morphology of the pulp system in equine cheek teeth. The continuous production of secondary dentine leads to distinct age-related changes of the endodontic cavity. Detailed anatomical knowledge of the dental cavities in all ages is required to explain the aetiopathology of typical equine endodontic diseases. Furthermore, data on mandibular and maxillary pulp systems is in high demand to provide a basis for the development of endodontic therapies. However, until now examination of the pulp cavity has been based on either sectioned teeth or clinical computed tomography. More precise results were expected by using micro-computed tomography with a resolution of about 0.1 mm and three-dimensional reconstructions based on previous greyscale analyses and histological verification. The aim of the present study was to describe the physiological configurations of the pulp system within a wide spectrum of tooth ages. Results Maxillary teeth: All morphological constituents of the endodontic cavity were present in teeth between 4 and 16 years: Triadan 06s displayed six pulp horns and five root canals, Triadan 07-10s five pulp horns and four root canals and Triadan 11s seven pulp horns and four to six root canals. A common pulp chamber was most frequent in teeth ≤5 years, but was found even in a tooth of 9 years. A large variety of pulp configurations was observed within 2.5 and 16 years post eruption, but most commonly a separation into mesial and distal pulp compartments was seen. Maxillary cheek teeth showed up to four separate pulp compartments but the frequency of two, three and four pulp compartments was not related to tooth age (P > 0.05). In Triadan 06s, pulp horn 6 was always connected to pulp horns 1 and 3 and root canal I. In Triadan 11s, pulp horns 7 and 8 were present in variable constitutions. Mandibular teeth: A common pulp chamber was present in teeth up to 15 years, but most commonly seen in teeth ≤5

  10. Structure and micro-computed tomography-based finite element modeling of Toucan beak.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yasuaki; Mackey, Mason; Meyers, Marc A

    2012-05-01

    Bird beaks are one of the most fascinating sandwich composites in nature. Their design is composed of a keratinous integument and a bony foam core. We evaluated the structure and mechanical properties of a Toucan beak to establish structure-property relationships. We revealed the hierarchical structure of the Toucan beak by microscopy techniques. The integument consists of 50 μm polygonal keratin tiles with ~7.5 nm embedded intermediate filaments. The branched intermediate filaments were visualized by TEM tomography techniques. The bony foam core or trabecular bone is a closed-cell foam, which serves as a stiffener for the beak. The tridimensional foam structure was reconstructed by μ-CT scanning to create a model for the finite element analysis (FEA). The mechanical response of the beak foam including trabeculae and cortical shell was measured in tension and compression. We found that Young's modulus is 3 (S.D. 2.2) GPa for the trabeculae and 0.3 (S.D. 0.2) GPa for the cortical shell. After obtaining the material parameters, the deformation and microscopic failure of foam were calculated by FEA. The calculations agree well with the experimental results. PMID:22498278

  11. Complex Odontoma: A Case Report with Micro-Computed Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Santos, L. A. N.; Roque-Torres, G. D.; Oliveira, V. F.; Freitas, D. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Odontomas are the most common benign tumors of odontogenic origin. They are normally diagnosed on routine radiographs, due to the absence of symptoms. Histopathologic evaluation confirms the diagnosis especially in cases of complex odontoma, which may be confused during radiographic examination with an osteoma or other highly calcified bone lesions. The micro-CT is a new technology that enables three-dimensional analysis with better spatial resolution compared with cone beam computed tomography. Another great advantage of this technology is that the sample does not need special preparation or destruction in the sectioned area as in histopathologic evaluation. An odontoma with CBCT and microtomography images is presented in a 26-year-old man. It was first observed on panoramic radiographs and then by CBCT. The lesion and the impacted third molar were surgically excised using a modified Neumann approach. After removal, it was evaluated by histopathology and microtomography to confirm the diagnostic hypothesis. According to the results, micro-CT enabled the assessment of the sample similar to histopathology, without destruction of the sample. With further development, micro-CT could be a powerful diagnostic tool in future research. PMID:27293913

  12. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Live Avian Embryonic Morphogenesis Via Micro-computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Alyssa L.; Jiang, Michael X.; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Many clinically relevant congenital malformations arise during mid to late embryonic stages. This period is challenging to image quantitatively in live embryos, necessitating the use of multiple specimens with increased experimental variability. Here we establish X-ray and blood-pool computed tomography (CT) contrast agent toxicity and teratogenesis thresholds for 3D Micro-CT imaging of live avian embryos. Day 4 chick embryos micro-injected with Visipaque™ (VP) developed for an additional 6 days without defect. X-ray radiation up to 798 mGy was nontoxic. Peak average contrast of 1,060 HU occurred within 1 hr of imaging at 50 μm resolution. VP-enhanced contrast persisted past 24 hr with delayed accumulation in the allantois. Regional volumes of VP-injected embryos were statistically identical to those of fixed embryos perfused with osmium tetroxide. We further quantified longitudinal volumetric morphogenesis of the allantois over 30 hr. These results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of contrast enhanced quantitative micro-CT imaging for live embryos. PMID:21761480

  13. Three-Dimensional Imaging Using Microcomputed Tomography For Studying Gaharu Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Yazid, Khair'iah; Bin Awang, Mat Rasol; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Bin Hj Khalid, Mohd Ashhar; Masschaele, Bert; Abdullah, Mohd. Zaid; Saleh, Junita Mohamad

    2010-01-05

    To demonstrates the potential application of the high resolution X-ray micro-CT technique in the analysis of internal structure in Gaharu wood. Gaharu or internationally, Agar wood, is known for its fragrant resinous wood. The hardware device used in this study was an X-ray micro-CT scanner at Center of Tomography (UGCT), CT facility in Ghent University, Belgium. This technique allows the 3D investigation of the internal structure of the wood in a non-destructive way. Most of the data analysis was done with the software VG Studio Max and MATLAB. Here we present some preliminary results from three-dimensional images from a piece of high grade Gaharu. Micro-CT images of the specimens were obtained at 7 mum resolution. Besides a clear distinction between pores and material, some bright white areas occur in the reconstruction images. Not only the volume visualization is helpful, morphological parameters of open-pores and dark resins are calculated from these 3D data set. The micro-CT technique is a valid support for evaluating the pores structure and resin distribution in Gaharu.

  14. Three-Dimensional Imaging Using Microcomputed Tomography For Studying Gaharu Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazid, Khair'iah; Masschaele, Bert; Bin Awang, Mat Rasol; Abdullah, Mohd. Zaid; Saleh, Junita Mohamad; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Bin Hj Khalid, Mohd Ashhar

    2010-01-01

    To demonstrates the potential application of the high resolution X-ray micro-CT technique in the analysis of internal structure in Gaharu wood. Gaharu or internationally, Agar wood, is known for its fragrant resinous wood. The hardware device used in this study was an X-ray micro-CT scanner at Center of Tomography (UGCT), CT facility in Ghent University, Belgium. This technique allows the 3D investigation of the internal structure of the wood in a non-destructive way. Most of the data analysis was done with the software VG Studio Max and MATLAB. Here we present some preliminary results from three-dimensional images from a piece of high grade Gaharu. Micro-CT images of the specimens were obtained at 7 μm resolution. Besides a clear distinction between pores and material, some bright white areas occur in the reconstruction images. Not only the volume visualization is helpful, morphological parameters of open-pores and dark resins are calculated from these 3D data set. The micro-CT technique is a valid support for evaluating the pores structure and resin distribution in Gaharu.

  15. Predicting mouse vertebra strength with micro-computed tomography-derived finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Makowski, Alexander J; Rowland, Barbara J; Merkel, Alyssa R; Sterling, Julie A; Bredbenner, Todd L; Perrien, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    As in clinical studies, finite element analysis (FEA) developed from computed tomography (CT) images of bones are useful in pre-clinical rodent studies assessing treatment effects on vertebral body (VB) strength. Since strength predictions from microCT-derived FEAs (μFEA) have not been validated against experimental measurements of mouse VB strength, a parametric analysis exploring material and failure definitions was performed to determine whether elastic μFEAs with linear failure criteria could reasonably assess VB strength in two studies, treatment and genetic, with differences in bone volume fraction between the control and the experimental groups. VBs were scanned with a 12-μm voxel size, and voxels were directly converted to 8-node, hexahedral elements. The coefficient of determination or R (2) between predicted VB strength and experimental VB strength, as determined from compression tests, was 62.3% for the treatment study and 85.3% for the genetic study when using a homogenous tissue modulus (E t) of 18 GPa for all elements, a failure volume of 2%, and an equivalent failure strain of 0.007. The difference between prediction and measurement (that is, error) increased when lowering the failure volume to 0.1% or increasing it to 4%. Using inhomogeneous tissue density-specific moduli improved the R (2) between predicted and experimental strength when compared with uniform E t=18 GPa. Also, the optimum failure volume is higher for the inhomogeneous than for the homogeneous material definition. Regardless of model assumptions, μFEA can assess differences in murine VB strength between experimental groups when the expected difference in strength is at least 20%. PMID:25908967

  16. Evaluating tooth restorations: micro-computed tomography in practical training for students in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyhle, Hans; Schmidli, Fredy; Krastl, Gabriel; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Direct composite fillings belong to widespread tooth restoration techniques in dental medicine. The procedure consists of successive steps, which include etching of the prepared tooth surface, bonding and placement of composite in incrementally built up layers. Durability and lifespan of the composite inlays strongly depend on the accurate completion of the individual steps to be also realized by students in dental medicine. Improper handling or nonconformity in the bonding procedure often lead to air enclosures (bubbles) as well as to significant gaps between the composite layers or at the margins of the restoration. Traditionally one analyzes the quality of the restoration cutting the tooth in an arbitrarily selected plane and inspecting this plane by conventional optical microscopy. Although the precision of this established method is satisfactory, it is restricted to the selected two-dimensional plane. Rather simple micro computed tomography (μCT) systems, such as SkyScan 1174™, allows for the non-destructive three-dimensional imaging of restored teeth ex vivo and virtually cutting the tomographic data in any desired direction, offering a powerful tool for inspection of the restored tooth with micrometer resolution before cutting and thus also to select a two-dimensional plane with potential defects. In order to study the influence of the individual steps on the resulted tooth restoration, direct composite fillings were placed in mod cavities of extracted teeth. After etching, an adhesive was applied in half of the specimens. From the tomographic datasets, it becomes clear that gaps occur more frequently when bonding is omitted. The visualization of air enclosures offers to determine the probability to find a micrometer-sized defect using an arbitrarily selected cutting plane for inspection.

  17. Predicting mouse vertebra strength with micro-computed tomography-derived finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Makowski, Alexander J; Rowland, Barbara J; Merkel, Alyssa R; Sterling, Julie A; Bredbenner, Todd L; Perrien, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    As in clinical studies, finite element analysis (FEA) developed from computed tomography (CT) images of bones are useful in pre-clinical rodent studies assessing treatment effects on vertebral body (VB) strength. Since strength predictions from microCT-derived FEAs (μFEA) have not been validated against experimental measurements of mouse VB strength, a parametric analysis exploring material and failure definitions was performed to determine whether elastic μFEAs with linear failure criteria could reasonably assess VB strength in two studies, treatment and genetic, with differences in bone volume fraction between the control and the experimental groups. VBs were scanned with a 12-μm voxel size, and voxels were directly converted to 8-node, hexahedral elements. The coefficient of determination or R2 between predicted VB strength and experimental VB strength, as determined from compression tests, was 62.3% for the treatment study and 85.3% for the genetic study when using a homogenous tissue modulus (Et) of 18 GPa for all elements, a failure volume of 2%, and an equivalent failure strain of 0.007. The difference between prediction and measurement (that is, error) increased when lowering the failure volume to 0.1% or increasing it to 4%. Using inhomogeneous tissue density-specific moduli improved the R2 between predicted and experimental strength when compared with uniform Et=18 GPa. Also, the optimum failure volume is higher for the inhomogeneous than for the homogeneous material definition. Regardless of model assumptions, μFEA can assess differences in murine VB strength between experimental groups when the expected difference in strength is at least 20%. PMID:25908967

  18. Three Dimensional Imaging of Paraffin Embedded Human Lung Tissue Samples by Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Anna E.; Vasilescu, Dragos M.; Seal, Katherine A. D.; Keyes, Samuel D.; Mavrogordato, Mark N.; Hogg, James C.; Sinclair, Ian; Warner, Jane A.; Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Lackie, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D) micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT) has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data. Methods FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4) were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm) was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging. Results The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15mm x 7mm). Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm) in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections. Conclusion We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis. PMID:26030902

  19. Micro-computed tomography (CT) based assessment of dental regenerative therapy in the canine mandible model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khobragade, P.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Andreana, S.; Dziak, R.; Sunkara, S. K.; Sunkara, S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution 3D bone-tissue structure measurements may provide information critical to the understanding of the bone regeneration processes and to the bone strength assessment. Tissue engineering studies rely on such nondestructive measurements to monitor bone graft regeneration area. In this study, we measured bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness through micro-CT slices for different grafts and controls. Eight canines underwent surgery to remove a bone volume (defect) in the canine's jaw at a total of 44 different locations. We kept 11 defects empty for control and filled the remaining ones with three regenerative materials; NanoGen (NG), a FDA-approved material (n=11), a novel NanoCalcium Sulfate (NCS) material (n=11) and NCS alginate (NCS+alg) material (n=11). After a minimum of four and eight weeks, the canines were sacrificed and the jaw samples were extracted. We used a custombuilt micro-CT system to acquire the data volume and developed software to measure the bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness. The software used a segmentation algorithm based on histograms derived from volumes of interest indicated by the operator. Using bone yield and fractal dimension as indices we are able to differentiate between the control and regenerative material (p<0.005). Regenerative material NCS showed an average 63.15% bone yield improvement over the control sample, NCS+alg showed 55.55% and NanoGen showed 37.5%. The bone regeneration process and quality of bone were dependent upon the position of defect and time period of healing. This study presents one of the first quantitative comparisons using non-destructive Micro-CT analysis for bone regenerative material in a large animal with a critical defect model. Our results indicate that Micro-CT measurement could be used to monitor invivo bone regeneration studies for greater regenerative process understanding.

  20. Intramembranous Bone Healing Process Subsequent to Tooth Extraction in Mice: Micro-Computed Tomography, Histomorphometric and Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Andreia Espindola; Repeke, Carlos Eduardo; Ferreira Junior, Samuel de Barros; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Assis, Gerson Francisco; Taga, Rumio; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue has a significant potential for healing, which involves a significant the interplay between bone and immune cells. While fracture healing represents a useful model to investigate endochondral bone healing, intramembranous bone healing models are yet to be developed and characterized. In this study, a micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular (RealTimePCRarray) characterization of post tooth-extraction alveolar bone healing was performed on C57Bl/6 WT mice. After the initial clot dominance (0h), the development of a provisional immature granulation tissue is evident (7d), characterized by marked cell proliferation, angiogenesis and inflammatory cells infiltration; associated with peaks of growth factors (BMP-2-4-7,TGFβ1,VEGFa), cytokines (TNFα, IL-10), chemokines & receptors (CXCL12, CCL25, CCR5, CXCR4), matrix (Col1a1-2, ITGA4, VTN, MMP1a) and MSCs (CD105, CD106, OCT4, NANOG, CD34, CD146) markers expression. Granulation tissue is sequentially replaced by more mature connective tissue (14d), characterized by inflammatory infiltrate reduction along the increased bone formation, marked expression of matrix remodeling enzymes (MMP-2-9), bone formation/maturation (RUNX2, ALP, DMP1, PHEX, SOST) markers, and chemokines & receptors associated with healing (CCL2, CCL17, CCR2). No evidences of cartilage cells or tissue were observed, strengthening the intramembranous nature of bone healing. Bone microarchitecture analysis supports the evolving healing, with total tissue and bone volumes as trabecular number and thickness showing a progressive increase over time. The extraction socket healing process is considered complete (21d) when the dental socket is filled by trabeculae bone with well-defined medullary canals; it being the expression of mature bone markers prevalent at this period. Our data confirms the intramembranous bone healing nature of the model used, revealing parallels between the gene expression profile and the histomorphometric

  1. Improved accuracy of cortical bone mineralization measured by polychromatic microcomputed tomography using a novel high mineral density composite calibration phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Deuerling, Justin M.; Rudy, David J.; Niebur, Glen L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) is increasingly used as a nondestructive alternative to ashing for measuring bone mineral content. Phantoms are utilized to calibrate the measured x-ray attenuation to discrete levels of mineral density, typically including levels up to 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, which encompasses levels of bone mineral density (BMD) observed in trabecular bone. However, levels of BMD observed in cortical bone and levels of tissue mineral density (TMD) in both cortical and trabecular bone typically exceed 1000 mg HA/cm{sup 3}, requiring extrapolation of the calibration regression, which may result in error. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate (1) the relationship between x-ray attenuation and an expanded range of hydroxyapatite (HA) density in a less attenuating polymer matrix and (2) the effects of the calibration on the accuracy of subsequent measurements of mineralization in human cortical bone specimens. Methods: A novel HA-polymer composite phantom was prepared comprising a less attenuating polymer phase (polyethylene) and an expanded range of HA density (0-1860 mg HA/cm{sup 3}) inclusive of characteristic levels of BMD in cortical bone or TMD in cortical and trabecular bone. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the new HA-polymer calibration phantom were compared to measurements using a conventional HA-polymer phantom comprising 0-800 mg HA/cm{sup 3} and the corresponding ash density measurements on the same specimens. Results: The HA-polymer composite phantom exhibited a nonlinear relationship between x-ray attenuation and HA density, rather than the linear relationship typically employed a priori, and obviated the need for extrapolation, when calibrating the measured x-ray attenuation to high levels of mineral density. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the conventional phantom was significantly lower than the measured ash density by 19% (p<0.001, ANCOVA) and 33% (p<0

  2. A Comparison of the Importance of Competencies for Applying Microcomputers in Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesolowski, Dennis G.; Roth, Gene L.

    A national sample of 134 vocational educators, representing 6 vocational disciplines (agriculture, business, home economics, marketing and distribution, trade and industrial, and health occupations education), was surveyed to ascertain the relative importance of 47 competencies for applying microcomputers in vocational education. The 12-member…

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of neovasculature in solid tumors and basement membrane matrix using ex vivo X-ray micro-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghyung; Barbe, Mary F.; Scalia, Rosario; Goldfinger, Lawrence E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To create accurate, high resolution 3D reconstructions of neovasculature structures in xenografted tumors and Matrigel plugs for quantitative analyses in angiogenesis studies in animal models. Methods The competent neovasculature within xenografted solid tumors or Matrigel plugs in mice was perfused with Microfil, a radio-opaque, hydrophilic polymerizing contrast agent, by systemic perfusion of the blood circulation via the heart. The perfused tumors and plugs were resected and scanned by X-ray micro-computed tomography to generate stacks of 2D images showing the radio-opaque material. A non-biased, precise post-processing scheme was employed to eliminate background X-ray absorbance from the extra-vascular tissue. The revised binary image stacks were compiled to reveal the Microfil-casted neovasculature as 3D reconstructions. Vascular structural parameters were calculated from the refined 3D reconstructions using the scanner software. Results Clarified 3D reconstructions were sufficiently precise to allow measurements of vascular architecture to a diametric limit of resolution of 3 μm in tumors and plugs. Conclusions Ex vivo micro-computed tomography can be used for 3D reconstruction and quantitative analysis of neovasculature including microcirculation in solid tumors and Matrigel plugs. This method can be generally applied for reconstructing and measuring vascular structures in 3 dimensions. PMID:25279426

  4. Grapevine petioles are more sensitive to drought induced embolism than stems: evidence from in vivo MRI and microcomputed tomography observations of hydraulic vulnerability segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Uri; Albuquerque, Caetano; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cochard, Herve; David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Brodersen, Craig R; McElrone, Andrew; Windt, Carel W

    2016-09-01

    The 'hydraulic vulnerability segmentation' hypothesis predicts that expendable distal organs are more susceptible to water stress-induced embolism than the main stem of the plant. In the current work, we present the first in vivo visualization of this phenomenon. In two separate experiments, using magnetic resonance imaging or synchrotron-based microcomputed tomography, grapevines (Vitis vinifera) were dehydrated while simultaneously scanning the main stems and petioles for the occurrence of emboli at different xylem pressures (Ψx ). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that 50% of the conductive xylem area of the petioles was embolized at a Ψx of -1.54 MPa, whereas the stems did not reach similar losses until -1.9 MPa. Microcomputed tomography confirmed these findings, showing that approximately half the vessels in the petioles were embolized at a Ψx of -1.6 MPa, whereas only few were embolized in the stems. Petioles were shown to be more resistant to water stress-induced embolism than previously measured with invasive hydraulic methods. The results provide the first direct evidence for the hydraulic vulnerability segmentation hypothesis and highlight its importance in grapevine responses to severe water stress. Additionally, these data suggest that air entry through the petiole into the stem is unlikely in grapevines during drought. PMID:26648337

  5. Design and validation of a novel bioreactor principle to combine online micro-computed tomography monitoring and mechanical loading in bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenmüller, Henri; Hitz, Marco; Merkle, Hans P.; Meinel, Lorenz; Müller, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loading plays an important role in bone remodeling in vivo and, therefore, has been suggested as a key parameter in stem cell-based engineering of bone-like tissue in vitro. However, the optimization of loading protocols during stem cell differentiation and subsequent bone-like tissue formation is challenged by multiple input factors, which are difficult to control and validate. These include the variable cellular performance of cells harvested from different patients, nonstandardized culture media components, the choice of the biomaterial forming the scaffold, and its morphology, impacting a broader validity of mechanical stimulation regimens. To standardize the cell culture of bone-like tissue constructs, we suggest the involvement of time-lapsed feedback loops. For this purpose we present a prototype bioreactor that combines online, nondestructive monitoring using micro-computed tomography and direct mechanical loading of three-dimensional tissue engineering constructs. Validation of this system showed displacement steps down to 1 μm and cyclic sinusoidal loadings of up to 10 Hz. Load detection resolution was 0.01 N, and micro-computed tomography data were of high quality. For the first time, the developed bioreactor links time-lapsed, nondestructive, and dynamic imaging with mechanical stimulation, designed for cell culture under sterile conditions. This system is believed to substantially improve today's experimental options to study and optimize osteogenic stem cell culture and differentiation at the interface with mechanical stimulation.

  6. Comparison of Apple, Epson, IBM, and Other Microcomputers for Applications in Rehabilitation Systems for Persons with Physical Handicaps. Revision D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderheiden, Gregg C.

    The paper analyzes major microcomputer systems and their use in rehabilitative systems for persons with physical handicaps. Four categories of microcomputers are addressed: systems designed for home or school with emphasis on low cost, recreation, and educational software; general purpose microcomputers with applications in a large number of…

  7. X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography of Apollo Samples as a Curation Technique Enabling Better Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, R. A.; Almeida, N. V.; Sykes, D.; Smith, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a technique that has been used to research meteorites for some time and many others], and recently it is becoming a more common tool for the curation of meteorites and Apollo samples. Micro-CT is ideally suited to the characterization of astromaterials in the curation process as it can provide textural and compositional information at a small spatial resolution rapidly, nondestructively, and without compromising the cleanliness of the samples (e.g., samples can be scanned sealed in Teflon bags). This data can then inform scientists and curators when making and processing future sample requests for meteorites and Apollo samples. Here we present some preliminary results on micro-CT scans of four Apollo regolith breccias. Methods: Portions of four Apollo samples were used in this study: 14321, 15205, 15405, and 60639. All samples were 8-10 cm in their longest dimension and approximately equant. These samples were micro-CT scanned on the Nikon HMXST 225 System at the Natural History Museum in London. Scans were made at 205-220 kV, 135-160 microamps beam current, with an effective voxel size of 21-44 microns. Results: Initial examination of the data identify a variety of mineral clasts (including sub-voxel FeNi metal grains) and lithic clasts within the regolith breccias. Textural information within some of the lithic clasts was also discernable. Of particular interest was a large basalt clast (approx.1.3 cc) found within sample 60639, which appears to have a sub-ophitic texture. Additionally, internal void space, e.g., fractures and voids, is readily identifiable. Discussion: It is clear from the preliminary data that micro-CT analyses are able to identify important "new" clasts within the Apollo breccias, and better characterize previously described clasts or igneous samples. For example, the 60639 basalt clast was previously believed to be quite small based on its approx.0.5 sq cm exposure on the surface of the main mass

  8. Understanding the micro structure of Berea Sandstone by the simultaneous use of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM).

    PubMed

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Mitra, Sushanta K; Vick, Douglas

    2011-07-01

    Berea sandstone is the building block for reservoirs containing precious hydrocarbon fuel. In this study, we comprehensively reveal the microstructure of Berea sandstone, which is often treated as a porous material with interconnected micro-pores of 2-5 μm. This has been possible due to the combined application of micro-computed tomography (CT) and focused ion beam (FIB)-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on a Berea sample. While the use of micro-CT images are common for geological materials, the clubbing and comparison of tomography on Berea with state-of-the-art microstructure imaging techniques like FIB-SEM reveals some unforeseen features of Berea microstructure. In particular, for the first time FIB-SEM has been used to understand the micro-structure of reservoir rock material like Berea sandstone. By using these characterization tools, we are able to show that the micro-pores (less than 30 μm) are absent below the solid material matrix, and that it has small interconnected pores (30-40 μm) and large crater-like voids (100-250 μm) throughout the bulk material. Three-dimensional pore space reconstructions have been prepared from the CT images. Accordingly, characterization of Berea sandstone specimen is performed by calculation of pore-structure volumes and determination of porosity values. PMID:21208806

  9. Analysis of calvarial bone defects in rats using microcomputed tomography: potential for a novel composite material and a new quantitative measurement.

    PubMed

    Efeoglu, Candan; Burke, Julie L; Parsons, Andrew J; Aitchison, Graham A; Scotchford, Colin; Rudd, Chris; Vikram, Aditya; Fisher, Sheila E

    2009-12-01

    Reconstruction of craniomaxillofacial defects is a challenge for surgeons and has psychological and functional burdens for patients. Undoubtedly, there is a need for improved biomaterials and techniques for craniomaxillofacial reconstruction. We assessed the potential regeneration of bone using three modifications of a novel composite and explored the validity of a new measurement using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). We placed three different composite samples in calvarial defects in rats and analysed healing with micro-CT. The results showed that polycaprolactone (PCL) with phosphate glass fibre is promising for non-load bearing applications in the craniomaxillofacial region. Also, the new micro-CT measurement of the temporal characterisation of the mineralisation of bone (TCBM) has the potential to evolve into a reliable predictor of bony healing and its quality. PMID:19395133

  10. Comparison of computed tomography dose reporting software.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, A; Sun, Z; Pongnapang, N; Ng, K-H

    2012-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) dose reporting software facilitates the estimation of doses to patients undergoing CT examinations. In this study, comparison of three software packages, i.e. CT-Expo (version 1.5, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany), ImPACT CT Patients Dosimetry Calculator (version 0.99×, Imaging Performance Assessment on Computed Tomography, www.impactscan.org) and WinDose (version 2.1a, Wellhofer Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany), has been made in terms of their calculation algorithm and the results of calculated doses. Estimations were performed for head, chest, abdominal and pelvic examinations based on the protocols recommended by European guidelines using single-slice CT (SSCT) (Siemens Somatom Plus 4, Erlangen, Germany) and multi-slice CT (MSCT) (Siemens Sensation 16, Erlangen, Germany) for software-based female and male phantoms. The results showed that there are some differences in final dose reporting provided by these software packages. There are deviations of effective doses produced by these software packages. Percentages of coefficient of variance range from 3.3 to 23.4 % in SSCT and from 10.6 to 43.8 % in MSCT. It is important that researchers state the name of the software that is used to estimate the various CT dose quantities. Users must also understand the equivalent terminologies between the information obtained from the CT console and the software packages in order to use the software correctly. PMID:22155753

  11. Microcomputer Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fors, George, Ed.

    Designed for use by school districts introducing computer mathematics into the curriculum, this manual provides guidelines for selecting a microcomputer system, as well as objectives and an outline for an introductory course in computer programming. Also presented are topics for computer applications in science, mathematics, chemistry, and…

  12. Inside Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, Franz J.

    1982-01-01

    The internal processes of microcomputer functioning are explained. Components include: (1) a central processing unit; (2) memories which store programs and data; (3) a clock which determines the order in which a computer performs its operations; (4) a bus consisting of receptacles for additional installations; (5) interfaces which connect the…

  13. Bone dynamics in the upward direction after a maxillary sinus floor elevation procedure: serial segmentation using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Bark, Chung Wung; Lim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Yong-Gun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Maxillary sinus floor augmentation has been shown to be the most predictable surgical technique for enhancing the bone volume in the posterior area of the maxilla. The purpose of this study was to analyze the serial slice image segmentation of newly formed bone and bone substitutes after sinus floor elevation using synchrotron radiation X-ray micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT). Materials and methods Bone biopsy specimens were collected after 6 months of sinus floor augmentation. From the six bone biopsy specimens, the cross-sectional images at every 8 μm along the apical direction from the inferior border using serial segmentation from three-dimensional reconstructed X-ray images were analyzed. The amount of new bone and bone substitutes were measured at each slicing image (300–430 images per specimen). Results The bone dynamics between the new bone and bone substitutes along the inferior–superior direction in humans after maxillary sinus floor elevation (MSFE) were analyzed using the whole sample region. Although these observations suggest that the specimens are structurally inhomogeneous, sinus floor elevation was confirmed to be a reliable surgical procedure for increasing the amount of bone. Conclusion SR-μCT is highly effective for obtaining high-resolution images. An analysis of biological specimens using SR-μCT is quite reliable and this technique will be an important tool in the wide field of tissue engineering. PMID:26347146

  14. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Bioactive Glass-Bone Integration in a Rabbit Tibia Model Using Synchrotron X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenhai; Jia, Weitao; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Liu, Xin; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomography (SR microCT), with a micron resolution, was used to evaluate the osteoconduction and osteointegration by borate bioactive glass after implantation 12 weeks in a rabbit tibia model. The study focused on the biomaterial–bone interface. Results from SR microCT two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions provided precise imaging of the biomaterial–bone integration and detailed microarchitecture of both the bone-like glass graft and the newly formed trabecular bone. Osteoconduction, the formation of new trabecular bone within a tibia defect, occurred only in the tibiae implanted with teicoplanin-loaded borate glass but not in those with teicoplanin-loaded CaSO4 beads, indicating the excellent biocompatibility of the glass implants. 3D reconstruction of the tibiae also showed the infiltration of vascular tissue in both the bioactive glass graft and the new trabecular bone. This study indicates that SR microCT can serve as a valuable complementary technique for imaging bone repair when using bioactive glass implants. PMID:21875330

  15. Three-dimensional X-ray microcomputed tomography of carbonates and biofilm on operated cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Santini, Maurizio; Guilizzoni, Manfredo; Lorenzi, Massimo; Atanassov, Plamen; Marsili, Enrico; Fest-Santini, Stephanie; Cristiani, Pierangela; Santoro, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Power output limitation is one of the main concerns that need to be addressed for full-scale applications of the microbial fuel cell technology. Fouling and biofilm growth on the cathode of single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFC) affects their performance in long-term operation with wastewater. In this study, the authors report the power output and cathode polarization curves of a membraneless SCMFC, fed with raw primary wastewater and sodium acetate for over 6 months. At the end of the experiment, the whole cathode surface is analyzed through X-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT), scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to characterize the fouling layer and the biofilm. EDX shows the distribution of Ca, Na, K, P, S, and other elements on the two faces of the cathode. Na-carbonates and Ca-carbonates are predominant on the air (outer) side and the water (inner) side, respectively. The three-dimensional reconstruction by X-ray microCT shows biofilm spots unevenly distributed above the Ca-carbonate layer on the inner (water) side of the cathode. These results indicate that carbonates layer, rather than biofilm, might lower the oxygen reduction reaction rate at the cathode during long-term SCMFC operation. PMID:26357848

  16. Post-mortem interval estimation of human skeletal remains by micro-computed tomography, mid-infrared microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hatzer-Grubwieser, P.; Bauer, C.; Parson, W.; Unterberger, S. H.; Kuhn, V.; Pemberger, N.; Pallua, Anton K.; Recheis, W.; Lackner, R.; Stalder, R.; Pallua, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study different state-of-the-art visualization methods such as micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), mid-infrared (MIR) microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) mapping were evaluated to study human skeletal remains for the determination of the post-mortem interval (PMI). PMI specific features were identified and visualized by overlaying molecular imaging data and morphological tissue structures generated by radiological techniques and microscopic images gained from confocal microscopy (Infinite Focus (IFM)). In this way, a more distinct picture concerning processes during the PMI as well as a more realistic approximation of the PMI were achieved. It could be demonstrated that the gained result in combination with multivariate data analysis can be used to predict the Ca/C ratio and bone volume (BV) over total volume (TV) for PMI estimation. Statistical limitation of this study is the small sample size, and future work will be based on more specimens to develop a screening tool for PMI based on the outcome of this multidimensional approach. PMID:25878731

  17. Experimental polyethylene-hydroxyapatite carrier-based endodontic system: an in vitro study on dynamic thermomechanical properties, sealing ability, and measurements of micro-computed tomography voids.

    PubMed

    Alhashimi, Raghad A; Mannocci, Francesco; Sauro, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic thermomechanical properties, sealing ability, and voids formation of an experimental obturation hydroxyapatite-reinforced polyethylene (HA/PE) composite/carrier system were investigated and compared with those of a commercial system [GuttaCore (GC)]. The HA/PE system was specifically designed using a melt-extrusion process. The viscoelastic properties of HA/PE were determined using a dynamic thermomechanical analyser. Human single-rooted teeth were endodontically instrumented and obturated using HA/PE or GC systems, and then sealing ability was assessed using a fluid filtration system. In addition, micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify apparent voids within the root-canal space. The data were statistically analysed using one-way anova and post hoc tests. The HA/PE composite exhibited important modulus and damping changes with an increase of temperature. The HA/PE system was more flexible than GC as the modulus of GC appeared to be significantly higher than that of HA/PE as a result of the high positive glass transition temperature (Tg ). However, HA/PE and GC presented similar sealing abilities. In conclusion, because sealing ability and voids formation were comparable between the tested materials, the experimental HA/PE system may be considered a suitable alternative material for root-canal obturation. Moreover, HA/PE possesses specific viscoelastic behaviour and lower melting points, which may facilitate root-canal retreatments. PMID:27041355

  18. An approach to compare the quality of cancellous bone from the femoral necks of healthy and osteoporotic patients through compression testing and microcomputed tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ciarallo, Anthony; Barralet, Jake; Tanzer, Michael; Kremer, Richard

    2006-01-01

    It is estimated that osteoporosis is responsible for about 300 000 hip fractures per year in the United States. Effective prevention of these fractures has been demonstrated using bisphosphonates. However, their mechanism of action has not been elucidated. Furthermore, the precise effect of bisphosphonates on the femoral neck and surrounding areas has never been studied. We are interested in establishing a protocol to analyze the bone quality of proximal femurs from patients treated with bisphosphonates. Following hip replacement surgery, the aim is to determine whether imaging and compression testing of cancellous bone from the discarded femoral necks can accurately assess the bone’s microarchitectural and biomechanical properties, respectively. To validate the technique, it was first tested on an untreated population. A bone biopsy trephine was used to extract cylindrical cores of trabecular bone from the centre of femoral necks. Densitometry, microcomputed tomography, and compression testing were used to assess the quality of bone in these samples. The compressive strength was found to be directly proportional to the modulus (i.e. stiffness) of the samples, thus reproducing previous findings. The relative porosity and, to a lesser extent, the bone mineral density were capable of predicting the quality of cancellous bone. In conclusion, a protocol to analyze the bone quality in human femoral necks using μCT and biomechanical compression testing was successfully established. It will be applied in a clinical setting to analyze bones from bisphosphonate-treated patients following total hip replacement. PMID:18523625

  19. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) as a novel method in ecotoxicology--determination of morphometric and somatic data in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Markus; Rizzo, Larissa Y; Lammers, Twan; Gremse, Felix; Schiwy, Sabrina; Kiessling, Fabian; Hollert, Henner

    2016-02-01

    Fish are important sentinel organisms for the assessment of water quality and play a central role in ecotoxicological research. Of particular importance to the assessment of health and fitness of fish stocks in response to environmental conditions or pollution are morphometric (e.g. Fulton's condition index) and somatic indices (e.g. hepatosomatic, and gonadosomatic index). Standard measurements of somatic indices are invasive and require, by definition, the sacrifice of examined animals, thus prohibiting longitudinal studies and relocation of animals captured in the field. As a potential solution, in the present study, we propose the use of micro-computed tomography (μCT) as imaging modality to non-invasively tomographically image rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to different sediment suspensions. We here demonstrate that μCT can be used as a tool to reliably measure the volumes of different organs, which could then be applied as a substitute of their weights in calculation of somatic indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report the results of μCT analyses in the context of ecotoxicological research in rainbow trout. It has the potential to greatly increase the information value of experiments conducted with fish and also to potentially reduce the number of animals required for studying temporal effects through facilitating longitudinal studies within the same individuals. PMID:26580735

  20. RooTrak: automated recovery of three-dimensional plant root architecture in soil from x-ray microcomputed tomography images using visual tracking.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Stefan; Zappala, Susan; Tracy, Saoirse R; Sturrock, Craig; Bennett, Malcolm; Mooney, Sacha J; Pridmore, Tony

    2012-02-01

    X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) is an invaluable tool for visualizing plant root systems within their natural soil environment noninvasively. However, variations in the x-ray attenuation values of root material and the overlap in attenuation values between roots and soil caused by water and organic materials represent major challenges to data recovery. We report the development of automatic root segmentation methods and software that view μCT data as a sequence of images through which root objects appear to move as the x-y cross sections are traversed along the z axis of the image stack. Previous approaches have employed significant levels of user interaction and/or fixed criteria to distinguish root and nonroot material. RooTrak exploits multiple, local models of root appearance, each built while tracking a specific segment, to identify new root material. It requires minimal user interaction and is able to adapt to changing root density estimates. The model-guided search for root material arising from the adoption of a visual-tracking framework makes RooTrak less sensitive to the natural ambiguity of x-ray attenuation data. We demonstrate the utility of RooTrak using μCT scans of maize (Zea mays), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) grown in a range of contrasting soil textures. Our results demonstrate that RooTrak can successfully extract a range of root architectures from the surrounding soil and promises to facilitate future root phenotyping efforts. PMID:22190339

  1. Heidelberg-mCT-Analyzer: a novel method for standardized microcomputed-tomography-guided evaluation of scaffold properties in bone and tissue research

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Christian; Hoellig, Melanie; Swing, Tyler; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Weber, Marc-André; Stiller, Wolfram; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Moghaddam, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering and bone scaffold development represent two challenging fields in orthopaedic research. Micro-computed tomography (mCT) allows non-invasive measurement of these scaffolds’ properties in vivo. However, the lack of standardized mCT analysis protocols and, therefore, the protocols’ user-dependency make interpretation of the reported results difficult. To overcome these issues in scaffold research, we introduce the Heidelberg-mCT-Analyzer. For evaluation of our technique, we built 10 bone-inducing scaffolds, which underwent mCT acquisition before ectopic implantation (T0) in mice, and at explantation eight weeks thereafter (T1). The scaffolds’ three-dimensional reconstructions were automatically segmented using fuzzy clustering with fully automatic level-setting. The scaffold itself and its pores were then evaluated for T0 and T1. Analysing the scaffolds’ characteristic parameter set with our quantification method showed bone formation over time. We were able to demonstrate that our algorithm obtained the same results for basic scaffold parameters (e.g. scaffold volume, pore number and pore volume) as other established analysis methods. Furthermore, our algorithm was able to analyse more complex parameters, such as pore size range, tissue mineral density and scaffold surface. Our imaging and post-processing strategy enables standardized and user-independent analysis of scaffold properties, and therefore is able to improve the quantitative evaluations of scaffold-associated bone tissue-engineering projects. PMID:26716008

  2. Characterization of the deformation behavior of intermediate porosity interconnected Ti foams using micro-computed tomography and direct finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Lee, P D; Lindley, T C; Kohlhauser, C; Hellmich, C; Bram, M; Imwinkelried, T; Dashwood, R J

    2010-06-01

    Under load-bearing conditions metal-based foam scaffolds are currently the preferred choice as bone/cartilage implants. In this study X-ray micro-computed tomography was used to discretize the three-dimensional structure of a commercial titanium foam used in spinal fusion devices. Direct finite element modeling, continuum micromechanics and analytical models of the foam were employed to characterize the elasto-plastic deformation behavior. These results were validated against experimental measurements, including ultrasound and monotonic and interrupted compression testing. Interrupted compression tests demonstrated localized collapse of pores unfavorably oriented with respect to the loading direction at many isolated locations, unlike the Ashby model, in which pores collapse row by row. A principal component analysis technique was developed to quantify the pore anisotropy which was then related to the yield stress anisotropy, indicating which isolated pores will collapse first. The Gibson-Ashby model was extended to incorporate this anisotropy by considering an orthorhombic, rather than a tetragonal, unit cell. It is worth noting that the natural bone is highly anisotropic and there is a need to develop and characterize anisotropic implants that mimic bone characteristics. PMID:19961958

  3. Heidelberg-mCT-Analyzer: a novel method for standardized microcomputed-tomography-guided evaluation of scaffold properties in bone and tissue research.

    PubMed

    Westhauser, Fabian; Weis, Christian; Hoellig, Melanie; Swing, Tyler; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Weber, Marc-André; Stiller, Wolfram; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Moghaddam, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering and bone scaffold development represent two challenging fields in orthopaedic research. Micro-computed tomography (mCT) allows non-invasive measurement of these scaffolds' properties in vivo. However, the lack of standardized mCT analysis protocols and, therefore, the protocols' user-dependency make interpretation of the reported results difficult. To overcome these issues in scaffold research, we introduce the Heidelberg-mCT-Analyzer. For evaluation of our technique, we built 10 bone-inducing scaffolds, which underwent mCT acquisition before ectopic implantation (T0) in mice, and at explantation eight weeks thereafter (T1). The scaffolds' three-dimensional reconstructions were automatically segmented using fuzzy clustering with fully automatic level-setting. The scaffold itself and its pores were then evaluated for T0 and T1. Analysing the scaffolds' characteristic parameter set with our quantification method showed bone formation over time. We were able to demonstrate that our algorithm obtained the same results for basic scaffold parameters (e.g. scaffold volume, pore number and pore volume) as other established analysis methods. Furthermore, our algorithm was able to analyse more complex parameters, such as pore size range, tissue mineral density and scaffold surface. Our imaging and post-processing strategy enables standardized and user-independent analysis of scaffold properties, and therefore is able to improve the quantitative evaluations of scaffold-associated bone tissue-engineering projects. PMID:26716008

  4. Laboratory Microcomputing

    PubMed Central

    York, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Microcomputers will play a major role in the laboratory, not only in the calculation and interpretation of clinical test data, but also will have an increasing place of importance in the management of laboratory resources in the face of the transition from revenue generating to the cost center era. We will give you a glimpse of what can be accomplished with the management data already collected by many laboratories today when the data are processed into meaningful reports.

  5. Novel fusion for hybrid optical/microcomputed tomography imaging based on natural light surface reconstruction and iterated closest point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Nannan; Tian, Jie; Liu, Xia; Deng, Kexin; Wu, Ping; Wang, Bo; Wang, Kun; Ma, Xibo

    2014-02-01

    In mathematics, optical molecular imaging including bioluminescence tomography (BLT), fluorescence tomography (FMT) and Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) are concerned with a similar inverse source problem. They all involve the reconstruction of the 3D location of a single/multiple internal luminescent/fluorescent sources based on 3D surface flux distribution. To achieve that, an accurate fusion between 2D luminescent/fluorescent images and 3D structural images that may be acquired form micro-CT, MRI or beam scanning is extremely critical. However, the absence of a universal method that can effectively convert 2D optical information into 3D makes the accurate fusion challengeable. In this study, to improve the fusion accuracy, a new fusion method for dual-modality tomography (luminescence/fluorescence and micro-CT) based on natural light surface reconstruction (NLSR) and iterated closest point (ICP) was presented. It consisted of Octree structure, exact visual hull from marching cubes and ICP. Different from conventional limited projection methods, it is 360° free-space registration, and utilizes more luminescence/fluorescence distribution information from unlimited multi-orientation 2D optical images. A mouse mimicking phantom (one XPM-2 Phantom Light Source, XENOGEN Corporation) and an in-vivo BALB/C mouse with implanted one luminescent light source were used to evaluate the performance of the new fusion method. Compared with conventional fusion methods, the average error of preset markers was improved by 0.3 and 0.2 pixels from the new method, respectively. After running the same 3D internal light source reconstruction algorithm of the BALB/C mouse, the distance error between the actual and reconstructed internal source was decreased by 0.19 mm.

  6. Microcomputed tomographic comparison of posterior composite resin restorative techniques: sonicated bulk fill versus incremental fill.

    PubMed

    Jarisch, Justin; Lien, Wen; Guevara, Peter H; Greenwood, William J; Dunn, William J

    2016-01-01

    Sonication technology has recently been touted to decrease composite viscosity during delivery and may allow better cavity preparation adaptation and minimize voids. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the difference between conventional, hand-placed, incremental application of a standard hybrid resin-based composite (RBC) and sonicated application of a bulk-fill RBC in box-type and cylindrical cavity preparations. Experimental restorations were fabricated using molds of box-type or cylindrical preparations. For bulk-filled specimens, a single compule of bulk-fill composite was dispensed with a sonic handpiece. The conventional hybrid material was placed in 3 increments (2 mm, 2 mm, and 1 mm). Microfocus x-ray computed tomography was used to analyze voids for percentage and total volume porosity as well as number of actual pores. An analysis of variance indicated that RBC restorations that were applied to cylindrical cavities using a sonicated bulk-filled application method exhibited significantly less porosity (1.42%; P < 0.001) than incrementally placed cylindrical restorations (2.87%); sonicated bulk-filled, cube-shaped restorations (3.12%); and incrementally placed cube-shaped restorations (5.16%). When the groups were subcategorized into the specific characteristics of shape (cube vs cylinder) and application method (bulk vs incremental), the cylindrical group, which included both bulk-filled and incrementally placed specimens, demonstrated significantly less porosity (2.00%; P < 0.001) than other groups. Restorations that were incrementally placed into cube-shaped cavities produced the largest amount of porosity. PMID:27599276

  7. Micro-computed tomography of pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by adenoviral gene transfer of biologically active transforming growth factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a novel tool for monitoring acute and chronic disease states in small laboratory animals. Its value for assessing progressive lung fibrosis in mice has not been reported so far. Here we examined the importance of in vivo micro-CT as non-invasive tool to assess progression of pulmonary fibrosis in mice over time. Methods Pulmonary fibrosis was induced in mice by intratracheal delivery of an adenoviral gene vector encoding biologically active TGF-ß1 (AdTGF-ß1). Respiratory gated and ungated micro-CT scans were performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks post pulmonary adenoviral gene or control vector delivery, and were then correlated with respective histopathology-based Ashcroft scoring of pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Visual assessment of image quality and consolidation was performed by 3 observers and a semi-automated quantification algorithm was applied to quantify aerated pulmonary volume as an inverse surrogate marker for pulmonary fibrosis. Results We found a significant correlation between classical Ashcroft scoring and micro-CT assessment using both visual assessment and the semi-automated quantification algorithm. Pulmonary fibrosis could be clearly detected in micro-CT, image quality values were higher for respiratory gated exams, although differences were not significant. For assessment of fibrosis no significant difference between respiratory gated and ungated exams was observed. Conclusions Together, we show that micro-CT is a powerful tool to assess pulmonary fibrosis in mice, using both visual assessment and semi-automated quantification algorithms. These data may be important in view of pre-clinical pharmacologic interventions for the treatment of lung fibrosis in small laboratory animals. PMID:21176193

  8. A comparative study of the effects of two nickel-titanium preparation techniques on root canal geometry assessed by microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Loizides, Alexios L; Kakavetsos, Vasilios D; Tzanetakis, Giorgos N; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G; Eliades, George

    2007-12-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim of evaluating and comparing the effects of a new Hero group (Endoflare, Hero-shaper, and Hero-apical; Micro-Mega, Besancon, France) and Protaper Ni-Ti rotary instruments (Dentsply/Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) on root canal geometry in extracted human teeth using microcomputed tomography (muCT). Twenty-two mesial root canals of mandibular first molars were randomly divided into two groups. Canals were scanned before and after preparation with both systems. Cross-sectional images of each canal were obtained at 2-mm intervals. Differences in canal roundness, cross-sectional area, perimeter of each canal before and after instrumentation, and the extent of root canal transportation were calculated using image analysis software. There was no difference between the two rotary systems in regards to working time. Both systems create a similar round shape after instrumentation regardless of the initial root canal's shape. The Hero instruments showed a greater cutting efficiency compared with the ProTaper at the levels of 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm but not at the level of 2 mm. On the other hand, the ProTaper seems to have a similar cutting efficiency at all levels. However, the ProTaper showed a tendency toward apical transportation. Under the conditions of the present study, both preparation techniques prepared the canals rapidly with a sufficient round shape. Despite that, it seems that there is a great potential for the improvement of shaping ability of rotary instruments. Hybrid instrumentation techniques should be evaluated by future studies in order to provide better results regarding the shaping ability of rotary instruments. PMID:18037058

  9. Effect of Porous Titanium Granules on Bone Regeneration and Primary Stability in Maxillary Sinus: A Human Clinical, Histomorphometric, and Microcomputed Tomography Analyses.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Ceyda Kanli; Dursun, Erhan; Eratalay, Kenan; Orhan, Kaan; Tatar, Ilkan; Baris, Emre; Tözüm, Tolga Fikret

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled study was to comparatively analyze the new bone (NB), residual bone, and graft-bone association in bone biopsies retrieved from augmented maxillary sinus sites by histomorphometry and microcomputed tomography (MicroCT) in a split-mouth model to test the efficacy of porous titanium granules (PTG) in maxillary sinus augmentation. Fifteen patients were included in the study and each patient was treated with bilateral sinus augmentation procedure using xenograft (equine origine, granule size 1000-2000 μm) and xenograft (1 g) + PTG (granule size 700-1000 μm, pore size >50 μm) (1 g), respectively. After a mean of 8.4 months, 30 bone biopsies were retrieved from the implant sites for three-dimensional MicroCT and two-dimensional histomorphometric analyses. Bone volume and vital NB percentages were calculated. Immediate after core biopsy, implants having standard dimensions were placed and implant stability quotient values were recorded at baseline and 3 months follow-up. There were no significant differences between groups according to residual bone height, residual bone width, implant dimensions, and implant stability quotient values (baseline and 3 months). According to MicroCT and two-dimensional histomorphometric analyses, the volume of newly formed bone was 57.05% and 52.67%, and 56.5% and 55.08% for xenograft + PTG and xenograft groups, respectively. No statistically significant differences found between groups according to NB percentages and higher Hounsfield unit values were found for xenograft + PTG group. The findings of the current study supports that PTG, which is a porous, permanent nonresorbable bone substitute, may have a beneficial osteoconductive effect on mechanical strength of NB in augmented maxillary sinus. PMID:26872278

  10. Integrated 3D view of postmating responses by the Drosophila melanogaster female reproductive tract, obtained by micro-computed tomography scanning

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Alexandra L.; Riccio, Mark L.; Avila, Frank W.; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological changes in females during and after mating are triggered by seminal fluid components in conjunction with female-derived molecules. In insects, these changes include increased egg production, storage of sperm, and changes in muscle contraction within the reproductive tract (RT). Such postmating changes have been studied in dissected RT tissues, but understanding their coordination in vivo requires a holistic view of the tissues and their interrelationships. Here, we used high-resolution, multiscale micro-computed tomography (CT) scans to visualize and measure postmating changes in situ in the Drosophila female RT before, during, and after mating. These studies reveal previously unidentified dynamic changes in the conformation of the female RT that occur after mating. Our results also reveal how the reproductive organs temporally shift in concert within the confines of the abdomen. For example, we observed chiral loops in the uterus and in the upper common oviduct that relax and constrict throughout sperm storage and egg movement. We found that specific seminal fluid proteins or female secretions mediate some of the postmating changes in morphology. The morphological movements, in turn, can cause further changes due to the connections among organs. In addition, we observed apparent copulatory damage to the female intima, suggesting a mechanism for entry of seminal proteins, or other exogenous components, into the female’s circulatory system. The 3D reconstructions provided by high-resolution micro-CT scans reveal how male and female molecules and anatomy interface to carry out and coordinate mating-dependent changes in the female’s reproductive physiology. PMID:26041806

  11. Use of micro-computed tomography to evaluate the effects of exercise on preventing the degeneration of articular cartilage in tail-suspended rats.

    PubMed

    Luan, Hui-Qin; Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wu, Xin-tong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Space flight has been shown to induce bone loss and muscle atrophy, which could initiate the degeneration of articular cartilage. Countermeasures to prevent bone loss and muscle atrophy have been explored, but few spaceflight or ground-based studies have focused on the effects on cartilage degeneration. In this study, we investigated the effects of exercise on articular cartilage deterioration in tail-suspended rats. Thirty-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=8 in each): tail suspension (TS), tail suspension plus passive motion (TSP), tail suspension plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON) groups. In the TS, TSP, and TSA groups, the rat hindlimbs were unloaded for 21 days by tail suspension. Next, the cartilage thickness and volume, and the attenuation coefficient of the distal femur were evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Histological analysis was used to assess the surface integrity of the cartilage, cartilage thickness, and chondrocytes. The results showed that: (1) the cartilage thickness on the distal femur was significantly lower in the TS and TSP groups compared with the CON and TSA groups; (2) the cartilage volume in the TS group was significantly lower compared with the CON, TSA, and TSP groups; and (3) histomorphology showed that the chondrocytes formed clusters where the degree of matrix staining was lower in the TS and TSP groups. There were no significant differences between any of these parameters in the CON and TSA groups. The cartilage thickness measurements obtained by μCT and histomorphology correlated well. In general, tail suspension could induce articular cartilage degeneration, but active exercise was effective in preventing this degeneration in tail-suspended rats. PMID:26256623

  12. Quantifying floral shape variation in 3D using microcomputed tomography: a case study of a hybrid line between actinomorphic and zygomorphic flowers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Neng; Hsu, Hao-Chun; Wang, Cheng-Chun; Lee, Tzu-Kuei; Kuo, Yan-Fu

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of floral shape variations is difficult because flower structures are both diverse and complex. Traditionally, floral shape variations are quantified using the qualitative and linear measurements of two-dimensional (2D) images. The 2D images cannot adequately describe flower structures, and thus lead to unsatisfactory discrimination of the flower shape. This study aimed to acquire three-dimensional (3D) images by using microcomputed tomography (μCT) and to examine the floral shape variations by using geometric morphometrics (GM). To demonstrate the advantages of the 3D-μCT-GM approach, we applied the approach to a second-generation population of florist's gloxinia (Sinningia speciosa) crossed from parents of zygomorphic and actinomorphic flowers. The flowers in the population considerably vary in size and shape, thereby served as good materials to test the applicability of the proposed phenotyping approach. Procedures were developed to acquire 3D volumetric flower images using a μCT scanner, to segment the flower regions from the background, and to select homologous characteristic points (i.e., landmarks) from the flower images for the subsequent GM analysis. The procedures identified 95 landmarks for each flower and thus improved the capability of describing and illustrating the flower shapes, compared with typically lower number of landmarks in 2D analyses. The GM analysis demonstrated that flower opening and dorsoventral symmetry were the principal shape variations of the flowers. The degrees of flower opening and corolla asymmetry were then subsequently quantified directly from the 3D flower images. The 3D-μCT-GM approach revealed shape variations that could not be identified using typical 2D approaches and accurately quantified the flower traits that presented a challenge in 2D images. The approach opens new avenues to investigate floral shape variations. PMID:26442038

  13. Experimental Fusion of Contrast Enhanced High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and High-Resolution Micro-Computed Tomography in Imaging the Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Counter, S. Allen; Damberg, Peter; Aski, Sahar Nikkhou; Nagy, Kálmán; Berglin, Cecilia Engmér; Laurell, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Imaging cochlear, vestibular, and 8th cranial nerve abnormalities remains a challenge. In this study, the membranous and osseous labyrinths of the wild type mouse inner ear were examined using volumetric data from ultra high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast at 9.4 Tesla and high-resolution micro-computed tomography (µCT) to visualize the scalae and vestibular apparatus, and to establish imaging protocols and parameters for comparative analysis of the normal and mutant mouse inner ear. Methods: For in vivo MRI acquisition, animals were placed in a Milleped coil situated in the isocenter of a horizontal 9.4 T Varian magnet. For µCT examination, cone beam scans were performed ex vivo following MRI using the µCT component of a nanoScan PET/CT in vivo scanner. Results: The fusion of Gd enhanced high field MRI and high-resolution µCT scans revealed the dynamic membranous labyrinth of the perilymphatic fluid filled scala tympani and scala vestibule of the cochlea, and semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus, within the µCT visualized contours of the contiguous osseous labyrinth. The ex vivo µCT segmentation revealed the surface contours and structural morphology of each cochlea turn and the semicircular canals in 3 planes. Conclusions: The fusion of ultra high-field MRI and high-resolution µCT imaging techniques were complementary, and provided high-resolution dynamic and static visualization of the complex morphological features of the normal mouse inner ear structures, which may offer a valuable approach for the investigation of cochlear and vestibular abnormalities that are associated with birth defects related to genetic inner ear disorders in humans. PMID:26401173

  14. Longitudinal Use of Micro-computed Tomography Does Not Alter Microarchitecture of the Proximal Tibia in Sham or Ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Longo, Amanda B; Sacco, Sandra M; Salmon, Phil L; Ward, Wendy E

    2016-06-01

    In vivo micro-computed tomography (μCT) provides the ability to measure longitudinal changes to tibia microarchitecture, but the effect of this radiation is not well understood. The right proximal tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 12/group) randomized to Sham-control (Sham) or ovariectomy (OVX) surgery at 12 weeks of age was scanned using μCT at 13, 17, 21, and 25 weeks of age, at a resolution of 18 μm and a radiation dose of 603 mGy. The left proximal tibia was scanned only at 25 weeks of age to serve as an internal non-irradiated control. Repeated irradiation did not affect tibia microarchitecture in Sham or OVX groups, although there was an increase in cortical eccentricity (P < 0.05). All trabecular outcomes and cortical BMD were different (P < 0.05) between groups after only 1 week post-surgery and differences persisted to study endpoint. Characteristic changes to trabecular bone were observed in OVX rats over time. Interactions of time and hormone status were found for cortical BMD (P < 0.001), Ps. Pm., and Ec. Pm. (P < 0.05). Repeated irradiation of the tibia at 13, 17, 21, and 25 weeks does not cause adverse effects to microarchitecture, regardless of hormone status. This radiation dose can be applied over a typical 3-month study period to comprehensively understand how an intervention alters tibia microarchitecture without confounding effects of radiation. PMID:26860853

  15. Fracture Healing in Mice Lacking Pten in Osteoblasts: A Micro-Computed Tomography Image-Based Analysis of the Mechanical Properties of the Femur

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Caitlyn J.; Vivanco, Juan; Sokn, Scott; Williams, Bart O.; Burgers, Travis A.; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 8 million osseous fractures are reported annually, of which 5-10% fail to create a bony union. Osteoblast-specific deletion of the gene Pten in mice has been found to stimulate bone growth and accelerate fracture healing. Healing rates at four weeks increased in femurs from Pten osteoblast conditional knock-out mice (Pten-CKO) compared to wild-type mice (WT) of the same genetic strain as measured by an increase in mechanical stiffness and failure load in four-point bending tests. Preceding mechanical testing, each femur was imaged using a Skyscan 1172 micro-computed tomography (μCT) scanner (Skyscan, Kontich, Belgium). The present study used μCT image-based analysis to test the hypothesis that the increased femoral fracture force and stiffness in Pten-CKO were due to greater section properties with the same effective material properties as that of the WT. The second moment of area and section modulus were computed in ImageJ 1.46 (National Institutes of Health) and used to predict the effective flexural modulus and the stress at failure for fourteen pairs of intact and callus WT and twelve pairs of intact and callus Pten-CKO femurs. For callus and intact femurs, the failure stress and tissue mineral density of the Pten-CKO and WT were not different; however, the section properties of the Pten-CKO were more than twice as large 28 days post-fracture. It was therefore concluded, when the gene Pten was conditionally knocked-out in osteoblasts, the resulting increased bending stiffness and force to fracture were due to increased section properties. PMID:25498366

  16. Study of the Microfocus X-Ray Tube Based on a Point-Like Target Used for Micro-Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rifeng; Zhou, Xiaojian; Li, Xiaobin; Cai, Yufang; Liu, Fenglin

    2016-01-01

    For a micro-Computed Tomography (Micro-CT) system, the microfocus X-ray tube is an essential component because the spatial resolution of CT images, in theory, is mainly determined by the size and stability of the X-ray focal spot of the microfocus X-ray tube. However, many factors, including voltage fluctuations, mechanical vibrations, and temperature changes, can cause the size and the stability of the X-ray focal spot to degrade. A new microfocus X-ray tube based on a point-like micro-target in which the X-ray target is irradiated with an unfocused electron beam was investigated. EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for the calculation of the X-ray intensity produced from the point-like micro-target and the substrate. The effects of several arrangements of the target material, target and beam size were studied. The simulation results demonstrated that if the intensity of X-rays generated at the point-like target is greater than half of the X-ray intensity produced on the substrate, the X-ray focal spot is determined in part by the point-like target rather than by the electron beam in the conventional X-ray tube. In theory, since it is able to reduce those unfavorable effects such as the electron beam trajectory swinging and the beam size changing for the microfocus X-ray tube, it could alleviate CT image artifacts caused by the X-ray focal spot shift and size change. PMID:27249559

  17. Use of micro-computed tomography to evaluate the effects of exercise on preventing the degeneration of articular cartilage in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Hui-Qin; Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wu, Xin-tong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Space flight has been shown to induce bone loss and muscle atrophy, which could initiate the degeneration of articular cartilage. Countermeasures to prevent bone loss and muscle atrophy have been explored, but few spaceflight or ground-based studies have focused on the effects on cartilage degeneration. In this study, we investigated the effects of exercise on articular cartilage deterioration in tail-suspended rats. Thirty-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8 in each): tail suspension (TS), tail suspension plus passive motion (TSP), tail suspension plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON) groups. In the TS, TSP, and TSA groups, the rat hindlimbs were unloaded for 21 days by tail suspension. Next, the cartilage thickness and volume, and the attenuation coefficient of the distal femur were evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Histological analysis was used to assess the surface integrity of the cartilage, cartilage thickness, and chondrocytes. The results showed that: (1) the cartilage thickness on the distal femur was significantly lower in the TS and TSP groups compared with the CON and TSA groups; (2) the cartilage volume in the TS group was significantly lower compared with the CON, TSA, and TSP groups; and (3) histomorphology showed that the chondrocytes formed clusters where the degree of matrix staining was lower in the TS and TSP groups. There were no significant differences between any of these parameters in the CON and TSA groups. The cartilage thickness measurements obtained by μCT and histomorphology correlated well. In general, tail suspension could induce articular cartilage degeneration, but active exercise was effective in preventing this degeneration in tail-suspended rats.

  18. Integrated 3D view of postmating responses by the Drosophila melanogaster female reproductive tract, obtained by micro-computed tomography scanning.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Alexandra L; Riccio, Mark L; Avila, Frank W; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2015-07-01

    Physiological changes in females during and after mating are triggered by seminal fluid components in conjunction with female-derived molecules. In insects, these changes include increased egg production, storage of sperm, and changes in muscle contraction within the reproductive tract (RT). Such postmating changes have been studied in dissected RT tissues, but understanding their coordination in vivo requires a holistic view of the tissues and their interrelationships. Here, we used high-resolution, multiscale micro-computed tomography (CT) scans to visualize and measure postmating changes in situ in the Drosophila female RT before, during, and after mating. These studies reveal previously unidentified dynamic changes in the conformation of the female RT that occur after mating. Our results also reveal how the reproductive organs temporally shift in concert within the confines of the abdomen. For example, we observed chiral loops in the uterus and in the upper common oviduct that relax and constrict throughout sperm storage and egg movement. We found that specific seminal fluid proteins or female secretions mediate some of the postmating changes in morphology. The morphological movements, in turn, can cause further changes due to the connections among organs. In addition, we observed apparent copulatory damage to the female intima, suggesting a mechanism for entry of seminal proteins, or other exogenous components, into the female's circulatory system. The 3D reconstructions provided by high-resolution micro-CT scans reveal how male and female molecules and anatomy interface to carry out and coordinate mating-dependent changes in the female's reproductive physiology. PMID:26041806

  19. Sine Systemate Chaos? A Versatile Tool for Earthworm Taxonomy: Non-Destructive Imaging of Freshly Fixed and Museum Specimens Using Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Rosa; Kvist, Sebastian; Lenihan, Jennifer; Giribet, Gonzalo; Ziegler, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the high relevance of lumbricid earthworms (‘Oligochaeta’: Lumbricidae) for soil structure and functioning, the taxonomy of this group of terrestrial invertebrates remains in a quasi-chaotic state. Earthworm taxonomy traditionally relies on the interpretation of external and internal morphological characters, but the acquisition of these data is often hampered by tedious dissections or restricted access to valuable and rare museum specimens. The present state of affairs, in conjunction with the difficulty of establishing primary homologies for multiple morphological features, has led to an almost unrivaled instability in the taxonomy and systematics of certain earthworm groups, including Lumbricidae. As a potential remedy, we apply for the first time a non-destructive imaging technique to lumbricids and explore the future application of this approach to earthworm taxonomy. High-resolution micro-computed tomography (μCT) scanning of freshly fixed and museum specimens was carried out using two cosmopolitan species, Aporrectodea caliginosa and A. trapezoides. By combining two-dimensional and three-dimensional dataset visualization techniques, we demonstrate that the morphological features commonly used in earthworm taxonomy can now be analyzed without the need for dissection, whether freshly fixed or museum specimens collected more than 60 years ago are studied. Our analyses show that μCT in combination with soft tissue staining can be successfully applied to lumbricid earthworms. An extension of the approach to other families is poised to strengthen earthworm taxonomy by providing a versatile tool to resolve the taxonomic chaos currently present in this ecologically important, but taxonomically neglected group of terrestrial invertebrates. PMID:24837238

  20. Study of the Microfocus X-Ray Tube Based on a Point-Like Target Used for Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rifeng; Zhou, Xiaojian; Li, Xiaobin; Cai, Yufang; Liu, Fenglin

    2016-01-01

    For a micro-Computed Tomography (Micro-CT) system, the microfocus X-ray tube is an essential component because the spatial resolution of CT images, in theory, is mainly determined by the size and stability of the X-ray focal spot of the microfocus X-ray tube. However, many factors, including voltage fluctuations, mechanical vibrations, and temperature changes, can cause the size and the stability of the X-ray focal spot to degrade. A new microfocus X-ray tube based on a point-like micro-target in which the X-ray target is irradiated with an unfocused electron beam was investigated. EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for the calculation of the X-ray intensity produced from the point-like micro-target and the substrate. The effects of several arrangements of the target material, target and beam size were studied. The simulation results demonstrated that if the intensity of X-rays generated at the point-like target is greater than half of the X-ray intensity produced on the substrate, the X-ray focal spot is determined in part by the point-like target rather than by the electron beam in the conventional X-ray tube. In theory, since it is able to reduce those unfavorable effects such as the electron beam trajectory swinging and the beam size changing for the microfocus X-ray tube, it could alleviate CT image artifacts caused by the X-ray focal spot shift and size change. PMID:27249559

  1. Deer bone extract suppresses articular cartilage damage induced by monosodium iodoacetate in osteoarthritic rats: an in vivo micro-computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Yooheon; Ahn, Chang Won; Park, Soo Hyun; Jung, Eun Young; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the anti-osteoarthritic effects of deer bone extract on articular cartilage damage by using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) in monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in rats. Male Wistar rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups (10 rats/group): sham control (SC; PBS injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); negative control (NC; MIA injection+PBS 1 mL treatment); positive control (PC; MIA injection+250 mg/kg glucosamine sulfate/chondroitin sulfate mixture treatment); low dose (LDB; MIA injection+250 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment); and high dose (HDB; MIA injection+500 mg/kg deer bone extract treatment). After 50 days of treatment, we observed that the administration of deer bone extract protected against bone destruction and reduced the number of erosion lacunae. When deer bone extract was administered, the trabecular thickness distribution (Tb.Th) (LDB: 75.9 μm, HDB: 80.7 μm vs. NC: 48.0 μm) and the trabecular bone volume fraction ratio (BV/TV) (LDB: 43.8%, HDB: 48.2% vs. NC: 39.1%) were significantly restored. Additionally, the trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) increase caused by MIA was decreased significantly with the administration of deer bone extract (LDB: 73.4 μm, HDB: 81.2 μm vs. NC: 112.0 μm). We concluded that the oral administration of deer bone extract effectively relieved the morphological changes induced by MIA injection in an animal model. PMID:24797662

  2. Determination of the Dynamics of Healing at the Tissue-Implant Interface by Means of Microcomputed Tomography and Functional Apparent Moduli

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Po-Chun; Seol, Yang-Jo; Goldstein, Steven A.; Giannobile, William V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It is currently a challenge to determine the biomechanical properties of the hard tissue–dental implant interface. Recent advances in intraoral imaging and tomographic methods, such as microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), provide three-dimensional details, offering significant potential to evaluate the bone-implant interface, but yield limited information regarding osseointegration because of physical scattering effects emanating from metallic implant surfaces. In the present study, it was hypothesized that functional apparent moduli (FAM), generated from functional incorporation of the peri-implant structure, would eliminate the radiographic artifact–affected layer and serve as a feasible means to evaluate the biomechanical dynamics of tissue-implant integration in vivo. Materials and Methods Cylindric titanium mini-implants were placed in osteotomies and osteotomies with defects in rodent maxillae. The layers affected by radiographic artifacts were identified, and the pattern of tissue-implant integration was evaluated from histology and micro-CT images over a 21-day observation period. Analyses of structural information, FAM, and the relationship between FAM and interfacial stiffness (IS) were done before and after eliminating artifacts. Results Physical artifacts were present within a zone of about 100 to 150 μm around the implant in both experimental defect situations (osteotomy alone and osteotomy + defect). All correlations were evaluated before and after eliminating the artifact-affected layers, most notably during the maturation period of osseointegration. A strong correlation existed between functional bone apparent modulus and IS within 300 μm at the osteotomy defects (r > 0.9) and functional composite tissue apparent modulus in the osteotomy defects (r > 0.75). Conclusion Micro-CT imaging and FAM were of value in measuring the temporal process of tissue-implant integration in vivo. This approach will be useful to complement imaging

  3. Generating virtual textile composite specimens using statistical data from micro-computed tomography: 3D tow representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Renaud G.; Blacklock, Matthew; Bale, Hrishikesh; Begley, Matthew R.; Cox, Brian N.

    2012-08-01

    Recent work presented a Monte Carlo algorithm based on Markov Chain operators for generating replicas of textile composite specimens that possess the same statistical characteristics as specimens imaged using high resolution x-ray computed tomography. That work represented the textile reinforcement by one-dimensional tow loci in three-dimensional space, suitable for use in the Binary Model of textile composites. Here analogous algorithms are used to generate solid, three-dimensional (3D) tow representations, to provide geometrical models for more detailed failure analyses. The algorithms for generating 3D models are divided into those that refer to the topology of the textile and those that deal with its geometry. The topological rules carry all the information that distinguishes textiles with different interlacing patterns (weaves, braids, etc.) and provide instructions for resolving interpenetrations or ordering errors among tows. They also simplify writing a single computer program that can accept input data for generic textile cases. The geometrical rules adjust the shape and smoothness of the generated virtual specimens to match data from imaged specimens. The virtual specimen generator is illustrated using data for an angle interlock weave, a common 3D textile architecture.

  4. Reproducibility of Global and Local Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Micro-Computed Tomography of Iliac Crest Biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen,S.; Eaker, D.; Vercnocke, A.; Ritman, E.

    2008-01-01

    Variation in computed tomography (CT) image grayscale and spatial geometry due to specimen orientation, magnification, voxel size, differences in X-ray photon energy and limited field-of-view during the scan, were evaluated in repeated micro-CT scans of iliac crest biopsies and test phantoms. Using the micro-CT scanner on beamline X2B at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source, 3-D micro-CT images were generated. They consisted of up to 1024 X 24002, 4-mum cubic voxels, each with 16-bit gray-scale. We also reconstructed the images at 16-, 32-, and 48-mum voxel resolution. Scan data were reconstructed from the complete profiles using filtered back-projection and from truncated profiles using profile-extension and with a Local reconstruction algorithm. Three biopsies and one bonelike test phantom were each rescanned at three different times at annual intervals. For the full-data-set reconstructions, the reproducibility of the estimates of mineral content of bone at mean bone opacity value, was {+-}28.8 mg/cm3, i.e., 2.56%, in a 4-mum cubic voxel at the 95% confidence level. The reproducibility decreased with increased voxel size. The interscan difference in imaged bone volume ranged from 0.86 {+-} 0.64% at 4-mum voxel resolution, and 2.64 {+-} 2.48% at 48 mum.

  5. Biomedical implications of dental-ceramic defects investigated by numerical simulation, radiographic, microcomputer tomography, and time-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Ionita, Ciprian; Marsavina, Liviu; Negru, Radu; Topala, Florin; Petrescu, Emanuela; Rominu, Roxana; Fabriky, Mihai; Bradu, Adrian; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2011-10-01

    Imagistic investigation of the metal-ceramic crowns and fixed partial prostheses represent a very important issue in nowadays dentistry. At this time, in dental office, it is difficult or even impossible to evaluate a metal ceramic crown or bridge before setting it in the oral cavity. The possibilities of ceramic fractures are due to small fracture lines or material defects inside the esthetic layers. Material and methods: In this study 25 metal ceramic crowns and fixed partial prostheses were investigated by radiographic method (Rx), micro computer tomography (MicroCT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) working in Time Domain, at 1300 nm. The OCT system contains two interferometers and one scanner. For each incident analysis a stuck made of 100 slices was obtain. These slices were used in order to obtain a 3D model of the ceramic interface. After detecting the presence and the positions of the ceramic defects the numerical simulation method was used to estimate the biomechanical effect of the masticatory forces on fractures propagations in ceramic materials. Results: For all the dental ceramic defects numerical simulation analysis was performed. The simulation of crack propagation shows that the crack could initiate from the upper, lower or both parts of the defect and propagates through the ceramic material where tensile stress field is present. RX and MicroCT are very powerful instruments that provide a good characterization of the dental construct. It is important to observe the reflections due to the metal infrastructure that could affect the evaluation of the metal ceramic crowns and bridges. The OCT investigations could complete the imagistic evaluation of the dental construct by offering important information when it is need it.

  6. Quantification of Osseointegration of Plasma-Polymer Coated Titanium Alloyed Implants by means of Microcomputed Tomography versus Histomorphometry

    PubMed Central

    Gabler, Carolin; Zietz, Carmen; Bieck, Richard; Göhler, Rebecca; Lindner, Tobias; Haenle, Maximilian; Meichsner, Jürgen; Testrich, Holger; Nowottnick, Mathias; Frerich, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A common method to derive both qualitative and quantitative data to evaluate osseointegration of implants is histomorphometry. The present study describes a new image reconstruction algorithm comparing the results of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) evaluated by means of µCT with histomorphometry data. Custom-made conical titanium alloyed (Ti6Al4V) implants were inserted in the distal tibial bone of female Sprague-Dawley rats. Different surface configurations were examined: Ti6Al4V implants with plasma-polymerized allylamine (PPAAm) coating and plasma-polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) coating as well as implants without surface coating. After six weeks postoperatively, tibiae were explanted and BIC was determined by µCT (3D) and afterwards by histomorphometry (2D). In comparison to uncoated Ti6Al4V implants demonstrating low BIC of 32.4% (histomorphometry) and 51.3% (µCT), PPAAm and PPEDA coated implants showed a nonsignificant increase in BIC (histomorphometry: 45.7% and 53.5% and µCT: 51.8% and 62.0%, resp.). Mean BIC calculated by µCT was higher for all surface configurations compared to BIC detected by histomorphometry. Overall, a high correlation coefficient of 0.70 (p < 0.002) was found between 3D and 2D quantification of BIC. The μCT analysis seems to be suitable as a nondestructive and accurate 3D imaging method for the evaluation of the bone-implant interface. PMID:26064874

  7. Long-term Risedronate Treatment Normalizes Mineralization and Continues to Preserve Trabecular Architecture: Sequential Triple Biopsy Studies with Micro-Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Borah,B.; Dufresne, T.; Ritman, E.; Jorgensen, S.; Liu, S.; Chmielewski, P.; Phipps, R.; Zhou, X.; Sibonga, J.; Turner, R.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the time course of changes in bone mineralization and architecture using sequential triple biopsies from women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) who received long-term treatment with risedronate. Transiliac biopsies were obtained from the same subjects (n = 7) at baseline and after 3 and 5 years of treatment with 5 mg daily risedronate. Mineralization was measured using 3-dimensional (3D) micro-computed tomography (CT) with synchrotron radiation and was compared to levels in healthy premenopausal women (n = 12). Compared to the untreated PMO women at baseline, the premenopausal women had higher average mineralization (Avg-MIN) and peak mineralization (Peak-MIN) by 5.8% (P = 0.003) and 8.0% (P = 0.003), respectively, and lower ratio of low to high-mineralized bone volume (BMR-V) and surface area (BMR-S) by 73.3% (P = 0.005) and 61.7% (P = 0.003), respectively. Relative to baseline, 3 years of risedronate treatment significantly increased Avg-MIN (4.9 {+-} 1.1%, P = 0.016) and Peak-MIN (6.2 {+-} 1.5%, P = 0.016), and significantly decreased BMR-V (-68.4 {+-} 7.3%, P = 0.016) and BMR-S (-50.2 {+-} 5.7%, P = 0.016) in the PMO women. The changes were maintained at the same level when treatment was continued up to 5 years. These results are consistent with the significant reduction of turnover observed after 3 years of treatment and which was similarly maintained through 5 years of treatment. Risedronate restored the degree of mineralization and the ratios of low- to high-mineralized bone to premenopausal levels after 3 years of treatment, suggesting that treatment reduced bone turnover in PMO women to healthy premenopausal levels. Conventional micro-CT analysis further demonstrated that bone volume (BV/TV) and trabecular architecture did not change from baseline up to 5 years of treatment, suggesting that risedronate provided long-term preservation of trabecular architecture in the PMO women. Overall, risedronate provided

  8. Three-Dimensional Quantification of Calcium Salt-Composite Resorption (CSC) In Vitro by Micro-computed Tomography (Micro-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, T.; Dai, X. Y.; Mielke, G.; Vogt, S.; Buechner, H.; Schantz, J. T.; Harder, Y.; Machens, H. G.; Morlock, M. M.; Schilling, A. F.

    2014-04-01

    The commonly applied cell-based, two-dimensional (2D) in vitro resorption assays for biomaterials are limited in a variety of cases, including high initial roughness of material surface, uncontrollable solubilization (or resorption) of the entire material surface, or complex three-dimensional (3D) structure of the bioactive material itself. All these make the accurate assessment and successful selection of the optimal bone substitute material difficult. In vivo, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has been widely applied for the analysis of bone physiology and pathology, as well as for the 3D analysis of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this study, we show that micro-CT can also be applied for the in vitro analysis of osteoclast-mediated resorption of biomaterials. For our experiments, we chose a calcium salt-composite (composite of calcium sulphate (CSC), calcium carbonate, glycerin-1,2,3-tripalmiate), which evades common 2D in vitro resorption analysis as a result of its high surface roughness and material composition. Human osteoclasts were differentiated from precursor cells on the surface of the material for 28 days. Cells were analyzed for expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), multinuclearity, and size. Volumetric analysis of resorption was performed by micro-CT. Multinucleated osteoclasts developed on the surface of the material. TRAP5b expression of the cells on CSC was comparable with TRAP5b expression of cells cultivated on dentin for the first 3 weeks of culture. At day 28, TRAP5b expression, cell number, and size of the TRAP+ cells were reduced on the CSC when compared with cells on dentin. Volumetric anaylsis by micro-CT showed a strong cellular effect on resorption of CSC. We consider micro-CT to be a promising technique for 3D quantification of cell-based resorption that will allow the study of cellular resorption of materials in vitro, which were up to now confined to animal experimental analysis.

  9. Rescuing Perishable Neuroanatomical Information from a Threatened Biodiversity Hotspot: Remote Field Methods for Brain Tissue Preservation Validated by Cytoarchitectonic Analysis, Immunohistochemistry, and X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Daniel F; Walker, Ellen M; Gignac, Paul M; Martinez, Anais; Negishi, Kenichiro; Lieb, Carl S; Greenbaum, Eli; Khan, Arshad M

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity hotspots, which harbor more endemic species than elsewhere on Earth, are increasingly threatened. There is a need to accelerate collection efforts in these regions before threatened or endangered species become extinct. The diverse geographical, ecological, genetic, morphological, and behavioral data generated from the on-site collection of an individual specimen are useful for many scientific purposes. However, traditional methods for specimen preparation in the field do not permit researchers to retrieve neuroanatomical data, disregarding potentially useful data for increasing our understanding of brain diversity. These data have helped clarify brain evolution, deciphered relationships between structure and function, and revealed constraints and selective pressures that provide context about the evolution of complex behavior. Here, we report our field-testing of two commonly used laboratory-based techniques for brain preservation while on a collecting expedition in the Congo Basin and Albertine Rift, two poorly known regions associated with the Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot. First, we found that transcardial perfusion fixation and long-term brain storage, conducted in remote field conditions with no access to cold storage laboratory equipment, had no observable impact on cytoarchitectural features of lizard brain tissue when compared to lizard brain tissue processed under laboratory conditions. Second, field-perfused brain tissue subjected to prolonged post-fixation remained readily compatible with subsequent immunohistochemical detection of neural antigens, with immunostaining that was comparable to that of laboratory-perfused brain tissue. Third, immersion-fixation of lizard brains, prepared under identical environmental conditions, was readily compatible with subsequent iodine-enhanced X-ray microcomputed tomography, which facilitated the non-destructive imaging of the intact brain within its skull. In summary, we have validated

  10. Rescuing Perishable Neuroanatomical Information from a Threatened Biodiversity Hotspot: Remote Field Methods for Brain Tissue Preservation Validated by Cytoarchitectonic Analysis, Immunohistochemistry, and X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Daniel F.; Walker, Ellen M.; Gignac, Paul M.; Martinez, Anais; Negishi, Kenichiro; Lieb, Carl S.; Greenbaum, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity hotspots, which harbor more endemic species than elsewhere on Earth, are increasingly threatened. There is a need to accelerate collection efforts in these regions before threatened or endangered species become extinct. The diverse geographical, ecological, genetic, morphological, and behavioral data generated from the on-site collection of an individual specimen are useful for many scientific purposes. However, traditional methods for specimen preparation in the field do not permit researchers to retrieve neuroanatomical data, disregarding potentially useful data for increasing our understanding of brain diversity. These data have helped clarify brain evolution, deciphered relationships between structure and function, and revealed constraints and selective pressures that provide context about the evolution of complex behavior. Here, we report our field-testing of two commonly used laboratory-based techniques for brain preservation while on a collecting expedition in the Congo Basin and Albertine Rift, two poorly known regions associated with the Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot. First, we found that transcardial perfusion fixation and long-term brain storage, conducted in remote field conditions with no access to cold storage laboratory equipment, had no observable impact on cytoarchitectural features of lizard brain tissue when compared to lizard brain tissue processed under laboratory conditions. Second, field-perfused brain tissue subjected to prolonged post-fixation remained readily compatible with subsequent immunohistochemical detection of neural antigens, with immunostaining that was comparable to that of laboratory-perfused brain tissue. Third, immersion-fixation of lizard brains, prepared under identical environmental conditions, was readily compatible with subsequent iodine-enhanced X-ray microcomputed tomography, which facilitated the non-destructive imaging of the intact brain within its skull. In summary, we have validated

  11. Investigation of a pre-clinical mandibular bone notch defect model in miniature pigs: clinical computed tomography, micro-computed tomography, and histological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To validate a critical-size mandibular bone defect model in miniature pigs. Materials and Methods Bilateral notch defects were produced in the mandible of dentally mature miniature pigs. The right mandibular defect remained untreated while the left defect received an autograft. Bone healing was evaluated by computed tomography (CT) at 4 and 16 weeks, and by micro-CT and non-decalcified histology at 16 weeks. Results In both the untreated and autograft treated groups, mineralized tissue volume was reduced significantly at 4 weeks post-surgery, but was comparable to the pre-surgery levels after 16 weeks. After 16 weeks, CT analysis indicated that significantly greater bone was regenerated in the autograft treated defect than in the untreated defect (P=0.013). Regardless of the treatment, the cortical bone was superior to the defect remodeled over 16 weeks to compensate for the notch defect. Conclusion The presence of considerable bone healing in both treated and untreated groups suggests that this model is inadequate as a critical-size defect. Despite healing and adaptation, the original bone geometry and quality of the pre-injured mandible was not obtained. On the other hand, this model is justified for evaluating accelerated healing and mitigating the bone remodeling response, which are both important considerations for dental implant restorations. PMID:26904491

  12. Comparison of Deconvolution Filters for Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Van de Sompel, Dominique; Sasportas, Laura S.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we compare the merits of three temporal data deconvolution methods for use in the filtered backprojection algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT). We evaluate the standard Fourier division technique, the Wiener deconvolution filter, and a Tikhonov L-2 norm regularized matrix inversion method. Our experiments were carried out on subjects of various appearances, namely a pencil lead, two man-made phantoms, an in vivo subcutaneous mouse tumor model, and a perfused and excised mouse brain. All subjects were scanned using an imaging system with a rotatable hemispherical bowl, into which 128 ultrasound transducer elements were embedded in a spiral pattern. We characterized the frequency response of each deconvolution method, compared the final image quality achieved by each deconvolution technique, and evaluated each method’s robustness to noise. The frequency response was quantified by measuring the accuracy with which each filter recovered the ideal flat frequency spectrum of an experimentally measured impulse response. Image quality under the various scenarios was quantified by computing noise versus resolution curves for a point source phantom, as well as the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of selected image features such as dots and linear structures in additional imaging subjects. It was found that the Tikhonov filter yielded the most accurate balance of lower and higher frequency content (as measured by comparing the spectra of deconvolved impulse response signals to the ideal flat frequency spectrum), achieved a competitive image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio, and yielded the greatest robustness to noise. While the Wiener filter achieved a similar image resolution, it tended to underrepresent the lower frequency content of the deconvolved signals, and hence of the reconstructed images after backprojection. In addition, its robustness to noise was poorer than that of the Tikhonov filter. The

  13. Microcomputer Applications in Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenberg, Gene; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist persons teaching a course in microcomputer applications in agriculture. (These applications are designed to be used on Apple IIe or TRS-80 microcomputers.) Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: microcomputer operating procedures; procedures for evaluating and…

  14. Microcomputers in Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snaden, James N.; And Others

    Geographers in the United States rely heavily on microcomputers. They employ microcomputers to enhance three general categories of tasks: word processing and other productivity needs, geographic instruction, and discipline-specific applications. Word processing and desktop publishing continue to be the primary uses of microcomputers by…

  15. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and micro-computed tomography techniques are discordant for bone density and geometry measurements in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ivy L; DeGuire, Jason R; Lavery, Paula; Agellon, Sherry; Weiler, Hope A

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to examine agreement among bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) estimates obtained using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), and micro-computed tomography (μCT) against high-resolution μCT and bone ash of the guinea pig femur. Middle-aged (n = 40, 86 weeks) male guinea pigs underwent in vivo followed by ex vivo DXA (Hologic QDR 4500A) scanning for intact and excised femur BMC and areal density. To assess bone architecture and strength, excised femurs were scanned on pQCT (Stratec XCT 2000L) as well as on two μCT scanners (LaTheta LCT-200; Skyscan 1174), followed by three-point bending test. Reproducibility was determined using triplicate scans; and agreement assessed using Bland-Altman plots with reference methods being high-resolution μCT (Skyscan) for BMD and bone ashing for BMC. All techniques showed satisfactory ex vivo precision (CV 0.05-4.3 %). However, bias compared to the reference method was highest (207.5 %) in trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) measured by LaTheta, and unacceptable in most total femur and cortical bone measurements. Volumetric BMD (vBMD) and BV/TV derived by LaTheta and pQCT at the distal metaphysis were biased from the Skyscan by an average of 49.3 and 207.5 %, respectively. Variability of vBMD, BV/TV and cross-sectional area at the diaphysis ranged from -5.5 to 30.8 %. LaTheta best quantified total femur BMC with an upper bias of 3.3 %. The observed differences among imaging techniques can be attributable to inherent dissimilarity in construction design, calibration, segmentation and scanning resolution used. These bone imaging tools are precise but are not comparable, at least when assessing guinea pig bones. PMID:26058491

  16. A Comparison of Ultrasound Tomography Methods in Circular Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Berryman, J G; Bertete-Aquirre, H R; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Littrup, P; Duric, N; Johnson, S A; Wuebbeling, F

    2002-01-24

    Extremely high quality data was acquired using an experimental ultrasound scanner developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a 2D ring geometry with up to 720 transmitter/receiver transducer positions. This unique geometry allows reflection and transmission modes and transmission imaging and quantification of a 3D volume using 2D slice data. Standard image reconstruction methods were applied to the data including straight-ray filtered back projection, reflection tomography, and diffraction tomography. Newer approaches were also tested such as full wave, full wave adjoint method, bent-ray filtered back projection, and full-aperture tomography. A variety of data sets were collected including a formalin-fixed human breast tissue sample, a commercial ultrasound complex breast phantom, and cylindrical objects with and without inclusions. The resulting reconstruction quality of the images ranges from poor to excellent. The method and results of this study are described including like-data reconstructions produced by different algorithms with side-by-side image comparisons. Comparisons to medical B-scan and x-ray CT scan images are also shown. Reconstruction methods with respect to image quality using resolution, noise, and quantitative accuracy, and computational efficiency metrics will also be discussed.

  17. Comparison between neutron tomography and X-ray tomography: A study on polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solórzano, E.; Pardo-Alonso, S.; Kardijlov, N.; Manke, I.; Wieder, F.; García-Moreno, F.; Rodriguez-Perez, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    This work aims at discussing the possibilities of high resolution neutron tomography, in comparison to conventional cone beam X-ray CT, based on the results on a set of polymeric foamed materials. The neutron experiments have been carried out at the V7/CONRAD-2 imaging instrument located at the BER-2 research reactor at HZB and compared to the images obtained in a X-ray CT system based on a microfocus tube and a flat panel detector. This type of materials has not been previously examined with neutron imaging. The enhanced neutron attenuation relative to the X-ray attenuation and the recent development of high-resolution neutron imaging detectors encouraged this investigation. The results point to a better signal-to-noise ratio of the X-rays in comparison with current neutron tomography - due to the rather low neutron flux. Nevertheless the contrast of polymeric materials in neutron imaging offers further possibilities for future developments in high resolution neutron tomography.

  18. Quantitative comparison of direct phase retrieval algorithms in in-line phase tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, Max; Cloetens, Peter; Guigay, Jean-Pierre; Peyrin, Francoise

    2008-10-15

    A well-known problem in x-ray microcomputed tomography is low sensitivity. Phase contrast imaging offers an increase of sensitivity of up to a factor of 10{sup 3} in the hard x-ray region, which makes it possible to image soft tissue and small density variations. If a sufficiently coherent x-ray beam, such as that obtained from a third generation synchrotron, is used, phase contrast can be obtained by simply moving the detector downstream of the imaged object. This setup is known as in-line or propagation based phase contrast imaging. A quantitative relationship exists between the phase shift induced by the object and the recorded intensity and inversion of this relationship is called phase retrieval. Since the phase shift is proportional to projections through the three-dimensional refractive index distribution in the object, once the phase is retrieved, the refractive index can be reconstructed by using the phase as input to a tomographic reconstruction algorithm. A comparison between four phase retrieval algorithms is presented. The algorithms are based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE), transport of intensity equation for weak absorption, the contrast transfer function (CTF), and a mixed approach between the CTF and TIE, respectively. The compared methods all rely on linearization of the relationship between phase shift and recorded intensity to yield fast phase retrieval algorithms. The phase retrieval algorithms are compared using both simulated and experimental data, acquired at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility third generation synchrotron light source. The algorithms are evaluated in terms of two different reconstruction error metrics. While being slightly less computationally effective, the mixed approach shows the best performance in terms of the chosen criteria.

  19. Leeches of the genus Helobdella (Clitellata: Hirudinida) from São Paulo, Brazil with descriptions of two new species using micro-computed tomography and a new record of Barbronia weberi (Blanchard 1897).

    PubMed

    Iwama, Rafael Eiji; Arruda, Eliane Pintor

    2016-01-01

    Leeches are an important group of macroinvertebrates found in the benthic zone of rivers, streams, lakes and ponds. Despite their ecological importance and potential as bioindicators, little is known about the diversity of leeches in Brazil, where only a few sporadic studies have been performed. Six locations in the region of Sorocaba, in the state of São Paulo, were sampled in order to study the diversity of predatory leeches. Besides traditional dissections, micro-computed tomography was used to access the internal morphology of the new species Helobdella chaviensis n. sp. and Helobdella schlenzae n. sp. Four additional native species were found and redescribed using traditional techniques. The invasive species Barbronia weberi (Blanchard 1897) was reported in the Tietê River for the first time. PMID:27470865

  20. Communications Software for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruman, Janet L.

    Focusing on the use of microcomputers as "smart terminals" for accessing time-sharing systems for libraries, this document discusses the communications software needed to allow the microcomputer to appear as a terminal to the remote host. The functions which communications software programs are designed to perform are defined and explained,…

  1. Microcomputers and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Antonio M., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A directory of resources related to computers lists the following: magazines/newsletters; sources of information; university educators involved in microcomputing; others involved in microcomputer education; and some sources of educational software. Also included is a list of articles on computers in education, alphabetized by author. (MP)

  2. Instructional Microcomputer Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, B. R.

    Intended to aid teachers, administrators, and interested parents by informing them about the state of the educational microcomputer market, this report is meant to be a guide to school districts in the acquisition and maintenance of microcomputers and related instructional materials. Trends in educational computing technology are noted in relation…

  3. Using Microcomputers for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Stuart

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of microcomputers for teaching social science research methods has been the subject of numerous articles. This article describes how microcomputers can be used to teach public policy content, particularly topics involving controversial issues. The discussion is organized into four sections. Section 1, "Four Important Elements,"…

  4. Administrative Uses of Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Chase

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the administrative uses of the microcomputer, stating that high performance educational managers are likely to have microcomputers in their organizations. Four situations that would justify the use of a computer are: (1) when massive amounts of data are processed through well-defined operations; (2) when data processing is…

  5. The Microcomputer Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinne, Harold C.

    The history of the development of the microcomputer industry since its inception in 1975 is explored in this brief paper, which pays special attention to the advent of the small business computer. The author describes the growth of sales, the development of successful companies, the early resistance to use of microcomputers in business, and the…

  6. Microcomputers and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grice, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of literacy associated with the widely used new medium of microcomputers has not been fully exploited by schools to foster development of literacy programs. Microcomputer applications need integration with classroom activities where students construct language meaning. (19 references) (CJH)

  7. Microcomputers in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochhar, Jaishree

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of microcomputers as a first step toward library automation in developing countries, and describes microcomputer projects in Trinidad and Tobago to illustrate factors that need to be considered. These factors include hardware selection, installation and maintenance, hardware appropriateness, output requirements, software, the…

  8. Comparison of optical coherence tomography imaging of cataracts with histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Roach, William P.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Cox, Ann B.; Fujimoto, James G.

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) captured cataract images to subsequent histopathological examination of the lenticular opacities. OCT imaging was performed on anesthetized Rhesus monkeys, known as the delayed effects colony (DEC), with documented cataracts. These monkeys were exposed to several types of radiation during the mid and late 1960s. The radiation and age related cataracts in these animals were closely monitored using a unique grading system developed specifically for the DEC. In addition to this system, a modified version of a common cataract grading scheme for use in humans was applied. Of the original 18 monkeys imaged, lenses were collected at necropsy from seven of these animals, processed, and compared to OCT images. Results showed a direct correlation between the vertical OCT images and the cataractous lesions seen on corresponding histopathological sections of the lenses. Based on the images obtained and their corresponding documented comparison to histopathology, OCT showed tremendous potential to aid identification and characterization of cataracts. There can be artifactual problems with the images related to movement and shadows produced by opacities. However, with the advent of increased speed in imaging and multiplanar imaging, these disadvantages may easily be overcome.

  9. Microcomputer Applications in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Joseph W.

    The first part of this paper addresses the following topics: (1) the usefulness of microcomputers; (2) applications for microcomputers in analytical chemistry; (3) costs; (4) major microcomputer systems and subsystems; and (5) which microcomputer to buy. Following these brief comments, the major focus of the paper is devoted to a discussion of…

  10. Microcomputer Technical Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moursund, David

    1984-01-01

    A rationale for understanding computer operations is given. An overview of microcomputer technology, including an introduction to computer software, hardware, input and output devices, central processing unit, primary and secondary memory, and videodisk interactive systems is presented. (Author/BS)

  11. Microcomputers in Teaching Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Ray

    1981-01-01

    Describes the development, content, and implementation of a two-credit graduate course for teachers at the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point in the use of microcomputers for teaching high school chemistry. (JJD)

  12. Comparison of total variation algorithms for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhou; Sato dos Santos, Gustavo; Dowrick, Thomas; Avery, James; Sun, Zhaolin; Xu, Hui; Holder, David S

    2015-06-01

    The applications of total variation (TV) algorithms for electrical impedance tomography (EIT) have been investigated. The use of the TV regularisation technique helps to preserve discontinuities in reconstruction, such as the boundaries of perturbations and sharp changes in conductivity, which are unintentionally smoothed by traditional l2 norm regularisation. However, the non-differentiability of TV regularisation has led to the use of different algorithms. Recent advances in TV algorithms such as the primal dual interior point method (PDIPM), the linearised alternating direction method of multipliers (LADMM) and the spilt Bregman (SB) method have all been demonstrated successful EIT applications, but no direct comparison of the techniques has been made. Their noise performance, spatial resolution and convergence rate applied to time difference EIT were studied in simulations on 2D cylindrical meshes with different noise levels, 2D cylindrical tank and 3D anatomically head-shaped phantoms containing vegetable material with complex conductivity. LADMM had the fastest calculation speed but worst resolution due to the exclusion of the second-derivative; PDIPM reconstructed the sharpest change in conductivity but with lower contrast than SB; SB had a faster convergence rate than PDIPM and the lowest image errors. PMID:26008768

  13. Comparison of image quality in computed laminography and tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Helfen, Lukas; Baumbach, Tilo; Suhonen, Heikki

    2012-01-16

    In computed tomography (CT), projection images of the sample are acquired over an angular range between 180 to 360 degrees around a rotation axis. A special case of CT is that of limited-angle CT, where some of the rotation angles are inaccessible, leading to artefacts in the reconstrucion because of missing information. The case of flat samples is considered, where the projection angles that are close to the sample surface are either i) completely unavailable or ii) very noisy due to the limited transmission at these angles. Computed laminography (CL) is an imaging technique especially suited for flat samples. CL is a generalization of CT that uses a rotation axis tilted by less than 90 degrees with respect to the incident beam. Thus CL avoids using projections from angles closest to the sample surface. We make a quantitative comparison of the imaging artefacts between CL and limited-angle CT for the case of a parallel-beam geometry. Both experimental and simulated images are used to characterize the effect of the artefacts on the resolution and visible image features. The results indicate that CL has an advantage over CT in cases when the missing angular range is a significant portion of the total angular range. In the case when the quality of the projections is limited by noise, CT allows a better tradeoff between the noise level and the missing angular range. PMID:22274425

  14. Generating virtual textile composite specimens using statistical data from micro-computed tomography: 1D tow representations for the Binary Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacklock, Matthew; Bale, Hrishikesh; Begley, Matthew; Cox, Brian

    2012-03-01

    A Monte Carlo algorithm is defined for generating replicas of textile composite specimens that possess the same statistical characteristics as specimens imaged using high resolution computed tomography. The textile reinforcement is represented by one-dimensional tow loci in three-dimensional space, which are easily incorporated into the Binary Model of textile composites. A tow locus is expressed as the sum of non-stochastic, periodic variations in the coordinates of the tow centroid and stochastic, non-periodic deviations. The non-stochastic variations have period commensurate with the dimensions of the unit cell of the textile, while the stochastic deviations, which describe geometrical defects, exhibit correlation lengths that may be incommensurate with the unit cell. The model is calibrated with data deduced in prior work from computed tomography images. The calibration obviates the need for assuming any ideal shape functions for the tow loci, which can take very general form. The approach is therefore valid for a wide range of textile architectures. Once calibrated, a Markov Chain algorithm can generate numerous stochastic replicas of a textile architecture very rapidly. These virtual specimens can be much larger than the real specimens from which the data were originally gathered, a necessary feature when real specimen size is limited by the nature of high resolution computed tomography. The virtual specimen generator is illustrated using data for an angle interlock weave.

  15. Microcomputers in the College Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Albert L.

    1983-01-01

    The limitations of microcomputers, their potential uses on college campuses, and what should be considered when purchasing them are discussed. Specific uses of microcomputer networks, including one at Kansas City Kansas Community College, are outlined. (Author/MLW)

  16. Rochester Orients Lab around Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Stephen C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes integration of Commodore PET microcomputers into the chemical engineering curriculum at the University of Rochester. Includes advantages of using microcomputers in laboratories to analyze data and control processes. (SK)

  17. Vocabulary Flashcards on the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Howard H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes possible modes of a diskette vocabulary review system as replacement for flash cards for students learning Russian. Disadvantages are that not everyone has microcomputers and that not all software is compatible with all microcomputers. (BK)

  18. Microcomputers in the Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James E.; Haas, John D.

    A discussion of microcomputer applications in elementary and secondary school social studies is accompanied by a list of publications and a checklist to aid educators in evaluating programs for microcomputers. Six instructional uses of the microcomputer are drill and practice, tutorial, demonstration, simulation, instructional games, and computer…

  19. A Comparison of Students' Approaches to Inquiry, Conceptual Learning, and Attitudes in Simulation-Based and Microcomputer-Based Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Sufen; Chang, Wen-Hua; Lai, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Cheng-Yue

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the effects of virtual versus physical manipulation using a simulation-based laboratory activity (SBL) and a microcomputer-based laboratory activity (MBL). Both the SBL and the MBL used computers to collect, graph, and analyze data. A major difference was that the MBL allowed the students to…

  20. Biocompatibility property of 100% strontium-substituted SiO2 -Al2 O3 -P2 O5 -CaO-CaF2 glass ceramics over 26 weeks implantation in rabbit model: Histology and micro-Computed Tomography analysis.

    PubMed

    Basu, Bikramjit; Sabareeswaran, A; Shenoy, S J

    2015-08-01

    One of the desired properties for any new biomaterial composition is its long-term stability in a suitable animal model and such property cannot be appropriately assessed by performing short-term implantation studies. While hydroxyapatite (HA) or bioglass coated metallic biomaterials are being investigated for in vivo biocompatibility properties, such study is not extensively being pursued for bulk glass ceramics. In view of their inherent brittle nature, the implant stability as well as impact of long-term release of metallic ions on bone regeneration have been a major concern. In this perspective, the present article reports the results of the in vivo implantation experiments carried out using 100% strontium (Sr)-substituted glass ceramics with the nominal composition of 4.5 SiO2 -3Al2 O3 -1.5P2 O5 -3SrO-2SrF2 for 26 weeks in cylindrical bone defects in rabbit model. The combination of histological and micro-computed tomography analysis provided a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the bone regeneration around the glass ceramic implants in comparison to the highly bioactive HA bioglass implants (control). The sequential polychrome labeling of bone during in vivo osseointegration using three fluorochromes followed by fluorescence microscopy observation confirmed homogeneous bone formation around the test implants. The results of the present study unequivocally confirm the long-term implant stability as well as osteoconductive property of 100% Sr-substituted glass ceramics, which is comparable to that of a known bioactive implant, that is, HA-based bioglass. PMID:25303146

  1. Microcomputers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Cheryl A.

    Designed to answer basic questions educators have about microcomputer hardware and software and their applications in teaching, this paper describes the revolution in computer technology that has resulted from the development of the microchip processor and provides information on the major computer components; i.e.; input, central processing unit,…

  2. Microcomputers in Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document is an information guide for teachers that introduces computers into vocational home economics education classes. The first part points out implications of microcomputers for home economics classes, while the second part provides information on selecting, using, and maintaining computer hardware. The final section describes procedures…

  3. Microcomputer Applications Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 16 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of microcomputer applications specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 16 units are…

  4. Microcomputers and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhlig, George E.

    Dangers are inherent in predicting the future. In discussing the future of computers, specifically, it is useful to consider the brief history of computers from the development of ENIAC to microcomputers. Advances in computer technology can be seen by looking at changes in individual components, including internal and external memory, the…

  5. Microcomputers in the Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafert, Bruce; Nicklin, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    A one-semester hour laboratory course introduced junior and senior physics majors to assembly language programing and to interfacing KIM-1 microcomputer to experiments. A general purpose interface to a standard breadboard was developed. Course details, apparatus, and some interfacing projects are given. (Author/SK)

  6. Microcomputers in Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenstein, Judy

    1983-01-01

    Presents three reports on ways in which microcomputers are being utilized in fields of agriculture, industry, and home economics, including a description of a school or classroom which is teaching vocational computer use. Charts describing software packages (name, hardware/memory, description, cost, grade level, backup policy) are provided. (EJS)

  7. Microcomputers and Language Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culhane, Terry

    Many commericially available computer programs contain test-type materials, and some courseware makes use of testing techniques as an instructional device. The area in which testing techniques are used most effectively for teaching is self-instruction. Most microcomputers operate using the BASIC language, but authoring languages are the most…

  8. Microcomputers and Field Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Born, Catherine E.

    1987-01-01

    Ways that one graduate school of social work has successfully incorporated microcomputing into its foundation curriculum are described. The key factors include integrating the project into existing curricula, making the assignment part of a required, first-year course, and using a computer application designed specifically for novice social work…

  9. Microcomputers and Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dina

    Preschool children can benefit by working with microcomputers. Thinking skills are enhanced by software games that focus on logic, memory, problem solving, and pattern recognition. Counting, sequencing, and matching games develop mathematics skills, and word games focusing on basic letter symbol and word recognition develop language skills.…

  10. Storage Media for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautman, Rodes

    1983-01-01

    Reviews computer storage devices designed to provide additional memory for microcomputers--chips, floppy disks, hard disks, optical disks--and describes how secondary storage is used (file transfer, formatting, ingredients of incompatibility); disk/controller/software triplet; magnetic tape backup; storage volatility; disk emulator; and…

  11. Functional morphology of the copulatory organs of a reed beetle and a shining leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Donaciinae, Criocerinae) using X-ray micro-computed tomography *

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Michael; Uhl, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For more than 100 years it has been known that the sclerotised median lobe of beetles harbours a membranous structure (the "internal sac" or "endophallus") which is everted during copula inside the female genital tract. In order to explore the functional role of this structure and those associated with it, we cryofixed copulating pairs of Donacia semicuprea and Lilioceris lilii and studied the relative position of the elements of the copulatory apparatus of males and females by micro-computer-tomography. We found that the everted endophallus fills the lumen of the bursa copulatrix completely. Our data suggest that in Lilioceris lilii the tip of the sclerotised distal part of the ejaculatory duct, the flagellum, is positioned exactly over the opening of the spermathecal duct inside the bursa copulatrix. The mouth of the bursa copulatrix in Donacia semicuprea is armed with a strong muscle ring, and the whole wall of the bursa is covered externally with a layer of muscle fibres. These morphological differences correspond with differences in mating behaviour: In reed beetles (Donaciinae), females seemingly can control mating to a higher degree than in lily beetles (Lilioceris spp.). PMID:26798321

  12. Localization of Metal Electrodes in the Intact Rat Brain Using Registration of 3D Microcomputed Tomography Images to a Magnetic Resonance Histology Atlas1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Jana Schaich; Vu, Mai-Anh; Badea, Cristian; Badea, Alexandra; Johnson, G. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Simultaneous neural recordings taken from multiple areas of the rodent brain are garnering growing interest because of the insight they can provide about spatially distributed neural circuitry. The promise of such recordings has inspired great progress in methods for surgically implanting large numbers of metal electrodes into intact rodent brains. However, methods for localizing the precise location of these electrodes have remained severely lacking. Traditional histological techniques that require slicing and staining of physical brain tissue are cumbersome and become increasingly impractical as the number of implanted electrodes increases. Here we solve these problems by describing a method that registers 3D computed tomography (CT) images of intact rat brains implanted with metal electrode bundles to a magnetic resonance imaging histology (MRH) atlas. Our method allows accurate visualization of each electrode bundle’s trajectory and location without removing the electrodes from the brain or surgically implanting external markers. In addition, unlike physical brain slices, once the 3D images of the electrode bundles and the MRH atlas are registered, it is possible to verify electrode placements from many angles by “reslicing” the images along different planes of view. Furthermore, our method can be fully automated and easily scaled to applications with large numbers of specimens. Our digital imaging approach to efficiently localizing metal electrodes offers a substantial addition to currently available methods, which, in turn, may help accelerate the rate at which insights are gleaned from rodent network neuroscience. PMID:26322331

  13. Anatomy of the murine and human cochlea visualized at the cellular level by synchrotron-radiation-based micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B.; Lareida, A.; Beckmann, F.; Diakov, G. M.; Kral, F.; Schwarm, F.; Stoffner, R.; Gunkel, A. R.; Glueckert, R.; Schrott-Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Andronache, A.; Freysinger, W.

    2006-08-01

    Diseases of the hearing organ and impairment affect a significant fraction of population. Therefore, the hearing organ embedded as a helical structure in the cochlea within the hardest human osseous structure inside the petrous bone is intensively investigated. Currently, studies of the cochlea with true micrometer resolution or better are destructive. Membranes and three-dimensional vessel structures of post-mortem explanted human cochlea were only visualized with limited spatial resolution or deformed anatomical features resulting from preparation artifacts. We have applied a preparation and staining protocol developed for electron microscopy, which allows the visualization and quantification of a great variety of soft-tissue structures including the Reissner's membrane, the tectorial membrane, basilar membrane, modiolus, lamina radialis, and Nuel's space by the use of synchrotron-radiation-based micro computed tomography at the beamline BW 2 (HASYLAB at DESY). The level of detail can be even improved by the application of sophisticated computer vision tools, which enables the extraction of the vascular tree down to the capillaries and of the course of nerve fibers as well as the topology of the osseous lamina radialis, which assembles the nerve fibers from the hair-cells to the ganglia in the center of the cochlea, the modiolus. These non-destructively obtained three-dimensional data are principal for the refined understanding of the hearing process by membranes morphologies and further anatomical features at the cellular level and for teaching purposes in medical curricula.

  14. Microcomputers and astronomical navigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin-Jouan, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Experienced navigators remember ancient astronomical navigation and its limitations. Using microcomputers in small packages and selecting up-to-date efficient methods will overcome many of these limitations. Both features lead to focus on observations, and encourage an increase in their numbers. With no intention of competing with satellite navigation, sextant navigation in the open sea can then be accessed again by anybody. It can be considered for demonstrative use or as a complement to the GPS.

  15. The Microcomputer in the Library: I. Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggate, Peter; Dyer, Hilary

    1985-01-01

    This first in a series of six articles introducing microcomputer applications in smaller libraries discusses microcomputer components (hardware, operating systems, applications software); microcomputer history; current hardware; library applications; performance criteria; factors influencing performance; integrated systems; information retrieval;…

  16. Transcranial thermoacoustic tomography: a comparison of two imaging algorithms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zijian; Liu, Lanbo; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Lihong Victory

    2013-02-01

    Thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is a novel, non-invasive medical imaging technique but has encountered obstacles in imaging through the cranium. In this paper we present two methods for transcranial TAT: Kirchhoff migration (KM) and reverse-time migration (RTM). The two methods' imaging qualities are verified and compared based on both synthetic and experimental data. RTM proves to have better velocity variance and imaging quality, and little noise with spatial aliasing. RTM is a promising approach for achieving transcranial TAT in further studies. PMID:23076033

  17. Comparison of double crosshole and fanbeam Lamb wave ultrasonic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, Mark K.; Malyarenko, Eugene V.

    2001-04-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves, Lamb waves, allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. The work discussed here focuses on a variety of different tomographic reconstruction techniques to graphically represent the Lamb wave data in quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the traveltimes of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. This paper describes two potentially practical implementations of Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques that can be optimized for in-the-field testing of large-area aircraft structures. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using either a ring of transducers with fan beam reconstructions, or a square array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography, is appropriate for detecting flaws in multilayer aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this presentation.

  18. TLC for Growing Minds. Microcomputer Projects. Adult Intermediate Microcomputer Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taitt, Henry A.

    Designed to improve students' thinking, learning, and creative skills while they learn to program a microcomputer in BASIC programing language, this book for intermediate learners at the high school/adult level provides a variety of microcomputer activities designed to extend the concepts taught in the accompanying instructional manuals (Volumes 3…

  19. Microcomputer basics, Part IV: Using microcomputers in pathology.

    PubMed

    Siguel, E N

    1984-03-01

    Microcomputers are invading every aspect of life including the practice of pathology. This last in a series of articles is designed to help neophytes make effective use of these new tools. This article describes how microcomputers can be used in pathology and provides guidelines for deciding what processes are worth computerizing and for selecting software. No specific program is recommended. PMID:10265488

  20. TLC for Growing Minds. Microcomputer Projects. Elementary Intermediate Microcomputer Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Marilyn

    Designed to improve students' thinking, learning, and creative skills while they learn to program a microcomputer in BASIC programing language, this book for intermediate learners at the elementary school level provides a variety of microcomputer activities designed to extend the concepts learned in accompanying instructional manuals (Volumes 3…

  1. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging comparisons in boxers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, B.D. ); Zimmerman, R.D. )

    1990-03-23

    The efficacy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying traumatic injuries of the brain was compared in a referred population of 21 amateur and professional boxers. Three boxers displayed CT scans with equivocal findings that were verified as artifacts by MRI. Eleven boxers had both CT and MRI scans with normal findings, and 7 boxers had both CT and MRI scans with abnormal findings. There were no instances where abnormalities demonstrated on CT scanning were not detected by MRI. However, some abnormalities detected on MRI were not detected on CT scans. These included a subdural hematoma, white-matter changes, and a focal contusion. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be the neuroradiodiagnostic test of choice compared with CT.

  2. Chips and Diodes of Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherbon, James W.

    1983-01-01

    Common computer terminology, microcomputer systems, peripheral equipment, and internal workings are discussed. Factors affecting establishment of a microcomputer in a music department are objectives and needs, available or easily created software, and hardware configurations that fit budgets yet provide needed power and flexibility. (KC)

  3. Microcomputer to Multichannel Analyzer Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Roger N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a microcomputer-based multichannel analyzer (MCA) in which the front end is connected to a microcomputer through a custom interface. Thus an MCA System of 1024 channel resolution, programmable in Basic rather than in machine language and having moderate cost, is achieved. (Author/SK)

  4. Discriminant Analysis on a Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Alan H.

    1988-01-01

    Described is a method for discriminant analysis which uses the multiple regression facilities offered by many microcomputer statistical packages. This method is illustrated with an ecological example using the MICROTAB statistical package on a BBC microcomputer. Compares these results with an analysis of the same data using SPSS X. (Author/CW)

  5. Microcomputers in the physics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, D.; Lamb, M. J.

    1993-03-01

    Microcomputers are now being used extensively in physics laboratories and it is important for students to gain some computer literacy at an early stage. This article describes the facilities developed and the strategies followed at The Queen's University of Belfast to encourage the effective use of microcomputers.

  6. Microcomputer basics. Hardware. Part I.

    PubMed

    Siguel, E N

    1983-12-01

    Microcomputers are invading every aspect of life including the practice of pathology. This first in a series of articles is designed to help neophytes make effective use of these new tools. A list of references, intended to provide readers with more information on the subject of microcomputers and their applications to pathology, will be furnished at the conclusion of the series. PMID:10264428

  7. A General Introduction to Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muiznieks, Viktors

    This basic introduction to microcomputers provides the neophyte with the terminology, definitions, and concepts that explain the microcomputer and computing technology in general. Mathematical operations with binary numbers, computer storage, controlling logic, and the concepts of stack and interrupt are explained. (RAO)

  8. Microcomputer basics. Part II. Software.

    PubMed

    Siguel, E N

    1984-01-01

    Microcomputers are invading every aspect of life including the practice of pathology. This second in a series of articles is designed to help neophytes make effective use of these new tools. A list of references, providing readers with more information on the subject of microcomputers and their applications to pathology, will be furnished at the conclusion of the series. PMID:10264834

  9. Comparison of micro-computerized tomography and cone-beam computerized tomography in the detection of accessory canals in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Tatar, İlkan; Arıkan, Volkan; Çelik, Hakan Hamdi; Yüksel, Selcen; Özen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the accuracy of micro-computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting accessory canals in primary molars. Materials and Methods Forty-one extracted human primary first and second molars were embedded in wax blocks and scanned using micro-CT and CBCT. After the images were taken, the samples were processed using a clearing technique and examined under a stereomicroscope in order to establish the gold standard for this study. The specimens were classified into three groups: maxillary molars, mandibular molars with three canals, and mandibular molars with four canals. Differences between the gold standard and the observations made using the imaging methods were calculated using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient test. Results The presence of accessory canals in micro-CT images of maxillary and mandibular root canals showed a statistically significant correlation with the stereomicroscopic images used as a gold standard. No statistically significant correlation was found between the CBCT findings and the stereomicroscopic images. Conclusion Although micro-CT is not suitable for clinical use, it provides more detailed information about minor anatomical structures. However, CBCT is convenient for clinical use but may not be capable of adequately analyzing the internal anatomy of primary teeth. PMID:26730367

  10. Solitary pulmonary metastases in high-risk melanoma patients: a prospective comparison of conventional and computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Heaston, D.K.; Putman, C.E.; Rodan, B.A.; Nicholson, E.; Ravin, C.E.; Korobkin, M.; Chen, J.T.; Seigler, H.F.

    1983-07-01

    A prospective comparison of chest radiography, conventional tomography, and computed tomography (CT) in the detection or confirmation of solitary pulmonary nodules was made in 42 patients with high propensity for pulmonary metastases due to advanced local (Clark level IV or V) or regional malignant melanoma. Unequivocal nodules were revealed by chest radiography in 11 patients, conventional tomograhy in 16, and computed tomography in 20 patients. Both plain films and tomography in three of these 20 were normal, but follow-up verified pulmonary metastases. Computed tomography detected more pulmonary nodules than conventional tomography in 11 patients in addition to identifying lesions in extrapulmonary sites. Therefore, chest CT is recommended before institution of immunotherapy or surgical removal of a solitary pulmonary melanoma metastasis. Once chemotherapy had been instituted for bulky regional or cutaneous involvement, however, the findings of either conventional or computed tomography were comparable in this study.

  11. Comparison with reconstruction algorithms in magnetic induction tomography.

    PubMed

    Han, Min; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xue, Yuyan

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a kind of imaging technology, which uses the principle of electromagnetic detection to measure the conductivity distribution. In this research, we make an effort to improve the quality of image reconstruction mainly via the image reconstruction of MIT analysis, including solving the forward problem and image reconstruction. With respect to the forward problem, the variational finite element method is adopted. We transform the solution of a nonlinear partial differential equation into linear equations by using field subdividing and the appropriate interpolation function so that the voltage data of the sensing coils can be calculated. With respect to the image reconstruction, a method of modifying the iterative Newton-Raphson (NR) algorithm is presented in order to improve the quality of the image. In the iterative NR, weighting matrix and L1-norm regularization are introduced to overcome the drawbacks of large estimation errors and poor stability of the reconstruction image. On the other hand, within the incomplete-data framework of the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm, the image reconstruction can be converted to the problem of EM through the likelihood function for improving the under-determined problem. In the EM, the missing-data is introduced and the measurement data and the sensitivity matrix are compensated to overcome the drawback that the number of the measurement voltage is far less than the number of the unknown. In addition to the two aspects above, image segmentation is also used to make the lesion more flexible and adaptive to the patients' real conditions, which provides a theoretical reference for the development of the application of the MIT technique in clinical applications. The results show that solving the forward problem with the variational finite element method can provide the measurement voltage data for image reconstruction, the improved iterative NR method and EM algorithm can enhance the image

  12. Comparison of denture models by means of micro computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vögtlin, Christoph; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Jäger, Kurt; Liebrich, Thomas; Weikert, Sascha; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The production of dental inlays and crowns requires precise information on patients' teeth morphology. The conventional method is the preparation of impressions using mold materials, e.g. a silicone impression material. The disadvantage of this technique is the human choke impulse and the flavor of the material. These discomforts can be avoided by methods where a three-dimensional scanner is used for recording the teeth morphology. The present study reveals the accuracy of three model types, namely conventional impression, rapid prototyping using an oral scanner C.O.S., 3M (Schweiz) AG and milling from a proprietary resin using the oral scanner iTero, Straumann Holding AG. For each method five models were fabricated from a steel reference (standard). Using a nanotom m (phoenixǀx-ray, GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH), three-dimensional micro computed tomography data sets of the standard and the 15 models were recorded and landmark distances within the data sets were measured with sub-pixel accuracy. To verify these results a coordinate measuring machine (Leitz PMM 864, Hexagon Metrology GmbH) based on tactile detection was used for the measurement of the landmark distances, and a correction of the distances measured by the nanotom m was arranged. The nanotom data sets of the 15 models were also compared to the standard by means of a non-rigid registration algorithm. The calculated deformation field exhibited mean pixel displacement values of (0.19 +/- 0.09) mm for the C.O.S. models, (0.12 +/- 0.07) mm for the gypsum models and (0.19 +/- 0.12) mm for the i-Tero models.

  13. Microcomputer versus mainframe simulations: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengtson, Neal M.

    1988-01-01

    The research was conducted to two parts. Part one consisted of a study of the feasibility of running the Space Transportation Model simulation on an office IBM-AT. The second part was to design simulation runs so as to study the effects of certain performance factors on the execution of the simulation model. The results of this research are given in the two reports which follow: Microcomputer vs. Mainframe Simulation: A Case Study and Fractional Factorial Designs of Simulation Runs for the Space Transportation System Operations Model. In the first part, a DOS batch job was written in order to simplify the execution of the simulation model on an office microcomputer. A comparison study was then performed of running the model on NASA-Langley's mainframe computer vs. running on the IBM-AT microcomputer. This was done in order to find the advantages and disadvantages of running the model on each machine with the objective of determining if running of the office PC was practical. The study concluded that it was. The large number of performance parameters in the Space Transportation model precluded running a full factorial design needed to determine the most significant design factors. The second report gives several suggested fractional factorial designs which require far fewer simulation runs in order to determine which factors have significant influence on results.

  14. Comparison of Computed Tomography Scout Based Reference Point Localization to Conventional Film and Axial Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  15. Comparison of computed tomography scout based reference point localization to conventional film and axial computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C H

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  16. Quantitative comparison of analysis methods for spectroscopic optical coherence tomography: reply to comment

    PubMed Central

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C.G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2014-01-01

    We reply to the comment by Kraszewski et al on “Quantitative comparison of analysis methods for spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.” We present additional simulations evaluating the proposed window function. We conclude that our simulations show good qualitative agreement with the results of Kraszewski, in support of their conclusion that SOCT optimization should include window shape, next to choice of window size and analysis algorithm. PMID:25401016

  17. Comparison of Swedish and Norwegian Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: a Questionnaire Study

    PubMed Central

    Strindberg, Jerker Edén; Hol, Caroline; Torgersen, Gerald; Møystad, Anne; Nilsson, Mats; Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Cone-beam computed tomography in dentistry can be used in some countries by other dentists than specialists in radiology. The frequency of buying cone-beam computed tomography to examine patients is rapidly growing, thus knowledge of how to use it is very important. The aim was to compare the outcome of an investigation on the use of cone-beam computed tomography in Sweden with a previous Norwegian study, regarding specifically technical aspects. Material and Methods The questionnaire contained 45 questions, including 35 comparable questions to Norwegian clinics one year previous. Results were based on inter-comparison of the outcome from each of the two questionnaire studies. Results Responses rate was 71% in Sweden. There, most of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations performed by dental nurses, while in Norway by specialists. More than two-thirds of the CBCT units had a scout image function, regularly used in both Sweden (79%) and Norway (75%). In Sweden 4% and in Norway 41% of the respondents did not wait for the report from the radiographic specialist before initiating treatment. Conclusions The bilateral comparison showed an overall similarity between the two countries. The survey gave explicit and important knowledge of the need for education and training of the whole team, since radiation dose to the patient could vary a lot for the same kind of radiographic examination. It is essential to establish quality assurance protocols with defined responsibilities in the team in order to maintain high diagnostic accuracy for all examinations when using cone-beam computed tomography for patient examinations. PMID:26904179

  18. Microcomputer Backup to Online Circulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intner, Sheila

    1981-01-01

    Describes the usage and advantages of microcomputers as an alternative to manual processing when the Great Neck Library minicomputer-based automated circulation system goes down for maintenance or repair. (RAA)

  19. Microcomputers! Applications to Physics Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, Robert F.; Stringer, Gene A.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews the use of computers in various aspects of physics teaching. Introduces some basic hardware and software concepts and jargon. Illustrates these ideas using four vastly different microcomputers, with prices, to help in choosing the right educational computer system. (GA)

  20. Microcomputer Acquisition Standards and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wold, Geoffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    Increased use of microcomputers in schools can be implemented more effectively when management develops acquisitions standards and controls. Technical standards as well as operational and documentation standards are outlined. (MLF)

  1. Interfacing Microcomputers with Laboratory Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Joseph W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes development of microcomputer-controlled gamma scintillation spectrometer and chromatographic data analyzer, including design and construction of interface electronics and production of software. Includes diagrams of electric circuits and project evaluation indicating that both instruments functioned as intended. (JN)

  2. Simple Interval Timers for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.; Burgess, G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses simple interval timers for microcomputers, including (1) the Jiffy clock; (2) CPU count timers; (3) screen count timers; (4) light pen timers; and (5) chip timers. Also examines some of the general characteristics of all types of timers. (JN)

  3. Microcomputer Activities and Occupational Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Nancy

    1984-01-01

    Directed to occupational therapists, the article focuses on the applications of microcomputers to services for developmentally disabled persons. Noted are computer devices (input, output, software, and firmware); computer programs (basic and sophisticated instruction, graphics); and LOGO, a computer language.

  4. Decisions, Decisions, Decisions: Help in Choosing Microcomputer Software and Hardware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, W. Jean; Fredenburg, Anne M.

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography, prepared with the information specialist, end-user, and administrator in mind, presents citations to 167 journal articles that provide concrete comparisons of commercially-available microcomputer software packages and hardware equipment. An index divided into software and hardware sections with references to type of comparison…

  5. Microcomputer data acquisition and control.

    PubMed

    East, T D

    1986-01-01

    In medicine and biology there are many tasks that involve routine well defined procedures. These tasks are ideal candidates for computerized data acquisition and control. As the performance of microcomputers rapidly increases and cost continues to go down the temptation to automate the laboratory becomes great. To the novice computer user the choices of hardware and software are overwhelming and sadly most of the computer sales persons are not at all familiar with real-time applications. If you want to bill your patients you have hundreds of packaged systems to choose from; however, if you want to do real-time data acquisition the choices are very limited and confusing. The purpose of this chapter is to provide the novice computer user with the basics needed to set up a real-time data acquisition system with the common microcomputers. This chapter will cover the following issues necessary to establish a real time data acquisition and control system: Analysis of the research problem: Definition of the problem; Description of data and sampling requirements; Cost/benefit analysis. Choice of Microcomputer hardware and software: Choice of microprocessor and bus structure; Choice of operating system; Choice of layered software. Digital Data Acquisition: Parallel Data Transmission; Serial Data Transmission; Hardware and software available. Analog Data Acquisition: Description of amplitude and frequency characteristics of the input signals; Sampling theorem; Specification of the analog to digital converter; Hardware and software available; Interface to the microcomputer. Microcomputer Control: Analog output; Digital output; Closed-Loop Control. Microcomputer data acquisition and control in the 21st Century--What is in the future? High speed digital medical equipment networks; Medical decision making and artificial intelligence. PMID:3805859

  6. Statistical Software Packages for the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Sevilla, Comp.

    The nine microcomputer statistical software packages that are described comprise the statistical software collection at the Appalachia Educational Laboratory (AEL). The packages are compatible with AEL's Apple II microcomputer, though many are also available with other microcomputers. References to software reviews are included for some programs.…

  7. Satellite Doppler data processing using a microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.; Lynn, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A microcomputer which was developed to compute ground radio beacon position locations using satellite measurements of Doppler frequency shift is described. Both the computational algorithms and the microcomputer hardware incorporating these algorithms were discussed. Results are presented where the microcomputer in conjunction with the NIMBUS-6 random access measurement system provides real time calculation of beacon latitude and longitude.

  8. Microcomputers: A Creative Approach for Young Minds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Marilyn S.; Taitt, Henry A.

    A sound approach to microcomputer instruction takes into account the special characteristics of microcomputers and uses them creatively to enhance the basic goals of education and to prepare students for a technological society. The most significant new tool man has designed in centuries, the microcomputer features one-person operation, low cost,…

  9. Microcomputer Data Base Programs in Social Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, C. Neal

    1986-01-01

    Microcomputer uses by social researchers include writing programs, standard spreadsheets and data base management. In addition, microcomputers can increase the effectiveness and efficiency of information gathering by improving notetaking and organizing. Software developments will help make microcomputer data base management tools, now not…

  10. Diagnosis of simulated condylar bone defects using panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography: A comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Fatemeh; Shokri, Abbas; Baharvand, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Radiographic examination is one of the most important parts of the clinical assessment routine for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) with panoramic radiography and spiral computed tomography for the detection of the simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Study Design: The sample consisted of 10 TMJs from 5 dried human skulls. Simulated erosive and osteophytic lesions were created in 3 different sizes using round diamond bur and bone chips, respectively. Panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography were used in defect detection. Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. The reliability and degrees of agreement between two observers were also determined by the mean of Cohen’s Kappa analysis. Results: CBCT had a statistically significant superiority than other studied techniques in detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with different sizes. There were significant differences between tomography and panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 1mm and 1.5 mm in size. However, there were no significant differences between Tomography and Panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 0.5 mm in size. Conclusions: CBCT images provide a greater diagnostic accuracy than spiral tomography and panoramic radiography in the detection of condylar bone erosions and osteophytes. Key words:Bone defect, Condyle, CBCT, Panoramic, radiography. PMID:25810839

  11. Networking and Microcomputers. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausmeier, Jane

    Computer networks can fall into three broad categories--local area networks (LAN), microcomputer based messaging systems (this includes computer bulletin board systems), or commercial information systems. Many of the same types of activities take place within the three categories. The major differences are the types of information available and…

  12. A Microcomputer Dynamical Modelling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogborn, Jon; Wong, Denis

    1984-01-01

    Presents a system that permits students to engage directly in the process of modelling and to learn some important lessons about models and classes of models. The system described currently runs on RML 380Z and 480Z, Apple II and IIe, and BBC model B microcomputers. (JN)

  13. Bibliographic Entries with a Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machalow, Robert

    This document presents the second portion of a library research exercise developed at York College which uses the Apple IIe microcomputer and word processing software--Applewriter--to teach library research skills. The original disk required students to compile a bibliography. This document, which contains the textual information found on a…

  14. Students Discuss Microcomputers and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slatta, Richard

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the authors experience in teaching a senior-level undergraduate course entitled: "Using a Microcomputer to Enhance Historical Research and Writing." The class used Ashton-Tate's FRAMEWORK, an integrated program that combines filing, outlining, word processing, and other functions. Includes the syllabus and student reactions to the course.…

  15. Administrative Uses of the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spuck, Dennis W.; Atkinson, Gene

    1983-01-01

    An outline of microcomputer applications for administrative computing in education is followed by discussions of aspects of office automation, database management systems, management information systems, administrative computer systems, and software. Several potential problems relating to administrative computing in education are identified.…

  16. Microcomputers for Laboratory Data Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Jack D.; Esch, Harald E.

    1984-01-01

    Advantages of computerized data acquisition and three approaches to data collection are discussed. Interfacing techniques and use of microcomputers as physiological recorders are also discussed. Examples of computerized data acquisition are provided. These include computer monitoring of animal activity and collecting data from species distribution…

  17. The Microcomputer and School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembowski, Frederick L.

    1984-01-01

    Microcomputers have many cost- and time-saving uses in school transportation management. Applications include routing and scheduling, demographic analysis, fleet maintenance, and personnel and contract management. Word processing is especially promising for storing and updating documents like specifications. Enrollment forecasting and inventory…

  18. Microcomputer Business Applications. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Marcia; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to teach concepts associated with business applications of microcomputers. It can be used in marketing, office education, and computer literacy courses. Most activities can be done in less than 1 hour. The course is organized in eight units that cover the following: (1) systems and software; (2) electronic filing;…

  19. Microcomputer Modules for Undergraduate Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groop, Richard; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Described and evaluated are microcomputer units of instruction that were developed for use in undergraduate geography courses. Students responded favorably to the modules--"Socioeconomic Patterns,""Economic Rent,""Sampling Distribution of Sample Means,""Land Use Competition,""Data Classing,""Weather and Climate," and "Landforms." (RM)

  20. History Microcomputer Games: Update 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Provides full narrative reviews of B-1 Nuclear Bomber (Avalon, 1982); American History Adventure (Social Science Microcomputer Review Software, 1985); Government Simulations (Prentice-Hall, 1985); and The Great War, FDR and the New Deal, and Hitler's War, all from New Worlds Software, 1985. Lists additional information on five other history and…

  1. Microcomputers in the Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Jeanne

    1984-01-01

    A table shows the number of public schools using microcomputers, by brand, in 1982-83 and 1983-84 respectively. It reveals that Apple has extended its market dominance from 51.1 to 66.2 percent during this time. (TE)

  2. Special-Interest Microcomputing Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colsher, William L.

    1980-01-01

    This article describes computer journals, newsletters, and cassette magazines that are devoted to a particular brand of personal computer, such as the TRS-80, or to a particular microprocessor, such as the 6502, used in the Apple II, Commodore PET, and other microcomputers. Publishers' addresses and rates are listed. (Author/SJL)

  3. Microcomputer Hardware. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in microcomputer hardware is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored…

  4. Using Microcomputers to Manage Grants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Jonathan L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Features of microcomputer systems and software that can be useful in administration of research grants are outlined, including immediacy of reporting, flexibility, accurate balance availability, useful coding, accurate payroll control, and forecasting capabilities. These are contrasted with the less flexible centralized computer operation. (MSE)

  5. Educational Software Acquisition for Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erikson, Warren; Turban, Efraim

    1985-01-01

    Examination of issues involved in acquiring appropriate microcomputer software for higher education focuses on the following points: developing your own software; finding commercially available software; using published evaluations; pre-purchase testing; customizing and adapting commercial software; post-purchase testing; and software use. A…

  6. Microcomputer Operations. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in microcomputer operations is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored…

  7. Determining Readability with a Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Keith

    1985-01-01

    Discusses history of the development of computer software to determine material readability and general design of readability software. Tables present summaries of: (1) parameters used by selected readability scales and their grade level applications; and (2) microcomputer software programs available, including readability techniques included in…

  8. Comparison of global ionospheric maps, high-orbital and low-orbital radio tomography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav E.; Andreeva, Elena S.; Nesterov, Ivan A.; Kalashnikova, Svetlana A.; Padokhin, Artem M.

    2010-05-01

    Observations on the GPS receivers networks which are being actively developed at present provide the input data for constructing global ionospheric maps (GIM) of the distributions of total electron content (TEC) in the ionosphere. The methods applied in the GIM construction at several data processing centers are different although all based on the common idea of finding the appropriate model parameters to fit the selected model of the vertical distribution of electron density to the observed GPS data. At the same time, the existing global IGS network together with several regional GPS networks open the possibility for solving the problem of 4D (spatiotemporal) ionospheric radio tomography (RT) based on the data of high-orbiting navigational satellite systems (the high orbital radio tomography, HORT). The approaches used in HORT are similar to those applied and found highly efficient in 2D low-orbital radio tomography (LORT). The purpose of the present work is to compare TEC estimations based on GIMs, calculated by different centers, with HORT and LORT reconstructions observed at different geomagnetic activity. The results of such comparison along RT systems in Russia and Alaska during the periods of geomagnetic storms of 2003-2004 are reported and discussed. The reconstructions for quiet periods are basically similar, although higher GIM and HORT TEC compared to LORT TEC, which might be due to the plasmaspheric contribution, are still noteworthy. However, during the geomagnetic storms, GIM TEC significantly differs from either LORT and HORT TEC. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants nos. 10-05-01126, 08-05-00676). The authors acknowledge IGS for GNSS data. We are also grateful to our colleagues in PGI and NWRS for the shared raw RT data.

  9. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Konecky, Soren D.; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Saffer, Janet R.; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2008-01-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake. In light of these observations, we suggest potential benefits of combining both PET and DOT for characterization of breast lesions. PMID:18383664

  10. MIRAP, microcomputer reliability analysis program

    SciTech Connect

    Jehee, J.N.T.

    1989-01-01

    A program for a microcomputer is outlined that can determine minimal cut sets from a specified fault tree logic. The speed and memory limitations of the microcomputers on which the program is implemented (Atari ST and IBM) are addressed by reducing the fault tree's size and by storing the cut set data on disk. Extensive well proven fault tree restructuring techniques, such as the identification of sibling events and of independent gate events, reduces the fault tree's size but does not alter its logic. New methods are used for the Boolean reduction of the fault tree logic. Special criteria for combining events in the 'AND' and 'OR' logic avoid the creation of many subsuming cut sets which all would cancel out due to existing cut sets. Figures and tables illustrates these methods. 4 refs., 5 tabs.