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Sample records for microfluidic perfusion system

  1. Multiwell cell culture plate format with integrated microfluidic perfusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, Jim; Griffith, Linda G.

    2006-01-01

    A new cell culture analog has been developed. It is based on the standard multiwell cell culture plate format but it provides perfused three-dimensional cell culture capability. The new capability is achieved by integrating microfluidic valves and pumps into the plate. The system provides a means to conduct high throughput assays for target validation and predictive toxicology in the drug discovery and development process. It can be also used for evaluation of long-term exposure to drugs or environmental agents or as a model to study viral hepatitis, cancer metastasis, and other diseases and pathological conditions.

  2. Microfluidic perfusion systems for secretion fingerprint analysis of pancreatic islets: applications, challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Castiello, F Rafael; Heileman, Khalil; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2016-02-01

    A secretome signature is a heterogeneous profile of secretions present in a single cell type. From the secretome signature a smaller panel of proteins, namely a secretion fingerprint, can be chosen to feasibly monitor specific cellular activity. Based on a thorough appraisal of the literature, this review explores the possibility of defining and using a secretion fingerprint to gauge the functionality of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. It covers the state of the art regarding microfluidic perfusion systems used in pancreatic islet research. Candidate analytical tools to be integrated within microfluidic perfusion systems for dynamic secretory fingerprint monitoring were identified. These analytical tools include patch clamp, amperometry/voltametry, impedance spectroscopy, field effect transistors and surface plasmon resonance. Coupled with these tools, microfluidic devices can ultimately find applications in determining islet quality for transplantation, islet regeneration and drug screening of therapeutic agents for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:26732665

  3. Simplified prototyping of perfusable polystyrene microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Reginald; Ahn, Byungwook; R. Myers, David; Qiu, Yongzhi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Moot, Robert; Mihevc, Emma; Trent Spencer, H.; Doering, Christopher; A. Lam, Wilbur

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture in microfluidic systems has primarily been conducted in devices comprised of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or other elastomers. As polystyrene (PS) is the most characterized and commonly used substrate material for cell culture, microfluidic cell culture would ideally be conducted in PS-based microsystems that also enable tight control of perfusion and hydrodynamic conditions, which are especially important for culture of vascular cell types. Here, we report a simple method to prototype perfusable PS microfluidics for endothelial cell culture under flow that can be fabricated using standard lithography and wet laboratory equipment to enable stable perfusion at shear stresses up to 300 dyn/cm2 and pumping pressures up to 26 kPa for at least 100 h. This technique can also be extended to fabricate perfusable hybrid PS-PDMS microfluidics of which one application is for increased efficiency of viral transduction in non-adherent suspension cells by leveraging the high surface area to volume ratio of microfluidics and adhesion molecules that are optimized for PS substrates. These biologically compatible microfluidic devices can be made more accessible to biological-based laboratories through the outsourcing of lithography to various available microfluidic foundries. PMID:25379106

  4. Development of an Integrated Microfluidic Perfusion Cell Culture System for Real-Time Microscopic Observation of Biological Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lung; Wang, Shih-Siou; Wu, Min-Hsien; Oh-Yang, Chih-Chin

    2011-01-01

    This study reports an integrated microfluidic perfusion cell culture system consisting of a microfluidic cell culture chip, and an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass-based microheater chip for micro-scale perfusion cell culture, and its real-time microscopic observation. The system features in maintaining both uniform, and stable chemical or thermal environments, and providing a backflow-free medium pumping, and a precise thermal control functions. In this work, the performance of the medium pumping scheme, and the ITO glass microheater were experimentally evaluated. Results show that the medium delivery mechanism was able to provide pumping rates ranging from 15.4 to 120.0 μL·min−1. In addition, numerical simulation and experimental evaluation were conducted to verify that the ITO glass microheater was capable of providing a spatially uniform thermal environment, and precise temperature control with a mild variation of ±0.3 °C. Furthermore, a perfusion cell culture was successfully demonstrated, showing the cultured cells were kept at high cell viability of 95 ± 2%. In the process, the cultured chondrocytes can be clearly visualized microscopically. As a whole, the proposed cell culture system has paved an alternative route to carry out real-time microscopic observation of biological cells in a simple, user-friendly, and low cost manner. PMID:22164082

  5. Control of perfusable microvascular network morphology using a multiculture microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Whisler, Jordan A; Chen, Michelle B; Kamm, Roger D

    2014-07-01

    The mechanical and biochemical microenvironment influences the morphological characteristics of microvascular networks (MVNs) formed by endothelial cells (ECs) undergoing the process of vasculogenesis. The objective of this study was to quantify the role of individual factors in determining key network parameters in an effort to construct a set of design principles for engineering vascular networks with prescribed morphologies. To achieve this goal, we developed a multiculture microfluidic platform enabling precise control over paracrine signaling, cell-seeding densities, and hydrogel mechanical properties. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded in fibrin gels and cultured alongside human lung fibroblasts (HLFs). The engineered vessels formed in our device contained patent, perfusable lumens. Communication between the two cell types was found to be critical in avoiding network regression and maintaining stable morphology beyond 4 days. The number of branches, average branch length, percent vascularized area, and average vessel diameter were found to depend uniquely on several input parameters. Importantly, multiple inputs were found to control any given output network parameter. For example, the vessel diameter can be decreased either by applying angiogenic growth factors--vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and sphingosine-1-phsophate (S1P)--or by increasing the fibrinogen concentration in the hydrogel. These findings introduce control into the design of MVNs with specified morphological properties for tissue-specific engineering applications. PMID:24151838

  6. A pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vasiliy N; Tran, Elizabeth; Yuen, Po Ki

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic platform for passive fluid pumping for pump-free perfusion cell culture, cell-based assay, and chemical applications. By adapting the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle from the previously developed perfusion microplate, which utilizes a combination of hydrostatic pressure generated by different liquid levels in the wells and fluid wicking through narrow strips of a porous membrane connecting the wells to generate fluid flow, a series of pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic devices was developed and their use for pump-free perfusion cell culture and cell-based assays was demonstrated. Each pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic device comprises at least three basic components: an open well for generating fluid flow, a micron-sized deep chamber/channel for cell culture or for fluid connection, and a wettable porous membrane for controlling the fluid flow. Each component is fluidically connected either by the porous membrane or by the micron-sized deep chamber/channel. By adapting and incorporating the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle into microfluidic devices, all the benefits of microfluidic technologies, such as small sample volumes, fast and efficient fluid exchanges, and fluid properties at the micro-scale, can be fully taken advantage of with this pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform. PMID:26392835

  7. A perfusion-capable microfluidic bioreactor for assessing microbial heterologous protein production.

    PubMed

    Mozdzierz, Nicholas J; Love, Kerry R; Lee, Kevin S; Lee, Harry L T; Shah, Kartik A; Ram, Rajeev J; Love, J Christopher

    2015-07-21

    We present an integrated microfluidic bioreactor for fully continuous perfusion cultivation of suspended microbial cell cultures. This system allowed continuous and stable heterologous protein expression by sustaining the cultivation of Pichia pastoris over 11 days. This technical capability also allowed testing the impact of perfusion conditions on protein expression. This advance should enable small-scale models for process optimization in continuous biomanufacturing. PMID:26055071

  8. A perfusion-capable microfluidic bioreactor for assessing microbial heterologous protein production

    PubMed Central

    Mozdzierz, Nicholas J.; Love, Kerry R.; Lee, Kevin S.; Lee, Harry L. T.; Shah, Kartik A.; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-01-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic bioreactor for fully continuous perfusion cultivation of suspended microbial cell cultures. This system allowed continuous and stable heterologous protein expression by sustaining the cultivation of Pichia pastoris over 11 days. This technical capability also allowed testing the impact of perfusion conditions on protein expression. This advance should enable small-scale models for process optimization in continuous biomanufacturing. PMID:26055071

  9. An integrated microfluidic cell culture system for high-throughput perfusion three-dimensional cell culture-based assays: effect of cell culture model on the results of chemosensitivity assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Wang, Shih-Siou; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Yung Chang; Lai, Chao-Sung; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2013-03-21

    Although microfluidic cell culture systems are versatile tools for cellular assays, their use has yet to set in motion an evolutionary shift away from conventional cell culture methods. This situation is mainly due to technical hurdles: the operational barriers to the end-users, the lack of compatible detection schemes capable of reading out the results of a microfluidic-based cellular assay, and the lack of fundamental data to bridge the gap between microfluidic and conventional cell culture models. To address these issues, we propose a high-throughput, perfusion, three-dimensional (3-D) microfluidic cell culture system encompassing 30 microbioreactors. This integrated system not only aims to provide a user-friendly cell culture tool for biologists to perform assays but also to enable them to obtain precise data. Its technical features include (i) integration of a heater chip based on transparent indium tin oxide glass, providing stable thermal conditions for cell culturing; (ii) a microscale 3-D culture sample loading scheme that is both efficient and precise; (iii) a non-mechanical pneumatically driven multiplex medium perfusion mechanism; and (iv) a microplate reader-compatible waste medium collector array for the subsequent high throughput bioassays. In this study, we found that the 3-D culture sample loading method provided uniform sample loading [coefficient of variation (CV): 3.2%]. In addition, the multiplex medium perfusion mechanism led to reasonably uniform (CV: 3.6-6.9%) medium pumping rates in the 30 microchannels. Moreover, we used the proposed system to perform a successful cell culture-based chemosensitivity assay. To determine the effects of cell culture models on the cellular proliferation, and the results of chemosensitivity assays, we compared our data with that obtained using three conventional cell culture models. We found that the nature of the cell culture format could lead to different evaluation outcomes. Consequently, when establishing a

  10. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation. PMID:26322723

  11. Continuous perfusion microfluidic cell culture array for high-throughput cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hung, Paul J; Lee, Philip J; Sabounchi, Poorya; Lin, Robert; Lee, Luke P

    2005-01-01

    We present for the first time a microfluidic cell culture array for long-term cellular monitoring. The 10 x 10 array could potentially assay 100 different cell-based experiments in parallel. The device was designed to integrate the processes used in typical cell culture experiments on a single self-contained microfluidic system. Major functions include repeated cell growth/passage cycles, reagent introduction, and real-time optical analysis. The single unit of the array consists of a circular microfluidic chamber, multiple narrow perfusion channels surrounding the main chamber, and four ports for fluidic access. Human carcinoma (HeLa) cells were cultured inside the device with continuous perfusion of medium at 37 degrees C. The observed doubling time was 1.4 +/- 0.1 days with a peak cell density of approximately 2.5*10(5) cells/cm(2). Cell assay was demonstrated by monitoring the fluorescence localization of calcein AM from 1 min to 10 days after reagent introduction. Confluent cell cultures were passaged within the microfluidic chambers using trypsin and successfully regrown, suggesting a stable culture environment suitable for continuous operation. The cell culture array could offer a platform for a wide range of assays with applications in drug screening, bioinformatics, and quantitative cell biology. PMID:15580587

  12. Experimental Microfluidic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbertson, Christopher; Gonda, Steve; Ramsey, John Michael

    2005-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to integrate microfluidic devices with NASA's space bioreactor systems. In such a system, the microfluidic device would provide realtime feedback control of the bioreactor by monitoring pH, glucose, and lactate levels in the cell media; and would provide an analytical capability to the bioreactor in exterrestrial environments for monitoring bioengineered cell products and health changes in cells due to environmental stressors. Such integrated systems could be used as biosentinels both in space and on planet surfaces. The objective is to demonstrate the ability of microfabricated devices to repeatedly and reproducibly perform bead cytometry experiments in micro, lunar, martian, and hypergravity (1.8g).

  13. Perfused drop microfluidic device for brain slice culture-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Pan, Liping; Cheng, Xuanhong; Berdichevsky, Yevgeny

    2016-06-01

    Living slices of brain tissue are widely used to model brain processes in vitro. In addition to basic neurophysiology studies, brain slices are also extensively used for pharmacology, toxicology, and drug discovery research. In these experiments, high parallelism and throughput are critical. Capability to conduct long-term electrical recording experiments may also be necessary to address disease processes that require protein synthesis and neural circuit rewiring. We developed a novel perfused drop microfluidic device for use with long term cultures of brain slices (organotypic cultures). Slices of hippocampus were placed into wells cut in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film. Fluid level in the wells was hydrostatically controlled such that a drop was formed around each slice. The drops were continuously perfused with culture medium through microchannels. We found that viable organotypic hippocampal slice cultures could be maintained for at least 9 days in vitro. PDMS microfluidic network could be readily integrated with substrate-printed microelectrodes for parallel electrical recordings of multiple perfused organotypic cultures on a single MEA chip. We expect that this highly scalable perfused drop microfluidic device will facilitate high-throughput drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:27194028

  14. Blood Perfusion in Microfluidic Models of Pulmonary Capillary Networks: Role of Geometry and Hematocrit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, Hagit; Waisman, Dan; Sznitman, Josue; Technion-IIT Team; Department of Neonatology Carmel Medical Center; Faculty of Medicine-Technion IIT Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic platforms are increasingly used to study blood microflows at true physiological scale due to their ability to overcome manufacturing obstacle of complex anatomical morphologies, such as the organ-specific architectures of the microcirculation. In the present work, we utilize microfluidic platforms to devise in vitro models of the underlying pulmonary capillary networks (PCN), where capillary lengths and diameters are similar to the size of RBCs (~ 5-10 μm). To better understand flow characteristics and dispersion of red blood cells (RBCs) in PCNs, we have designed microfluidic models of alveolar capillary beds inspired by the seminal ``sheet flow'' model of Fung and Sobin (1969). Our microfluidic PCNs feature confined arrays of staggered pillars with diameters of ~ 5,7 and 10 μm, mimicking the dense structure of pulmonary capillary meshes. The devices are perfused with suspensions of RBCs at varying hematocrit levels under different flow rates. Whole-field velocity patterns using micro-PIV and single-cell tracking using PTV are obtained with fluorescently-labelled RBCs and discussed. Our experiments deliver a real-scale quantitative description of RBC perfusion characteristics across the pulmonary capillary microcirculation.

  15. A microfluidic perfusion platform for cultivation and screening study of motile microalgal cells

    PubMed Central

    Eu, Young-Jae; Park, Hye-Sun; Kim, Dong-Pyo; Wook Hong, Jong

    2014-01-01

    Systematic screening of algal cells is getting huge interest due to their capability of producing lipid-based biodiesel. Here, we introduce a new microfluidic platform composed of an array of perfusion chambers designed for long-term cultivation and preliminary screening of motile microalgal cells through loading and releasing of cells to and from the chambers. The chemical environment in each perfusion chamber was independently controlled for 5 days. The effect of nitrogen-depletion on the lipid production, phototaxis behavior in the absence of Ca2+, and cytotoxic effect of herbicide on microalgal cells was successfully monitored and compared with simultaneous control experiments on the platform. The present methodology could be extended to effective screening of algal cells and various cell lines for the production of biodiesel and other useful chemicals. PMID:24803962

  16. Ice matrix in reconfigurable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, A. M.; Vareijka, M.; Piletska, E. V.; Turner, A. P. F.; Meglinski, I.; Piletsky, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Microfluidic devices find many applications in biotechnologies. Here, we introduce a flexible and biocompatible microfluidic ice-based platform with tunable parameters and configuration of microfluidic patterns that can be changed multiple times during experiments. Freezing and melting of cavities, channels and complex relief structures created and maintained in the bulk of ice by continuous scanning of an infrared laser beam are used as a valve action in microfluidic systems. We demonstrate that pre-concentration of samples and transport of ions and dyes through the open channels created can be achieved in ice microfluidic patterns by IR laser-assisted zone melting. The proposed approach can be useful for performing separation and sensing processes in flexible reconfigurable microfluidic devices.

  17. Microfluidic Systems for Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kuo-Kang; Wu, Ren-Guei; Chuang, Yun-Ju; Khoo, Hwa Seng; Huang, Shih-Hao; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2010-01-01

    In the past two decades, Micro Fluidic Systems (MFS) have emerged as a powerful tool for biosensing, particularly in enriching and purifying molecules and cells in biological samples. Compared with conventional sensing techniques, distinctive advantages of using MFS for biomedicine include ultra-high sensitivity, higher throughput, in-situ monitoring and lower cost. This review aims to summarize the recent advancements in two major types of micro fluidic systems, continuous and discrete MFS, as well as their biomedical applications. The state-of-the-art of active and passive mechanisms of fluid manipulation for mixing, separation, purification and concentration will also be elaborated. Future trends of using MFS in detection at molecular or cellular level, especially in stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, are also prospected. PMID:22163570

  18. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  19. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  20. Self-contained microfluidic systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Boyd-Moss, Mitchell; Baratchi, Sara; Di Venere, Martina; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2016-08-16

    Microfluidic systems enable rapid diagnosis, screening and monitoring of diseases and health conditions using small amounts of biological samples and reagents. Despite these remarkable features, conventional microfluidic systems rely on bulky expensive external equipment, which hinders their utility as powerful analysis tools outside of research laboratories. 'Self-contained' microfluidic systems, which contain all necessary components to facilitate a complete assay, have been developed to address this limitation. In this review, we provide an in-depth overview of self-contained microfluidic systems. We categorise these systems based on their operating mechanisms into three major groups: passive, hand-powered and active. Several examples are provided to discuss the structure, capabilities and shortcomings of each group. In particular, we discuss the self-contained microfluidic systems enabled by active mechanisms, due to their unique capability for running multi-step and highly controllable diagnostic assays. Integration of self-contained microfluidic systems with the image acquisition and processing capabilities of smartphones, especially those equipped with accessory optical components, enables highly sensitive and quantitative assays, which are discussed. Finally, the future trends and possible solutions to expand the versatility of self-contained, stand-alone microfluidic platforms are outlined. PMID:27425637

  1. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    West, Jay A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  2. Magnetoactive Sponges for Dynamic Control of Microfluidic Flow Patterns in Microphysiological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ringo; Chan, Hon Fai; Leong, Kam W; Truskey, George A; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2014-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic flow-control system capable of dynamically generating various flow patterns on demand. The flow-control system is based on novel magnetoactive sponges embedded in microfluidic flow channels. Applying a non-uniform magnetic field compresses the magnetoactive sponge, significantly reducing porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Tuning the applied magnetic field can dynamically vary the flow rate in the microfluidic channel. Pulsatile and physiological flow patterns with frequency between 1 and 3 Hz, flow rates between 0.5 and 10 μL/min and duration over 3 weeks have been achieved. Smooth muscle cells in engineered blood vessels perfused for 7 days aligned perpendicular to the flow direction under pulsatile but not steady flow, similar to the in vivo orientation. Owing to its various advantages over traditional flow-control methods, the new system potentially has important applications in microfluidic-based microphysiological systems to simulate the physiological nature of blood flow. PMID:24310854

  3. Bio-functionalized silk hydrogel microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siwei; Chen, Ying; Partlow, Benjamin P; Golding, Anne S; Tseng, Peter; Coburn, Jeannine; Applegate, Matthew B; Moreau, Jodie E; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2016-07-01

    Bio-functionalized microfluidic systems were developed based on a silk protein hydrogel elastomeric materials. A facile multilayer fabrication method using gelatin sacrificial molding and layer-by-layer assembly was implemented to construct interconnected, three dimensional (3D) microchannel networks in silk hydrogels at 100 μm minimum feature resolution. Mechanically activated valves were implemented to demonstrate pneumatic control of microflow. The silk hydrogel microfluidics exhibit controllable mechanical properties, long-term stability in various environmental conditions, tunable in vitro and in vivo degradability in addition to optical transparency, providing unique features for cell/tissue-related applications than conventional polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and existing hydrogel-based microfluidic options. As demonstrated in the work here, the all aqueous-based fabrication process at ambient conditions enabled the incorporation of active biological substances in the bulk phase of these new silk microfluidic systems during device fabrication, including enzymes and living cells, which are able to interact with the fluid flow in the microchannels. These silk hydrogel-based microfluidic systems offer new opportunities in engineering active diagnostic devices, tissues and organs that could be integrated in vivo, and for on-chip cell sensing systems. PMID:27077566

  4. Polymer-based platform for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William; Krulevitch, Peter; Maghribi, Mariam; Hamilton, Julie; Rose, Klint; Wang, Amy W.

    2009-10-13

    A method of forming a polymer-based microfluidic system platform using network building blocks selected from a set of interconnectable network building blocks, such as wire, pins, blocks, and interconnects. The selected building blocks are interconnectably assembled and fixedly positioned in precise positions in a mold cavity of a mold frame to construct a three-dimensional model construction of a microfluidic flow path network preferably having meso-scale dimensions. A hardenable liquid, such as poly (dimethylsiloxane) is then introduced into the mold cavity and hardened to form a platform structure as well as to mold the microfluidic flow path network having channels, reservoirs and ports. Pre-fabricated elbows, T's and other joints are used to interconnect various building block elements together. After hardening the liquid the building blocks are removed from the platform structure to make available the channels, cavities and ports within the platform structure. Microdevices may be embedded within the cast polymer-based platform, or bonded to the platform structure subsequent to molding, to create an integrated microfluidic system. In this manner, the new microfluidic platform is versatile and capable of quickly generating prototype systems, and could easily be adapted to a manufacturing setting.

  5. Perfusion and Characterization of an Endothelial Cell-Seeded Modular Tissue Engineered Construct Formed in a Microfluidic Remodeling Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Omar F.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineered constructs containing tortuous endothelial cell-lined perfusion channels were formed by randomly assembling endothelial cell-seeded submillimeter-sized collagen cylinders (modules) into a microfluidic perfusion chamber. The interconnected void space produced by random module packing created flow channels that were lined with endothelial cells. The effect of perfusion (0.5 mL min−1, Re* = 14.36 and shear stress = 0.64 dyn cm−2) through the tortuous channels on construct remodeling and endothelium quiescence was studied. Over time, modules fused at their points of contact and as they contracted, decreased the internal void space, which reduced the overall perfusion through the construct. As compared to static controls, perfusion caused a transient increase in activation (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression) after 1 hour followed by a decrease after 24 hours. Proliferation (by BrdU) was reduced significantly, while KLF2, which is upregulated with atheroprotective laminar shear stress, was upregulated significantly after 24 hours. VE-cadherin became discontinuous and was significantly downregulated after 24 hours, which was likely caused by the dismantling of the endothelial cell adherens junctions during remodeling. Collectively, these outcomes suggest that flow through the construct did not drive the endothelial cells towards an inflamed, “atherosclerotic like” disturbed flow pathology. PMID:20678792

  6. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  7. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  8. Integrated perfusion and separation systems for entrainment of insulin secretion from islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Schrell, Adrian M; Mukhitov, Nikita; Roper, Michael G

    2015-02-01

    A microfluidic system was developed to investigate the entrainment of insulin secretion from islets of Langerhans to oscillatory glucose levels. A gravity-driven perfusion system was integrated with a microfluidic system to deliver sinusoidal glucose waveforms to the islet chamber. Automated manipulation of the height of the perfusion syringes allowed precise control of the ratio of two perfusion solutions into a chamber containing 1-10 islets. Insulin levels in the perfusate were measured using an online competitive electrophoretic immunoassay with a sampling period of 10 s. The insulin immunoassay had a detection limit of 3 nM with RSDs of calibration points ranging from 2-8%. At 11 mM glucose, insulin secretion from single islets was oscillatory with a period ranging from 3-6 min. Application of a small amplitude sinusoidal wave of glucose with a period of 5 or 10 min, shifted the period of the insulin oscillations to this forcing period. Exposing groups of 6-10 islets to a sinusoidal glucose wave synchronized their behavior, producing a coherent pulsatile insulin response from the population. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the developed system for the study of oscillatory insulin secretion and can be easily modified for investigating the dynamic nature of other hormones released from different cell types. PMID:25474044

  9. Microfluidic systems for single DNA dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Danielle J.; Brockman, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microfluidics have enabled the molecular-level study of polymer dynamics using single DNA chains. Single polymer studies based on fluorescence microscopy allow for the direct observation of non-equilibrium polymer conformations and dynamical phenomena such as diffusion, relaxation, and molecular stretching pathways in flow. Microfluidic devices have enabled the precise control of model flow fields to study the non-equilibrium dynamics of soft materials, with device geometries including curved channels, cross-slots, and microfabricated obstacles and structures. This review explores recent microfluidic systems that have advanced the study of single polymer dynamics, while identifying new directions in the field that will further elucidate the relationship between polymer microstructure and bulk rheological properties. PMID:23139700

  10. Recent advances in microfluidic detection systems

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher A; Duong, Cindy T; Grimley, Alix; Roper, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous detection methods available for methods are being put to use for detection on these miniaturized systems, with the analyte of interest driving the choice of detection method. In this article, we summarize microfluidic 2 years. More focus is given to unconventional approaches to detection routes and novel strategies for performing high-sensitivity detection. PMID:20414455

  11. Fundamental principles and applications of microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Ong, Soon-Eng; Zhang, Sam; Du, Hejun; Fu, Yongqing

    2008-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology has provided the platform for the miniaturization of analytical devices for biological applications. Beside the fabrication technology, the study and understanding of flow characteristics of fluid in micrometer or even nanometer scale is vital for the successful implementation of such miniaturized systems. Microfluidics is currently under the spotlight for medical diagnostics and many other bio-analysis as its physical size manifested numerous advantages over lab-based devices. In this review, elementary concepts of fluid and its flow characteristics together with various transport processes and microchannel condition are presented. They are among the fundamental building block for the success in microfluidic systems. Selected application examples include biological cell handling employing different schemes of manipulation and DNA amplification using different microreactor arrangement and fluid flow regime. PMID:17981751

  12. Microfluidic-Based Robotic Sampling System for Radioactive Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Julia L. Tripp; Tara E. Smith; Veronica J. Rutledge; Troy G. Garn; John Svoboda; Larry Macaluso

    2014-02-01

    A novel microfluidic based robotic sampling system has been developed for sampling and analysis of liquid solutions in nuclear processes. This system couples the use of a microfluidic sample chip with a robotic system designed to allow remote, automated sampling of process solutions in-cell and facilitates direct coupling of the microfluidic sample chip with analytical instrumentation. This system provides the capability for near real time analysis, reduces analytical waste, and minimizes the potential for personnel exposure associated with traditional sampling methods. A prototype sampling system was designed, built and tested. System testing demonstrated operability of the microfluidic based sample system and identified system modifications to optimize performance.

  13. Microfluidic Biosensing Systems Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Keplinger, Franz

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses) into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:24022689

  14. Self-driven perfusion culture system using a paper-based double-layered scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Ai; Arisaka, Yoshinori; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Shear stress caused by fluid flow is known to promote tissue development from cells in vivo. Therefore, perfusion cultures have been studied to investigate the mechanisms involved and to fabricate engineered tissues in vitro, particularly those that include blood vessels. Microfluidic devices, which function with fine machinery of chambers and microsyringes for fluid flow and have small culture areas, are conventionally used for perfusion culture. In contrast, we have developed a self-driven perfusion culture system by using a paper-based double-layered scaffold as the fundamental component. Gelatin microfibers were electrospun onto a paper material to prepare the scaffold system, in which the constant perfusion of the medium and the scaffold for cell adhesion/proliferation were functionally divided into a paper and a gelatin microfiber layer, respectively. By applying both the capillary action and siphon phenomenon of the paper-based scaffold, which bridged two medium chambers at different height levels, a self-driven medium flow was achieved and the flow rate was also stable, constant, and quantitatively controllable. Moreover, the culture area was enlargeable to the cm(2) scale. The endothelial cells cultivated on this system oriented along the medium-flow direction, suggesting that the shear stress caused by medium flow was effectively applied. This perfusion culture system is expected to be useful for fabricating three-dimensional and large engineered tissues in the future. PMID:27550929

  15. Electrostatic actuators for portable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Joshua

    Both developed and developing nations have an urgent need to diagnose disease cheaply, reliably, and independently of centralized facilities. Microfulidic platforms are well-positioned to address the need for portable diagnostics, mainly due to their obvious advantage in size. However, most microfluidic methods rely on equipment outside of the chip either for driving fluid flow (e.g., syringe pumps) or for taking measurements (e.g., lasers or microscopes). The energy and space requirements of the whole system inhibit portability and contribute to costs. To capitalize on the strengths of microfluidic platforms and address the serious needs of society, system components need to be miniaturized. Also, miniaturization should be accomplished as simply as possible, considering that simplicity is usually requisite for achieving truly transformative technology. Herein, I attempt to address the issue of controlling fluid flow in portable microfluidic systems. I focus on systems that are driven by elastomer-based membrane valves, since these valves are inherently simple, yet they are capable of sophisticated fluid manipulation. Others have attempted to modify pneumatic microvalves for portable applications, e.g., by transitioning to electromagnetic, thermopneumatic, or piezoelectric actuation principles. However, none of these strategies maintain the proper balance of simplicity, functionality, and ease of integration. My research centers on electrostatic actuators, due to their conceptual simplicity and the efficacy of electrostatic forces on the microscale. To ensure easy integration with polymer-based systems, and to maintain simplicity in the fabrication procedure, the actuators were constructed solely from poly(dimethylsiloxane) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the actuators were fabricated exclusively with soft-lithographic techniques. A mathematical model was developed to identify actuator parameters compatible with soft-lithography, and also to

  16. Microfluidic Impedimetric Cell Regeneration Assay to Monitor the Enhanced Cytotoxic Effect of Nanomaterial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rothbauer, Mario; Praisler, Irene; Docter, Dominic; Stauber, Roland H.; Ertl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the application of nanomaterials (NMs) in technical products and biomedicine has become a rapidly increasing market trend. As the safety and efficacy of NMs are of utmost importance, new methods are needed to study the dynamic interactions of NMs at the nano-biointerface. However, evaluation of NMs based on standard and static cell culture end-point detection methods does not provide information on the dynamics of living biological systems, which is crucial for the understanding of physiological responses. To bridge this technological gap, we here present a microfluidic cell culture system containing embedded impedance microsensors to continuously and non-invasively monitor the effects of NMs on adherent cells under varying flow conditions. As a model, the impact of silica NMs on the vitality and regenerative capacity of human lung cells after acute and chronic exposure scenarios was studied over an 18-h period following a four-hour NM treatment. Results of the study demonstrated that the developed system is applicable to reliably analyze the consequences of dynamic NM exposure to physiological cell barriers in both nanotoxicology and nanomedicine. PMID:26633532

  17. Microfluidic Impedimetric Cell Regeneration Assay to Monitor the Enhanced Cytotoxic Effect of Nanomaterial Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Rothbauer, Mario; Praisler, Irene; Docter, Dominic; Stauber, Roland H; Ertl, Peter

    2015-12-01

    In the last decade, the application of nanomaterials (NMs) in technical products and biomedicine has become a rapidly increasing market trend. As the safety and efficacy of NMs are of utmost importance, new methods are needed to study the dynamic interactions of NMs at the nano-biointerface. However, evaluation of NMs based on standard and static cell culture end-point detection methods does not provide information on the dynamics of living biological systems, which is crucial for the understanding of physiological responses. To bridge this technological gap, we here present a microfluidic cell culture system containing embedded impedance microsensors to continuously and non-invasively monitor the effects of NMs on adherent cells under varying flow conditions. As a model, the impact of silica NMs on the vitality and regenerative capacity of human lung cells after acute and chronic exposure scenarios was studied over an 18-h period following a four-hour NM treatment. Results of the study demonstrated that the developed system is applicable to reliably analyze the consequences of dynamic NM exposure to physiological cell barriers in both nanotoxicology and nanomedicine. PMID:26633532

  18. Cell-based bioassays in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itle, Laura J.; Zguris, Jeanna C.; Pishko, Michael V.

    2004-12-01

    The development of cell-based bioassays for high throughput drug screening or the sensing of biotoxins is contingent on the development of whole cell sensors for specific changes in intracellular conditions and the integration of those systems into sample delivery devices. Here we show the feasibility of using a 5-(and-6)-carboxy SNARF-1, acetoxymethyl ester, acetate, a fluorescent dye capable of responding to changes in intracellular pH, as a detection method for the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide. We used photolithography to entrap cells with this dye within poly(ethylene) glyocol diacrylate hydrogels in microfluidic channels. After 18 hours of exposure to lipopolysaccharide, we were able to see visible changes in the fluorescent pattern. This work shows the feasibility of using whole cell based biosensors within microfluidic networks to detect cellular changes in response to exogenous agents.

  19. Structure and fabrication details of an integrated modularized microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingchang; Mu, Ying; Xu, Yanan; Song, Qi; Yu, Bingwen; Ma, Congcong; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan

    2015-12-01

    This article contains schemes, original experimental data and figures for an integrated modularized microfluidic system described in "An integrated microfluidic system for bovine DNA purification and digital PCR detection [1]". In this data article, we described the structure and fabrication of the integrated modularized microfluidic system. This microfluidic system was applied to isolate DNA from ovine tissue lysate and detect the bovine DNA with digital PCR (dPCR). The DNA extraction efficiency of the microdevice was compared with the efficiency of benchtop protocol. PMID:26594657

  20. 3D functional and perfusable microvascular networks for organotypic microfluidic models.

    PubMed

    Bersini, Simone; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-05-01

    The metastatic dissemination of cancer cells from primary tumors to secondary loci is a complex and multistep process including local invasion, intravasation, survival in the blood stream and extravasation towards the metastatic site. It is well known cancer metastases follow organ-specific pathways with selected primary tumors mainly metastasizing towards a specific panel of secondary organs (Steven Paget's theory 1889). However, circulatory patterns and microarchitecture of capillary networks play a key role in the metastatic spread as well (James Ewing's theory 1929). Taking into account both these factors would be critical to develop more complex and physiologically relevant in vitro cancer models. This review presents recent advances in the generation of microvascularized systems through microfluidic approaches and discusses promising results achieved by organ-on-a-chip platforms mimicking the pathophysiology of the functional units of specific organs. The combination of physiologically-like microvascular networks and organotypic microenvironments would foster a new generation of in vitro cancer models to more effectively screen new therapeutics, design personalized medicine treatments and investigate molecular pathways involved in cancer metastases. PMID:25893395

  1. Real-time monitoring system for microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapuppo, F.; Cantelli, G.; Fortuna, L.; Arena, P.; Bucolo, M.

    2007-05-01

    A new non-invasive real-time system for the monitoring and control of microfluidodynamic phenomena is proposed. The general purpose design of such system is suitable for in vitro and in vivo experimental setup and therefore for microfluidic application in the biomedical field such as lab-on-chip and for research studies in the field of microcirculation. The system consists of an ad hoc optical setup for image magnification providing images suitable for image acquisition and processing. The optic system was designed and developed using discrete opto-mechanic components mounted on a breadboard in order to provide an optic path accessible at any point where the information needs to be acquired. The optic sensing, acquisition, and processing were performed using an integrated vision system based on the Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) analogic technology called Focal Plane Processor (FPP, Eye-RIS, Anafocus) and inserted in the optic path. Ad hoc algorithms were implemented for the real-time analysis and extraction of fluido-dynamic parameters in micro-channels. They were tested on images recorded during in vivo microcirculation experiments on hamsters and then they were applied on images optically acquired and processed in real-time during in vitro experiments on a continuous microfluidic device (serpentine mixer, ThinXXS) with a two-phase fluid.

  2. A Phantom Tissue System for the Calibration of Perfusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Scott, Elaine P.; Diller, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to simulate the nondirectional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent® to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue when a thermal event (convective cooling) is applied. The blood perfusion and contact resistance are estimated by a parameter estimation code. From the experimental and analytical results, it was concluded that the probe displayed good measurement repeatability and sensitivity. The experimental perfusion measurements in the tissue were in good agreement with those of the CFD models and demonstrated the value of the phantom tissue system. PMID:19045509

  3. Microfluidic Systems for Studying Neurotransmitters and Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Croushore, Callie A.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators are molecules within the nervous system that play key roles in cell-to-cell communication. Upon stimulation, neurons release these signaling molecules, which then act at local or distant locations to elicit a physiological response. Ranging from small molecules, such as diatomic gases and amino acids, to larger peptides, these chemical messengers are involved in many functional processes including growth, reproduction, memory and behavior. Understanding signaling molecules and the conditions that govern their release in healthy or damaged networks promises to deliver insights into neural network formation and function. Microfluidic devices can provide optimal cell culture conditions, reduced volume systems, and precise control over the chemical and physical nature of the extracellular environment, making them well-suited for studying neurotransmission and other forms of cell-to-cell signaling. Here we review selected microfluidic approaches that are suitable for monitoring cell-to-cell signaling molecules. We highlight devices that improve in vivo sample collection as well as compartmentalized devices designed to isolate individual neurons or co-cultures in vitro, including a focus on systems used for studying neural injury and regeneration, and devices that allow selective chemical stimulations and the characterization of released molecules. PMID:23474943

  4. Integrated Multi-process Microfluidic Systems for Automating Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weichun; Woolley, Adam T.

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies have been applied extensively in rapid sample analysis. Some current challenges for standard microfluidic systems are relatively high detection limits, and reduced resolving power and peak capacity compared to conventional approaches. The integration of multiple functions and components onto a single platform can overcome these separation and detection limitations of microfluidics. Multiplexed systems can greatly increase peak capacity in multidimensional separations and can increase sample throughput by analyzing many samples simultaneously. On-chip sample preparation, including labeling, preconcentration, cleanup and amplification, can all serve to speed up and automate processes in integrated microfluidic systems. This paper summarizes advances in integrated multi-process microfluidic systems for automated analysis, their benefits and areas for needed improvement. PMID:20514343

  5. Imaging of oxygen in microreactors and microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shiwen; Ungerböck, Birgit; Mayr, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    This review gives an overview on the state-of-the-art of oxygen imaging in microfluidics. Oxygen imaging using optical oxygen sensors based on luminescence is a versatile and powerful tool for obtaining profoundly space-resolved information of oxygen in microreactors and microfluidic systems. We briefly introduce the principle of oxygen imaging and present techniques of oxygen imaging applied in microreactors and microfluidic devices, including selection criteria and demands of sensing material and basic set-up for a 2D oxygen sensing system. A detailed review of oxygen imaging in microreactors and microfluidic systems is given on different applications in oxygen gradient monitoring, cell culturing, single-cell analysis and chemical reactions. Finally, we discuss challenges and trends of oxygen imaging in microfluidic systems.

  6. Microfluidic System for Automated Cell-based Assays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip J; Ghorashian, Navid; Gaige, Terry A; Hung, Paul J

    2007-12-01

    Microfluidic cell culture is a promising technology for applications in the drug screening industry. Key benefits include improved biological function, higher quality cell-based data, reduced reagent consumption, and lower cost. In this work, we demonstrate how a microfluidic cell culture design was adapted to be compatible with the standard 96-well plate format. Key design features include the elimination of tubing and connectors, the ability to maintain long term continuous perfusion cell culture using a passive gravity driven pump, and direct analysis on the outlet wells of the microfluidic plate. A single microfluidic culture plate contained 8 independent flow units, each with 10(4) cells at a flow rate of 50 μl/day (6 minute residence time). The cytotoxicity of the anti-cancer drug etoposide was measured on HeLa cells cultured in this format, using a commercial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) plate reader assay. The integration of microfluidic cell culture methods with commercial automation capabilities offers an exciting opportunity for improved cell-based screening. PMID:18172509

  7. Dynamical systems techniques for enhancing microfluidic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-01

    Achieving rapid mixing is often desirable in microfluidic devices, for example in improving reation rates in biotechnological assays. Enhancing mixing within a particular context is often achieved by introducing problem-specific strategies such as grooved or twisted channels, ac electromagnetic fields or oscillatory microsyringe flows. Evaluating the efficiency of these methods is challenging since either experimental fabrication and sensing, or computationally expensive direct numerical simulations with complicated boundary conditions, are required. A review of how mixing can be quantified when velocity fields have been obtained from such situations is presented. A less-known alternative to these methods is offered by dynamical systems, which characterizes the motion of collective fluid parcel trajectories by studying crucial interior flow barriers which move unsteadily, but nevertheless strongly govern mixing possibilities. The methodology behind defining these barriers and quantifying the fluid transport influenced by them is explained. Their application towards several microfluidic situations (e.g. best cross-flow positioning in cross-channel micromixers, usage of channel curvature to enhance mixing within microdroplets traveling in a channel, optimum frequencies of velocity agitations to use) is discussed.

  8. Integrated microfluidic systems for DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel K; Chen, Hui-Wen; Witek, Małgorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of genome-related research in terms of evolving basic discoveries in biology has generated widespread use of DNA diagnostics and DNA forensics and driven the accelerated development of fully integrated microfluidic systems for genome processing. To produce a microsystem with favorable performance characteristics for genetic-based analyses, several key operational elements must be strategically chosen, including device substrate material, temperature control, fluidic control, and reaction product readout. As a matter of definition, a microdevice is a chip that performs a single processing step, for example microchip electrophoresis. Several microdevices can be integrated to a single wafer, or combined on a control board as separate devices to form a microsystem. A microsystem is defined as a chip composed of at least two microdevices. Among the many documented analytical microdevices, those focused on the ability to perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported extensively due to the importance of this processing step in most genetic-based assays. Other microdevices that have been detailed in the literature include those for solid-phase extractions, microchip electrophoresis, and devices composed of DNA microarrays used for interrogating DNA primary structure. Great progress has also been made in the areas of chip fabrication, bonding and sealing to enclose fluidic networks, evaluation of different chip substrate materials, surface chemistries, and the architecture of reaction conduits for basic processing steps such as mixing. Other important elements that have been developed to realize functional systems include miniaturized readout formats comprising optical or electrochemical transduction and interconnect technologies. These discoveries have led to the development of fully autonomous and functional integrated systems for genome processing that can supply "sample in/answer out" capabilities. In this chapter, we focus on

  9. Multilayer-based lab-on-a-chip systems for perfused cell-based assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbach, Udo; Sonntag, Frank; Grünzner, Stefan; Busek, Mathias; Schmieder, Florian; Franke, Volker

    2014-12-01

    A novel integrated technology chain of laser-microstructured multilayer foils for fast, flexible, and low-cost manufacturing of lab-on-a-chip devices especially for complex cell and tissue culture applications, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-cells ratio, was developed and established. Initially the microfluidic system is constructively divided into individual layers, which are formed by separate foils or plates. Based on the functional boundary conditions and the necessary properties of each layer, their corresponding foils and plates are chosen. In the third step, the foils and plates are laser microstructured and functionalized from both sides. In the fourth and last manufacturing step, the multiple plates and foils are joined using different bonding techniques like adhesive bonding, welding, etc. This multilayer technology together with pneumatically driven micropumps and valves permits the manufacturing of fluidic structures and perfusion systems, which spread out above multiple planes. Based on the established lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays, a multilayer microfluidic system with two parallel connected cell culture chambers was successfully implemented.

  10. The MainSTREAM component platform: a holistic approach to microfluidic system design.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, David; Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Søe, Martin Jensen; Hemmingsen, Mette; Alberti, Massimo; Coman, Vasile; Petersen, Jesper; Emnéus, Jenny; Kutter, Jörg P; Snakenborg, Detlef; Jørgensen, Flemming; Clausen, Christian; Holmstrøm, Kim; Dufva, Martin

    2013-06-01

    A microfluidic component library for building systems driving parallel or serial microfluidic-based assays is presented. The components are a miniaturized eight-channel peristaltic pump, an eight-channel valve, sample-to-waste liquid management, and interconnections. The library of components was tested by constructing various systems supporting perfusion cell culture, automated DNA hybridizations, and in situ hybridizations. The results showed that the MainSTREAM components provided (1) a rapid, robust, and simple method to establish numerous fluidic inputs and outputs to various types of reaction chips; (2) highly parallel pumping and routing/valving capability; (3) methods to interface pumps and chip-to-liquid management systems; (4) means to construct a portable system; (5) reconfigurability/flexibility in system design; (6) means to interface to microscopes; and (7) compatibility with tested biological methods. It was found that LEGO Mindstorms motors, controllers, and software were robust, inexpensive, and an accessible choice as compared with corresponding custom-made actuators. MainSTREAM systems could operate continuously for weeks without leaks, contamination, or system failures. In conclusion, the MainSTREAM components described here meet many of the demands on components for constructing and using microfluidics systems. PMID:23015520

  11. Microfluidic System for Solution Array Based Bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, G M; Tok, J B; Pannu, S S; Rose, K A

    2006-02-10

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate new enabling technology for multiplex biodetection systems that are flexible, miniaturizable, highly automated, low cost, and high performance. It builds on prior successes at LLNL with particle-based solution arrays, such as those used in the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) successfully field deployed to multiple locations nationwide. We report the development of a multiplex solution array immunoassay based upon engineered metallic nanorod particles. Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} particles are fabricated by sequential electrodeposition of dissimilar metals within porous alumina templates, yielding optically encoded striping patterns that can be read using standard laboratory microscope optics and PC-based image processing software. The addition of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings and target-specific antibodies allows each encoded class of nanorod particles to be directed against a different antigen target. A prototype assay panel directed against bacterial, viral, and soluble protein targets demonstrates simultaneous detection at sensitivities comparable to state of the art immunoassays, with minimal cross-reactivity. Studies have been performed to characterize the colloidal properties (zeta potential) of the suspended nanorod particles as a function of pH, the ionic strength of the suspending solution, and surface functionalization state. Additional studies have produced means for the non-contact manipulation of the particles, including the insertion of magnetic nickel stripes within the encoding pattern, and control via externally applied electromagnetic fields. Using the results of these studies, the novel Nanobarcodes{reg_sign} based assay was implemented in a prototype automated system with the sample processing functions and optical readout performed on a microfluidic card. The unique physical properties of the nanorod particles enable the development of integrated microfluidic systems for

  12. Sample preparation system for microfluidic applications

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P.; Crocker, Robert W.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Harnett, Cindy K.

    2007-05-08

    An apparatus that couples automated injection with flow feedback to provide nanoliter accuracy in controlling microliter volumes. The apparatus comprises generally a source of hydraulic fluid pressure, a fluid isolator joined to the outlet of the hydraulic pressure source and a flow sensor to provide pressure-driven analyte metering. For operation generally and particularly in microfluidic systems the hydraulic pressure source is typically an electrokinetic (EK) pump that incorporates gasless electrodes. The apparatus is capable of metering sub-microliter volumes at flowrates of 1 100 .mu.L/min into microsystem load pressures of up to 1000 50 psi, respectively. Flowrates can be specified within 0.5 .mu.L/min and volumes as small as 80 nL can be metered.

  13. Single cell microfluidics for systems oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong

    2012-02-01

    The singular term ``cancer'' is never one kind of disease, but deceivingly encompasses a large number of heterogeneous disease states, which makes it impossible to completely treat cancer using a generic approach. Rather systems approaches are urgently required to assess cancer heterogeneity, stratify patients and enable the most effective, individualized treatment. The heterogeneity of tumors at the single cell level is reflected by the hierarchical complexity of the tumor microenvironment. To identify all the cellular components, including both tumor and infiltrating immune cells, and to delineate the associated cell-to-cell signaling network that dictates tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, we developed a single cell microfluidics chip that can analyze a panel of proteins that are potentially associated inter-cellular signaling network in tumor microenvironment from hundreds of single cells in parallel. This platform integrates two advanced technologies -- microfluidic single cell handling and ultra-high density protein array. This device was first tested for highly multiplexed profiling of secreted proteins including tumor-immune signaling molecules from monocytic leukemia cells. We observed profound cellular heterogeneity with all functional phenotypes quantitatively identified. Correlation analysis further indicated the existence of an intercellular cytokine network in which TNFα-induced secondary signaling cascades further increased functional cellular diversity. It was also exploited to evaluate polyfunctionality of tumor antigen-specific T cells from melanoma patients being treated with adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy. This platform could be further extended to analyze both solid tumor cells (e.g. human lung carcinoma cells) and infiltrating immune cells (e.g. macrophages) so as to enable systems analysis of the complex tumor microenvironment from small amounts of clinical specimens, e.g. skinny needle biopsies. Thus, it could potentially

  14. Nifedipine and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Nitenberg, A.; Venot, A.; Guerin, F.; Degeorges, M.; Roucayrol, J.C.

    1986-05-29

    Heart disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may be due in part to myocardial ischemia caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in this disorder are potentially reversible, we evaluated the effect of the coronary vasodilator nifedipine on myocardial perfusion assessed by thallium-201 scanning in 20 patients. Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computerized tomography was performed under control conditions and 90 minutes after 20 mg of oral nifedipine. The mean (+/- SD) number of left ventricular segments with perfusion defects decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 2.2 after nifedipine (P = 0.0003). Perfusion abnormalities were quantified by a perfusion score (0 to 2.0) assigned to each left ventricular segment and by a global perfusion score (0 to 18) for the entire left ventricle. The mean perfusion score in segments with resting defects increased from 0.97 +/- 0.24 to 1.26 +/- 0.44 after nifedipine (P less than 0.00001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 11.2 +/- 1.7 to 12.8 +/- 2.4 after nifedipine (P = 0.003). The global perfusion score increased by at least 2.0 in 10 patients and decreased by at least 2.0 in only 1. These observations reveal short-term improvement in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion with nifedipine in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The results are consistent with a potentially reversible abnormality of coronary vasomotion in this disorder, but the long-term therapeutic effects of nifedipine remain to be determined.

  15. A hybrid MEMS-based microfluidic system for cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Pedro; Keegan, Neil; Spoors, Julia; Hedley, John; Harris, Alun; Burdess, Jim; Burnett, Richard; Velten, Thomas; Biehl, Margit; Knoll, Thorsten; Haberer, Werner; Solomon, Matthew; Campitelli, Andrew; McNeil, Calum

    2008-12-01

    A microfluidic system for cancer diagnosis based around a core MEMS biosensor technology is presented in this paper. The principle of the MEMS biosensor is introduced and the functionalisation strategy for cancer marker recognition is described. In addition, the successful packaging and integration of functional MEMS biosensor devices are reported herein. This ongoing work represents one of the first hybrid systems to integrate a PCB packaged silicon MEMS device into a disposable microfluidic cartridge.

  16. Tailoring microfluidic systems for organ-like cell culture applications using multiphysics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmeyer, Britta; Schütte, Julia; Böttger, Jan; Gebhardt, Rolf; Stelzle, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Replacing animal testing with in vitro cocultures of human cells is a long-term goal in pre-clinical drug tests used to gain reliable insight into drug-induced cell toxicity. However, current state-of-the-art 2D or 3D cell cultures aiming at mimicking human organs in vitro still lack organ-like morphology and perfusion and thus organ-like functions. To this end, microfluidic systems enable construction of cell culture devices which can be designed to more closely resemble the smallest functional unit of organs. Multiphysics simulations represent a powerful tool to study the various relevant physical phenomena and their impact on functionality inside microfluidic structures. This is particularly useful as it allows for assessment of system functions already during the design stage prior to actual chip fabrication. In the HepaChip®, dielectrophoretic forces are used to assemble human hepatocytes and human endothelial cells in liver sinusoid-like structures. Numerical simulations of flow distribution, shear stress, electrical fields and heat dissipation inside the cell assembly chambers as well as surface wetting and surface tension effects during filling of the microchannel network supported the design of this human-liver-on-chip microfluidic system for cell culture applications. Based on the device design resulting thereof, a prototype chip was injection-moulded in COP (cyclic olefin polymer). Functional hepatocyte and endothelial cell cocultures were established inside the HepaChip® showing excellent metabolic and secretory performance.

  17. Integrated Electroosmotic Perfusion of Tissue with Online Microfluidic Analysis to Track the Metabolism of Cystamine, Pantethine and Coenzyme A

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juanfang; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an approach that integrates electroosmotic perfusion of tissue with a substrate-containing solution and online microfluidic analysis of products, in this case thiols. Using this approach we have tracked the metabolism of cystamine, pantethine and CoA in the extracellular space of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). Currently, little is known about coenzyme A (CoA) biodegradation and even less is known about the regulation and kinetic characteristics for this sequential multi-enzyme reaction. We found that the steady state percentage yields of cysteamine from cystamine and pantethine during the transit through OHSCs were 91% ± 4% (SEM) and 0.01%–0.03%, respectively. The large difference in the yields of cysteamine can be used to explain the drugs’ different toxicities and clinical effectiveness against cystinosis. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the ectoenzyme pantetheinase are KM,C/α = 4.4 ± 1.1 mM and Vmax,C = 29 ± 3 nM/s, where α is the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange. We estimate that the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange is approximately 0.5%. Based on the formation rate of cysteamine in the OHSCs, we obtained the overall apparent Michaelis constant and maximum reaction rate for sequential, extracellular CoA degradation in an in situ environment, which are K′M = 16 ± 4 μM, V′max = 7.1 ± 0.5 nM/s. Kinetic parameters obtained in situ, although difficult to measure, are better representations of the biochemical flux in the living organism than those from isolated enzymes in vitro. PMID:24215585

  18. Integrated electroosmotic perfusion of tissue with online microfluidic analysis to track the metabolism of cystamine, pantethine, and coenzyme A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juanfang; Sandberg, Mats; Weber, Stephen G

    2013-12-17

    We have developed an approach that integrates electroosmotic perfusion of tissue with a substrate-containing solution and online microfluidic analysis of products, in this case thiols. Using this approach we have tracked the metabolism of cystamine, pantethine and CoA in the extracellular space of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). Currently, little is known about coenzyme A (CoA) biodegradation and even less is known about the regulation and kinetic characteristics for this sequential multienzyme reaction. We found that the steady state percentage yields of cysteamine from cystamine and pantethine during the transit through OHSCs were 91% ± 4% (SEM) and 0.01%-0.03%, respectively. The large difference in the yields of cysteamine can be used to explain the drugs' different toxicities and clinical effectiveness against cystinosis. The kinetic parameters of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the ectoenzyme pantetheinase are KM,C/α = 4.4 ± 1.1 mM and Vmax,C = 29 ± 3 nM/s, where α is the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange. We estimate that the percentage yield of pantethine to pantetheine through disulfide exchange is approximately 0.5%. Based on the formation rate of cysteamine in the OHSCs, we obtained the overall apparent Michaelis constant and maximum reaction rate for sequential, extracellular CoA degradation in an in situ environment, which are K'M = 16 ± 4 μM, V'max = 7.1 ± 0.5 nM/s. Kinetic parameters obtained in situ, although difficult to measure, are better representations of the biochemical flux in the living organism than those from isolated enzymes in vitro. PMID:24215585

  19. Chemically generated convective transport in microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    High precision manipulation of small volumes of fluid, containing suspended micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules, is one of the main goals in designing modern lab-on-a-chip devices which can find a variety of chemical and biological applications. To transport the cargo toward sensing elements, typical microfluidic devices often use pressure driven flows. Here, we propose to use enzymatic chemical reactions which decompose reagent into less dense products and generate flows that can transport particles. Density variations that lead to flow in the assigned direction are created between the place where reagent is fed into the solution and the location where it is decomposed by enzymes attached to the surface of the microchannel. When the reagent is depleted, the fluid motion stops and particles sediment to the bottom. We demonstrate how the choice of chemicals, leading to specific reaction rates, can affect the transport properties. In particular, we show that the intensity of the fluid flow, the final location of cargo, and the time for cargo delivery are controlled by the amount and type of reagent in the system.

  20. Acoustothermal heating of polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Hang; Lee, Kang Soo; Destgeer, Ghulam; Park, Jinsoo; Choung, Jin Seung; Jung, Jin Ho; Shin, Jennifer Hyunjong; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-01-01

    We report an observation of rapid (exceeding 2,000 K/s) heating of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), one of the most popular microchannel materials, under cyclic loadings at high (~MHz) frequencies. A microheater was developed based on the finding. The heating mechanism utilized vibration damping in PDMS induced by sound waves that were generated and precisely controlled using a conventional surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic system. The refraction of SAW into the PDMS microchip, called the leaky SAW, takes a form of bulk wave and rapidly heats the microchannels in a volumetric manner. The penetration depths were measured to range from 210 μm to 1290 μm, enough to cover most sizes of microchannels. The energy conversion efficiency was SAW frequency-dependent and measured to be the highest at around 30 MHz. Independent actuation of each interdigital transducer (IDT) enabled independent manipulation of SAWs, permitting spatiotemporal control of temperature on the microchip. All the advantages of this microheater facilitated a two-step continuous flow polymerase chain reaction (CFPCR) to achieve the billion-fold amplification of a 134 bp DNA amplicon in less than 3 min. PMID:26138310

  1. Acoustothermal heating of polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Byung Hang; Lee, Kang Soo; Destgeer, Ghulam; Park, Jinsoo; Choung, Jin Seung; Jung, Jin Ho; Shin, Jennifer Hyunjong; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-07-01

    We report an observation of rapid (exceeding 2,000 K/s) heating of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), one of the most popular microchannel materials, under cyclic loadings at high (~MHz) frequencies. A microheater was developed based on the finding. The heating mechanism utilized vibration damping in PDMS induced by sound waves that were generated and precisely controlled using a conventional surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic system. The refraction of SAW into the PDMS microchip, called the leaky SAW, takes a form of bulk wave and rapidly heats the microchannels in a volumetric manner. The penetration depths were measured to range from 210 μm to 1290 μm, enough to cover most sizes of microchannels. The energy conversion efficiency was SAW frequency-dependent and measured to be the highest at around 30 MHz. Independent actuation of each interdigital transducer (IDT) enabled independent manipulation of SAWs, permitting spatiotemporal control of temperature on the microchip. All the advantages of this microheater facilitated a two-step continuous flow polymerase chain reaction (CFPCR) to achieve the billion-fold amplification of a 134 bp DNA amplicon in less than 3 min.

  2. Acoustothermal heating of polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic system

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Byung Hang; Lee, Kang Soo; Destgeer, Ghulam; Park, Jinsoo; Choung, Jin Seung; Jung, Jin Ho; Shin, Jennifer Hyunjong; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-01-01

    We report an observation of rapid (exceeding 2,000 K/s) heating of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), one of the most popular microchannel materials, under cyclic loadings at high (~MHz) frequencies. A microheater was developed based on the finding. The heating mechanism utilized vibration damping in PDMS induced by sound waves that were generated and precisely controlled using a conventional surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic system. The refraction of SAW into the PDMS microchip, called the leaky SAW, takes a form of bulk wave and rapidly heats the microchannels in a volumetric manner. The penetration depths were measured to range from 210 μm to 1290 μm, enough to cover most sizes of microchannels. The energy conversion efficiency was SAW frequency-dependent and measured to be the highest at around 30 MHz. Independent actuation of each interdigital transducer (IDT) enabled independent manipulation of SAWs, permitting spatiotemporal control of temperature on the microchip. All the advantages of this microheater facilitated a two-step continuous flow polymerase chain reaction (CFPCR) to achieve the billion-fold amplification of a 134 bp DNA amplicon in less than 3 min. PMID:26138310

  3. Active liquid degassing in microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, J Mikael; Gazin, Muriel; Laakso, Sanna; Haraldsson, Tommy; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Mäki, Minna; Goossens, Herman; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2013-11-21

    We present a method for efficient air bubble removal in microfluidic applications. Air bubbles are extracted from a liquid chamber into a vacuum chamber through a semipermeable membrane, consisting of PDMS coated with amorphous Teflon(®) AF 1600. Whereas air is efficiently extracted through the membrane, water loss is greatly reduced by the Teflon even at elevated temperatures. We present the water loss and permeability change with the amount of added Teflon AF to the membrane. Also, we demonstrate bubble-free, multiplex DNA amplification using PCR in a PDMS microfluidic device. PMID:24056885

  4. Microfluidic systems for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Bahrami, Sajad; Mirshekari, Hamed; Basri, Seyed Masoud Moosavi; Nik, Amirala Bakhshian; Aref, Amir R; Akbari, Mohsen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Neural tissue engineering aims at developing novel approaches for the treatment of diseases of the nervous system, by providing a permissive environment for the growth and differentiation of neural cells. Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems provide a closer biomimetic environment, and promote better cell differentiation and improved cell function, than could be achieved by conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture systems. With the recent advances in the discovery and introduction of different types of stem cells for tissue engineering, microfluidic platforms have provided an improved microenvironment for the 3D-culture of stem cells. Microfluidic systems can provide more precise control over the spatiotemporal distribution of chemical and physical cues at the cellular level compared to traditional systems. Various microsystems have been designed and fabricated for the purpose of neural tissue engineering. Enhanced neural migration and differentiation, and monitoring of these processes, as well as understanding the behavior of stem cells and their microenvironment have been obtained through application of different microfluidic-based stem cell culture and tissue engineering techniques. As the technology advances it may be possible to construct a "brain-on-a-chip". In this review, we describe the basics of stem cells and tissue engineering as well as microfluidics-based tissue engineering approaches. We review recent testing of various microfluidic approaches for stem cell-based neural tissue engineering. PMID:27296463

  5. Optical two-beam traps in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2016-08-01

    An attractive solution for optical trapping and stretching by means of two counterpropagating laser beams is to embed waveguides or optical fibers in a microfluidic system. The microfluidic system can be constructed in different materials, ranging from soft polymers that may easily be cast in a rapid prototyping manner, to hard polymers that could even be produced by injection moulding, or to silica in which waveguides may either be written directly, or with grooves for optical fibers. Here, we review different solutions to the system and also show results obtained in a polymer chip with DUV written waveguides and in an injection molded polymer chip with grooves for optical fibers.

  6. Microfluidics-based integrated airborne pathogen detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northrup, M. Allen; Alleman-Sposito, Jennifer; Austin, Todd; Devitt, Amy; Fong, Donna; Lin, Phil; Nakao, Brian; Pourahmadi, Farzad; Vinas, Mary; Yuan, Bob

    2006-09-01

    Microfluidic Systems is focused on building microfluidic platforms that interface front-end mesofluidics to handle real world sample volumes for optimal sensitivity coupled to microfluidic circuitry to process small liquid volumes for complex reagent metering, mixing, and biochemical analysis, particularly for pathogens. MFSI is the prime contractor on two programs for the US Department of Homeland Security: BAND (Bioagent Autonomous Networked Detector) and IBADS (Instantaneous Bio-Aerosol Detection System). The goal of BAND is to develop an autonomous system for monitoring the air for known biological agents. This consists of air collection, sample lysis, sample purification, detection of DNA, RNA, and toxins, and a networked interface to report the results. For IBADS, MFSI is developing the confirmatory device which must verify the presence of a pathogen with 5 minutes of an air collector/trigger sounding an alarm. Instrument designs and biological assay results from both BAND and IBADS will be presented.

  7. Microfluidic systems for electrochemical and biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ackler, H., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    Microfluidic devices with microelectrodes have the potential to enable studies of phenomena at size scales where behavior may be dominated by different mechanisms than at macroscales. Through our work developing microfluidic devices for dielectrophoretic separation and sensing of cells and particles, we have fabricated devices from which general or more specialized research devices may be derived. Fluid channels from 80 {micro}m wide X 20 {micro}m deep to 1 mm wide to 200 {micro}m deep have been fabricated in glass, with lithographically patterned electrodes from 10 to 80 {micro}m wide on one or both sides on the channels and over topographies tens of microns in heights. the devices are designed to easily interface to electronic and fluidic interconnect packages that permit reuse of devices, rather than one-time use, crude glue-based methods. Such devices may be useful for many applications of interest to the electrochemical and biological community.

  8. A metering rotary nanopump for microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Darby, Scott G; Moore, Matthew R; Friedlander, Troy A; Schaffer, David K; Reiserer, Ron S; Wikswo, John P; Seale, Kevin T

    2010-12-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a microfabricated metering rotary nanopump for the purpose of driving fluid flow in microfluidic devices. The miniature peristaltic pump is composed of a set of microfluidic channels wrapped in a helix around a central camshaft in which a non-cylindrical cam rotates. The cam compresses the helical channels to induce peristaltic flow as it is rotated. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanopump design is able to produce intermittent delivery or removal of several nanolitres of fluid per revolution as well as consistent continuous flow rates ranging from as low as 15 nL min(-1) to above 1.0 µL min(-1). At back pressures encountered in typical microfluidic devices, the pump acts as a high impedance flow source. The durability, biocompatibility, ease of integration with soft-lithographic fabrication, the use of a simple rotary motor instead of multiple synchronized pneumatic or mechanical actuators, and the absence of power consumption or fluidic conductance in the resting state all contribute to a compact pump with a low cost of fabrication and versatile implementation. This suggests that the pump design may be useful for a wide variety of biological experiments and point of care devices. PMID:20959938

  9. A metering rotary nanopump for microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Darby, Scott G.; Moore, Matthew R.; Friedlander, Troy A.; Schaffer, David K.; Reiserer, Ron S.; Wikswo, John P.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a microfabricated metering rotary nanopump for the purpose of driving fluid flow in microfluidic devices. The miniature peristaltic pump is composed of a set of microfluidic channels wrapped in a helix around a central cam shaft in which a non-cylindrical cam rotates. The cam compresses the helical channels to induce peristaltic flow as it is rotated. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanopump design is able to produce intermittent delivery or removal of several nanoliters of fluid per revolution as well as consistent continuous flow rates ranging from as low as 15 nL/min to above 1.0 µL/min. At back pressures encountered in typical microfluidic devices, the pump acts as a high impedance flow source. The durability, biocompatibility, ease of integration with soft-lithographic fabrication, the use of a simple rotary motor instead of multiple synchronized pneumatic or mechanical actuators, and the absence of power consumption or fluidic conductance in the resting state all contribute to a compact pump with a low cost of fabrication and versatile implementation. This suggests that the pump design may be useful for a wide variety of biological experiments and point of care devices. PMID:20959938

  10. A Microfluidics-HPLC/Differential Mobility Spectrometer Macromolecular Detection System for Human and Robotic Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, S. L.; Killeen, K.; Han, J.; Eiceman, G. A.; Kanik, I.; Kidd, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a unique, miniaturized, solute analyzer based on microfluidics technology. The analyzer consists of an integrated microfluidics High Performance Liquid Chromatographic chip / Differential Mobility Spectrometer (?HPLCchip/ DMS) detection system

  11. Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Based Microfluidic Devices for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Muhammad Waseem; Tayyaba, Shahzadi; Afzulpurkar, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) based microfluidic devices have gained popularity in biomedicine field over the last few years. In this paper, a comprehensive overview of microfluidic devices such as micropumps and microneedles has been presented for biomedical applications. The aim of this paper is to present the major features and issues related to micropumps and microneedles, e.g., working principles, actuation methods, fabrication techniques, construction, performance parameters, failure analysis, testing, safety issues, applications, commercialization issues and future prospects. Based on the actuation mechanisms, the micropumps are classified into two main types, i.e., mechanical and non-mechanical micropumps. Microneedles can be categorized according to their structure, fabrication process, material, overall shape, tip shape, size, array density and application. The presented literature review on micropumps and microneedles will provide comprehensive information for researchers working on design and development of microfluidic devices for biomedical applications. PMID:21747700

  12. System-level simulation of liquid filling in microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2011-06-01

    Liquid filling in microfluidic channels is a complex process that depends on a variety of geometric, operating, and material parameters such as microchannel geometry, flow velocity∕pressure, liquid surface tension, and contact angle of channel surface. Accurate analysis of the filling process can provide key insights into the filling time, air bubble trapping, and dead zone formation, and help evaluate trade-offs among the various design parameters and lead to optimal chip design. However, efficient modeling of liquid filling in complex microfluidic networks continues to be a significant challenge. High-fidelity computational methods, such as the volume of fluid method, are prohibitively expensive from a computational standpoint. Analytical models, on the other hand, are primarily applicable to idealized geometries and, hence, are unable to accurately capture chip level behavior of complex microfluidic systems. This paper presents a parametrized dynamic model for the system-level analysis of liquid filling in three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic networks. In our approach, a complex microfluidic network is deconstructed into a set of commonly used components, such as reservoirs, microchannels, and junctions. The components are then assembled according to their spatial layout and operating rationale to achieve a rapid system-level model. A dynamic model based on the transient momentum equation is developed to track the liquid front in the microchannels. The principle of mass conservation at the junction is used to link the fluidic parameters in the microchannels emanating from the junction. Assembly of these component models yields a set of differential and algebraic equations, which upon integration provides temporal information of the liquid filling process, particularly liquid front propagation (i.e., the arrival time). The models are used to simulate the transient liquid filling process in a variety of microfluidic constructs and in a multiplexer, representing a

  13. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Thomas G.; Gunser, John M.; Saviello, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: This paper describes the design and use of Epic Systems software for documentation of perfusion activities as part of the patient electronic medical record. The University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics adapted the Anesthesia software module and developed an integrated perfusion/anesthesia record for the documentation of cardiac and non-cardiac surgical procedures. This project involved multiple committees, approvals, and training to successfully implement. This article will describe our documentation options, concepts, design, challenges, training, and implementation during our initial experience. PMID:26834288

  14. Nanostructured microfluidic digestion system for rapid high-performance proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gong; Hao, Si-Jie; Yu, Xu

    2014-01-01

    A novel microfluidic protein digestion system with nanostructured and bioactive inner surface was constructed by an easy biomimetic self-assembly strategy for rapid and effective proteolysis in 2 minutes, which is faster than the conventional overnight digestion methods. It is expected that this work would contribute to rapid online digestion in future high-throughput proteomics. PMID:25511010

  15. Cusps and spouts in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duboin, Aurélien; Malloggi, Florent; Monti, Fabrice; Tabeling, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    By injecting mineral oil (inner phase) and polymer solutions (outer phase), in a microfluidic flow focusing geometry, we observed the formation of cusps. These cusps undergo a transition from a steady state, to a thin cylindrical spout (oil in polymer). These oil spouts, do not touch the walls, and are surprisingly stable (they do not break into droplets). We study the nature of the cusp-spout transition, and find it is of first order. By taking advantage of the stability of the jet, we expect to synthesize micro-wires with this approach.

  16. Characterizing potential heart agents with an isolated perfused heart system

    SciTech Connect

    Pendleton, D.B.; Sands, H.; Gallagher, B.M.; Camin, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have used an isolated perfused heart system for characterizing potential myocardial perfusion radiopharamaceuticals. Rabbit or guinea pig (GP) hearts are removed and perfused through the aorta with a blood-free buffer. Heart rate and ventricular pressure are monitored as indices of viability. Tc-99m-MAA is 96-100% retained in these hearts, and Tc-99m human serum albumin shows less than 5% extraction. Tl-201 is 30-40% extracted. It is known that in-vivo, Tc-99m(dmpe)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2//sup +/ is taken up by rabbit heart but not by GP or human heart. Analogous results are obtained with the isolated perfused heart model, where the complex is extracted well by the isolated rabbit heart (24%) but not by the GP heart (<5%). Values are unchanged if human, rabbit or GP blood is mixed and co-injected with the complex. Tc-99m)dmpe)/sub 3//sup +/ is also taken up by rabbit but not by GP hearts in-vivo. However, isolated perfused hearts of both species extract this complex well (45-52%). Heart uptake is diminished to <7% if the complex is pre-equilibrated with human blood. GP blood produces a moderate inhibition (in GP hearts only) and rabbit blood has no effect. This suggests that a human or GP blood factor may have a significant effect on heart uptake of this complex. Tc-99m(CN-t-butyl)/sub 6//sup +/ is taken up well by both rabbit and GP hearts in-vivo, and is extracted 100% by both isolated perfused hearts. Heart retention remains high (73-75%) in the presence of human blood.

  17. Microfluidics-Based Laser Guided Cell-Micropatterning System

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Nick; Schmidt, Lucas; Qin, Wan; Yang, Xiaoqi; Lin, Yongliang; DeSilva, Mauris N; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to place individual cells into an engineered microenvironment in a cell-culture model is critical for the study of in vivo-relevant cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Microfluidics provides a high-throughput modality to inject various cell types into a microenvironment. Laser guided systems provide the high spatial and temporal resolution necessary for single-cell micropatterning. Combining these two techniques, the authors designed, constructed, tested, and evaluated 1) a novel removable microfluidics-based cell-delivery biochip and 2) a combined system that uses the novel biochip coupled with a laser guided cell-micropatterning system to place individual cells into both 2D and 3D arrays. Cell-suspensions of chick forebrain neurons and glial cells were loaded into their respective inlet reservoirs and traversed the microfluidic channels until reaching the outlet ports. Individual cells were trapped and guided from the outlet of a microfluidic channel to a target site on the cell-culture substrate. At the target site, 2D and 3D pattern arrays were constructed with micron-level accuracy. Single-cell manipulation was accomplished at a rate of 150 μm/s in the radial plane and 50 μm/s in the axial direction of the laser beam. Results demonstrated that a single-cell can typically be patterned in 20-30 seconds, and that highly accurate and reproducible cellular arrays and systems can be achieved through coupling the microfluidics-based cell-delivery biochip with the laser guided system. PMID:25190714

  18. Microfluidics-based laser cell-micropatterning system.

    PubMed

    Erdman, Nick; Schmidt, Lucas; Qin, Wan; Yang, Xiaoqi; Lin, Yongliang; DeSilva, Mauris N; Gao, Bruce Z

    2014-09-01

    The ability to place individual cells into an engineered microenvironment in a cell-culture model is critical for the study of in vivo relevant cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Microfluidics provides a high-throughput modality to inject various cell types into a microenvironment. Laser guided systems provide the high spatial and temporal resolution necessary for single-cell micropatterning. Combining these two techniques, the authors designed, constructed, tested and evaluated (1) a novel removable microfluidics-based cell-delivery biochip and (2) a combined system that uses the novel biochip coupled with a laser guided cell-micropatterning system to place individual cells into both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) arrays. Cell-suspensions of chick forebrain neurons and glial cells were loaded into their respective inlet reservoirs and traversed the microfluidic channels until reaching the outlet ports. Individual cells were trapped and guided from the outlet of a microfluidic channel to a target site on the cell-culture substrate. At the target site, 2D and 3D pattern arrays were constructed with micron-level accuracy. Single-cell manipulation was accomplished at a rate of 150 μm s(-1) in the radial plane and 50 μm s(-1) in the axial direction of the laser beam. Results demonstrated that a single-cell can typically be patterned in 20-30 s, and that highly accurate and reproducible cellular arrays and systems can be achieved through coupling the microfluidics-based cell-delivery biochip with the laser guided system. PMID:25190714

  19. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  20. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  5. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

    1984-08-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined.

  6. Artificial Lymphatic Drainage Systems for Vascularized Microfluidic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keith H. K.; Truslow, James G.; Khankhel, Aimal H.; Chan, Kelvin L. S.; Tien, Joe

    2012-01-01

    The formation of a stably perfused microvasculature continues to be a major challenge in tissue engineering. Previous work has suggested the importance of a sufficiently large transmural pressure in maintaining vascular stability and perfusion. Here we show that a system of empty channels that provides a drainage function analogous to that of lymphatic microvasculature in vivo can stabilize vascular adhesion and maintain perfusion rate in dense, hydraulically resistive fibrin scaffolds in vitro. In the absence of drainage, endothelial delamination increased as scaffold density increased from 6 mg/mL to 30 mg/mL and scaffold hydraulic conductivity decreased by a factor of twenty. Single drainage channels exerted only localized vascular stabilization, the extent of which depended on the distance between vessel and drainage as well as scaffold density. Computational modeling of these experiments yielded an estimate of 0.40–1.36 cm H2O for the minimum transmural pressure required for vascular stability. We further designed and constructed fibrin patches (0.8 by 0.9 cm2) that were perfused by a parallel array of vessels and drained by an orthogonal array of drainage channels; only with the drainage did the vessels display long-term stability and perfusion. This work underscores the importance of drainage in vascularization, especially when a dense, hydraulically resistive scaffold is used. PMID:23281125

  7. A microfluidic system for dynamic yeast cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip J; Helman, Noah C; Lim, Wendell A; Hung, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of cellular processes and gene regulatory networks within living cells requires the development of improved technology for dynamic, single cell imaging. Here, we demonstrate a microfluidic system capable of mechanical trapping of yeast cells with continuous flow and flow switching capability during time-lapse high magnification fluorescence imaging. The novel functionality of the system was validated by observing the response of pheromone-induced expression of GFP in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:18254385

  8. Imaging label-free biosensor with microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahns, S.; Glorius, P.; Hansen, M.; Nazirizadeh, Y.; Gerken, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a microfluidic system suitable for parallel label-free detection of several biomarkers utilizing a compact imaging measurement system. The microfluidic system contains a filter unit to separate the plasma from human blood and a functionalized, photonic crystal slab sensor chip. The nanostructure of the photonic crystal slab sensor chip is fabricated by nanoimprint lithography of a period grating surface into a photoresist and subsequent deposition of a TiO2 layer. Photonic crystal slabs are slab waveguides supporting quasi-guided modes coupling to far-field radiation, which are sensitive to refractive index changes due to biomarker binding on the functionalized surface. In our imaging read-out system the resulting resonance shift of the quasi-guided mode in the transmission spectrum is converted into an intensity change detectable with a simple camera. By continuously taking photographs of the sensor surface local intensity changes are observed revealing the binding kinetics of the biomarker to its specific target. Data from two distinct measurement fields are used for evaluation. For testing the sensor chip, 1 μM biotin as well as 1 μM recombinant human CD40 ligand were immobilized in spotsvia amin coupling to the sensor surface. Each binding experiment was performed with 250 nM streptavidin and 90 nM CD40 ligand antibody dissolved in phosphate buffered saline. In the next test series, a functionalized sensor chip was bonded onto a 15 mm x 15 mm opening of the 75 mm x 25 mm x 2 mm microfluidic system. We demonstrate the functionality of the microfluidic system for filtering human blood such that only blood plasma was transported to the sensor chip. The results of first binding experiments in buffer with this test chip will be presented.

  9. Centrifugal Microfluidic System for Nucleic Acid Amplification and Detection

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Baogang; Peng, Niancai; Li, Lei; Li, Zheng; Hu, Fei; Zhang, Zengming; Wang, Chaohui

    2015-01-01

    We report here the development of a rapid PCR microfluidic system comprising a double-shaft turntable and centrifugal-based disc that rapidly drives the PCR mixture between chambers set at different temperatures, and the bidirectional flow improved the space utilization of the disc. Three heating resistors and thermistors maintained uniform, specific temperatures for the denaturation, annealing, and extension steps of the PCR. Infrared imaging showed that there was little thermal interference between reaction chambers; the system enabled the cycle number and reaction time of each step to be independently adjusted. To validate the function and efficiency of the centrifugal microfluidic system, a 350-base pair target gene from the hepatitis B virus was amplified and quantitated by fluorescence detection. By optimizing the cycling parameters, the reaction time was reduced to 32 min as compared to 120 min for a commercial PCR machine. DNA samples with concentrations ranging from 10 to 106 copies/mL could be quantitatively analyzed using this system. This centrifugal-based microfluidic platform is a useful system and possesses industrialization potential that can be used for portable diagnostics. PMID:26556354

  10. Electrical microfluidic pressure gauge for elastomer microelectromechanical systems

    PubMed Central

    Kartalov, Emil P.; Maltezos, George; Anderson, W. French; Taylor, Clive R.; Scherer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    We report on an electrical microfluidic pressure gauge. A polydimethylsiloxane microvalve closes at a characteristic applied pressure determined by the material’s properties and the valve’s dimensions. Hence, when the same pressure is applied to all valves of a heterogeneous valve array, some valves close while others remain open. The state of the array is combined with knowledge of the respective characteristic closing pressures of the individual valves to yield an estimate of the applied pressure. The state of each valve is obtained by electrical measurements, since the electrical resistance of the respective underlying fluid-filled channel increases by at least two orders of magnitude as the valve closes and its insulating elastomer material interrupts the electrical circuit. The overall system functions as a pressure gauge with electrical readout. This device would be a critical component in active pressure-regulation loops in future integrated microfluidic systems. PMID:19587835

  11. Suspended microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics. PMID:23729815

  12. Microfluidic cell culture chip with multiplexed medium delivery and efficient cell/scaffold loading mechanisms for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional cell culture-based assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Shih-Siou; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2011-06-01

    This study reports a microfluidic cell culture chip consisting of 48 microbioreactors for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture-based assays. Its advantages include the capability for multiplexed and backflow-free medium delivery, and both efficient and high-throughput micro-scale, 3-D cell culture construct loading. In this work, the microfluidic cell culture chip is fabricated using two major processes, specifically, a computer-numerical-controlled (CNC) mold machining process and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replication process. The chip is composed of micropumps, microbioreactors, connecting microchannels and a cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism. The performance of the new pneumatic micropumps and the cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism has been experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that this proposed multiplexed medium-pumping design is able to provide a uniform pumping rate ranging from 1.5 to 298.3 μl hr(-1) without any fluid backflow and the resultant medium contamination. In addition, the simple cell/agarose loading method has been proven to be able to load the 3-D cell culture construct uniformly and efficiently in all 48 microbioreactors investigated. Furthermore, a micro-scale, perfusion, 3-D cell culture-based assay has been successfully demonstrated using this proposed cell culture chip. The experimental results are also compared to a similar evaluation using a conventional static 3-D cell culture with a larger scale culture. It is concluded that the choice of a cell culture format can influence assay results. As a whole, because of the inherent advantages of a miniaturized perfusion 3-D cell culture assay, the cell culture chip not only can provide a stable, well-defined and more biologically-meaningful culture environment, but it also features a low consumption of research resources. Moreover, due to the integrated medium pumping mechanism and the simple cell/agarose loading method, this chip is

  13. Silicon photonic sensors incorporated in a digital microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Lerma Arce, Cristina; Witters, Daan; Puers, Robert; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Bienstman, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Label-free biosensing with silicon nanophotonic microring resonator sensors has proven to be an excellent sensing technique for achieving high-throughput and high sensitivity, comparing favorably with other labeled and label-free sensing techniques. However, as in any biosensing platform, silicon nanophotonic microring resonator sensors require a fluidic component which allows the continuous delivery of the sample to the sensor surface. This component is typically based on microchannels in polydimethylsiloxane or other materials, which add cost and complexity to the system. The use of microdroplets in a digital microfluidic system, instead of continuous flows, is one of the recent trends in the field, where microliter- to picoliter-sized droplets are generated, transported, mixed, and split, thereby creating miniaturized reaction chambers which can be controlled individually in time and space. This avoids cross talk between samples or reagents and allows fluid plugs to be manipulated on reconfigurable paths, which cannot be achieved using the more established and more complex technology of microfluidic channels where droplets are controlled in series. It has great potential for high-throughput liquid handling, while avoiding on-chip cross-contamination. We present the integration of two miniaturized technologies: label-free silicon nanophotonic microring resonator sensors and digital microfluidics, providing an alternative to the typical microfluidic system based on microchannels. The performance of this combined system is demonstrated by performing proof-of-principle measurements of glucose, sodium chloride, and ethanol concentrations. These results show that multiplexed real-time detection and analysis, great flexibility, and portability make the combination of these technologies an ideal platform for easy and fast use in any laboratory. PMID:22926129

  14. Microfluidic systems with embedded materials and structures and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Rose, Klint A; Maghribi, Mariam; Benett, William; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie; Graff, Robert T.; Jankowski, Alan

    2007-03-06

    Described herein is a process for fabricating microfluidic systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are molded into the polymeric material polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Micromachining is used to create a mold master and the liquid precursors for PDMS are poured over the mold and allowed to cure. The PDMS is then removed form the mold and bonded to another material such as PDMS, glass, or silicon after a simple surface preparation step to form sealed microchannels.

  15. Microfluidics co-culture systems for studying tooth innervation

    PubMed Central

    Pagella, Pierfrancesco; Neto, Estrela; Jiménez-Rojo, Lucia; Lamghari, Meriem; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.

    2014-01-01

    Innervation plays a key role in the development and homeostasis of organs and tissues of the orofacial complex. Among these structures, teeth are peculiar organs as they are not innervated until later stages of development. Furthermore, the implication of neurons in tooth initiation, morphogenesis and differentiation is still controversial. Co-cultures constitute a valuable method to investigate and manipulate the interactions of nerve fibers with their target organs in a controlled and isolated environment. Conventional co-cultures between neurons and their target tissues have already been performed, but these cultures do not offer optimal conditions that are closely mimicking the in vivo situation. Indeed, specific cell populations require different culture media in order to preserve their physiological properties. In this study we evaluate the usefulness of a microfluidics system for co-culturing mouse trigeminal ganglia and developing teeth. This device allows the application of specific media for the appropriate development of both neuronal and dental tissues. The results show that mouse trigeminal ganglia and teeth survive for long culture periods in this microfluidics system, and that teeth maintain the attractive or repulsive effect on trigeminal neurites that has been observed in vivo. Neurites are repealed when co-cultured with embryonic tooth germs, while postnatal teeth exert an attractive effect to trigeminal ganglia-derived neurons. In conclusion, microfluidics system devices provide a valuable tool for studying the behavior of neurons during the development of orofacial tissues and organs, faithfully imitating the in vivo situation. PMID:25202282

  16. Multiplex microfluidic system integrating sequential operations of microalgal lipid production.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ho Seok; Kim, Jaoon Young Hwan; Na, Sang Cheol; Jeon, Noo Li; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-21

    The unit cost for the production of algal biofuel needs to be reduced in order to be a substitute for fossil fuel. To achieve this goal, the development of a novel system is needed for a rapid screening of numerous microalgal species to isolate superior strains with the highest lipid productivity. Here, we developed a PDMS-based multiplex microfluidic system with eight chambers and micropillar arrays to expedite multiple steps for lipid sample preparation from different microalgal strains. We could rapidly and efficiently perform sequential operations from cell culture to lipid extraction of eight different microalgal strains simultaneously on a single device without harvesting and purification steps, which are labor- and energy-intensive, by the simple injection of medium and solvent into the central inlet due to the integrated micropillar arrays connecting the chambers and central inlet. The lipid extraction efficiency using this system was comparable (94.5-102.6%) to the conventional Bligh-Dyer method. We investigated the cell growth and lipid productivity of different strains using the microfluidic device. We observed that each strain has a different lipid accumulation pattern according to stress conditions. These results demonstrate that our multiplex microfluidic approach can provide an efficient analytical tool for the rapid analysis of strain performances (e.g. cell growth and lipid productivities) and the determination of the optimal lipid induction condition for each strain. PMID:26783562

  17. Microfluidic hubs, systems, and methods for interface fluidic modules

    DOEpatents

    Bartsch, Michael S; Claudnic, Mark R; Kim, Hanyoup; Patel, Kamlesh D; Renzi, Ronald F; Van De Vreugde, James L

    2015-01-27

    Embodiments of microfluidic hubs and systems are described that may be used to connect fluidic modules. A space between surfaces may be set by fixtures described herein. In some examples a fixture may set substrate-to-substrate spacing based on a distance between registration surfaces on which the respective substrates rest. Fluidic interfaces are described, including examples where fluid conduits (e.g. capillaries) extend into the fixture to the space between surfaces. Droplets of fluid may be introduced to and/or removed from microfluidic hubs described herein, and fluid actuators may be used to move droplets within the space between surfaces. Continuous flow modules may be integrated with the hubs in some examples.

  18. Evaluation of peristaltic micromixers for highly integrated microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duckjong; Rho, Hoon Suk; Jambovane, Sachin; Shin, Soojeong; Hong, Jong Wook

    2016-03-01

    Microfluidic devices based on the multilayer soft lithography allow accurate manipulation of liquids, handling reagents at the sub-nanoliter level, and performing multiple reactions in parallel processors by adapting micromixers. Here, we have experimentally evaluated and compared several designs of micromixers and operating conditions to find design guidelines for the micromixers. We tested circular, triangular, and rectangular mixing loops and measured mixing performance according to the position and the width of the valves that drive nanoliters of fluids in the micrometer scale mixing loop. We found that the rectangular mixer is best for the applications of highly integrated microfluidic platforms in terms of the mixing performance and the space utilization. This study provides an improved understanding of the flow behaviors inside micromixers and design guidelines for micromixers that are critical to build higher order fluidic systems for the complicated parallel bio/chemical processes on a chip.

  19. Evaluation of peristaltic micromixers for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duckjong; Rho, Hoon Suk; Jambovane, Sachin; Shin, Soojeong; Hong, Jong Wook

    2016-03-01

    Microfluidic devices based on the multilayer soft lithography allow accurate manipulation of liquids, handling reagents at the sub-nanoliter level, and performing multiple reactions in parallel processors by adapting micromixers. Here, we have experimentally evaluated and compared several designs of micromixers and operating conditions to find design guidelines for the micromixers. We tested circular, triangular, and rectangular mixing loops and measured mixing performance according to the position and the width of the valves that drive nanoliters of fluids in the micrometer scale mixing loop. We found that the rectangular mixer is best for the applications of highly integrated microfluidic platforms in terms of the mixing performance and the space utilization. This study provides an improved understanding of the flow behaviors inside micromixers and design guidelines for micromixers that are critical to build higher order fluidic systems for the complicated parallel bio/chemical processes on a chip. PMID:27036809

  20. Flow control for capillary-pumped microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestad, T.; Marr, D. W. M.; Oakey, J.

    2004-11-01

    Advantages of performing analytical and diagnostic tasks in microfluidic-based systems include small sample volume requirements, rapid transport times and the promise of compact, portable instrumentation. The application of such systems in home and point-of-care situations has been limited, however, because these devices typically require significant associated hardware to initiate and control fluid flow. Capillary-based pumping can address many of these deficiencies by taking advantage of surface tension to pull fluid through devices. The development of practical instrumentation however will rely upon the development of precision control schemes to complement capillary pumping. Here, we introduce a straightforward, robust approach that allows for reconfigurable fluid guidance through otherwise fixed capillary networks. This technique is based on the opening and closing of microfluidic channels cast in a flexible elastomer via automated or even manual mechanical actuation. This straightforward approach can completely and precisely control flows such as samples of complex fluids, including whole blood, at very high resolutions according to real-time user feedback. These results demonstrate the suitability of this technique for portable, microfluidic instruments in laboratory, field or clinical diagnostic applications.

  1. DIELECTROPHORESIS-BASED MICROFLUIDIC SEPARATION AND DETECTION SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Vykoukal, Jody; Noshari, Jamileh; Becker, Frederick; Gascoyne, Peter; Krulevitch, Peter; Fuller, Chris; Ackler, Harold; Hamilton, Julie; Boser, Bernhard; Eldredge, Adam; Hitchens, Duncan; Andrews, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of human diseases frequently requires isolation and detection of certain cell types from a complex mixture. Compared with traditional separation and detection techniques, microfluidic approaches promise to yield easy-to-use diagnostic instruments tolerant of a wide range of operating environments and capable of accomplishing automated analyses. These approaches will enable diagnostic advances to be disseminated from sophisticated clinical laboratories to the point-of-care. Applications will include the separation and differential analysis of blood cell subpopulations for host-based detection of blood cell changes caused by disease, infection, or exposure to toxins, and the separation and analysis of surface-sensitized, custom dielectric beads for chemical, biological, and biomolecular targets. Here we report a new particle separation and analysis microsystem that uses dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF). The system consists of a microfluidic chip with integrated sample injector, a DEP-FFF separator, and an AC impedance sensor. We show the design of a miniaturized impedance sensor integrated circuit (IC) with improved sensitivity, a new packaging approach for micro-flumes that features a slide-together compression package and novel microfluidic interconnects, and the design, control, integration and packaging of a fieldable prototype. Illustrative applications will be shown, including the separation of different sized beads and different cell types, blood cell differential analysis, and impedance sensing results for beads, spores and cells. PMID:22025905

  2. Rapid laser prototyping of valves for microfluidic autonomous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, M. I.; Abraham, E.; Y Desmulliez, M. P.

    2013-03-01

    Capillary forces in microfluidics provide a simple yet elegant means to direct liquids through flow channel networks. The ability to manipulate the flow in a truly automated manner has proven more problematic. The majority of valves require some form of flow control devices, which are manually, mechanically or electrically driven. Most demonstrated capillary systems have been manufactured by photolithography, which, despite its high precision and repeatability, can be labour intensive, requires a clean room environment and the use of fixed photomasks, limiting thereby the agility of the manufacturing process to readily examine alternative designs. In this paper, we describe a robust and rapid CO2 laser manufacturing process and demonstrate a range of capillary-driven microfluidic valve structures embedded within a microfluidic network. The manufacturing process described allows for advanced control and manipulation of fluids such that flow can be halted, triggered and delayed based on simple geometrical alterations to a given microchannel. The rapid prototyping methodology has been employed with PMMA substrates and a complete device has been created, ready for use, within 2-3 h. We believe that this agile manufacturing process can be applied to produce a range of complex autonomous fluidic platforms and allows subsequent designs to be rapidly explored.

  3. Label-free cell separation and sorting in microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Gossett, Daniel R.; Weaver, Westbrook M.; Mach, Albert J.; Hur, Soojung Claire; Tse, Henry Tat Kwong; Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed

    2010-01-01

    Cell separation and sorting are essential steps in cell biology research and in many diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Recently, there has been interest in methods which avoid the use of biochemical labels; numerous intrinsic biomarkers have been explored to identify cells including size, electrical polarizability, and hydrodynamic properties. This review highlights microfluidic techniques used for label-free discrimination and fractionation of cell populations. Microfluidic systems have been adopted to precisely handle single cells and interface with other tools for biochemical analysis. We analyzed many of these techniques, detailing their mode of separation, while concentrating on recent developments and evaluating their prospects for application. Furthermore, this was done from a perspective where inertial effects are considered important and general performance metrics were proposed which would ease comparison of reported technologies. Lastly, we assess the current state of these technologies and suggest directions which may make them more accessible. Figure A wide range of microfluidic technologies have been developed to separate and sort cells by taking advantage of differences in their intrinsic biophysical properties PMID:20419490

  4. Development of a fast thermal response microfluidic system using liquid metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Meng; Gui, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Room temperature liquid metal gallium alloy has been widely used in many micro-electromechanical systems applications, such as on-chip electrical microheaters, micro temperature sensors, micro pumps and so on. Injecting liquid metal into microchannels can provide a simple, rapid, low-cost but efficient way to integrate these elements in microfluidic chips with high accuracy. The liquid metal-filled microstructures can be designed in any shape and easily integrated into microfluidic chips. In this paper, an on-chip liquid metal-based thermal microfluidic system is proposed for quick temperature control at the microscale. The micro system utilizes just one microfluidic chip as a basic working platform, which has liquid metal-based on-chip heaters, temperature sensors and electroosmotic flow pumps. Under the comprehensive control of these elements, the micro system can quickly change the temperature of a target fluid in the microfluidic chip. These liquid metal-based on-chip elements are very helpful for the fabrication and miniaturization of the microfluidic chip. In this paper, deionized water is used to test the temperature control performance of the thermal microfluidic system. According to the experimental results, the micro system can efficiently control the temperature of water ranging from 28 °C to 90 °C. The thermal microfluidic system has great potential for use in many microfluidic applications, such as on-chip polymerase chain reaction, temperature gradient focusing, protein crystallization and chemical synthesis.

  5. SmartBuild-a truly plug-n-play modular microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2008-08-01

    In this Technical Note, for the first time, a truly "plug-n-play" modular microfluidic system (SmartBuild Plug-n-Play Modular Microfluidic System) is presented for designing and building integrated modular microfluidic systems for biological and chemical applications. The modular microfluidic system can be built by connecting multiple microfluidic components together to form a larger integrated system. The SmartBuild System comprises of a motherboard with interconnect channels/grooves, fitting components, microchannel inserts with different configurations and microchips/modules with different functionalities. Also, heaters, micropumps and valving systems can be designed and used in the system. Examples of an integrated mixing system and reaction systems are presented here to demonstrate the versatility of the SmartBuild System. PMID:18651081

  6. Temperature control system for water-perfused suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brengelmann, G. L.; Mckeag, M.; Rowell, L. B.

    1977-01-01

    A system used to control skin temperature in human subjects wearing water-perfused garments is described. It supplies 8 l/min at 10 psi with water temperature controlled within plus or minus 0.1 C. Temperature control is facilitated by a low circulating thermal mass and a fast responding heater based on a commercially available quartz heat lamp. The system is open so that hot or cold water can be added from the building mains to produce rates of change of water temperature exceeding 5 C/min. These capabilities allow semiautomatic control of skin temperature within plus or minus 0.1 C of desired wave forms.

  7. Microfluidic electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field. PMID:22711057

  8. Microfluidic system for single cell sorting with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Thomas; Becsi, Laszlo; Talkenberg, Marc; Wagner, Michael; Weber, Petra; Mescheder, Ulrich; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2010-11-01

    A microfluidic system was developed and combined with optical tweezers for single cell sorting. This system consists of a glass chip of 300 μm thickness with an etched crosswise channel structure, a silicon layer for sealing and a PMMA substrate for tubular coupling. Selected cells are trapped and moved in perpendicular direction to the main flow for recovery in special reservoirs and further evaluation (e.g. by polymerase chain reaction, PCR). In addition, maximum light doses and exposure times for maintaining cell viability were determined.

  9. Microfluidic System Based High Throughput Drug Screening System for Curcumin/TRAIL Combinational Chemotherapy in Human Prostate Cancer PC3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Dami; Kim, Kwangmi; Kim, Jeongyun

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a fully automated high throughput drug screening (HTDS) system based on the microfluidic cell culture array to perform combinational chemotherapy. This system has 64 individually addressable cell culture chambers where the sequential combinatorial concentrations of two different drugs can be generated by two microfluidic diffusive mixers. Each diffusive mixer has two integrated micropumps connected to the media and the drug reservoirs respectively for generating the desired combination without the need for any extra equipment to perfuse the solution such as syringe pumps. The cell array is periodically exposed to the drug combination with the programmed LabVIEW system during a couple of days without extra handling after seeding the cells into the microfluidic device and also, this device does not require the continuous generation of solutions compared to the previous systems. Therefore, the total amount of drug being consumed per experiment is less than a few hundred micro liters in each reservoir. The utility of this system is demonstrated through investigating the viability of the prostate cancer PC3 cell line with the combinational treatments of curcumin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Our results suggest that the system can be used for screening and optimizing drug combination with a small amount of reagent for combinatorial chemotherapy against cancer cells. PMID:25143816

  10. Digital Microfluidic Logic Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Xu, Tao; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Microfluidic computing is an emerging application for microfluidics technology. We propose microfluidic logic gates based on digital microfluidics. Using the principle of electrowetting-on-dielectric, AND, OR, NOT and XOR gates are implemented through basic droplet-handling operations such as transporting, merging and splitting. The same input-output interpretation enables the cascading of gates to create nontrivial computing systems. We present a potential application for microfluidic logic gates by implementing microfluidic logic operations for on-chip HIV test.

  11. An easy-to-use microfluidic interconnection system to create quick and reversibly interfaced simple microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Brandt Andersen, Karsten; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2015-11-01

    The presented microfluidic interconnection system provides an alternative for the individual interfacing of simple microfluidic devices fabricated in polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate and cyclic olefin polymer. A modification of the device inlet enables the direct attachment of tubing (such as polytetrafluoroethylene tubing) secured and sealed by using a small plug, without the need for additional assembly, glue or o-rings. This provides a very clean connection that does not require additional, potentially incompatible, materials. The tightly sealed connection can withstand pressures above 250 psi and therefore supports applications with high flow rates or highly viscous fluids. The ease of incorporation, configuration, fabrication and use make this interconnection system ideal for the rapid prototyping of simple microfluidic devices or other integrated systems that require microfluidic interfaces. It provides a valuable addition to the toolbox of individual and small arrays of connectors suitable for micromachined or template-based injection molded devices since it does not require protruding, threaded or glued modifications on the inlet and avoids bulky and expensive fittings.

  12. A microfluidic mixing system for single-molecule measurements.

    PubMed

    Pfeil, Shawn H; Wickersham, Charles E; Hoffmann, Armin; Lipman, Everett A

    2009-05-01

    This article describes the design and fabrication of a microfluidic mixing system optimized for ultrasensitive optical measurements. Channels are replica-molded in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer and sealed with fused-silica coverglass. The resulting devices have broad chemical compatibility and extremely low fluorescence background, enabling measurements of individual molecules under well-characterized nonequilibrium conditions. Fluid delivery and pressure connections are made using an interface that allows for rapid assembly, rapid sample exchange, and modular device replacement while providing access for high numerical aperture optics. PMID:19485532

  13. Silicon micromachined pumps employing piezoelectric membrane actuation for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Michael

    Microsystems technology is a rapidly expanding area that comprises electronics, mechanics and optics. In this field, physical/chemical sensing, fluid handling and optical communication are emerging as potential markets. Microfluidic systems like an implantable insulin pump, a drug delivery system and a total chemical analysis system are currently being developed by academia and industry around the world. This project contributes to the area of microfluidics in that a novel thick-film-on-silicon membrane actuator has been developed to allow inexpensive mass production of micropumps. To date piezoelectric plates have been surface mounted onto a silicon membrane. This single chip fabrication method can now be replaced by screen printing thick piezoelectric layers onto 4 inch silicon substrates. Two different pump types have been developed. These are membrane pumps with either cantilever valves or diffuser/nozzle valves. Pump rates between 100 and 200 μl min-1 and backpressures up to 4 kPa have been achieved with these pumps. Along with the technology of micropumps, simulators have been developed. A novel coupled FEM-CFD solver was realised by a computer controlled coupling of two commercially available packages (ANSYS and CFX-Flow3D). The results of this simulator were in good agreement with measurements on micromachined cantilever valves. CFX- Flow3D was also used to successfully model the behaviour of the diffuser/nozzle valve. Finally, the pump has been simulated using a continuity equation. A behavioural dynamic extension of the cantilever valve was necessary to achieve better prediction of the pump rates for higher frequencies. As well, a common process has been developed for microfluidic devices like micromixers, particle counters and sorters as well as flow sensors. The micromixer has been tested already and achieves mixing for input pressures between 2 and 7 kPa. This agrees with simulations of the diffusive mixing with CFX-Flow3D. Together with the micropump

  14. Microfluidic systems and methods of transport and lysis of cells and analysis of cell lysate

    DOEpatents

    Culbertson, Christopher T.; Jacobson, Stephen C.; McClain, Maxine A.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2004-08-31

    Microfluidic systems and methods are disclosed which are adapted to transport and lyse cellular components of a test sample for analysis. The disclosed microfluidic systems and methods, which employ an electric field to rupture the cell membrane, cause unusually rapid lysis, thereby minimizing continued cellular activity and resulting in greater accuracy of analysis of cell processes.

  15. Microfluidic systems and methods for transport and lysis of cells and analysis of cell lysate

    DOEpatents

    Culbertson, Christopher T [Oak Ridge, TN; Jacobson, Stephen C [Knoxville, TN; McClain, Maxine A [Knoxville, TN; Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    Microfluidic systems and methods are disclosed which are adapted to transport and lyse cellular components of a test sample for analysis. The disclosed microfluidic systems and methods, which employ an electric field to rupture the cell membrane, cause unusually rapid lysis, thereby minimizing continued cellular activity and resulting in greater accuracy of analysis of cell processes.

  16. Development of Microfluidic Systems Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Protein Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Beiyuan; Li, Xiufeng; Chen, Deyong; Peng, Hongshang; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic systems enabling high-throughput characterization of single-cell proteins. Four key perspectives of microfluidic platforms are included in this review: (1) microfluidic fluorescent flow cytometry; (2) droplet based microfluidic flow cytometry; (3) large-array micro wells (microengraving); and (4) large-array micro chambers (barcode microchips). We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on three key performance parameters (absolute quantification, sensitivity, and throughput). PMID:26891303

  17. Development of Microfluidic Systems Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Protein Characterization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Beiyuan; Li, Xiufeng; Chen, Deyong; Peng, Hongshang; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic systems enabling high-throughput characterization of single-cell proteins. Four key perspectives of microfluidic platforms are included in this review: (1) microfluidic fluorescent flow cytometry; (2) droplet based microfluidic flow cytometry; (3) large-array micro wells (microengraving); and (4) large-array micro chambers (barcode microchips). We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on three key performance parameters (absolute quantification, sensitivity, and throughput). PMID:26891303

  18. Label-free all-electronic biosensing in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Michael A.

    Label-free, all-electronic detection techniques offer great promise for advancements in medical and biological analysis. Electrical sensing can be used to measure both interfacial and bulk impedance changes in conducting solutions. Electronic sensors produced using standard microfabrication processes are easily integrated into microfluidic systems. Combined with the sensitivity of radiofrequency electrical measurements, this approach offers significant advantages over competing biological sensing methods. Scalable fabrication methods also provide a means of bypassing the prohibitive costs and infrastructure associated with current technologies. We describe the design, development and use of a radiofrequency reflectometer integrated into a microfluidic system towards the specific detection of biologically relevant materials. We developed a detection protocol based on impedimetric changes caused by the binding of antibody/antigen pairs to the sensing region. Here we report the surface chemistry that forms the necessary capture mechanism. Gold-thiol binding was utilized to create an ordered alkane monolayer on the sensor surface. Exposed functional groups target the N-terminus, affixing a protein to the monolayer. The general applicability of this method lends itself to a wide variety of proteins. To demonstrate specificity, commercially available mouse anti- Streptococcus Pneumoniae monoclonal antibody was used to target the full-length recombinant pneumococcal surface protein A, type 2 strain D39 expressed by Streptococcus Pneumoniae. We demonstrate the RF response of the sensor to both the presence of the surface decoration and bound SPn cells in a 1x phosphate buffered saline solution. The combined microfluidic sensor represents a powerful platform for the analysis and detection of cells and biomolecules.

  19. Microfluidic filtration system to isolate extracellular vesicles from blood.

    PubMed

    Davies, Ryan T; Kim, Junho; Jang, Su Chul; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Gho, Yong Song; Park, Jaesung

    2012-12-21

    Extracellular vesicles are released by various cell types, particularly tumor cells, and may be potential targets for blood-based cancer diagnosis. However, studies performed on blood-borne vesicles to date have been limited by lack of effective, standardized purification strategies. Using in situ prepared nanoporous membranes, we present a simple strategy employing a microfluidic filtration system to isolate vesicles from whole blood samples. This method can be applied to purify nano-sized particles from blood allowing isolation of intact extracellular vesicles, avoiding the need for laborious and potentially damaging centrifugation steps or overly specific antibody-based affinity purification. Porous polymer monoliths were integrated as membranes into poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chips by benchtop UV photopolymerization through a mask, allowing precise positioning of membrane elements while preserving simplicity of device preparation. Pore size could be manipulated by changing the ratio of porogenic solvent to prepolymer solution, and was tuned to a size proper for extraction of vesicles. Using the membrane as a size exclusion filter, we separated vesicles from cells and large debris by injecting whole blood under pressure through the microfluidic device. To enhance isolation purity, DC electrophoresis was employed as an alternative driving force to propel particles across the filter and increase the separation efficiency of vesicles from proteins. From the whole blood of melanoma-grown mice, we isolated extracellular vesicles and performed RT-PCR to verify their contents of RNA. Melan A mRNA derived from melanoma tumor cells were found enriched in filtered samples, confirming the recovery of vesicles via their cargo. This filtration system can be incorporated into other on-chip processes enabling integrated sample preparation for the downstream analysis of blood-based extracellular vesicles. PMID:23111789

  20. Laminated plastic microfluidic components for biological and chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Matson, D.W.; Bennett, W.D.; Lin, Y.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    Laminated plastic microfluidic components are being developed for biological testing systems and chemical sensors. Applications include a DNA thermal cycler, DNA analytical systems, electrophoretic flow systems, dialysis systems, and metal sensors for ground water. This article describes fabrication processes developed for these plastic microfluidic components, and the fabrication of a chromium metal sensor and a microdialysis device. Most of the components have a stacked architecture. Using this architecture, the fluid flows, or is pumped through, as many as nine laminated functional levels. Functions include pumping, mixing, reaction, detection, reservoirs, separations, and electronics. Polyimide, poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), and polycarbonate materials with thicknesses between 25 and 125 {mu}m are used to construct the components. This makes the components low cost, inert to many biological fluids and chemicals, and disposable. The components are fabricated by excimer laser micromachining the microchannel patterns and microstructures in the various laminates. In some cases, micropumps are integrated into these components to move the fluids. Vias and interconnects are also cut by the laser and integrated with micropumps. The laminates are sealed and bonded by adhesive and thermal processes and are leak tight. The parts withstand pressures as high as 790 kPa. Typical channel widths are 50 to 100 {mu}m, with aspect ratios near 5. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  1. Design, modeling and characterization of microfluidic architectures for high flow rate, small footprint microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Saias, Laure; Autebert, Julien; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-03-01

    We propose a strategy for optimizing distribution of flow in a microfluidic chamber for microreactor, lateral flow assay and immunocapture applications. It is aimed at maximizing flow throughput, while keeping footprint, cell thickness, and shear stress in the distribution channels at a minimum, and offering a uniform flow field along the whole analysis chamber. In order to minimize footprint, the traditional tree-like or "rhombus" design, in which distribution microchannels undergo a series of splittings into two subchannels with equal lengths and widths, was replaced by a design in which subchannel lengths are unequal, and widths are analytically adapted within the Hele-Shaw approximation, in order to keep the flow resistance uniform along all flow paths. The design was validated by hydrodynamic flow simulation using COMSOL finite element software. Simulations show that, if the channel is too narrow, the Hele-Shaw approximation loses accuracy, and the flow velocity in the chamber can fluctuate by up to 20%. We thus used COMSOL simulation to fine-tune the channel parameters, and obtained a fluctuation of flow velocity across the whole chamber below 10%. The design was then implemented into a PDMS device, and flow profiles were measured experimentally using particle tracking. Finally, we show that this system can be applied to cell sorting in self-assembling magnetic arrays, increasing flow throughput by a factor 100 as compared to earlier reported designs. PMID:21240403

  2. Passive injection control for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.; Neyer, David W.

    2004-12-21

    Apparatus for eliminating siphoning, "dead" regions, and fluid concentration gradients in microscale analytical devices. In its most basic embodiment, the present invention affords passive injection control for both electric field-driven and pressure-driven systems by providing additional fluid flow channels or auxiliary channels disposed on either side of a sample separation column. The auxiliary channels are sized such that volumetric fluid flow rate through these channels, while sufficient to move the sample away from the sample injection region in a timely fashion, is less than that through the sample separation channel or chromatograph.

  3. CAD system for automatic analysis of CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, T.; Ogiela, M. R.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, authors present novel algorithms developed for the computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system for analysis of dynamic brain perfusion, computer tomography (CT) maps, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Those methods perform both quantitative analysis [detection and measurement and description with brain anatomy atlas (AA) of potential asymmetries/lesions] and qualitative analysis (semantic interpretation of visualized symptoms). The semantic interpretation (decision about type of lesion: ischemic/hemorrhagic, is the brain tissue at risk of infraction or not) of visualized symptoms is done by, so-called, cognitive inference processes allowing for reasoning on character of pathological regions based on specialist image knowledge. The whole system is implemented in.NET platform (C# programming language) and can be used on any standard PC computer with.NET framework installed.

  4. Zebrafish embryo development in a microfluidic flow-through system.

    PubMed

    Wielhouwer, Eric M; Ali, Shaukat; Al-Afandi, Abdulrahman; Blom, Marko T; Riekerink, Marinus B Olde; Poelma, Christian; Westerweel, Jerry; Oonk, Johannes; Vrouwe, Elwin X; Buesink, Wilfred; vanMil, Harald G J; Chicken, Jonathan; van't Oever, Ronny; Richardson, Michael K

    2011-05-21

    The zebrafish embryo is a small, cheap, whole-animal model which may replace rodents in some areas of research. Unfortunately, zebrafish embryos are commonly cultured in microtitre plates using cell-culture protocols with static buffer replacement. Such protocols are highly invasive, consume large quantities of reagents and do not readily permit high-quality imaging. Zebrafish and rodent embryos have previously been cultured in static microfluidic drops, and zebrafish embryos have also been raised in a prototype polydimethylsiloxane setup in a Petri dish. Other than this, no animal embryo has ever been shown to undergo embryonic development in a microfluidic flow-through system. We have developed and prototyped a specialized lab-on-a-chip made from bonded layers of borosilicate glass. We find that zebrafish embryos can develop in the chip for 5 days, with continuous buffer flow at pressures of 0.005-0.04 MPa. Phenotypic effects were seen, but these were scored subjectively as 'minor'. Survival rates of 100% could be reached with buffer flows of 2 µL per well per min. High-quality imaging was possible. An acute ethanol exposure test in the chip replicated the same assay performed in microtitre plates. More than 100 embryos could be cultured in an area, excluding infrastructure, smaller than a credit card. We discuss how biochip technology, coupled with zebrafish larvae, could allow biological research to be conducted in massive, parallel experiments, at high speed and low cost. PMID:21491052

  5. A hybrid microfluidic platform for cell-based assays via diffusive and convective trans-membrane perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchagina, Elizaveta; Mc Glade, Declan; Glynn, Macdara; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel 3D hybrid assembly of a polymer microfluidic chip with polycarbonate track-etched membrane (PCTEM) enabling membrane-supported cell culture. Two chip designs have been developed to establish either diffusive or convective reagent delivery using the integrated PCTEM. While it is well suited to a range of cell-based assays, we specifically employ this platform for the screening of a common antitumor chemotoxic agent (mitomycin C – MMC) on the HL60 myeloid leukemia cell line. The toxic activity of MMC is based on the generation of severe DNA damage in the cells. Using either mode of operation, the HL60 cells were cultured on-chip before, during, and after exposure to MMC at concentrations ranging from 0 to 50 μM. Cell viability was analysed off-chip by the trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The results of the on-chip viability assay were found to be consistent with those obtained off-chip and indicated ca. 40% cell survival at MMC concentration of 50 μM. The catalogue of capabilities of the here described cell assay platform comprises of (i) the culturing of cells either under shear-free conditions or under induced through-membrane flows, (ii) the tight time control of the reagent exposure, (iii) the straightforward assembly of devices, (iv) the flexibility on the choice of the membrane, and, prospectively, (v) the amenability for large-scale parallelization. PMID:24404021

  6. Enhanced optical chromatography in a PDMS microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terray, A.; Arnold, J.; Hart, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    The purely refractive index driven separation of uniformly sized polystyrene, n = 1.59 and poly(methylmethacrylate), n = 1.49 in an optical chromatography system has been enhanced through the incorporation of a custom poly(dimethysiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic system. A customized channel geometry was used to create separate regions with different linear flow velocities tailored to the specific application. These separate flow regions were then used to expose the entities in the separation to different linear flow velocities thus enhancing their separation relative to the same separation in a constant velocity flow environment. A microbiological sample containing spores of the biological warfare agent, Bacillus anthracis, and a common environmental interferent, mulberry pollen, was investigated to test the use of tailored velocity regions. These very different samples were analyzed simultaneously only through the use of tailored velocity regions.

  7. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jeffrey B; Justison, George A

    2015-12-01

    The authors comment on Steffens and Gunser's article describing the University of Wisconsin adoption of the Epic anesthesia record to include perfusion information from the cardiopulmonary bypass patient experience. We highlight the current-day lessons and the valuable quality and safety principles the Wisconsin-Epic model anesthesia-perfusion record provides. PMID:26834289

  8. Microfluidic System Simulation Including the Electro-Viscous Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojas, Eileen; Chen, C. P.; Majumdar, Alok

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a practical approach using a general purpose lumped-parameter computer program, GFSSP (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) for calculating flow distribution in a network of micro-channels including electro-viscous effects due to the existence of electrical double layer (EDL). In this study, an empirical formulation for calculating an effective viscosity of ionic solutions based on dimensional analysis is described to account for surface charge and bulk fluid conductivity, which give rise to electro-viscous effect in microfluidics network. Two dimensional slit micro flow data was used to determine the model coefficients. Geometry effect is then included through a Poiseuille number correlation in GFSSP. The bi-power model was used to calculate flow distribution of isotropically etched straight channel and T-junction microflows involving ionic solutions. Performance of the proposed model is assessed against experimental test data.

  9. On-demand droplet release for droplet-based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Chun; Liu, YingShuai; Li, Chang Ming

    2010-03-01

    On-demand droplet release from microwell was successfully implemented and well combined with droplet trapping/fusion functions to make an ideal and integrated droplet based microfluidic system. PMID:20162230

  10. Modular integration of electronics and microfluidic systems using flexible printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Wu, Amy; Wang, Lisen; Jensen, Erik; Mathies, Richard; Boser, Bernhard

    2010-02-21

    Microfluidic systems offer an attractive alternative to conventional wet chemical methods with benefits including reduced sample and reagent volumes, shorter reaction times, high-throughput, automation, and low cost. However, most present microfluidic systems rely on external means to analyze reaction products. This substantially adds to the size, complexity, and cost of the overall system. Electronic detection based on sub-millimetre size integrated circuits (ICs) has been demonstrated for a wide range of targets including nucleic and amino acids, but deployment of this technology to date has been limited due to the lack of a flexible process to integrate these chips within microfluidic devices. This paper presents a modular and inexpensive process to integrate ICs with microfluidic systems based on standard printed circuit board (PCB) technology to assemble the independently designed microfluidic and electronic components. The integrated system can accommodate multiple chips of different sizes bonded to glass or PDMS microfluidic systems. Since IC chips and flex PCB manufacturing and assembly are industry standards with low cost, the integrated system is economical for both laboratory and point-of-care settings. PMID:20126694

  11. Cell Separation by Non-Inertial Force Fields in Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hideaki; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Cell and microparticle separation in microfluidic systems has recently gained significant attention in sample preparations for biological and chemical studies. Microfluidic separation is typically achieved by applying differential forces on the target particles to guide them into different paths. This paper reviews basic concepts and novel designs of such microfluidic separators with emphasis on the use of non-inertial force fields, including dielectrophoretic force, optical gradient force, magnetic force, and acoustic primary radiation force. Comparisons of separation performances with discussions on physiological effects and instrumentation issues toward point-of-care devices are provided as references for choosing appropriate separation methods for various applications. PMID:20046897

  12. An integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for protein analysis with magnetic bead-based sampling capabilities.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Woo; Oh, Kwang W; Thomas, Jennifer H; Heineman, William R; Halsall, H Brian; Nevin, Joseph H; Helmicki, Arthur J; Henderson, H Thurman; Ahn, Chong H

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents the development and characterization of an integrated microfluidic biochemical detection system for fast and low-volume immunoassays using magnetic beads, which are used as both immobilization surfaces and bio-molecule carriers. Microfluidic components have been developed and integrated to construct a microfluidic biochemical detection system. Magnetic bead-based immunoassay, as a typical example of biochemical detection and analysis, has been successfully performed on the integrated microfluidic biochemical analysis system that includes a surface-mounted biofilter and electrochemical sensor on a glass microfluidic motherboard. Total time required for an immunoassay was less than 20 min including sample incubation time, and sample volume wasted was less than 50 microl during five repeated assays. Fast and low-volume biochemical analysis has been successfully achieved with the developed biofilter and immunosensor, which is integrated to the microfluidic system. Such a magnetic bead-based biochemical detection system, described in this paper, can be applied to protein analysis systems. PMID:15100857

  13. Moving droplets between closed and open microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqiang; Jones, Thomas B

    2015-05-21

    In electric-field-mediated droplet microfluidics, there are two distinct architectures - closed systems using parallel-plate electrodes and open systems using coplanar electrodes fabricated on an open substrate. An architecture combining both closed and open systems on a chip would facilitate many of the chemical and biological processes now envisioned for the laboratory on a chip. To accomplish such an integration requires a means to move droplets back and forth between the two. This paper presents an investigation of the requirements for such manipulation of both water and oil droplets. The required wetting conditions for a droplet to cross the open/closed boundary is revealed by a force balance analysis and predictions of this model are compared to experimental results. Water droplets can be moved between closed and open systems by electrowetting actuation; droplet detachment from the upper plate is facilitated by the use of beveled edge. The force model predicts that driving an oil droplet from a closed to an open structure requires an oleophobic surface. This prediction has been tested and confirmed using <100> silicon wafers made oleophobic by re-entrant microstructures etched into the surface. PMID:25850701

  14. Field-effect flow control in a polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Buch, J S; Wang, P C; DeVoe, D L; Lee, C S

    2001-10-01

    The application of the field-effect for direct control of electroosmosis in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic system, constructed on a silicon wafer with a 2.0 microm electrically insulating layer of silicon dioxide, is demonstrated. This microfluidic system consists of a 2.0 cm open microchannel fabricated on a PDMS slab, which can reversibly adhere to the silicon wafer to form a hybrid microfluidic device. Aside from mechanically serving as a robust bottom substrate to seal the channel and support the microfluidic system, the silicon wafer is exploited to achieve field-effect flow control by grounding the semiconductive silicon medium. When an electric field is applied through the channel, a radial electric potential gradient is created across the silicon dioxide layer that allows for direct control of the zeta potential and the resulting electroosmotic flow (EOF). By configuring this microfluidic system with two power supplies at both ends of the microchannel, the applied electric potentials can be varied for manipulating the polarity and the magnitude of the radial electric potential gradient across the silicon dioxide layer. At the same time, the longitudinal potential gradient through the microchannel, which is used to induce EOF, is held constant. The results of EOF control in this hybrid microfluidic system are presented for phosphate buffer at pH 3 and pH 5. It is also demonstrated that EOF control can be performed at higher solution pH of 6 and 7.4 by modifying the silicon wafer surface with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) prior to assembly of the hybrid microfluidic system. Results of EOF control from this study are compared with those reported in the literature involving the use of other microfluidic devices under comparable solution conditions. PMID:11700719

  15. Dynamic cell culture: a microfluidic function generator for live cell microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip J; Gaige, Terry A; Hung, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    We present a microfluidic system for time-lapsed, live cell microscopy with the ability to control solution exchange via a dynamic flow controller. The application specific microfluidic plates are designed to maintain adherent and non-adherent cell types for multiple days with continuous medium perfusion. Upstream channels with flow controlled via custom software allow the delivery of unique exposure profiles to the cultured cells, such as square waves, step functions, ramps, etc. PMID:19209350

  16. Microfluidics on compliant substrates: recent developments in foldable and bendable devices and system packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Bonnie L.

    2012-04-01

    Microfluidics is revolutionizing laboratory methods and biomedical devices, offering new capabilities and instrumentation in multiple areas such as DNA analysis, proteomics, enzymatic analysis, single cell analysis, immunology, point-of-care medicine, personalized medicine, drug delivery, and environmental toxin and pathogen detection. For many applications (e.g., wearable and implantable health monitors, drug delivery devices, and prosthetics) mechanically flexible polymer devices and systems that can conform to the body offer benefits that cannot be achieved using systems based on conventional rigid substrate materials. However, difficulties in implementing active devices and reliable packaging technologies have limited the success of flexible microfluidics. Employing highly compliant materials such as PDMS that are typically employed for prototyping, we review mechanically flexible polymer microfluidic technologies based on free-standing polymer substrates and novel electronic and microfluidic interconnection schemes. Central to these new technologies are hybrid microfabrication methods employing novel nanocomposite polymer materials and devices. We review microfabrication methods using these materials, along with demonstrations of example devices and packaging schemes that employ them. We review these recent developments and place them in the context of the fields of flexible microfluidics and conformable systems, and discuss cross-over applications to conventional rigid-substrate microfluidics.

  17. A latchable thermally activated phase change actuator for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    Complex microfluidic systems often require a high number of individually controllable active components like valves and pumps. In this paper we present the development and optimization of a latchable thermally controlled phase change actuator which uses a solid/liquid phase transition of a phase change medium and the displacement of the liquid phase change medium to change and stabilize the two states of the actuator. Because the phase change is triggered by heat produced with ohmic resistors the used control signal is an electrical signal. In contrast to pneumatically activated membrane valves this concept allows the individual control of several dozen actuators with only two external pressure lines. Within this paper we show the general working principle of the actuator and demonstrate its general function and the scalability of the concept at an example of four actuators. Additionally we present the complete results of our studies to optimize the response behavior of the actuator - the influence of the heating power as well as the used phase change medium on melting and solidifying times.

  18. Evaluation of nanoencapsulated verteporfin's cytotoxicity using a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Tokarska, Katarzyna; Bułka, Magdalena; Bazylińska, Urszula; Jastrzębska, Elżbieta; Chudy, Michał; Dybko, Artur; Wilk, Kazimiera A; Brzózka, Zbigniew

    2016-08-01

    A new-generation of nanoencapsulated photosensitizers could be a good solution to perform effective photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this paper, we present physicochemical characterization and cellular investigation of newly prepared long-sustained release oil-core polyelectrolyte nanocarriers loaded with verteporfin (nano VP) in relation to free VP. For this purpose, a macroscale multiwell plates and multifunctional microfluidic system (for three types of cell cultures: monoculture, coculture and mixed culture) were used. A physical analysis of nano VP showed its high stability, monodispersity with unimodal shape and highly positive charge, what made them good candidates for cancer treatment. Biological properties (cellular internalization and uptake as well as cytotoxicity) of nano and free VP were evaluated using both carcinoma (A549) and normal (MRC-5) human lung cells. It was investigated that verteporfin was accumulated in cancer cells preferentially. Low cytotoxicity of the tested photosensitizer was observed in both macro, and microscale. However, in experiments performed in the microsystem, nano VP allowed the reduction of cytotoxic effect, especially in relation to the normal cells. It could result from the specific environment of cell growth in the microsystem which can quite closely mimic the in vivo conditions. Our results suggest that the presented microsystem could be a very useful microtool for testing of new generation of photosensitizers in various configurations of cell cultures, which are difficult to perform in the macroscale. Moreover, the prepared nano VP could be successfully used for further research i.e. evaluation of PDT procedures. PMID:26997162

  19. Direct observation of dispersion and mixing processes in microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Yoshimasa; Fujino, Tatsuya; Korenaga, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    The diffusion phenomena, dispersion and mixing processes of the sample solute (Basic Blue 3 dye and KMnO4 aqueous solutions) were directly observed in laminar flow in glass microchannels. Quasi steady-state UV-visible absorption spectrometry was carried out using CCD camera images of the colored sample dispersion and mixing processes, and the absorbance change (DeltaAbs) was discussed based on the dimensionless parameter, tau which represents the flow time renormalized to the diffusion coefficient and the channel cross section. It was found that DeltaAbs showed almost the same tau dependence, even though the solutions and the microchannel sizes differed in laminar flow, if the microchannel fabrication method was the same. On the basis of this fundamental result, the total microchannel length required for the reaction of 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) and NO2- at a flow rate of 2 microL min(-1) was calculated, and the obtained value ( approximately 100 mm) showed very good agreement with our previous microchip research. It was concluded that both results were useful for designing the microchannel width, depth and length to control the chemical reaction time in recent microfluidic systems. PMID:18997379

  20. Microfluidic system for high throughput characterisation of echogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Rademeyer, Paul; Carugo, Dario; Lee, Jeong Yu; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-01-21

    Echogenic particles, such as microbubbles and volatile liquid micro/nano droplets, have shown considerable potential in a variety of clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The accurate prediction of their response to ultrasound excitation is however extremely challenging, and this has hindered the optimisation of techniques such as quantitative ultrasound imaging and targeted drug delivery. Existing characterisation techniques, such as ultra-high speed microscopy provide important insights, but suffer from a number of limitations; most significantly difficulty in obtaining large data sets suitable for statistical analysis and the need to physically constrain the particles, thereby altering their dynamics. Here a microfluidic system is presented that overcomes these challenges to enable the measurement of single echogenic particle response to ultrasound excitation. A co-axial flow focusing device is used to direct a continuous stream of unconstrained particles through the combined focal region of an ultrasound transducer and a laser. Both the optical and acoustic scatter from individual particles are then simultaneously recorded. Calibration of the device and example results for different types of echogenic particle are presented, demonstrating a high throughput of up to 20 particles per second and the ability to resolve changes in particle radius down to 0.1 μm with an uncertainty of less than 3%. PMID:25367757

  1. Magnetic microfluidic system for isolation of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitterboeck, Richard; Kokkinis, Georgios; Berris, Theocharis; Keplinger, Franz; Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the design and realization of a compact, portable and cost effective microfluidic system for isolation and detection of rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in suspension. The innovative aspect of the proposed isolation method is that it utilizes superparamagnetic particles (SMPs) to label CTCs and then isolate those using microtraps with integrated current carrying microconductors. The magnetically labeled and trapped CTCs can then be detected by integrated magnetic microsensors e.g. giant magnetoresistive (GMR) or giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensors. The channel and trap dimensions are optimized to protect the cells from shear stress and achieve high trapping efficiency. These intact single CTCs can then be used for additional analysis, testing and patient specific drug screening. Being able to analyze the CTCs metastasis-driving capabilities on the single cell level is considered of great importance for developing patient specific therapies. Experiments showed that it is possible to capture single labeled cells in multiple microtraps and hold them there without permanent electric current and magnetic field.

  2. Microfluidic organs-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Ingber, Donald E

    2014-08-01

    An organ-on-a-chip is a microfluidic cell culture device created with microchip manufacturing methods that contains continuously perfused chambers inhabited by living cells arranged to simulate tissue- and organ-level physiology. By recapitulating the multicellular architectures, tissue-tissue interfaces, physicochemical microenvironments and vascular perfusion of the body, these devices produce levels of tissue and organ functionality not possible with conventional 2D or 3D culture systems. They also enable high-resolution, real-time imaging and in vitro analysis of biochemical, genetic and metabolic activities of living cells in a functional tissue and organ context. This technology has great potential to advance the study of tissue development, organ physiology and disease etiology. In the context of drug discovery and development, it should be especially valuable for the study of molecular mechanisms of action, prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing and biomarker identification. PMID:25093883

  3. Utilization of the organ care system as ex-vivo lung perfusion after cold storage transportation.

    PubMed

    Mohite, P N; Maunz, O; Popov, A-F; Zych, B; Patil, N P; Simon, A R

    2015-11-01

    The Organ Care System (OCS) allows perfusion and ventilation of the donor lungs under physiological conditions. Ongoing trials to compare preservation with OCS Lung with standard cold storage do not include donor lungs with suboptimal gas exchange and donor lungs treated with OCS following cold storage transportation. We present a case of a 48-yr-old man who received such lungs after cold storage transportation treated with ex-vivo lung perfusion utilizing OCS. PMID:25662732

  4. Point-of-care, portable microfluidic blood analyzer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Teimour; Fricke, Todd; Quesenberry, J. T.; Todd, Paul W.; Leary, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in MEMS technology have provided an opportunity to develop microfluidic devices with enormous potential for portable, point-of-care, low-cost medical diagnostic tools. Hand-held flow cytometers will soon be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. Despite much interest in miniaturizing commercially available cytometers, they remain costly, bulky, and require expert operation. In this article, we report progress on the development of a battery-powered handheld blood analyzer that will quickly and automatically process a drop of whole human blood by real-time, on-chip magnetic separation of white blood cells (WBCs), fluorescence analysis of labeled WBC subsets, and counting a reproducible fraction of the red blood cells (RBCs) by light scattering. The whole blood (WB) analyzer is composed of a micro-mixer, a special branching/separation system, an optical detection system, and electronic readout circuitry. A droplet of un-processed blood is mixed with the reagents, i.e. magnetic beads and fluorescent stain in the micro-mixer. Valve-less sorting is achieved by magnetic deflection of magnetic microparticle-labeled WBC. LED excitation in combination with an avalanche photodiode (APD) detection system is used for counting fluorescent WBC subsets using several colors of immune-Qdots, while counting a reproducible fraction of red blood cells (RBC) is performed using a laser light scatting measurement with a photodiode. Optimized branching/channel width is achieved using Comsol Multi-Physics™ simulation. To accommodate full portability, all required power supplies (40v, +/-10V, and +3V) are provided via step-up voltage converters from one battery. A simple onboard lock-in amplifier is used to increase the sensitivity/resolution of the pulse counting circuitry.

  5. Photo inactivation of virus particles in microfluidic capillary systems.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yudan; Crump, Colin M; Mackley, Malcolm M; Li Puma, Gianluca; Reis, Nuno M

    2016-07-01

    It has long been established that UVC light is a very effective method for inactivating pathogens in a fluid, yet the application of UVC irradiation to modern biotechnological processes is limited by the intrinsic short penetration distance of UVC light in optically dense protein solutions. This experimental and numerical study establishes that irradiating a fluid flowing continuously in a microfluidic capillary system, in which the diameter of the capillary is tuned to the depth of penetration of UVC light, uniquely treats the whole volume of the fluid to UVC light, resulting in fast and effective inactivation of pathogens, with particular focus to virus particles. This was demonstrated by inactivating human herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1, a large enveloped virus) on a dense 10% fetal calf serum solution in a range of fluoropolymer capillary systems, including a 0.75 mm and 1.50 mm internal diameter capillaries and a high-throughput MicroCapillary Film with mean hydraulic diameter of 206 μm. Up to 99.96% of HSV-1 virus particles were effectively inactivated with a mean exposure time of up to 10 s, with undetectable collateral damage to solution proteins. The kinetics of virus inactivation matched well the results from a new mathematical model that considers the parabolic flow profile in the capillaries, and showed the methodology is fully predictable and scalable and avoids both the side effect of UVC light to proteins and the dilution of the fluid in current tubular UVC inactivation systems. This is expected to speed up the industrial adoption of non-invasive UVC virus inactivation in clinical biotechnology and biomanufacturing of therapeutic molecules. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1481-1492. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26694540

  6. A compact fluorescence detection system integrated with LED and PIN photodetector for microfluidic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wenwen; Wen, Zhiyu; Xu, Yi; Wen, Zhongquan; Zeng, Wei

    2011-08-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is the most sensitivity and widely used detection method in microfluidic chip. However the tranditional LIF detection has the disadvantage of bulky which limits the promotion and widely use of microfluidic chip. A novel compact fluorescence detection system which can be generally used in glass based micro-fluidic chip is proposed. The high-powered light emitting diode (LED) is used as the exciting light source, and multimode optical fiber is also used as transmission channel to transmit exciting light into the detection window. The filter is a specially designed thin film with the thickness of only 2-3 microns and is integrated on the bottom of the glass based microfluidic chip. PIN silicon based chip is chosen as the photodetector, and is integrated on the microfluidic chip by silicon and glass bonding. The integrated microfluidic chip is packaged in a specially designed cavity to shield external stray light. Experiment results show that the best working current for LED is 200mA; the distance between optical fiber tip and detection spot is 1.5mm; the transmittance of the thin film filter of emission light can reach up to 90% at the wavelength of 520nm; the detection limits for FITC labeled Phenylalanine is 10-7mol/L, and the on-line electrophoresis detection is also achieved.

  7. Analysis system for characterisation of simple, low-cost microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne; Naidoo, Thegaran; Nxumalo, Zandile; Land, Kevin; Davies, Emlyn; Fourie, Louis; Marais, Philip; Roux, Pieter

    2014-06-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between cost and operational integrity of microfluidic components, especially when intended for use in point-of-care devices. We present an analysis system developed to characterise microfluidic components for performing blood cell counting, enabling the balance between function and cost to be established quantitatively. Microfluidic components for sample and reagent introduction, mixing and dispensing of fluids were investigated. A simple inlet port plugging mechanism is used to introduce and dispense a sample of blood, while a reagent is released into the microfluidic system through compression and bursting of a blister pack. Mixing and dispensing of the sample and reagent are facilitated via air actuation. For these microfluidic components to be implemented successfully, a number of aspects need to be characterised for development of an integrated point-of-care device design. The functional components were measured using a microfluidic component analysis system established in-house. Experiments were carried out to determine: 1. the force and speed requirements for sample inlet port plugging and blister pack compression and release using two linear actuators and load cells for plugging the inlet port, compressing the blister pack, and subsequently measuring the resulting forces exerted, 2. the accuracy and repeatability of total volumes of sample and reagent dispensed, and 3. the degree of mixing and dispensing uniformity of the sample and reagent for cell counting analysis. A programmable syringe pump was used for air actuation to facilitate mixing and dispensing of the sample and reagent. Two high speed cameras formed part of the analysis system and allowed for visualisation of the fluidic operations within the microfluidic device. Additional quantitative measures such as microscopy were also used to assess mixing and dilution accuracy, as well as uniformity of fluid dispensing - all of which are important requirements towards the

  8. [Micro-droplet characterization and its application for amino acid detection in droplet microfluidic system].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huiling; Dong, Libing; Tu, Ran; Du, Wenbin; Ji, Shiru; Wang, Qinhong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the droplet microfluidic system attracts interests due to its high throughput and low cost to detect and screen. The picoliter micro-droplets from droplet microfluidics are uniform with respect to the size and shape, and could be used as monodispensed micro-reactors for encapsulation and detection of single cell or its metabolites. Therefore, it is indispensable to characterize micro-droplet and its application from droplet microfluidic system. We first constructed the custom-designed droplet microfluidic system for generating micro-droplets, and then used the micro-droplets to encapsulate important amino acids such as glutamic acid, phenylalanine, tryptophan or tyrosine to test the droplets' properties, including the stability, diffusivity and bio-compatibility for investigating its application for amino acid detection and sorting. The custom-designed droplet microfluidic system could generate the uniformed micro-droplets with a controllable size between 20 to 50 microm. The micro-droplets could be stable for more than 20 h without cross-contamination or fusion each other. The throughput of detection and sorting of the system is about 600 micro-droplets per minute. This study provides a high-throughput platform for the analysis and screening of amino acid-producing microorganisms. PMID:24818488

  9. Continuous synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles in a microfluidic system for photovoltaic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Leem, Juyoung; Yoon, Sang Youl; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2014-02-01

    This study describes the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) using a microfluidic system. A continuous and efficient synthetic process was developed based on a microfluidic reactor in which was implemented a time pulsed mixing method that had been optimized using numerical simulations and experimental methods. Numerical simulations revealed that efficient mixing conditions could be obtained over the frequency range 5-15 Hz. This system used ethanol solutions containing 30 mM sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or 10 mM dehydrated zinc acetate (Zn(OAc)2) under 5 Hz pulsed conditions, which provided the optimal mixing performance conditions. The ZnO NPs prepared using the microfluidic synthetic system or batch-processed system were validated by several analytical methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV/VIS NIR and zeta (ζ) potential analysis. Bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells were fabricated with the synthesized ZnO NPs to investigate the practicability and compared with batch-process synthesized ZnO NPs. The results showed that microfluidic synthesized ZnO NPs had good preservability and stability in working solution and the synthetic microfluidic system provided a low-cost, environmentally friendly approach to the continuous production of ZnO NPs.

  10. Amperometric quantification based on serial dilution microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Khaled; Pittet, Patrick; Sigaud, Monique; Renaud, Louis; Vittori, Olivier; Morin, Pierre; Ouaini, Naim; Ferrigno, Rosaria

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a microfluidic device fabricated in poly(dimethylsiloxane) that was employed to perform amperometric quantifications using on-chip calibration curves and on-chip standard addition methods. This device integrated a network of Au electrodes within a microfluidic structure designed for automatic preparation of a series of solutions containing an electroactive molecule at a concentration linearly decreasing. This device was first characterized by fluorescence microscopy and then evaluated with a model electroactive molecule such as Fe(CN(6))(4-). Operating a quantification in this microfluidic parallel approach rather than in batch mode allows a reduced analysis time to be achieved. Moreover, the microfluidic approach is compatible with the on-chip calibration of sensors simultaneously to the analysis, therefore preventing problems due to sensor response deviation with time. When using the on-chip calibration and on-chip standard addition method, we reached concentration estimation better than 5%. We also demonstrated that compared to the calibration curve approach, the standard addition mode is less complex to operate. Indeed, in this case, it is not necessary to take into account flow rate discrepancies as in the calibration approach. PMID:19238282

  11. How to fabricate robust microfluidic systems for a dollar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, Florian; Cameron, Neil R.; Oakeshott, John; Peat, Thomas; Zhu, Yonggang

    2013-12-01

    Since the past decade, the interest towards microfluidic devices has sensibly grown due to the wide variety of multidisciplinary applications. One branch of the microfluidic domain consists in the synthesis of various types of emulsions requested by cosmetic, food and biotechnological industries In particular, monodisperse water-in-oil microemulsion synthetised in microfluidic devices are quickly becoming the new generation of emulsions for precise bead control and high surface area. These microemulsions are generally aqueous bioreactors in the form of droplets from 500 nm to 10 μm in diameter, enclosed in an oil environment. An increasing demand for bigger emulsions has led us to investigate new techniques for fabricating fluidic devices allowing a better control over the final size of the droplets. An easy, cheap, reproducible and fast technology for generating emulsions in the range of 100s μm with high throughout (up to mL/h) is reported. Simply using pipette tips and tubing, an innovative microfluidic device was fabricated, able to synthetise water-in-oil emulsions within the range 50 - 500 _μm and double emulsions. These new emulsions are currently used for the synthesis of highly porous polymers beads from High Internal Phase Emulsion (HIPE). These beads will find high potential in 3D cell culture due to their high porosity (up to 90%) and pore size (from 5 to 30μm).

  12. Particle dynamics and particle-cell interaction in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Matthew T.

    Particle-laden flow in a microchannel resulting in aggregation of microparticles was investigated to determine the dependence of the cluster growth rate on the following parameters: suspension void fraction, shear strain rate, and channel-height to particle-diameter ratio. The growth rate of an average cluster was found to increase linearly with suspension void fraction, and to obey a power-law relationships with shear strain rate as S 0.9 and channel-height to particle-diameter ratio as (h/d )--3.5. Ceramic liposomal nanoparticles and silica microparticles were functionalized with antibodies that act as targeting ligands. The bio-functionality and physical integrity of the cerasomes were characterized. Surface functionalization allows cerasomes to deliver drugs with selectivity and specificity that is not possible using standard liposomes. The functionalized particle-target cell binding process was characterized using BT-20 breast cancer cells. Two microfluidic systems were used; one with both species in suspension, the other with cells immobilized inside a microchannel and particle suspension as the mobile phase. Effects of incubation time, particle concentration, and shear strain rate on particle-cell binding were investigated. With both species in suspension, the particle-cell binding process was found to be reasonably well-described by a first-order model. Particle desorption and cellular loss of binding affinity in time were found to be negligible; cell-particle-cell interaction was identified as the limiting mechanism in particle-cell binding. Findings suggest that separation of a bound particle from a cell may be detrimental to cellular binding affinity. Cell-particle-cell interactions were prevented by immobilizing cells inside a microchannel. The initial stage of particle-cell binding was investigated and was again found to be reasonably well-described by a first-order model. For both systems, the time constant was found to be inversely proportional to

  13. Functional maintenance of differentiated embryoid bodies in microfluidic systems: a platform for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Guven, Sinan; Lindsey, Jennifer S; Poudel, Ishwari; Chinthala, Sireesha; Nickerson, Michael D; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Gurkan, Umut A; Anchan, Raymond M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-03-01

    Hormone replacement therapies have become important for treating diseases such as premature ovarian failure or menopausal complications. The clinical use of bioidentical hormones might significantly reduce some of the potential risks reportedly associated with the use of synthetic hormones. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility and advantage of a microfluidic chip culture system to enhance the development of personalized, on-demand, treatment modules using embryoid bodies (EBs). Functional EBs cultured on microfluidic chips represent a platform for personalized, patient-specific treatment cassettes that can be cryopreserved until required for treatment. We assessed the viability, differentiation, and functionality of EBs cultured and cryopreserved in this system. During extended microfluidic culture, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and anti-müllerian hormone levels were measured, and the expression of differentiated steroidogenic cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assay for the ovarian tissue markers anti-müllerian hormone receptor type II, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, and inhibin β-A and the estrogen biosynthesis enzyme aromatase. Our studies showed that under microfluidic conditions, differentiated steroidogenic EBs continued to secrete estradiol and progesterone at physiologically relevant concentrations (30-120 pg/ml and 150-450 pg/ml, respectively) for up to 21 days. Collectively, we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using a microfluidic chip system with continuous flow for the differentiation and extended culture of functional steroidogenic stem cell-derived EBs, the differentiation of EBs into cells expressing ovarian antigens in a microfluidic system, and the ability to cryopreserve this system with restoration of growth and functionality on thawing. These results present a platform for the development of a new therapeutic system for personalized medicine. PMID:25666845

  14. Piezo-microfluidic transport system for multi-targets biochip detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chia-Chin; Wang, Pei-Wen; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2016-03-01

    Detecting minute trace of interferon-gamma and various bio-markers by using a single biochip was adopted as a platform to examine the technology advancements presented. As bio-detection faces the restriction that only very small quantity of specimen is available, ways to make the best use of the sample available are a must. Since samples concentration will affect the binding rate of an immunoassay, the testing order will become an influencing factor if multiple biomarkers testing situation are needed by using only a single trace of sample. More specifically, if we test disease A first and then detect disease B using the sample just been measured by testing disease A, we most likely will get different results if we reverse the testing order. With an attempt to examine and maybe resolve the issues mentioned above, a micro-fluid control system was developed. The design requirements not only ask for microfluidic control but also demand the system developed has the potential to be integrated within the biochip once its performance is verified. A piezo-vibrating system that can generate traveling waves for microfluidic control was chosen due to its versatility and large force to volume ratio. A simulation software COMSOL was adopted first to predict the microfluidic behavior of the two-mode excited piezo-microfluidic transport system. Secondly, fluorescent particles was used to analyze the microfluidic behavior of system fabricated based on the simulation. Finally, Electrochemistry Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was implemented to verify the performance and extendibility of this newly developed system for multi-target detections.

  15. Functional Maintenance of Differentiated Embryoid Bodies in Microfluidic Systems: A Platform for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Sinan; Lindsey, Jennifer S.; Poudel, Ishwari; Chinthala, Sireesha; Nickerson, Michael D.; Gerami-Naini, Behzad; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2015-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapies have become important for treating diseases such as premature ovarian failure or menopausal complications. The clinical use of bioidentical hormones might significantly reduce some of the potential risks reportedly associated with the use of synthetic hormones. In the present study, we demonstrate the utility and advantage of a microfluidic chip culture system to enhance the development of personalized, on-demand, treatment modules using embryoid bodies (EBs). Functional EBs cultured on microfluidic chips represent a platform for personalized, patient-specific treatment cassettes that can be cryopreserved until required for treatment. We assessed the viability, differentiation, and functionality of EBs cultured and cryopreserved in this system. During extended microfluidic culture, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and anti-müllerian hormone levels were measured, and the expression of differentiated steroidogenic cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assay for the ovarian tissue markers anti-müllerian hormone receptor type II, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, and inhibin β-A and the estrogen biosynthesis enzyme aromatase. Our studies showed that under microfluidic conditions, differentiated steroidogenic EBs continued to secrete estradiol and progesterone at physiologically relevant concentrations (30–120 pg/ml and 150–450 pg/ml, respectively) for up to 21 days. Collectively, we have demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of using a microfluidic chip system with continuous flow for the differentiation and extended culture of functional steroidogenic stem cell-derived EBs, the differentiation of EBs into cells expressing ovarian antigens in a microfluidic system, and the ability to cryopreserve this system with restoration of growth and functionality on thawing. These results present a platform for the development of a new therapeutic system for personalized medicine. PMID:25666845

  16. Rapid prototyping of arrayed microfluidic systems in polystyrene for cell-based assays

    PubMed Central

    Young, Edmond W.K.; Berthier, Erwin; Guckenberger, David J.; Sackmann, Eric; Lamers, Casey; Meyvantsson, Ivar; Huttenlocher, Anna; Beebe, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic cell-based systems have enabled the study of cellular phenomena with improved spatiotemporal control of the microenvironment and at increased throughput. While PDMS has emerged as the most popular material in microfluidics research, it has specific limitations that prevent microfluidic platforms from achieving their full potential. We present here a complete process, ranging from mold design to embossing and bonding, that describes the fabrication of polystyrene (PS) microfluidic devices with similar cost and time expenditures as PDMS-based devices. Emphasis was placed on creating methods that can compete with PDMS fabrication methods in terms of robustness, complexity and time requirements. To achieve this goal several improvements were made to remove critical bottlenecks in existing PS embossing methods. First, traditional lithography techniques were adapted to fabricate bulk epoxy molds capable of resisting high temperatures and pressures. Second, a method was developed to emboss through-holes in a PS layer, enabling creation of large arrays of independent microfluidic systems on a single device without need to manually create access ports. Third, thermal bonding of PS layers was optimized in order to achieve quality bonding over large arrays of microsystems. The choice of materials and methods were validated for biological function using two different cell-based applications to demonstrate the versatility of our streamlined fabrication process. PMID:21261280

  17. Microfluidic devices, systems, and methods for quantifying particles using centrifugal force

    SciTech Connect

    Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.

    2015-11-17

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward microfluidic systems, apparatus, and methods for measuring a quantity of cells in a fluid. Examples include a differential white blood cell measurement using a centrifugal microfluidic system. A method may include introducing a fluid sample containing a quantity of cells into a microfluidic channel defined in part by a substrate. The quantity of cells may be transported toward a detection region defined in part by the substrate, wherein the detection region contains a density media, and wherein the density media has a density lower than a density of the cells and higher than a density of the fluid sample. The substrate may be spun such that at least a portion of the quantity of cells are transported through the density media. Signals may be detected from label moieties affixed to the cells.

  18. Interaction of droplets in recirculation regions within microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, Nastaran; Hosseini, Ashkan; Shojaei-Zadeh, Shahab

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of oil droplets in continuous water phase as they travel across the streamlines of a recirculation region using microfluidic devices. Oil droplets are first generated using hydrodynamic focusing and then enter a recirculation region. The droplets then keep recirculating until they are pushed out by the incoming ones. We show that the frequency of droplet generation, viscosity contrast (oil to water), and geometry determine which droplets to stay in the recirculation region and which one to leave. Using flow field simulations, we investigate the migration of droplets and their trajectories based on the geometry of the recirculation region, the bubble size, and fluid properties. Under favorable conditions, when droplets interact within the recirculation region for long enough time, the film thickness that separates the two interfaces reduces and droplets will coalesce. The proposed design thus provides a suitable platform to study droplet coalescence within microfluidic devices.

  19. Mobile Monolith Polymer Elements For Flow Control In Microfluidic Systems

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2006-01-24

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  20. Real-time optical pH measurement in a standard microfluidic cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Einar B; Halldorsson, Skarphedinn; Fleming, Ronan M T; Leosson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    The rapid growth of microfluidic cell culturing in biological and biomedical research and industry calls for fast, non-invasive and reliable methods of evaluating conditions such as pH inside a microfluidic system. We show that by careful calibration it is possible to measure pH within microfluidic chambers with high accuracy and precision, using a direct single-pass measurement of light absorption in a commercially available phenol-red-containing cell culture medium. The measurement is carried out using a standard laboratory microscope and, contrary to previously reported methods, requires no modification of the microfluidic device design. We demonstrate the validity of this method by measuring absorption of light transmitted through 30-micrometer thick microfluidic chambers, using an inverted microscope fitted with a scientific-grade digital camera and two bandpass filters. In the pH range of 7-8, our measurements have a standard deviation and absolute error below 0.05 for a measurement volume smaller than 4 nL. PMID:24049695

  1. Development of microfluidic system and optical tweezers for electrophysiological investigations of an individual cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrifaiy, A.; Bitaraf, N.; Lindahl, O.; Ramser, K.

    2010-08-01

    We present a new approach of combining Lab-on-a-chip technologies with optical manipulation technique for accurate investigations in the field of cell biology. A general concept was to develop and combine different methods to perform advanced electrophysiological investigations of an individual living cell under optimal control of the surrounding environment. The conventional patch clamp technique was customized by modifying the open system with a gas-tight multifunctional microfluidics system and optical trapping technique (optical tweezers). The system offers possibilities to measure the electrical signaling and activity of the neuron under optimum conditions of hypoxia and anoxia while the oxygenation state is controlled optically by means of a spectroscopic technique. A cellbased microfluidics system with an integrated patch clamp pipette was developed successfully. Selectively, an individual neuron is manipulated within the microchannels of the microfluidic system under a sufficient control of the environment. Experiments were performed to manipulate single yeast cell and red blood cell (RBC) optically through the microfluidics system toward an integrated patch clamp pipette. An absorption spectrum of a single RCB was recorded which showed that laser light did not impinge on the spectroscopic spectrum of light. This is promising for further development of a complete lab-on-a-chip system for patch clamp measurements.

  2. Zeta potential determination by streaming current modelization and measurement in electrophoretic microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Louis; Kleimann, Pascal; Morin, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Electrophoresis in capillary and microfluidic systems, used in analytical chemistry to separate charged species, are quite sensitive to surface phenomena in terms of separation performances. In order to improve theses performances, new surface functionalization techniques are required. There is a need for methods to provide fast and accurate quantification about surface charges at liquid/solid interfaces. We present a fast, simple, and low-cost technique for the measurement of the zeta-potential, via the modelization and the measurement of streaming currents. Due to the small channel cross section in microfluidic devices, the streaming current modelization is easier than the streaming potential measurement. The modelization combines microfluidic simulations based on the Navier-Stokes equation and charge repartition simulations based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This method has been validated with square and circular cross section shape fused-silica capillaries and can be easily transposed to any lab-on-chip microsystems. PMID:14730576

  3. An integrated microfluidic system for bovine DNA purification and digital PCR detection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingchang; Mu, Ying; Xu, Yanan; Song, Qi; Yu, Bingwen; Ma, Congcong; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we described an integrated modularized microfluidic system that contained two distinct functional modules, one for nucleic acids (NA) extraction and the other for digital PCR (dPCR), allowing for detecting the bovine DNA in ovine tissue. PMID:26364950

  4. Screening of C60 crystallization using a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Kyosuke; Fukui, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroaki; Sekimura, Naoto; Okamoto, Koji

    2006-07-18

    We have carried out screening of C60 crystallization using a simple liquid/liquid interfacial precipitation method in a microfluidic device. By controlling the time, temperature, and concentration, various metastable phases of C60 crystals were found, including tubes, spheres, open-ended hollow columns, stars, branches, and trees. The obtained C60 crystal shapes are similar to those of snow crystals. These findings suggest an urgent need to screen C60 crystallization for the development of fullerene C60 drugs. PMID:16830986

  5. Tissue culture on a chip: Developmental biology applications of self-organized capillary networks in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takashi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    Organ culture systems are used to elucidate the mechanisms of pattern formation in developmental biology. Various organ culture techniques have been used, but the lack of microcirculation in such cultures impedes the long-term maintenance of larger tissues. Recent advances in microfluidic devices now enable us to utilize self-organized perfusable capillary networks in organ cultures. In this review, we will overview past approaches to organ culture and current technical advances in microfluidic devices, and discuss possible applications of microfluidics towards the study of developmental biology. PMID:27272910

  6. A microfluidic system with integrated molecular imprinting polymer films for surface plasmon resonance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, Wen-Janq; Yang, Ming-Chang

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic system with integrated molecular imprinting polymer (MIP) films designed for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing of multiple nanoscale biomolecules. The innovative microfluidic chip uses pneumatic microvalves and micropumps to transport a precise amount of the biosample through multiple microchannels to sensing regions containing the locally spin-coated MIP films. The signals of SPR biosensing are basically proportional to the number of molecules adsorbed on the MIP films. Hence, a precise control of flow rates inside microchannels is important to determine the adsorption amount of the molecules in the SPR/MIP chips. The integration of micropumps and microvalves can automate the sample introduction process and precisely control the amount of the sample injection to the microfluidic system. The proposed biochip enables the label-free biosensing of biomolecules in an automatic format, and provides a highly sensitive, highly specific and high-throughput detection performance. Three samples, i.e. progesterone, cholesterol and testosterone, are successfully detected using the developed system. The experimental results show that the proposed SPR/MIP microfluidic chip provides a comparable sensitivity to that of large-scale SPR techniques, but with reduced sample consumption and an automatic format. As such, the developed biochip has significant potential for a wide variety of nanoscale biosensing applications. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at Transducers 2005, Seoul, Korea, 5-9 June 2005.

  7. Integration of microfluidics/electrochemical system for trace metal analysis by stripping voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuehe; Zhao, Rui; Thrall, Karla D.; Timchalk, C. A.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Matson, Dean W.

    1999-08-01

    Microanalytical systems based on a microfluidics/electrochemical detection scheme were developed. Individual modules, such as microfabricated piezoelectrically actuated pumps and a microelectrochemical cell were integrated onto portable platforms. This allows rapid change-out and repair of individual components by incorporating `plug and play' concepts now standard in PC's. Two different integration schemes were used for construction of the microanalytical systems based on microfluidics/electrochemical detection. In first scheme, all individual modules were integrated in the surface of the standard microfluidic platform based on a plug-and-play design. Microelectrochemical flow cell which integrated three electrodes based on a wall-jet design was fabricated on polymer substrate. The microelectrochemical flow cell was then plugged directly into the microfluidic platform. Another integration scheme was based on a multilayer lamination method utilizing stacking modules with different functionality to achieve a compact microanalytical device. Application of the microanalytical system for detection of lead in river water and saliva samples using stripping voltammetry is described.

  8. Entropy-based separation of yeast cells using a microfluidic system of conjoined spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Kai-Jian; Qin, S.-J. Bai, Zhong-Chen; Zhang, Xin; Mai, John D.

    2013-11-21

    A physical model is derived to create a biological cell separator that is based on controlling the entropy in a microfluidic system having conjoined spherical structures. A one-dimensional simplified model of this three-dimensional problem in terms of the corresponding effects of entropy on the Brownian motion of particles is presented. This dynamic mechanism is based on the Langevin equation from statistical thermodynamics and takes advantage of the characteristics of the Fokker-Planck equation. This mechanism can be applied to manipulate biological particles inside a microfluidic system with identical, conjoined, spherical compartments. This theoretical analysis is verified by performing a rapid and a simple technique for separating yeast cells in these conjoined, spherical microfluidic structures. The experimental results basically match with our theoretical model and we further analyze the parameters which can be used to control this separation mechanism. Both numerical simulations and experimental results show that the motion of the particles depends on the geometrical boundary conditions of the microfluidic system and the initial concentration of the diffusing material. This theoretical model can be implemented in future biophysics devices for the optimized design of passive cell sorters.

  9. Laminated microfluidic system for small sample protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saedinia, Sara; Nastiuk, Kent L.; Krolewski, John J.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We describe a technology based on lamination that allows for the production of highly integrated 3D devices suitable for performing a wide variety of microfluidic assays. This approach uses a suite of microfluidic coupons (“microfloupons”) that are intended to be stacked as needed to produce an assay of interest. Microfloupons may be manufactured in paper, plastic, gels, or other materials, in advance, by different manufacturers, then assembled by the assay designer as needed. To demonstrate this approach, we designed, assembled, and characterized a microfloupon device that performs sodium-dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on a small sample of protein. This device allowed for the manipulation and transport of small amounts of protein sample, tight injection into a thin polyacrylamide gel, electrophoretic separation of the proteins into bands, and subsequent removal of the gel from the device for imaging and further analysis. The microfloupons are rugged enough to handle and can be easily aligned and laminated, allowing for a variety of different assays to be designed and configured by selecting appropriate microfloupons. This approach provides a convenient way to perform assays that have multiple steps, relieving the need to design highly sophisticated devices that incorporate all functions in a single unit, while still achieving the benefits of small sample size, automation, and high speed operation. PMID:24753728

  10. Electrokinetic Properties of Lubricin Antiadhesive Coatings in Microfluidic Systems.

    PubMed

    Greene, George W; Duffy, Emer; Shallan, Aliaa; Wuethrich, Alain; Paull, Brett

    2016-02-23

    Lubricin is a glycoprotein found in articular joints which has long been recognized as being an important biological boundary lubricant molecule and, more recently, an impressive antiadhesive that readily self-assembles into a well ordered, polymer brush layer on virtually any substrate. The lubricin molecule possesses an overabundance of anionic charge, a property that is atypical among antiadhesive molecules, that enables its use as a coating for applications involving electrokinetic processes such as electrophoresis and electroosmosis. Coating the surfaces of silica and polymeric microfluidic devices with self-assembled lubricin coatings affords a unique combination of excellent fouling resistance and high charge density that enables notoriously "sticky" biomolecules such as proteins to be used and controlled electrokinetically in the device without complications arising from nonspecific adsorption. Using capillary electrophoresis, we characterized the stability, uniformity, and electrokinetic properties of lubricin coatings applied to silica and PTFE capillaries over a range of run buffer pHs and when exposed to concentrated solutions of protein. In addition, we demonstrate the effectiveness of lubricin as a coating to minimize nonspecific protein adsorption in an electrokinetically controlled polydimethylsiloxane/silica microfluidic device. PMID:26814794

  11. The effect of captopril on thallium 201 myocardial perfusion in systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Venot, A.; Strauch, G. )

    1990-04-01

    In systemic sclerosis, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and may be caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. We evaluated the long-term effect of captopril (75 to 150 mg per day) on thallium 201 myocardial perfusion in 12 normotensive patients with systemic sclerosis. Captopril significantly decreased the mean (+/- SD) number of segments with thallium 201 myocardial perfusion defects (6.5 +/- 1.9 at baseline and 4.4 +/- 2.7 after 1 year of treatment with captopril; p less than 0.02) and increased the mean global thallium score (9.6 +/- 1.7 at baseline and 11.4 +/- 2.1 after captopril; p less than 0.05). In a control group of eight normotensive patients with systemic sclerosis who did not receive captopril, no significant modification in thallium results occurred. Side effects with captopril included hypotension (six patients), taste disturbances (one patient), and skin rash (one patient). These side effects subsided when the dosage was reduced. These findings demonstrate that captopril improves thallium 201 myocardial perfusion in patients with systemic sclerosis and may therefore have a beneficial effect on scleroderma myocardial disease.

  12. A Serial Sample Loading System: Interfacing Multi-well plates with Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Tushar D.; Zec, Helena; Wang, Jeff Tza-Huei

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for novel high-throughput screening (HTS) technologies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industries. The robotic sample handling techniques currently used in these industries, although fast, are still limited to operating in multi-well plates with the sample volumes per reaction in the microliter regime. Digital microfluidics offers an alternative for reduction in sample volume consumption for HTS but lacks a reliable technique for transporting large number of samples to the microfluidic device. In this report, we develop a technique for serial delivery of sample arrays to a microfluidic device from multi-well plates, through a single sample inlet. Under this approach, a serial array of sample plugs, separated by an immiscible carrier fluid, is loaded into a capillary and delivered to a microfluidic device. Similar approaches have been attempted in the past, however, either with a slower sample loading device like syringe pump or vacuum based sample loading with limited driving pressure. We demonstrated the application of our positive pressure based ‘Serial Sample Loading’ (SSL) system to load a series of sample plugs into a capillary. The adaptability of the SSL system to generate sample plugs with a variety of volumes in a predictable manner was also demonstrated. PMID:22885789

  13. Three-Dimensionally Printed Microfluidic Cross-flow System for Ultrafiltration/Nanofiltration Membrane Performance Testing.

    PubMed

    Wardrip, Nathaniel C; Arnusch, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Minimization and management of membrane fouling is a formidable challenge in diverse industrial processes and other practices that utilize membrane technology. Understanding the fouling process could lead to optimization and higher efficiency of membrane based filtration. Here we show the design and fabrication of an automated three-dimensionally (3-D) printed microfluidic cross-flow filtration system that can test up to 4 membranes in parallel. The microfluidic cells were printed using multi-material photopolymer 3-D printing technology, which used a transparent hard polymer for the microfluidic cell body and incorporated a thin rubber-like polymer layer, which prevents leakages during operation. The performance of ultrafiltration (UF), and nanofiltration (NF) membranes were tested and membrane fouling could be observed with a model foulant bovine serum albumin (BSA). Feed solutions containing BSA showed flux decline of the membrane. This protocol may be extended to measure fouling or biofouling with many other organic, inorganic or microbial containing solutions. The microfluidic design is especially advantageous for testing materials that are costly or only available in small quantities, for example polysaccharides, proteins, or lipids due to the small surface area of the membrane being tested. This modular system may also be easily expanded for high throughput testing of membranes. PMID:26968008

  14. Integrated optofluidic-microfluidic twin channels: toward diverse application of lab-on-a-chip systems

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Chao; Xia, Hong; Guan, Wei; Sun, Yun-Lu; Tian, Zhen-Nan; Jiang, Tong; Wang, Ying-Shuai; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Chen, Qi-Dai; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Yu, Yu-De; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Optofluidics, which integrates microfluidics and micro-optical components, is crucial for optical sensing, fluorescence analysis, and cell detection. However, the realization of an integrated system from optofluidic manipulation and a microfluidic channel is often hampered by the lack of a universal substrate for achieving monolithic integration. In this study, we report on an integrated optofluidic-microfluidic twin channels chip fabricated by one-time exposure photolithography, in which the twin microchannels on both surfaces of the substrate were exactly aligned in the vertical direction. The twin microchannels can be controlled independently, meaning that fluids could flow through both microchannels simultaneously without interfering with each other. As representative examples, a tunable hydrogel microlens was integrated into the optofluidic channel by femtosecond laser direct writing, which responds to the salt solution concentration and could be used to detect the microstructure at different depths. The integration of such optofluidic and microfluidic channels provides an opportunity to apply optofluidic detection practically and may lead to great promise for the integration and miniaturization of Lab-on-a-Chip systems. PMID:26823292

  15. Integrated optofluidic-microfluidic twin channels: toward diverse application of lab-on-a-chip systems.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chao; Xia, Hong; Guan, Wei; Sun, Yun-Lu; Tian, Zhen-Nan; Jiang, Tong; Wang, Ying-Shuai; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Chen, Qi-Dai; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Yu, Yu-De; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Optofluidics, which integrates microfluidics and micro-optical components, is crucial for optical sensing, fluorescence analysis, and cell detection. However, the realization of an integrated system from optofluidic manipulation and a microfluidic channel is often hampered by the lack of a universal substrate for achieving monolithic integration. In this study, we report on an integrated optofluidic-microfluidic twin channels chip fabricated by one-time exposure photolithography, in which the twin microchannels on both surfaces of the substrate were exactly aligned in the vertical direction. The twin microchannels can be controlled independently, meaning that fluids could flow through both microchannels simultaneously without interfering with each other. As representative examples, a tunable hydrogel microlens was integrated into the optofluidic channel by femtosecond laser direct writing, which responds to the salt solution concentration and could be used to detect the microstructure at different depths. The integration of such optofluidic and microfluidic channels provides an opportunity to apply optofluidic detection practically and may lead to great promise for the integration and miniaturization of Lab-on-a-Chip systems. PMID:26823292

  16. Integrated optofluidic-microfluidic twin channels: toward diverse application of lab-on-a-chip systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chao; Xia, Hong; Guan, Wei; Sun, Yun-Lu; Tian, Zhen-Nan; Jiang, Tong; Wang, Ying-Shuai; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Chen, Qi-Dai; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Yu, Yu-De; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Optofluidics, which integrates microfluidics and micro-optical components, is crucial for optical sensing, fluorescence analysis, and cell detection. However, the realization of an integrated system from optofluidic manipulation and a microfluidic channel is often hampered by the lack of a universal substrate for achieving monolithic integration. In this study, we report on an integrated optofluidic-microfluidic twin channels chip fabricated by one-time exposure photolithography, in which the twin microchannels on both surfaces of the substrate were exactly aligned in the vertical direction. The twin microchannels can be controlled independently, meaning that fluids could flow through both microchannels simultaneously without interfering with each other. As representative examples, a tunable hydrogel microlens was integrated into the optofluidic channel by femtosecond laser direct writing, which responds to the salt solution concentration and could be used to detect the microstructure at different depths. The integration of such optofluidic and microfluidic channels provides an opportunity to apply optofluidic detection practically and may lead to great promise for the integration and miniaturization of Lab-on-a-Chip systems.

  17. Systemic oxygen delivery by peritoneal perfusion of oxygen microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Feshitan, Jameel A; Legband, Nathan D; Borden, Mark A; Terry, Benjamin S

    2014-03-01

    Severe hypoxemia refractory to pulmonary mechanical ventilation remains life-threatening in critically ill patients. Peritoneal ventilation has long been desired for extrapulmonary oxygenation owing to easy access of the peritoneal cavity for catheterization and the relative safety compared to an extracorporeal circuit. Unfortunately, prior attempts involving direct oxygen ventilation or aqueous perfusates of fluorocarbons or hemoglobin carriers have failed, leading many researchers to abandon the method. We attribute these prior failures to limited mass transfer of oxygen to the peritoneum and have designed an oxygen formulation that overcomes this limitation. Using phospholipid-coated oxygen microbubbles (OMBs), we demonstrate 100% survival for rats experiencing acute lung trauma to at least 2 h. In contrast, all untreated rats and rats treated with peritoneal oxygenated saline died within 30 min. For rats treated with OMBs, hemoglobin saturation and heart rate were at normal levels over the 2-h timeframe. Peritoneal oxygenation with OMBs was therefore shown to be safe and effective, and the method requires less equipment and technical expertise than initiating and maintaining an extracorporeal circuit. Further translation of peritoneal oxygenation with OMBs may provide therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome arising from trauma, sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration, burns and other pulmonary diseases. PMID:24439406

  18. Hydrodynamic guiding for addressing subsets of immobilized cells and molecules in microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Brevig, Thomas; Krühne, Ulrich; Kahn, Rachel A; Ahl, Thomas; Beyer, Michael; Pedersen, Lars H

    2003-01-01

    Background The interest in microfluidics and surface patterning is increasing as the use of these technologies in diverse biomedical applications is substantiated. Controlled molecular and cellular surface patterning is a costly and time-consuming process. Methods for keeping multiple separate experimental conditions on a patterned area are, therefore, needed to amplify the amount of biological information that can be retrieved from a patterned surface area. We describe, in three examples of biomedical applications, how this can be achieved in an open microfluidic system, by hydrodynamically guiding sample fluid over biological molecules and living cells immobilized on a surface. Results A microfluidic format of a standard assay for cell-membrane integrity showed a fast and dose-dependent toxicity of saponin on mammalian cells. A model of the interactions of human mononuclear leukocytes and endothelial cells was established. By contrast to static adhesion assays, cell-cell adhesion in this dynamic model depended on cytokine-mediated activation of both endothelial and blood cells. The microfluidic system allowed the use of unprocessed blood as sample material, and a specific and fast immunoassay for measuring the concentration of C-reactive protein in whole blood was demonstrated. Conclusion The use of hydrodynamic guiding made multiple and dynamic experimental conditions on a small surface area possible. The ability to change the direction of flow and produce two-dimensional grids can increase the number of reactions per surface area even further. The described microfluidic system is widely applicable, and can take advantage of surfaces produced by current and future techniques for patterning in the micro- and nanometer scale. PMID:12875662

  19. A fast prototyping process for fabrication of microfluidic systems on soda-lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Che-Hsin; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Lin, Yen-Heng; Chang, Guan-Liang

    2001-11-01

    This paper describes a fast, low-cost but reliable process for the fabrication of microfluidic systems on soda-lime glass substrates. Instead of using an expensive metal or polisilicon/nitride layer as an etch mask, a thin layer of AZ 4620 positive photoresist (PR) is used for buffered oxide etching (BOE) of soda-lime glass. A novel two-step baking process prolongs the survival time of the PR mask in the etchant, which avoids serious peeling problems of the PR. A new process to remove precipitated particles generated during the etching process is also reported in which the glass substrate is dipped into a 1 M hydrochloride solution. A microfluidic channel with a depth of 35.95±0.39 µm is formed after 40 min BOE in an ultrasonic bath. The resulting channel has a smooth profile with a surface roughness of less than 45.95±7.96 Å. Glass chips with microfluidic channels are then bonded at 580 °C for 20 min to seal the channel while a slight pressure is applied. A new bonding process has been developed such that the whole process can be finished within 10 h. To our knowledge, this is the shortest processing time that has ever been reported. In the present study, an innovative microfluidic device, a `micro flow-through sampling chip', has been demonstrated using the fabrication method. Successful sampling and separation of Cy5-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA has been achieved. This simple fabrication process is suitable for fast prototyping and mass production of microfluidic systems.

  20. Research on microfluidic chip and imaging system used to measure Ca2+ in cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Sixiang; Ran, Dugang; Liu, Bao

    2009-07-01

    The microfluidic fluorescence detecting system which is used to measure the concentration of Ca2+ had been designed. On the microfluidic chip we designed, cell-dyeing, cell fostering, reagent injecting and other operations can be completed. The monochromatic light came from optical monochromator which can emit continuous spectrum was used to excitated the fluorescent probe in the cell, then the fluorescence signal and image were sampled by the PMT and CCD, at last the data was processed and the content of Ca2+ in the cell was figured out by using the fluorescence ratio method. Meanwhile, by using the system, the dynamic curve of [Ca2+]1 in cell was given after being stimulated by high K+. The precise result verifies that the system is stable and credible and it meets the requirement of detecting [Ca2+]i in live cells in the filed of physiology.

  1. A microfluidic two-pump system inspired by liquid feeding in mosquitoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Andrew; Goad, Angela; Stremler, Mark; Socha, John; Jung, Sunghwan

    Mosquitoes feed on nectar and blood using a two-pump system in the head-a smaller cibarial pump in line with a larger a pharyngeal pump, with a valve in between. To suck, mosquitoes transport the liquid (which may be a multi-component viscous fluid, blood) through a long micro-channel, the proboscis. In the engineering realm, microfluidic devices in biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip technology, necessitate implementing a robust pump design to handle clogging and increase flow control compared to a single-pump system. In this talk, we introduce a microfluidic pump design inspired by the mosquito's two-pump system. The pumping performance (flow rate) in presence of impurities (air bubbles, soft clogs) is quantified as a function of phase difference and volume expansion of the pumps, and the elasticity of the valve.

  2. MEMS-based flow cytometry: microfluidics-based cell identification system by fluorescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, W K; Liang, C K; Huang, J Z

    2004-01-01

    This study utilizes MEMS technology to realize a novel low-cost microfluidics-based biochip system for flow-type cell handling. Powered by vacuum pump, the microfluidic driving system enables cells to move in order one by one in the biochip by an effect of sheath flow prefocus. Then, cells are guided to a fluorescent inspection region where two detection tasks such as cell image identification and cell counting are conducted. Currently, the glass-based biochip has been manufactured and all the related devices have been well set up in our laboratory. With this proposed prototype system, typical results about cell separation of yeast cell and PC-3 cell are available and their separated images are also presented, respectively. PMID:17270801

  3. [Development of rotating perfusion bioreactor system and application for bone tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Dichen; Wang, Lin; Wang, Zhen; Lu, Bingheng

    2007-02-01

    A rotating perfusion bioreactor system has recently been developed in our laboratory to produce 3D dynamic culture condition, and the critical-sized scaffolds with interconnected microchennels were fabricated. Gas exchange occurs by semipermeable membrane covered on each side of bioreactor and gas-permeable peristaltic pump tube. Rotation and perfusion of culture media through large scaffolds enhance well mixing and mass transport of oxygen and nutrients in the bioreactor. Osteoblastic cells attached to microchennels are exposed to a low fluid flow-induced shear stress level. This bioreactor system overcomes several defects exited in static culture condition, improves the culture environment, facilitates osteoblast proliferation, differntiation, significant matrix production and mineralization, and the controllability of culture process is enhanced. Large scaffolds/osteoblast constructs were cultured in the bioreactor system for 14 days. Osteoblastic cells attached to microchannels of scaffolds were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicated that cells grew extensively in the microchennels of large scaffolds. PMID:17333894

  4. Small-angle optical deflection from collinear configuration for sensitive detection in microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Li, Xiangtang; Li, Jing; Yuan, Hongyan; Zhao, Shulin; Xiao, Dan

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a novel detection system based on small-angle optical deflection from the collinear configuration of a microfluidic chip. In this system, the incident light beam was focused on the microchannel through the edge of a lens, resulting in a small deflection angle that deviated 20° from the collinear configuration. The emitted fluorescence was collected through the center of the same lens and delivered to a photomultiplier tube in the vertical direction; the reflection light of the chip plate was kept away from the detector. In contrast to traditional confocal and nonconfocal laser-induced fluorescence detection systems, background levels resulting from scattered excitation light, reflection and refraction from the microchip was significantly eliminated. Significant enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio was obtained by shaping a laser beam that combined an attenuator with a spectral filter to optimize laser power and the dimensions of the laser beam. FITC and FITC-labeled amino acid were used as model analytes to demonstrate the performance sensitivity, separation efficiency, and reproducibility of this detection system by using a hybrid polydimethylsiloxane/glass microfluidic device. The limit of detection of FITC was estimated to be 2 pM (0.55 zmol) (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the single cell analysis for the determination of intracellular glutathione in a single 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell was demonstrated. The results suggest that the proposed optical arrangements will be promising for development of sensitive, low-cost microfluidic systems. PMID:22806465

  5. Plug-n-play microfluidic systems from flexible assembly of glass-based flow-control modules.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Wei; Liang, Xuan; Zheng, Wei-Chao; Deng, Nan-Nan; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-04-21

    In this study, we report on a simple and versatile plug-n-play microfluidic system that is fabricated from flexible assembly of glass-based flow-control modules for flexibly manipulating flows for versatile emulsion generation. The microfluidic system consists of three basic functional units: a flow-control module, a positioning groove, and a connection fastener. The flow-control module that is based on simple assembly of low-cost glass slides, coverslips, and glass capillaries provides excellent chemical resistance and optical properties, and easy wettability modification for flow manipulation. The flexible combination of the flow-control modules with 3D-printed positioning grooves and connection fasteners enables creation of versatile microfluidic systems for generating various higher-order multiple emulsions. The simple and reversible connection of the flow-control modules also allows easy disassembly of the microfluidic systems for further scale-up and functionalization. We demonstrate the scalability and controllability of flow manipulation by creating microfluidic systems from flexible assembly of flow-control modules for controllable generation of multiple emulsions from double emulsions to quadruple emulsions. Meanwhile, the flexible flow manipulation in the flow-control module provides advanced functions for improved control of the drop size, and for controllable generation of drops containing distinct components within multiple emulsions to extend the emulsion structure. Such modular microfluidic systems provide flexibility and versatility to flexibly manipulate micro-flows for enhanced and extended applications. PMID:25711675

  6. High-speed CMOS image sensor for high-throughput lensless microfluidic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mei; Huang, Xiwei; Jia, Qixiang; Nadipalli, Revanth; Wang, Tongxi; Shang, Yang; Yu, Hao; Je, Minkyu; Yeo, Kiatseng

    2012-03-01

    The integration of CMOS image sensor and microfluidics becomes a promising technology for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis. However, commercial image sensors usually have limited speed and low-light sensitivity. One high-speed and high-sensitivity CMOS image sensor chip is introduced in this paper, targeted for high-throughput microfluidic imaging system. Firstly, high speed image sensor architecture is introduced with design of column-parallel single-slope analog-todigital converter (ADC) with digital correlated double sampling (CDS). The frame rate can be achieved to 2400 frames/second (fps) with resolution of 128×96 for high-throughput microfluidic imaging. Secondly, the designed system has superior low-light sensitivity, which is achieved by large pixel size (10μm×10μm, 56% fill factor). Pixel peak signalnoise- ratio (SNR) reaches to 50dB with 10dB improvement compared to the commercial pixel (2.2μm×2.2μm). The degradation of pixel resolution is compensated by super-resolution image processing algorithm. By reconstructing single image with multiple low-resolution frames, we can equivalently achieve 2μm resolution with physical 10μm pixel. Thirdly, the system-on-chip (SoC) integration results in a real-time controlled intelligent imaging system without expensive data storage and time-consuming computer analysis. This initial sensor prototype with timing-control makes it possible to develop high-throughput lensless microfluidic imaging system for POC diagnosis.

  7. Finger-powered microfluidic systems using multilayer soft lithography and injection molding processes.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Kosuke; Shih, Kuan Cheng; Lin, Xiao; Brubaker, Thomas A; Sochol, Ryan D; Lin, Liwei

    2014-10-01

    Point-of-care (POC) and disposable biomedical applications demand low-power microfluidic systems with pumping components that provide controlled pressure sources. Unfortunately, external pumps have hindered the implementation of such microfluidic systems due to limitations associated with portability and power requirements. Here, we propose and demonstrate a 'finger-powered' integrated pumping system as a modular element to provide pressure head for a variety of advanced microfluidic applications, including finger-powered on-chip microdroplet generation. By utilizing a human finger for the actuation force, electrical power sources that are typically needed to generate pressure head were obviated. Passive fluidic diodes were designed and implemented to enable distinct fluids from multiple inlet ports to be pumped using a single actuation source. Both multilayer soft lithography and injection molding processes were investigated for device fabrication and performance. Experimental results revealed that the pressure head generated from a human finger could be tuned based on the geometric characteristics of the pumping system, with a maximum observed pressure of 7.6 ± 0.1 kPa. In addition to the delivery of multiple, distinct fluids into microfluidic channels, we also employed the finger-powered pumping system to achieve the rapid formation of both water-in-oil droplets (106.9 ± 4.3 μm in diameter) and oil-in-water droplets (75.3 ± 12.6 μm in diameter) as well as the encapsulation of endothelial cells in droplets without using any external or electrical controllers. PMID:25102160

  8. An electric stimulation system for electrokinetic particle manipulation in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-de la Fuente, M. S.; Moncada-Hernandez, H.; Perez-Gonzalez, V. H.; Lapizco-Encinas, B. H.; Martinez-Chapa, S. O.

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic devices have grown significantly in the number of applications. Microfabrication techniques have evolved considerably; however, electric stimulation systems for microdevices have not advanced at the same pace. Electric stimulation of micro-fluidic devices is an important element in particle manipulation research. A flexible stimulation instrument is desired to perform configurable, repeatable, automated, and reliable experiments by allowing users to select the stimulation parameters. The instrument presented here is a configurable and programmable stimulation system for electrokinetic-driven microfluidic devices; it consists of a processor, a memory system, and a user interface to deliver several types of waveforms and stimulation patterns. It has been designed to be a flexible, highly configurable, low power instrument capable of delivering sine, triangle, and sawtooth waveforms with one single frequency or two superimposed frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 40 kHz, and an output voltage of up to 30 Vpp. A specific stimulation pattern can be delivered over a single time period or as a sequence of different signals for different time periods. This stimulation system can be applied as a research tool where manipulation of particles suspended in liquid media is involved, such as biology, medicine, environment, embryology, and genetics. This system has the potential to lead to new schemes for laboratory procedures by allowing application specific and user defined electric stimulation. The development of this device is a step towards portable and programmable instrumentation for electric stimulation on electrokinetic-based microfluidic devices, which are meant to be integrated with lab-on-a-chip devices.

  9. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Particle Laden Flows in Microfluidic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, D S; Weisgraber, T; Wheeler, E; Hon, G; Radford, J; Gascoyne, P; Smity, R; Liepmann, D; Meinhart, C; Santiago, J; Krulevitch, P

    2003-07-22

    The goal of this effort was to develop dynamic simulation tools to study and characterize particulate transport in Microfluidic devices. This includes the effects of external fields and near-field particle-particle, particle-surface interactions. The unique aspect of this effort is that we focused on the particles in suspension and rigorously accounted for all of the interactions that they experienced in solution. In contrast, other numerical methods within the program, finite element and finite volume approaches, typically treat the suspended species as non-interacting point particles. Later in the program, some of these approaches incorporated approximations to begin to account for particle-particle interactions. Through the programs (BioFlips and SIMBIOSYS), we developed collaborative relationships with device-oriented efforts. More specifically and at the request of the SIMBIOSYS program manager, we allowed our efforts/milestones to be more guided by the needs of our BioFlips colleagues; therefore, our efforts were focused on the needs of the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Peter Gascoyne), UCDavis (Rosemary Smith), and UC Berkeley (Dorian Liepmann). The first two collaborations involved the development of Dielectrophoresis analysis tools and the later involved the development of suspension and fluid modeling tools for microneedles.

  10. An electromagnetic microvalve for pneumatic control of microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuling; Li, Songjing

    2014-10-01

    An electromagnetic microvalve for pneumatic control of microfluidic devices has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The microvalve is composed of two parts: a miniature electromagnetic actuator and a valve body. The electromagnetic actuator consists mainly of a thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based elastomer, which acts as the valve diaphragm. The diaphragm, used as a solid hydraulic medium, converts the large contact area of a valve core into a small contact area of valve head while maintaining a large stroking force. This microvalve remains closed because of a compressed mechanical spring force generated by the actuator. On the other hand, when a voltage is applied, the valve core moves up, relaxing the thin PDMS membrane, opening the microvalve. The fast open response (~17 ms) of the valve was achieved with a leak rate as low as 0.026 sccm at 200 KPa (N2) pressure. We tested the pertinent dynamic parameters such as flow rate in on/off mode, flow rate of duty cycles, and actuated frequencies in pulse width modulation (PWM) mode. Our method provides a simple, cheap, and small microvalve that avoids the bulky and expensive external pressure control solenoid manifold. This allows it to be easily integrated into portable and disposable devices. PMID:24742860

  11. Integrated microwave resonant device for dielectric analysis of microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D. J.; Porch, A.; Barrow, D. A.; Allender, C. J.

    2011-08-01

    Herein we present a device for performing non-contact dielectric spectroscopy upon liquids in a microfluidic environment. The device is comprised of a compression-sealed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chip with an embedded coaxial resonator, which is overmoded for dielectric measurements at six discrete frequencies between 1 and 8 GHz. A novel capacitive coupling structure allows transmission measurements to be taken from one end of the resonator, and an optimised microchannel design maximises sensitivity and repeatability. The use of a PTFE substrate and a non-contact measurement gives excellent chemical and biological compatibility. A simple 'fingerprint' method for identifying solvents is demonstrated, whereby a sample is characterised by air-referenced changes in complex frequency. Complex permittivity values are also obtained via a perturbation theory-based inversion. A combination of experimental and simulated results is used to characterise the device behaviour, limits of operation and measurement uncertainty. The high stability of temporal measurements, coupled with the robustness of the design, make this device ideal for analytical chemistry and industrial process control.

  12. Microfluidics-Based Lab-on-Chip Systems in DNA-Based Biosensing: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Dutse, Sabo Wada; Yusof, Nor Azah

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics-based lab-on-chip (LOC) systems are an active research area that is revolutionising high-throughput sequencing for the fast, sensitive and accurate detection of a variety of pathogens. LOCs also serve as portable diagnostic tools. The devices provide optimum control of nanolitre volumes of fluids and integrate various bioassay operations that allow the devices to rapidly sense pathogenic threat agents for environmental monitoring. LOC systems, such as microfluidic biochips, offer advantages compared to conventional identification procedures that are tedious, expensive and time consuming. This paper aims to provide a broad overview of the need for devices that are easy to operate, sensitive, fast, portable and sufficiently reliable to be used as complementary tools for the control of pathogenic agents that damage the environment. PMID:22163925

  13. Modular microfluidic cartridge-based universal diagnostic system for global health applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Holger; Klemm, Richard; Dietze, William; White, Wallace; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Freyberg, Susanne; Moche, Christian; Dailey, Peter; Gärtner, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Current microfluidics-enabled point-of-care diagnostic systems are typically designed specifically for one assay type, e.g. a molecular diagnostic assay for a single disease of a class of diseases. This approach often leads to high development cost and a significant training requirement for users of different instruments. We have developed an open platform diagnostic system which allows to run molecular, immunological and clinical assays on a single instrument platform with a standardized microfluidic cartridge architecture in an automated sample-in answer-out fashion. As examples, a molecular diagnostic assay for tuberculosis, an immunoassay for HIV p24 and a clinical chemistry assay for ALT liver function have been developed and results of their pre-clinical validation are presented.

  14. Laser ablated micropillar energy directors for ultrasonic welding of microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esben Poulsen, Carl; Kistrup, Kasper; Korsgaard Andersen, Nis; Taboryski, Rafael; Fougt Hansen, Mikkel; Wolff, Anders

    2016-06-01

    We present a new type of energy director (ED) for ultrasonic welding of microfluidic systems. These micropillar EDs are based on the replication of cone like protrusion structures introduced using a pico-second laser and may therefore be added to any mould surface accessible to a pico-second laser beam. The technology is demonstrated on an injection moulded microfluidic device featuring high-aspect ratio (h  ×  w  =  2000 μm  ×  550 μm) and free-standing channel walls, where bonding is achieved with no detectable channel deformation. The bonding strength is similar to conventional EDs and the fabricated system can withstand pressures of over 9.5 bar.

  15. Hydrodynamic directional control of liquid metal droplets within a microfluidic flow focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gol, Berrak; Kurdzinski, Michael E.; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J.; Petersen, Phred; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2016-04-01

    Here, we investigate the directional control of Galinstan liquid metal droplets when transferring from the high-viscosity glycerol core into the parallel low-viscosity NaOH sheath streams within a flow focusing microfluidic system. In the presence of sufficient flow mismatch between the sheath streams, the droplets are driven toward the higher velocity interface and cross the interface under the influence of surface tension gradient. A minimum flow mismatch of 125 μl/min is required to enable the continuous transfer of droplets toward the desired sheath stream. The response time of droplets, the time required to change the direction of droplet transfer, is governed by the response time of the syringe pump driven microfluidic system and is found to be 3.3 and 8.8 s when increasing and decreasing the flow rate of sheath stream, respectively.

  16. A droplet microfluidic system for sequential generation of lipid bilayers and transmembrane electrical recordings.

    PubMed

    Czekalska, Magdalena A; Kaminski, Tomasz S; Jakiela, Slawomir; Tanuj Sapra, K; Bayley, Hagan; Garstecki, Piotr

    2015-01-21

    This paper demonstrates a microfluidic system that automates i) formation of a lipid bilayer at the interface between a pair of nanoliter-sized aqueous droplets in oil, ii) exchange of one droplet of the pair to form a new bilayer, and iii) current measurements on single proteins. A new microfluidic architecture is introduced - a set of traps designed to localize the droplets with respect to each other and with respect to the recording electrodes. The system allows for automated execution of experimental protocols by active control of the flow on chip with the use of simple external valves. Formation of stable artificial lipid bilayers, incorporation of α-hemolysin into the bilayers and electrical measurements of ionic transport through the protein pore are demonstrated. PMID:25412368

  17. Design of liquid lens based optical system for microfluidic chip detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Lijun; Zhou, Ya; Hu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Chang

    2015-08-01

    The precision of manufacturing and installing together with the flexibility is a serious challenge for laser induced fluorescent detector (LIFD) of microfluidic chip. In this paper, a focus tunable liquid lens based on liquid zoom system for LIFD with automatic adjustment is proposed. With the help of liquid zoom lens whose surface curvature can be varied continuously by current, the system can achieve a continuous zoom. Instead of using the traditional mechanical axial displacement scanning motion mechanism, the proposed zoom system can implement axial displacement scan by means of the well-designed autofocus feedback current control function. The simulation results show that the focal length variation range of the designed optical system is 4.87mm~ 8.40mm, which is also the axial scanning displacement range. The size of scanning spot is around 15μm when a 473nm wavelength laser is used, which can meet the demand of microfluidic chip detection. With this design, the required precision of the LIFD could be reduced significantly as well as costs. Moreover, it also makes the detection of microfluidic chip qualified to adapt to different size of detecting channel.

  18. Microfluidic system for high-throughput immunoglobulin-E analysis from clinical serum samples.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lulu; Fu, Yongfeng; Jiang, Xiran; Man, Suqin; Ran, Wei; Feng, Meng; Liu, Sixiu; Cheng, Xunjia; Sui, Guodong

    2015-10-01

    Rapid and high-throughput analytical techniques for IgE that requires a small serum amount are very important, especially for pediatric patients. In these patients, blood is collected from veins, which is painful compared to fingertip blood collection. Herein, a novel microfluidic system capable of high-throughput parallel analyses of allergen-specific IgE from small amounts of patient serum was successfully developed. A six-plex immunoassay was constructed within a microfluidic chip, and the entire system was validated using samples from clinical patients. Major antigens from house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae and Blomia tropicalis), cat (Felis domesticus), fungus (Cladosporium herbarum), ragweed (Humulus japonicas), and tree pollen (Platanus acerifolia) were used as analysis targets. Sample consumption decreased to <0.05 µL compared with the 480µL serum consumption by fluoroenzyme immunoassay (UniCAP system Pharmacia Diagnostics AB, Uppsala, Sweden), the 50 µL serum consumption by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA), or the 1.5 µL serum consumption by conventional protein chip analysis. Analysis duration, reagent cost, and total cost for each measurement were also considerably decreased. The assay showed good accuracy and sensitivity toward the clinical samples. A significant correlation of allergen-specific IgE levels was found among the microfluidic assay, UniCAP system, and ELISA. PMID:26078132

  19. Microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded materials and structures and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Rose, Klint A; Maghribi, Mariam; Benett, William; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie; Graff, Robert T.; Jankowski, Alan

    2005-07-26

    Described herein is a process for fabricating microfluidic systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are molded into the polymeric material polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Micromachining is used to create a mold master and the liquid precursors for PDMS are poured over the mold and allowed to cure. The PDMS is then removed form the mold and bonded to another material such as PDMS, glass, or silicon after a simple surface preparation step to form sealed microchannels.

  20. DEM microfabrication technique and its applications in bioscience and microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Di; Yang, Fan; Tang, Min; Li, Yigui; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Dacheng

    2001-10-01

    A new LIGA-like microfabrication technique was developed by present authors. DEM (deepetching, electroforming and microreplication) is the abbreviation of three main process steps in this new microfabrication technique. In contrast to LIGA technique, DEM technique has the advantages of lower cost and shorter process period. Microfluidic systems like plastic capillary electrophoresis chips, micro flowmeters and three-dimensional DNA chips were developed using DEM technique. DEM technique offers a new way for fabrication of MEMS and MOEMS components.

  1. Integrated Cantilever-Based Flow Sensors with Tunable Sensitivity for In-Line Monitoring of Flow Fluctuations in Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Noeth, Nadine; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2014-01-01

    For devices such as bio-/chemical sensors in microfluidic systems, flow fluctuations result in noise in the sensor output. Here, we demonstrate in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations with a cantilever-like sensor integrated in a microfluidic channel. The cantilevers are fabricated in different materials (SU-8 and SiN) and with different thicknesses. The integration of arrays of holes with different hole size and number of holes allows the modification of device sensitivity, theoretical detection limit and measurement range. For an average flow in the microliter range, the cantilever deflection is directly proportional to the flow rate fluctuations in the microfluidic channel. The SiN cantilevers show a detection limit below 1 nL/min and the thinnest SU-8 cantilevers a detection limit below 5 nL/min. Finally, the sensor is applied for in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations generated by external pumps connected to the microfluidic system. PMID:24366179

  2. The effect of nifedipine on myocardial perfusion and metabolism in systemic sclerosis. A positron emission tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Duboc, D.; Kahan, A.; Maziere, B.; Loc'h, C.; Crouzel, C.; Menkes, C.J.; Amor, B.; Strauch, G.; Guerin, F.; Syrota, A. )

    1991-02-01

    We assessed the effect of nifedipine on myocardial perfusion and metabolism in 9 patients with systemic sclerosis, using positron emission tomography with a perfusion tracer (potassium-38) and a metabolic tracer (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)). Nifedipine, 20 mg 3 times daily for 1 week, induced a significant increase in 38K myocardial uptake, a significant decrease in 18FDG myocardial uptake, and a significant increase in the myocardial 38K: 18FDG ratio. These results indicate that the increase in myocardial perfusion is associated with modifications in myocardial energy metabolism, which probably result from a beneficial anti-ischemic effect of nifedipine in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  3. Micro-fluidic interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus for simultaneously aligning and interconnecting microfluidic ports is presented. Such interconnections are required to utilize microfluidic devices fabricated in Micro-Electromechanical-Systems (MEMS) technologies, that have multiple fluidic access ports (e.g. 100 micron diameter) within a small footprint, (e.g. 3 mm.times.6 mm). Fanout of the small ports of a microfluidic device to a larger diameter (e.g. 500 microns) facilitates packaging and interconnection of the microfluidic device to printed wiring boards, electronics packages, fluidic manifolds etc.

  4. Microfluidics-Based in Vivo Mimetic Systems for the Study of Cellular Biology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus The human body is a complex network of molecules, organelles, cells, tissues, and organs: an uncountable number of interactions and transformations interconnect all the system’s components. In addition to these biochemical components, biophysical components, such as pressure, flow, and morphology, and the location of all of these interactions play an important role in the human body. Technical difficulties have frequently limited researchers from observing cellular biology as it occurs within the human body, but some state-of-the-art analytical techniques have revealed distinct cellular behaviors that occur only in the context of the interactions. These types of findings have inspired bioanalytical chemists to provide new tools to better understand these cellular behaviors and interactions. What blocks us from understanding critical biological interactions in the human body? Conventional approaches are often too naïve to provide realistic data and in vivo whole animal studies give complex results that may or may not be relevant for humans. Microfluidics offers an opportunity to bridge these two extremes: while these studies will not model the complexity of the in vivo human system, they can control the complexity so researchers can examine critical factors of interest carefully and quantitatively. In addition, the use of human cells, such as cells isolated from donated blood, captures human-relevant data and limits the use of animals in research. In addition, researchers can adapt these systems easily and cost-effectively to a variety of high-end signal transduction mechanisms, facilitating high-throughput studies that are also spatially, temporally, or chemically resolved. These strengths should allow microfluidic platforms to reveal critical parameters in the human body and provide insights that will help with the translation of pharmacological advances to clinical trials. In this Account, we describe selected microfluidic innovations within the

  5. Toward complete miniaturisation of flow injection analysis systems: microfluidic enhancement of chemiluminescent detection.

    PubMed

    Gracioso Martins, Ana M; Glass, Nick R; Harrison, Sally; Rezk, Amgad R; Porter, Nichola A; Carpenter, Peter D; Du Plessis, Johan; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2014-11-01

    Conventional flow injection systems for aquatic environmental analysis typically comprise large laboratory benchscale equipment, which place considerable constraints for portable field use. Here, we demonstrate the use of an integrated acoustically driven microfluidic mixing scheme to enhance detection of a chemiluminescent species tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate-a common chemiluminescent reagent widely used for the analysis of a wide range of compounds such as illicit drugs, pharmaceuticals, and pesticides-such that rapid in-line quantification can be carried out with sufficient on-chip sensitivity. Specifically, we employ surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to drive intense chaotic streaming within a 100 μL chamber cast in polydimethoxylsiloxane (PDMS) atop a microfluidic chip consisting of a single crystal piezoelectric material. By optimizing the power, duration, and orientation of the SAW input, we show that the mixing intensity of the sample and reagent fed into the chamber can be increased by one to two orders of magnitude, leading to a similar enhancement in the detection sensitivity of the chemiluminescent species and thus achieving a theoretical limit of detection of 0.02 ppb (0.2 nM) of l-proline-a decade improvement over the industry gold-standard and two orders of magnitude more sensitive than that achievable with conventional systems-simply using a portable photodetector and without requiring sample preconcentration. This on-chip microfluidic mixing strategy, together with the integrated miniature photodetector and the possibility for chip-scale microfluidic actuation, then alludes to the attractive possibility of a completely miniaturized platform for portable field-use microanalytical systems. PMID:25275830

  6. Modeling and simulation of DNA flow in a microfluidic-based pathogen detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H

    2005-01-31

    We present simulation results from a new computational model of DNA flow in microfluidic devices. This work is important because computational models are needed to design miniaturized biomedical devices that are becoming the state-of-the-art in many significant applications including pathogen detection as well as continuous monitoring and drug delivery. Currently advanced algorithms in design tools are non-existent but necessary to understand the complex fluid and polymer dynamics involved in biological flow at small scales. Our model is based on a fully coupled fluid-particle numerical algorithm with both stochastic and deterministic components in a bead-rod polymer representation. We have applied this work to DNA extraction configurations in a microfluidic PCR chamber used in a pathogen detection system. We demonstrate our method on the test problem of flow of a single DNA molecule in a 2D packed array microchannel. We are also investigating mechanisms for molecular ''sticking'' using short range forces.

  7. A fully integrated microfluidic genetic analysis system with sample-in-answer-out capability.

    PubMed

    Easley, Christopher J; Karlinsey, James M; Bienvenue, Joan M; Legendre, Lindsay A; Roper, Michael G; Feldman, Sanford H; Hughes, Molly A; Hewlett, Erik L; Merkel, Tod J; Ferrance, Jerome P; Landers, James P

    2006-12-19

    We describe a microfluidic genetic analysis system that represents a previously undescribed integrated microfluidic device capable of accepting whole blood as a crude biological sample with the endpoint generation of a genetic profile. Upon loading the sample, the glass microfluidic genetic analysis system device carries out on-chip DNA purification and PCR-based amplification, followed by separation and detection in a manner that allows for microliter samples to be screened for infectious pathogens with sample-in-answer-out results in < 30 min. A single syringe pump delivers sample/reagents to the chip for nucleic acid purification from a biological sample. Elastomeric membrane valving isolates each distinct functional region of the device and, together with resistive flow, directs purified DNA and PCR reagents from the extraction domain into a 550-nl chamber for rapid target sequence PCR amplification. Repeated pressure-based injections of nanoliter aliquots of amplicon (along with the DNA sizing standard) allow electrophoretic separation and detection to provide DNA fragment size information. The presence of Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) in 750 nl of whole blood from living asymptomatic infected mice and of Bordetella pertussis in 1 microl of nasal aspirate from a patient suspected of having whooping cough are confirmed by the resultant genetic profile. PMID:17159153

  8. A fluorescence-based centrifugal microfluidic system for parallel detection of multiple allergens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. L.; Ho, H. P.; Cheung, K. L.; Kong, S. K.; Suen, Y. K.; Kwan, Y. W.; Li, W. J.; Wong, C. K.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports a robust polymer based centrifugal microfluidic analysis system that can provide parallel detection of multiple allergens in vitro. Many commercial food products (milk, bean, pollen, etc.) may introduce allergy to people. A low-cost device for rapid detection of allergens is highly desirable. With this as the objective, we have studied the feasibility of using a rotating disk device incorporating centrifugal microfluidics for performing actuationfree and multi-analyte detection of different allergen species with minimum sample usage and fast response time. Degranulation in basophils or mast cells is an indicator to demonstrate allergic reaction. In this connection, we used acridine orange (AO) to demonstrate degranulation in KU812 human basophils. It was found that the AO was released from granules when cells were stimulated by ionomycin, thus signifying the release of histamine which accounts for allergy symptoms [1-2]. Within this rotating optical platform, major microfluidic components including sample reservoirs, reaction chambers, microchannel and flow-control compartments are integrated into a single bio-compatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. The flow sequence and reaction time can be controlled precisely. Sequentially through varying the spinning speed, the disk may perform a variety of steps on sample loading, reaction and detection. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of using centrifugation as a possible immunoassay system in the future.

  9. Microprocessor-based integration of microfluidic control for the implementation of automated sensor monitoring and multithreaded optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ezra, Elishai; Maor, Idan; Bavli, Danny; Shalom, Itai; Levy, Gahl; Prill, Sebastian; Jaeger, Magnus S; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2015-08-01

    Microfluidic applications range from combinatorial synthesis to high throughput screening, with platforms integrating analog perfusion components, digitally controlled micro-valves and a range of sensors that demand a variety of communication protocols. Currently, discrete control units are used to regulate and monitor each component, resulting in scattered control interfaces that limit data integration and synchronization. Here, we present a microprocessor-based control unit, utilizing the MS Gadgeteer open framework that integrates all aspects of microfluidics through a high-current electronic circuit that supports and synchronizes digital and analog signals for perfusion components, pressure elements, and arbitrary sensor communication protocols using a plug-and-play interface. The control unit supports an integrated touch screen and TCP/IP interface that provides local and remote control of flow and data acquisition. To establish the ability of our control unit to integrate and synchronize complex microfluidic circuits we developed an equi-pressure combinatorial mixer. We demonstrate the generation of complex perfusion sequences, allowing the automated sampling, washing, and calibrating of an electrochemical lactate sensor continuously monitoring hepatocyte viability following exposure to the pesticide rotenone. Importantly, integration of an optical sensor allowed us to implement automated optimization protocols that require different computational challenges including: prioritized data structures in a genetic algorithm, distributed computational efforts in multiple-hill climbing searches and real-time realization of probabilistic models in simulated annealing. Our system offers a comprehensive solution for establishing optimization protocols and perfusion sequences in complex microfluidic circuits. PMID:26227212

  10. Fabrication and integration of microprism mirrors for high-speed three-dimensional measurement in inertial microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Joonyoung; Kim, Jihye; Shin, Jung H.; Lee, Wonhee

    2014-09-01

    Inertial microfluidics utilizes fluid inertia from high flow velocity to manipulate particles and fluids in 3D. Acquiring a 3D information of particle positions and complex flow patterns within microfluidic devices requires 3D imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy, which are often expensive and slow. Here, we report on a prism-mirror-embedded microfluidic device that allows simultaneous imaging of the top and side view of the microchannel for a high-speed, low-cost 3D imaging. The microprism mirrors are fabricated and integrated into a microfluidic system using conventional microfabrication techniques including wet etch and soft lithography. This inexpensive high quality prism mirror provides a highly reflective, smooth mirror surface with precise 45° reflection angle, enabling 3D measurement of inertial migration of microparticles in a rectangular channel at speeds in excess of 10 000 frame/s.

  11. Note: A micro-perfusion system for use during real-time physiological studies under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltas, Jeff; Long, Zac; Huff, Alison; Maloney, Ryan; Ryan, Jordan; Urayama, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We construct a micro-perfusion system using piston screw pump generators for use during real-time, high-pressure physiological studies. Perfusion is achieved using two generators, with one generator being compressed while the other is retracted, thus maintaining pressurization while producing fluid flow. We demonstrate control over perfusion rates in the 10-μl/s range and the ability to change between fluid reservoirs at up to 50 MPa. We validate the screw-pump approach by monitoring the cyanide-induced response of UV-excited autofluorescence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under pressurization.

  12. Versatile minimized system - a step towards safe perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Y M; Körver, E P J; Yamamoto, Y; Weerwind, P W

    2016-05-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates the superiority of minimized cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) systems compared to conventional systems in terms of inflammatory reactions and transfusion requirements. Evident benefits of minimized CPB systems, however, do not come without consequences. Kinetic-assisted drainage, as used in these circuits, can result in severe fluctuations of venous line pressures and, consequently, fluctuation of the blood flow delivered to the patient. Furthermore, subatmospheric venous line pressures can cause gaseous microemboli. Another limitation is the absence of cardiotomy suction, which can lead to excessive blood loss via a cell saver. The most serious limitation of minimized circuits is that these circuits are very constrained in the case of complications or changing of the surgery plan. We developed a versatile minimized system (VMS) with a priming volume of about 600 ml. A compliance chamber in the venous line decreases peaks of pressure fluctuations. This chamber also acts as a bubble trap. Additionally, the open venous reservoir is connected parallel to the venous line and excluded from the circulation during an uncomplicated CPB. This reservoir can be included in the circulation via a roller pump and be used as a cardiotomy reservoir. The amount and rate of returned blood in the circulation is regulated by a movable level detector. Further, the circuit can easily be converted to an open system with vacuum-assisted venous drainage in the case of unexpected complications. The VMS combines the benefits of minimized circuits with the versatility and safety of a conventional CPB system. Perfusionists familiar with this system can secure an adequate and timely response at expected and unexpected intraoperative complications. PMID:26354746

  13. Nanomaterial based detection and degradation of biological and chemical contaminants in a microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamohan, Harikrishnan

    Monitoring and remediation of environmental contaminants (biological and chemical) form the crux of global water resource management. There is an extant need to develop point-of-use, low-power, low-cost tools that can address this problem effectively with minimal environmental impact. Nanotechnology and microfluidics have made enormous advances during the past decade in the area of biosensing and environmental remediation. The "marriage" of these two technologies can effectively address some of the above-mentioned needs. In this dissertation, nanomaterials were used in conjunction with microfluidic techniques to detect and degrade biological and chemical pollutants. In the first project, a point-of-use sensor was developed for detection of trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. A self-organizing nanotubular titanium dioxide (TNA) synthesized by electrochemical anodization and functionalized with photocatalytically deposited platinum (Pt/TNA) was applied to the detection. The morphology and crystallinity of the Pt/TNA sensor was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dis- persive x-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The sensor could detect TCE in the concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000 ppm. The room-temperature operation capability of the sensor makes it less power intensive and can potentially be incorporated into a field-based sensor. In the second part, TNA synthesized on a foil was incorporated into a flow-based microfluidic format and applied to degradation of a model pollutant, methylene blue. The system was demonstrated to have enhanced photocatalytic performance at higher flow rates (50-200 muL/min) over the same microfluidic format with TiO2 nanoparticulate (commercial P25) catalyst. The microfluidic format with TNA catalyst was able to achieve 82% fractional conversion of 18 mM methylene blue in comparison to 55% in the case of the TiO2 nanoparticulate layer at a flow rate of 200 L/min. The microfluidic device was

  14. Uniform mixing in paper-based microfluidic systems using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Amgad R; Qi, Aisha; Friend, James R; Li, Wai Ho; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-02-21

    Paper-based microfluidics has recently received considerable interest due to their ease and low cost, making them extremely attractive as point-of-care diagnostic devices. The incorporation of basic fluid actuation and manipulation schemes on paper substrates, however, afford the possibility to extend the functionality of this simple technology to a much wider range of typical lab-on-a-chip operations, given its considerable advantages in terms of cost, size and integrability over conventional microfluidic substrates. We present a convective actuation mechanism in a simple paper-based microfluidic device using surface acoustic waves to drive mixing. Employing a Y-channel structure patterned onto paper, the mixing induced by the 30 MHz acoustic waves is shown to be consistent and rapid, overcoming several limitations associated with its capillary-driven passive mixing counterpart wherein irreproducibilities and nonuniformities are often encountered in the mixing along the channel--capillary-driven passive mixing offers only poor control, is strongly dependent on the paper's texture and fibre alignment, and permits backflow, all due to the scale of the fibres being significant in comparison to the length scales of the features in a microfluidic system. Using a novel hue-based colourimetric technique, the mixing speed and efficiency is compared between the two methods, and used to assess the effects of changing the input power, channel tortuousity and fibre/flow alignment for the acoustically-driven mixing. The hue-based technique offers several advantages over grayscale pixel intensity analysis techniques in facilitating quantification without limitations on the colour contrast of the samples, and can be used, for example, for quantification in on-chip immunochromatographic assays. PMID:22193520

  15. A pneumatic pressure-driven multi-throughput microfluidic circulation culture system.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Narazaki, G; Sugita, R; Kobayashi, H; Sugiura, S; Kanamori, T

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report a pneumatic pressure-driven microfluidic device capable of multi-throughput medium circulation culture. The circulation culture system has the following advantages for application in drug discovery: (i) simultaneous operation of multiple circulation units, (ii) use of a small amount of circulating medium (3.5 mL), (iii) pipette-friendly liquid handling, and (iv) a detachable interface with pneumatic pressure lines via sterile air-vent filters. The microfluidic device contains three independent circulation culture units, in which human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured under physiological shear stress induced by circulation of the medium. Circulation of the medium in the three culture units was generated by programmed sequentially applied pressure from two pressure-control lines. HUVECs cultured in the microfluidic device were aligned under a one-way circulating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2); they exhibited a randomly ordered alignment under no shear stress and under reciprocating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2). We also observed 2.8- to 4.9-fold increases in expression of the mRNAs of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and thrombomodulin under one-way circulating flow with a shear stress of 10 dyn cm(-2) compared with conditions of no shear stress or reciprocating flow. PMID:27229626

  16. Microfluidic bioassay system based on microarrays of hydrogel sensing elements entrapping quantum dot-enzyme conjugates.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunji; Kim, Sinyoung; Koh, Won-Gun

    2012-01-15

    This paper presents a simple method to fabricate a microfluidic biosensor that is able to detect substrates for H(2)O(2)-generating oxidase. The biosensor consists of three components (quantum dot-enzyme conjugates, hydrogel microstructures, and a set of microchannels) that were hierarchically integrated into a microfluidic device. The quantum dot (QD)-enzyme conjugates were entrapped within the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel microstructures that were fabricated within the microchannels by a photopatterning process. Glucose oxidase (GOX) and alcohol oxidase (AOX) were chosen as the model oxidase enzymes, conjugated to carboxyl-terminated CdSe/ZnS QDs, and entrapped within the hydrogel microstructures, which resulted in a fluorescent hydrogel microarray that was responsive to glucose or alcohol. The hydrogel-entrapped GOX and AOX were able to perform enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of glucose and alcohol, respectively, to produce H(2)O(2), which subsequently quenched the fluorescence of the conjugated QDs. The fluorescence intensity of the hydrogel microstructures decreased as the glucose and alcohol concentrations increased, and the detection limits of this system were found to be 50 μM of glucose and 70 μM of alcohol. Because each microchannel was able to carry out different assays independently, the simultaneous detection of glucose and alcohol was possible using our novel microfluidic device composed of multiple microchannels. PMID:22177543

  17. Droplet-based microfluidic system to form and separate multicellular spheroids using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungjun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Minsoo; Park, Tai Hyun

    2013-04-21

    The importance of creating a three-dimensional (3-D) multicellular spheroid has recently been gaining attention due to the limitations of monolayer cell culture to precisely mimic in vivo structure and cellular interactions. Due to this emerging interest, researchers have utilized new tools, such as microfluidic devices, that allow high-throughput and precise size control to produce multicellular spheroids. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic system that can encapsulate both cells and magnetic nanoparticles within alginate beads to mimic the function of a multicellular tumor spheroid. Cells were entrapped within the alginate beads along with magnetic nanoparticles, and the beads of a relatively uniform size (diameters of 85% of the beads were 170-190 μm) were formed in the oil phase. These beads were passed through parallel streamlines of oil and culture medium, where the beads were magnetically transferred into the medium phase from the oil phase using an external magnetic force. This microfluidic chip eliminates additional steps for collecting the spheroids from the oil phase and transferring them to culture medium. Ultimately, the overall spheroid formation process can be achieved on a single microchip. PMID:23426090

  18. Novel localized heating technique on centrifugal microfluidic disc with wireless temperature monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of centrifugal microfluidic disc suggest the need for electrical interface in the disc to perform active biomedical assays. In this paper, we have demonstrated an active application powered by the energy harvested from the rotation of the centrifugal microfluidic disc. A novel integration of power harvester disc onto centrifugal microfluidic disc to perform localized heating technique is the main idea of our paper. The power harvester disc utilizing electromagnetic induction mechanism generates electrical energy from the rotation of the disc. This contributes to the heat generation by the embedded heater on the localized heating disc. The main characteristic observed in our experiment is the heating pattern in relative to the rotation of the disc. The heating pattern is monitored wirelessly with a digital temperature sensing system also embedded on the disc. Maximum temperature achieved is 82 °C at rotational speed of 2000 RPM. The technique proves to be effective for continuous heating without the need to stop the centrifugal motion of the disc. PMID:26736977

  19. Comparative Single-Cell Analysis of Different E. coli Expression Systems during Microfluidic Cultivation.

    PubMed

    Binder, Dennis; Probst, Christopher; Grünberger, Alexander; Hilgers, Fabienne; Loeschcke, Anita; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Drepper, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production is mostly realized with large-scale cultivations and monitored at the level of the entire population. Detailed knowledge of cell-to-cell variations with respect to cellular growth and product formation is limited, even though phenotypic heterogeneity may distinctly hamper overall production yields, especially for toxic or difficult-to-express proteins. Unraveling phenotypic heterogeneity is thus a key aspect in understanding and optimizing recombinant protein production in biotechnology and synthetic biology. Here, microfluidic single-cell analysis serves as the method of choice to investigate and unmask population heterogeneities in a dynamic and spatiotemporal fashion. In this study, we report on comparative microfluidic single-cell analyses of commonly used E. coli expression systems to uncover system-inherent specifications in the synthetic M9CA growth medium. To this end, the PT7lac/LacI, the PBAD/AraC and the Pm/XylS system were systematically analyzed in order to gain detailed insights into variations of growth behavior and expression phenotypes and thus to uncover individual strengths and deficiencies at the single-cell level. Specifically, we evaluated the impact of different system-specific inducers, inducer concentrations as well as genetic modifications that affect inducer-uptake and regulation of target gene expression on responsiveness and phenotypic heterogeneity. Interestingly, the most frequently applied expression system based on E. coli strain BL21(DE3) clearly fell behind with respect to expression homogeneity and robustness of growth. Moreover, both the choice of inducer and the presence of inducer uptake systems proved crucial for phenotypic heterogeneity. Conclusively, microfluidic evaluation of different inducible E. coli expression systems and setups identified the modified lacY-deficient PT7lac/LacI as well as the Pm/XylS system with conventional m-toluic acid induction as key players for precise and robust

  20. Comparative Single-Cell Analysis of Different E. coli Expression Systems during Microfluidic Cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Hilgers, Fabienne; Loeschcke, Anita; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Drepper, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production is mostly realized with large-scale cultivations and monitored at the level of the entire population. Detailed knowledge of cell-to-cell variations with respect to cellular growth and product formation is limited, even though phenotypic heterogeneity may distinctly hamper overall production yields, especially for toxic or difficult-to-express proteins. Unraveling phenotypic heterogeneity is thus a key aspect in understanding and optimizing recombinant protein production in biotechnology and synthetic biology. Here, microfluidic single-cell analysis serves as the method of choice to investigate and unmask population heterogeneities in a dynamic and spatiotemporal fashion. In this study, we report on comparative microfluidic single-cell analyses of commonly used E. coli expression systems to uncover system-inherent specifications in the synthetic M9CA growth medium. To this end, the PT7lac/LacI, the PBAD/AraC and the Pm/XylS system were systematically analyzed in order to gain detailed insights into variations of growth behavior and expression phenotypes and thus to uncover individual strengths and deficiencies at the single-cell level. Specifically, we evaluated the impact of different system-specific inducers, inducer concentrations as well as genetic modifications that affect inducer-uptake and regulation of target gene expression on responsiveness and phenotypic heterogeneity. Interestingly, the most frequently applied expression system based on E. coli strain BL21(DE3) clearly fell behind with respect to expression homogeneity and robustness of growth. Moreover, both the choice of inducer and the presence of inducer uptake systems proved crucial for phenotypic heterogeneity. Conclusively, microfluidic evaluation of different inducible E. coli expression systems and setups identified the modified lacY-deficient PT7lac/LacI as well as the Pm/XylS system with conventional m-toluic acid induction as key players for precise and robust

  1. Physiological Response to a Simplified Veno-Venous Perfusion-Induced Systemic Hyperthermia System

    PubMed Central

    Ballard-Croft, Cherry; Wang, Dongfang; Jones, Cameron; Sumpter, L. Ryan; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Thomas, Joe; Topaz, Stephen; Zwischenberger, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Our original venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (vv-PISH) system appeared to significantly improve lung cancer patient survival, but was too complex with numerous dialysis problems. We tested a simplified vv-PISH circuit that includes the AvalonElite double lumen cannula, a modified heat exchanger, water heater/cooler, and a centrifugal pump. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this simplified vv-PISH system (without hemodialyzer) and to investigate the physiological response to whole body hyperthermia in pigs. We tested our vv-PISH circuit in healthy female adult swine (n= 7, 55-68 kg). The therapeutic core temperature (42°C), calculated as mean of rectal, bladder, and esophageal temperatures, was achieved in six swine. A maximum difference of 0.5°C was observed between the individual temperature sensor readings, indicating homogeneous heat distribution. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure were transiently altered, but were safely managed. A significant elevation in pulmonary artery pressure occurred during the heating phase, resulting in one pig death. In all other pigs, pulmonary artery pressure returned to physiologic values during the therapeutic phase. Arterial blood electrolytes were maintained without the need of a dialyzer. Major organ function was within normal parameters. The simplified vv-PISH circuit reliably delivered the hyperthermic dose with no need of dialysis. PMID:23085942

  2. Novel microfluidic system for online monitoring of biofilm dynamics by electrical impedance spectroscopy and amperometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchmann, Julia; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Schwartz, Thomas; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    Biofilm formation is ubiquitous in nature where microorganisms attach to surfaces and form highly adapted and protected communities. In technical and industrial systems like drinking water supply, food production or shipping industry biofilms are a major cause of product contamination, biofouling, and biocorrosion. Therefore, understanding of biofilm formation and means of preventing biofilm formation is important to develop novel biofilm treatment strategies. A system allowing directly online detection and monitoring biofilm formation is necessary. However, until today, there are little to none technical systems featuring a non-destructive real-time characterization of biofilm formation in a highthroughput manner. This paper presents such a microfluidic system based on electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and amperomertic current measurement. The sensor consists of four modules, each housing 24 independent electrodes within 12 microfluidic channels. Attached biomass on the electrodes is monitored as increased inhibition in charge transfer by EIS and a change in metabolic activity is measured as change in produced electric current by amperometry. This modular sensor system is highly adaptable and suitable for a broad range of microbiological applications. Among others, biofilm formation processes can be characterized online, biofilm manipulation like inactivation or destabilization can be monitored in real-time and gene expression can be analyzed in parallel. The use of different electrode designs allows effective biofilm studies during all biofilm phases. The whole system was recently extended by an integrated pneumatic microfluidic pump which enables easy handling procedures. Further developments of this pumping module will allow a fully- automated computer-controlled valving and pumping.

  3. Automated and miniaturized detection of biological threats with a centrifugal microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D.; van Oordt, T.; Strohmeier, O.; Roth, G.; Drexler, J.; Eberhard, M.; Niedrig, M.; Patel, P.; Zgaga-Griesz, A.; Bessler, W.; Weidmann, M.; Hufert, F.; Zengerle, R.; von Stetten, F.

    2012-06-01

    The world's growing mobility, mass tourism, and the threat of terrorism increase the risk of the fast spread of infectious microorganisms and toxins. Today's procedures for pathogen detection involve complex stationary devices, and are often too time consuming for a rapid and effective response. Therefore a robust and mobile diagnostic system is required. We present a microstructured LabDisk which performs complex biochemical analyses together with a mobile centrifugal microfluidic device which processes the LabDisk. This portable system will allow fully automated and rapid detection of biological threats at the point-of-need.

  4. Plant-in-chip: Microfluidic system for studying root growth and pathogenic interactions in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Archana; Pandey, Santosh

    2011-06-01

    We report a microfluidic platform for the hydroponic growth of Arabidopsis plants with high-resolution visualization of root development and root-pathogen interactions. The platform comprises a set of parallel microchannels with individual input/output ports where 1-day old germinated seedlings are initially placed. Under optimum conditions, a root system grows in each microchannel and its images are recorded over a 198-h period. Different concentrations of plant growth media show different root growth characteristics. Later, the developed roots are inoculated with two plant pathogens (nematodes and zoospores) and their physicochemical interactions with the live root systems are observed.

  5. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Clarissa; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Batt, Carl A.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform. PMID:22412335

  6. A compact disk-like centrifugal microfluidic system for high-throughput nanoliter-scale protein crystallization screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junjun; Hu, Xiaojian; Zhao, Jianlong

    2010-06-01

    A centrifuge-based microfluidic system has been developed that enables automated high-throughput and low-volume protein crystallizations. In this system, protein solution was automatically and accurately metered and dispensed into nanoliter-sized multiple reaction chambers, and it was mixed with various types of precipitants using a combination of capillary effect and centrifugal force. It has the advantages of simple fabrication, easy operation, and extremely low waste. To demonstrate the feasibility of this system, we constructed a chip containing 24 units and used it to perform lysozyme and cyan fluorescent protein (CyPet) crystallization trials. The results demonstrate that high-quality crystals can be grown and harvested from such a nanoliter-volume microfluidic system. Compared to other microfluidic technologies for protein crystallization, this microfluidic system allows zero waste, simple structure and convenient operation, which suggests that our microfluidic disk can be applied not only to protein crystallization, but also to the miniaturization of various biochemical reactions requiring precise nanoscale control. PMID:20459060

  7. Robust fluidic connections to freestanding microfluidic hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Bradly B.; Larsen, Taylor S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds approaching physiological scale, whose size and large cellular load far exceed the limits of diffusion, require incorporation of a fluidic means to achieve adequate nutrient/metabolite exchange. This need has driven the extension of microfluidic technologies into the area of biomaterials. While construction of perfusable scaffolds is essentially a problem of microfluidic device fabrication, functional implementation of free-standing, thick-tissue constructs depends upon successful integration of external pumping mechanisms through optimized connective assemblies. However, a critical analysis to identify optimal materials/assembly components for hydrogel substrates has received little focus to date. This investigation addresses this issue directly by evaluating the efficacy of a range of adhesive and mechanical fluidic connection methods to gelatin hydrogel constructs based upon both mechanical property analysis and cell compatibility. Results identify a novel bioadhesive, comprised of two enzymatically modified gelatin compounds, for connecting tubing to hydrogel constructs that is both structurally robust and non-cytotoxic. Furthermore, outcomes from this study provide clear evidence that fluidic interconnect success varies with substrate composition (specifically hydrogel versus polydimethylsiloxane), highlighting not only the importance of selecting the appropriately tailored components for fluidic hydrogel systems but also that of encouraging ongoing, targeted exploration of this issue. The optimization of such interconnect systems will ultimately promote exciting scientific and therapeutic developments provided by microfluidic, cell-laden scaffolds. PMID:26045731

  8. Characterization of microfluidic human epidermal keratinocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Adrian T.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2008-01-01

    Human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) are skin cells of primary importance in maintaining the body’s defensive barrier and are used in vitro to assess the irritation potential and toxicity of chemical compounds. Microfluidic systems hold promise for high throughput irritant and toxicity assays, but HEK growth kinetics have yet to be characterized within microscale culture chambers. This research demonstrates HEK patterning on microscale patches of Type I collagen within microfluidic channels and maintenance of these cells under constant medium perfusion for 72 h. HEK were shown to maintain 93.0%–99.6% viability at 72 h under medium perfusion ranging from 0.025–0.4 μl min−1. HEK maintained this viability while ∼100% confluent—a level not possible in 96 well plates. Microscale HEK cultures offer the ability to precisely examine the morphology, behavior and viability of individual cells which may open the door to new discoveries in toxicological screening methods and wound healing techniques. PMID:19002858

  9. Enhancement of antibody production by growth factor addition in perfusion and hollow-fiber culture systems.

    PubMed

    Omasa, T; Kobayashi, M; Nishikawa, T; Shioya, S; Suga, K; Uemura, S; Kitani, Y; Imamura, Y

    1995-12-20

    The effects of the high-molecular-weight growth factors, transferrin and bovine serum albumin (BSA), on antibody production were analyzed quantitatively in continuous hollow-fiber cultivation over a period of 60 days. Transferrin enhanced cell growth but had no significant effect on the specific antibody production rate, whereas BSA significantly enhanced antibody production. The antibody production rate was increased 4- and 14-fold respectively by feeding BSA at 2 and 5 g L(-1) into the EC side of the system (the side connected to the cell-containing outer part of the hollow-fiber unit) compared with the production achieved without BSA. Addition of 5 g L(1) BSA into the IC side of the system (the side connected to the inner part of the hollow-fiber unit) resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in the antibody production rate. The effect of BSA was also analyzed using the perfusion culture system with a separation unit. When fresh medium containing either 2 or 5 g L(-1) BSA was fed into the reactor, both the specific growth rate and specific death rate increased, while the specific antibody production rate was increased 2- and 25-fold, respectively, by feeding BSA at these two concentrations compared with no addition. Comparing the two systems, the increase in the antibody production rate achieved with the hollow-fiber system was threefold greater than that in the perfusion culture system with the same concentration of BSA feeding. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18623537

  10. High-Throughput Cytotoxicity Testing System of Acetaminophen Using a Microfluidic Device (MFD) in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Seon Min; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Jeongyun

    2015-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a microfluidic device (MFD) that integrates several lab functions into a single chip of only millimeters in size. LOC provides several advantages, such as low fluidic volumes consumption, faster analysis, compactness, and massive parallelization. These properties enable a microfluidic-based high-throughput drug screening (HTDS) system to acquire cell-based abundant cytotoxicity results depending on linear gradient concentration of drug with only few hundreds of microliters of the drug. Therefore, a microfluidic device was developed containing an array of eight separate microchambers for cultivating HepG2 cells to be exposed to eight different concentrations of acetaminophen (APAP) through a diffusive-mixing-based concentration gradient generator. Every chamber array with eight different concentrations (0, 5.7, 11.4, 17.1, 22.8, 28.5, 34.2, or 40 mM) APAP had four replicating cell culture chambers. Consequently, 32 experimental results were acquired with a single microfluidic device experiment. The microfluidic high-throughput cytotoxicity device (μHTCD) and 96-well culture system showed comparable cytotoxicity results with increasing APAP concentration of 0 to 40 mM. The HTDS system yields progressive concentration-dependent cytotoxicity results using minimal reagent and time. Data suggest that the HTDS system may be applicable as alternative method for cytotoxicity screening for new drugs in diverse cell types. PMID:26241707

  11. A hybrid microfluidic system for regulation of neural differentiation in induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hesari, Zahra; Soleimani, Massoud; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Sharifdini, Meysam; Nadri, Samad; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Zare, Mehrak; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-06-01

    Controlling cellular orientation, proliferation, and differentiation is valuable in designing organ replacements and directing tissue regeneration. In the present study, we developed a hybrid microfluidic system to produce a dynamic microenvironment by placing aligned PDMS microgrooves on surface of biodegradable polymers as physical guidance cues for controlling the neural differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The neuronal differentiation capacity of cultured hiPSCs in the microfluidic system and other control groups was investigated using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) and immunocytochemistry. The functionally of differentiated hiPSCs inside hybrid system's scaffolds was also evaluated on the rat hemisected spinal cord in acute phase. Implanted cell's fate was examined using tissue freeze section and the functional recovery was evaluated according to the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale. Our results confirmed the differentiation of hiPSCs to neuronal cells on the microfluidic device where the expression of neuronal-specific genes was significantly higher compared to those cultured on the other systems such as plain tissue culture dishes and scaffolds without fluidic channels. Although survival and integration of implanted hiPSCs did not lead to a significant functional recovery, we believe that combination of fluidic channels with nanofiber scaffolds provides a great microenvironment for neural tissue engineering, and can be used as a powerful tool for in situ monitoring of differentiation potential of various kinds of stem cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1534-1543, 2016. PMID:26914600

  12. A PDMS-Based Cylindrical Hybrid Lens for Enhanced Fluorescence Detection in Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bor-Shyh; Yang, Yu-Ching; Ho, Chong-Yi; Yang, Han-Yu; Wang, Hsiang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic systems based on fluorescence detection have been developed and applied for many biological and chemical applications. Because of the tiny amount of sample in the system; the induced fluorescence can be weak. Therefore, most microfluidic systems deploy multiple optical components or sophisticated equipment to enhance the efficiency of fluorescence detection. However, these strategies encounter common issues of complex manufacturing processes and high costs. In this study; a miniature, cylindrical and hybrid lens made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to improve the fluorescence detection in microfluidic systems is proposed. The hybrid lens integrates a laser focusing lens and a fluorescence collecting lens to achieve dual functions and simplify optical setup. Moreover, PDMS has advantages of low-cost and straightforward fabrication compared with conventional optical components. The performance of the proposed lens is first examined with two fluorescent dyes and the results show that the lens provides satisfactory enhancement for fluorescence detection of Rhodamine 6G and Nile Red. The overall increments in collected fluorescence signal and detection sensitivity are more than 220% of those without lens, and the detection limits of Rhodamine 6G and Nile red are lowered to 0.01 μg/mL and 0.05 μg/mL, respectively. The hybrid lens is further applied to the detection of Nile red-labeled Chlorella vulgaris cells and it increases both signal intensity and detection sensitivity by more than 520%. The proposed hybrid lens also dramatically reduces the variation in detected signal caused by the deviation in incident angle of excitation light. PMID:24531300

  13. Recent Results of the Investigation of a Microfluidic Sampling Chip and Sampling System for Hot Cell Aqueous Processing Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Tripp; Jack Law; Tara Smith

    2013-10-01

    A Fuel Cycle Research and Development project has investigated an innovative sampling method that could evolve into the next generation sampling and analysis system for metallic elements present in aqueous processing streams. Initially sampling technologies were evaluated and microfluidics sampling chip technology was selected and tested. A conceptual design for a fully automated microcapillary-based system was completed and a robotic automated sampling system was fabricated. The mechanical and sampling operation of the completed sampling system was investigated. In addition, the production of a less expensive, mass produced sampling chip was investigated to avoid chip reuse thus increasing sampling reproducibility/accuracy. The microfluidic-based robotic sampling system’s mechanical elements were tested to ensure analytical reproducibility and the optimum robotic handling of microfluidic sampling chips.

  14. Portable laser speckle perfusion imaging system based on digital signal processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuejun; Feng, Nengyun; Sun, Xiaoli; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming

    2010-12-01

    The ability to monitor blood flow in vivo is of major importance in clinical diagnosis and in basic researches of life science. As a noninvasive full-field technique without the need of scanning, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is widely used to study blood flow with high spatial and temporal resolution. Current LSCI systems are based on personal computers for image processing with large size, which potentially limit the widespread clinical utility. The need for portable laser speckle contrast imaging system that does not compromise processing efficiency is crucial in clinical diagnosis. However, the processing of laser speckle contrast images is time-consuming due to the heavy calculation for enormous high-resolution image data. To address this problem, a portable laser speckle perfusion imaging system based on digital signal processor (DSP) and the algorithm which is suitable for DSP is described. With highly integrated DSP and the algorithm, we have markedly reduced the size and weight of the system as well as its energy consumption while preserving the high processing speed. In vivo experiments demonstrate that our portable laser speckle perfusion imaging system can obtain blood flow images at 25 frames per second with the resolution of 640 × 480 pixels. The portable and lightweight features make it capable of being adapted to a wide variety of application areas such as research laboratory, operating room, ambulance, and even disaster site.

  15. Portable laser speckle perfusion imaging system based on digital signal processor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuejun; Feng, Nengyun; Sun, Xiaoli; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming

    2010-12-01

    The ability to monitor blood flow in vivo is of major importance in clinical diagnosis and in basic researches of life science. As a noninvasive full-field technique without the need of scanning, laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is widely used to study blood flow with high spatial and temporal resolution. Current LSCI systems are based on personal computers for image processing with large size, which potentially limit the widespread clinical utility. The need for portable laser speckle contrast imaging system that does not compromise processing efficiency is crucial in clinical diagnosis. However, the processing of laser speckle contrast images is time-consuming due to the heavy calculation for enormous high-resolution image data. To address this problem, a portable laser speckle perfusion imaging system based on digital signal processor (DSP) and the algorithm which is suitable for DSP is described. With highly integrated DSP and the algorithm, we have markedly reduced the size and weight of the system as well as its energy consumption while preserving the high processing speed. In vivo experiments demonstrate that our portable laser speckle perfusion imaging system can obtain blood flow images at 25 frames per second with the resolution of 640 × 480 pixels. The portable and lightweight features make it capable of being adapted to a wide variety of application areas such as research laboratory, operating room, ambulance, and even disaster site. PMID:21198054

  16. Detection and analysis of temperature-sensitive dermal blood perfusion dynamics and distribution by a hybrid camera system.

    PubMed

    Blanik, N; Paul, M; Blazek, V; Leonhardt, S

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present an application of two optical imaging modalities for non-invasive assessment of dermal perfusion. This hybrid setup consists of a photo-plethysmographic camera sensing in the visible spectrum and a thermal camera sensing in the infrared-C-band. This allows to combine the information of both sources complementarily: The extracted perfusion index as well as the skin surface temperature. The feasibility of the presented system is tested in two studies with local temperature stress on the forehead of a subject. In the first, a local cooling on the subject's forehead is monitored and further analyzed. In the second, skin perfusion reactions to heat are considered. For both experiments the results are compared to baseline measurements and non-affected areas in the field of view of the cameras. As results, the dependencies between temperature and perfusion change are presented. Further, influences of the stressor can be visualized in functional mappings of calculated perfusion indices. For the performed test, a linear correlation between temperature and perfusion change is obtained. PMID:26736773

  17. Methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for detection of an active enzymatic agent

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory J; Hatch, Anson V; Singh, Anup K; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2014-10-28

    Embodiments of the present invention provide methods, microfluidic devices, and systems for the detection of an active target agent in a fluid sample. A substrate molecule is used that contains a sequence which may cleave in the presence of an active target agent. A SNAP25 sequence is described, for example, that may be cleaved in the presence of Botulinum Neurotoxin. The substrate molecule includes a reporter moiety. The substrate molecule is exposed to the sample, and resulting reaction products separated using electrophoretic separation. The elution time of the reporter moiety may be utilized to identify the presence or absence of the active target agent.

  18. Sensing Characteristics of Shear-Mode AlN Solidly Mounted Resonators with a Silicone Microfluidic System in Viscous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Juan; Guo, Peng; Sun, Xi-Liang; Wang, Sheng-Fu; Hu, Ming-Zhe; Gu, Hao-Shuang

    2014-02-01

    AlN solidly mounted resonators with silicone microfluidic systems vibrating in shear mode are fabricated and characterized. The fabrication process is compatible with integrated circuits and the c-axis tilted AlN films are deposited, which allow in-liquid operation through excitation of the shear mode. The silicone microfluidic system is mounted on top of the sensor chip to transport the analyses and confine the flow to the active area. The properties of sensor operation in air, deionized water, ethanol, isopropanol, 80% glycol aqueous solution, glycol, and olive oil are characterized. The effects of different viscosities on the resonance frequency shift and Q-factor of the sensor have been discussed. The sensitivity and Q value in glycol of the sensor are 1.52 MHz cm2/μg and around 60, respectively. The results indicate the potential of a highly sensitive microfluidic sensor system for the applications in viscous media.

  19. DropBot: An open-source digital microfluidic control system with precise control of electrostatic driving force and instantaneous drop velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fobel, Ryan; Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, 160 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1 ; Fobel, Christian; Wheeler, Aaron R.; Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, 160 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1; Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6

    2013-05-13

    We introduce DropBot: an open-source instrument for digital microfluidics (http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot). DropBot features two key functionalities for digital microfluidics: (1) real-time monitoring of instantaneous drop velocity (which we propose is a proxy for resistive forces), and (2) application of constant electrostatic driving forces through compensation for amplifier-loading and device capacitance. We anticipate that this system will enhance insight into failure modes and lead to new strategies for improved device reliability, and will be useful for the growing number of users who are adopting digital microfluidics for automated, miniaturized laboratory operation.

  20. DropBot: An open-source digital microfluidic control system with precise control of electrostatic driving force and instantaneous drop velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fobel, Ryan; Fobel, Christian; Wheeler, Aaron R.

    2013-05-01

    We introduce DropBot: an open-source instrument for digital microfluidics (http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot). DropBot features two key functionalities for digital microfluidics: (1) real-time monitoring of instantaneous drop velocity (which we propose is a proxy for resistive forces), and (2) application of constant electrostatic driving forces through compensation for amplifier-loading and device capacitance. We anticipate that this system will enhance insight into failure modes and lead to new strategies for improved device reliability, and will be useful for the growing number of users who are adopting digital microfluidics for automated, miniaturized laboratory operation.

  1. Automatic microfluidic fluorescence-array measurement system for detecting organic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Lin, Jung-Chin; Lin, Shyan-Lung; Chang, I-Nan; Lin, Chern-Sheng; Chen, Shi-Yao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an automatic microfluidic fluorescence-array measurement system is developed to detect the concentration of organic phosphate based on the luminol-hydrogen peroxide catalytic fluorescent mechanism. Not only sample quantity and cost can be reduced, but also detection time, accuracy and precision can be improved in the system. The system is composed of a CCD image module, a stepper motor with driver, a microfluidic fluorescence array, a background light elimination module, and a dynamic image-analyzed interface. The pesticides of chlorpyrifos and fenitrothion of organic phosphate are chosen as experimental samples. Only a 2.5 μ l quantity of sample is required to have a fast response time of 1.4 second. Experimental results show that the sensitivities of chlorpyrifos and fenitrothion are 1.88 V/ppm in the range of 0.166 ∼ 10 ppm with averaged error of 1.66% and 0.32 V/ppm in the range of 0.03 ∼ 10 ppm with averaged error of 1.68% respectively. The organophosphorus effective detection range of the developed system covers the legal prescription for pesticide residues. PMID:26409537

  2. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G; Wilson, David L

    2016-03-21

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR  <  0.8), perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR [Formula: see text] 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29  ±  0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42  ±  0.01 (p  <  0.05) at 70 keV. On the non-ischemic inferior wall (not a LAD territory), the flow ratio was 0.50  ±  0.04 falsely indicating an actionable ischemic condition

  3. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR  <  0.8), perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR ≈ 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29  ±  0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42  ±  0.01 (p  <  0.05) at 70 keV. On the non-ischemic inferior wall (not a LAD territory), the flow ratio was 0.50  ±  0.04 falsely indicating an actionable ischemic condition in a healthy

  4. A Scalable Perfusion Culture System with Miniature Peristaltic Pumps for Live-Cell Imaging Assays with Provision for Microfabricated Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Sreenath; Suma, M.S.; Raju, Shilpa R.; Bhargav, Santosh D.B.; Arunima, S.; Das, Saumitra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a perfusion culture system with miniature bioreactors and peristaltic pumps. The bioreactors are designed for perfusion, live-cell imaging studies, easy incorporation of microfabricated scaffolds, and convenience of operation in standard cell culture techniques. By combining with miniature peristaltic pumps—one for each bioreactor to avoid cross-contamination and to maintain desired flow rate in each—we have made a culture system that facilitates perfusion culture inside standard incubators. This scalable system can support multiple parallel perfusion experiments. The major components are fabricated by three-dimensional printing using VeroWhite, which we show to be amenable to ex vivo cell culture. Furthermore, the components of the system can be reused, thus making it economical. We validate the system and illustrate its versatility by culturing primary rat hepatocytes, live imaging the growth of mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) on microfabricated ring-scaffolds inserted into the bioreactor, performing perfusion culture of breast cancer cells (MCF7), and high-magnification imaging of hepatocarcinoma cells (HuH7). PMID:26309810

  5. SU-E-QI-06: Design and Initial Validation of a Precise Capillary Phantom to Test Perfusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R; Iacobucci, G; Khobragade, P; Ying, L; Snyder, K; Wack, D; Rudin, S; Ionita, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a precise perfusion phantom mimicking capillaries of the brain vasculature which could be used to test various perfusion protocols and algorithms which generate perfusion maps. Methods: A perfusion phantom was designed in Solidworks and built using additive manufacturing. The phantom was an overall cylindrical shape of diameter and height 20mm and containing capillaries of 200μm or 300μm which were parallel and in contact making up the inside volume where flow was allowed. We created a flow loop using a peristaltic pump and contrast agent was injected manually. Digital Subtraction Angiographic images and low contrast images with cone beam CT were acquired after the contrast was injected. These images were analyzed by our own code in LabVIEW software and Time-Density Curve, MTT and TTP was calculated. Results: Perfused area was visible in the cone beam CT images; however, individual capillaries were not distinguishable. The Time-Density Curve acquired was accurate, sensitive and repeatable. The parameters MTT, and TTP offered by the phantom were very sensitive to slight changes in the TDC shape. Conclusion: We have created a robust calibrating model for evaluation of existing perfusion data analysis systems. This approach is extremely sensitive to changes in the flow due to the high temporal resolution and could be used as a golden standard to assist developers in calibrating and testing of imaging perfusion systems and software algorithms. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  6. A microfluidic manifold with a single pump system to generate highly mono-disperse alginate beads for cell encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Choong; Park, Juyoung

    2014-01-01

    Cell encapsulation technology is a promising strategy applicable to tissue engineering and cell therapy. Many advanced microencapsulation chips that function via multiple syringe pumps have been developed to generate mono-disperse hydrogel beads encapsulating cells. However, their operation is difficult and only trained microfluidic engineers can use them with dexterity. Hence, we propose a microfluidic manifold system, driven by a single syringe pump, which can enable the setup of automated flow sequences and generate highly mono-disperse alginate beads by minimizing disturbances to the pump pressure. The encapsulation of P19 mouse embryonic carcinoma cells and embryonic body formation are demonstrated to prove the efficiency of the proposed system. PMID:25587376

  7. Changes in mixed-function oxidase system in the perfused liver of the cold-acclimated rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, T.; Miyazaki, Y.; Motohashi, Y.; Yamada, K.

    1986-09-01

    Changes in the hepatic cytochrome P-450-dependent drug-metabolizing system were studied in perfused livers obtained from cold-acclimated male Wistar rats after 30 days of cold exposure (4‡C) when using hexobarbital as a substrate. In fasted animals the cold-acclimated rats showed higher levels of hexobarbital metabolic rates compared to control rats, but there was no significant difference in fed animals. The maximum rates of hexobarbital metabolism produced by xylitol perfusion were also significantly higher in the perfused liver of cold-acclimated rats. It was concluded that the function of the cytochrome P-450 system for hexobarbital in cold-acclimated rats changed due to both an increase in the activity of the cytochrome P-450 system and to changes in regulation of the cytochrome P-450 system by the supply of reducing equivalents.

  8. A microfluidic chemical/biological sensing system based on membrane dissolution and optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharamurthy, Sudheer S.; Dong, Liang; Jiang, Hongrui

    2007-01-01

    A microfluidic system to sense chemical and biological analytes using membranes dissolvable by the analyte is demonstrated. The scheme to detect the dissolution of the membrane is based on the difference in optical absorption of the membrane and the fluidic sample being assayed. The presence of the analyte in the sample chemically cleaves the membrane and causes the sample to flow into the membrane area. This causes a change in the optical absorption of the path between the light source and detector. A device comprising the microfluidic channels and the membrane is microfabricated using liquid-phase photopolymerization. A light emitting diode (LED) and a detector with an integrated amplifier are positioned and aligned on either side of the device. The state of the membrane is continuously monitored after introducing the sample. The temporal dissolution characteristics of the membrane are extracted in terms of the output voltage of the detector as a function of time. This is used to determine the concentration of the analyte. The absorption spectra of the membrane and fluidic sample are studied to determine the optimal wavelength that provides the maximum difference in absorbance between the membrane and the sample. In this work, the dissolution of a poly(acrylamide) hydrogel membrane in the presence of a reducing agent (dithiothreitol—DTT) is used as a model system. For this system, with 1 M DTT, complete membrane dissolution occurred after 65 min.

  9. Perfusion Assessment with the SPY System after Arterial Venous Reversal for Upper Extremity Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: The timing and pattern of reperfusion following arterial- venous reversal (AVR) in patients with terminal ischemia of an upper extremity is not well understood. Methods: The current case series describes the timing and pattern of reperfusion observed in patients with terminal upper extremity ischemia who underwent AVR and repeated postoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography between 2004 and 2009. For all included patients, the SPY Near-Infrared Perfusion Assessment System permitted visualization of ICG-labeled blood flow for 60-second sampling periods at scheduled postoperative time points; outflow and rate and amplitude of inflow were objectively quantified with SPY-Q Analysis Toolkit image analysis software. Results: The series comprised 6 male patients (mean age, 46 years) who presented with upper extremity ischemia related to hypothenar hammer syndrome (n = 2), embolism with patent foramen ovale (n = 2), atherosclerosis (n = 1), and avulsion amputation of the thumb (n = 1); the patient with the avulsion amputation was diagnosed with thromboangiitis obliterans at the time of replantation. AVR was successful in all 6 patients. In 5 of 6 patients, ICG angiography and SPY-based visualization/quantification showed that venous outflow and arterial inflow gradually normalized (versus unaffected digits) between postoperative days (PODs) 0 and 3 and was maintained at long-term follow-up (≥3 months); for the patient who underwent thumb replantation, perfusion normalized between POD 3 and month 5 follow-up. Conclusions: AVR effectively reestablished blood flow in patients with terminal upper extremity ischemia. ICG angiography with SPY technology revealed that, in most cases, kinetic curves, timing, and patterns of perfusion gradually normalized over several PODs. PMID:25426368

  10. Magnetic manipulation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a microfluidic system for drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agiotis, L.; Theodorakos, I.; Samothrakitis, S.; Papazoglou, S.; Zergioti, I.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS), have attracted major interest, due to their small size and unique magnetic properties, for drug delivery applications. In this context, iron oxide nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) (150 nm magnetic core diameter), were used as drug carriers, aiming to form a magnetically controlled nano-platform. The navigation capabilities of the iron oxide nanoparticles in a microfluidic channel were investigated by simulating the magnetic field and the magnetic force applied on the magnetic nanoparticles inside a microfluidic chip. The simulations have been performed using finite element method (ANSY'S software). The optimum setup which intends to simulate the magnetic navigation of the nanoparticles, by the use of MRI-type fields, in the human circulatory system, consists of two parallel permanent magnets to produce a homogeneous magnetic field, in order to ensure the maximum magnetization of the magnetic nanoparticles, an electromagnet for the induction of the magnetic gradients and the creation of the magnetic force and a microfluidic setup so as to simulate the blood flow inside the human blood vessels. The magnetization of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the consequent magnetic torque developed by the two permanent magnets, together with the mutual interactions between the magnetized nanoparticles lead to the creation of rhabdoid aggregates in the direction of the homogeneous field. Additionally, the magnetic gradients introduced by the operation of the electromagnet are capable of directing the aggregates, as a whole, to the desired direction. By removing the magnetic fields, the aggregates are disrupted, due to the super paramagnetic nature of the nanoparticles, avoiding thus the formation of undesired thrombosis.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Flow Distribution in Micro-Fluidics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Cole, Helen; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an application of a general purpose computer program, GFSSP (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) for calculating flow distribution in a network of micro-channels. GFSSP employs a finite volume formulation of mass and momentum conservation equations in a network consisting of nodes and branches. Mass conservation equation is solved for pressures at the nodes while the momentum conservation equation is solved at the branches to calculate flowrate. The system of equations describing the fluid network is solved by a numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods. The numerical results have been compared with test data and detailed CFD (computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations. The agreement between test data and predictions is satisfactory. The discrepancies between the predictions and test data can be attributed to the frictional correlation which does not include the effect of surface tension or electro-kinetic effect.

  12. A multiplexed immunoassay system based upon reciprocating centrifugal microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Peytavi, Régis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Jasinskas, Algimantas; Micic, Miodrag; Felgner, Philip L.; Madou, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel, centrifugal disk-based micro-total analysis system (μTAS) for low cost and high throughput semi-automated immunoassay processing was developed. A key innovation in the disposable immunoassay disk design is in a fluidic structure that enables very efficient micro-mixing based on a reciprocating mechanism in which centrifugal acceleration acting upon a liquid element first generates and stores pneumatic energy that is then released by a reduction of the centrifugal acceleration, resulting in a reversal of direction of flow of the liquid. Through an alternating sequence of high and low centrifugal acceleration, the system reciprocates the flow of liquid within the disk to maximize incubation/hybridization efficiency between antibodies and antigen macromolecules during the incubation/hybridization stage of the assay. The described reciprocating mechanism results in a reduction in processing time and reagent consumption by one order of magnitude. PMID:21721711

  13. Electroosmotic pumps and their applications in microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiayan; Cheng, Chang; Wang, Shili; Liu, Shaorong

    2009-01-01

    Electroosmotic pumping is receiving increasing attention in recent years owing to the rapid development in micro total analytical systems. Compared with other micropumps, electroosmotic pumps (EOPs) offer a number of advantages such as creation of constant pulse-free flows and elimination of moving parts. The flow rates and pumping pressures of EOPs matches well with micro analysis systems. The common materials and fabrication technologies make it readily integrateable with lab-on-a-chip devices. This paper reviews the recent progress on EOP fabrications and applications in order to promote the awareness of EOPs to researchers interested in using micro- and nano-fluidic devices. The pros and cons of EOPs are also discussed, which helps these researchers in designing and constructing their micro platforms. PMID:20126306

  14. Standard addition/absorption detection microfluidic system for salt error-free nitrite determination.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Hoon; Jo, Kyoung Ho; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2015-07-30

    A continuous-flow microfluidic chip-based standard addition/absorption detection system has been developed for accurate determination of nitrite in water of varying salinity. The absorption detection of nitrite is made via color development using the Griess reaction. We have found the yield of the reaction is significantly affected by salinity (e.g., -12% error for 30‰ NaCl, 50.0 μg L(-1)N-NO2(-) solution). The microchip has been designed to perform standard addition, color development, and absorbance detection in sequence. To effectively block stray light, the microchip made from black poly(dimethylsiloxane) is placed on the top of a compact housing that accommodates a light-emitting diode, a photomultiplier tube, and an interference filter, where the light source and the detector are optically isolated. An 80-mm liquid-core waveguide mounted on the chip externally has been employed as the absorption detection flow cell. These designs for optics secure a wide linear response range (up to 500 μg L(-1)N-NO2(-)) and a low detection limit (0.12 μg L(-1)N-NO2(-) = 8.6 nM N-NO2(-), S/N = 3). From determination of nitrite in standard samples and real samples collected from an estuary, it has been demonstrated that our microfluidic system is highly accurate (<1% RSD, n = 3) and precise (<1% RSD, n = 3). PMID:26320643

  15. A microfluidic system to study cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes to primary brain microvascularendothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Herricks, Thurston; Seydel, Karl B; Turner, George; Molyneux, Malcolm; Heyderman, Robert; Taylor, Terrie; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2011-09-01

    The cellular events leading to severe and complicated malaria in some Plasmodium falciparum infections are poorly understood. Additional tools are required to better understand the pathogenesis of this disease. In this technical report, we describe a microfluidic culture system and image processing algorithms that were developed to observe cytoadhesion interactions of P. falciparum parasitized erythrocytes rolling on primary brain microvascularendothelial cells. We isolated and cultured human primary microvascular brain endothelial cells in a closed loop microfluidic culture system where a peristaltic pump and media reservoirs were integrated onto a microscope stage insert. We developed image processing methods to enhance contrast of rolling parasitized erythrocytes on endothelial cells and to estimate the local wall shear stress. The velocity of parasitized erythrocytes rolling on primary brain microvascularendothelial cells was then measured under physiologically relevant wall shear stresses. Finally, we deployed this method successfully at a field site in Blantyre, Malawi. The method is a promising new tool for the investigation of the pathogenesis of severe malaria. PMID:21743938

  16. Analysis of pairwise cell interactions using an integrated dielectrophoretic-microfluidic system

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhizhong; Noren, David; Wang, C Joanne; Hang, Rob; Levchenko, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Blood vessel formation, during either normal vascular reconstruction or pathogenic tumour formation, relies upon highly organized cell–cell interactions. Isolating the function of any particular component of this cell–cell communication is often difficult, given the vast complexity of communication networks in multicellular systems. One way to address this problem is to analyse cell–cell communication on the most elementary scale—cell pairs. Here, we describe an integrated dielectrophoretic (DEP)-microfluidic device allowing for such analysis. Single cancer and endothelial cells (ECs) and cell pairs were patterned using DEP force and cultured within a minimally stressful microfluidic channel network. Controlling both the initial cell positions and extracellular environment, we investigated cell motility in homo- and heterotypic cell pairs under diverse conditions. We found that secreted collagen IV and soluble vascular endothelial growth factor have considerable guidance effect on ECs at the level of two interacting cells. Cell interaction rules extracted from the experiments of cell pairs were used to mathematically predict branching patterns characteristic of developing multicellular blood vessels. This integrative analysis method can be extended to other systems involving complex multicellular interactions. PMID:19096359

  17. Computational Analysis of Enhanced Magnetic Bioseparation in Microfluidic Systems with Flow-Invasive Magnetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Khashan, S. A.; Alazzam, A.; Furlani, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic design is proposed for realizing greatly enhanced separation of magnetically-labeled bioparticles using integrated soft-magnetic elements. The elements are fixed and intersect the carrier fluid (flow-invasive) with their length transverse to the flow. They are magnetized using a bias field to produce a particle capture force. Multiple stair-step elements are used to provide efficient capture throughout the entire flow channel. This is in contrast to conventional systems wherein the elements are integrated into the walls of the channel, which restricts efficient capture to limited regions of the channel due to the short range nature of the magnetic force. This severely limits the channel size and hence throughput. Flow-invasive elements overcome this limitation and enable microfluidic bioseparation systems with superior scalability. This enhanced functionality is quantified for the first time using a computational model that accounts for the dominant mechanisms of particle transport including fully-coupled particle-fluid momentum transfer. PMID:24931437

  18. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays. PMID:26669749

  19. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays.

  20. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays. PMID:26669749

  1. Low power integrated pumping and valving arrays for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.; Rose, Klint A.; Hamilton, Julie; Maghribi, Mariam

    2006-04-11

    Low power integrated pumping and valving arrays which provide a revolutionary approach for performing pumping and valving approach for performing pumping and valving operations in microfabricated fluidic systems for applications such as medical diagnostic microchips. Traditional methods rely on external, large pressure sources that defeat the advantages of miniaturization. Previously demonstrated microfabrication devices are power and voltage intensive, only function at sufficient pressure to be broadly applicable. This approach integrates a lower power, high-pressure source with a polymer, ceramic, or metal plug enclosed within a microchannel, analogous to a microsyringe. When the pressure source is activated, the polymer plug slides within the microchannel, pumping the fluid on the opposite side of the plug without allowing fluid to leak around the plug. The plugs also can serve as microvalves.

  2. Light-governed capillary flow in microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Erickson, David

    2013-01-14

    Light-based flow systems for point-of-care devices are of interest because, in principle, sunlight could be used to operate them, potentially allowing for high functionality with minimal device complexity and expense. A light-operated method to drive flow using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), a 'smart' polymer that changes wettability as a function of temperature, is introduced. It is grafted onto a carbon black-polydimethylsiloxane surface, which converts light into a thermal pattern that valves flow at user-defined locations. Flow rates are demonstrated ranging from 4 μL min(-1) at 25 °C to 0.1 μL min(-1) at 40 °C. The valving dynamics are also characterised, and a response time of less than 4 s is shown. Light-operated flow could provide the simple architecture and advanced functionality needed in low-resource point-of-care devices. PMID:23015307

  3. Acoustic Filtration, Fractionation, and Mixing in Microfluidic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A; Fisher, K

    2002-02-04

    This project is concerned with the research and development of a technique to manipulate small particles using acoustic energy coupled into a fluid filled plastic or glass sample chamber. These resulting miniaturized systems combine high functionality with an inexpensive, disposable sample chamber. Our approach to this problem is based on a combination of sophisticated modeling tools in conjunction with laboratory experiments. The design methodology is summarized in Figure 1. The process begins by investigating a wide range of device parameters using a one-dimensional analytical approximation. The results of these initial parameter studies are incorporated into a sophisticated three-dimensional multi-physics finite element code. From these simulations the optimized designs are prototyped and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental observations are then used to improve analytical approximations and the process is repeated as necessary.

  4. Pressure Stabilizer for Reproducible Picoinjection in Droplet Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Minsoung; Light, Yooli K.; Yilmaz, Suzan; Adams, Paul D.; Saxena, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Picoinjection is a promising technique to add reagents into pre-formed emulsion droplets on chip; however, it is sensitive to pressure fluctuation, making stable operation of the picoinjector challenging. We present a chip architecture using a simple pressure stabilizer for consistent and highly reproducible picoinjection in multi-step biochemical assays with droplets. Incorporation of the stabilizer immediately upstream of a picoinjector or a combination of injectors greatly reduces pressure fluctuations enabling reproducible and effective picoinjection in systems where the pressure varies actively during operation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the pressure stabilizer for an integrated platform for on-demand encapsulation of bacterial cells followed by picoinjection of reagents for lysing the encapsulated cells. The pressure stabilizer was also used for picoinjection of multiple displacement amplification (MDA) reagents to achieve genomic DNA amplification of lysed bacterial cells. PMID:25270338

  5. A Bacterial Continuous Culture System Based on a Microfluidic Droplet Open Reactor.

    PubMed

    Ito, Manami; Sugiura, Haruka; Ayukawa, Shotaro; Kiga, Daisuke; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Recently, micrometer-sized bacterial culture systems have attracted attention as useful tools for synthetic biology studies. Here, we present the development of a bacterial continuous culture system based on a microdroplet open reactor consisting of two types of water-in-oil microdroplets with diameters of several hundred micrometers. A continuous culture was realized the through supply of nutrient substrates and the removal of waste and excess bacterial cells based on repeated fusion and fission of droplets. The growth dynamics was controlled by the interval of fusion. We constructed a microfluidic system and quantitatively assessed the dynamics of the bacterial growth using a mathematical model. This system will facilitate the study of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering in the future. PMID:26753707

  6. Sensitive Optical and Microfluidic Systems for Cellular Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, Perry G.

    Investigating rare cells and heterogeneous subpopulations is challenging for a myriad reasons. This dissertation describes novel techniques to analyze single molecules, synaptic vesicles, and rare circulating tumor cells. The eDAR platform for isolating rare cells in fluids provides a new method to monitor breast cancer status in patients as well as to guide research for personalized treatment and efficacy. In a side-by-side comparison with CellSearch, eDAR detected CTCs in all 20 Stage IV metastatic breast cancer patients while the CellSearch system found CTCs in just 8 patients. The single-molecule capillary electrophoresis technology is a method to characterize an entire sample one molecule at a time, providing detailed information about the absolute number and nature of molecules present in a sample. The nFASS platform has the potential to apply the advantages that currently exist in flow cytometry to the study of items on a much smaller scale such as subcellular organelles and nanometer-sized objects. For example, the isolation of subpopulations of synaptic vesicles will allow for detailed protein quantification and identification in the study of neurological diseases. These tools facilitate fundamental investigation of objects ranging from single molecules to single cells.

  7. An expert system for the interpretation of radionuclide ventilation-perfusion lung scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Frank V.; Datz, Frederick L.; Christian, Paul E.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Morton, Kathryn A.

    1993-09-01

    One of the most commonly performed imaging procedures in nuclear medicine is the lung scan for suspected pulmonary embolism. The purpose of this research was to develop an expert system that interprets lung scans and gives a probability of pulmonary embolism. Three standard ventilation and eight standard perfusion images are first outlined manually. Then the images are normalized. Because lung size varies from patient to patient, each image undergoes a two-dimensional stretch onto a standard-size mask. To determine the presence of regional defects in ventilation or perfusion, images are then compared on a pixel by pixel basis with a normal database. This database consists of 21 normal studies that represent the variation in activity between subjects. Any pixel that falls more than 2.2 standard deviations below the normal file is flagged as possibly abnormal. To reduce statistical fluctuations, a clustering criteria is applied such that each pixel must have at least two continuous neighbors that are abnormal for a pixel to be flagged abnormal.

  8. A Review of Heating and Temperature Control in Microfluidic Systems: Techniques and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Miralles, Vincent; Huerre, Axel; Malloggi, Florent; Jullien, Marie-Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the different techniques developed over the last decade to regulate the temperature within microfluidic systems. A variety of different approaches has been adopted, from external heating sources to Joule heating, microwaves or the use of lasers to cite just a few examples. The scope of the technical solutions developed to date is impressive and encompasses for instance temperature ramp rates ranging from 0.1 to 2,000 °C/s leading to homogeneous temperatures from −3 °C to 120 °C, and constant gradients from 6 to 40 °C/mm with a fair degree of accuracy. We also examine some recent strategies developed for applications such as digital microfluidics, where integration of a heating source to generate a temperature gradient offers control of a key parameter, without necessarily requiring great accuracy. Conversely, Temperature Gradient Focusing requires high accuracy in order to control both the concentration and separation of charged species. In addition, the Polymerase Chain Reaction requires both accuracy (homogeneous temperature) and integration to carry out demanding heating cycles. The spectrum of applications requiring temperature regulation is growing rapidly with increasingly important implications for the physical, chemical and biotechnological sectors, depending on the relevant heating technique. PMID:26835667

  9. Thermoplastic elastomer gels: an advanced substrate for microfluidic chemical analysis systems.

    PubMed

    Sudarsan, Arjun P; Wang, Jian; Ugaz, Victor M

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrate the use of thermoplastic elastomer gels as advanced substrates for construction of complex microfluidic networks suitable for use in miniaturized chemical analysis systems. These gels are synthesized by combining inexpensive polystyrene-(polyethylene/polybutylene)-polystyrene triblock copolymers with a hydrocarbon extender oil for which the ethylene/butylene midblocks are selectively miscible. The insoluble styrene end blocks phase separate into localized nanodomains, resulting in the formation of an optically transparent, viscoelastic, and biocompatible gel network that is melt-processable at temperatures in the vicinity of 100 degrees C. This unique combination of properties allows microfluidic channels to be fabricated in a matter of minutes by simply making impressions of the negative relief structures on heated master molds. Melt processability allows multiple impressions to be made against different masters to construct complex geometries incorporating multi-height features within the same microchannel. Intricate interconnected multilayered structures are also easily fabricated owing to the ability to bond and seal multiple layers by briefly heating the material at the bond interface. Thermal and mechanical properties are tunable over a wide range through proper selection of gel composition. PMID:16097755

  10. Single Cell Mass Measurement Using Drag Force Inside Lab-on-Chip Microfluidics System.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Single cell mass (SCM) is an intrinsic property of single cell, it arouses a great interest among scientists as cell mass depends on the synthesis of proteins, DNA replication, cell wall stiffness, cell cytoplasm density, cell growth, ribosome, and other analogous of organisms. To date, several great strides have been taken to the advancements of SCM measurement techniques. Nevertheless, more works are required to enable the technology to push frontier in deep analysis of SCM measurement, hence to elucidate intracellular properties. In this paper, we present a lab-on-chip microfluidics system for SCM measurement, related with the force required to drag a single cell and Newton's law of motion inside microfluidics channel. Drag force on the cell was generated by a pressure driven syringe micropump and the motion of the cell was measured using optical observation under an inverted microscope. This approach of measuring SCM was calibrated using known mass (77.3 pg) of a polystyrene particle of 5.2 μm diameter. Furthermore, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast cells of different sizes ([Formula: see text] diameter) for SCM measurement. Mass of 4.4 μm diameter of single yeast cell was measured as 2.12 pg which is in the range of previously reported single yeast cell mass (2-3 pg). In addition, we also studied the relation between SCM and single cell size. Results showed that single yeast cell mass increases exponentially with the increasing of single cell size. PMID:26761952

  11. Probing Hypoxia-Induced Staurosporine Resistance in Prostate Cancer Cells with a Microfluidic Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Grishma; Hiemstra, Scott

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic system for cell culture and drug response studies was developed to elucidate the effects of hypoxia on drug susceptibility. Drug response studies were performed in prostate cancer cells and Ramos B cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. A vacuum actuated microfluidic culture device was used for cell culture and PC3 cells were cultured in the chip up to 16 hours. Cells were treated with several concentrations of staurosporine and apoptosis was assayed using the fluorescent probes MitoTracker Red and Annexin-V. For hypoxic samples, the chip was placed in a hypoxia chamber and pre-conditioned at <1% oxygen before inducing the cells with staurosporine. Cells exposed to 2 μM staurosporine were 32% ± 10% apoptotic under normoxic conditions but only 1.5% ± 12% apoptotic under hypoxic conditions. As little as 1 hour of hypoxic preconditioning increased drug resistance. Cell apoptosis correlated with drug dose, although in each case hypoxia reduced the apoptotic fraction significantly. Given the rapid nature of cell adaptation to hypoxia, this chip and analysis approach can be used to identify compounds that can induce cell death in hypoxic tumor cells rapidly. PMID:24479128

  12. Developing optimal input design strategies in cancer systems biology with applications to microfluidic device engineering

    PubMed Central

    Menolascina, Filippo; Bellomo, Domenico; Maiwald, Thomas; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Ciminelli, Caterina; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Background Mechanistic models are becoming more and more popular in Systems Biology; identification and control of models underlying biochemical pathways of interest in oncology is a primary goal in this field. Unfortunately the scarce availability of data still limits our understanding of the intrinsic characteristics of complex pathologies like cancer: acquiring information for a system understanding of complex reaction networks is time consuming and expensive. Stimulus response experiments (SRE) have been used to gain a deeper insight into the details of biochemical mechanisms underlying cell life and functioning. Optimisation of the input time-profile, however, still remains a major area of research due to the complexity of the problem and its relevance for the task of information retrieval in systems biology-related experiments. Results We have addressed the problem of quantifying the information associated to an experiment using the Fisher Information Matrix and we have proposed an optimal experimental design strategy based on evolutionary algorithm to cope with the problem of information gathering in Systems Biology. On the basis of the theoretical results obtained in the field of control systems theory, we have studied the dynamical properties of the signals to be used in cell stimulation. The results of this study have been used to develop a microfluidic device for the automation of the process of cell stimulation for system identification. Conclusion We have applied the proposed approach to the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor pathway and we observed that it minimises the amount of parametric uncertainty associated to the identified model. A statistical framework based on Monte-Carlo estimations of the uncertainty ellipsoid confirmed the superiority of optimally designed experiments over canonical inputs. The proposed approach can be easily extended to multiobjective formulations that can also take advantage of identifiability analysis. Moreover, the

  13. System-level network simulation for robust centrifugal-microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, I; Zehnle, S; Hutzenlaub, T; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2016-05-10

    Centrifugal microfluidics shows a clear trend towards a higher degree of integration and parallelization. This trend leads to an increase in the number and density of integrated microfluidic unit operations. The fact that all unit operations are processed by the same common spin protocol turns higher integration into higher complexity. To allow for efficient development anyhow, we introduce advanced lumped models for network simulations in centrifugal microfluidics. These models consider the interplay of centrifugal and Euler pressures, viscous dissipation, capillary pressures and pneumatic pressures. The simulations are fast and simple to set up and allow for the precise prediction of flow rates as well as switching and valving events. During development, channel and chamber geometry variations due to manufacturing tolerances can be taken into account as well as pipetting errors, variations of contact angles, compliant chamber walls and temperature variations in the processing device. As an example of considering these parameters during development, we demonstrate simulation based robustness analysis for pneumatic siphon valving in centrifugal microfluidics. Subsequently, the influence of liquid properties on pumping and valving is studied for four liquids relevant for biochemical analysis, namely, water (large surface tension), blood plasma (large contact angle hysteresis), ethanol/water (highly wetting) and glycerine/water (highly viscous). In a second example, we derive a spin protocol to attain a constant flow rate under varying pressure conditions. Both examples show excellent agreement with experimental validations. PMID:27095248

  14. Acoustically detectable cellular-level lung injury induced by fluid mechanical stresses in microfluidic airway systems.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongeun; Fujioka, Hideki; Tung, Yi-Chung; Futai, Nobuyuki; Paine, Robert; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2007-11-27

    We describe a microfabricated airway system integrated with computerized air-liquid two-phase microfluidics that enables on-chip engineering of human airway epithelia and precise reproduction of physiologic or pathologic liquid plug flows found in the respiratory system. Using this device, we demonstrate cellular-level lung injury under flow conditions that cause symptoms characteristic of a wide range of pulmonary diseases. Specifically, propagation and rupture of liquid plugs that simulate surfactant-deficient reopening of closed airways lead to significant injury of small airway epithelial cells by generating deleterious fluid mechanical stresses. We also show that the explosive pressure waves produced by plug rupture enable detection of the mechanical cellular injury as crackling sounds. PMID:18006663

  15. Measurement of the microscopic viscosities of microfluids with a dynamic optical tweezers system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuquan; Wu, Xiaojing; Wang, Yijia; Zhu, Siwei; Gao, Bruce Z; Yuan, X-C

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity coefficients of microfluids—Newtonian and non-Newtonian—were explored through the rotational motion of a particle trapped by optical tweezers in a microflute. Unlike conventional methods based on viscometers, our microfluidic system employs samples of less than 30 µl to complete a measurement. Viscosity coefficients of ethanol and fetal bovine serum, as typical examples of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, were obtained experimentally, and found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Additionally, a practical application to a DNA solution with incremental ethidium bromide content was employed and the results are consistent with clinical data, indicating that our system provides a potentially important complementary tool for use in such biological and medical applications. PMID:27087769

  16. Cell-based drug combination screening with a microfluidic droplet array system.

    PubMed

    Du, Guan-Sheng; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Zhu, Ying; den Toonder, Jaap M J; Fang, Qun

    2013-07-16

    We performed cell-based drug combination screening using an integrated droplet-based microfluidic system based on the sequential operation droplet array (SODA) technique. In the system, a tapered capillary connected with a syringe pump was used for multistep droplet manipulations. An oil-covered two-dimensional droplet array chip fixed in an x-y-z translation stage was used as the platform for cell culture and analysis. Complex multistep operations for drug combination screening involving long-term cell culture, medium changing, schedule-dependent drug dosage and stimulation, and cell viability testing were achieved in parallel in the semiopen droplet array, using multiple droplet manipulations including liquid metering, aspirating, depositing, mixing, and transferring. Long-term cell culture as long as 11 days was performed in oil-covered 500 nL droplets by changing the culture medium in each droplet every 24 h. The present system was applied in parallel schedule-dependent drug combination screening for A549 nonsmall lung cancer cells with the cell cycle-dependent drug flavopiridol and two anticancer drugs of paclitaxel and 5-fluorouracil. The highest inhibition efficiency was obtained with a schedule combination of 200 nM flavopiridol followed by 100 μM 5-fluorouracil. The drug consumption for each screening test was substantially decreased to 5 ng-5 μg, corresponding to 10-1000-fold reductions compared with traditional drug screening systems with 96-well or 384-well plates. The present work provides a novel and flexible droplet-based microfluidic approach for performing cell-based screening with complex and multistep operation procedures. PMID:23786644

  17. Engineering anastomosis between living capillary networks and endothelial cell-lined microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; Sobrino, Agua; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2016-01-21

    This paper reports a method for generating an intact and perfusable microvascular network that connects to microfluidic channels without appreciable leakage. This platform incorporates different stages of vascular development including vasculogenesis, endothelial cell (EC) lining, sprouting angiogenesis, and anastomosis in sequential order. After formation of a capillary network inside the tissue chamber via vasculogenesis, the adjacent microfluidic channels are lined with a monolayer of ECs, which then serve as the high-pressure input ("artery") and low pressure output ("vein") conduits. To promote a tight interconnection between the artery/vein and the capillary network, sprouting angiogenesis is induced, which promotes anastomosis of the vasculature inside the tissue chamber with the EC lining along the microfluidic channels. Flow of fluorescent microparticles confirms the perfusability of the lumenized microvascular network, and minimal leakage of 70 kDa FITC-dextran confirms physiologic tightness of the EC junctions and completeness of the interconnections between artery/vein and the capillary network. This versatile device design and its robust construction methodology establish a physiological transport model of interconnected perfused vessels from artery to vascularized tissue to vein. The system has utility in a wide range of organ-on-a-chip applications as it enables the physiological vascular interconnection of multiple on-chip tissue constructs that can serve as disease models for drug screening. PMID:26616908

  18. Evaluation of mechanical and morphologic features of PLLA membranes as supports for perfusion cells culture systems.

    PubMed

    Montesanto, S; Brucato, V; La Carrubba, V

    2016-12-01

    Porous biodegradable PLLA membranes, which can be used as supports for perfusion cell culture systems were designed, developed and characterized. PLLA membranes were prepared via diffusion induced phase separation (DIPS). A glass slab was coated with a binary PLLA-dioxane solution (8wt.% PLLA) via dip coating, then pool immersed in two subsequent coagulation baths, and finally dried in a humidity-controlled environment. Surface and mechanical properties were evaluated by measuring pore size, porosity via scanning electron microscopy, storage modulus, loss modulus and loss angle by using a dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Cell adhesion assays on different membrane surfaces were also performed by using a standard count method. Results provide new insights into the foaming methods for producing polymeric membranes and supply indications on how to optimise the fabrication parameters to design membranes for tissue cultures and regeneration. PMID:27612778

  19. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    DOEpatents

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  20. From microfluidic modules to an integrated Lab-on-a-chip system for the detection of Francisella tularensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlawatsch, Nadine; Krumbholz, Marco; Prüfer, Anna; Moche, Christian; Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LoC) systems translating the whole process of pathogen analysis to an integrated, miniaturized, and automatically functioning microfluidic platform are generally expected to be very promising future diagnostic approaches. The development of such a LoC system for the detection of bacterial pathogens applied to the example pathogen Francisella tularensis is described in this report. To allow functional testing of the whole process cascade before final device integration, various bio-analytical steps such as cell lysis, DNA extraction and purification, continuous-flow PCR and analyte detection have been adapted to unique functional microfluidic modules. As a successive step, positively tested modules for pathogen detection have been successfully assembled to an integrated chip. Moreover, technical solutions for a smooth interaction between sample input from the outer world as well as microfluidic chip and chip driving instrument have been developed. In conclusion, a full repertoire of analytical tools have been developed and successfully tested in the concerted manner of a functionally integrated microfluidic device representing a tool for future diagnostic approaches.

  1. Tissue-engineering bioreactors: a new combined cell-seeding and perfusion system for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sodian, Ralf; Lemke, Thees; Fritsche, Clemens; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Fu, Ping; Potapov, Evgenij V; Hausmann, Harald; Hetzer, Roland

    2002-10-01

    One approach to the tissue engineering of vascular structures is to develop in vitro conditions in order ultimately to fabricate functional vascular tissues before final implantation. In our experiment, we aimed to develop a new combined cell seeding and perfusion system that provides sterile conditions during cell seeding and biomechanical stimuli in order to fabricate autologous human vascular tissue in vitro. The cell seeding and perfusion system is made of Plexiglas and is completely transparent (Berlin Heart, Berlin, Germany; University Hospital Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany). The whole system consists of a cell seeding chamber that can be incorporated into the perfusion system and an air-driven respirator pump connected to the bioreactor. The cell culture medium continuously circulates through a closed-loop system. We thus developed a cell seeding device for static and dynamic seeding of vascular cells onto a polymeric vascular scaffold and a closed-loop perfused bioreactor for long-term vascular conditioning. The cell seeding chamber can be easily connected to the bioreactor, which combines continuous, pulsatile perfusion and mechanical stimulation to the tissue-engineered conduit. Adjusting the stroke volume, the stroke rate, and the inspiration/expiration time of the ventilator allows various pulsatile flows and different levels of pressure. The whole system is a highly isolated cell culture setting, which provides a high level of sterility and a gas supply and fits into a standard humidified incubator. The device can be sterilized by ethylene oxide and assembled with a standard screwdriver. Our newly developed combination of a cell seeding and conditioning device provides sterile conditions and biodynamic stimuli for controlled tissue development and in vitro conditioning of an autologous tissue-engineered vessel. PMID:12459065

  2. A microfluidic in vitro system for the quantitative study of the stomach mucus barrier function.

    PubMed

    Li, Leon; Lieleg, Oliver; Jang, Sae; Ribbeck, Katharina; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-10-21

    In the stomach, a layer of gastric mucus protects the epithelial cells of the stomach wall against damage by the acidic digestive juices in the gastric lumen. Despite considerable research, the biophysical mechanisms for this acid barrier are not understood. We present an in vitro microfluidic tool to characterize the stomach acid barrier, in which purified mucin polymers are "secreted" against an acidic zone on chip, mimicking the in vivo secretion of gastric mucus into an acidic stomach lumen. This device reconstitutes both the H(+) concentration gradient and outward flow environment of the mucus layer in vivo. Our experiments demonstrate that a continuously secreted mucin layer hinders acid diffusion, suggesting novel insights into the barrier role of mucins. More broadly, our system may serve as a platform tool for studying the barrier functions provided by mucus layers in the body and for studying mucus drug interactions. PMID:22878692

  3. Examination of glass-silicon and glass-glass bonding techniques for microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raley, N.F.; Davidson, J.C.; Balch, J.W.

    1995-10-23

    We report here on the results of experiments concerning particular bonding processes potentially useful for ultimate miniaturization of microfluidic systems. Direct anodic bonding of continuous thin pyrex glass of 250 {mu}m thickness to silicon substrates gives multiple, large voids in the glass. Etchback of thick glass of 1200 {mu}m thickness bonded to silicon substrates gives thin continuous glass layers of 189 {mu}m thickness without voids over areas of 5 cm {times} 12 cm. Glass was also successfully bonded to glass by thermal bonding at 800{degrees}C over a 5 cm {times} 7 cm area. Anticipated applications include microfabricated DNA sequencing, flow injection analysis, and liquid and gas chromatography microinstruments.

  4. The μSCAPE System: 3-Dimensional Profiling of Microfluidic Architectural Features Using a Flatbed Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kerui; Liu, Qian; Jackson, Kimberly R.; Landers, James P.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a microfluidic scanner-based profile exploration system, μSCAPE, capable of generating high resolution 3D profiles of microstructure architecture in a variety of transparent substrates. The profile is obtained by scanning the dye-filled microstructure followed by absorbance calculation and the reconstruction of the optical length at each point. The power of the method was demonstrated in (1) the inspection of the variation of the cross-section of laser-ablated PDMS channel; (2) the volume of PeT chamber; and (3) the population distribution of the volumes of the micro wells in HF-etched glass and laser-ablated PDMS. The reported methods features low equipment-cost, convenient operation and large field of view (FOV), and has revealed unreported quality parameters of the tested microstructures.

  5. The μSCAPE System: 3-Dimensional Profiling of Microfluidic Architectural Features Using a Flatbed Scanner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kerui; Liu, Qian; Jackson, Kimberly R; Landers, James P

    2016-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic scanner-based profile exploration system, μSCAPE, capable of generating high resolution 3D profiles of microstructure architecture in a variety of transparent substrates. The profile is obtained by scanning the dye-filled microstructure followed by absorbance calculation and the reconstruction of the optical length at each point. The power of the method was demonstrated in (1) the inspection of the variation of the cross-section of laser-ablated PDMS channel; (2) the volume of PeT chamber; and (3) the population distribution of the volumes of the micro wells in HF-etched glass and laser-ablated PDMS. The reported methods features low equipment-cost, convenient operation and large field of view (FOV), and has revealed unreported quality parameters of the tested microstructures. PMID:26924294

  6. Efficient Nanoporous Silicon Membranes for Integrated Microfluidic Separation and Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ileri, N; L?tant, S E; Britten, J; Nguyen, H; Larson, C; Zaidi, S; Palazoglu, A; Faller, R; Tringe, J W; Stroeve, P

    2009-04-06

    Nanoporous devices constitute emerging platforms for selective molecule separation and sensing, with great potential for high throughput and economy in manufacturing and operation. Acting as mass transfer diodes similar to a solid-state device based on electron conduction, conical pores are shown to have superior performance characteristics compared to traditional cylindrical pores. Such phenomena, however, remain to be exploited for molecular separation. Here we present performance results from silicon membranes created by a new synthesis technique based on interferometric lithography. This method creates millimeter sized planar arrays of uniformly tapered nanopores in silicon with pore diameter 100 nm or smaller, ideally-suited for integration into a multi-scale microfluidic processing system. Molecular transport properties of these devices are compared against state-of-the-art polycarbonate track etched (PCTE) membranes. Mass transfer rates of up to fifteen-fold greater than commercial sieve technology are obtained. Complementary results from molecular dynamics simulations on molecular transport are reported.

  7. The μSCAPE System: 3-Dimensional Profiling of Microfluidic Architectural Features Using a Flatbed Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kerui; Liu, Qian; Jackson, Kimberly R.; Landers, James P.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a microfluidic scanner-based profile exploration system, μSCAPE, capable of generating high resolution 3D profiles of microstructure architecture in a variety of transparent substrates. The profile is obtained by scanning the dye-filled microstructure followed by absorbance calculation and the reconstruction of the optical length at each point. The power of the method was demonstrated in (1) the inspection of the variation of the cross-section of laser-ablated PDMS channel; (2) the volume of PeT chamber; and (3) the population distribution of the volumes of the micro wells in HF-etched glass and laser-ablated PDMS. The reported methods features low equipment-cost, convenient operation and large field of view (FOV), and has revealed unreported quality parameters of the tested microstructures. PMID:26924294

  8. Capillary electrophoresis-electrochemistry microfluidic system for the determination of organic peroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Joseph; Escarpa, Alberto; Pumera, Martin; Feldman, Jason; Svehla, D. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A microfluidic analytical system for the separation and detection of organic peroxides, based on a microchip capillary electrophoresis device with an integrated amperometric detector, was developed. The new microsystem relies on the reductive detection of both organic acid peroxides and hydroperoxides at -700 mV (vs. Ag wire/AgCl). Factors influencing the separation and detection processes were examined and optimized. The integrated microsystem offers rapid measurements (within 130 s) of these organic-peroxide compounds, down to micromolar levels. A highly stable response for repetitive injections (RSD 0.35-3.12%; n = 12) reflects the negligible electrode passivation. Such a "lab-on-a-chip" device should be attractive for on-site analysis of organic peroxides, as desired for environmental screening and industrial monitoring.

  9. Real-time concentration monitoring in microfluidic system via plasmonic nanocrescent arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingpu; Xiao, Xiao; Liu, Ting; Gao, Yibo; Huang, Yingzhou; Wen, Weijia

    2016-03-15

    In this work, on-chip bio/chemical sensor was reported based on localized surface plasmon resonance of nanocrescent patterns fabricated via electron beam lithography. The nanocrescent arrays with different dimensional features exhibited controllable plasmonic properties in accordance with the simulation results based on the finite-difference time-domain model. The highest refractive index sensitivity of the fabricated samples was achieved to be ~699.2 nm/RIU with a figure of merit of ~3.1 when the two opposite crescents own a gap of ~43.3 nm. Such obtained plasmonic sensor was further integrated into the microfluidic system which can simply control the specific analyte concentrations via tuning the flow rate ratios between two injecting microstreams. Our method has successfully demonstrated the capability of the nanocrescent patterns as on-chip plasmonic bio/chemical sensor for real-time monitoring of dynamic concentrations in the microchannel. PMID:26436326

  10. Perfusion and infusion for melanoma in-transit metastases in the era of effective systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grünhagen, Dirk J; Kroon, Hidde M; Verhoef, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    The management of melanoma in-transit metastases (IT-mets) is challenging. For many years, the absence of effective systemic therapy has prompted physicians to focus on regional therapies for melanoma confined to the limb. The introduction of isolated limb perfusion (ILP) and isolated limb infusion (ILI) has enabled effective delivery of cytotoxic drugs in an isolated circuit, so as to overcome systemic toxicity and maximize local response. Both techniques have evolved over years and both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-based ILP and ILI have distinct indications. The development of new systemic treatment options for patients with melanoma in the past decade has shed a new light on melanoma therapy. The present manuscript focuses on the modern role of ILI and ILP in the treatment of patients with melanoma with in-transit metastases in the era of effective systemic therapy. The response and control rates of ILI/ILP are still superior to rates achieved with systemic agents. The extent of disease in patients with stage III disease, however, warrants effective systemic treatment to prolong survival. There is great potential in combining rapid response therapy such as ILI/ILP with systemic agents for sustainable response. Trial results are eagerly awaited. PMID:25993219

  11. Perfusion circuit concepts for hollow-fiber bioreactors used as in vitro cell production systems or ex vivo bioartificial organs.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Stephen C; McKeel, Daniel; Triolo, Fabio; Gridelli, Bruno; Zeilinger, Katrin; Bornemann, Reiner; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2011-05-01

    For the development and implementation of primary human cell- and stem cell-based applications in regenerative medicine, large amounts of cells with well-defined characteristics are needed. Such cell quantities can be obtained with the use of hollow fiber-based bioreactors. While the use of such bioreactors generally requires a perfusion circuit, the configuration and complexity of such circuits is still in debate. We evaluated various circuit configurations to investigate potential perfusate volume shifts in the arterial and venous sides of the perfusion circuit, as well as in the feed and waste lines. Volume shifts with changes in flow conditions were measured with graduated bubble traps in the circuit, and perfusion pressures were measured at three points in the circuits. The results of this study demonstrate that the bioreactor perfusion circuit configuration has an effect on system pressures and volume shifts in the circuit. During operation, spikes in post-bioreactor pressures caused detrimental, potentially dangerous volume shifts in the feed and waste lines for configurations that lacked feed pumps and/or waste line check valves. Our results indicate that a more complex tubing circuit adds to safety of operation and avoids technical challenges associated with the use of large-scale hollow fiber bioreactors (e.g., for extracorporeal liver support or erythrocyte production from hematopoietic stem cells), including volume shifts and the need for a large reservoir. Finally, to ensure safe use of bioreactors, measuring pre-, intra-, and post-bioreactor pressures, and pump operation control is also advisable, which suggests the use of specifically developed bioreactor perfusion devices. PMID:21623585

  12. A microfluidic platform for generating large-scale nearly identical human microphysiological system arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Moya, Monica L.; Hughes, Christopher C.W.; Georgea, Steven C.; Lee, Abraham P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic model system that can develop an array of nearly identical human microtissues with interconnected vascular networks. The microfluidic system design is based on an analogy with an electric circuit, applying resistive circuit concepts to design pressure dividers in serially-connected microtissue chambers. A long microchannel (550, 620 and 775 mm) creates a resistive circuit with a large hydraulic resistance. Two media reservoirs with a large cross-sectional area and of different heights are connected to the entrance and exit of the long microchannel to serve as a pressure source, and create a near constant pressure drop along the long microchannel. Microtissue chambers (0.12 μl) serve as a two-terminal resistive component with an input impedance > 50-fold larger than the long microchannel. Connecting each microtissue chamber to two different positions along the long microchannel creates a series of pressure dividers. Each microtissue chamber enables a controlled pressure drop of a segment of the microchannel without altering the hydrodynamic behaviour of the microchannel. The result is a controlled and predictable microphysiological environment within the microchamber. Interstitial flow, a mechanical cue for stimulating vasculogenesis, was verified by finite element simulation and experiments. The simplicity of this design enabled the development of multiple microtissue arrays (5, 12, and 30 microtissues) by co-culturing endothelial cells, stromal cells, and fibrin within the microchambers over two and three week periods. This methodology enables the culturing of a large array of microtissues with interconnected vascular networks for biological studies and applications such as drug development. PMID:23723013

  13. Fish-on-a-chip: a sensitive detection microfluidic system for alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidics has become an important tool in diagnosing many diseases, including neurological and genetic disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that irreversibly and progressively destroys memory, language ability, and thinking skills. Commonly, detection of AD is expensive and complex. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based microfluidic chip platform is capable of diagnosing AD at an early stage and they are effective tools for the diagnosis with low cost, high speed, and high sensitivity. In this review, we tried to provide basic information on the diagnosis of AD via FISH-based microfluidics. Different sample preparations using a microfluidic chip for diagnosis of AD are highlighted. Moreover, rapid innovations in nanotechnology for diagnosis are explained. This review will provide information on dynamic quantification methods for the diagnosis and treatment of AD. The knowledge provided in this review will help develop new integration diagnostic techniques based on FISH and microfluidics. PMID:21619660

  14. An on-chip microfluidic pressure regulator that facilitates reproducible loading of cells and hydrogels into microphysiological system platforms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; Zhao, Da; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2016-03-01

    Coculturing multiple cell types together in 3-dimensional (3D) cultures better mimics the in vivo microphysiological environment, and has become widely adopted in recent years with the development of organ-on-chip systems. However, a bottleneck in set-up of these devices arises as a result of the delivery of the gel into the microfluidic chip being sensitive to pressure fluctuations, making gel confinement at a specific region challenging, especially when manual operation is performed. In this paper, we present a novel design of an on-chip regulator module with pressure-releasing safety microvalves that can facilitate stable gel delivery into designated microchannel regions while maintaining well-controlled, non-bursting gel interfaces. This pressure regulator design can be integrated into different microfluidic chip designs and is compatible with a wide variety of gel injection apparatuses operated automatically or manually at different flow rates. The sensitivity and working range of this pressure regulator can be adjusted by changing the width of its pressure releasing safety microvalve design. The effectiveness of the design is validated by its incorporation into a microfluidic platform we have developed for generating 3D vascularized micro-organs (VMOs). Reproducible gel loading is demonstrated for both an automatic syringe pump and a manually-operated micropipettor. This design allows for rapid and reproducible loading of hydrogels into microfluidic devices without the risk of bursting gel-air interfaces. PMID:26879519

  15. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  16. Resolution of pulmonary hypertension complication during venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia application.

    PubMed

    Ballard-Croft, Cherry; Wang, Dongfang; Jones, Cameron; Wang, Jingkun; Pollock, Robert; Jubak, Bob; Topaz, Stephen; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (vv-PISH) system for advanced cancer treatment. The vv-PISH system consistently delivered hyperthermia to adult healthy swine, but significant pulmonary hypertension developed during the heating phase. The goal of this study was to develop a method to prevent pulmonary hypertension. We hypothesized that pulmonary hypertension results from decreased priming solution air solubility, which causes pulmonary gas embolism. Healthy adult sheep (n = 3) were used to establish a standard vv-PISH sheep model without priming solution preheating. In subsequent sheep (n = 7), the priming solution was preheated (42-46°C) and the hyperthermia circuit flushed with CO2. All sheep survived the experiment and achieved 2 hours of 42°C hyperthermia. In the group lacking priming solution preheating, significant pulmonary hypertension (35-44 mm Hg) developed. In the sheep with priming solution preheating, pulmonary artery pressure was very stable without pulmonary hypertension. Blood electrolytes were in physiologic range, and complete blood counts were unaffected by hyperthermia. Blood chemistries revealed no significant liver or kidney damage. Our simple strategy of priming solution preheating completely resolved the problem of pulmonary hypertension as a milestone toward developing a safe and easy-to-use vv-PISH system for cancer treatment. PMID:23820278

  17. A Microfluidic Device for Continuous Sensing of Systemic Acute Toxicants in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    A bioluminescent-cell-based microfluidic device for sensing toxicants in drinking water was designed and fabricated. The system employed Vibrio fischeri cells as broad-spectrum sensors to monitor potential systemic cell toxicants in water, such as heavy metal ions and phenol. Specifically, the chip was designed for continuous detection. The chip design included two counter-flow micromixers, a T-junction droplet generator and six spiral microchannels. The cell suspension and water sample were introduced into the micromixers and dispersed into droplets in the air flow. This guaranteed sufficient oxygen supply for the cell sensors. Copper (Cu2+), zinc (Zn2+), potassium dichromate and 3,5-dichlorophenol were selected as typical toxicants to validate the sensing system. Preliminary tests verified that the system was an effective screening tool for acute toxicants although it could not recognize or quantify specific toxicants. A distinct non-linear relationship was observed between the zinc ion concentration and the Relative Luminescence Units (RLU) obtained during testing. Thus, the concentration of simple toxic chemicals in water can be roughly estimated by this system. The proposed device shows great promise for an early warning system for water safety. PMID:24300075

  18. Rapid isolation and diagnosis of live bacteria from human joint fluids by using an integrated microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Yang, Sung-Yi; Lin, Yi-Cheng; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Mel S; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2014-09-01

    Arthroplasty is a general approach for improving the life quality for patients with degenerative or injured joints. However, post-surgery complications including periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) poses a serious drawback to the procedure. Several methods are available for diagnosing PJI, but they are time-consuming or have poor sensitivity and specificity. Alternatively, reverse-transcription PCR can detect live bacteria and reduce false-positive results but cannot avoid the cumbersome RNA handling and human contamination issues. In response, an integrated microfluidic system capable of detecting live bacteria from clinical PJI samples within 55 minutes is developed in this study. This system employs an ethidium monoazide (EMA)-based assay and a PCR with universal bacterial primers and probes to isolate and detect only the live bacteria that commonly cause PJI. The experimental results indicated that the developed system can detect bacteria in human joint fluids with a detection limit of 10(4) colony formation unit mL(-1). Furthermore, nine clinical samples were analyzed using the microfluidic system. The results obtained from the microfluidic system were negative for all culture-negative cases, indicating that the proposed system can indeed reduce false-positive results. In addition, experimental results showed that the EMA sample pre-treatment process was crucial for successful detection of live bacteria. The culture-positive cases were diagnosed as positive by the proposed system only when the clinical samples were treated with EMA immediately after being sampled from patients. Based on these promising results, the developed microfluidic system can be a useful tool to detect PJI and potentially be applied in other clinical situations. PMID:25005800

  19. Integration of spore-based genetically engineered whole-cell sensing systems into portable centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Date, Amol; Pasini, Patrizia; Daunert, Sylvia

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial whole-cell biosensing systems provide important information about the bioavailable amount of target analytes. They are characterized by high sensitivity and specificity/selectivity along with rapid response times and amenability to miniaturization as well as high-throughput analysis. Accordingly, they have been employed in various environmental and clinical applications. The use of spore-based sensing systems offers the unique advantage of long-term preservation of the sensing cells by taking advantage of the environmental resistance and ruggedness of bacterial spores. In this work, we have incorporated spore-based whole-cell sensing systems into centrifugal compact disk (CD) microfluidic platforms in order to develop a portable sensing system, which should enable the use of these hardy sensors for fast on-field analysis of compounds of interest. For that, we have employed two spore-based sensing systems for the detection of arsenite and zinc, respectively, and evaluated their analytical performance in the miniaturized microfluidic format. Furthermore, we have tested environmental and clinical samples on the CD microfluidic platforms using the spore-based sensors. Germination of spores and quantitative response to the analyte could be obtained in 2.5-3 h, depending on the sensing system, with detection limits of 1 x 10(-7) M for arsenite and 1 x 10(-6) M for zinc in both serum and fresh water samples. Incorporation of spore-based whole-cell biosensing systems on microfluidic platforms enabled the rapid and sensitive detection of the analytes and is expected to facilitate the on-site use of such sensing systems. PMID:20582692

  20. Intrinsic FGF2 and FGF5 promotes angiogenesis of human aortic endothelial cells in 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Joo, Hyung Joon; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Cui, Long-Hui; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The human body contains different endothelial cell types and differences in their angiogenic potential are poorly understood. We compared the functional angiogenic ability of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic cell culture system. HAECs and HUVECs exhibited similar cellular characteristics in a 2D culture system; however, in the 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system, HAECs exhibited stronger angiogenic potential than HUVECs. Interestingly, the expression level of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and FGF5 under vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A stimulation was significantly higher in HAECs than in HUVECs. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of FGF2 and FGF5 more significantly attenuated vascular sprouting induced from HAECs than HUVECs. Our results suggest that HAECs have greater angiogenic potential through FGF2 and FGF5 upregulation and could be a compatible endothelial cell type to achieve robust angiogenesis. PMID:27357248

  1. Intrinsic FGF2 and FGF5 promotes angiogenesis of human aortic endothelial cells in 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Joo, Hyung Joon; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Cui, Long-Hui; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The human body contains different endothelial cell types and differences in their angiogenic potential are poorly understood. We compared the functional angiogenic ability of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic cell culture system. HAECs and HUVECs exhibited similar cellular characteristics in a 2D culture system; however, in the 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system, HAECs exhibited stronger angiogenic potential than HUVECs. Interestingly, the expression level of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and FGF5 under vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A stimulation was significantly higher in HAECs than in HUVECs. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of FGF2 and FGF5 more significantly attenuated vascular sprouting induced from HAECs than HUVECs. Our results suggest that HAECs have greater angiogenic potential through FGF2 and FGF5 upregulation and could be a compatible endothelial cell type to achieve robust angiogenesis. PMID:27357248

  2. Measurement of myocardial perfusion and infarction size using computer-aided diagnosis system for myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Du, Guo-Qing; Xue, Jing-Yi; Guo, Yanhui; Chen, Shuang; Du, Pei; Wu, Yan; Wang, Yu-Hang; Zong, Li-Qiu; Tian, Jia-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Proper evaluation of myocardial microvascular perfusion and assessment of infarct size is critical for clinicians. We have developed a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) approach for myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) to measure myocardial perfusion and infarct size. Rabbits underwent 15 min of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion (group I, n = 15) or 60 min of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion (group II, n = 15). Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed before and 7 d after ischemia/reperfusion, and images were analyzed with the CAD system on the basis of eliminating particle swarm optimization clustering analysis. The myocardium was quickly and accurately detected using contrast-enhanced images, myocardial perfusion was quantitatively calibrated and a color-coded map calibrated by contrast intensity and automatically produced by the CAD system was used to outline the infarction region. Calibrated contrast intensity was significantly lower in infarct regions than in non-infarct regions, allowing differentiation of abnormal and normal myocardial perfusion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis documented that -54-pixel contrast intensity was an optimal cutoff point for the identification of infarcted myocardium with a sensitivity of 95.45% and specificity of 87.50%. Infarct sizes obtained using myocardial perfusion defect analysis of original contrast images and the contrast intensity-based color-coded map in computerized images were compared with infarct sizes measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Use of the proposed CAD approach provided observers with more information. The infarct sizes obtained with myocardial perfusion defect analysis, the contrast intensity-based color-coded map and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were 23.72 ± 8.41%, 21.77 ± 7.8% and 18.21 ± 4.40% (% left ventricle) respectively (p > 0.05), indicating that computerized myocardial contrast echocardiography can

  3. OUTCOMES OF THE FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PEDIATRIC MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND PEDIATRIC CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION

    PubMed Central

    Ündar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of the Conference was to bring together internationally know clinicians, bioengineers, and basic scientists involved in research on pediatric mechanical cardiac support systems and pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The primary focus was to explicitly describe the problems with current pediatric mechanical circulatory support systems, methods, and techniques during acute and chronic support. The organizers were able to bring together respected international scholars from over 25 different countries at past conferences that has already made a significant impact on the treatment of pediatric cardiac patients during the past three years. Over 1,300 participants (250–300 participants each year) from many countries, including Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States, have participated in the 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 events. To date, The Fifth International Conference on Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Systems and Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Perfusion is the only conference solely dedicated to pediatric cardiac devices used during acute and chronic mechanical circulatory support. There is no other national or international conference to precisely define the problems with pediatric cardiac patients, and to suggest solutions with new methodologies and devices for pediatric patients, but specifically for neonates and infants. PMID:20021466

  4. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed. PMID:27091777

  5. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin; Qin, Lidong

    2016-04-01

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed. PMID:27091777

  6. In Vivo Bone Regeneration Using Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor Cultured Nanofibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, Andrew B.; Both, Sanne K.; Yang, Wanxun; Alghamdi, Hamdan S.; Yang, Fang; Jansen, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bioreactors for the in vitro culture of constructs for bone tissue engineering has become prevalent as these systems may improve the growth and differentiation of a cultured cell population. Here we utilize a tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and implant the cultured constructs into rat femoral condyle defects. Using nanofibrous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds, hMSCs were cultured for 10 days in vitro in the TPS bioreactor with cellular and acellular scaffolds cultured statically for 10 days as a control. After 3 and 6 weeks of in vivo culture, explants were removed and subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Results indicated more rapid bone regeneration in defects implanted with bioreactor cultured scaffolds with a new bone area of 1.23±0.35 mm2 at 21 days compared to 0.99±0.43 mm2 and 0.50±0.29 mm2 in defects implanted with statically cultured scaffolds and acellular scaffolds, respectively. At the 21 day timepoint, statistical differences (p<0.05) were only observed between defects implanted with cell containing scaffolds and the acellular control. After 42 days, however, defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds had the greatest new bone area with 1.72±0.40 mm2. Defects implanted with statically cultured and acellular scaffolds had a new bone area of 1.26±0.43 mm2 and 1.19±0.33 mm2, respectively. The increase in bone growth observed in defects implanted with TPS cultured scaffolds was statistically significant (p<0.05) when compared to both the static and acellular groups at this timepoint. This study demonstrates the efficacy of the TPS bioreactor to improve bone tissue regeneration and highlights the benefits of utilizing perfusion bioreactor systems to culture MSCs for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23865551

  7. Reversible cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, E.L.; Firestein, G.S.; Weiss, J.L.; Heuser, R.R.; Leitl, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Brinker, J.A.; Ciuffo, A.A.; Becker, L.C.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of peripheral cold exposure on myocardial perfusion and function were studied in 13 patients with scleroderma without clinically evident myocardial disease. Ten patients had at least one transient, cold-induced, myocardial perfusion defect visualized by thallium-201 scintigraphy, and 12 had reversible, cold-induced, segmental left ventricular hypokinesis by two-dimensional echocardiography. The 10 patients with transient perfusion defects all had anatomically corresponding ventricular wall motion abnormalities. No one in either of two control groups (9 normal volunteers and 7 patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) had cold-induced abnormalities. This study is the first to show the simultaneous occurrence of cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in patients with scleroderma. The results suggest that cold exposure in such patients may elicit transient reflex coronary vasoconstriction resulting in reversible myocardial ischemia and dysfunction. Chronic recurrent episodes of coronary spasm may lead to focal myocardial fibrosis.

  8. Compact electromagnetically operated microfluidic system for detection of sub-200-nm magnetic labels for biosensing without external pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Takamura, T.; Sandhu, A.

    2010-05-01

    The combination of small sample analyte volumes, high sensitivity, ease of use, high speed, and portability is an important factor for the development of protocols for point of care biodiagnosis. Currently, handling small amounts of liquids is achieved using microfluidic systems but it is challenging to satisfy the remaining factors using conventional approaches based on biosensors employing detection of fluorescent labels. Thus to resolve the other requirements, biosensing systems based on the detection of functionalized superparamagnetic beads acting as "magnetic labels" are being studied as an alternative approach. Notably, for greater quantification, there are increasing demands for the use of sub-200-nm magnetic labels, which are comparable in size to actual biomolecules. However, detection of small numbers of sub-200-nm diameter magnetic beads by magnetoresistive device-based platforms is extremely challenging due to the intrinsic noise of the electronic devices. In order to overcome the limitation, we have developed a simple procedure for detecting sub-200-nm diameter magnetic labels for biosensing via magnetically induced self-assembly of superparamagnetic beads. Applying our approach to conventional microfluidic systems satisfies the most of prerequisites; however conventional microfluidic systems attached to the external pumps are yet suitable for point of care biodiagnosis. Here we propose the development of an alternative biosensing system based on our previous work that does not require external pumps to achieve miniaturization.

  9. Rapid detection and typing of live bacteria from human joint fluid samples by utilizing an integrated microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chih-Lin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Mel S; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-04-15

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most dreading complications that hinder the merits of an arthroplasty. A prerequisite for treatment of the above procedure is rapid detection of live bacteria to prevent its recurrence and proper choice of antibiotics. Conventional culture methods are time-consuming and associated with a high false negative rate. Amplification of bacterial genetic materials requires a tedious process but is associated with a high false positive rate. An integrated microfluidic system capable of molecular diagnosis for detecting live bacteria was reported in our previous work. However, the system could not provide detailed information about infectious bacteria for the subsequent antibiotic choices. Furthermore, it took at least 55min to finish the entire process. In this work, a microfluidic platform using ethidium monoazide (EMA) which can only penetrate into dead bacteria is presented for live bacteria detection and typing within a short period of time (30min for the detection of live bacteria and another 40min for the typing of bacteria strains). We tested the proposed system by using human joint fluid samples and found its limit of detection for bacterial detection equal to 10(2)CFU (colony formation unit) for live bacteria detection with gold nanoparticle probes and 10(2)-10(4)CFU for typing bacteria by an on-chip polymerase chain reaction. The whole procedure of the integrated microfluidic system is automated with little human intervention. Moreover, this is the first time that sequential live bacteria detection and typing are demonstrated on the same microfluidic platform. Based on the promising results, the proposed system may become in the near future an auxiliary tool for immediate medical decision and choice of antibiotics in routine arthroplasties or PJI's. PMID:25460896

  10. Single cell functional analysis of multiple myeloma cell populations correlates with diffusion profiles in static microfluidic coculture systems.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas A; Young, Edmond W K

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic cell culture systems are becoming increasingly useful for studying biology questions, particularly those involving small cell populations that are cultured within microscale geometries mimicking the complex cellular microenvironment. Depending on the geometry and spatial organization of these cell populations, however, paracrine signaling between cell types can depend critically on spatial concentration profiles of soluble factors generated by diffusive transport. In scenarios where single cell data are acquired to study cell population heterogeneities in functional response, uncertainty associated with concentration profiles can lead to interpretation bias. To address this issue and provide important evidence on how diffusion develops within typical microfluidic cell culture systems, a combination of experimental and computational approaches were applied to measure and predict concentration patterns within microfluidic geometries, and characterize the functional response of culture cells based on single-cell resolution transcription factor activation. Using a model coculture system consisting of multiple myeloma cells (MMCs) and neighboring bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), we measured concentrations of three cytokines (IL-6, VEGF, and TNF-α) in conditioned media collected from separate culture compartments using a multiplex ELISA system. A 3D numerical model was developed to predict biomolecular diffusion and resulting concentration profiles within the tested microsystems and compared with experimental diffusion of 20 kDa FITC-Dextran. Finally, diffusion was further characterized by controlling exogenous IL-6 diffusion and the coculture spatial configuration of BMSCs to stimulate STAT3 nuclear translocation in MMCs. Results showed agreement between numerical and experimental results, provided evidence of a shallow concentration gradient across the center well of the microsystem that did not lead to a bias in results, and demonstrated that

  11. Integrated microfluidic system for rapid detection of influenza H1N1 virus using a sandwich-based aptamer assay.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chih-Hung; Chang, Chih-Peng; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-08-15

    The rapid spread of influenza-associated H1N1 viruses has caused serious concern in recent years. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automatic, point-of-care devices for rapid diagnosis of the influenza virus. Conventional approaches suffer from several critical issues; notably, they are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and are characterized by relatively low sensitivity. In this work, we present a new approach for fluorescence-based detection of the influenza A H1N1 virus using a sandwich-based aptamer assay that is automatically performed on an integrated microfluidic system. The entire detection process was shortened to 30min using this chip-based system which is much faster than the conventional viral culture method. The limit of detection was significantly improved to 0.032 hemagglutination unit due to the high affinity and high specificity of the H1N1-specific aptamers. The results showed that the two-aptamer microfluidic system had about 10(3) times higher sensitivity than the conventional serological diagnosis. It was demonstrated that the developed microfluidic system may play as a powerful tool in the detection of the H1N1 virus. PMID:27054814

  12. Microfluidic cytometric analysis of cancer cell transportability and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongbin; Lee, Yeonju; Jang, Joon hee; Li, Ying; Han, Xin; Yokoi, Kenji; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhou, Ledu; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    The extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of cancer cells plays an important role in tumor progression and therapeutic resistance. Characterizing this heterogeneity and identifying invasive phenotype may provide possibility to improve chemotherapy treatment. By mimicking cancer cell perfusion through circulatory system in metastasis, we develop a unique microfluidic cytometry (MC) platform to separate cancer cells at high throughput, and further derive a physical parameter ‘transportability’ to characterize the ability to pass through micro-constrictions. The transportability is determined by cell stiffness and cell-surface frictional property, and can be used to probe tumor heterogeneity, discriminate more invasive phenotypes and correlate with biomarker expressions in breast cancer cells. Decreased cell stiffness and cell-surface frictional force leads to an increase in transportability and may be a feature of invasive cancer cells by promoting cell perfusion through narrow spaces in circulatory system. The MC-Chip provides a promising microfluidic platform for studying cell mechanics and transportability could be used as a novel marker for probing tumor heterogeneity and determining invasive phenotypes. PMID:26404901

  13. Optical biosensor system with integrated microfluidic sample preparation and TIRF based detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, Eduard; Scheicher, Sylvia R.; Suppan, Michael; Pichler, Heinz; Rumpler, Markus; Satzinger, Valentin; Palfinger, Christian; Reil, Frank; Hajnsek, Martin; Köstler, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    There is a steadily growing demand for miniaturized bioanalytical devices allowing for on-site or point-of-care detection of biomolecules or pathogens in applications like diagnostics, food testing, or environmental monitoring. These, so called labs-on-a-chip or micro-total analysis systems (μ-TAS) should ideally enable convenient sample-in - result-out type operation. Therefore, the entire process from sample preparation, metering, reagent incubation, etc. to detection should be performed on a single disposable device (on-chip). In the early days such devices were mainly fabricated using glass or silicon substrates and adapting established fabrication technologies from the electronics and semiconductor industry. More recently, the development focuses on the use of thermoplastic polymers as they allow for low-cost high volume fabrication of disposables. One of the most promising materials for the development of plastic based lab-on-achip systems are cyclic olefin polymers and copolymers (COP/COC) due to their excellent optical properties (high transparency and low autofluorescence) and ease of processing. We present a bioanalytical system for whole blood samples comprising a disposable plastic chip based on TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) optical detection. The chips were fabricated by compression moulding of COP and microfluidic channels were structured by hot embossing. These microfluidic structures integrate several sample pretreatment steps. These are the separation of erythrocytes, metering of sample volume using passive valves, and reagent incubation for competitive bioassays. The surface of the following optical detection zone is functionalized with specific capture probes in an array format. The plastic chips comprise dedicated structures for simple and effective coupling of excitation light from low-cost laser diodes. This enables TIRF excitation of fluorescently labeled probes selectively bound to detection spots at the microchannel surface

  14. The in vitro growth of a three-dimensional human dermal replacement using a single-pass perfusion system.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, C R; Hardin, R; Bezverkov, K; Snyder, D; Allen, L; Landeen, L

    1994-04-01

    A human dermal replacement has been developed by seeding human neonatal dermal fibroblasts onto a biosorbable polyglactin (polyglycolide/polylactide) mesh and culturing in a bioreactor. The mesh provides the proper environment for the cells to attach, grow in a three-dimensional array, and establish a tissue matrix over a 2- to 3-week culture period. The dermal replacement has been characterized and found to contain a variety of naturally occurring dermal matrix proteins, including fibronectin, glycosaminoglycans, and collagen types I and III. To efficiently and reproducibly produce this dermal tissue equivalent, a closed, single-pass perfusion system was developed and compared with a static process. In the single-pas perfusion system, growth medium (containing ascorbic acid) was perfused around the 4 x 6 in. pieces of mesh at specific flow rates determined by nutrient consumption and waste production rates. The flow rates used for this system indicate that a diffusion-limited regime exists with a mean residence time greater than 1 h for essential nutrients and factors. By controlling glucose concentrations in the system to a delta of 0.70 g/L from the inlet to the outlet of the bioreactor, it took 6 fewer days to grow a tissue similar to that produced by the static system. PMID:18615797

  15. All inkjet-printed electroactive polymer actuators for microfluidic lab-on-chip systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabst, Oliver; Beckert, Erik; Perelaer, Jolke; Schubert, Ulrich S.; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Piezoelectric electroactive polymers (EAP) are promising materials for applications in microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. In such systems, fluids can be analyzed by different chemical or physical methods. During the analysis the fluids need to be distributed through the channels of the chip, which requires a pumping function. We present here all inkjet-printed EAP actuators that can be configured as a membrane-based micropump suitable for direct integration into lab-on-chip systems. Drop-on-demand inkjet printing is a versatile digital deposition technique that is capable of depositing various functional materials onto a wide variety of substrates in an additive way. Compared to conventional lithography-based processing it is cost-efficient and flexible, as no masking is required. The actuators consist of a polymer foil substrate with an inkjet-printed EAP layer sandwiched between a set of two electrodes. The actuators are printed using a commercially available EAP solution and silver nanoparticle inks. When a voltage is applied across the polymer layer, piezoelectric strain leads to a bending deflection of the beam or membrane. Circular membrane actuators with 20 mm diameter and EAP thicknesses of 10 to 15 μm exhibit deflections of several μm when driven at their resonance frequency with voltages of 110 V. From the behavior of membrane actuators a pumping rate of several 100 μL/min can be estimated, which is promising for applications in lab-on-chip devices.

  16. Integrated optical systems for excitation delivery and broadband detection in micro-fluidic electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    KEMME,SHANALYN A.; WARREN,MIAL E.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WENDT,JOEL R.; BAILEY,CHRISTOPHER G.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; ARNOLD,DON W.; CARTER,TONY RAY; ASBILL,RANDOLPH E.; SAMORA,SALLY

    2000-03-15

    The authors have designed and assembled two generations of integrated micro-optical systems that deliver pump light and detect broadband laser-induced fluorescence in micro-fluidic chemical separation systems employing electrochromatography. The goal is to maintain the sensitivity attainable with larger, tabletop machines while decreasing package size and increasing throughput (by decreasing the required chemical volume). One type of micro-optical system uses vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) as the excitation source. Light from the VCSELs is relayed with four-level surface relief diffractive optical elements (DOEs) and delivered to the chemical volume through substrate-mode propagation. Indirect fluorescence from dye-quenched chemical species is collected and collimated with a high numerical aperture DOE. A filter blocks the excitation wavelength, and the resulting signal is detected as the chemical separation proceeds. Variations of this original design include changing the combination of reflective and transmissive DOEs and optimizing the high numerical aperture DOE with a rotationally symmetric iterative discrete on-axis algorithm. The authors will discuss the results of these implemented optimizations.

  17. Fertilization of Mouse Gametes in Vitro Using a Digital Microfluidic System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hong-Yuan; Shen, Hsien-Hua; Chung, Lung-Yuan; Chung, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Chih-Chen; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Fan, Shih-Kang; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrated in vitro fertilization (IVF) using a digital microfluidic (DMF) system, so-called electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD). The DMF device was proved to be biocompatible and the DMF manipulation of a droplet was harmless to the embryos. This DMF platform was then used for the fertilization of mouse gametes in vitro and for embryo dynamic culture based on a dispersed droplet form. Development of the embryos was instantaneously recorded by a time-lapse microscope in an incubator. Our results indicated that increasing the number of sperms for IVF would raise the rate of fertilization. However, the excess of sperms in the 10 μL culture medium would more easily make the embryo dead during cell culture. Dynamic culture powered with EWOD can manipulate a single droplet containing mouse embryos and culture to the eight-cell stage. The fertilization rate of IVF demonstrated by DMF system was 34.8%, and about 25% inseminated embryos dynamically cultured on a DMF chip developed into an eight-cell stage. The results indicate that the DMF system has the potential for application in assisted reproductive technology. PMID:26529769

  18. Raman tweezers in microfluidic systems for analysis and sorting of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilát, Zdenëk; Ježek, Jan; Kaňka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    We have devised an analytical and sorting system combining optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy in microfluidic environment in order to identify and sort biological objects, such as living cells of various prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Our main objective was to create a robust and universal platform for non-contact sorting of microobjects based on their Raman spectral properties. This approach allowed us to collect information about the chemical composition of the objects, such as the presence and composition of lipids, proteins, or nucleic acids without using artificial chemical probes such as fluorescent markers. The non-destructive and non-contact nature of this optical analysis and manipulation allowed us to separate individual living cells of our interest in a sterile environment and provided the possibility to cultivate the selected cells for further experiments. We used differently treated cells of algae to test and demonstrate the function of our analytical and sorting system. The devised system could find its use in many medical, biotechnological, and biological applications.

  19. Raman tweezers in microfluidic systems for analysis and sorting of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilát, Zdeněk.; Ježek, Jan; Kaňka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-12-01

    We have devised an analytical and sorting system combining optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy in microfluidic environment, dedicated to identification and sorting of biological objects, such as living cells of various unicellular organisms. Our main goal was to create a robust and universal platform for non-destructive and non-contact sorting of micro-objects based on their Raman spectral properties. This approach allowed us to collect spectra containing information about the chemical composition of the objects, such as the presence and composition of pigments, lipids, proteins, or nucleic acids, avoiding artificial chemical probes such as fluorescent markers. The non-destructive nature of this optical analysis and manipulation allowed us to separate individual living cells of our interest in a sterile environment and provided the possibility to cultivate the selected cells for further experiments. We used a mixture of polystyrene micro-particles and algal cells to test and demonstrate the function of our analytical and sorting system. The devised system could find its use in many medical, biotechnological, and biological applications.

  20. Multiple enzyme-doped thread-based microfluidic system for blood urea nitrogen and glucose detection in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-An; Lin, Che-Hsin

    2015-03-01

    This research presents a multiple enzyme-doped thread-based microfluidic system for blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and glucose detection in human whole blood. A novel enzyme-doped thread coated with a thin polyvinylchloride (PVC) membrane is produced for on-site electrochemical detection of urea and glucose in whole blood. Multiple enzymes can be directly applied to the thread without delicate pretreatment or a surface modification process prior to sealing the thread with PVC membrane. Results indicate that the developed device exhibits a good linear dynamic range for detecting urea and glucose in concentrations from 0.1 mM-10.0 mM (R(2 )= 0.9850) and 0.1 mM-13.0 mM (R(2 )= 0.9668), which is suitable for adoption in detecting the concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN, 1.78-7.12 mM) and glucose (3.89-6.11 mM) in serum. The detection result also shows that the developed thread-based microfluidic system can successfully separate and detect the ions, BUN, and glucose in blood. The calculated concentrations of BUN and glucose ante cibum (glucose before meal) in the whole blood sample are 3.98 mM and 4.94 mM, respectively. The developed thread-based microfluidic system provides a simple yet high performance for clinical diagnostics. PMID:25825613

  1. Development of an aptamer-based impedimetric bioassay using microfluidic system and magnetic separation for protein detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixian; Ye, Zunzhong; Ping, Jianfeng; Jing, Shunru; Ying, Yibin

    2014-09-15

    An aptamer-based impedimetric bioassay using the microfluidic system and magnetic separation was developed for the sensitive and rapid detection of protein. The microfluidic impedance device was fabricated through integrating the gold interdigitated array microelectrode into a flow cell made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Aptamer modified magnetic beads were used to capture and separate the target protein, and concentrated into a suitable volume. Then the complexes were injected into the microfluidic flow cell for impedance measurement. To demonstrate the high performance of this novel detection system, thrombin was employed as the target protein. The results showed that the impedance signals at the frequency of 90 kHz have a good linearity with the concentrations of thrombin in a range from 0.1 nM to 10nM and the detection limit is 0.01 nM. Compared with the reported impedimetric aptasensors for thrombin detection, this method possesses several advantages, such as the increasing sensitivity, improving reproducibility, reducing sample volume and assay time. All these demonstrate the proposed detection system is an alternative way to enable sensitive, rapid and specific detection of protein. PMID:24709326

  2. A bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system based on a microfluidic co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng-fei; Cao, Yan-wei; Zhang, Shu-dong; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Xiao-guang; Shi, Hao-qing; Hu, Ke-yao; Zhu, Guan-qun; Ma, Bo; Niu, Hai-tao

    2015-11-10

    A tumor microenvironment may promote tumor metastasis and progression through the dynamic interplay between neoplastic cells and stromal cells. In this work, the most representative and significant stromal cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages were used as vital component elements and combined with bladder cancer cells to construct a bladder cancer microenvironment simulation system. This is the first report to explore bladder cancer microenvironments based on 4 types of cells co-cultured simultaneously. This simulation system comprises perfusion equipment, matrigel channel units, a medium channel and four indirect contact culture chambers, allowing four types of cells to simultaneously interact through soluble biological factors and metabolites. With this system, bladder cancer cells (T24) with a tendency to form a 'reticular' structure under 3 dimensional culture conditions were observed in real time. The microenvironment characteristics of paracrine interactions and cell motility were successfully simulated in this system. The phenotype change process in stromal cells was successfully reproduced in this system by testing the macrophage effector molecule Arg-1. Arg-1 was highly expressed in the simulated tumor microenvironment group. To develop "precision medicine" in bladder cancer therapy, bladder cancer cells were treated with different clinical 'neo-adjuvant' chemotherapy schemes in this system, and their sensitivity differences were fully reflected. This work provides a preliminary foundation for neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in bladder cancer, a theoretical foundation for tumor microenvironment simulation and promotes individual therapy in bladder cancer patients. PMID:26462177

  3. An integrated microfluidic system for diagnosis of the resistance of Helicobacter pylori to quinolone-based antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chih-Yu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Che, Yu-Jui; Kao, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a species of bacteria that can colonize the human stomach mucosa. It is closely associated with gastric diseases such as ulcer and inflammation. Recently, some H. pylori strains were found to express resistance to a family of antibiotics known as quinolones due to single-point mutations. Although traditional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and molecular diagnostic-based approaches can be used to determine the presence and abundance of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains, such processes are relatively expensive, labor-intensive, and require bulky and costly equipment. This study therefore reports an advanced diagnostic assay performed on an integrated microfluidic system for rapid detection of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori. The assay features three components: (1) nucleic acid extraction by specific probe-conjugated magnetic beads, (2) amplification of the target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments by using single-nucleotide-polymorphism polymerase chain reaction (SNP-PCR), and (3) optical detection of the PCR products. The device integrates several microfluidic components including micro-pumps, normally-closed micro-valves, and reaction chambers such that the entire diagnostic assay can be automatically executed on a single microfluidic system within one hour with detection limits of 10(0), 10(2), and 10(2) bacterial cells for H. pylori detection and two different SNP sites strains. Three PCR-based assays for determining presence of H. pylori infection and two DNA single-point mutation assays aimed at determining whether the infected strains were resistant to quinolone can be performed simultaneously on a single chip, suggesting that this microfluidic system could be a promising tool for rapid diagnosis of the presence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains. PMID:26630283

  4. Bioreactor perfusion system for the long-term maintenance of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle organoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, J. A.; Shansky, J.; Perrone, C.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional skeletal muscle organ-like structures (organoids) formed in tissue culture by fusion of proliferating myoblasts into parallel networks of long, unbranched myofibers provide an in vivo-like model for examining the effects of growth factors, tension, and space flight on muscle cell growth and metabolism. To determine the feasibility of maintaining either avian or mammalian muscle organoids in a commercial perfusion bioreactor system, we measured metabolism, protein turnover. and autocrine/paracrine growth factor release rates. Medium glucose was metabolized at a constant rate in both low-serum- and serum-free media for up to 30 d. Total organoid noncollagenous protein and DNA content decreased approximately 22-28% (P < 0.05) over a 13-d period. Total protein synthesis rates could be determined accurately in the bioreactors for up to 30 h and total protein degradation rates could be measured for up to 3 wk. Special fixation and storage conditions necessary for space flight studies were validated as part of the studies. For example, the anabolic autocrine/paracrine skeletal muscle growth factors prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) could be measured accurately in collected media fractions, even after storage at 37 degrees C for up to 10 d. In contrast, creatine kinase activity (a marker of cell damage) in collected media fractions was unreliable. These results provide initial benchmarks for long-term ex vivo studies of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle.

  5. An intelligent digital microfluidic system with fuzzy-enhanced feedback for multi-droplet manipulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Liu, Xianming; Chen, Tianlan; Mak, Pui-In; Du, Yuguang; Vai, Mang-I; Lin, Bingcheng; Martins, Rui P

    2013-02-01

    The complexity of droplet hydrodynamics on a digital microfluidic (DMF) system eventually weakens its potential for application in large-scale chemical/biological micro-reactors. We describe here an intelligent DMF technology to address that intricacy. A wide variety of control-engaged droplet manageability is proposed and demonstrated through the operation of our modular DMF prototype, which comprises: (i) rigid profiling ability of different droplet's hydrodynamics under a real-time trajectory track of droplet-derived capacitance, permitting accurate and autonomous multi-droplet positioning without visual setup and heavy image signal processing; (ii) fuzzy-enhanced controllability saving up to 21% charging time when compared with the classical approach, enhancing the throughput, fidelity and lifetime of the DMF chip, while identifying and renouncing those weakened electrodes deteriorated over time, and (iii) expert manipulability of multi-droplet routings under countermeasure decisions in real time, preventing droplet-to-droplet or task-to-task interference. Altogether, this work exhibits the first modular DMF system with built-in electronic-control software-defined intelligence to enhance the fidelity and reliability of each droplet operation, allowing future manufacturability of a wide range of life science analyses and combinatorial chemical screening applications. PMID:23232546

  6. Ultrafast STR Separations on Short-Channel Microfluidic Systems for Forensic Screening and Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Aboud, Maurice J; Gassmann, Marcus; McCord, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    There are situations in which it is important to quickly and positively identify an individual. Examples include suspects detained in the neighborhood of a bombing or terrorist incident, individuals detained attempting to enter or leave the country, and victims of mass disasters. Systems utilized for these purposes must be fast, portable, and easy to maintain. DNA typing methods provide the best biometric information yielding identity, kinship, and geographical origin, but they are not portable and rapid. This study details the development of a portable short-channel microfluidic device based on a modified Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer for applications in forensic genomics. The system utilizes a denaturing polymer matrix with dual-channel laser-induced fluorescence and is capable of producing a genotype in 80 sec. The device was tested for precision and resolution using an allelic ladder created from 6 short tandem repeat (STR) loci and a sex marker (amelogenin). The results demonstrated a precision of 0.09-0.21 bp over the entire size range and resolution values from 2.5 to 4.1 bp. Overall, the results demonstrate the chip provides a portable, rapid, and precise method for screening amplified short tandem repeats and human identification screening. PMID:26280913

  7. Development of an Automated Microfluidic System for DNA Collection, Amplification, and Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, Bethany S.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2002-12-01

    This project was focused on developing and testing automated routines for a microfluidic Pathogen Detection System. The basic pathogen detection routine has three primary components; cell concentration, DNA amplification, and detection. In cell concentration, magnetic beads are held in a flow cell by an electromagnet. Sample liquid is passed through the flow cell and bacterial cells attach to the beads. These beads are then released into a small volume of fluid and delivered to the peltier device for cell lysis and DNA amplification. The cells are lysed during initial heating in the peltier device, and the released DNA is amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or strand displacement amplification (SDA). Once amplified, the DNA is then delivered to a laser induced fluorescence detection unit in which the sample is detected. These three components create a flexible platform that can be used for pathogen detection in liquid and sediment samples. Future developments of the system will include on-line DNA detection during DNA amplification and improved capture and release methods for the magnetic beads during cell concentration.

  8. Production of monoclonal antibodies for breast cancer by HB8696 hybridoma cells using novel perfusion system.

    PubMed

    Kamthan, Shweta; Gomes, James; Roychoudhury, Pradip K

    2014-10-01

    Perfusion culture using spinfilters have been used for the production of health-care products using mammalian cells culture. However, available spinfilters are either highly prone to clog and/or are disposable and hence affects product formation. To address these problems, a novel non-woven Bombyx mori silk screen based spinfilter module for clog-free extended perfusion culture of hybridoma cells has been designed. The module is versatile in nature and reusable, after autoclaving and replacement of used polymeric membrane. Its application for clog-free extended perfusion culture was demonstrated by comparative perfusion experiments of HB8696 cells with stainless-steel spinfilter. HB8696 cells produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 520C9 active against breast cancer oncoprotein. Silk spinfilter was found to be less prone to clog with cells and debris owing to its negatively charged hydrophobic screen compared to the positively charged hydrophilic stainless-steel spinfilter. Therefore, it provides extended cell growth phase and production phase of up to 56 h and 40 h respectively and 57.4% increase in MAb productivity compared to the stainless-steel spinfilter. The effect of different perfusion rates on MAb production was studied and an optimal MAb productivity of 1.6 g L(-1) day(-1) was achieved. PMID:25152416

  9. A method to integrate patterned electrospun fibers with microfluidic systems to generate complex microenvironments for cell culture applications

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Patric; Zandén, Carl; Carlberg, Björn; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Liu, Johan; Gold, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The properties of a cell’s microenvironment are one of the main driving forces in cellular fate processes and phenotype expression invivo. The ability to create controlled cell microenvironments invitro becomes increasingly important for studying or controlling phenotype expression in tissue engineering and drug discovery applications. This includes the capability to modify material surface properties within well-defined liquid environments in cell culture systems. One successful approach to mimic extra cellular matrix is with porous electrospun polymer fiber scaffolds, while microfluidic networks have been shown to efficiently generate spatially and temporally defined liquid microenvironments. Here, a method to integrate electrospun fibers with microfluidic networks was developed in order to form complex cell microenvironments with the capability to vary relevant parameters. Spatially defined regions of electrospun fibers of both aligned and random orientation were patterned on glass substrates that were irreversibly bonded to microfluidic networks produced in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Concentration gradients obtained in the fiber containing channels were characterized experimentally and compared with values obtained by computational fluid dynamic simulations. Velocity and shear stress profiles, as well as vortex formation, were calculated to evaluate the influence of fiber pads on fluidic properties. The suitability of the system to support cell attachment and growth was demonstrated with a fibroblast cell line. The potential of the platform was further verified by a functional investigation of neural stem cell alignment in response to orientation of electrospun fibers versus a microfluidic generated chemoattractant gradient of stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. The described method is a competitive strategy to create complex microenvironments invitro that allow detailed studies on the interplay of topography, substrate surface properties, and soluble

  10. A method to integrate patterned electrospun fibers with microfluidic systems to generate complex microenvironments for cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Patric; Zandén, Carl; Carlberg, Björn; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Liu, Johan; Gold, Julie

    2012-06-01

    The properties of a cell's microenvironment are one of the main driving forces in cellular fate processes and phenotype expression invivo. The ability to create controlled cell microenvironments invitro becomes increasingly important for studying or controlling phenotype expression in tissue engineering and drug discovery applications. This includes the capability to modify material surface properties within well-defined liquid environments in cell culture systems. One successful approach to mimic extra cellular matrix is with porous electrospun polymer fiber scaffolds, while microfluidic networks have been shown to efficiently generate spatially and temporally defined liquid microenvironments. Here, a method to integrate electrospun fibers with microfluidic networks was developed in order to form complex cell microenvironments with the capability to vary relevant parameters. Spatially defined regions of electrospun fibers of both aligned and random orientation were patterned on glass substrates that were irreversibly bonded to microfluidic networks produced in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Concentration gradients obtained in the fiber containing channels were characterized experimentally and compared with values obtained by computational fluid dynamic simulations. Velocity and shear stress profiles, as well as vortex formation, were calculated to evaluate the influence of fiber pads on fluidic properties. The suitability of the system to support cell attachment and growth was demonstrated with a fibroblast cell line. The potential of the platform was further verified by a functional investigation of neural stem cell alignment in response to orientation of electrospun fibers versus a microfluidic generated chemoattractant gradient of stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. The described method is a competitive strategy to create complex microenvironments invitro that allow detailed studies on the interplay of topography, substrate surface properties, and soluble

  11. Passive Mixing Capabilities of Micro- and Nanofibres When Used in Microfluidic Systems.

    PubMed

    Matlock-Colangelo, Lauren; Colangelo, Nicholas W; Fenzl, Christoph; Frey, Margaret W; Baeumner, Antje J

    2016-01-01

    Nanofibres are increasingly being used in the field of bioanalytics due to their large surface-area-to-volume ratios and easy-to-functionalize surfaces. To date, nanofibres have been studied as effective filters, concentrators, and immobilization matrices within microfluidic devices. In addition, they are frequently used as optical and electrochemical transduction materials. In this work, we demonstrate that electrospun nanofibre mats cause appreciable passive mixing and therefore provide dual functionality when incorporated within microfluidic systems. Specifically, electrospun nanofibre mats were integrated into Y-shaped poly(methyl methacrylate) microchannels and the degree of mixing was quantified using fluorescence microscopy and ImageJ analysis. The degree of mixing afforded in relationship to fibre diameter, mat height, and mat length was studied. We observed that the most mixing was caused by small diameter PVA nanofibres (450-550 nm in diameter), producing up to 71% mixing at the microchannel outlet, compared to up to 51% with polystyrene microfibres (0.8-2.7 μm in diameter) and 29% mixing in control channels containing no fibres. The mixing afforded by the PVA nanofibres is caused by significant inhomogeneity in pore size and distribution leading to percolation. As expected, within all the studies, fluid mixing increased with fibre mat height, which corresponds to the vertical space of the microchannel occupied by the fibre mats. Doubling the height of the fibre mat led to an average increase in mixing of 14% for the PVA nanofibres and 8% for the PS microfibres. Overall, mixing was independent of the length of the fibre mat used (3-10 mm), suggesting that most mixing occurs as fluid enters and exits the fibre mat. The mixing effects observed within the fibre mats were comparable to or better than many passive mixers reported in literature. Since the nanofibre mats can be further functionalized to couple analyte concentration, immobilization, and

  12. Tunable osteogenic differentiation of hMPCs in tubular perfusion system bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Ko, Henry; Fisher, John P

    2016-08-01

    The use of bioreactors for bone tissue engineering has been widely investigated. While the benefits of shear stress on osteogenic differentiation are well known, the underlying effects of dynamic culture on subpopulations within a bioreactor are less evident. In this work, we explore the influence of applied flow in the tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMPCs), specifically analyzing the effects of axial position along the growth chamber. TPS bioreactor experiments conducted with unidirectional flow demonstrated enhanced expression of osteogenic markers in cells cultured downstream from the inlet flow. We utilized computational fluid dynamic modeling to confirm uniform shear stress distribution on the surface of the scaffolds and along the length of the growth chamber. The concept of paracrine signaling between cell populations was validated with the use of alternating flow, which diminished the differences in osteogenic differentiation between cells cultured at the inlet and outlet of the growth chamber. After the addition of controlled release of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) into the system, osteogenic differentiation among subpopulations along the growth chamber was augmented, yet remained homogenous. These results allow for greater understanding of axial bioreactor cultures, their microenvironment, and how well-established parameters of osteogenic differentiation affect bone tissue development. With this work, we have demonstrated the capability of tuning osteogenic differentiation of hMPCs through the application of fluid flow and the addition of exogenous growth factors. Such precise control allows for the culture of distinct subpopulation within one dynamic system for the use of complex engineered tissue constructs. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1805-1813. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26724678

  13. The Hawaiian bobtail squid as a model system for selective particle capture in microfluidic systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Janna; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Dabiri, John

    2013-11-01

    Juvenile Hawaiian bobtail squids reliably capture and isolate a single species of bacteria, Vibrio fischeri, from inhaled coastal water containing a huge background of living and non-living particles of comparable size. Biochemical mechanisms orchestrate a chain of specific interactions as soon as V.fischeri attach to the squid's internal light organ. It remains unclear, however, how the bacteria carried by the squid's ventilation currents are initially attracted to the light organ's surface. Here we present preliminary experimental data showing how arrangement and coordination of the cilia covering the light organ create a 3D flow field that facilitates advection, sieving and selective retention of flow-borne particles. These studies may inspire novel microfluidic tools for detection and capture of specific cells and particles.

  14. Anisotropic ferromagnetic polymer: A first step for their implementation in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Damien; Dhungana, Daya; Ourry, Laurence; Faivre, Magalie; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Tamion, Alexandre; Dupuis, Véronique; Salles, Vincent; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2016-05-01

    Here we report on the influence of anisotropic microstructure on the performances of magnetically soft micro-patterns intended to integrate microfluidic systems. These micro-patterns are made of a composite obtained by mixing carbonyl iron particles with polydimethylsiloxane, which offers practical integration advantages. We investigated a wide range of magnetic particle loadings, from 10wt% to 83wt%, reaching magnetization as high as 630 kA/m. A homogeneous field was applied during the polymer's cross-linking phase so that to obtain a 1D arrangement of the particles in the solidified polymer, along the field direction. Here we present the results obtained for square-based micro-pillars prepared under a magnetic field applied along one of its diagonal. We assessed the magnetic anisotropy owing to the particles' spatial arrangement by comparing the magnetization processes along the two diagonals of the micro-pillar's base. The magnetic susceptibilities along the two directions differ from a factor greater than three. The results can be described in terms of high aspect ratio and porous magnetic agglomerates.

  15. A microfluidic fluorescence measurement system using an astigmatic diffractive microlens array

    SciTech Connect

    Schonbrun, E.; Steinvurzel, P.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-01-12

    We demonstrate an opto-fluidic detection system based on an array of astigmatic diffractive microlenses integrated into a microfluidic flow focus device. Each astigmatic microlens produces a line excitation across the channel and collects fluorescence emission from the linear detection regions. The linear excitation spot results in uniform excitation across the channel and high time resolution in the direction of the flow. Collected fluorescence from each integrated microlens is relayed to a sub-region on a fast CMOS camera. By analyzing the signal from individual microlenses, we demonstrate counting and resolution of 500 nm and 1.1 μm beads at rates of up to 8,300 per second at multiple locations. In addition, a cross-correlation analysis of the signals from different microlenses yields the velocity dispersion of beads traveling through the channel at peak speeds as high as 560 mm/s. Arrays of specifically designed diffractive optics promise to increase the resolution and functionality of opto-fluidic analysis such as flow cytometry and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

  16. Cosmo Cassette: A Microfluidic Microgravity Microbial System For Synthetic Biology Unit Tests and Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berliner, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Although methods in the design-build-test life cycle of the synthetic biology field have grown rapidly, the expansion has been non-uniform. The design and build stages in development have seen innovations in the form of biological CAD and more efficient means for building DNA, RNA, and other biological constructs. The testing phase of the cycle remains in need of innovation. Presented will be both a theoretical abstraction of biological measurement and a practical demonstration of a microfluidics-based platform for characterizing synthetic biological phenomena. Such a platform demonstrates a design of additive manufacturing (3D printing) for construction of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to be used in experiments carried out in space. First, the biocompatibility of the polypropylene chassis will be demonstrated. The novel MFCs will be cheaper, and faster to make and iterate through designs. The novel design will contain a manifold switchingdistribution system and an integrated in-chip set of reagent reservoirs fabricated via 3D printing. The automated nature of the 3D printing yields itself to higher resolution switching valves and leads to smaller sized payloads, lower cost, reduced power and a standardized platform for synthetic biology unit tests on Earth and in space. It will be demonstrated that the application of unit testing in synthetic biology will lead to the automatic construction and validation of desired constructs. Unit testing methodologies offer benefits of preemptive problem identification, change of facility, simplicity of integration, ease of documentation, and separation of interface from implementation, and automated design.

  17. Design of a microfluidic system for red blood cell aggregation investigation.

    PubMed

    Mehri, R; Mavriplis, C; Fenech, M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to design a microfluidic apparatus capable of providing controlled flow conditions suitable for red blood cell (RBC) aggregation analysis. The linear velocity engendered from the controlled flow provides constant shear rates used to qualitatively analyze RBC aggregates. The design of the apparatus is based on numerical and experimental work. The numerical work consists of 3D numerical simulations performed using a research computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver, Nek5000, while the experiments are conducted using a microparticle image velocimetry system. A Newtonian model is tested numerically and experimentally, then blood is tested experimentally under several conditions (hematocrit, shear rate, and fluid suspension) to be compared to the simulation results. We find that using a velocity ratio of 4 between the two Newtonian fluids, the layer corresponding to blood expands to fill 35% of the channel thickness where the constant shear rate is achieved. For blood experiments, the velocity profile in the blood layer is approximately linear, resulting in the desired controlled conditions for the study of RBC aggregation under several flow scenarios. PMID:24700377

  18. A novel microfluidic system for the mass production of Inertial Fusion Energy shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N. T.

    2016-04-01

    A system which can mass produce millimetre sized spherical polymer shells economically and with high precision will be a great step towards the Inertial Fusion Energy goal. Microfluidics has shown itself to be a disruptive technology, where a rapid and continuous production of compound emulsions can be processed into such shells. Planar emulsion generators co-flow-focus in one step (COFON) and cascaded co-flow- focus (COFUS) enable millimetre compound emulsions to be produced using a one or two step formation process respectively. The co-flow-focus geometry uses symmetric and curved carrier fluid entrance walls to create a focusing orifice-minima and a carrier flow which aids movement and shaping of the dispersed fluid(s) towards the outlet, whilst maintaining operation in the dripping regime. Precision concentric alignment of these compound emulsions remains one of the greatest challenges. However steps to solve this passively using curved channel modulation to perturbate the emulsion have shown that rapid alignment can be achieved. Issues with satellite droplet formation, repeatability of the emulsion generation and cost are also addressed.

  19. A dielectrophoretic-gravity driven particle focusing technique for digital microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiei, Ehsan; Rezaei Nejad, Hojatollah; Hoorfar, Mina

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, a particle focusing technique functioning based on the cumulative effects of gravity and negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP) is developed for digital microfluidic (DMF) systems. This technique works using the conventional electrodes used for droplet manipulation without a need for geometrical modification. Particle manipulation is performed by applying an AC voltage to the electrode above which there is the droplet containing the non-buoyant particles. The particles sediment due to the difference between the gravitational and the vertical component of the nDEP forces, while the horizontal component of the nDEP force concentrates them on the center of the electrode. Therefore, the magnitude of the voltage must be kept within an effective range to have simultaneous effects of sedimentation (dominated by gravity) and concentration (due to the horizontal component of the nDEP force). The physics of the phenomenon is explained using simulation. The effects of the magnitude of the applied voltage, the particle size and density, and the electrode size on the focusing behavior of the particles are studied. Finally, a potential application of the present technique is illustrated for particle concentration in DMF.

  20. A standalone perfusion platform for drug testing and target validation in micro-vessel networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boyang; Peticone, Carlotta; Murthy, Shashi K.; Radisic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    Studying the effects of pharmacological agents on human endothelium includes the routine use of cell monolayers cultivated in multi-well plates. This configuration fails to recapitulate the complex architecture of vascular networks in vivo and does not capture the relationship between shear stress (i.e. flow) experienced by the cells and dose of the applied pharmacological agents. Microfluidic platforms have been applied extensively to create vascular systems in vitro; however, they rely on bulky external hardware to operate, which hinders the wide application of microfluidic chips by non-microfluidic experts. Here, we have developed a standalone perfusion platform where multiple devices were perfused at a time with a single miniaturized peristaltic pump. Using the platform, multiple micro-vessel networks, that contained three levels of branching structures, were created by culturing endothelial cells within circular micro-channel networks mimicking the geometrical configuration of natural blood vessels. To demonstrate the feasibility of our platform for drug testing and validation assays, a drug induced nitric oxide assay was performed on the engineered micro-vessel network using a panel of vaso-active drugs (acetylcholine, phenylephrine, atorvastatin, and sildenafil), showing both flow and drug dose dependent responses. The interactive effects between flow and drug dose for sildenafil could not be captured by a simple straight rectangular channel coated with endothelial cells, but it was captured in a more physiological branching circular network. A monocyte adhesion assay was also demonstrated with and without stimulation by an inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α. PMID:24404058

  1. A microfluidic reciprocating intracochlear drug delivery system with reservoir and active dose control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ernest S.; Gustenhoven, Erich; Mescher, Mark J.; Pararas, Erin E. Leary; Smith, Kim A.; Spencer, Abigail J.; Tandon, Vishal; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Fiering, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Reciprocating microfluidic drug delivery, as compared to steady or pulsed infusion, has unique features which may be advantageous in many therapeutic applications. We have previously described a device, designed for wearable use in small animal models, which periodically infuses then withdraws a sub-microliter volume of drug solution to and from the endogenous fluid of the inner ear. This delivery approach results in zero net volume of liquid transfer while enabling mass transport of compounds to the cochlea by means of diffusion and mixing. We report here on an advanced wearable delivery system aimed at further miniaturization and complex dose protocols. Enhancements to the system include the incorporation of a planar micropump to generate reciprocating flow and a novel drug reservoir which maintains zero net volume delivery and permits programmable modulation of the drug concentration in the infused bolus. The reciprocating pump is fabricated from laminated polymer films and employs a miniature electromagnetic actuator to meet the size and weight requirements of a head-mounted in vivo guinea pig testing system. The reservoir comprises a long microchannel in series with a micropump, connected in parallel with the reciprocating flow network. We characterized in vitro the response and repeatability of the planar pump and compared the results with a lumped element simulation. We also characterized the performance of the reservoir, including repeatability of dosing and range of dose modulation. Acute in vivo experiments were performed in which the reciprocating pump was used to deliver a test compound to the cochlea of anesthetized guinea pigs to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of the system. These advances are key steps toward realization of an implantable device for long-term therapeutic applications in humans. PMID:24302432

  2. A microfluidic system for studying the behavior of zebrafish larvae under acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Erickstad, Michael; Hale, Laura A; Chalasani, Sreekanth H; Groisman, Alex

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen is essential for metabolism of animals and is a vital component of their natural habitats. Hypoxic conditions in tissue, when oxygen levels are lower than normal, change a variety of cellular processes, while environmental hypoxia can have physiological and behavioral effects on the whole animal. Larval zebrafish respond to oxygen deprivation with a characteristic set of physiological changes and motor behaviors, making them a convenient vertebrate model to study hypoxia responses. However, to date, hypoxia studies in zebrafish are limited by the existing experimental setups, which only impose hypoxia on a scale of minutes to hours. Here, we present a microfluidic system, which makes it possible to expose spatially confined unanesthetized zebrafish larvae to a broad range of hypoxic and normoxic conditions and to switch between different oxygen concentrations in the medium around the larvae on a 2 second timescale. We used the system to observe different behavioral responses of zebrafish larvae to three levels of rapidly imposed hypoxia. Larvae increased their rate of body movements in response to the strongest hypoxia and increased their rate of pectoral fin beats in response to all levels of hypoxia. Importantly, the behavior of the larvae changed within 15 seconds of the changes in the oxygen content of the medium. The proposed experimental system can be used to study the behavior of zebrafish larvae or other aquatic organisms exposed to other water-dissolved gasses or to different temporal patterns of oxygen concentration. This system can also potentially be used for testing the effects of genetic modifications and small molecule drugs and for probing neural mechanisms underlying various behaviors. PMID:25490410

  3. Thermal imaging of microfluidic systems as a model for investigating energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Michael G.; Chiou, Richard Y.; Varapula, Dharma T.; Kamarajugadda, Pranav R.; Liu, Changchun; Tseng, Tzu-Liang (.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the use of a commercial thermal imaging infrared camera (7-12 micron, uncooled microbolometer array, 320 x 240 resolution) to characterize microfluidic devices with the aims of: 1) evaluating the usefulness of thermal imaging to assess various flow configurations with respect to heat transfer, and 2) developing educational laboratory projects combining rapid prototyping, thermal imaging, microfluidics, and heat transfer. We investigated concurrent and countercurrent heat exchangers, mixing streams of different temperature (cold and hot water), mixing streams yielding a heat of mixing (ethanol and water), mixing streams yielding a heat of reaction (acid-base neutralization), and freezing and heating flowing streams in channels with a Peltier module. Energy efficiency can be assessed to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of microfluidic designs. Substantial improvements in mixing and heat transfer using a magnetic stirrer are demonstrated with thermal imaging.

  4. Tacky COC: a solvent bonding technique for fabrication of microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nico; Nargang, Tobias M.; Helmer, Dorothea; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    The academic community knows cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) as a well suited material for microfluidic applications because COC has numerous interesting properties such as high transmittance, good chemical resistance and good biocompatibility. Here we present a fast and cost-effective method for bonding of two COC substrates: exposure to appropriate solvents gives a tacky COC surface which when brought in contact with untreated COC forms a strong and optical clear bond. The bonding process is carried out at room temperature and takes less than three minutes which makes it significantly faster than currently described methods: This method does not require special lab equipment such as hot plates or hydraulic presses. The mild conditions of the bond process also allow for such "tacky COC" lids to be used for sealing of microfluidic chips containing immobilized protein patterns which is of high interest for immunodiagnostic testing inside microfluidic chips.

  5. Human periosteal-derived cell expansion in a perfusion bioreactor system: proliferation, differentiation and extracellular matrix formation.

    PubMed

    Sonnaert, M; Papantoniou, I; Bloemen, V; Kerckhofs, G; Luyten, F P; Schrooten, J

    2014-09-01

    Perfusion bioreactor systems have shown to be a valuable tool for the in vitro development of three-dimensional (3D) cell-carrier constructs. Their use for cell expansion, however, has been much less explored. Since maintenance of the initial cell phenotype is essential in this process, it is imperative to obtain insight into the bioreactor-related variables determining cell fate. Therefore, this study investigated the influence of fluid flow-induced shear stress on the proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition of human periosteal-derived cells in the absence of additional differentiation-inducing stimuli; 120 000 cells were seeded on additive manufactured 3D Ti6Al4V scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days at different flow rates in the range 0.04-6 ml/min. DNA measurements showed, on average, a three-fold increase in cell content for all perfused conditions in comparison to static controls, whereas the magnitude of the flow rate did not have an influence. Contrast-enhanced nanofocus X-ray computed tomography showed substantial formation of an engineered neotissue in all perfused conditions, resulting in a filling (up to 70%) of the total internal void volume, and no flow rate-dependent differences were observed. The expression of key osteogenic markers, such as RunX2, OCN, OPN and Col1, did not show any significant changes in comparison to static controls after 28 days of culture, with the exception of OSX at high flow rates. We therefore concluded that, in the absence of additional osteogenic stimuli, the investigated perfusion conditions increased cell proliferation but did not significantly enhance osteogenic differentiation, thus allowing for this process to be used for cell expansion. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25186024

  6. Spatially Selective Reagent Delivery into Cancer Cells Using a Two-Layer Microfluidic Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Butler, W. Boyd; Pappas, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a two-layer microfluidic system capable of spatially selective delivery of drugs and other reagents under low shear stress. Loading occurs by hydrodynamically focusing a reagent stream over a particular region of the cell culture. The system consisted of a cell culture chamber and fluid flow channel, which were located in different layers to reduce shear stress on cells. Cells in the center of the culture chamber were exposed to parallel streams of laminar flow, which allowed fast changes to be made to the cellular environment. The shear force was reduced to 2.7 dyn/cm2 in the two-layer device (vs. 6.0 dyn/cm2 in a one-layer device). Cells in the side of the culture chamber were exposed to the side streams of buffer; the shear force was further reduced to a greater extent since the sides of the culture chamber were separated from the main fluid path. The channel shape and flow rate of the multiple streams were optimized for spatially-controlled reagent delivery. The boundaries between streams were well controlled at a flow rate of 0.1 mL/h, which was optimized for all streams. We demonstrated multi-reagent delivery to different regions of the same culture well, as well as selective treatment of cancer cells with a built in control group in the same well. In the case of apoptosis induction using staurosporine, 10% of cells remained viable after 24 hours of exposure. Cells in the same chamber, but not exposed to staurosporine, had a viability of 90%. This chip allows dynamic observation of cellular behavior immediately after drug delivery, as well as long-term drug treatment with the benefit of large cell numbers, device simplicity, and low shear stress. PMID:22882832

  7. Microfluidic Preparative Free-Flow Isoelectric Focusing: System Optimization for Protein Complex Separation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jian; Wilker, Erik W.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2010-01-01

    Isoelectric Focusing (IEF) is the first step for two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and plays an important role in sample purification for proteomics. However, biases in protein size and pI resolution, as well as limitations in sample volume, gel capacity, sample loss, and experimental time, remain challenges. In order to address some of the limitations of traditional IEF, we present a microfluidic free flow IEF (FF-IEF) device for continuous protein separation into 24 fractions. The device reproducibly establishes a nearly linear pH gradient from 4 to 10. Optimized dynamic coatings of 4% poly (vinyl) alcohol (PVA) minimize peak broadening by transverse electrokinetic flows. Even though the device operates at high electric fields (up to 370V/cm) efficient cooling maintains solution temperature inside the separation channel controllably in the range 2 – 25 °C. Protein samples with a dynamic concentration range between µg/mL to mg/mL can be loaded into the micro device at a flow rate of 1 mL/hr and residence time of ~12 min. By using a protein complex of 9 proteins and 13 isoforms, we demonstrate improved separation with the FF-IEF system over traditional 2D gel electrophoresis. Device to device reproducibility is also illustrated through the efficient depletion of the albumin and hemoglobin assays. Post-device sample concentrations result in a 10 to 20-fold increase, which allow for isolation and detection of low abundance proteins. The separation of specific proteins from a whole cell lysate is demonstrated as an example. The micro device has the further benefits of retaining high molecular weight proteins, providing higher yield of protein that has a broader range in pI, and reducing experimental time compared to conventional IEF IGP gel strip approaches. PMID:20092256

  8. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Barany, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft3). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic system

  9. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  10. Multiple enzyme-doped thread-based microfluidic system for blood urea nitrogen and glucose detection in human whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-An

    2015-01-01

    This research presents a multiple enzyme-doped thread-based microfluidic system for blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and glucose detection in human whole blood. A novel enzyme-doped thread coated with a thin polyvinylchloride (PVC) membrane is produced for on-site electrochemical detection of urea and glucose in whole blood. Multiple enzymes can be directly applied to the thread without delicate pretreatment or a surface modification process prior to sealing the thread with PVC membrane. Results indicate that the developed device exhibits a good linear dynamic range for detecting urea and glucose in concentrations from 0.1 mM–10.0 mM (R2 = 0.9850) and 0.1 mM–13.0 mM (R2 = 0.9668), which is suitable for adoption in detecting the concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN, 1.78–7.12 mM) and glucose (3.89–6.11 mM) in serum. The detection result also shows that the developed thread-based microfluidic system can successfully separate and detect the ions, BUN, and glucose in blood. The calculated concentrations of BUN and glucose ante cibum (glucose before meal) in the whole blood sample are 3.98 mM and 4.94 mM, respectively. The developed thread-based microfluidic system provides a simple yet high performance for clinical diagnostics. PMID:25825613

  11. Microfluidic bead suspension hopper.

    PubMed

    Price, Alexander K; MacConnell, Andrew B; Paegel, Brian M

    2014-05-20

    Many high-throughput analytical platforms, from next-generation DNA sequencing to drug discovery, rely on beads as carriers of molecular diversity. Microfluidic systems are ideally suited to handle and analyze such bead libraries with high precision and at minute volume scales; however, the challenge of introducing bead suspensions into devices before they sediment usually confounds microfluidic handling and analysis. We developed a bead suspension hopper that exploits sedimentation to load beads into a microfluidic droplet generator. A suspension hopper continuously delivered synthesis resin beads (17 μm diameter, 112,000 over 2.67 h) functionalized with a photolabile linker and pepstatin A into picoliter-scale droplets of an HIV-1 protease activity assay to model ultraminiaturized compound screening. Likewise, trypsinogen template DNA-coated magnetic beads (2.8 μm diameter, 176,000 over 5.5 h) were loaded into droplets of an in vitro transcription/translation system to model a protein evolution experiment. The suspension hopper should effectively remove any barriers to using suspensions as sample inputs, paving the way for microfluidic automation to replace robotic library distribution. PMID:24761972

  12. Submental Perforator Flap Design with a Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging System: The Relation between Number of Perforators, Flap Perfusion, and Venous Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aya; Lee, Bernard T.; Winer, Joshua H.; Laurence, Rita G.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Background The submental flap is a reliable alternative to microsurgical reconstruction of facial deformities, providing an excellent cosmetic match with the contour and color of the face. In this study, we evaluated submental flap design by employing near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence angiography to identify perforator arteries (PAs). The impact of the number of preserved PAs on flap perfusion and venous drainage were quantified. Methods Indocyanine green was injected intravenously into n = 18 pigs. Three groups of 6 animals each had one, two, or three PAs preserved. The FLARE™ NIR fluorescence imaging system was employed for image acquisition. Images were recorded before and after flap creation, and every h, for 6 h. The time to maximum perfusion, the drainage ratio (an indicator of venous drainage), and the percentage of perfused flap area were analyzed statistically at each time point. Results Flaps with a single dominant PA had an initial mean perfused area of 80%, which improved to 97% at 6 h. For flaps with two and three preserved PAs, perfused area at 6 h was 99.8% and 100%, respectively. A significant increase was observed in all three metrics as more vessels were preserved. Regardless of the number of PAs preserved, though, all three metrics improved over 6 h. Conclusions NIR fluorescence angiography can reliably identify submental PAs for flap design, and can be used to assess flap perfusion and venous drainage in real-time. Flap metrics at 6 h were equivalent when either one, or multiple PAs, were preserved. PMID:19935293

  13. Identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using an integrated and modular microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Soper, Steven A

    2013-02-21

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of hospital-acquired (HA-MRSA) infection worldwide. As a result, the rapid and specific detection of MRSA is crucial not only for early prevention of disease spread, but also for the effective treatment of these infections. We report here an integrated modular-based microfluidic system for MRSA identification, which can carry out the multi-step assay used for MRSA identification in a single disposable fluidic cartridge. The multi-step assay included PCR amplification of the mecA gene harboring methicillin resistance loci that can provide information on drug susceptibility, ligase detection reaction (LDR) to generate fluorescent ligation products appended with a zip-code complement that directs the ligation product to a particular address on a universal array containing zip-code probes and a universal DNA array, which consisted of a planar waveguide for evanescent excitation. The fluidic cartridge design was based on a modular format, in which certain steps of the molecular processing pipeline were poised on a module made from a thermoplastic. The cartridge was comprised of a module interconnected to a fluidic motherboard configured in a 3-dimensional network; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and was used for PCR and LDR, while the module was made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, and contained an air-embedded waveguide serving as the support for the universal array. Fluid handling, thermal management and optical readout hardware were situated off-chip and configured into a small footprint instrument. In this work, the cartridge was used to carry out a multiplexed PCR/LDR coupled with the universal array allowed for simultaneous detection of five genes that encode for 16S ribosomal RNA (SG16S), protein A (spa), the femA protein of S. epidermidis (femA), the virulence factor of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the gene that confers methicillin resistance (mecA). Results

  14. Design and validation of a system to simulate coronary flexure dynamics on arterial segments perfused ex vivo.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, J Scott; Londono, Ricardo; Nieponice, Alejandro; Vorp, David A

    2009-02-01

    Cyclic flexure of the coronary arteries can lead to spatially varying fluid and solid stress patterns. These patterns may explain the heterogenous distribution of atherosclerotic lesions. Here we describe the design and validation of an experimental system to simulate coronary-like flexure dynamics on intact arterial segments ex vivo. Our previously described ex vivo perfusion system was modified with a polymer flexure membrane controlled by a custom data acquisition/motion control system. The system was validated by perfusing arterial segments with pulsatile hemodynamics with or without cyclic flexure. Digital images were obtained to quantify dynamic vessel curvature and arc length. Tissue integrity was assessed by histology. The device generated physiologic curvatures (0-1.8 cm(-1)) at 1 Hz with a physiologic phase relationship with the pressure waveform. Additionally, the in vivo longitudinal extension ratio (40%) was maintained within 2.3% during the flexure cycle. Twelve hours of cyclic contact with the membrane did not compromise arterial segment integrity. This device provides a novel method to examine how the local biomechanical milieu could impact atherosclerotic lesion localization. PMID:18297319

  15. Application of perfusion culture system improves in vitro and in vivo osteogenesis of bone marrow-derived osteoblastic cells in porous ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yichao; Uemura, Toshimasa; Dong, Jian; Kojima, Hiroko; Tanaka, Junzo; Tateishi, Tetsuya

    2003-12-01

    Composites of bone marrow-derived osteoblasts (BMOs) and porous ceramics have been widely used as a bone graft model for bone tissue engineering. Perfusion culture has potential utility for many cell types in three-dimensional (3D) culture. Our hypothesis was that perfusion of medium would increase the cell viability and biosynthetic activity of BMOs in porous ceramic materials, which would be revealed by increased levels of alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) and enhanced bone formation in vivo. For testing in vitro, BMO/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites were cultured in a perfusion container (Minucells and Minutissue, Bad Abbach, Germany) with fresh medium delivered at a rate of 2 mL/h by a peristaltic pump. The ALP activity and OCN content of composites were measured at the end of 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of subculture. For testing in vivo, after subculturing for 2 weeks, the composites were subcutaneously implanted into syngeneic rats. These implants were harvested 4 or 8 weeks later. The samples then underwent a biochemical analysis of ALP activity and OCN content and were observed by light microscopy. The levels of ALP activity and OCN in the composites were significantly higher in the perfusion group than in the control group (p < 0.01), both in vitro and in vivo. Histomorphometric analysis of the hematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections revealed a higher average ratio of bone to pore in BMO/beta-TCP composites of the perfusion group after implantation: 47.64 +/- 6.16 for the perfusion group and 26.22 +/- 4.84 for control at 4 weeks (n = 6, p < 0.01); 67.97 +/- 3.58 for the perfusion group and 47.39 +/- 4.10 for control at 8 weeks (n = 6, p < 0.05). These results show that the application of a perfusion culture system during the subculture of BMOs in a porous ceramic scaffold is beneficial to their osteogenesis. After differentiation culture in vitro with the perfusion culture system, the activity of the osteoblastic cells and the

  16. Flexible opto-electronics enabled microfluidics systems with cloud connectivity for point-of-care micronutrient analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen; Aranyosi, A J; Wong, Michelle D; Hong, Ji Hyung; Lowe, Jared; Chan, Carol; Garlock, David; Shaw, Scott; Beattie, Patrick D; Kratochvil, Zachary; Kubasti, Nick; Seagers, Kirsten; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Swanson, Christina D

    2016-04-15

    In developing countries, the deployment of medical diagnostic technologies remains a challenge because of infrastructural limitations (e.g. refrigeration, electricity), and paucity of health professionals, distribution centers and transportation systems. Here we demonstrate the technical development and clinical testing of a novel electronics enabled microfluidic paper-based analytical device (EE-μPAD) for quantitative measurement of micronutrient concentrations in decentralized, resource-limited settings. The system performs immune-detection using paper-based microfluidics, instrumented with flexible electronics and optoelectronic sensors in a mechanically robust, ultrathin format comparable in size to a credit card. Autonomous self-calibration, plasma separation, flow monitoring, timing and data storage enable multiple devices to be run simultaneously. Measurements are wirelessly transferred to a mobile phone application that geo-tags the data and transmits it to a remote server for real time tracking of micronutrient deficiencies. Clinical tests of micronutrient levels from whole blood samples (n=95) show comparable sensitivity and specificity to ELISA-based tests. These results demonstrate instantaneous acquisition and global aggregation of diagnostics data using a fully integrated point of care system that will enable rapid and distributed surveillance of disease prevalence and geographical progression. PMID:26630284

  17. Bead-Based Assays for Biodetection: From Flow-Cytometry to Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby J.

    2009-05-04

    ABSTRACT The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for detection of biological species will be described: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. The methods and automated fluidic systems used for trapping functionalized microbeads will be described. This approach allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive assays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in assay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical assays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based assays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (> 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100’s of picomolar range (10’s of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach. Video taping magnetic nanoparticle capture and release was used to improve understanding of the process and revealed interesting behavior.

  18. Self-assembled magnetic bead chains for sensitivity enhancement of microfluidic electrochemical biosensor platforms.

    PubMed

    Armbrecht, L; Dincer, C; Kling, A; Horak, J; Kieninger, J; Urban, G

    2015-11-21

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to enhance the sensitivity of microfluidic biosensor platforms with self-assembled magnetic bead chains. An adjustable, more than 5-fold sensitivity enhancement is achieved by introducing a magnetic field gradient along a microfluidic channel by means of a soft-magnetic lattice with a 350 μm spacing. The alternating magnetic field induces the self-assembly of the magnetic beads in chains or clusters and thus improves the perfusion and active contact between the analyte and the beads. The soft-magnetic lattices can be applied independent of the channel geometry or chip material to any microfluidic biosensing platform. At the same time, the bead-based approach achieves chip reusability and shortened measurement times. The bead chain properties and the maximum flow velocity for bead retention were validated by optical microscopy in a glass capillary. The magnetic actuation system was successfully validated with a biotin-streptavidin model assay on a low-cost electrochemical microfluidic chip, fabricated by dry-film photoresist technology (DFR). Labelling with glucose oxidase (GOx) permits rapid electrochemical detection of enzymatically produced H2O2. PMID:26394820

  19. Bead-based assays for biodetection: from flow-cytometry to microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozanich, Richard M., Jr.; Antolick, Kathryn; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2009-05-01

    The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for antibody-based detection of biological species are described in this paper: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. These approaches both involve the use of automated fluidic systems for trapping antibody-functionalized microbeads, which allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive immunoassays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in immunoassay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical immunoassays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based immunoassays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (>= 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100's of picomolar range (10's of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach.

  20. Rapid microfluidic thermal cycler for nucleic acid amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Vafai, Kambiz

    2015-10-27

    A system for thermal cycling a material to be thermal cycled including a microfluidic heat exchanger; a porous medium in the microfluidic heat exchanger; a microfluidic thermal cycling chamber containing the material to be thermal cycled, the microfluidic thermal cycling chamber operatively connected to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at first temperature; a first system for transmitting the working fluid at first temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a working fluid at a second temperature, a second system for transmitting the working fluid at second temperature to the microfluidic heat exchanger; a pump for flowing the working fluid at the first temperature from the first system to the microfluidic heat exchanger and through the porous medium; and flowing the working fluid at the second temperature from the second system to the heat exchanger and through the porous medium.

  1. Development and characterization of fatty acid-coated microgels within microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Mary L.

    2003-10-01

    Fatty acid-coated hydrogel microstructures (mugels) were prepared within microfluidic devices and their properties were investigated. A photopolymerization technique was used to position pH-sensitive mugels within microchannels, and lipophilic acid chlorides were covalently grafted to these objects with an in situ process. The resulting hydrophobic coatings served as selectively permeable barriers that enabled pH-sensitive mugels to remain contracted while bathed by buffered solutions that caused expansion in unmodified samples. Modified mugels were capable of swelling once the fatty acid coating was physically disrupted. Barrier permeability was also chemically induced with buffered detergent solutions, triggering complete hydrogel expansion through an asymmetric process. The influence of the fatty acid chain length on the ion gradient stability in the absence of perturbing additives was investigated. In contrast to solid-supported self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), the ion gradient stability of the modified mugels did not increase with increasing chain length, suggesting the structure of the fatty acid coating was inherently different from that of a SAM. The structure of the fatty acid-modified mugels was elucidated through the characterization of comparable hydrogel substrates. Imaging the microstructures with scanning electron microscopy revealed a rough and irregular hydrogel surface, which indicated structural assessment would be challenging since many surface characterization techniques require smooth substrates to acquire depth profiles. The presence of the fatty acid coating was confirmed through investigation of an analogous model system with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and the use of a lipophilic fluorescent dye indicated the coating was confined to the periphery of the mugel. Transmission electron microscopy imaging of modified nonionic hydrogels revealed the mugel matrix was

  2. Resonance Raman study of the oxygenation cycle of optically trapped single red blood cells in a microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Logg, Katarina; Enger, Jonas; Goksor, Mattias; Kall, Mikael; Hanstorp, Dag

    2004-10-01

    The average environmental response of red blood cells (RBCs) is routinely measured in ensemble studies, but in such investigations valuable information on the single cell level is obscured. In order to elucidate this hidden information is is important to enable the selection of single cells with certain properties while subsequent dynamics triggered by environmental stimulation are recorded in real time. It is also desirable to manipulate and control the cells under phsyiological conditions. As shown here, this can be achieved by combining optical tweezers with a confocal Raman set-up equipped with a microfluidic system. A micro-Raman set-up is combined with an optical trap with separate optical paths, lasers and objectives, which enables the acquisition of resonance Raman profils of single RBCs. The microfluidic system, giving full control over the media surrounding the cell, consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs produced by electron beam lithography and moulded in PDMS. Fresh Hepes buffer or buffer containing sodium dithionite are transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the direct Raman response of the single optically trapped RBC is registered in another reservoir in the middle of the channel. Thus, it is possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle in a single cell and to study photo-induced chemistry. This experimental set-up has high potential for monitoring the drug response or conformational changes caused by other environmental stimuli for many types of single functional cells since "in vivo" conditions can be created.

  3. Fabrication Methods and Performance of Low-Permeability Microfluidic Components for a Miniaturized Wearable Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Mescher, Mark J.; Swan, Erin E. Leary; Fiering, Jason; Holmboe, Maria E.; Sewell, William F.; Kujawa, Sharon G.; McKenna, Michael J.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe low-permeability components of a microfluidic drug delivery system fabricated with versatile micromilling and lamination techniques. The fabrication process uses laminate sheets which are machined using XY milling tables commonly used in the printed-circuit industry. This adaptable platform for polymer microfluidics readily accommodates integration with silicon-based sensors, printed-circuit, and surface-mount technologies. We have used these methods to build components used in a wearable liquid-drug delivery system for in vivo studies. The design, fabrication, and performance of membrane-based fluidic capacitors and manual screw valves provide detailed examples of the capability and limitations of the fabrication method. We demonstrate fluidic capacitances ranging from 0.015 to 0.15 μL/kPa, screw valves with on/off flow ratios greater than 38 000, and a 45× reduction in the aqueous fluid loss rate to the ambient due to permeation through a silicone diaphragm layer. PMID:20852729

  4. Ex-Vivo Lymphatic Perfusion System for Independently Controlling Pressure Gradient and Transmural Pressure in Isolated Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2015-01-01

    In addition to external forces, collecting lymphatic vessels intrinsically contract to transport lymph from the extremities to the venous circulation. As a result, the lymphatic endothelium is routinely exposed to a wide range of dynamic mechanical forces, primarily fluid shear stress and circumferential stress, which have both been shown to affect lymphatic pumping activity. Although various ex-vivo perfusion systems exist to study this innate pumping activity in response to mechanical stimuli, none are capable of independently controlling the two primary mechanical forces affecting lymphatic contractility: transaxial pressure gradient, ΔP, which governs fluid shear stress; and average transmural pressure, Pavg, which governs circumferential stress. Hence, the authors describe a novel ex-vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling these two outputs using a linear, explicit model predictive control (MPC) algorithm. The ELPS is capable of reproducing arbitrary waveforms within the frequency range observed in the lymphatics in vivo, including a time-varying ΔP with a constant Pavg, time-varying ΔP and Pavg, and a constant ΔP with a time-varying Pavg. In addition, due to its implementation of syringes to actuate the working fluid, a post-hoc method of estimating both the flow rate through the vessel and fluid wall shear stress over multiple, long (5 sec) time windows is also described. PMID:24809724

  5. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  6. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  7. The active transport of 5-hydroxyindol-3-ylacetic acid and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid from a recirculatory perfusion system of the cerebral ventricles of the unanaesthetized dog

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, G. W.; Dow, R. C.; Moir, A. T. B.

    1968-01-01

    1. An operation on dogs for the implantation of guide tubes to the lateral ventricle and cisterna magna and a method whereby the ventricular space can be repeatedly perfused in conscious and unrestrained animals are described. 2. The characteristics of a recirculatory perfusion system were examined and the bulk formation and absorption of cerebrospinal fluid and the volume of the ventricular space perfused were derived from the concentrations achieved during the infusion of inulin into the system. 3. 5-hydroxyindol-3-ylacetic acid (5-HIAA), the acid metabolite of 5-hydroxytryptamine, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HVA), the main acid metabolite of dopamine, were demonstrated to be mainly removed from cerebrospinal fluid (c.s.f.) by an active transport system localized in the region of the fourth ventricle. 4. It was possible to inhibit the active transport of these acids from cerebrospinal fluid by pre-treating the dogs with probenecid. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2 PMID:5723518

  8. Microfluidic waves.

    PubMed

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2011-11-21

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s(-1) result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  9. Multiplexed microfluidic enzyme assays for simultaneous detection of lipolysis products from adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Colleen E.; Cawthorn, William P.; MacDougald, Ormond A.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidics have enabled new cell biology experiments. Incorporating chemical monitoring of cellular secretion into chips offers the potential to increase information content and utility of such systems. In this work, an integrated, multilayer polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip was developed to simultaneously measure fatty acids and glycerol secreted from cultured adipocytes on-chip in near real-time. Approximately 48,000 adipocytes were loaded into a cell chamber in a reversibly-sealed chip. Cells were perfused at 0.75 μL/min. Cell perfusate was split and directed to separate, continuously operating fluorescent enzyme assay channel networks. The fluorescent assay products were detected simultaneously near the outlet of the chip. The fatty acid and glycerol assays had linear dynamic ranges to 150 μM and 110 μM, and LOD of 6 μM and 5 μM, respectively. Surface modifications including pretreatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate were utilized to prevent adsorption of fatty acids to the chip surface. Using the chip, basal fatty acid and glycerol concentrations ranged from 0.18–0.7 nmol 106 cell−1 min−1 and 0.23–0.85 nmol 106 cell−1 min−1, respectively. Using valves built into the chip, the perfusion solution was switched to add 20 μM isoproterenol, a β-adrenergic agonist, which stimulates the release of glycerol and fatty acids in adipocytes. This manipulation resulted in a rapid and stable 1.5- to 6.0-fold increase of NEFA and glycerol. The ratio of NEFA to glycerol released increased with adipocyte age. These experiments illustrate the potential for performing multiple real-time assays on cells in culture using microfluidic devices. PMID:24880873

  10. Multiplexed microfluidic enzyme assays for simultaneous detection of lipolysis products from adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Colleen E; Cawthorn, William P; MacDougald, Ormond A; Kennedy, Robert T

    2014-08-01

    Microfluidics has enabled new cell biology experiments. Incorporating chemical monitoring of cellular secretion into chips offers the potential to increase information content and utility of such systems. In this work, an integrated, multilayer polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip was developed to simultaneously measure fatty acids and glycerol secreted from cultured adipocytes on chip in near real time. Approximately 48,000 adipocytes were loaded into a cell chamber in a reversibly sealed chip. Cells were perfused at 0.75 μL/min. Cell perfusate was split and directed to separate, continuously operating fluorescent enzyme assay channel networks. The fluorescent assay products were detected simultaneously near the outlet of the chip. The fatty acid and glycerol assays had linear dynamic ranges of 150 and 110 μM and limit of detection (LOD) of 6 and 5 μM, respectively. Surface modifications including pretreatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate were utilized to prevent adsorption of fatty acids to the chip surface. Using the chip, basal fatty acid and glycerol concentrations ranged from 0.18 to 0.7 nmol × 10(6) cell(-1) min(-1) and from 0.23 to 0.85 nmol × 10(6) cell(-1) min(-1), respectively. Using valves built into the chip, the perfusion solution was switched to add 20 μM isoproterenol, a β-adrenergic agonist, which stimulates the release of glycerol and fatty acids in adipocytes. This manipulation resulted in a rapid and stable 1.5- to 6.0-fold increase of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and glycerol. The ratio of NEFA:glycerol released increased with adipocyte age. These experiments illustrate the potential for performing multiple real-time assays on cells in culture using microfluidic devices. PMID:24880873

  11. Engineering a perfusable 3D human liver platform from iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Arnout; Li, Cheri; Chhabra, Arnav; Seney, Benjamin Tschudy; Bhatia, Sangeeta

    2016-07-01

    In vitro models of human tissue are crucial to our ability to study human disease as well as develop safe and effective drug therapies. Models of single organs in static and microfluidic culture have been established and shown utility for modeling some aspects of health and disease; however, these systems lack multi-organ interactions that are critical to some aspects of drug metabolism and toxicity. Thus, as part of a consortium of researchers, we have developed a liver chip that meets the following criteria: (1) employs human iPS cells from a patient of interest, (2) cultures cells in perfusable 3D organoids, and (3) is robust to variations in perfusion rate so as to be compatible in series with other specialized tissue chips (e.g. heart, lung). In order to achieve this, we describe methods to form hepatocyte aggregates from primary and iPS-derived cells, alone and in co-culture with support cells. This necessitated a novel culture protocol for the interrupted differentiation of iPS cells that permits their removal from a plated surface and aggregation while maintaining phenotypic hepatic functions. In order to incorporate these 3D aggregates in a perfusable platform, we next encapsulated the cells in a PEG hydrogel to prevent aggregation and overgrowth once on chip. We adapted a C-trap chip architecture from the literature that enabled robust loading with encapsulated organoids and culture over a range of flow rates. Finally, we characterize the liver functions of this iHep organoid chip under perfusion and demonstrate a lifetime of at least 28 days. We envision that such this strategy can be generalized to other microfluidic tissue models and provides an opportunity to query patient-specific liver responses in vitro. PMID:27296616

  12. Scalable Approach for Extrusion and Perfusion of Tubular, Heterotypic Biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeronimo, Mark David

    Soft material tubes are critical in the vasculature of mammalian tissues, forming networks of blood vessels and airways. Homogeneous and heterogeneous hydrogel tubes were extruded in a one-step process using a three layer microfluidic device. Co-axial cylindrical flow of crosslinking solutions and an alginate matrix is generated by a radial arrangement of microfluidic channels at the device's vertical extrusion outlet. The flow is confined and begins a sol-gel transition immediately as it extrudes at velocities upwards of 4 mm/s. This approach allows for predictive control over the dimensions of the rapidly formed tubular structures for outer diameters from 600 microm to 3 mm. A second microfluidic device hosts tube segments for controlled perfusion and pressurization using a reversible vacuum seal. On-chip tube deflection is observed and modeled as a measure of material compliance and circumferential elasticity. I anticipate applications of these devices for perfusion cell culture of cell-laden hydrogel tubes.

  13. In Vitro Perfused Human Capillary Networks

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Monica L.; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Abraham P.; Hughes, Christopher C.W.

    2013-01-01

    Replicating in vitro the complex in vivo tissue microenvironment has the potential to transform our approach to medicine and also our understanding of biology. In order to accurately model the 3D arrangement and interaction of cells and extracellular matrix, new microphysiological systems must include a vascular supply. The vasculature not only provides the necessary convective transport of oxygen, nutrients, and waste in 3D culture, but also couples and integrates the responses of organ systems. Here we combine tissue engineering and microfluidic technology to create an in vitro 3D metabolically active stroma (∼1 mm3) that, for the first time, contains a perfused, living, dynamic, interconnected human capillary network. The range of flow rate (μm/s) and shear rate (s−1) within the network was 0–4000 and 0–1000, respectively, and thus included the normal physiological range. Infusion of FITC dextran demonstrated microvessels (15–50 μm) to be largely impermeable to 70 kDa. Our high-throughput biology-directed platform has the potential to impact a broad range of fields that intersect with the microcirculation, including tumor metastasis, drug discovery, vascular disease, and environmental chemical toxicity. PMID:23320912

  14. A low resistance microfluidic system for the creation of stable concentration gradients in a defined 3D microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Amadi, Ovid C.; Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Nishi, Yuichi; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D.; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of microfluidic technology allows control and interrogation of cell behavior by defining the local microenvironment with an assortment of biochemical and biophysical stimuli. Many approaches have been developed to create gradients of soluble factors, but the complexity of such systems or their inability to create defined and controllable chemical gradients has limited their widespread implementation. Here we describe a new microfluidic device which employs a parallel arrangement of wells and channels to create stable, linear concentration gradients in a gel region between a source and a sink well. Pressure gradients between the source and sink wells are dissipated through low resistance channels in parallel with the gel channel, thus minimizing the convection of solute in this region. We demonstrate the ability of the new device to quantitate chemotactic responses in a variety of cell types, yielding a complete profile of the migratory response and representing the total number of migrating cells and the distance each cell has migrated. Additionally we show the effect of concentration gradients of the morphogen Sonic hedgehog on the specification of differentiating neural progenitors in a 3-dimensional matrix. PMID:20661647

  15. A microfluidic device with multi-valves system to enable several simultaneous exposure tests on Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaehoon; Nakajima, Masahiro; Masaru, Takeuchi; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a microfluidic device with a multi-valve system to conduct several exposure tests on Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) simultaneously. It has pneumatic valves and no-moving-parts (NMP) valves. An NMP valve is incorporated with a chamber and enables the unidirectional movement of C. elegans in the chamber; once worms are loaded into the chamber, they cannot exit, regardless of the flow direction. To demonstrate the ability of the NMP valve to handle worms, we made a microfluidic device with three chambers. Each chamber was used to expose worms to Cd and Cu solutions, and K-medium. A pair of electrodes was installed in the device and the capacitance in-between the electrode was measured. When a C. elegans passed through the electrodes, the capacitance was changed. The capacitance change was proportional to the body volume of the worm, thus the body volume change by the heavy metal exposure was measured in the device. Thirty worms were divided into three groups and exposed to each solution. We confirmed that the different solutions induced differences in the capacitance changes for each group. These results indicate that our device is a viable method for simultaneously analyzing the effect of multiple stimuli on C. elegans.

  16. Development of microLIPS (Luciferase Immunoprecipitation Systems): a novel microfluidic assay for rapid serum antibody detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrangsu, Matt; Burbelo, Peter D.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Smith, Paul D.; Morgan, Nicole Y.

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of rapid, point-of-care antibody detection for the diagnosis of infectious and auto-immune diseases. In this paper, we present work on the development of a self-contained microfluidic format for the Luciferase Immunoprecipitation Systems (LIPS) assay. Whereas the majority of immunoassays for antigen-specific antibodies employ either bacteria- or yeast-expressed proteins and require the use of secondary antibodies, the LIPS technique uses a fusion protein comprised of a Renilla luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest produced via mammalian cell culture, ensuring the addition of mammalian post-translational modifications. Patient serum is mixed with the fusion protein and passed over immobilized Protein A/G; after washing, the only remaining luciferase-tagged antigens are those retained by specific antibodies. These can be quantitatively measured using chemiluminescence upon the introduction of coelenterazine. The assay has been successfully employed for a wide variety of diseases in a microwell format. We report on a recent demonstration of rapid HSV-2 diagnosis with the LIPS assay in a microfluidic format, using one microliter of serum and obtaining results in under ten minutes. We will also discuss recent progress on two fronts, both aimed at the deployment of this technology in the field: first, simplifying assay operation through the automation of flow control using power-free means; and second, efforts to increase signal levels, primarily through strategies to increase antibody binding capacity, in order to move towards portable battery powered electronics.

  17. Myocardial function and perfusion in the CREST syndrome variant of progressive systemic sclerosis. Exercise radionuclide evaluation and comparison with diffuse scleroderma

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Owens, G.R.; Steen, V.D.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-09-01

    Myocardial function and perfusion were evaluated in 22 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with the CREST syndrome using exercise and radionuclide techniques, pulmonary function testing, and chest roentgenography. The results were compared with a similar study of 26 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma. The prevalence of thallium perfusion abnormalities was similar in the groups with CREST syndrome and diffuse scleroderma, (64 percent versus 77 percent), but the defects were significantly smaller in the CREST syndrome (p less than 0.01). Reperfusion thallium defects in the absence of extramural coronary artery disease were seen in 38 percent of patients with diffuse scleroderma. This finding was not seen in any of the patients with the CREST syndrome. In diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of both right and left ventricular function were related to larger thallium perfusion defects. In the CREST syndrome, abnormalities of left ventricular function were minor, were seen only during exercise, and were unrelated to thallium perfusion defects. Abnormal resting right ventricular function was seen in 36 percent of the patients with the CREST syndrome and was associated with an isolated decrease in diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. It is concluded that the cardiac manifestations of the CREST syndrome are distinct from those found in diffuse scleroderma. Unlike diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of left ventricular function in the CREST syndrome are minor and are unrelated to abnormalities of coronary perfusion. Right ventricular dysfunction in the CREST syndrome appears to be primarily related to pulmonary vascular disease.

  18. Dielectric spectroscopy for monitoring human pancreatic islet differentiation within cell-seeded scaffolds in a perfusion bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Daoud, J; Heileman, K; Shapka, S; Rosenberg, L; Tabrizian, M

    2015-09-21

    The long-term in vitro culture and differentiation of human pancreatic islets is still hindered by the inability to emulate a suitable microenvironment mimicking physiological extracellular matrix (ECM) support and nutrient/oxygen perfusion. This is further amplified by the current lack of a non-invasive and rapid monitoring system to readily evaluate cellular processes. In this study, we realized a viable method for non-invasively monitoring isolated human pancreatic islets in vitro. Islets are induced to dedifferentiate into proliferative duct-like structures (DLS) in preparation for potential and subsequent re-differentiation into functional islet-like structures (ILS) in a process reminiscent of islet regeneration strategies. This long-term in vitro process is conducted within a three-dimensional microenvironment involving islets embedded in an optimized ECM gel supported by microfabricated three-dimensional scaffolds. The islet-scaffold is then housed and continuously perfused within chambers of a bioreactor platform. The process in its entirety is monitored through dielectric spectroscopy measurements, yielding an accurate representation of cellular morphology, functionality, and volume fraction. This non-invasive and real-time monitoring tool can be further manipulated to elucidate important information about the optimized cellular microenvironment required for maintaining long-term culture and achieve efficient differentiation for islet regeneration. PMID:26280028

  19. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken]; SNL,

    2013-01-25

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  20. Miniaturised medium pressure capillary liquid chromatography system with flexible open platform design using off-the-shelf microfluidic components.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Dvořák, Miloš; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Stanley, Roger; Nuchtavorn, Nantana; Krčmová, Lenka Kujovská; Aufartová, Jana; Macka, Mirek

    2015-10-01

    Trends towards portable analytical instrumentation of the last decades have not been equally reflected in developments of portable liquid chromatography (LC) instrumentation for rapid on-site measurements. A miniaturised medium pressure capillary LC (MPLC) system with gradient elution capability has been designed based on a flexible modular microfluidic system using primarily off-the-shelf low cost components to ensure wide accessibility to other analysts. The microfluidic platform was assembled on a breadboard and contained microsyringe pumps and switch valves, complemented with an injection valve and on-capillary detectors, all controlled by a PC. Four miniaturised microsyringe pumps, with 5, 20 and 100 μL syringe volume options, formed the basis of the pumping system. Two pairs of pumps were used for each mobile phase to create gradient elution capability. The two microsyringe pumps in each pairs were linked by two electrically operated microfluidic switching valves and both pairs of pumps were connected through a zero void volume cross-connector, thus providing a low hold-up volume for gradient formation. Sample was injected by a 20 nL nano-LC sampling valve, directly connected to a 18 cm long 100 μm i.d. Chromolith CapRod RP-18 monolithic capillary column. On-capillary LED-based UV-vis photometric detection was conducted through a piece of equal diameter fused silica capillary connected after the column. The performance of the portable LC system was evaluated theoretically and experimentally, including the maximum operating pressure, gradient mixing performance, and the performance of the detectors. The 5 μL microsyringe pump offered the best performance, with typical maximum operating pressures up to 11.4 ± 0.4 MPa (water) and gradient pumping repeatability of between 4 and 9% for gradients between 0.10% s(-1) and 0.33% s(-1). Test analytes of charged and uncharged dyes and pharmaceuticals of varying hydrophobicity showed typical RSD values of 0

  1. New advances in electrochemical biosensors for the detection of toxins: Nanomaterials, magnetic beads and microfluidics systems. A review.

    PubMed

    Reverté, Laia; Prieto-Simón, Beatriz; Campàs, Mònica

    2016-02-18

    The use of nanotechnology in bioanalytical devices has special advantages in the detection of toxins of interest in food safety and environmental applications. The low levels to be detected and the small size of toxins justify the increasing number of publications dealing with electrochemical biosensors, due to their high sensitivity and design versatility. The incorporation of nanomaterials in their development has been exploited to further increase their sensitivity, providing simple and fast devices, with multiplexed capabilities. This paper gives an overview of the electrochemical biosensors that have incorporated carbon and metal nanomaterials in their configurations for the detection of toxins. Biosensing systems based on magnetic beads or integrated into microfluidics systems have also been considered because of their contribution to the development of compact analytical devices. The roles of these materials, the methods used for their incorporation in the biosensor configurations as well as the advantages they provide to the analyses are summarised. PMID:26826685

  2. Relationship between systemic hypertension, perfusion pressure and glaucoma: A comparative study in an adult Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Amit K; Kaliaperumal, Subashini; Rao, Vasudev A; Sengupta, Sabyasachi

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To study the relationship between blood pressure (BP), intraocular pressure (IOP), mean ocular perfusion pressure (MOPP) and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with hypertension and compare it to a control group of normotensives. Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Materials and Methods: A total of 108 subjects with primary hypertension and 100 age-matched controls without hypertension were enrolled for the study. IOP measurement using Noncontact Tonometer and dilated fundus evaluation using + 90 D lens were done for all cases. Single recording of BP was taken. Gonioscopy, Humphrey's central visual fields, optical coherence tomography and pachymetry were done for all subjects with IOP > 21 mm Hg or C: D ratio ≥ 0.5 or asymmetry of > 0.2. Statistical Analysis: Univariate and multivariate multinomial regression models were used to determine the association between covariates and risk of glaucoma or glaucoma suspect. Results: There was no difference in the glaucoma status between subjects with and without hypertension. Subjects on antihypertensive medications were 1½ times more likely to have suspicious glaucoma (odds ratio [OR] =1.56] and nearly twice as likely to have POAG (OR = 1.85). In addition, we found a 31% and 12% reduction in risk of having POAG (95% confidence interval [CI] =13–45%, P = 0.001) and glaucoma suspect (95% CI = 2–21%, P = 0.03) respectively with every 1 mm Hg increment in MOPP. Conclusion: Subjects on antihypertensive medications are more likely to have either glaucoma or glaucoma suspect, and higher ocular perfusion pressure offers relative protection from glaucomatous damage. PMID:25370392

  3. Development of a fully integrated analysis system for ions based on ion-selective optodes and centrifugal microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.; Badr, I. H.; Barrett, G.; Lai, S.; Lu, Y.; Madou, M. J.; Bachas, L. G.; Daunert, S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A fully integrated, miniaturized analysis system for ions based on a centrifugal microfluidics platform and ion-selective optode membranes is described. The microfluidic architecture is composed of channels, five solution reservoirs, a measuring chamber, and a waste reservoir manufactured onto a disk-shaped substrate of poly(methyl methacrylate). Ion-selective optode membranes, composed of plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) impregnated with an ionophore, a proton chromoionophore, and a lipophilic anionic additive, were cast, with a spin-on device, onto a support layer and then immobilized on the disk. Fluid propulsion is achieved by the centrifugal force that results from spinning the disk, while a system of valves is built onto the disk to control flow. These valves operate based on fluid properties and fluid/substrate interactions and are controlled by the angular frequency of rotation. With this system, we have been able to deliver calibrant solutions, washing buffers, or "test" solutions to the measuring chamber where the optode membrane is located. An analysis system based on a potassium-selective optode has been characterized. Results indicate that optodes immobilized on the platform demonstrate theoretical responses in an absorbance mode of measurement. Samples of unknown concentration can be quantified to within 3% error by fitting the response function for a given optode membrane using an acid (for measuring the signal for a fully protonated chromoionophore), a base (for fully deprotonated chromoionophore), and two standard solutions. Further, the ability to measure ion concentrations by employing one standard solution in conjunction with acid and base and with two standards alone were studied to delineate whether the current architecture could be simplified. Finally, the efficacy of incorporating washing steps into the calibration protocol was investigated.

  4. High-throughput analysis of yeast replicative aging using a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Jo, Myeong Chan; Liu, Wei; Gu, Liang; Dang, Weiwei; Qin, Lidong

    2015-07-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an important model for studying the molecular mechanisms of aging in eukaryotic cells. However, the laborious and low-throughput methods of current yeast replicative lifespan assays limit their usefulness as a broad genetic screening platform for research on aging. We address this limitation by developing an efficient, high-throughput microfluidic single-cell analysis chip in combination with high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This innovative design enables, to our knowledge for the first time, the determination of the yeast replicative lifespan in a high-throughput manner. Morphological and phenotypical changes during aging can also be monitored automatically with a much higher throughput than previous microfluidic designs. We demonstrate highly efficient trapping and retention of mother cells, determination of the replicative lifespan, and tracking of yeast cells throughout their entire lifespan. Using the high-resolution and large-scale data generated from the high-throughput yeast aging analysis (HYAA) chips, we investigated particular longevity-related changes in cell morphology and characteristics, including critical cell size, terminal morphology, and protein subcellular localization. In addition, because of the significantly improved retention rate of yeast mother cell, the HYAA-Chip was capable of demonstrating replicative lifespan extension by calorie restriction. PMID:26170317

  5. Disposable on-chip microfluidic system for buccal cell lysis, DNA purification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Woong; Maeng, Joon-Ho; Ahn, Yoomin; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports the development of a disposable, integrated biochip for DNA sample preparation and PCR. The hybrid biochip (25 × 45 mm) is composed of a disposable PDMS layer with a microchannel chamber and reusable glass substrate integrated with a microheater and thermal microsensor. Lysis, purification, and PCR can be performed sequentially on this microfluidic device. Cell lysis is achieved by heat and purification is performed by mechanical filtration. Passive check valves are integrated to enable sample preparation and PCR in a fixed sequence. Reactor temperature is needed to lysis and PCR reaction is controlled within ±1°C by PID controller of LabVIEW software. Buccal epithelial cell lysis, DNA purification, and SY158 gene PCR amplification were successfully performed on this novel chip. Our experiments confirm that the entire process, except the off-chip gel electrophoresis, requires only approximately 1 h for completion. This disposable microfluidic chip for sample preparation and PCR can be easily united with other technologies to realize a fully integrated DNA chip. PMID:23784986

  6. A model microfluidics-based system for the human and mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shawn; Thakur, Ankush; Redenti, Stephen; Vazquez, Maribel

    2015-12-01

    The application of microfluidics technologies to the study of retinal function and response holds great promise for development of new and improved treatments for patients with degenerative retinal diseases. Restoration of vision via retinal transplantation therapy has been severely limited by the low numbers of motile cells observed post transplantation. Using modern soft lithographic techniques, we have developed the μRetina, a novel and convenient biomimetic microfluidics device capable of examing the migratory behavior of retinal lineage cells within biomimetic geometries of the human and mouse retina. Coupled computer simulations and experimental validations were used to characterize and confirm the formation of chemical concentration gradients within the μRetina, while real-time images within the device captured radial and theta cell migration in response to concentration gradients of stromal derived factor (SDF-1), a known chemoattractant. Our data underscore how the μRetina can be used to examine the concentration-dependent migration of retinal progenitors in order to enhance current therapies, as well as develop novel migration-targeted treatments. PMID:26475458

  7. A thermopneumatic-actuated PDMS microfluidic system integrated with micropump amd microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jong-Chul; Kang, C. J.; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2005-03-01

    We developed microfluidic devices integrated with microvalves and micropumps which is essential to develop a lab-on-a-chip. The advantage of the proposed device includes low cost fabrication process and the optical transparency using PDMS and ITO glass. Also the proposed micropump has the same fabrication process and substrate with the in-channel structured microvalve. The flow rate of the microvalve is proportional to the channel width, however, the power needed to close the microvalve is around 100 mW which is almost the same regardless of the channel width. The flow rate can be well controlled by ON/OFF switching function of the ITO heater and the closing and the opening times are around 20 sec and 25 sec, respectively. The pumping rate of the micropump increases linearly as the applied pulse voltage to the ITO heater increases. The maximum pump rate of 78 nl/min was obtained at the applied frequency of 6 Hz and duty ratio of 10 %. The characteristics of microfluidic devices integrated with microvalve and micropump will be optimized.

  8. Microgravity Separation of Alginate Empty Capsules from Encapsulated Pancreatic Islets Using a Microfluidic System.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soojeong; Yoo, Young Je; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-10-01

    Although microencapsulated pancreatic islets have merits, such as ease of transplantation, viability and functionality improvement, and immune protection in vivo, the co-production of alginate empty capsules during the encapsulation of islets with alginate makes them unusable for biomedical application. In previous research, the removal of empty alginate capsules with high yield was achieved using density-gradient centrifugation. Here, we report advanced microgravity-based separation techniques in a microfluidic format for alginate empty capsules. The optimal separation conditions were mathematically evaluated using Stokes' law and the separation of the encapsulation product was accomplished. A microfluidic chip was designed with two inlets and two outlets at different elevations to mimic the vertical percoll gradient in density-gradient centrifugation. The separation of alginate empty capsules using microgravitational force resulted in effective separation of encapsulated islets from alginate empty capsules with more than 70% efficiency. Moreover, no loss of encapsulated islets was expected because the process is a one-pot separation, unlike the previous method. This type of microgravitational particle separation could be used both for the fractionization of heterogeneous encapsulated cells and to remove empty capsules. PMID:26726432

  9. Molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensing of urinary melatonin in a microfluidic system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; O'Hare, Danny; Chen, Yi-Li; Chang, Yu-Chia; Yang, Chien-Hsin; Liu, Bin-Da; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin levels may be related to the risks of breast cancer and prostate cancer. The measurement of urinary melatonin is also useful in monitoring serum melatonin levels following oral administration. In this work, melatonin is the target molecule, which is imprinted onto poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) by evaporation of the solvent on the working electrode of an electrochemical sensing chip. This sensing chip is used directly as a tool for optimizing the imprinting polymer composition, flow rate, and injection volume of the samples. Microfluidic sensing of the target and interference molecules revealed that the lowest detection limit is as low as ∼pM, and the electrochemical response is weak even at high interference concentrations. Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), containing 44 mol. % ethylene, had an imprinting effectiveness of more than six-fold. In random urine analysis, the microfluidic amperometric measurements of melatonin levels with an additional and recovery of melatonin, the melatonin recovery achieved 94.78 ± 1.9% for melatonin at a concentration of 1.75–2.11 pg/mL. PMID:25584113

  10. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  11. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  12. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  13. A high-throughput microfluidic dental plaque biofilm system to visualize and quantify the effect of antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Nance, William C.; Dowd, Scot E.; Samarian, Derek; Chludzinski, Jeffrey; Delli, Joseph; Battista, John; Rickard, Alexander H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Few model systems are amenable to developing multi-species biofilms in parallel under environmentally germane conditions. This is a problem when evaluating the potential real-world effectiveness of antimicrobials in the laboratory. One such antimicrobial is cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), which is used in numerous over-the-counter oral healthcare products. The aim of this work was to develop a high-throughput microfluidic system that is combined with a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of CPC against oral multi-species biofilms grown in human saliva. Methods Twenty-four-channel BioFlux microfluidic plates were inoculated with pooled human saliva and fed filter-sterilized saliva for 20 h at 37°C. The bacterial diversity of the biofilms was evaluated by bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP). The antimicrobial/anti-biofilm effect of CPC (0.5%–0.001% w/v) was examined using Live/Dead stain, CLSM and 3D imaging software. Results The analysis of biofilms by bTEFAP demonstrated that they contained genera typically found in human dental plaque. These included Aggregatibacter, Fusobacterium, Neisseria, Porphyromonas, Streptococcus and Veillonella. Using Live/Dead stain, clear gradations in killing were observed when the biofilms were treated with CPC between 0.5% and 0.001% w/v. At 0.5% (w/v) CPC, 90% of the total signal was from dead/damaged cells. Below this concentration range, less killing was observed. In the 0.5%–0.05% (w/v) range CPC penetration/killing was greatest and biofilm thickness was significantly reduced. Conclusions This work demonstrates the utility of a high-throughput microfluidic–CLSM system to grow multi-species oral biofilms, which are compositionally similar to naturally occurring biofilms, to assess the effectiveness of antimicrobials. PMID:23800904

  14. Microfluidic conductimetric bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Limbut, Warakorn; Loyprasert, Suchera; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Asawatreratanakul, Punnee; Limsakul, Chusak; Wongkittisuksa, Booncharoen; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2007-06-15

    A microfluidic conductimetric bioreactor has been developed. Enzyme was immobilized in the microfluidic channel on poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface via covalent binding method. The detection unit consisted of two gold electrodes and a laboratory-built conductimetric transducer to monitor the increase in the conductivity of the solution due to the change of the charges generated by the enzyme-substrate catalytic reaction. Urea-urease was used as a representative analyte-enzyme system. Under optimum conditions urea could be determined with a detection limit of 0.09 mM and linearity in the range of 0.1-10 mM (r=0.9944). The immobilized urease on the microchannel chip provided good stability (>30 days of operation time) and good repeatability with an R.S.D. lower than 2.3%. Good agreement was obtained when urea concentrations of human serum samples determined by the microfluidic flow injection conductimetric bioreactor system were compared to those obtained using the Berthelot reaction (P<0.05). After prolong use the immobilized enzyme could be removed from the PDMS microchannel chip enabling new active enzyme to be immobilized and the chip to be reused. PMID:17289366

  15. TISSUE ENGINEERING PERFUSABLE CANCER MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Fong, E.L.; Santoro, M.; Farach-Carson, M.C.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of fluid flow on cancer progression is currently not well understood, highlighting the need for perfused tumor models to close this gap in knowledge. Enabling biological processes at the cellular level to be modeled with high spatiotemporal control, microfluidic tumor models have demonstrated applicability as platforms to study cell-cell interactions, effect of interstitial flow on tumor migration and the role of vascular barrier function. To account for the multi-scale nature of cancer growth and invasion, macroscale models are also necessary. The consideration of fluid dynamics within tumor models at both the micro- and macroscopic levels may greatly improve our ability to more fully mimic the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24634812

  16. Detection of glutathione within single mice hepatocytes using microfluidic chips coupled with a laser-induced fluorescence system.

    PubMed

    Hao, Minglu; Liu, Rutao; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yating; Jing, Mingyang

    2014-05-01

    A rapid and accurate detection of glutathione (GSH) content in single cells is important to the early diagnosis and prevention of diseases. A microfluidic system allows the manipulation of trace amounts of reagents and single cells in a simple and cheap glass chip coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. 2,3-Naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) was used as the derivatization reagent to label GSH in cells. Microchannel surface derivatization and optimization of injection and separation were investigated in detail, and then the GSH in single mice hepatocyte was separated and detected under optimum conditions with a linear range of 5×10(-4) M~5×10(-3) M and a detection limit of 4.47×10(-5) M. This study provides a simple and effective method for rapid GSH detection in single cells using few reagents. PMID:24534424

  17. Detection of glutathione within single mice hepatocytes using microfluidic chips coupled with a laser-induced fluorescence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Minglu; Liu, Rutao; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yating; Jing, Mingyang

    A rapid and accurate detection of glutathione (GSH) content in single cells is important to the early diagnosis and prevention of diseases. A microfluidic system allows the manipulation of trace amounts of reagents and single cells in a simple and cheap glass chip coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. 2,3-Naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) was used as the derivatization reagent to label GSH in cells. Microchannel surface derivatization and optimization of injection and separation were investigated in detail, and then the GSH in single mice hepatocyte was separated and detected under optimum conditions with a linear range of 5 × 10-4 M ˜ 5 × 10-3 M and a detection limit of 4.47 × 10-5 M. This study provides a simple and effective method for rapid GSH detection in single cells using few reagents.

  18. Design and fabrication of a microfluidic circuitboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schabmueller, C. G. J.; Koch, M.; Evans, A. G. R.; Brunnschweiler, A.

    1999-06-01

    This paper reports the design and fabrication of a micromachined microfluidic circuitboard. The circuitboard consists of a Pyrex wafer in which trenches and connection holes are etched. Channels are then formed by anodically bonding a silicon wafer to the Pyrex wafer. On top of this, various microfluidic devices can be mounted via the anodic bonding technique. This allows a simple way of mass production of different microfluidic systems. To realize other microfluidic systems only the mask layout for creating the channels in the Pyrex wafer has to be changed. The microfluidic circuitboard has been successfully fabricated and single devices have been surface mounted. A whole system has been tested and it proved to be functional and without any leakage.

  19. Design and Application of Microfluidic Systems for In Vitro Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Drug Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, T.J.; Novik, E.; Chao, P.; Barminko, J.; Nahmias, Y.; Yarmush, M.L.; Cheng, K.-C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the development of new chemical entities within the pharmaceutical industry is the extrapolation of key in vivo parameters from in vitro cell culture assays and animal studies. Development of microscale devices and screening assays incorporating primary human cells can potentially provide better, faster and more efficient prediction of in vivo toxicity and clinical drug performance. With this goal in mind, large strides have been made in the area of microfluidics to provide in vitro surrogates that are designed to mimic the physiological architecture and dynamics. More recent advancements have been made in the development of in vitro analogues to physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models – a mathematical model that represents the body as interconnected compartments specific for a particular organ. In this review we highlight recent advancements in human hepatocyte microscale culture, and describe the next generation of integrated devices, whose potential allows for the high throughput assessment of drug metabolism, distribution and pharmacokinetics. PMID:20166997

  20. Rheology and instabilities of thermally responsive polymer solutions in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeber, Boris; Liepmann, Dorian; Muller, Susan

    2004-11-01

    Aqueous solutions of PEO_x-PPO_y-PEOx triblock copolymers undergo a reversible phase change at elevated concentrations and/or temperatures from an isotropic micelle liquid to a soft cubic crystal. The thermo-thickening behavior of these polymer solutions, as well as their shear-thinning properties, have been characterized using cone-and-plate rheometry. Observations of the gel formation process in microchannels under different flow conditions, for example behind a moving air bubble, have been explained by the rheological properties of these polymer solutions. Furthermore, at ambient temperatures close to the gelation temperature shear-induced viscous heating in the flow is sufficient to induce gel formation. This effect has been used to demonstrate thermo-viscous instabilities as well as passive flow control in microfluidic devices.

  1. On total internal reflection investigation of nanoparticles by integrated micro-fluidic system.

    PubMed

    Sarov, Yanko E; Capek, Ignac; Ivanov, Tzvetan B; Ivanova, Katerina Zh; Sarova, Valentina A; Rangelow, Ivo W

    2008-02-01

    We report on a novel sensor for characterization of nanoparticles colloidal suspensions. We employ a diffraction grating under total internal reflection for investigation of nanodisperse fluids passing through an integrated microfluidic channel. Dispersions containing polymeric, metallic, and ferromagnetic nanoparticles are studied. Using this device, we can accurately determine in real-time the specific refractive index for the nanoparticle suspension and the nanoparticle concentration. The nanoparticle concentrations can be calculated with a resolution of 0.3-0.5 wt% for polymeric nanoparticles, 0.03-0.05 wt% for metallic nanoparticles, and 0.05-0.1 wt% for ferromagnetic nanoparticles. This translates to an effective refractive index that can be determined with an accuracy of 7 x 10(-4) for the polymeric and 2 x 10(-4) for the metallic and ferromagnetic dispersions. PMID:18163661

  2. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a- Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments. In addition to developing computational models of the microfluidic channels, valves and pumps that form the basis of every biochip, we are also trying to identify potential problems that could arise in reduced gravity and develop solutions to these problems. One such problem is due to the prevalence of bubbly sample fluids in microgravity. A bubble trapped in a microfluidic channel could be detrimental to the operation of a biochip. Therefore, the process of bubble formation in microgravity needs to be studied, and a model of this process has been developed and used to understand how bubbles develop and move through biochip components. It is clear that some type of bubble filter would be necessary in Space, and

  3. Adequate Systemic Perfusion Maintained by a CentriMag during Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Favaloro, Roberto R.; Bertolotti, Alejandro; Diez, Mirta; Favaloro, Liliana; Gomez, Carmen; Peradejordi, Margarita; Trentadue, Julio; Hellman, Lorena; Arzani, Yanina; Otero, Pilar Varela

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support during severe acute heart failure presents options for myocardial recovery or cardiac replacement. Short-term circulatory support with the newest generation of magnetically levitated centrifugal-flow pumps affords several potential advantages. Herein, we present our experience with such a pump—the CentriMag® (Levitronix LLC; Waltham, Mass) centrifugal-flow ventricular assist device—in 4 critically ill patients who were in cardiogenic shock. From November 2007 through March 2008, 3 patients were supported after cardiac surgery, and 1 after chronic heart failure worsened. Two patients were bridged to heart transplantation, and 2 died during support. Perfusion during support was evaluated in terms of serum lactic acid levels and oxygenation values. In all of the patients, the CentriMag's pump flow was adequate, and continuous mechanical ventilation support was provided. Lactic acid levels substantially improved with CentriMag support and were maintained at near-normal levels throughout. At the same time, arterial pH, PO2, and carbon dioxide levels remained within acceptable ranges. No thromboembolic events or mechanical failures occurred. Our experience indicates that short-term use of the CentriMag ventricular assist device during acute heart failure can restore and adequately support circulation until recovery or until the application of definitive therapy. PMID:18941648

  4. Influences of Detection Pinhole and Sample Flow on Thermal Lens Detection in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingqiang; Franko, Mladen

    2014-12-01

    Thermal lens microscopy (TLM), due to its high temporal () and spatial resolution (), has been coupled to lab-on-chip chemistry for detection of a variety of compounds in chemical or biological fields. Due to the very short optical path length (usually below 100 ) in a microchip, the sensitivity of TLM is unfortunately still 10 to 100 times lower than conventional TLS with 1 cm sample length. Optimization of the TLM optical configuration was made with respect to different pinhole aperture-to-beam size ratios for the best signal-to-noise ratio. In the static mode, the instrumental noise comes mainly from the shot noise of the probe beam when the chopper frequency is over 1 kHz or from the flicker noise of the probe beam at low frequencies. In the flowing mode, the flow-induced noise becomes dominant when the flow rate is high. At a given flow rate, fluids with a higher density and/or a higher viscosity will cause larger flow-induced noise. As an application, a combined microfluidic flow injection analysis ()-TLM device was developed for rapid determination of pollutants by colorimetric reactions. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was measured as a model analyte. Analytical signals for 12 sample injections in 1 min have been recorded by the FIA-TLM. For injections of sub-L samples into the microfluidic stream in a deep microchannel, a limit of detection of was achieved for Cr(VI) in water at 60 mW excitation power.

  5. A continuous glucose monitoring device by graphene modified electrochemical sensor in microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Pu, Zhihua; Zou, Chongwei; Wang, Ridong; Lai, Xiaochen; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin; Li, Dachao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a continuous glucose monitoring microsystem consisting of a three-electrode electrochemical sensor integrated into a microfluidic chip. The microfluidic chip, which was used to transdermally extract and collect subcutaneous interstitial fluid, was fabricated from five polydimethylsiloxane layers using micromolding techniques. The electrochemical sensor was integrated into the chip for continuous detection of glucose. Specifically, a single-layer graphene and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were decorated onto the working electrode (WE) of the sensor to construct a composite nanostructured surface and improve the resolution of the glucose measurements. Graphene was transferred onto the WE surface to improve the electroactive nature of the electrode to enable measurements of low levels of glucose. The AuNPs were directly electrodeposited onto the graphene layer to improve the electron transfer rate from the activity center of the enzyme to the electrode to enhance the sensitivity of the sensor. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized onto the composite nanostructured surface to specifically detect glucose. The factors required for AuNPs deposition and GOx immobilization were also investigated, and the optimized parameters were obtained. The experimental results displayed that the proposed sensor could precisely measure glucose in the linear range from 0 to 162 mg/dl with a detection limit of 1.44 mg/dl (S/N = 3). The proposed sensor exhibited the potential to detect hypoglycemia which is still a major challenge for continuous glucose monitoring in clinics. Unlike implantable glucose sensors, the wearable device enabled external continuous monitoring of glucose without interference from foreign body reaction and bioelectricity. PMID:26958097

  6. Microfluidic Picoliter Bioreactor for Microbial Single-cell Analysis: Fabrication, System Setup, and Operation

    PubMed Central

    Gruenberger, Alexander; Probst, Christopher; Heyer, Antonia; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Frunzke, Julia; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    In this protocol the fabrication, experimental setup and basic operation of the recently introduced microfluidic picoliter bioreactor (PLBR) is described in detail. The PLBR can be utilized for the analysis of single bacteria and microcolonies to investigate biotechnological and microbiological related questions concerning, e.g. cell growth, morphology, stress response, and metabolite or protein production on single-cell level. The device features continuous media flow enabling constant environmental conditions for perturbation studies, but in addition allows fast medium changes as well as oscillating conditions to mimic any desired environmental situation. To fabricate the single use devices, a silicon wafer containing sub micrometer sized SU-8 structures served as the replication mold for rapid polydimethylsiloxane casting. Chips were cut, assembled, connected, and set up onto a high resolution and fully automated microscope suited for time-lapse imaging, a powerful tool for spatio-temporal cell analysis. Here, the biotechnological platform organism Corynebacterium glutamicum was seeded into the PLBR and cell growth and intracellular fluorescence were followed over several hours unraveling time dependent population heterogeneity on single-cell level, not possible with conventional analysis methods such as flow cytometry. Besides insights into device fabrication, furthermore, the preparation of the preculture, loading, trapping of bacteria, and the PLBR cultivation of single cells and colonies is demonstrated. These devices will add a new dimension in microbiological research to analyze time dependent phenomena of single bacteria under tight environmental control. Due to the simple and relatively short fabrication process the technology can be easily adapted at any microfluidics lab and simply tailored towards specific needs. PMID:24336165

  7. Functional Heart Valve Scaffolds Obtained by Complete Decellularization of Porcine Aortic Roots in a Novel Differential Pressure Gradient Perfusion System.

    PubMed

    Sierad, Leslie Neil; Shaw, Eliza Laine; Bina, Alexander; Brazile, Bryn; Rierson, Nicholas; Patnaik, Sourav S; Kennamer, Allison; Odum, Rebekah; Cotoi, Ovidiu; Terezia, Preda; Branzaniuc, Klara; Smallwood, Harrison; Deac, Radu; Egyed, Imre; Pavai, Zoltan; Szanto, Annamaria; Harceaga, Lucian; Suciu, Horatiu; Raicea, Victor; Olah, Peter; Simionescu, Agneta; Liao, Jun; Movileanu, Ionela; Harpa, Marius; Simionescu, Dan Teodor

    2015-12-01

    There is a great need for living valve replacements for patients of all ages. Such constructs could be built by tissue engineering, with perspective of the unique structure and biology of the aortic root. The aortic valve root is composed of several different tissues, and careful structural and functional consideration has to be given to each segment and component. Previous work has shown that immersion techniques are inadequate for whole-root decellularization, with the aortic wall segment being particularly resistant to decellularization. The aim of this study was to develop a differential pressure gradient perfusion system capable of being rigorous enough to decellularize the aortic root wall while gentle enough to preserve the integrity of the cusps. Fresh porcine aortic roots have been subjected to various regimens of perfusion decellularization using detergents and enzymes and results compared to immersion decellularized roots. Success criteria for evaluation of each root segment (cusp, muscle, sinus, wall) for decellularization completeness, tissue integrity, and valve functionality were defined using complementary methods of cell analysis (histology with nuclear and matrix stains and DNA analysis), biomechanics (biaxial and bending tests), and physiologic heart valve bioreactor testing (with advanced image analysis of open-close cycles and geometric orifice area measurement). Fully acellular porcine roots treated with the optimized method exhibited preserved macroscopic structures and microscopic matrix components, which translated into conserved anisotropic mechanical properties, including bending and excellent valve functionality when tested in aortic flow and pressure conditions. This study highlighted the importance of (1) adapting decellularization methods to specific target tissues, (2) combining several methods of cell analysis compared to relying solely on histology, (3) developing relevant valve-specific mechanical tests, and (4) in vitro testing

  8. Development of a three-dimensional cell culture system based on microfluidics for nuclear magnetic resonance and optical monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Esteve, Vicent; Monge, Rosa; Celda, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    A new microfluidic cell culture device compatible with real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is presented here. The intended application is the long-term monitoring of 3D cell cultures by several techniques. The system has been designed to fit inside commercially available NMR equipment to obtain maximum readout resolution when working with small samples. Moreover, the microfluidic device integrates a fibre-optic-based sensor to monitor parameters such as oxygen, pH, or temperature during NMR monitoring, and it also allows the use of optical microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy. This manuscript reports the initial trials culturing neurospheres inside the microchamber of this device and the preliminary images and spatially localised spectra obtained by NMR. The images show the presence of a necrotic area in the interior of the neurospheres, as is frequently observed in histological preparations; this phenomenon appears whenever the distance between the cells and fresh nutrients impairs the diffusion of oxygen. Moreover, the spectra acquired in a volume of 8 nl inside the neurosphere show an accumulation of lactate and lipids, which are indicative of anoxic conditions. Additionally, a basis for general temperature control and monitoring and a graphical control software have been developed and are also described. The complete platform will allow biomedical assays of therapeutic agents to be performed in the early phases of therapeutic development. Thus, small quantities of drugs or advanced nanodevices may be studied long-term under simulated living conditions that mimic the flow and distribution of nutrients. PMID:25553182

  9. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mitrovski, Svetlana M.

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  10. Expansion of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Fresh Bone Marrow in a 3D Scaffold-Based System under Direct Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Brachat, Sophie; Braccini, Alessandra; Wendt, David; Barbero, Andrea; Jacobi, Carsten; Martin, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (MSC) expansion in conventional monolayer culture on plastic dishes (2D) leads to progressive loss of functionality and thus challenges fundamental studies on the physiology of skeletal progenitors, as well as translational applications for cellular therapy and molecular medicine. Here we demonstrate that 2D MSC expansion can be entirely bypassed by culturing freshly isolated bone marrow nucleated cells within 3D porous scaffolds in a perfusion-based bioreactor system. The 3D-perfusion system generated a stromal tissue that could be enzymatically treated to yield CD45- MSC. As compared to 2D-expanded MSC (control), those derived from 3D-perfusion culture after the same time (3 weeks) or a similar extent of proliferation (7–8 doublings) better maintained their progenitor properties, as assessed by a 4.3-fold higher clonogenicity and the superior differentiation capacity towards all typical mesenchymal lineages. Transcriptomic analysis of MSC from 5 donors validated the robustness of the process and indicated a reduced inter-donor variability and a significant upregulation of multipotency-related gene clusters following 3D-perfusion- as compared to 2D-expansion. Interestingly, the differences in functionality and transcriptomics between MSC expanded in 2D or under 3D-perfusion were only partially captured by cytofluorimetric analysis using conventional surface markers. The described system offers a multidisciplinary approach to study how factors of a 3D engineered niche regulate MSC function and, by streamlining conventional labor-intensive processes, is prone to automation and scalability within closed bioreactor systems. PMID:25020062

  11. Machine vision for digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2010-01-01

    Machine vision is widely used in an industrial environment today. It can perform various tasks, such as inspecting and controlling production processes, that may require humanlike intelligence. The importance of imaging technology for biological research or medical diagnosis is greater than ever. For example, fluorescent reporter imaging enables scientists to study the dynamics of gene networks with high spatial and temporal resolution. Such high-throughput imaging is increasingly demanding the use of machine vision for real-time analysis and control. Digital microfluidics is a relatively new technology with expectations of becoming a true lab-on-a-chip platform. Utilizing digital microfluidics, only small amounts of biological samples are required and the experimental procedures can be automatically controlled. There is a strong need for the development of a digital microfluidics system integrated with machine vision for innovative biological research today. In this paper, we show how machine vision can be applied to digital microfluidics by demonstrating two applications: machine vision-based measurement of the kinetics of biomolecular interactions and machine vision-based droplet motion control. It is expected that digital microfluidics-based machine vision system will add intelligence and automation to high-throughput biological imaging in the future. PMID:20113117

  12. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices, and which incorporates a molded ring or seal set into a ferrule cartridge, with or without a compression screw. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  13. Application of an acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siwei; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Andriotis, Orestis G.; Ching, Kuan Y.; Jonnalagadda, Umesh S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Hill, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage grafts generated using conventional static tissue engineering strategies are characterised by low cell viability, suboptimal hyaline cartilage formation and, critically, inferior mechanical competency, which limit their application for resurfacing articular cartilage defects. To address the limitations of conventional static cartilage bioengineering strategies and generate robust, scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes, the present study utilised custom-built microfluidic perfusion bioreactors with integrated ultrasound standing wave traps. The system employed sweeping acoustic drive frequencies over the range of 890 to 910 kHz and continuous perfusion of the chondrogenic culture medium at a low-shear flow rate to promote the generation of three-dimensional agglomerates of human articular chondrocytes, and enhance cartilage formation by cells of the agglomerates via improved mechanical stimulation and mass transfer rates. Histological examination and assessment of micromechanical properties using indentation-type atomic force microscopy confirmed that the neocartilage grafts were analogous to native hyaline cartilage. Furthermore, in the ex vivo organ culture partial thickness cartilage defect model, implantation of the neocartilage grafts into defects for 16 weeks resulted in the formation of hyaline cartilage-like repair tissue that adhered to the host cartilage and contributed to significant improvements to the tissue architecture within the defects, compared to the empty defects. The study has demonstrated the first successful application of the acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactors to bioengineer scaffold-free neocartilage grafts of human articular chondrocytes that have the potential for subsequent use in second generation autologous chondrocyte implantation procedures for the repair of partial thickness cartilage defects. PMID:25272195

  14. A Microfluidic Interface for the Culture and Sampling of Adiponectin from Primary Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Leah A.; Brooks, Jessica C.; Hoepfner, Lauren D.; Wanders, Desiree; Judd, Robert L.; Easley, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Secreted from adipose tissue, adiponectin is a vital endocrine hormone that acts in glucose metabolism, thereby establishing its crucial role in diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disease states. Insulin exposure to primary adipocytes cultured in static conditions has been shown to stimulate adiponectin secretion. However, conventional, static methodology for culturing and stimulating adipocytes falls short of truly mimicking physiological environments. Along with decreases in experimental costs and sample volume, and increased temporal resolution, microfluidic platforms permit small-volume flowing cell culture systems, which more accurately represent the constant flow conditions through vasculature in vivo. Here, we have integrated a customized primary tissue culture reservoir into a passively operated microfluidic device made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Fabrication of the reservoir was accomplished through unique PDMS “landscaping” above sampling channels, with a design strategy targeted to primary adipocytes to overcome issues of positive cell buoyancy. This reservoir allowed three-dimensional culture of primary murine adipocytes, accurate control over stimulants via constant perfusion, and sampling of adipokine secretion during various treatments. As the first report of primary adipocyte culture and sampling within microfluidic systems, this work sets the stage for future studies in adipokine secretion dynamics. PMID:25423362

  15. Estimating a regional ventilation-perfusion index

    PubMed Central

    Muller, P A; Li, T; Isaacson, D; Newell, J C; Saulnier, G J; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Ashe, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This is a methods paper, where an approximation to the local ventilation-perfusion ratio is derived. This approximation, called the ventilation-perfusion index since it is not exactly the physiological ventilation-perfusion ratio, is calculated using conductivity reconstructions obtained using electrical impedance tomography. Since computation of the ventilation-perfusion index only requires knowledge of the internal conductivity, any conductivity reconstruction method may be used. The method is explained, and results are presented using conductivities obtained from two EIT systems, one using an iterative method and the other a linearization method. PMID:26006279

  16. Stimuli-Responsive Reagent System for Enabling Microfluidic Immunoassays with Biomarker Purification and Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Immunoassays have been translated into microfluidic device formats, but significant challenges relating to upstream sample processing still limit their applications. Here, stimuli-responsive polymer–antibody conjugates are utilized in a microfluidic immunoassay to enable rapid biomarker purification and enrichment as well as sensitive detection. The conjugates were constructed by covalently grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), a thermally responsive polymer, to the lysine residues of anti-prostate specific antigen (PSA) Immunoglobulin G (IgG) using carbodiimide chemistry via the polymer end-carboxylate. The antibody-PNIPAAm (capture) conjugates and antibody-alkaline phosphatase (detection) conjugates formed sandwich immunocomplexes via PSA binding in 50% human plasma. The complexes were loaded into a recirculating poly(dimethylsiloxane) microreactor, equipped with micropumps and transverse flow features, for subsequent separation, enrichment, and quantification. The immunocomplexes were captured by heating the solution to 39 °C, mixed over the transverse features for 2 min, and washed with warm buffer. In one approach, the assay utilized immunocomplex solution that was contained in an 80 nL microreactor, which was loaded with solution at room temperature and subsequently heated to 39 °C. The assay took 25 min and resulted in 37 pM PSA limit of detection (LOD), which is comparable to a plate ELISA employing the same antibody pair. In another approach, the microreactor was preheated to 39 °C, and immunocomplex solution was flowed through the reactor, mixed, and washed. When the specimen volume was increased to 7.5 μL by repeating the capture process three times, the higher specimen volume led to immunocomplex enrichment within the microreactor. The resulting assay LOD was 0.5 pM, which is 2 orders of magnitude lower than the plate ELISA. Both approaches generate antigen specific signal over a clinically significant range. The sample processing

  17. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  18. Microfluidic opportunities in the field of nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Kiehne, Justin; Sinoway, Lawrence I.; Cameron, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition has always been closely related to human health, which is a constant motivational force driving research in a variety of disciplines. Over the years, the rapidly emerging field of microfluidics has been pushing forward the healthcare industry with the development of microfluidic-based, point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices. Though a great deal of work has been done in developing microfluidic platforms for disease diagnoses, potential microfluidic applications in the field of nutrition remain largely unexplored. In this Focus article, we would like to investigate the potential chances for microfluidics in the field of nutrition. We will first highlight some of the recent advances in microfluidic blood analysis systems that have the capacity to detect biomarkers of nutrition. Then we will examine existing examples of microfluidic devices for the detection of specific biomarkers of nutrition or nutrient content in food. Finally, we will discuss the challenges in this field and provide some insight into the future of applied microfluidics in nutrition. PMID:24056522

  19. Size-based microfluidic multimodal microparticle sorter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Papautsky, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Microfluidic sorting of synthetic and biological microparticles has attracted much interest in recent years. Inertial microfluidics uses hydrodynamic forces to manipulate migration of such microparticles in microfluidic channels to achieve passive sorting based on size with high throughput. However, most inertial microfluidic devices are only capable of bimodal separation with a single cutoff diameter and a well-defined size difference. These limitations inhibit efficient separation of real-world samples that often include heterogeneous mixtures of multiple microparticle components. Our design overcomes these challenges to achieve continuous multimodal sorting of microparticles with high resolution and high tunability of separation cutoff diameters. We demonstrate separations with flexible modulation of the separation bandwidth and the passband location. Our approach offers a number of benefits, including straightforward system design, easily and precisely tuned cutoff diameters, high separation resolution, and high throughput. Ultimately, the unique multimodal separation functionality significantly broadens applications of inertial microfluidics in sorting of complex microparticle samples. PMID:25590954

  20. Application of optically-induced-dielectrophoresis in microfluidic system for purification of circulating tumour cells for gene expression analysis- Cancer cell line model

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Chou, Wen-Pin; Huang, Song-Bin; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Yung-Chang; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in a blood circulation system are associated with cancer metastasis. The analysis of the drug-resistance gene expression of cancer patients’ CTCs holds promise for selecting a more effective therapeutic regimen for an individual patient. However, the current CTC isolation schemes might not be able to harvest CTCs with sufficiently high purity for such applications. To address this issue, this study proposed to integrate the techniques of optically induced dielectrophoretic (ODEP) force-based cell manipulation and fluorescent microscopic imaging in a microfluidic system to further purify CTCs after the conventional CTC isolation methods. In this study, the microfluidic system was developed, and its optimal operating conditions and performance for CTC isolation were evaluated. The results revealed that the presented system was able to isolate CTCs with cell purity as high as 100%, beyond what is possible using the previously existing techniques. In the analysis of CTC gene expression, therefore, this method could exclude the interference of leukocytes in a cell sample and accordingly contribute to higher analytical sensitivity, as demonstrated in this study. Overall, this study has presented an ODEP-based microfluidic system capable of simply and effectively isolating a specific cell species from a cell mixture. PMID:27609546

  1. Application of optically-induced-dielectrophoresis in microfluidic system for purification of circulating tumour cells for gene expression analysis- Cancer cell line model.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Chou, Wen-Pin; Huang, Song-Bin; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Yung-Chang; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in a blood circulation system are associated with cancer metastasis. The analysis of the drug-resistance gene expression of cancer patients' CTCs holds promise for selecting a more effective therapeutic regimen for an individual patient. However, the current CTC isolation schemes might not be able to harvest CTCs with sufficiently high purity for such applications. To address this issue, this study proposed to integrate the techniques of optically induced dielectrophoretic (ODEP) force-based cell manipulation and fluorescent microscopic imaging in a microfluidic system to further purify CTCs after the conventional CTC isolation methods. In this study, the microfluidic system was developed, and its optimal operating conditions and performance for CTC isolation were evaluated. The results revealed that the presented system was able to isolate CTCs with cell purity as high as 100%, beyond what is possible using the previously existing techniques. In the analysis of CTC gene expression, therefore, this method could exclude the interference of leukocytes in a cell sample and accordingly contribute to higher analytical sensitivity, as demonstrated in this study. Overall, this study has presented an ODEP-based microfluidic system capable of simply and effectively isolating a specific cell species from a cell mixture. PMID:27609546

  2. Integrated microfluidic system with automatic sampling for permanent molecular and antigen-based detection of CBRNE-related pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Holger; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Klemm, Richard; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Gärtner, Claudia

    2015-03-01

    The continuous monitoring of the environment for lethal pathogens is a central task in the field of biothreat detection. Typical scenarios involve air-sampling in locations such as public transport systems or large public events and a subsequent analysis of the samples by a portable instrument. Lab-on-a-chip technologies are one of the promising technological candidates for such a system. We have developed an integrated microfluidic system with automatic sampling for the detection of CBRNE-related pathogens. The chip contains a two-pronged analysis strategy, on the one hand an immunological track using antibodies immobilized on a frit and a subsequent photometric detection, on the other hand a molecular biology approach using continuous-flow PCR with a fluorescence end-point detection. The cartridge contains two-component molded rotary valve to allow active fluid control and switching between channels. The accompanying instrument contains all elements for fluidic and valve actuation, thermal control, as well as the two detection modalities. Reagents are stored in dedicated reagent packs which are connected directly to the cartridge. With this system, we have been able to demonstrate the detection of a variety of pathogen species.

  3. REMUS100 AUV with an integrated microfluidic system for explosives detection.

    PubMed

    Adams, André A; Charles, Paul T; Veitch, Scott P; Hanson, Alfred; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Kusterbeck, Anne W

    2013-06-01

    Quantitating explosive materials at trace concentrations in real-time on-site within the marine environment may prove critical to protecting civilians, waterways, and military personnel during this era of increased threat of widespread terroristic activity. Presented herein are results from recent field trials that demonstrate detection and quantitation of small nitroaromatic molecules using novel high-throughput microfluidic immunosensors (HTMI) to perform displacement-based immunoassays onboard a HYDROID REMUS100 autonomous underwater vehicle. Missions were conducted 2-3 m above the sea floor, and no HTMI failures were observed due to clogging from biomass infiltration. Additionally, no device leaks were observed during the trials. HTMIs maintained immunoassay functionality during 2 h deployments, while continuously sampling seawater absent without any pretreatment at a flow rate of 2 mL/min. This 20-fold increase in the nominal flow rate of the assay resulted in an order of magnitude reduction in both lag and assay times. Contaminated seawater that contained 20-175 ppb trinitrotoluene was analyzed. PMID:23539095

  4. Microfluidic system for the identification of bacterial pathogens causing urinary tract infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Lind, Anders; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbi; Turlej-Rogacka, Agata; Goossens, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections and pose a significant healthcare burden. The growing trend in antibiotic resistance makes it mandatory to develop diagnostic kits which allow not only the determination of a pathogen but also the antibiotic resistances. We have developed a microfluidic cartridge which takes a direct urine sample, extracts the DNA, performs an amplification using batch-PCR and flows the sample over a microarray which is printed into a microchannel for fluorescence detection. The cartridge is injection-molded out of COP and contains a set of two-component injection-molded rotary valves to switch between input and to isolate the PCR chamber during thermocycling. The hybridization probes were spotted directly onto a functionalized section of the outlet microchannel. We have been able to successfully perform PCR of E.coli in urine in this chip and perform a fluorescence detection of PCR products. An upgraded design of the cartridge contains the buffers and reagents in blisters stored on the chip.

  5. One-photon and two-photon stimulation of neurons in a microfluidic culture system.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Myung; Lee, Jeonghyeon; Kim, Hyeongeun; Jeon, Noo Li; Jung, Woonggyu

    2016-04-26

    In this study, we demonstrate a novel platform for optical stimulation of neural circuits combined with a microfluidic culture method and microelectrode array measurements. Neuron-on-a-chip was designed and fabricated to isolate axons without a soma or dendrite. Thus, it is readily able to manipulate the neuronal alignment and to investigate the neuronal activity at the locations we want to observe. We adapted the optical stimulation technique to the arranged neurons to generate the neuronal signals in a non-invasive fashion. A blue light-emitting diode and a femtosecond laser with 780 nm center wavelength were used for neuronal activation and the corresponding neuronal signals were measured by MEAs at the same time. We found that one-photon light via caged glutamate provoked periodic spiking. In contrast, the femtosecond pulse irradiation generated repetitive firing at constant rates. Response times of one-photon and two-photon stimulation were around 200 ms and 50 ms, respectively. We also quantified neural responses, by varying optical parameters such as exposure time and irradiation power. PMID:27053163

  6. Design of a hybrid advective-diffusive microfluidic system with ellipsometric detection for studying adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Cunlu; Wijnperlé, Daniel; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-05-01

    Establishing and maintaining concentration gradients that are stable in space and time is critical for applications that require screening the adsorption behavior of organic or inorganic species onto solid surfaces for wide ranges of fluid compositions. In this work, we present a design of a simple and compact microfluidic device based on steady-state diffusion of the analyte, between two control channels where liquid is pumped through. The device generates a near-linear distribution of concentrations. We demonstrate this via experiments with dye solutions and comparison to finite-element numerical simulations. In a subsequent step, the device is combined with total internal reflection ellipsometry to study the adsorption of (cat)ions on silica surfaces from CsCl solutions at variable pH. Such a combined setup permits a fast determination of an adsorption isotherm. The measured optical thickness is compared to calculations from a triple layer model for the ion distribution, where surface complexation reactions of the silica are taken into account. Our results show a clear enhancement of the ion adsorption with increasing pH, which can be well described with reasonable values for the equilibrium constants of the surface reactions. PMID:27375818

  7. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia. PMID:26854878

  8. Evaporative cooling in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltezos, George; Rajagopal, Aditya; Scherer, Axel

    2006-08-01

    Evaporative cooling is an effective and energy efficient way to rapidly remove heat from a system. Specifically, evaporative cooling in microfluidic channels can provide a cost-effective solution for the cooling of electronic devices and chemical reactors. Here we present microfluidic devices fabricated by using soft-lithography techniques to form simple fluidic junctions between channels carrying refrigerant and channels carrying N2 gas. The effects of channel geometry and delivery pressure on the performance of refrigeration through vaporization of acetone, isopropyl alcohol, and ethyl ether were characterized. By varying gas inlet pressures, refrigerants, and angles of the microfluidic junctions, optimal cooling conditions were found. Refrigeration rates in excess of 40°C/s were measured, and long lasting subzero cooling in the junction could be observed.

  9. Microfluidic sieve valves

    SciTech Connect

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  10. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  11. A portable automatic endpoint detection system for amplicons of loop mediated isothermal amplification on microfluidic compact disk platform.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Shah Mukim; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Sayad, Abkar Ahmed; Thiha, Aung; Pei, Koh Xiu; Mohktar, Mas S; Hashim, Uda; Cho, Jongman; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many improvements have been made in foodborne pathogen detection methods to reduce the impact of food contamination. Several rapid methods have been developed with biosensor devices to improve the way of performing pathogen detection. This paper presents an automated endpoint detection system for amplicons generated by loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) on a microfluidic compact disk platform. The developed detection system utilizes a monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) emitter for excitation of fluorescent labeled LAMP amplicons and a color sensor to detect the emitted florescence from target. Then it processes the sensor output and displays the detection results on liquid crystal display (LCD). The sensitivity test has been performed with detection limit up to 2.5 × 10(-3) ng/µL with different DNA concentrations of Salmonella bacteria. This system allows a rapid and automatic endpoint detection which could lead to the development of a point-of-care diagnosis device for foodborne pathogens detection in a resource-limited environment. PMID:25751077

  12. A Portable Automatic Endpoint Detection System for Amplicons of Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification on Microfluidic Compact Disk Platform

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Shah Mukim; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Sayad, Abkar Ahmed; Thiha, Aung; Pei, Koh Xiu; Mohktar, Mas S.; Hashim, Uda; Cho, Jongman; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many improvements have been made in foodborne pathogen detection methods to reduce the impact of food contamination. Several rapid methods have been developed with biosensor devices to improve the way of performing pathogen detection. This paper presents an automated endpoint detection system for amplicons generated by loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) on a microfluidic compact disk platform. The developed detection system utilizes a monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) emitter for excitation of fluorescent labeled LAMP amplicons and a color sensor to detect the emitted florescence from target. Then it processes the sensor output and displays the detection results on liquid crystal display (LCD). The sensitivity test has been performed with detection limit up to 2.5 × 10−3 ng/µL with different DNA concentrations of Salmonella bacteria. This system allows a rapid and automatic endpoint detection which could lead to the development of a point-of-care diagnosis device for foodborne pathogens detection in a resource-limited environment. PMID:25751077

  13. Continuous pH monitoring in a perfused bioreactor system using an optical pH sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Vani, Sundeep; Taylor, Thomas D.; Anderson, Melody M.

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring and regulating the pH of the solution in a bioprocess is one of the key steps in the success of bioreactor operation. An in-line optical pH sensor, based on the optical absorption properties of phenol red present in the medium, was developed and tested in this work for use in NASA space bioreactors based on a rotating wall-perfused vessel system supporting a baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell culture. The sensor was tested over three 30-day and one 124-day cell runs. The pH sensor initially was calibrated and then used during the entire cell culture interval. The pH reported by the sensor was compared to that measured by a fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer and a blood gas analyzer. The maximum standard error of prediction for all the four cell runs for development pH sensor against BGA was +/-0.06 pH unit and for the fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer against the blood gas analyzer was +/-0.05 pH unit. The pH sensor system performed well without need of recalibration for 124 days. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Rapid detection of live methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by using an integrated microfluidic system capable of ethidium monoazide pre-treatment and molecular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium resistant to all existing penicillin and lactam-based antimicrobial drugs and, therefore, has become one of the most prevalent antibiotic-resistant pathogens found in hospitals. The multi-drug resistant characteristics of MRSA make it challenging to clinically treat infected patients. Therefore, early diagnosis of MRSA has become a public-health priority worldwide. Conventionally, cell-culture based methodology and microscopic identification are commonly used for MRSA detection. However, they are relatively time-consuming and labor-intensive. Recently, molecular diagnosis based on nucleic acid amplification techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), has been widely investigated for the rapid detection of MRSA. However, genomic DNA of both live and dead pathogens can be distinguished by conventional PCR. These results thus could not provide sufficient confirmation of an active infection for clinicians. In this study, live MRSA was rapidly detected by using a new integrated microfluidic system. The microfluidic system has been demonstrated to have 100% specificity to detect live MRSA with S. aureus and other pathogens commonly found in hospitals. The experimental results showed that the limit of detection for live MRSA from biosamples was approximately 102 CFU/μl. In addition, the entire diagnostic protocol, from sample pre-treatment to fluorescence observation, can be automatically completed within 2.5 h. Consequently, this microfluidic system may be a powerful tool for the rapid molecular diagnosis of live MRSA. PMID:24019858

  15. Effects of scaffold architecture on mechanical characteristics and osteoblast response to static and perfusion bioreactor cultures.

    PubMed

    Bartnikowski, Michal; Klein, Travis J; Melchels, Ferry P W; Woodruff, Maria A

    2014-07-01

    Tissue engineering focuses on the repair and regeneration of tissues through the use of biodegradable scaffold systems that structurally support regions of injury while recruiting and/or stimulating cell populations to rebuild the target tissue. Within bone tissue engineering, the effects of scaffold architecture on cellular response have not been conclusively characterized in a controlled-density environment. We present a theoretical and practical assessment of the effects of polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold architectural modifications on mechanical and flow characteristics as well as MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cellular response in an in vitro static plate and custom-designed perfusion bioreactor model. Four scaffold architectures were contrasted, which varied in inter-layer lay-down angle and offset between layers, while maintaining a structural porosity of 60 ± 5%. We established that as layer angle was decreased (90° vs. 60°) and offset was introduced (0 vs. 0.5 between layers), structural stiffness, yield stress, strength, pore size, and permeability decreased, while computational fluid dynamics-modeled wall shear stress was increased. Most significant effects were noted with layer offset. Seeding efficiencies in static culture were also dramatically increased due to offset (∼ 45% to ∼ 86%), with static culture exhibiting a much higher seeding efficiency than perfusion culture. Scaffold architecture had minimal effect on cell response in static culture. However, architecture influenced osteogenic differentiation in perfusion culture, likely by modifying the microfluidic environment. PMID:24473931

  16. Screening Reactive Metabolites Bioactivated by Multiple Enzyme Pathways Using a Multiplexed Microfluidic System

    PubMed Central

    Wasalathanthri, Dhanuka P.; Faria, Ronaldo C.; Malla, Spundana; Joshi, Amit A.; Schenkman, John B.; Rusling, James F.

    2012-01-01

    A multiplexed, microfluidic platform to detect reactive metabolites is described, and its performance is illustrated for compounds metabolized by oxidative and bioconjugation enzymes in multi-enzyme pathways to mimic natural human drug metabolism. The device features four 8-electrode screen printed carbon arrays coated with thin films of DNA, a ruthenium-polyvinylpyridine (RuPVP) catalyst, and multiple enzyme sources including human liver microsomes (HLM), cytochrome P450 (cyt P450) 1B1 supersomes, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EH), human S9 liver fractions (Hs9) and N-acetyltransferase (NAT). Arrays are arranged in parallel to facilitate multiple compound screening, enabling up to 32 enzyme reactions and measurements in 20–30 min. In the first step of the assay, metabolic reactions are achieved under constant flow of oxygenated reactant solutions by electrode driven natural catalytic cycles of cyt P450s and cofactor-supported bioconjugation enzymes. Reactive metabolites formed in the enzyme reactions can react with DNA. Relative DNA damage is measuring in the second assay step using square wave voltammetry (SWV) with RuPVP as catalyst. Studies were done on chemicals known to require metabolic activation to induce genotoxicity, and results reproduced known features of metabolite DNA-reactivity for the test compounds. Metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) by cyt P450s and epoxide hydrolase showed an enhanced relative DNA damage rate for DNA damage compared to cyt P450s alone. DNA damage rates for arylamines by pathways featuring both oxidative and conjugative enzymes at pH 7.4 gave better correlation with rodent genotoxicity metric TD50. Results illustrate the broad utility of the reactive metabolite screening device. PMID:23095952

  17. Laser Ablation of Polymer Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, Kevin

    2004-03-01

    Microfluidic technology is ideal for processing precious samples of limited volumes. Some of the most important classes of biological samples are both high in sample complexity and low in concentration. Combining the elements of sample pre-concentration, chemical separation and high sensitivity detection with chemical identification is essential for realizing a functional microfluidic based analysis system. Direct write UV laser ablation has been used to rapidly fabricate microfluidic devices capable of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS. These chip-LC/MS devices use bio-compatible, solvent resistant and flexible polymer materials such as polyimide. A novel microfluidic to rotary valve interface enables, leak free, high pressure fluid switching between multiple ports of the microfluidic chip-LC/MS device. Electrospray tips with outer dimension of 50 um and inner of 15 um are formed by ablating the polymer material concentrically around a multilayer laminated channel structure. Biological samples of digested proteins were used to evaluate the performance of these microfluidic devices. Liquid chromatography separation and similar sample pretreatments have been performed using polymeric microfluidic devices with on-chip separation channels. Mass spectrometry was performed using an Agilent Technologies 1100 series ion trap mass spectrometer. Low fmol amounts of protein samples were positively and routinely identified by searching the MS/MS spectral data against protein databases. The sensitivity and separation performance of the chip-LC devices has been found to be comparable to state of the art nano-electrospray systems.

  18. Quantitative Validation of the Presto Blue™ Metabolic Assay for Online Monitoring of Cell Proliferation in a 3D Perfusion Bioreactor System

    PubMed Central

    Sonnaert, Maarten; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Luyten, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    As the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine mature toward clinical applications, the need for online monitoring both for quantitative and qualitative use becomes essential. Resazurin-based metabolic assays are frequently applied for determining cytotoxicity and have shown great potential for monitoring 3D bioreactor-facilitated cell culture. However, no quantitative correlation between the metabolic conversion rate of resazurin and cell number has been defined yet. In this work, we determined conversion rates of Presto Blue™, a resazurin-based metabolic assay, for human periosteal cells during 2D and 3D static and 3D perfusion cultures. Our results showed that for the evaluated culture systems there is a quantitative correlation between the Presto Blue conversion rate and the cell number during the expansion phase with no influence of the perfusion-related parameters, that is, flow rate and shear stress. The correlation between the cell number and Presto Blue conversion subsequently enabled the definition of operating windows for optimal signal readouts. In conclusion, our data showed that the conversion of the resazurin-based Presto Blue metabolic assay can be used as a quantitative readout for online monitoring of cell proliferation in a 3D perfusion bioreactor system, although a system-specific validation is required. PMID:25336207

  19. Quantitative Validation of the Presto Blue Metabolic Assay for Online Monitoring of Cell Proliferation in a 3D Perfusion Bioreactor System.

    PubMed

    Sonnaert, Maarten; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan Ir

    2015-06-01

    As the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine mature toward clinical applications, the need for online monitoring both for quantitative and qualitative use becomes essential. Resazurin-based metabolic assays are frequently applied for determining cytotoxicity and have shown great potential for monitoring 3D bioreactor-facilitated cell culture. However, no quantitative correlation between the metabolic conversion rate of resazurin and cell number has been defined yet. In this work, we determined conversion rates of Presto Blue, a resazurin-based metabolic assay, for human periosteal cells during 2D and 3D static and 3D perfusion cultures. Our results showed that for the evaluated culture systems there is a quantitative correlation between the Presto Blue conversion rate and the cell number during the expansion phase with no influence of the perfusion-related parameters, that is, flow rate and shear stress. The correlation between the cell number and Presto Blue conversion subsequently enabled the definition of operating windows for optimal signal readouts. In conclusion, our data showed that the conversion of the resazurin-based Presto Blue metabolic assay can be used as a quantitative readout for online monitoring of cell proliferation in a 3D perfusion bioreactor system, although a system-specific validation is required. PMID:25336207

  20. Development of a microfluidic device for determination of cell osmotic behavior and membrane transport properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Hung; Purtteman, Jester J P; Heimfeld, Shelly; Folch, Albert; Gao, Dayong

    2007-12-01

    An understanding of cell osmotic behavior and membrane transport properties is indispensable for cryobiology research and development of cell-type-specific, optimal cryopreservation conditions. A microfluidic perfusion system is developed here to measure the kinetic changes of cell volume under various extracellular conditions, in order to determine cell osmotic behavior and membrane transport properties. The system is fabricated using soft lithography and is comprised of microfluidic channels and a perfusion chamber for trapping cells. During experiments, rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-1 line) cells were injected into the inlet of the device, allowed to flow downstream, and were trapped within a perfusion chamber. The fluid continues to flow to the outlet due to suction produced by a Hamilton Syringe. Two sets of experiments have been performed: the cells were perfused by (1) hypertonic solutions with different concentrations of non-permeating solutes and (2) solutions containing a permeating cryoprotective agent (CPA), dimethylsulfoxide (Me(2)SO), plus non-permeating solute (sodium chloride (NaCl)), respectively. From experiment (1), cell osmotically inactive volume (V(b)) and the permeability coefficient of water (L(p)) for RBL cells are determined to be 41% [n=18, correlation coefficient (r(2)) of 0.903] of original/isotonic volume, and 0.32+/-0.05 microm/min/atm (n=8, r(2)>0.963), respectively, for room temperature (22 degrees C). From experiment (2), the permeability coefficient of water (L(p)) and of Me(2)SO (P(s)) for RBL cells are 0.38+/-0.09 microm/min/atm and (0.49+/-0.13) x 10(-3)cm/min (n=5, r(2)>0.86), respectively. We conclude that this device enables us to: (1) readily monitor the changes of extracellular conditions by perfusing single or a group of cells with prepared media; (2) confine cells (or a cell) within a monolayer chamber, which prevents imaging ambiguity, such as cells overlapping or moving out of the focus plane; (3) study individual cell

  1. An automated microfluidic chip system for detection of piscine nodavirus and characterization of its potential carrier in grouper farms.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Che; Wang, Ting-Yu; Hsu, Hao-Hsuan; Lee, Szu-Hsien; Chen, Young-Mao; Tsai, Tieh-Jung; Ou, Ming-Chang; Ku, Hsiao-Tung; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2012-01-01

    Groupers of the Epinephelus spp. are an important aquaculture species of high economic value in the Asia Pacific region. They are susceptible to piscine nodavirus infection, which results in viral nervous necrosis disease. In this study, a rapid and sensitive automated microfluidic chip system was implemented for the detection of piscine nodavirus; this technology has the advantage of requiring small amounts of sample and has been developed and applied for managing grouper fish farms. Epidemiological investigations revealed an extremely high detection rate of piscine nodavirus (89% of fish samples) from 5 different locations in southern Taiwan. In addition, positive samples from the feces of fish-feeding birds indicated that the birds could be carrying the virus between fish farms. In the present study, we successfully introduced this advanced technology that combines engineering and biological approaches to aquaculture. In the future, we believe that this approach will improve fish farm management and aid in reducing the economic loss experienced by fish farmers due to widespread disease outbreaks. PMID:22912690

  2. A microfluidic system enabling Raman measurements of the oxygenation cycle in single optically trapped red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ramser, Kerstin; Enger, Jonas; Goksör, Mattias; Hanstorp, Dag; Logg, Katarina; Käll, Mikael

    2005-04-01

    Using a lab-on-a-chip approach we demonstrate the possibility of selecting a single cell with certain properties and following its dynamics after an environmental stimulation in real time using Raman spectroscopy. This is accomplished by combining a micro Raman set-up with optical tweezers and a microfluidic system. The latter gives full control over the media surrounding the cell, and it consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs defined by electron beam lithography that is moulded into rubber silicon (PDMS). Different buffers can be transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the resonance Raman response of an optically trapped red blood cell (RBC) is simultaneously registered. This makes it possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle of the cell in real time and to investigate effects like photo-induced chemistry caused by the illumination. The experimental set-up has high potential for in vivo monitoring of cellular drug response using a variety of spectroscopic probes. PMID:15791341

  3. Microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip preparation routes for organic nanoparticles and vesicular systems for nanomedicine applications.

    PubMed

    Capretto, Lorenzo; Carugo, Dario; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Zhang, Xunli

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, advancements in the fields of microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip technologies have provided unique opportunities for the implementation of nanomaterial production processes owing to the miniaturisation of the fluidic environment. It has been demonstrated that microfluidic reactors offer a range of advantages compared to conventional batch reactors, including improved controllability and uniformity of nanomaterial characteristics. In addition, the fast mixing achieved within microchannels, and the predictability of the laminar flow conditions, can be leveraged to investigate the nanomaterial formation dynamics. In this article recent developments in the field of microfluidic production of nanomaterials for drug delivery applications are reviewed. The features that make microfluidic reactors a suitable technological platform are discussed in terms of controllability of nanomaterials production. An overview of the various strategies developed for the production of organic nanoparticles and colloidal assemblies is presented, focusing on those nanomaterials that could have an impact on nanomedicine field such as drug nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, liposomes, polymersomes, polyplexes and hybrid nanoparticles. The effect of microfluidic environment on nanomaterials formation dynamics, as well as the use of microdevices as tools for nanomaterial investigation is also discussed. PMID:23933616

  4. In Situ Fabrication of 3D Ag@ZnO Nanostructures for Microfluidic Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we develop an in situ method to grow highly controllable, sensitive, three-dimensional (3D) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates via an optothermal effect within microfluidic devices. Implementing this approach, we fabricate SERS substrates composed of Ag@ZnO structures at prescribed locations inside microfluidic channels, sites within which current fabrication of SERS structures has been arduous. Conveniently, properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO nanostructures such as length, packing density, and coverage can also be adjusted by tuning laser irradiation parameters. After exploring the fabrication of the 3D nanostructures, we demonstrate a SERS enhancement factor of up to ∼2 × 106 and investigate the optical properties of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures through finite-difference time-domain simulations. To illustrate the potential value of our technique, low concentrations of biomolecules in the liquid state are detected. Moreover, an integrated cell-trapping function of the 3D Ag@ZnO structures records the surface chemical fingerprint of a living cell. Overall, our optothermal-effect-based fabrication technique offers an effective combination of microfluidics with SERS, resolving problems associated with the fabrication of SERS substrates in microfluidic channels. With its advantages in functionality, simplicity, and sensitivity, the microfluidic-SERS platform presented should be valuable in many biological, biochemical, and biomedical applications. PMID:25402207

  5. A lab-on-a-chip system for the development of complex assays using modular microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Carstens, Cornelia; Brandst"tter, Thomas; Becker, Holger; Elbracht, Rudi; Gärtner, Claudia

    2012-03-01

    For complex biological or diagnostic assays, the development of an integrated microfluidic device can be difficult and error-prone. For this reason, a modular approach, using individual microfluidic functional modules for the different process steps, can be advantageous. However often the interconnection of the modules proves to be tedious and the peripheral instrumentation to drive the various modules is cumbersome and of large size. For this reason, we have developed an integrated instrument platform which has generic functionalities such as valves and pumps, heating zones for continuous-flow PCR, moveable magnets for bead-based assays and an optical detection unit build into the instrument. The instrument holds a titerplate-sized carrier in which up to four microscopy-slide sized microfluidic modules can be clipped in. This allows for developing and optimizing individual assay steps without the need to modify the instrument or generate a completely new microfluidic cartridge. As a proof-of-concept, the automated sample processing of liquor or blood culture in microfluidic structures for detection of currently occuring Neisseria meningitidis strains was carried out. This assay involves the extraction of bacterial DNA, the fluorescent labeling, amplification using PCR as well as the hybridization of the DNA molecules in three-dimensional capture sites spotted into a microchannel. To define the assay sensitivity, chip modules were tested with bacteria spiked samples of different origins and results were controlled by conventional techniques. For liquor or blood culture, the presence of 200 bacteria was detected within 1 hour.

  6. Analogy among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Shian; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-01

    We wish to illuminate the analogous link between microfluidic-based devices, and the already established pairing of micromechanics and microelectronics to create a triangular/three-way scientific relationship as a means of interlinking familial disciplines and accomplishing two primary goals: (1) to facilitate the modeling of multidisciplinary domains; and, (2) to enable us to co-simulate the entire system within a compact circuit simulator (e.g., Cadence or SPICE). A microfluidic channel-like structure embedded in a micro-electro-mechanical resonator via our proposed CMOS-MEMS technology is used to illustrate the connections among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics. PMID:23963526

  7. Detection of unlabeled particles in the low micrometer size range using light scattering and hydrodynamic 3D focusing in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Guisheng; Jensen, Thomas G; Kutter, Jörg P

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a microfluidic device composed of integrated microoptical elements and a two-layer microchannel structure for highly sensitive light scattering detection of micro/submicrometer-sized particles. In the two-layer microfluidic system, a sample flow stream is first constrained in the out-of-plane direction into a narrow sheet, and then focused in-plane into a small core region, obtaining on-chip three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing. All the microoptical elements, including waveguides, microlens, and fiber-to-waveguide couplers, and the in-plane focusing channels are fabricated in one SU-8 layer by standard photolithography. The channels for out-of-plane focusing are made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer by a single cast using a SU-8 master. Numerical and experimental results indicate that the device can realize 3D hydrodynamic focusing reliably over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (0.5 < Re < 20). Polystyrene particles of three sizes (2, 1, and 0.5 μm) were measured in the microfluidic device with integrated optics, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach to detect particles in the low micrometer size range by light scattering detection. PMID:22740459

  8. Fabrication of plastic microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Hammerstrom, D. J.

    1998-09-01

    Plastic components have many advantages, including ease of fabrication, low cost, chemical inertness, lightweight, and disposability. We report on the fabrication of three plastics-based microfluidic components: a motherboard, a dialysis unit, and a metal sensor. Microchannels, headers, and interconnects were produced in thin sheets (>=50 microns) of polyimide, PMMA, polyethylene, and polycarbonate using a direct-write excimer laser micromachining system. Machined sheets were laminated by thermal and adhesive bonding to form leak-tight microfluidic components. The microfluidic motherboard borrowed the `functionality on a chip' concept from the electronics industry and was the heart of a complex microfluidic analytical device. The motherboard platform was designed to be tightly integrated and self-contained (i.e., liquid flows are all confined within machined microchannels), reducing the need for tubing with fluid distribution and connectivity. This concept greatly facilitated system integration and miniaturization. As fabricated, the motherboard consisted of three fluid reservoirs connected to micropumps by microchannels. The fluids could either be pumped independently or mixed in microchannels prior to being directed to exterior analytical components via outlet ports. The microdialysis device was intended to separate electrolytic solutes from low volume samples prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The device consisted of a dialysis membrane laminated between opposed serpentine microchannels containing the sample fluid and a buffer solution. The laminated metal sensor consisted of fluid reservoirs, micro-flow channels, micropumps, mixing channels, reaction channels, and detector circuitry.

  9. Non-contact tissue perfusion and oxygenation imaging using a LED based multispectral and a thermal imaging system, first results of clinical intervention studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    During clinical interventions objective and quantitative information of the tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature can be useful for the surgical strategy. Local (point) measurements give limited information and affected areas can easily be missed, therefore imaging large areas is required. In this study a LED based multispectral imaging system (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370nm-880nm) and a thermo camera were applied during clinical interventions: tissue flap transplantations (ENT), local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery (epileptic seizure). The images covered an area of 20x20 cm, when doing measurements in an (operating) room, they turned out to be more complicated than laboratory experiments due to light fluctuations, movement of the patient and limited angle of view. By constantly measuring the background light and the use of a white reference, light fluctuations and movement were corrected. Oxygenation concentration images could be calculated and combined with the thermal images. The effectively of local anesthesia of a hand could be predicted in an early stage using the thermal camera and the reperfusion of transplanted skin flap could be imaged. During brain surgery, a temporary hyper-perfused area was witnessed which was probably related to an epileptic attack. A LED based multispectral imaging system combined with thermal imaging provide complementary information on perfusion and oxygenation changes and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics during clinical interventions.

  10. Wnt5a-mediating neurogenesis of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells in a 3D microfluidic cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeein; Kim, Sohyeun; Jung, Jinsun; Lim, Youngbin; Kang, Kyungsun; Park, Seungsu; Kang, Sookyung

    2011-10-01

    In stem cell biology, cell plasticity refers to the ability of stem cells to differentiate into a variety of cell lineages. Recently, cell plasticity has been used to refer to the ability of a given cell type to reversibly de-differentiate, re-differentiate, or transdifferentiate in response to specific stimuli. These processes are regulated by multiple intracellular and extracellular growth and differentiation factors, including low oxygen. Our recent study showed that 3D microfluidic cell culture induces activation of the Wnt5A/β-catenin signaling pathway in hATSCs (human Adipose Tissue-derived Stem Cells). This resulted in self renewal and transdifferentiation of hATSCs into neurons. To improve neurogenic potency of hATSCs in response to low oxygen and other unknown physical factors, we developed a gel-free 3D microfluidic cell culture system (3D-μFCCS). The functional structure was developed for the immobilization of 3D multi-cellular aggregates in a microfluidic channel without the use of a matrix on the chip. Growth of hATSCs neurosphere grown on a chip was higher than the growth of control cells grown in a culture dish. Induction of differentiation in the Chip system resulted in a significant increase in the induction of neuronal-like cell structures and the presentation of TuJ or NF160 positive long neuritis compared to control cells after active migration from the center of the microfluidic channel layer to the outside of the microfluidic channel layer. We also observed that the chip neurogenesis system induced a significantly higher level of GABA secreting neurons and, in addition, almost 60% of cells were GABA + cells. Finally, we observed that 1 month of after the transplantation of each cell type in a mouse SCI lesion, chip cultured and neuronal differentiated hATSCs exhibited the ability to effectively transdifferentiate into NF160 + motor neurons at a high ratio. Interestingly, our CHIP/PCR analysis revealed that HIF1α-induced hATSCs neurogenesis

  11. A ferrofluid guided system for the rapid separation of the non-magnetic particles in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Asmatulu, R; Zhang, B; Nuraje, N

    2010-10-01

    A microfluidic device was fabricated via UV lithography technique to separate non-magnetic fluoresbrite carboxy microspheres (approximately 4.5 microm) in the pH 7 ferrofluids made of magnetite nanoparticles (approximately 10 nm). A mixture of microspheres and ferrofluid was injected to a lithographically developed Y shape microfluidic device, and then by applying the external magnet fields (0.45 T), the microspheres were clearly separated into different channels because of the magnetic force acting on those non-magnetic particles. During this study, various pumping speeds and particle concentrations associated with the various distances between the magnet and the microfluidic device were investigated for an efficient separation. This study may be useful for the separation of biological particles, which are very sensitive to pH value of the solutions. PMID:21137734

  12. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  13. A reversibly sealed, easy access, modular (SEAM) microfluidic architecture to establish in vitro tissue interfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abhyankar, Vinay V.; Wu, Meiye; Koh, Chung -Yan; Hatch, Anson V.; Eddington, David T.

    2016-05-26

    Microfluidic barrier tissue models have emerged as advanced in vitro tools to explore interactions with external stimuli such as drug candidates, pathogens, or toxins. However, the procedures required to establish and maintain these systems can be challenging to implement for end users, particularly those without significant in-house engineering expertise. Here we present a module-based approach that provides an easy-to-use workflow to establish, maintain, and analyze microscale tissue constructs. Our approach begins with a removable culture insert that is magnetically coupled, decoupled, and transferred between standalone, prefabricated microfluidic modules for simplified cell seeding, culture, and downstream analysis. The modular approach allowsmore » several options for perfusion including standard syringe pumps or integration with a self-contained gravity-fed module for simple cell maintenance. As proof of concept, we establish a culture of primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and report combined surface protein imaging and gene expression after controlled apical stimulation with the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We also demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating hydrated biomaterial interfaces into the microfluidic architecture by integrating an ultra-thin (< 1 μm), self-assembled hyaluronic acid/peptide amphiphile culture membrane with brain-specific Young’s modulus (~ 1kPa). To highlight the importance of including biomimetic interfaces into microscale models we report multi-tiered readouts from primary rat cortical cells cultured on the self-assembled membrane and compare a panel of mRNA targets with primary brain tissue signatures. As a result, we anticipate that the modular approach and simplified operational workflows presented here will enable a wide range of research groups to incorporate microfluidic barrier tissue models into their work.« less

  14. A Reversibly Sealed, Easy Access, Modular (SEAM) Microfluidic Architecture to Establish In Vitro Tissue Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abhyankar, Vinay V.; Wu, Meiye; Koh, Chung-Yan; Hatch, Anson V.

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic barrier tissue models have emerged as advanced in vitro tools to explore interactions with external stimuli such as drug candidates, pathogens, or toxins. However, the procedures required to establish and maintain these systems can be challenging to implement for end users, particularly those without significant in-house engineering expertise. Here we present a module-based approach that provides an easy-to-use workflow to establish, maintain, and analyze microscale tissue constructs. Our approach begins with a removable culture insert that is magnetically coupled, decoupled, and transferred between standalone, prefabricated microfluidic modules for simplified cell seeding, culture, and downstream analysis. The modular approach allows several options for perfusion including standard syringe pumps or integration with a self-contained gravity-fed module for simple cell maintenance. As proof of concept, we establish a culture of primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and report combined surface protein imaging and gene expression after controlled apical stimulation with the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We also demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating hydrated biomaterial interfaces into the microfluidic architecture by integrating an ultra-thin (< 1 μm), self-assembled hyaluronic acid/peptide amphiphile culture membrane with brain-specific Young’s modulus (~ 1kPa). To highlight the importance of including biomimetic interfaces into microscale models we report multi-tiered readouts from primary rat cortical cells cultured on the self-assembled membrane and compare a panel of mRNA targets with primary brain tissue signatures. We anticipate that the modular approach and simplified operational workflows presented here will enable a wide range of research groups to incorporate microfluidic barrier tissue models into their work. PMID:27227828

  15. A Reversibly Sealed, Easy Access, Modular (SEAM) Microfluidic Architecture to Establish In Vitro Tissue Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Abhyankar, Vinay V; Wu, Meiye; Koh, Chung-Yan; Hatch, Anson V

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic barrier tissue models have emerged as advanced in vitro tools to explore interactions with external stimuli such as drug candidates, pathogens, or toxins. However, the procedures required to establish and maintain these systems can be challenging to implement for end users, particularly those without significant in-house engineering expertise. Here we present a module-based approach that provides an easy-to-use workflow to establish, maintain, and analyze microscale tissue constructs. Our approach begins with a removable culture insert that is magnetically coupled, decoupled, and transferred between standalone, prefabricated microfluidic modules for simplified cell seeding, culture, and downstream analysis. The modular approach allows several options for perfusion including standard syringe pumps or integration with a self-contained gravity-fed module for simple cell maintenance. As proof of concept, we establish a culture of primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and report combined surface protein imaging and gene expression after controlled apical stimulation with the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We also demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating hydrated biomaterial interfaces into the microfluidic architecture by integrating an ultra-thin (< 1 μm), self-assembled hyaluronic acid/peptide amphiphile culture membrane with brain-specific Young's modulus (~ 1kPa). To highlight the importance of including biomimetic interfaces into microscale models we report multi-tiered readouts from primary rat cortical cells cultured on the self-assembled membrane and compare a panel of mRNA targets with primary brain tissue signatures. We anticipate that the modular approach and simplified operational workflows presented here will enable a wide range of research groups to incorporate microfluidic barrier tissue models into their work. PMID:27227828

  16. Multidimensional bioseparation with modular microfluidics

    DOEpatents

    Chirica, Gabriela S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-08-27

    A multidimensional chemical separation and analysis system is described including a prototyping platform and modular microfluidic components capable of rapid and convenient assembly, alteration and disassembly of numerous candidate separation systems. Partial or total computer control of the separation system is possible. Single or multiple alternative processing trains can be tested, optimized and/or run in parallel. Examples related to the separation and analysis of human bodily fluids are given.

  17. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a-Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments.

  18. Replaceable Microfluidic Cartridges for a PCR Biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Kevin; Sullivan, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts a replaceable microfluidic cartridge that is a component of a miniature biosensor that detects target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences. The biosensor utilizes (1) polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to multiply the amount of DNA to be detected, (2) fluorogenic polynucleotide probe chemicals for labeling the target DNA sequences, and (3) a high-sensitivity epifluorescence-detection optoelectronic subsystem. Microfluidics is a relatively new field of device development in which one applies techniques for fabricating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to miniature systems for containing and/or moving fluids. Typically, microfluidic devices are microfabricated, variously, from silicon or polymers. The development of microfluidic devices for applications that involve PCR and fluorescence-based detection of PCR products poses special challenges

  19. Target hepatic artery regional chemotherapy and bevacizumab perfusion in liver metastatic colorectal cancer after failure of first-line or second-line systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zhang, Ji; Cao, Guang; Liu, Peng; Xu, Haifeng; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xu; Gao, Song; Guo, Jianhai; Zhu, Linzhong; Zhang, Pengjun

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRLM) is a refractory disease after failure of first-line or second-line chemotherapy. Bevacizumab is recommended as first-line therapy for advanced colorectal cancer, but is unproven in CRLM through the hepatic artery. We report favorable outcomes with targeted vessel regional chemotherapy (TVRC) for liver metastatic gastric cancer. TVRC with FOLFOX and bevacizumab perfusion through the hepatic artery was attempted for CRLM for efficacy and safety evaluation. In a single-institution retrospective observational study, 246 patients with CRLM after at least first-line or second-line failure of systemic chemotherapy received TVRC with FOLFOX (i.e. oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil). Of 246 patients, 63 were enrolled into two groups: group 1 (n=30) received bevacizumab and TVRC following tumor progression during previous TVRC treatments; group 2 (n=33) received TVRC plus bevacizumab for CRLM on initiating TVRC. There were no significant differences in the median survival time (14.7 vs. 13.2 months, P=0.367), although the median time to progression was significant (3.3 vs. 5.5 months, P=0.026) between groups. No severe adverse events related to TVRC plus bevacizumab perfusion occurred. Target vessel regional chemotherapy with FOLFOX plus bevacizumab perfusion through the hepatic artery was effective and safe in CRLM. The optimal combination of TVRC and bevacizumab needs further confirmation in future phase II-III clinical trials. PMID:26566233

  20. An automated microfluidic system for single-stranded DNA preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiqin; Sun, Yujia; Liu, Yan; Xiang, Guangxin; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic device capable of performing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis with a white-light detection for detecting mutations that account for hereditary hearing loss. The entire operation process, which includes loading of streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and biotin-labeled polymerase chain reaction products, active dispersion of the MBs with DNA for binding, alkaline denaturation of DNA, dynamic hybridization of the bead-labeled ssDNA to a tag array, and white-light detection, can all be automatically accomplished in a single chamber of the microchip, which was operated on a self-contained instrument with all the necessary components for thermal control, fluidic control, and detection. Two novel mixing valves with embedded polydimethylsiloxane membranes, which can alternately generate a 3-μl pulse flow at a peak rate of around 160 mm/s, were integrated into the chip for thoroughly dispersing magnetic beads in 2 min. The binding efficiency of biotinylated oligonucleotides to beads was measured to be 80.6% of that obtained in a tube with the conventional method. To critically test the performance of this automated microsystem, we employed a commercial microarray-based detection kit for detecting nine mutation loci that account for hereditary hearing loss. The limit of detection of the microsystem was determined as 2.5 ng of input K562 standard genomic DNA using this kit. In addition, four blood samples obtained from persons with mutations were all correctly typed by our system in less than 45 min per run. The fully automated, “amplicon-in-answer-out” operation, together with the white-light detection, makes our system an excellent platform for low-cost, rapid genotyping in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25825617

  1. An automated microfluidic system for single-stranded DNA preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuaiqin; Sun, Yujia; Gan, Wupeng; Liu, Yan; Xiang, Guangxin; Wang, Dong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Peng

    2015-03-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic device capable of performing single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preparation and magnetic bead-based microarray analysis with a white-light detection for detecting mutations that account for hereditary hearing loss. The entire operation process, which includes loading of streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (MBs) and biotin-labeled polymerase chain reaction products, active dispersion of the MBs with DNA for binding, alkaline denaturation of DNA, dynamic hybridization of the bead-labeled ssDNA to a tag array, and white-light detection, can all be automatically accomplished in a single chamber of the microchip, which was operated on a self-contained instrument with all the necessary components for thermal control, fluidic control, and detection. Two novel mixing valves with embedded polydimethylsiloxane membranes, which can alternately generate a 3-μl pulse flow at a peak rate of around 160 mm/s, were integrated into the chip for thoroughly dispersing magnetic beads in 2 min. The binding efficiency of biotinylated oligonucleotides to beads was measured to be 80.6% of that obtained in a tube with the conventional method. To critically test the performance of this automated microsystem, we employed a commercial microarray-based detection kit for detecting nine mutation loci that account for hereditary hearing loss. The limit of detection of the microsystem was determined as 2.5 ng of input K562 standard genomic DNA using this kit. In addition, four blood samples obtained from persons with mutations were all correctly typed by our system in less than 45 min per run. The fully automated, "amplicon-in-answer-out" operation, together with the white-light detection, makes our system an excellent platform for low-cost, rapid genotyping in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25825617

  2. Microfluidics on liquid handling stations (μF-on-LHS): a new industry-compatible microfluidic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittelmann, Jörg; Radtke, Carsten P.; Waldbaur, Ansgar; Neumann, Christiane; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2014-03-01

    Since the early days microfluidics as a scientific discipline has been an interdisciplinary research field with a wide scope of potential applications. Besides tailored assays for point-of-care (PoC) diagnostics, microfluidics has been an important tool for large-scale screening of reagents and building blocks in organic chemistry, pharmaceutics and medical engineering. Furthermore, numerous potential marketable products have been described over the years. However, especially in industrial applications, microfluidics is often considered only an alternative technology for fluid handling, a field which is industrially mostly dominated by large-scale numerically controlled fluid and liquid handling stations. Numerous noteworthy products have dominated this field in the last decade and have been inhibited the widespread application of microfluidics technology. However, automated liquid handling stations and microfluidics do not have to be considered as mutually exclusive approached. We have recently introduced a hybrid fluidic platform combining an industrially established liquid handling station and a generic microfluidic interfacing module that allows probing a microfluidic system (such as an essay or a synthesis array) using the instrumentation provided by the liquid handling station. We term this technology "Microfluidic on Liquid Handling Stations (μF-on-LHS)" - a classical "best of both worlds"- approach that allows combining the highly evolved, automated and industry-proven LHS systems with any type of microfluidic assay. In this paper we show, to the best of our knowledge, the first droplet microfluidics application on an industrial LHS using the μF-on-LHS concept.

  3. Transitioning from multi-phase to single-phase microfluidics for long-term culture and treatment of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kay S; Boyd, Marie; Zagnoni, Michele

    2016-09-21

    When compared to methodologies based on low adhesion or hanging drop plates, droplet microfluidics offers several advantages for the formation and culture of multicellular spheroids, such as the potential for higher throughput screening and the use of reduced cell numbers, whilst providing increased stability for plate handling. However, a drawback of the technology is its characteristic compartmentalisation which limits the nutrients available to cells within an emulsion and poses challenges to the exchange of the encapsulated solution, often resulting in short-term cell culture and/or viability issues. The aim of this study was to develop a multi-purpose microfluidic platform that combines the high-throughput characteristics of multi-phase flows with that of ease of perfusion typical of single-phase microfluidics. We developed a versatile system to upscale the formation and long-term culture of multicellular spheroids for testing anticancer treatments, creating an array of fluidically addressable, compact spheroids that could be cultured in either medium or within a gel scaffold. The work provides proof-of-concept results for using this system to test both chemo- and radio-therapeutic protocols using in vitro 3D cancer models. PMID:27477673

  4. Retrograde heart perfusion: the Langendorff technique of isolated heart perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bell, Robert M; Mocanu, Mihaela M; Yellon, Derek M

    2011-06-01

    In the late 19th century, a number of investigators were working on perfecting isolated heart model, but it was Oscar Langendorff who, in 1895, pioneered the isolated perfused mammalian heart. Since that time, the Langendorff preparation has evolved and provided a wealth of data underpinning our understanding of the fundamental physiology of the heart: its contractile function, coronary blood flow regulation and cardiac metabolism. In more recent times, the procedure has been used to probe pathophysiology of ischaemia/reperfusion and disease states, and with the dawn of molecular biology and genetic manipulation, the Langendorff perfused heart has remained a stalwart tool in the study of the impact upon the physiology of the heart by pharmacological inhibitors and targeted deletion or up-regulation of genes and their impact upon intracellular signalling and adaption to clinically relevant stressful stimuli. We present here the basic structure of the Langendorff system and the fundamental experimental rules which warrant a viable heart preparation. In addition, we discuss the use of the isolated retrograde perfused heart in the model of ischaemia-reperfusion injury ex-vivo, and its applicability to other areas of study. The Langendorff perfusion apparatus is highly adaptable and this is reflected not only in the procedure's longevity but also in the number of different applications to which it has been turned. PMID:21385587

  5. Fabrication of microfluidic vascular phantoms by laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Scott A.; Luu, Long; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-06-01

    Imaging of capillary structures and monitoring of blood flow within vasculature is becoming more common in clinical settings. However, very few dynamic phantoms exist which mimic capillary structures. We report the fabrication and testing of microfluidic, vascular phantoms aimed at the study of blood flow. These phantoms are fabricated using low-cost, off-the-shelf materials and require no lithographic processing, stamping, or embossing. Using laser micromachining, complex microfluidic structures can be fabricated in under an hour. The laser system is capable of producing microfluidic features with sizes on the order of tens of microns, over an area of several square centimeters. Because the laser micromachining system is computer controlled and accepts both vector and raster files, the microfluidic structure can be simple, rectilinear patterns or complex, anatomically correct patterns. The microfluidic devices interface with simple off the shelf syringe pumps. The microfluidic devices fabricated with this technique were used for non-invasive monitoring of flow using speckle based techniques.

  6. High-Throughput Microfluidic Platform for 3D Cultures of Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Towards Engineering Developmental Processes.

    PubMed

    Occhetta, Paola; Centola, Matteo; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Redaelli, Alberto; Martin, Ivan; Rasponi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The development of in vitro models to screen the effect of different concentrations, combinations and temporal sequences of morpho-regulatory factors on stem/progenitor cells is crucial to investigate and possibly recapitulate developmental processes with adult cells. Here, we designed and validated a microfluidic platform to (i) allow cellular condensation, (ii) culture 3D micromasses of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBM-MSCs) under continuous flow perfusion, and (ii) deliver defined concentrations of morphogens to specific culture units. Condensation of hBM-MSCs was obtained within 3 hours, generating micromasses in uniform sizes (56.2 ± 3.9 μm). As compared to traditional macromass pellet cultures, exposure to morphogens involved in the first phases of embryonic limb development (i.e. Wnt and FGF pathways) yielded more uniform cell response throughout the 3D structures of perfused micromasses (PMMs), and a 34-fold higher percentage of proliferating cells at day 7. The use of a logarithmic serial dilution generator allowed to identify an unexpected concentration of TGFβ3 (0.1 ng/ml) permissive to hBM-MSCs proliferation and inductive to chondrogenesis. This proof-of-principle study supports the described microfluidic system as a tool to investigate processes involved in mesenchymal progenitor cells differentiation, towards a 'developmental engineering' approach for skeletal tissue regeneration. PMID:25983217

  7. Digital microfluidic operations on micro-electrode dot array architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Teng, D; Fan, S-K

    2011-12-01

    As digital microfluidics-based biochips find more applications, their complexity is expected to increase significantly owing to the trend of multiple and concurrent assays on the chip. There is a pressing need to deliver a top-down design methodology that the biochip designer can leverage the same level of computer-aided design support as the semi-conductor industry now does. Moreover, as microelectronics fabrication technology is scaling up and integrated device performance is improving, it is expected that these microfluidic biochips will be integrated with microelectronic components in next-generation system-on-chip designs. This study presents the analysis and experiments of digital microfluidic operations on a novel electrowetting-on-dielectric-based 'micro-electrode dot array architecture' that fosters a development path for hierarchical top-down design approach for digital microfluidics. The proposed architecture allows dynamic configurations and activations of identical basic microfluidic unit called 'micro-electrode cells' to design microfluidic components, layouts, routing, microfluidic operations and applications of the biochip hierarchically. Fundamental microfluidic operations have been successfully performed by the architecture. In addition, this novel architecture demonstrates a number of advantages and flexibilities over the conventional digital microfluidics in performing advanced microfluidic operations. PMID:22149873

  8. Predictive toxicology using systemic biology and liver microfluidic “on chip” approaches: Application to acetaminophen injury

    SciTech Connect

    Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Bunescu, Andrei; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Snouber, Leila Choucha; Griscom, Laurent; Razan, Florence; Bois, Frederic Y.; Legallais, Cécile; and others

    2012-03-15

    We have analyzed transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic profiles of hepatoma cells cultivated inside a microfluidic biochip with or without acetaminophen (APAP). Without APAP, the results show an adaptive cellular response to the microfluidic environment, leading to the induction of anti-oxidative stress and cytoprotective pathways. In presence of APAP, calcium homeostasis perturbation, lipid peroxidation and cell death are observed. These effects can be attributed to APAP metabolism into its highly reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). That toxicity pathway was confirmed by the detection of GSH-APAP, the large production of 2-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, and methionine, cystine, and histidine consumption in the treated biochips. Those metabolites have been reported as specific biomarkers of hepatotoxicity and glutathione depletion in the literature. In addition, the integration of the metabolomic, transcriptomic and proteomic collected profiles allowed a more complete reconstruction of the APAP injury pathways. To our knowledge, this work is the first example of a global integration of microfluidic biochip data in toxicity assessment. Our results demonstrate the potential of that new approach to predictive toxicology. -- Highlights: ► We cultivated liver cells in microfluidic biochips ► We integrated transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomics profiles ► Pathways reconstructions were proposed in control and acetaminophen treated cultures ► Biomarkers were identified ► Comparisons with in vivo studies were proposed.

  9. Flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC with elastomeric microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC chips with PDMS microfluidics. Microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the CMOS die. The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the CMOS chip. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor die and matched PDMS microfluidic channels in a flexible package. The packaged system is fully functional under 3cm bending radius. The flexible integration of CMOS ICs with microfluidics enables previously unavailable flexible CMOS electronic systems with fluidic manipulation capabilities, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing.

  10. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system improves cerebral microcirculatory perfusion in diabetic hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Estato, Vanessa; Obadia, Nathalie; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Freitas, Felipe Santos; Reis, Patrícia; Castro-Faria Neto, Hugo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    We examined the functional and structural microcirculatory alterations in the brain, skeletal muscle and myocardium of non-diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and diabetic SHR (D-SHR), as well as the effects of long-term treatment with the angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonist olmesartan and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril. Diabetes was experimentally induced by a combination of a high-fat diet with a single low dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection). D-SHR were orally administered with olmesartan (5 mg/kg/day), enalapril (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 28 days, and compared with vehicle-treated non-diabetic SHR or normotensive non-diabetic Wistar-Kyoto rats. The cerebral and skeletal muscle functional capillary density of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats was assessed using intravital fluorescence videomicroscopy. Chronic treatment with olmesartan or enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure and reversed brain functional capillary rarefaction. Brain oxidative stress was reduced to non-diabetic control levels in animals treated with olmesartan or enalapril. Histochemical analysis of the structural capillary density showed that both olmesartan and enalapril increased the capillary-to-fiber ratio in skeletal muscle and the capillary-to-fiber volume density in the left ventricle. Olmesartan and enalapril also prevented collagen deposition and the increase in cardiomyocyte diameter in the left ventricle. Our results suggest that the association between hypertension and diabetes results in microvascular alterations in the brain, skeletal muscle and myocardium that can be prevented by chronic blockade of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:23466285

  11. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications. PMID:25938973

  12. Enabling two-phase microfluidic thermal transport systems using a novel thermal-flux degassing and fluid charging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Dhillon, Navdeep; Pisano, Albert P.

    2014-03-01

    A novel two-port thermal-flux method has been proposed and demonstrated for degassing and charging two-phase microfluidic thermal transport systems with a degassed working fluid. In microscale heat pipes and loop heat pipes (mLHPs), small device volumes and large capillary forces associated with smaller feature sizes render conventional vacuum pump-based degassing methods quite impractical. Instead, we employ a thermally generated pressure differential to purge non-condensable gases from these devices before charging them with a degassed working fluid in a two-step process. Based on the results of preliminary experiments studying the effectiveness and reliability of three different high temperature-compatible device packaging approaches, an optimized compression packaging technique was developed to degas and charge a mLHP device using the thermal-flux method. An induction heating-based noninvasive hermetic sealing approach for permanently sealing the degassed and charged mLHP devices has also been proposed. To demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, induction heating experiments were performed to noninvasively seal 1 mm square silicon fill-hole samples with donut-shaped solder preforms. The results show that the minimum hole sealing induction heating time is heat flux limited and can be estimated using a lumped capacitance thermal model. However, further continued heating of the solder uncovers the hole due to surface tension-induced contact line dynamics of the molten solder. It was found that an optimum mass of the solder preform is required to ensure a wide enough induction-heating time window for successful sealing of a fill-hole.

  13. Simply and reliably integrating micro heaters/sensors in a monolithic PCR-CE microfluidic genetic analysis system.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Runtao; Pan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Lei; Dai, Zhongpeng; Qin, Jianhua; Lin, Bingcheng

    2009-04-01

    A novel fabrication process was presented to construct a monolithic integrated PCR-CE microfluidic DNA analysis system as a step toward building a total genetic analysis microsystem. Microfabricated Titanium/Platinum (Ti/Pt) heaters and resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were integrated on the backside of a bonded glass chip to provide good thermal transfer and precise temperature detection for the drilled PCR-wells. This heater/RTD integration procedure was simple and reliable, and the resulting metal layer can be easily renewed when the Ti/Pt layer was damaged in later use or novel heater/RTD design was desired. A straightforward "RTD-calibration" method was employed to optimize the chip-based thermal cycling conditions. This method was convenient and rapid, comparing with a conventional RTD-calibration/temperature adjustment method. The highest ramping rates of 14 degrees C/s for heating and 5 degrees C/s for cooling in a 3-microL reaction volume allow 30 complete PCR cycles in about 33 min. After effectively passivating the PCR-well surface, successful lambda-phage DNA amplifications were achieved using a two- or three-temperature cycling protocol. The functionality and performance of the integrated microsystem were demonstrated by successful amplification and subsequent on-line separation/sizing of lambda-phage DNA. A rapid assay for Hepatitis B virus, one of the major human pathogens, was performed in less than 45 min, demonstrating that the developed PCR-CE microsystem was capable of performing automatic and high-speed genetic analysis. PMID:19319907

  14. Electrochemical velocimetry on centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Abi-Samra, Kameel; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Park, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Nahui; Kim, Jintae; Kim, Hanshin; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Madou, Marc

    2013-08-21

    Expanding upon recent applications of interfacing electricity with centrifugal microfluidic platforms, we introduce electrochemical velocimetry to monitor flow in real-time on rotating fluidic devices. Monitoring flow by electrochemical techniques requires a simple, compact setup of miniaturized electrodes that are embedded within a microfluidic channel and are connected to a peripherally-located potentiostat. On-disc flow rates, determined by electrochemical velocimetry, agreed well with theoretically expected values and with optical measurements. As an application of the presented techniques, the dynamic process of droplet formation and release was recorded, yielding critical information about droplet frequency and volume. Overall, the techniques presented in this work advance the field of centrifugal microfluidics by offering a powerful tool, previously unavailable, to monitor flow in real-time on rotating microfluidic systems. PMID:23787459

  15. A Plug-Based Microfluidic System for Dispensing Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) Material Validated by Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Fu, Qiang; Kors, Christopher A.; Stewart, Lance; Nollert, Peter; Laible, Philip D.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a plug-based microfluidic system to dispense nanoliter-volume plugs of Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) material and subsequently merge the LCP plugs with aqueous plugs. This system was validated by crystallizing membrane proteins in lipidic mesophases, including LCP. This system allows for accurate dispensing of LCP material in nanoliter volumes, prevents inadvertent phase transitions that may occur due to dehydration by enclosing LCP in plugs, and is compatible with the traditional method of forming LCP material using a membrane protein sample, as shown by the successful crystallization of bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarum. Conditions for the formation of LCP plugs were characterized and presented in a phase diagram. This system was also implemented using two different methods of introducing the membrane protein: 1) the traditional method of generating the LCP material using a membrane protein sample and 2) Post LCP-formation Incorporation (PLI), which involves making LCP material without protein, adding the membrane protein sample externally to the LCP material, and allowing the protein to diffuse into the LCP material or into other lipidic mesophases that may result from phase transitions. Crystals of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Blastochloris viridis were obtained using PLI. The plug-based, LCP-assisted microfluidic system, combined with the PLI method for introducing membrane protein into LCP, should be useful for minimizing consumption of samples and broadening the screening of parameter space in membrane protein crystallization. PMID:20473353

  16. Recent results of the investigation of a micro-fluidic sampling chip and sampling system for hot cell aqueous processing streams

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, J.; Smith, T.; Law, J.

    2013-07-01

    A Fuel Cycle Research and Development project has investigated an innovative sampling method that could evolve into the next generation sampling and analysis system for metallic elements present in aqueous processing streams. Initially sampling technologies were evaluated and micro-fluidic sampling chip technology was selected and tested. A conceptual design for a fully automated microcapillary-based system was completed and a robotic automated sampling system was fabricated. The mechanical and sampling operation of the completed sampling system was investigated. Different sampling volumes have been tested. It appears that the 10 μl volume has produced data that had much smaller relative standard deviations than the 2 μl volume. In addition, the production of a less expensive, mass produced sampling chip was investigated to avoid chip reuse thus increasing sampling reproducibility/accuracy. The micro-fluidic-based robotic sampling system's mechanical elements were tested to ensure analytical reproducibility and the optimum robotic handling of micro-fluidic sampling chips. (authors)

  17. Design of the micro pressure multi-node measuring system for micro-fluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lili; Guo, Shuheng; Rong, Li; Yin, Ke

    2016-01-01

    An online multi-node microfludic pressure measuring system was designed in the paper. The research focused on the design of pressure test circuit system and methods on dealing with pressure data collecting. The MPXV7002 micro-pressure sensor was selected to measure the chip inside channel pressure and installed by a silicone tube on different micro-channel measured nodes. The pressure transmission loss was estimated in the paper, and corrected by the filtering and smoothing method. The pressure test experiment was carried out and the data were analyzed. Finally, the measuring system was calibrated. The results showed that the measuring system had high testing precision.

  18. Development of a normothermic extracorporeal liver perfusion system toward improving viability and function of human extended criteria donor livers.

    PubMed

    Banan, Babak; Watson, Rao; Xu, Min; Lin, Yiing; Chapman, William

    2016-07-01

    Donor organ shortages have led to an increased interest in finding new approaches to recover organs from extended criteria donors (ECD). Normothermic extracorporeal liver perfusion (NELP) has been proposed as a superior preservation method to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), precondition suboptimal grafts, and treat ECD livers so that they can be successfully used for transplantation. The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of a modified NELP circuit on discarded human livers. Seven human livers that were rejected for transplantation were placed on a modified NELP circuit for 8 hours. Perfusate samples and needle core biopsies were obtained at hourly intervals. A defatting solution that contained exendin-4 (50 nM) and L-carnitine (10 mM) was added to the perfusate for 2 steatotic livers. NELP provided normal temperature, electrolytes, and pH and glucose levels in the perfusate along with physiological vascular flows and pressures. Functional, biochemical, and microscopic evaluation revealed no additional injuries to the grafts during NELP with an improved oxygen extraction ratio (>0.5) and stabilized markers of hepatic injury. All livers synthesized adequate amounts of bile and coagulation factors. We also demonstrated a mild reduction (10%) of macroglobular steatosis with the use of the defatting solution. Histology demonstrated normal parenchymal architecture and a minimal to complete lack of IRI at the end of NELP. In conclusion, a modified NELP circuit preserved hepatocyte architecture, recovered synthetic functions, and hepatobiliary parameters of ECD livers without additional injuries to the grafts. This approach has the potential to increase the donor pool for clinical transplantation. Liver Transplantation 22 979-993 2016 AASLD. PMID:27027254

  19. Successful lung transplantation after donor lung reconditioning with urokinase in ex vivo lung perfusion system.

    PubMed

    Inci, Ilhan; Yamada, Yoshito; Hillinger, Sven; Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang; Trinkwitz, Michael; Weder, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is considered a contraindication to lung donation for transplantation as it might result in graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to assess and recondition a questionable donor graft before transplantation. In this report we present a case of successful bilateral lung transplant after donor lung assessment and treatment with a fibrinolytic agent, urokinase, during EVLP. PMID:25441801

  20. Microfluidic serial dilution ladder.

    PubMed

    Ahrar, Siavash; Hwang, Michelle; Duncan, Philip N; Hui, Elliot E

    2014-01-01

    Serial dilution is a fundamental procedure that is common to a large number of laboratory protocols. Automation of serial dilution is thus a valuable component for lab-on-a-chip systems. While a handful of different microfluidic strategies for serial dilution have been reported, approaches based on continuous flow mixing inherently consume larger amounts of sample volume and chip real estate. We employ valve-driven circulatory mixing to address these issues and also introduce a novel device structure to store each stage of the dilution process. The dilution strategy is based on sequentially mixing the rungs of a ladder structure. We demonstrate a 7-stage series of 1 : 1 dilutions with R(2) equal to 0.995 in an active device area of 1 cm(2). PMID:24231765

  1. Microfluidic system with integrated electroosmotic pumps, concentration gradient generator and fish cell line (RTgill-W1)--towards water toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Glawdel, Tomasz; Elbuken, Caglar; Lee, Lucy E J; Ren, Carolyn L

    2009-11-21

    This study presents a microfluidic system that incorporates electroosmotic pumps, a concentration gradient generator and a fish cell line (rainbow trout gill) to perform toxicity testing on fish cells seeded in the system. The system consists of three mechanical components: (1) a toxicity testing chip containing a microfluidic gradient generator which creates a linear concentration distribution of toxicant in a cell test chamber, (2) an electroosmotic (EO) pump chip that controls the flow rate and operation of the toxicity chip, and (3) indirect reservoirs that connect the two chips allowing for the toxicant solution to be pumped separately from the electroosmotic pump solution. The flow rate and stability of the EO pumps was measured and tested by monitoring the gradient generator using fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, a lethality test was performed with this system setup using a rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1) as the test cells and sodium dodecyl sulfate as a model toxicant. A gradient of sodium dodecyl sulfate, from 0 to 50 microg mL(-1), was applied for 1 hr to the attached cells, and the results were quantified using a Live/Dead cell assay. This work is a preliminary study on the application of EO pumps in a living cell assay, with the potential to use the pumps in portable water quality testing devices with RTgill-W1 cells as the biosensors. PMID:19865731

  2. [Extended hypothermic heart-lung preservation system for cardiopulmonary preservation with retrograde coronary sinus perfusion and lung immersion].

    PubMed

    Senoo, Y; Bando, K; Tago, M; Seno, S; Teraoka, H; Teramoto, S

    1990-09-01

    One major restriction of clinical heart-lung transplantation has been the inability to provide extended hypothermic organ preservation. We examined whether core-cooling, retrograde heart perfusion and lung immersion could provide adequate cardiopulmonary preservation. Hence, donor dogs were placed on cardiopulmonary bypass, and rapidly cooled to 15 degrees C. Then heterotopic heart unilateral left lung transplantations were performed. In control group I (n = 5), hearts and lungs were harvested following core-cooling and cardioplegic arrest, and transplanted immediately. In experimental group II (n = 5), heart-lung blocks were similarly excised but stored at 4 degrees C for 12 hours and then transplanted. During preservation, the lungs were immersed in the extracellular solution. For the heart, non-recirculating retrograde coronary sinus perfusion was performed with oxygenated intracellular solution containing perfluorochemicals. Myocardial function determined by the ratio of end-systolic pressure to end-systolic dimension in the experimental group was similar to that in controls. Although pulmonary vascular resistance and extravascular lung water of the experimental group was higher than those in control group, arterial oxygenation was similar in both groups. Thus, extended heart-lung preservation with core-cooling, retrograde heart perfusion and lung immersion technique could be achieved for heart-lung transplantation. PMID:2246529

  3. Fundamentals and applications of inertial microfluidics: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yan, Sheng; Yuan, Dan; Alici, Gursel; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Ebrahimi Warkiani, Majid; Li, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, inertial microfluidics has attracted significant attention and a wide variety of channel designs that focus, concentrate and separate particles and fluids have been demonstrated. In contrast to conventional microfluidic technologies, where fluid inertia is negligible and flow remains almost within the Stokes flow region with very low Reynolds number (Re ≪ 1), inertial microfluidics works in the intermediate Reynolds number range (~1 < Re < ~100) between Stokes and turbulent regimes. In this intermediate range, both inertia and fluid viscosity are finite and bring about several intriguing effects that form the basis of inertial microfluidics including (i) inertial migration and (ii) secondary flow. Due to the superior features of high-throughput, simplicity, precise manipulation and low cost, inertial microfluidics is a very promising candidate for cellular sample processing, especially for samples with low abundant targets. In this review, we first discuss the fundamental kinematics of particles in microchannels to familiarise readers with the mechanisms and underlying physics in inertial microfluidic systems. We then present a comprehensive review of recent developments and key applications of inertial microfluidic systems according to their microchannel structures. Finally, we discuss the perspective of employing fluid inertia in microfluidics for particle manipulation. Due to the superior benefits of inertial microfluidics, this promising technology will still be an attractive topic in the near future, with more novel designs and further applications in biology, medicine and industry on the horizon. PMID:26584257

  4. A portable microfluidic chip system for cancer diagnosis with simultaneous detection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyoungseon; Kim, Kwang Bok; Jun, Changsu; Chung, Taek Dong; Kim, Hee Chan

    2012-10-01

    In clinical and biological fields, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) attracts much attention for the valuable information about cancer progression, cancer status, and prognosis after the treatment with metastatic cancer. Recently, many researchers have studied to count CTCs efficiently. Representative methods of CTC detection are the immune-reaction based method and the morphology-based method. However, the immune-reaction based method is weak due to the imperfect markers, and morphology-based method has a defect because of the unclear criterion. In this paper, we described the CTC detection system based on flow cytometry technique with morphology and immune reaction based methods. The size and the immune-reaction information can be simultaneously obtained from DC impedance based detection and fluorescence detection, respectively. The performance of our system was evaluated with fluorescence beads. To apply the proposed system to biological samples, the human ovarian cancer cell lines (OVCAR-3) suspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were tested. OVCAR-3 cells were stained by fluorescence tagged anti-epithelial cancer adhesion molecule (EpCAM). The portable flow cytometer system could detect the cancer cells with these methods. The proposed system has sufficient potential for point-of-care testing type cancer cell counter and many valuable clinical applications in the near future.

  5. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields—and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such “unconventional” microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  6. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  7. Predicting Droplet Formation on Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Jacob Alfred

    Centrifugal microfluidics is a widely known research tool for biological sample and water quality analysis. Currently, the standard equipment used for such diagnostic applications include slow, bulky machines controlled by multiple operators. These machines can be condensed into a smaller, faster benchtop sample-to-answer system. Sample processing is an important step taken to extract, isolate, and convert biological factors, such as nucleic acids or proteins, from a raw sample to an analyzable solution. Volume definition is one such step. The focus of this thesis is the development of a model predicting monodispersed droplet formation and the application of droplets as a technique for volume definition. First, a background of droplet microfluidic platforms is presented, along with current biological analysis technologies and the advantages of integrating such technologies onto microfluidic platforms. Second, background and theories of centrifugal microfluidics is given, followed by theories relevant to droplet emulsions. Third, fabrication techniques for centrifugal microfluidic designs are discussed. Finally, the development of a model for predicting droplet formation on the centrifugal microfluidic platform are presented for the rest of the thesis. Predicting droplet formation analytically based on the volumetric flow rates of the continuous and dispersed phases, the ratios of these two flow rates, and the interfacial tension between the continuous and dispersed phases presented many challenges, which will be discussed in this work. Experimental validation was completed using continuous phase solutions of different interfacial tensions. To conclude, prospective applications are discussed with expected challenges.

  8. Microfluidic Cell Deformability Assay for Rapid and Efficient Kinase Screening with the CRISPR-Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin; Liu, Zongbin; Zhao, Li; Wang, Feng; Yu, Yang; Yang, Jianhua; Chen, Rui; Qin, Lidong

    2016-07-18

    Herein we report a CRISPR-Cas9-mediated loss-of-function kinase screen for cancer cell deformability and invasive potential in a high-throughput microfluidic chip. In this microfluidic cell separation platform, flexible cells with high deformability and metastatic propensity flowed out, while stiff cells remained trapped. Through deep sequencing, we found that loss of certain kinases resulted in cells becoming more deformable and invasive. High-ranking candidates identified included well-reported tumor suppressor kinases, such as chk2, IKK-α, p38 MAPKs, and DAPK2. A high-ranking candidate STK4 was chosen for functional validation and identified to play an important role in the regulation of cell deformability and tumor suppression. Collectively, we have demonstrated that CRISPR-based on-chip mechanical screening is a potentially powerful strategy to facilitate systematic genetic analyses. PMID:27258939

  9. Planar Microfluidic System Based on Electrophoresis for Detection of 130-nm Magnetic Labels for Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Tsukasa; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2011-04-01

    Superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) used as magnetic labels offer potential for the realization of high sensitivity and low cost biosensors for point of care treatment (POCT). For better biomolecular affinity and higher sensitivity, it is desirable to use sub-200-nm-diameter SPBs comparable in size to actual biomolecules. However, the detection of small concentrations of such SPBs by magnetoresistive devices is extremely challenging due to small magnetic response of SPBs. As a solution to these limitations, we describe a simple detecting procedure where the capture of micro-SPBs by immobilized nano-target SPBs due to self-assembly induced by an external magnetic field, which was monitored under an optical microscope. Here we describe biosensing system based on self-assembly of micro-SPBs by nanoSPBs targets using a system without external pumps, thereby enabling greater miniaturization and portability.

  10. Local drug delivery with a self-contained, programmable, microfluidic system

    PubMed Central

    Fiering, J.; Mescher, M. J.; Swan, E. E. Leary; Holmboe, M. E.; Murphy, B. A.; Chen, Z.; Peppi, M.; Sewell, W. F.; McKenna, M. J.; Kujawa, S. G.; Borenstein, J. T.

    2010-01-01

    The development and optimization of many new drug therapies requires long-term local delivery with controlled, but variable dosage. Current methods for chronic drug delivery have limited utility because they either cannot deliver drugs locally to a specific organ or tissue, do not permit changes in delivery rate in situ, or cannot be used in clinical trials in an untethered, wearable configuration. Here, we describe a small, self-contained system for liquid-phase drug delivery. This system enables studies lasting several months and infusion rates can be programmed and modified remotely. A commercial miniature pump is integrated with microfabricated components to generate ultralow flow rates and stroke volumes. Solutions are delivered in pulses as small as 370 nL, with pulses delivered at any interval of 1 min or longer. A unique feature of the system is the ability to infuse and immediately withdraw liquid, resulting in zero net volume transfer while compounds are exchanged by mixing and diffusion with endogenous fluid. We present in vitro results demonstrating repeatability of the delivered pulse volume for nearly 3 months. Furthermore, we present in vivo results in an otology application, infusing into the cochlea of a guinea pig a glutamate receptor antagonist, which causes localized and reversible changes in auditory sensitivity. PMID:19089621

  11. Parallel Imaging Microfluidic Cytometer