Science.gov

Sample records for microorganisms producing recombinant

  1. Human recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Mojica, Ángela J; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Alexander; Mosquera, Ángela; Díaz, Dennis; Beltrán, Laura; Díaz, Sergio; Pimentel, Natalia; Moreno, Jefferson; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Sánchez, Oscar F; Córdoba, Henry; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Barrera, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are caused by accumulation of partially degraded substrates within the lysosome, as a result of a function loss of a lysosomal protein. Recombinant lysosomal proteins are usually produced in mammalian cells, based on their capacity to carry out post-translational modifications similar to those observed in human native proteins. However, during the last years, a growing number of studies have shown the possibility to produce active forms of lysosomal proteins in other expression systems, such as plants and microorganisms. In this paper, we review the production and characterization of human lysosomal proteins, deficient in several LSDs, which have been produced in microorganisms. For this purpose, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Ogataea minuta have been used as expression systems. The recombinant lysosomal proteins expressed in these hosts have shown similar substrate specificities, and temperature and pH stability profiles to those produced in mammalian cells. In addition, pre-clinical results have shown that recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms can be taken-up by cells and reduce the substrate accumulated within the lysosome. Recently, metabolic engineering in yeasts has allowed the production of lysosomal enzymes with tailored N-glycosylations, while progresses in E. coli N-glycosylations offer a potential platform to improve the production of these recombinant lysosomal enzymes. In summary, microorganisms represent convenient platform for the production of recombinant lysosomal proteins for biochemical and physicochemical characterization, as well as for the development of ERT for LSD. PMID:26071627

  2. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2012-02-21

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  3. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  4. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  5. Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  6. Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H.C.

    1997-12-30

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  7. Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions

    DOEpatents

    Buelter, Thomas; Meinhold, Peter; Feldman, Reid M. Renny; Hawkins, Andrew C.; Urano, Jun; Bastian, Sabine; Arnold, Frances

    2012-01-17

    The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

  8. Biocorrosion produced by Thiobacillus-like microorganisms.

    PubMed

    López, A I; Marín, I; Amils, R

    1994-01-01

    Biocorrosion can be produced by many different microorganisms through diverse mechanisms. The biocorrosion produced by acidophilic microorganisms of the genus Thiobacillus is based on the production of sulfuric acid and ferric ion from pyrites or related mineral structures, as a result of the chemolithotrophic metabolism of these microorganisms. The products of this aerobic respiration are also powerful oxidant elements, which can produce chemical oxidations of other metallic structures. The Tinto River, a very unusual extremophilic habitat (pH around 2, and high concentration of ferric ion), product of the growth of strict chemolithotrophic microorganisms, is discussed as a model case. PMID:7946115

  9. Food-processing enzymes from recombinant microorganisms--a review.

    PubMed

    Olempska-Beer, Zofia S; Merker, Robert I; Ditto, Mary D; DiNovi, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Enzymes are commonly used in food processing and in the production of food ingredients. Enzymes traditionally isolated from culturable microorganisms, plants, and mammalian tissues are often not well-adapted to the conditions used in modern food production methods. The use of recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to manufacture novel enzymes suitable for specific food-processing conditions. Such enzymes may be discovered by screening microorganisms sampled from diverse environments or developed by modification of known enzymes using modern methods of protein engineering or molecular evolution. As a result, several important food-processing enzymes such as amylases and lipases with properties tailored to particular food applications have become available. Another important achievement is improvement of microbial production strains. For example, several microbial strains recently developed for enzyme production have been engineered to increase enzyme yield by deleting native genes encoding extracellular proteases. Moreover, certain fungal production strains have been modified to reduce or eliminate their potential for production of toxic secondary metabolites. In this article, we discuss the safety of microorganisms used as hosts for enzyme-encoding genes, the construction of recombinant production strains, and methods of improving enzyme properties. We also briefly describe the manufacture and safety assessment of enzyme preparations and summarize options for submitting information on enzyme preparations to the US Food and Drug Administration. PMID:16769167

  10. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

    1992-12-22

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

  11. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

  12. Biosurfactants Produced by Marine Microorganisms with Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gudiña, Eduardo J.; Teixeira, José A.; Rodrigues, Lígia R.

    2016-01-01

    Marine microorganisms possess unique metabolic and physiological features and are an important source of new biomolecules, such as biosurfactants. Some of these surface-active compounds synthesized by marine microorganisms exhibit antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activity against a broad spectrum of human pathogens (including multi-drug resistant pathogens), and could be used instead of existing drugs to treat infections caused by them. In other cases, these biosurfactants show anti-cancer activity, which could be envisaged as an alternative to conventional therapies. However, marine biosurfactants have not been widely explored, mainly due to the difficulties associated with the isolation and growth of their producing microorganisms. Culture-independent techniques (metagenomics) constitute a promising approach to study the genetic resources of otherwise inaccessible marine microorganisms without the requirement of culturing them, and can contribute to the discovery of novel biosurfactants with significant biological activities. This paper reviews the most relevant biosurfactants produced by marine microorganisms with potential therapeutic applications and discusses future perspectives and opportunities to discover novel molecules from marine environments. PMID:26901207

  13. Cultivating Insect Cells To Produce Recombinant Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn; Goodwin, Thomas; Prewett, Tacey; Andrews, Angela; Francis, Karen; O'Connor, Kim

    1996-01-01

    Method of producing recombinant proteins involves growth of insect cells in nutrient solution in cylindrical bioreactor rotating about cylindrical axis, oriented horizontally and infecting cells with viruses into which genes of selected type cloned. Genes in question those encoding production of desired proteins. Horizontal rotating bioreactor preferred for use in method, denoted by acronym "HARV", described in "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662).

  14. Biofuel and chemical production by recombinant microorganisms via fermentation of proteinaceous biomass

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.; Cho, Kwang Myung; Yan, Yajun; Huo, Yixin

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are metabolically modified microorganisms characterized by having an increased keto-acid flux when compared with the wild-type organism and comprising at least one polynucleotide encoding an enzyme that when expressed results in the production of a greater quantity of a chemical product when compared with the wild-type organism. The recombinant microorganisms are useful for producing a large number of chemical compositions from various nitrogen containing biomass compositions and other carbon sources. More specifically, provided herein are methods of producing alcohols, acetaldehyde, acetate, isobutyraldehyde, isobutyric acid, n-butyraldehyde, n-butyric acid, 2-methyl-1-butyraldehyde, 2-methyl-1-butyric acid, 3-methyl-1-butyraldehyde, 3-methyl-1-butyric acid, ammonia, ammonium, amino acids, 2,3-butanediol, 1,4-butanediol, 2-methyl-1,4-butanediol, 2-methyl-1,4-butanediamine, isobutene, itaconate, acetoin, acetone, isobutene, 1,5-diaminopentane, L-lactic acid, D-lactic acid, shikimic acid, mevalonate, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), isoprenoids, fatty acids, homoalanine, 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA), succinic acid, malic acid, citric acid, adipic acid, p-hydroxy-cinnamic acid, tetrahydrofuran, 3-methyl-tetrahydrofuran, gamma-butyrolactone, pyrrolidinone, n-methylpyrrolidone, aspartic acid, lysine, cadeverine, 2-ketoadipic acid, and/or S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) from a suitable nitrogen rich biomass.

  15. Extracellular enzymes produced by microorganisms isolated from maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Loperena, Lyliam; Soria, Verónica; Varela, Hermosinda; Lupo, Sandra; Bergalli, Alejandro; Guigou, Mairan; Pellegrino, Andrés; Bernardo, Angela; Calviño, Ana; Rivas, Federico; Batista, Silvia

    2012-05-01

    Antarctic environments can sustain a great diversity of well-adapted microorganisms known as psychrophiles or psychrotrophs. The potential of these microorganisms as a resource of enzymes able to maintain their activity and stability at low temperature for technological applications has stimulated interest in exploration and isolation of microbes from this extreme environment. Enzymes produced by these organisms have a considerable potential for technological applications because they are known to have higher enzymatic activities at lower temperatures than their mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts. A total of 518 Antarctic microorganisms, were isolated during Antarctic expeditions organized by the Instituto Antártico Uruguayo. Samples of particules suspended in air, ice, sea and freshwater, soil, sediment, bird and marine animal faeces, dead animals, algae, plants, rocks and microbial mats were collected from different sites in maritime Antarctica. We report enzymatic activities present in 161 microorganisms (120 bacteria, 31 yeasts and 10 filamentous fungi) isolated from these locations. Enzymatic performance was evaluated at 4 and 20°C. Most of yeasts and bacteria grew better at 20°C than at 4°C, however the opposite was observed with the fungi. Amylase, lipase and protease activities were frequently found in bacterial strains. Yeasts and fungal isolates typically exhibited lipase, celullase and gelatinase activities. Bacterial isolates with highest enzymatic activities were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis as Pseudomonas spp., Psychrobacter sp., Arthrobacter spp., Bacillus sp. and Carnobacterium sp. Yeasts and fungal strains, with multiple enzymatic activities, belonged to Cryptococcus victoriae, Trichosporon pullulans and Geomyces pannorum. PMID:22806048

  16. Recombinant protein vaccines produced in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Manon M J

    2012-02-27

    The baculovirus-insect cell expression system is a well known tool for the production of complex proteins. The technology is also used for commercial manufacture of various veterinary and human vaccines. This review paper provides an overview of how this technology can be applied to produce a multitude of vaccine candidates. The key advantage of this recombinant protein manufacturing platform is that a universal "plug and play" process may be used for producing a broad range of protein-based prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for both human and veterinary use while offering the potential for low manufacturing costs. Large scale mammalian cell culture facilities previously established for the manufacturing of monoclonal antibodies that have now become obsolete due to yield improvement could be deployed for the manufacturing of these vaccines. Alternatively, manufacturing capacity could be established in geographic regions that do not have any vaccine production capability. Dependent on health care priorities, different vaccines could be manufactured while maintaining the ability to rapidly convert to producing pandemic influenza vaccine when the need arises. PMID:22265860

  17. Selection of lipase-producing microorganisms through submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Colla, Luciane Maria; Primaz, Andreiza Lazzarotto; Benedetti, Silvia; Loss, Raquel Aparecida; de Lima, Marieli; Reinehr, Christian Oliveira; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2010-01-01

    Lipases are enzymes used in various industrial sectors such as food, pharmaceutical and chemical synthesis industries. The selection of microorganisms isolated from soil or wastewater is an alternative to the discovery of new species with high enzymes productivity and with different catalytic activities. In this study, the selection of lipolytic fungi was carried out by submerged fermentation. A total of 27 fungi were used, of which 20 were isolated from dairy effluent and 7 from soil contaminated with diesel oil. The largest producers were the fungi Penicillium E-3 with maximum lipolytic activity of 2.81 U, Trichoderma E-19 and Aspergillus O-8 with maximum activities of 2.34 and 2.03 U where U is the amount of enzyme that releases 1 micromol of fatty acid per min per mL of enzyme extract. The fungi had maximum lipolytic activities on the 4th day of fermentation. PMID:20737918

  18. Recombinant Human Factor IX Produced from Transgenic Porcine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Hwan; Lin, Yin-Shen; Tu, Ching-Fu; Yen, Chon-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Production of biopharmaceuticals from transgenic animal milk is a cost-effective method for highly complex proteins that cannot be efficiently produced using conventional systems such as microorganisms or animal cells. Yields of recombinant human factor IX (rhFIX) produced from transgenic porcine milk under the control of the bovine α-lactalbumin promoter reached 0.25 mg/mL. The rhFIX protein was purified from transgenic porcine milk using a three-column purification scheme after a precipitation step to remove casein. The purified protein had high specific activity and a low ratio of the active form (FIXa). The purified rhFIX had 11.9 γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues/mol protein, which approached full occupancy of the 12 potential sites in the Gla domain. The rhFIX was shown to have a higher isoelectric point and lower sialic acid content than plasma-derived FIX (pdFIX). The rhFIX had the same N-glycosylation sites and phosphorylation sites as pdFIX, but had a higher specific activity. These results suggest that rhFIX produced from porcine milk is physiologically active and they support the use of transgenic animals as bioreactors for industrial scale production in milk. PMID:24955355

  19. Six Siderophore-Producing Microorganisms Identified in Biological Soil Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noonan, K.; Anbar, A. D.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Poret-peterson, A. T.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are diverse microbial communities that colonize soils in arid and semi-arid environments. Cyanobacteria in BSCs are pioneer organisms that increase ecosystem habitability by providing fixed carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) as well as by reducing water run-off and increasing infiltration. Photosynthesis and N fixation, in particular, require a variety of metals in large quantities, and yet, metals are predominantly insoluble in the environments where BSCs thrive. Therefore, BSC organisms must have efficient strategies for extracting metals from soil minerals. We hypothesized that BSC microbes, particularly the cyanobacteria, produce siderophores to serve their metal-acquisition needs. Siderophores are small organic compounds that bind Fe with high affinity and are produced by a variety of microorganisms, including cyanobacteria. Most siderophores bind Fe, primarily; however, some can also bind Mo, V, and Cu. Soil siderophores are released by microbes to increase the solubility of metals from minerals and to facilitate microbial uptake. Thus, siderophores serve as chemical weathering agents and provide a direct link between soil microbes and minerals. Studying siderophore production in BSCs provides insight into how BSCs tackle the challenge of acquiring insoluble metals, and may help conservationists determine useful fertilizers for BSC growth by facilitating metal acquisition. Biological soil crusts were collected near Moab, UT. Soil slurries were prepared in deionized water and transferred to modified BG-11 agar plates. The O-CAS agar plate assay was used to screen organisms for siderophore production. Siderophore producing microbes were isolated and identified by16S rRNA gene sequencing. Cultures were then grown in 3 L batch cultures under metal limitation, and siderophore presence was monitored using the traditional liquid CAS assay. After siderophore detection, cells were removed by centrifugation, organic compounds were separated using

  20. Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  1. Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H.C.

    1998-05-26

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  2. Alum affects ammonia-producing microorganisms in poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientists at the USDA-ARS in Bowling Green, KY and in Fayetteville, AR are working to uncover the microbiology of ammonia production in poultry litter. Poultry litter is a valuable nutrient source for plants and microorganisms that contains high levels of protein, nitrogen, and other minerals. Howe...

  3. Advancing oleaginous microorganisms to produce lipid via metabolic engineering technology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2013-10-01

    With the depletion of global petroleum and its increasing price, biodiesel has been becoming one of the most promising biofuels for global fuels market. Researchers exploit oleaginous microorganisms for biodiesel production due to their short life cycle, less labor required, less affection by venue, and easier to scale up. Many oleaginous microorganisms can accumulate lipids, especially triacylglycerols (TAGs), which are the main materials for biodiesel production. This review is covering the related researches on different oleaginous microorganisms, such as yeast, mold, bacteria and microalgae, which might become the potential oil feedstocks for biodiesel production in the future, showing that biodiesel from oleaginous microorganisms has a great prospect in the development of biomass energy. Microbial oils biosynthesis process includes fatty acid synthesis approach and TAG synthesis approach. In addition, the strategies to increase lipids accumulation via metabolic engineering technology, involving the enhancement of fatty acid synthesis approach, the enhancement of TAG synthesis approach, the regulation of related TAG biosynthesis bypass approaches, the blocking of competing pathways and the multi-gene approach, are discussed in detail. It is suggested that DGAT and ME are the most promising targets for gene transformation, and reducing PEPC activity is observed to be beneficial for lipid production. PMID:23685199

  4. Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and uses thereof for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-05-06

    Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-tolerant microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), acrylic acid, and propionic acid. Further modifications to the microorganisms such as increasing expression of malonyl-CoA reductase and/or acetyl-CoA carboxylase provide or increase the ability of the microorganisms to produce 3HP. Methods of generating an organic acid with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers include replacing acsA or homologs thereof in cells with genes of interest and selecting for the cells comprising the genes of interest with amounts of organic acids effective to inhibit growth of cells harboring acsA or the homologs.

  5. [PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT OF LIVE RECOMBINANT ANTHRAX VACCINES BASED ON OPPORTUNISTIC AND APATHOGENIC MICROORGANISMS].

    PubMed

    Popova, P Yu; Mikshis, N I

    2016-01-01

    Live genetic engineering anthrax vaccines on the platform of avirulent and probiotic micro-organisms are a safe and adequate alternative to preparations based on attenuated Bacillus anthracis strains. Mucosal application results in a direct contact of the vaccine preparations with mucous membranes in those organs arid tissues of the macro-organisms, that are exposed to the pathogen in the first place, resulting in a development of local and systemic immune response. Live recombinant anthrax vaccines could be used both separately as well as in a prime-boost immunization scheme. The review focuses on immunogenic and protective properties of experimental live genetic engineering prearations, created based on members of geni of Salmonella, Lactobacillus and adenoviruses. PMID:27029122

  6. Biocidal Efficacy of Dissolved Ozone, Formaldehyde and Sodium Hypochlorite Against Total Planktonic Microorganisms in Produced Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puyate, Y. T.; Rim-Rukeh, A.

    The performance of three biocides (dissolved ozone, formaldehyde and sodium hypochlorite) in eliminating the bacteria and fungi in produced water is investigated experimentally. The analysis involves monitoring the microbial population in nine conical flasks each containing the same volume of a mixture of produced water, culture medium that sustains the growth of microorganisms and a known concentration of biocide. The concentrations of each biocide used in the study are 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 ppm. It is shown that dissolved ozone exhibits the best biocidal characteristics and a concentration of 0.5 ppm eliminated all the microorganisms in the produced water after 150 min contact time.

  7. North Western Spain hot springs are a source of lipolytic enzyme-producing thermophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Deive, Francisco J; Alvarez, María S; Sanromán, M Angeles; Longo, Maria A

    2013-02-01

    Several hot springs in Galicia (North Western Spain) have been investigated as potential sources of lipolytic enzyme-producing thermophilic microorganisms. After isolating 12 esterase producing strains, 9 of them were assured to be true lipase producers, and consequently grown in submerged cultures, obtaining high extracellular activities by two of them. Furthermore, a preliminary partial characterization of the crude lipase, obtained by ultrafiltration of the cell-free culture supernatant, was carried out at several pH and temperature values. It is outstanding that several enzymes turned out to be multiextremozymes, since they had their optimum temperature and pH at typical values from thermoalkalophiles. The thermal stability in aqueous solution of the crude enzymes was also assayed, and the influence of some potential enzyme stabilizing compounds was tested. Finally, the viability of the selected microorganisms has been demonstrated at bioreactor scale. PMID:22763779

  8. Cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1997-12-16

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  9. Cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H.C.

    1997-12-16

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  10. Transgenic silkworms produce recombinant human type III procollagen in cocoons.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masahiro; Munetsuna, Hiroto; Sato, Tsutomu; Adachi, Takahiro; Hino, Rika; Hayashi, Masahiro; Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Nakamura, Namiko; Tamura, Toshiki; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2003-01-01

    We describe the generation of transgenic silkworms that produce cocoons containing recombinant human collagen. A fusion cDNA was constructed encoding a protein that incorporated a human type III procollagen mini-chain with C-propeptide deleted, a fibroin light chain (L-chain), and an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). This cDNA was ligated downstream of the fibroin L-chain promoter and inserted into a piggyBac vector. Silkworm eggs were injected with the vectors, producing worms displaying EGFP fluorescence in their silk glands. The cocoons emitted EGFP fluorescence, indicating that the promoter and fibroin L-chain cDNAs directed the synthesized products to be secreted into cocoons. The presence of fusion proteins in cocoons was demonstrated by immunoblotting, collagenase-sensitivity tests, and amino acid sequencing. The fusion proteins from cocoons were purified to a single electrophoretic band. This study demonstrates the viability of transgenic silkworms as a tool for producing useful proteins in bulk. PMID:12483223

  11. Identification of carotenoids with high antioxidant capacity produced by extremophile microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mandelli, Fernanda; Miranda, Viviane S; Rodrigues, Eliseu; Mercadante, Adriana Z

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the carotenoids produced by the extremophile microorganisms Halococcus morrhuae, Halobacterium salinarium and Thermus filiformis were separated and identified by high-performance liquid chromatography connected to a diode array detector and a tandem mass spectrometer. The in vitro scavenging capacity of the carotenoid extracts against radical and non-radical species was evaluated. In halophilic microorganisms, the following carotenoids were identified: bacterioruberin, bisanhydrobacterioruberin, trisanhydrobacterioruberin and their derivatives. In the thermophilic bacterium, the carotenoids all-trans-zeaxanthin, zeaxanthin monoglucoside, thermozeaxanthins and thermobiszeaxanthins were identified. The antioxidant capacities of the carotenoid extracts of H. morrhuae (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity = 5.07 and IC(50) = 0.85 μg mL(-1)) and H. salinarium (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity = 5.28 and IC(50) = 0.84 μg mL(-1)) were similar and higher than those of the bacterium T. filiformis (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity = 2.87 and IC(50) = 2.41 μg mL(-1)). This difference is related to the presence of acyclic carotenoids with both large numbers of conjugated double bounds and of hydroxyl groups in the major carotenoid of the halophilic microorganisms. PMID:22805960

  12. Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for detection, fate, and survival analysis of genetically engineered microorganisms and their recombinant genetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Seidler, R.J.

    1989-02-01

    The research included in this document represents the current scientific information available regarding the applicability of terrestrial microcosms and related methodologies for evaluating detection methods and the fate and survival of microorganisms in the environment. The three terrestrial microcosms described in this document were used to evaluate the survival and fate of recombinant bacteria in soils and in association with plant surfaces and insects and their transport through soil with percolating water and root systems, and to test new methods and procedures to improve detection and enumeration of bacteria in soil. Simple (potting soil composed of peat mix and perlite, lacking environmental control and monitoring) and complex microcosms (agricultural soil with partial control and monitoring of environmental conditions) were demonstrated to be useful tools for preliminary assessments of microbial viability in terrestrial ecosystems. These studies evaluated the survival patterns of Enterobacter cloacae (pBR322) in soil and on plant surfaces and the ingestion of this same microorganism by cutworms and survival in the foregut and frass. The Versacore microcosm design was used to monitor the fate and competitiveness of genetically engineered bacteria in soil. Both selective media and gene probes were used successfully to follow the fate of two recombinant Pseudomonas sp. introduced into Versacore microcosms. Intact soil-core microcosms were employed to evaluate the fate and transport of genetically altered Azospirillum sp. and Pseudomonas sp. in soil and the plant rhizosphere. The usefulness of these various microcosms as a tool for risk assessment is underscored by the ease in obtaining soil from a proposed field release site to evaluate subsequent GEM fate and survival.

  13. Emergence of Antibiotic-Producing Microorganisms in Residential Versus Recreational Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Woappi, Yvon; Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Om V.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To identify novel antibiotic-producing microbial strains with unprecedented pertinence. We hypothesize that site-specific soil samples will contain a variety of antibiotic-producing species (APS) with diverse specificity of molecular elements. Place and Duration of Study Laboratory of Microbiology, Division of Biological and Health Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Bradford, PA-16701, USA, between August 2010 and May 2011. Methodology The environmental soil samples were collected from residential and recreational sites in Southern, PA, USA at longitude: −76 42 21.7116, latitude: 39 56 35.7252; approximately 201 meters above sea level. Over 70 natural antibiotic-producing soil bacteria were screened against 19 pathogenic microorganisms. Agar-plug assay was established to identify the antibiotics’ potency and pathogenic inhibitory index calculations were employed to measure the inhibitory potential of each isolate; 16S rRNA sequencing was used for microbial classification. Results A total of 71 microorganisms from residential soil demonstrated zones of inhibition (ZOI), followed by 9 organisms from recreational soil sample. A total of 15 bioactive strains demonstrated convincing growth inhibitory properties against 16 clinically relevant pathogens; 40% revealed pDNA presence, of which 67% exhibited stringent potencies against S. aureus. We observed a highly bioactive residential soil microbiota compared to recreational soil. Conclusion 16S rRNA sequence analysis corroborated several of the species belonging to Enterobacteriaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, and Bacillaceae. These findings may indicate a co-evolutionary biosynthesis of novel antibiotics driven by the increase of bioactive microbiota in residential environments. PMID:25221747

  14. Reduction of butyrate- and methane-producing microorganisms in patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pozuelo, Marta; Panda, Suchita; Santiago, Alba; Mendez, Sara; Accarino, Anna; Santos, Javier; Guarner, Francisco; Azpiroz, Fernando; Manichanh, Chaysavanh

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains unclear. Here we investigated the microbiome of a large cohort of patients to identify specific signatures for IBS subtypes. We examined the microbiome of 113 patients with IBS and 66 healthy controls. A subset of these participants provided two samples one month apart. We analyzed a total of 273 fecal samples, generating more than 20 million 16S rRNA sequences. In patients with IBS, a significantly lower microbial diversity was associated with a lower relative abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (P = 0.002; q < 0.06), in particular in patients with IBS-D and IBS-M. IBS patients who did not receive any treatment harboured a lower abundance of Methanobacteria compared to healthy controls (P = 0.005; q = 0.05). Furthermore, significant correlations were observed between several bacterial taxa and sensation of flatulence and abdominal pain (P < 0.05). Altogether, our findings showed that IBS-M and IBS-D patients are characterized by a reduction of butyrate producing bacteria, known to improve intestinal barrier function, and a reduction of methane producing microorganisms a major mechanism of hydrogen disposal in the human colon, which could explain excess of abdominal gas in IBS. PMID:26239401

  15. Method for producing aldehyde from CO.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-09-29

    The invention provides recombinant microorganisms capable of producing isobutyraldehyde using CO.sub.2 as a carbon source. The invention further provides methods of preparing and using such microorganisms to produce isobutyraldehyde.

  16. Human recombinant type I collagen produced in plants.

    PubMed

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2013-07-01

    As a central element of the extracellular matrix, collagen is intimately involved in tissue development, remodeling, and repair and confers high tensile strength to tissues. Numerous medical applications, particularly, wound healing, cell therapy, bone reconstruction, and cosmetic technologies, rely on its supportive and healing qualities. Its synthesis and assembly require a multitude of genes and post-translational modifications, where even minor deviations can be deleterious or even fatal. Historically, collagen was always extracted from animal and human cadaver sources, but bare risk of contamination and allergenicity and was subjected to harsh purification conditions resulting in irreversible modifications impeding its biofunctionality. In parallel, the highly complex and stringent post-translational processing of collagen, prerequisite of its viability and proper functioning, sets significant limitations on recombinant expression systems. A tobacco plant expression platform has been recruited to effectively express human collagen, along with three modifying enzymes, critical to collagen maturation. The plant extracted recombinant human collagen type I forms thermally stable helical structures, fibrillates, and demonstrates bioactivity resembling that of native collagen. Deployment of the highly versatile plant-based biofactory can be leveraged toward mass, rapid, and low-cost production of a wide variety of recombinant proteins. As in the case of collagen, proper planning can bypass plant-related limitations, to yield products structurally and functionally identical to their native counterparts. PMID:23252967

  17. Use of continuous culture to screen for lipase-producing microorganisms and interesterification of butter fat by lipase isolates.

    PubMed

    Pabai, F; Kermasha, S; Morin, A

    1996-05-01

    The continuous cultivation technique was used to investigate the screening for lipase-producing microorganisms from four commercial starters suitable for the degradation of domestic wastes. Using this technique, three strains of lipase-producing bacteria were isolated and identified: Pantoea agglomerans (BB96CC1, BB168CC2) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (BW96CC1). In addition, butter fat induced more lipase production when present in the growth medium. Interesterification of butter fat triacylglycerols by enzymatic extracts of the isolated strains of microorganisms resulted in an appreciable interesterification yield, implying that hydrolysis was suppressed and interesterification of butter fat triacylglycerols was maximized in a microemulsion free-cosurfactant system. PMID:8640605

  18. The Influence of Siderophores Produced by Alkaliphilic Microorganisms on Iron and Metal Contaminant Speciation and Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, A. M.; Peyton, B. M.; Petersen, J. N.; Apel, W. A.; Camper, A. K.

    2003-12-01

    Halomonas campisalis strain 4A has been identified as capable of producing siderophores under halo-alkaliphilic growth conditions. Because of the scarcity of iron under the alkaline conditions in which Halomonas campisalis thrives, we hypothesize that the siderophores secreted by Halomonas campisalis and other alkaliphilic bacteria will have a stronger affinity for binding and solubilizing ferrous iron than siderophores produced by mesophilic bacteria. Siderophore production by Halomonas campisalis was confirmed through the use of the chrome azural S (CAS) agar plate method which showed a red orange halo around the bacterial colonies indicative of siderophore production. The siderophores were found to be produced under conditions of both high salinity and pH with a salt concentrations ranging from 0.4 - 1.8 M NaCl and pH ranging from 8 - 11. The siderophores produced have been determined to be of the hydroxamate class via the Csaky method. A negative response to the Arnow assay indicated that the siderophore produced does not contain any catechol moieties in its chemical structure. It was found that maximum siderophore production was equivalent to approximately 400 mM desferrioxamine and occurred during mid stationary phase. Similar results were found at pH 8, 10 and 11. A purification scheme was developed that involved an initial extraction of the siderophore from the growth medium into benzyl alcohol followed by precipitation with diethyl ether. Additional purification was achieved via ion exchange chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. Final purification was achieved via HPLC. The structure of the purified siderophore was analyzed via LC/MS/MS equipped with an ESI source. To date, few studies have included the siderophores produced by microorganisms capable of tolerating highly saline and alkaline environments. In addition to unique structure and high affinity for iron, it is further hypothesized that siderophores from alkaliphilic bacteria will also

  19. Biological activity of glycolipids produced by microorganisms: new trends and possible therapeutic alternatives.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Sánchez, Alejandro de Jesús; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto; Jaramillo-Flores, María Eugenia

    2013-01-15

    Several biological processes in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms require the presence of glycolipids (biosurfactants), compounds with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups in their structure. They constitute the backbone of different metabolic functions and biological structures such as cell membranes. Besides being structural components, glycolipids show surface activity in the interfaces and are mainly produced by microorganisms. Interest in biosurfactants has increased considerably in recent times due to their applications in the environmental, oil, food, and pharmaceutical industries, since they have unique properties such as low toxicity, high biodegradability, environmentally friendly, foaming capacity, high selectivity and specificity at extreme temperatures, pH and salinity, as well as biological activity. All of these properties are considered advantages over other chemical surfactants, and therefore glycolipids are considered a good alternative, given the current interest on sustainable development. The present work shows a general view of bio-surfactants of microbial origin, particularly of glycolipids, referring to several studies on their biological activity that have revealed their great potential in the medical-biological field, discovering interesting possibilities for their therapeutic application in the near future. PMID:22959834

  20. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is an... deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology. The device is intended for use in general soft tissue approximation...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is an... deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology. The device is intended for use in general soft tissue approximation...

  2. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is an... deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology. The device is intended for use in general soft tissue approximation...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is an... deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology. The device is intended for use in general soft tissue approximation...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is an... deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology. The device is intended for use in general soft tissue approximation...

  5. Whole cell electrochemistry of electricity-producing microorganisms evidence an adaptation for optimal exocellular electron transport.

    PubMed

    Busalmen, Juan Pablo; Esteve-Nuñez, Abraham; Feliu, Juan Miguel

    2008-04-01

    The mechanism(s) by which electricity-producing microorganisms interact with an electrode is poorly understood. Outer membrane cytochromes and conductive pili are being considered as possible players, but the available information does not concur to a consensus mechanism yet. In this work we demonstrate that Geobacter sulfurreducens cells are able to change the way in which they exchange electrons with an electrode as a response to changes in the applied electrode potential. After several hours of polarization at 0.1 V Ag/AgCl-KCl (saturated), the voltammetric signature of the attached cells showed a single redox pair with a formal redox potential of about -0.08 V as calculated from chronopotentiometric analysis. A similar signal was obtained from cells adapted to 0.4 V. However, new redox couples were detected after conditioning at 0.6 V. A large oxidation process beyond 0.5 V transferring a higher current than that obtained at 0.1 V was found to be associated with two reduction waves at 0.23 and 0.50 V. The apparent equilibrium potential of these new processes was estimated to be at about 0.48 V from programmed current potentiometric results. Importantly, when polarization was lowered again to 0.1 V for 18 additional hours, the signals obtained at 0.6 V were found to greatly diminish in amplitude, whereas those previously found at the lower conditioning potential were recovered. Results clearly show the reversibility of cell adaptation to the electrode potential and pointto the polarization potential as a key variable to optimize energy production from an electricity producing population. PMID:18504979

  6. The role of microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing micro-organisms in producing banded iron formations.

    PubMed

    Chan, C S; Emerson, D; Luther, G W

    2016-09-01

    Despite the historical and economic significance of banded iron formations (BIFs), we have yet to resolve the formation mechanisms. On modern Earth, neutrophilic microaerophilic Fe-oxidizing micro-organisms (FeOM) produce copious amounts of Fe oxyhydroxides, leading us to wonder whether similar organisms played a role in producing BIFs. To evaluate this, we review the current knowledge of modern microaerophilic FeOM in the context of BIF paleoenvironmental studies. In modern environments wherever Fe(II) and O2 co-exist, microaerophilic FeOM proliferate. These organisms grow in a variety of environments, including the marine water column redoxcline, which is where BIF precursor minerals likely formed. FeOM can grow across a range of O2 concentrations, measured as low as 2 μm to date, although lower concentrations have not been tested. While some extant FeOM can tolerate high O2 concentrations, many FeOM appear to prefer and thrive at low O2 concentrations (~3-25 μm). These are similar to the estimated dissolved O2 concentrations in the few hundred million years prior to the 'Great Oxidation Event' (GOE). We compare biotic and abiotic Fe oxidation kinetics in the presence of varying levels of O2 and show that microaerophilic FeOM contribute substantially to Fe oxidation, at rates fast enough to account for BIF deposition. Based on this synthesis, we propose that microaerophilic FeOM were capable of playing a significant role in depositing the largest, most well-known BIFs associated with the GOE, as well as afterward when global O2 levels increased. PMID:27392195

  7. A Highly Efficient and Simple Construction Strategy for Producing Recombinant Baculovirus Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingjian; Wei, Yonglong; Li, Yinü; Li, Haoyang; Yang, Xin; Yi, Yongzhu; Zhang, Zhifang

    2016-01-01

    The silkworm baculovirus expression system is widely used to produce recombinant proteins. Several strategies for constructing recombinant viruses that contain foreign genes have been reported. Here, we developed a novel defective-rescue BmNPV Bacmid (reBmBac) expression system. A CopyControl origin of replication was introduced into the viral genome to facilitate its genetic manipulation in Escherichia coli and to ensure the preparation of large amounts of high quality reBmBac DNA as well as high quality recombinant baculoviruses. The ORF1629, cathepsin and chitinase genes were partially deleted or rendered defective to improve the efficiency of recombinant baculovirus generation and the expression of foreign genes. The system was validated by the successful expression of luciferase reporter gene and porcine interferon γ. This system can be used to produce batches of recombinant baculoviruses and target proteins rapidly and efficiently in silkworms. PMID:27008267

  8. A Highly Efficient and Simple Construction Strategy for Producing Recombinant Baculovirus Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingjian; Wei, Yonglong; Li, Yinü; Li, Haoyang; Yang, Xin; Yi, Yongzhu; Zhang, Zhifang

    2016-01-01

    The silkworm baculovirus expression system is widely used to produce recombinant proteins. Several strategies for constructing recombinant viruses that contain foreign genes have been reported. Here, we developed a novel defective-rescue BmNPV Bacmid (reBmBac) expression system. A CopyControl origin of replication was introduced into the viral genome to facilitate its genetic manipulation in Escherichia coli and to ensure the preparation of large amounts of high quality reBmBac DNA as well as high quality recombinant baculoviruses. The ORF1629, cathepsin and chitinase genes were partially deleted or rendered defective to improve the efficiency of recombinant baculovirus generation and the expression of foreign genes. The system was validated by the successful expression of luciferase reporter gene and porcine interferon γ. This system can be used to produce batches of recombinant baculoviruses and target proteins rapidly and efficiently in silkworms. PMID:27008267

  9. Investigation of biosurfactant-producing indigenous microorganisms that enhance residue oil recovery in an oil reservoir after polymer flooding.

    PubMed

    She, Yue-Hui; Zhang, Fan; Xia, Jing-Jing; Kong, Shu-Qiong; Wang, Zheng-Liang; Shu, Fu-Chang; Hu, Ji-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Three biosurfactant-producing indigenous microorganisms (XDS1, XDS2, XDS3) were isolated from a petroleum reservoir in the Daqing Oilfield (China) after polymer flooding. Their metabolic, biochemical, and oil-degradation characteristics, as well as their oil displacement in the core were studied. These indigenous microorganisms were identified as short rod bacillus bacteria with white color, round shape, a protruding structure, and a rough surface. Strains have peritrichous flagella, are able to produce endospores, are sporangia, and are clearly swollen and terminal. Bacterial cultures show that the oil-spreading values of the fermentation fluid containing all three strains are more than 4.5 cm (diameter) with an approximate 25 mN/m surface tension. The hydrocarbon degradation rates of each of the three strains exceeded 50%, with the highest achieving 84%. Several oil recovery agents were produced following degradation. At the same time, the heavy components of crude oil were degraded into light components, and their flow characteristics were also improved. The surface tension and viscosity of the crude oil decreased after being treated by the three strains of microorganisms. The core-flooding tests showed that the incremental oil recoveries were 4.89-6.96%. Thus, XDS123 treatment may represent a viable method for microbial-enhanced oil recovery. PMID:20652442

  10. Isolation and characterization of a novel thraustochytrid-like microorganism that efficiently produces docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Perveen, Zakia; Ando, Hitomi; Ueno, Akio; Ito, Yukiya; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Yamada, Yohko; Takagi, Tomoko; Kaneko, Takako; Kogame, Kazuhiro; Okuyama, Hidetoshi

    2006-02-01

    A thraustochytrid-like microorganism (strain 12B) was isolated from the mangrove area of Okinawa, Japan. On the basis of its ectoplasmic net structure and biflagellate zoospores we determined strain 12B to be a novel member of the phylum Labyrinthulomycota in the kingdom Protoctista. When grown on glucose/seawater at 28 degrees C, it had a lipid content of 58% with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) at 43% of the total fatty acids. It had a growth rate of 0.38 h(-1). The DHA production rate of 2.8 +/- 0.7 g l(-1) day(-1) is the highest value reported for any microorganism. PMID:16489498

  11. A rapid, efficient and sensitive plate assay for detection and screening of l-asparaginase-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Richi V; Saran, Saurabh; Saxena, Rajendra K; Srivastava, Ayush K

    2013-04-01

    l-Asparaginase-producing microbes are conventionally screened on phenol red l-asparagine-containing plates. However, sometimes the contrast of the zone obtained (between yellow and pink) is not very sharp and distinct. In the present investigation, an improved method for screening of the microorganisms producing extracellular l-asparaginase is reported wherein bromothymol blue (BTB) is incorporated as pH indicator in l-asparagine-containing medium instead of phenol red. Plates containing BTB at acidic pH are yellow and turn dark blue at alkaline pH. Thus, a dense dark blue zone is formed around microbial colonies producing l-asparaginase, differentiating between enzyme producers and non-producers. The present method is more sensitive and accurate than the conventional method for screening of both fungi and bacteria producing extracellular l-asparaginase. Furthermore, BTB gives a transient green colour at neutral pH (7.0) and dark blue colour at higher pH 8.0-9.0, indicating the potency of the microorganism for l-asparaginase production. PMID:23398626

  12. Convenient treatment of acetonitrile-containing wastes using the tandem combination of nitrile hydratase and amidase-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Erina; Yoshimura, Akihiro; Aoshima, Daisuke; Yoshida, Toyokazu; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Nagasawa, Toru

    2006-09-01

    This study aimed to construct an acetonitrile-containing waste treatment process by using nitrile-degrading microorganisms. To degrade high concentrations of acetonitrile, the microorganisms were newly acquired from soil and water samples. Although no nitrilase-producing microorganisms were found to be capable of degrading high concentrations of acetonitrile, the resting cells of Rhodococcus pyridinivorans S85-2 containing nitrile hydratase could degrade acetonitrile at concentrations as high as 6 M. In addition, an amidase-producing bacterium, Brevundimonas diminuta AM10-C-1, of which the resting cells degraded 6 M acetamide, was isolated. The combination of R. pyridinivorans S85-2 and B. diminuta AM10-C-1 was tested for the conversion of acetonitrile into acetic acid. The resting cells of B. diminuta AM10-C-1 were added after the first conversion involving R. pyridinivorans S85-2. Through this tandem process, 6 M acetonitrile was converted to acetic acid at a conversion rate of >90% in 10 h. This concise procedure will be suitable for practical use in the treatment of acetonitrile-containing wastes on-site. PMID:16402166

  13. Detergent composition comprising a cellulase containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702 or mutant thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  14. Detergent composition comprising a cellulase containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702 or mutant thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dees, H.C.

    1998-07-14

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  15. Vaccination against Anthrax with Attenuated Recombinant Strains of Bacillus anthracis That Produce Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, John P.; Friedlander, Arthur M.

    1999-01-01

    The protective efficacy of several live, recombinant anthrax vaccines given in a single-dose regimen was assessed with Hartley guinea pigs. These live vaccines were created by transforming ΔANR and ΔSterne, two nonencapsulated, nontoxinogenic strains of Bacillus anthracis, with four different recombinant plasmids that express the anthrax protective antigen (PA) protein to various degrees. This enabled us to assess the effect of the chromosomal background of the strain, as well as the amount of PA produced, on protective efficacy. There were no significant strain-related effects on PA production in vitro, plasmid stability in vivo, survival of the immunizing strain in the host, or protective efficacy of the immunizing infection. The protective efficacy of the live, recombinant anthrax vaccine strains correlated with the anti-PA antibody titers they elicited in vivo and the level of PA they produced in vitro. PMID:9916059

  16. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70.degree. C. to 90.degree. C., at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%.

  17. Process for producing modified microorganisms for oil treatment at high temperatures, pressures and salinity

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.

    1996-02-20

    This invention relates to the preparation of new, modified organisms, through challenge growth processes, that are viable in the extreme temperature, pressure and pH conditions and salt concentrations of an oil reservoir and that are suitable for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The modified microorganisms of the present invention are used to enhance oil recovery and remove sulfur compounds and metals from the crude oil. The processes are comprised of steps which successively limit the carbon sources and increase the temperature, pressure and salinity of the media. This is done until microbial strains are obtained that are capable of growing in essentially crude oil as a carbon source and at a temperature range from about 70 C to 90 C, at a pressure range from about 2,000 to 2,500 psi and at a salinity range from about 1.3 to 35%. 68 figs.

  18. Recent development of two chitinase inhibitors, Argifin and Argadin, produced by soil microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Tomoyasu; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Chitin, the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, occurs in fungi, some algae and many invertebrates, including insects. Thus, chitin synthesis and degradation could represent specific targets for fungicides and insecticides. Chitinases hydrolyze chitin into oligomers of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine at key points in the life cycles of organisms, consequently, chitinase inhibitors have become subject of increasing interest. This review covers the development of two chitinase inhibitors of natural origin, Argifin and Argadin, isolated from the cultured broth of microorganisms in our laboratory. In particular, the practical total synthesis of these natural products, the synthesis of lead compounds via computer-aided rational molecular design, and discovery methods that generate only highly-active compounds using a kinetic target(chitinase)-guided synthesis approach (termed in situ click chemistry) are described. PMID:20154467

  19. Protein folding and conformational stress in microbial cells producing recombinant proteins: a host comparative overview

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, Brigitte; Saloheimo, Markku; Rinas, Ursula; Dragosits, Martin; Rodríguez-Carmona, Escarlata; Baumann, Kristin; Giuliani, Maria; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Branduardi, Paola; Lang, Christine; Porro, Danilo; Ferrer, Pau; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Mattanovich, Diethard; Villaverde, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Different species of microorganisms including yeasts, filamentous fungi and bacteria have been used in the past 25 years for the controlled production of foreign proteins of scientific, pharmacological or industrial interest. A major obstacle for protein production processes and a limit to overall success has been the abundance of misfolded polypeptides, which fail to reach their native conformation. The presence of misfolded or folding-reluctant protein species causes considerable stress in host cells. The characterization of such adverse conditions and the elicited cell responses have permitted to better understand the physiology and molecular biology of conformational stress. Therefore, microbial cell factories for recombinant protein production are depicted here as a source of knowledge that has considerably helped to picture the extremely rich landscape of in vivo protein folding, and the main cellular players of this complex process are described for the most important cell factories used for biotechnological purposes. PMID:18394160

  20. Activity and characterization of secondary metabolites produced by a new microorganism for control of plant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ko, Wen-Hsiung; Tsou, Yi-Jung; Lin, Mei-Ju; Chern, Lih-Ling

    2010-09-30

    Microorganisms capable of utilizing vegetable tissues for growth in soils were isolated and their vegetable broth cultures were individually sprayed directly on leaves to test their ability to control Phytophthora blight of bell pepper caused by Phytophthora capsici. Liquid culture of Streptomyces strain TKA-5, a previously undescribed species obtained in this study, displayed several desirable disease control characteristics in nature, including high potency, long lasting and ability to control also black leaf spot of spoon cabbage caused by Alternaria brassicicolca. The extract was fungicidal to P. capsici but fungistatic to A. brassicicola. It was stable at high temperature and high pH. However, after exposure to pH 2 for 24h, the extract was no longer inhibitory to P. capsici although it was still strongly inhibitory to A. brassicicola. After treatment with cation or anion exchange resins, the extract lost its inhibitory effect against P. capsici but not A. brassicicola. The results suggest that the extract contained two different kinds of inhibitory metabolites, one against P. capsici with both positive and negative charges on its molecule and another against A. brassicicola with no charges on its molecule. The inhibitory metabolites were soluble in ethanol or methanol but not in water, ether or chloroform. They were dialyzable in the membrane tubing with molecular weight cut-off of 10,000, 1000 or 500 but not 100, indicating that the inhibitors have a molecular weight between 500 and 100. Results also showed that both inhibitors are not proteins. PMID:20580869

  1. Efficacy of detergents and fresh produce disinfectants against microorganisms associated with mixed raw vegetables.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Nasrin; Abadian, Neda; Bakhtiari, Donya; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Jamalifar, Hossein

    2009-07-01

    Efficacy of commercial detergent and disinfectants to eliminate microorganisms associated with fresh vegetables eaten raw in Iran, including radish, parsley, basil, coriander (cilantro), Allium porrum (leek), and peppermint were studied. The raw vegetables were subjected to a triple wash treatment of washing in tap water for mud removal, washing in water containing a detergent (dishwashing liquid) or disinfectant individually, and rinsing in tap water. The population of total mesophilic microbes on the surface of untreated vegetables ranged from 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/g. Washing in tap water or treatment with detergent (333 ppm for 10 min) or benzalkonium chloride (92 ppm for 15 min) reduced the total microbial count, most probable number (MPN) of coliforms, MPN of fecal coliforms, and MPN of fecal streptococci by about 1.2 to 2.3 log. No significant differences in microbial populations were found on vegetables after decontamination with tap water, detergent, or benzalkonium chloride (P > 0.05). Treatments with peracetic acid (100 ppm for 15 min) and hydrogen peroxide (133 ppm for 30 min) reduced the total mesophilic microbial counts by about 2.8 log. The microbial reductions with calcium hypochlorite (300 ppm for 15 min) and combined hydrogen peroxide and silver ion (133 ppm for 30 min) were significantly higher than those obtained after rinsing in tap water or after detergent or benzalkonium chloride wash (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with detergent slightly enhanced the efficacy of all decontamination treatments, but results were not significantly different from those obtained after individual application of disinfectants. PMID:19681275

  2. Recombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Moreno, Jefferson; Beltran, Laura; Díaz, Dennis; Pardo, Andrea; Ramírez, Aura María; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J.; Pimentel, Luisa; Barrera, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IV A (MPS IV A, Morquio A disease) is a lysosomal storage disease (LSD) produced by mutations on N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Recently an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for this disease was approved using a recombinant enzyme produced in CHO cells. Previously, we reported the production of an active GALNS enzyme in Escherichia coli that showed similar stability properties to that of a recombinant mammalian enzyme though it was not taken-up by culture cells. In this study, we showed the production of the human recombinant GALNS in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 (prGALNS). We observed that removal of native signal peptide and co-expression with human formylglycine-generating enzyme (SUMF1) allowed an improvement of 4.5-fold in the specific GALNS activity. prGALNS enzyme showed a high stability at 4 °C, while the activity was markedly reduced at 37 and 45 °C. It was noteworthy that prGALNS was taken-up by HEK293 cells and human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner through a process potentially mediated by an endocytic pathway, without any additional protein or host modification. The results show the potential of P. pastoris in the production of a human recombinant GALNS for the development of an ERT for Morquio A. PMID:27378276

  3. Recombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Moreno, Jefferson; Beltran, Laura; Díaz, Dennis; Pardo, Andrea; Ramírez, Aura María; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J; Pimentel, Luisa; Barrera, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IV A (MPS IV A, Morquio A disease) is a lysosomal storage disease (LSD) produced by mutations on N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Recently an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for this disease was approved using a recombinant enzyme produced in CHO cells. Previously, we reported the production of an active GALNS enzyme in Escherichia coli that showed similar stability properties to that of a recombinant mammalian enzyme though it was not taken-up by culture cells. In this study, we showed the production of the human recombinant GALNS in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 (prGALNS). We observed that removal of native signal peptide and co-expression with human formylglycine-generating enzyme (SUMF1) allowed an improvement of 4.5-fold in the specific GALNS activity. prGALNS enzyme showed a high stability at 4 °C, while the activity was markedly reduced at 37 and 45 °C. It was noteworthy that prGALNS was taken-up by HEK293 cells and human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner through a process potentially mediated by an endocytic pathway, without any additional protein or host modification. The results show the potential of P. pastoris in the production of a human recombinant GALNS for the development of an ERT for Morquio A. PMID:27378276

  4. Using the second law of thermodynamics for enrichment and isolation of microorganisms to produce fuel alcohols or hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Richard A; Kim, Seon-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Fermentation of crops, waste biomass, or gases has been proposed as a means to produce desired chemicals and renewable fuels. The second law of thermodynamics has been shown to determine the net direction of metabolite flow in fermentation processes. In this article, we describe a process to isolate and direct the evolution of microorganisms that convert cellulosic biomass or gaseous CO2 and H2 to biofuels such as ethanol, 1-butanol, butane, or hexane (among others). Mathematical models of fermentation elucidated sets of conditions that thermodynamically favor synthesis of desired products. When these conditions were applied to mixed cultures from the rumen of a cow, bacteria that produced alcohols or alkanes were isolated. The examples demonstrate the first use of thermodynamic analysis to isolate bacteria and control fermentation processes for biofuel production among other uses. PMID:26231417

  5. Influence of Space-Flight Factors on the Properties of Microorganisms, Producers of Biologically Active Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikova, T. K.; Kanaeva, E. N.; Ukraintsev, A. D.; Smolyanaya, G. L.; Kuznetsov, N. V.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Shcherbakov, G. Ya.

    2001-07-01

    The following substances were isolated under the influence of space-flight factors in cosmic experiments aboard the Mirorbital station: an MIB-90 monoisolant, which is distinguished by its morphological and biochemical properties and enhanced productivity, was isolated from the Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. Kurstaki var. Z-52culture, which is a producer of the plant protection agent Lepidocide; and MIA-74 and MIP-89 monoisolants, which are highly active toward heavy petroleum fractions (C23 C33), were isolated from the Arthrobacter OC-1culture, which is a producer of biodegradants for petroleum.

  6. EVALUATION OF TERRESTRIAL MICROCOSMS FOR DETECTION, FATE, AND SURVIVAL ANALYSIS OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MICROORGANISMS AND THEIR RECOMBINANT GENETIC MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Terrestrial microcosms have been used for several decades by researcher to evaluate the fate and transport of xenobiotics in the environment; however, very little information is available on their application to the fate, survival, and transport of recombinant bacteria and microb...

  7. Irrigation waters as a source of pathogenic microorganisms in produce: a review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increasing evidence that consumption of raw fresh produce is a major factor contributing to human gastrointestinal illness. A wide variety of pathogens contribute to food-borne illnesses, including bacteria (e.g., Salmonella, pathogenic E. coli), protozoa (e.g., Cryptosporidium, Giardia), ...

  8. High-resolution gas chromatographic profiles of volatile organic compounds produced by microorganisms at refrigerated temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M L; Smith, D L; Freeman, L R

    1979-01-01

    Three different strains of bacteria isolated from spoiled, uncooked chicken were grown in pure culture on Trypticase soy agar supplemented with yeast extract. The volatile organic compounds produced by each culture were concentrated on a porous polymer precolumn and analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatographic mass spectrometry. Twenty different compounds were identified. Both qualitative and quantitative differences in the chromatographic profiles from each culture were found. PMID:104660

  9. Recombinant GDNF: Tetanus toxin fragment C fusion protein produced from insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Celia, Samuel A.; Kashi, Brenda B.; Tamrazian, Eric; Matthews, Jonathan C.; Remington, Mary P.; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-07-31

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent survival-promoting effects on CNS motor neurons in experimental animals. Its therapeutic efficacy in humans, however, may have been limited by poor bioavailability to the brain and spinal cord. With a view toward improving delivery of GDNF to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we generated a recombinant fusion protein comprised of rat GDNF linked to the non-toxic, neuron-binding fragment of tetanus toxin. Recombinant GDNF:TTC produced from insect cells was a soluble homodimer like wild-type GDNF and was bi-functional with respect to GDNF and TTC activity. Like recombinant rat GDNF, the fusion protein increased levels of immunoreactive phosphoAkt in treated NB41A3-hGFR{alpha}-1 neuroblastoma cells. Like TTC, GDNF:TTC bound to immobilized ganglioside GT1b in vitro with high affinity and selectivity. These results support further testing of recombinant GDNF:TTC as a non-viral vector to improve delivery of GDNF to brain and spinal cord in vivo.

  10. Producing Recombinant mTEX101; a Murine Testis Specific Protein

    PubMed Central

    Barzegar Yarmohammadi, Leila; Modarresi, Mohammad Hossein; Talebi, Saeed; Hadavi, Reza; Ostad Karampour, Mahyar; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Rabbani, Hodjattallah; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Production of antibodies against specific proteins of testis germ cells is of great significance for the investigation of processes involved in spermatogenesis, study of infertility problems and determination of the probable role of these proteins as cancer-testis antigens. Murine Testis Specific Recombinant Protein 101 (mTEX101) is a 38kDa, GPI-anchored protein which is expressed in testis germ cells of adult mice but it seems to be absent in other tissues. The structure and function of mTEX101 is not completely understood yet, but it is speculated that it may transduce biochemical signals into the cytoplasm since mTEX101 does not have an intracellular domain but the precise mechanisms are still ambiguous. Materials and Methods RNA was extracted from three adult mice testis. The RNA was used in RT-PCR, employing a pair of specific primers for mTEX101 ORF region. TA-cloning technique was performed by the insertion of mTEX101 into a pGEM-T Easy Vector, followed by its subcloning into a His-tagged expression vector, pET-28a (+). The recombinant mTEX101 was then produced by transfection of the expression vector into BL 21 (DE3) E. coli strain. Results A recombinant protein, weighing 27kDa, was produced upon IPTG-induction of the bacterial host. The presence of mTEX101 protein was detected through Western blot analysis by anti-mTEX101 peptide antibodies. Conclusion We produced mTEX101 recombinant protein that could be used for the production of mono and polyclonal antibodies. PMID:23926468

  11. Creation of a producent, optimization of expression, and purification of recombinant Yersinia pseudotuberculosis L-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Sidoruk, K V; Pokrovsky, V S; Borisova, A A; Omeljanuk, N M; Aleksandrova, S S; Pokrovskaya, M V; Gladilina, Ju A; Bogush, V G; Sokolov, N N

    2011-12-01

    Recombinant E. coli strain producing Y. pseudotuberculosis Q66CJ2 (YpA) L-asparaginase II was created. Gene ansB homologue encoding Y. pseudotuberculosis IP 32953 L-asparaginase precursor was synthesized. The gene was cloned in pBad24 expression vector and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Optimal conditions for the producer strain culturing were selected. An effective method for isolation and purification of the enzyme by two-staged column chromatography was developed. PMID:22808465

  12. Fluorescence technique for on-line monitoring of state of hydrogen-producing microorganisms

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; Makarova, Valeriya; Tsygankov, Anatoly A.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2007-06-12

    In situ fluorescence method to monitor state of sulfur-deprived algal culture's ability to produce H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion, comprising: a) providing sulfur-deprived algal culture; b) illuminating culture; c) measuring onset of H.sub.2 percentage in produced gas phase at multiple times to ascertain point immediately after anerobiosis to obtain H.sub.2 data as function of time; and d) determining any abrupt change in three in situ fluorescence parameters; i) increase in F.sub.t (steady-state level of chlorophyll fluorescence in light adapted cells); ii) decrease in F.sub.m', (maximal saturating light induced fluorescence level in light adapted cells); and iii) decrease in .DELTA.F/F.sub.m'=(F.sub.m'-F.sub.t)/F.sub.m' (calculated photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) signaling full reduction of plastoquinone pool between PSII and PSI, which indicates start of anaerobic conditions that induces synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme for subsequent H.sub.2 production that signal oxidation of plastoquinone pool asmain factor to regulate H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion.

  13. Baculovirus Coinfection Strategy for Improved Galactosylation of Recombinant Glycoprotein Produced by Insect Cell Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Yap Wei; Rahman, Badarulhisam Abdul; Aziz, Azila Abdul

    Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is widely used for the production of recombinant glycoproteins, but it is not ideal for pharmaceutical glycoprotein production due to incomplete glycosylation. The factors that ensure successful glycosylation are the presence of sufficient amount of glycosyltransferases, sugar nucleotides as the substrate donor and the recombinant protein as the substrate acceptor. In this study, we analyzed the galactosylation process by the introduction of ß-1,4galactosyltransferase (ß-1,4GalT) as the glycosyltransferase of interest and uridine-5`-diphosphogalactose (UDP-Gal) as the substrate donor. Recombinant human transferrin (rhTf) as a model protein was used as the substrate acceptor. Insect cell lines have been reported to produce a small amount of ß-1,4GalT and thus insufficient for effective galactosylation. In this study, we developed a method to produce galactosylated rhTf and optimized the expression of rhTf with better N-glycan quality. Recombinant ß-1,4GalT was introduced during protein expression by the coinfection of the BEVS with baculovirus carrying bovine ß-1,4GalT. To evaluate the extent of galactosylation by the coinfection strategy, a binding assay was established. In this binding assay, glycoprotein acceptor was absorbed onto ELISA plate surface. A lectin known as Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I) labeled with peroxidase, was added and allowed to recognize Gal ß1>4GlcNAc group on the N-glycan of the glycoprotein, followed by appropriate color reaction measurements. Coexpression between rhTf and ß-1,4GalT did not show encouraging results due to the reduction of UDP-Gal upon baculovirus infection. This interesting finding suggested that the introduction of ß-1,4GalT alone was not sufficient for successful galactosylation. Alternatively, post harvest glycosylation method strategy seems to be a promising technique in the improvement of glycoprotein quality.

  14. Genome Sequence of the Streptomycin-Producing Microorganism Streptomyces griseus IFO 13350▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Yasuo; Ishikawa, Jun; Hara, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Ikenoya, Miwa; Ikeda, Haruo; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hattori, Masahira; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2008-01-01

    We determined the complete genome sequence of Streptomyces griseus IFO 13350, a soil bacterium producing an antituberculosis agent, streptomycin, which is the first aminoglycoside antibiotic, discovered more than 60 years ago. The linear chromosome consists of 8,545,929 base pairs (bp), with an average G+C content of 72.2%, predicting 7,138 open reading frames, six rRNA operons (16S-23S-5S), and 66 tRNA genes. It contains extremely long terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 132,910 bp each. The telomere's nucleotide sequence and secondary structure, consisting of several palindromes with a loop sequence of 5′-GGA-3′, are different from those of typical telomeres conserved among other Streptomyces species. In accordance with the difference, the chromosome has pseudogenes for a conserved terminal protein (Tpg) and a telomere-associated protein (Tap), and a novel pair of Tpg and Tap proteins is instead encoded by the TIRs. Comparisons with the genomes of two related species, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces avermitilis, clarified not only the characteristics of the S. griseus genome but also the existence of 24 Streptomyces-specific proteins. The S. griseus genome contains 34 gene clusters or genes for the biosynthesis of known or unknown secondary metabolites. Transcriptome analysis using a DNA microarray showed that at least four of these clusters, in addition to the streptomycin biosynthesis gene cluster, were activated directly or indirectly by AdpA, which is a central transcriptional activator for secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in the A-factor (a γ-butyrolactone signaling molecule) regulatory cascade in S. griseus. PMID:18375553

  15. Generation of a Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line Producing Recombinant Human Glucocerebrosidase

    PubMed Central

    Novo, Juliana Branco; Morganti, Ligia; Moro, Ana Maria; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Serrano, Solange Maria de Toledo; Raw, Isaias; Ho, Paulo Lee

    2012-01-01

    Impaired activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCR) results in the inherited metabolic disorder known as Gaucher disease. Current treatment consists of enzyme replacement therapy by administration of exogenous GCR. Although effective, it is exceptionally expensive, and patients worldwide have a limited access to this medicine. In Brazil, the public healthcare system provides the drug free of charge for all Gaucher's patients, which reaches the order of $ 84 million per year. However, the production of GCR by public institutions in Brazil would reduce significantly the therapy costs. Here, we describe a robust protocol for the generation of a cell line producing recombinant human GCR. The protein was expressed in CHO-DXB11 (dhfr−) cells after stable transfection and gene amplification with methotrexate. As expected, glycosylated GCR was detected by immunoblotting assay both as cell-associated (~64 and 59 kDa) and secreted (63–69 kDa) form. Analysis of subclones allowed the selection of stable CHO cells producing a secreted functional enzyme, with a calculated productivity of 5.14 pg/cell/day for the highest producer. Although being laborious, traditional methods of screening high-producing recombinant cells may represent a valuable alternative to generate expensive biopharmaceuticals in countries with limited resources. PMID:23091360

  16. Recombinant L-Asparaginase from Zymomonas mobilis: A Potential New Antileukemic Agent Produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Einsfeldt, Karen; Baptista, Isis Cavalcante; Pereira, Juliana Christina Castanheira Vicente; Costa-Amaral, Isabele Campos; Costa, Elaine Sobral da; Ribeiro, Maria Cecília Menks; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Alves, Tito Lívio Moitinho; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase is an enzyme used as a chemotherapeutic agent, mainly for treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this study, the gene of L-asparaginase from Zymomonas mobilis was cloned in pET vectors, fused to a histidine tag, and had its codons optimized. The L-asparaginase was expressed extracellularly and intracellularly (cytoplasmically) in Escherichia coli in far larger quantities than obtained from the microorganism of origin, and sufficient for initial cytotoxicity tests on leukemic cells. The in silico analysis of the protein from Z. mobilis indicated the presence of a signal peptide in the sequence, as well as high identity to other sequences of L-asparaginases with antileukemic activity. The protein was expressed in a bioreactor with a complex culture medium, yielding 0.13 IU/mL extracellular L-asparaginase and 3.6 IU/mL intracellular L-asparaginase after 4 h of induction with IPTG. The cytotoxicity results suggest that recombinant L-asparaginase from Z. mobilis expressed extracellularly in E.coli has a cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on leukemic cells. PMID:27253887

  17. Recombinant L-Asparaginase from Zymomonas mobilis: A Potential New Antileukemic Agent Produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Juliana Christina Castanheira Vicente; Costa-Amaral, Isabele Campos; da Costa, Elaine Sobral; Ribeiro, Maria Cecília Menks; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Alves, Tito Lívio Moitinho; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase is an enzyme used as a chemotherapeutic agent, mainly for treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this study, the gene of L-asparaginase from Zymomonas mobilis was cloned in pET vectors, fused to a histidine tag, and had its codons optimized. The L-asparaginase was expressed extracellularly and intracellularly (cytoplasmically) in Escherichia coli in far larger quantities than obtained from the microorganism of origin, and sufficient for initial cytotoxicity tests on leukemic cells. The in silico analysis of the protein from Z. mobilis indicated the presence of a signal peptide in the sequence, as well as high identity to other sequences of L-asparaginases with antileukemic activity. The protein was expressed in a bioreactor with a complex culture medium, yielding 0.13 IU/mL extracellular L-asparaginase and 3.6 IU/mL intracellular L-asparaginase after 4 h of induction with IPTG. The cytotoxicity results suggest that recombinant L-asparaginase from Z. mobilis expressed extracellularly in E.coli has a cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on leukemic cells. PMID:27253887

  18. The potential of transgenic green microalgae; a robust photobioreactor to produce recombinant therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Fariba; Eskandani, Morteza; Khosroushahi, Ahmad Yari

    2014-11-01

    Microalgae have been used in food, cosmetic, and biofuel industries as a natural source of lipids, vitamins, pigments and antioxidants for a long time. Green microalgae, as potent photobioreactors, can be considered as an economical expression system to produce recombinant therapeutical proteins at large-scale due to low cost of production and scaling-up capitalization owning to the inexpensive medium requirement, fast growth rate, and the ease of manipulation. These microalgae possess all benefit eukaryotic expression systems including the ability of post-translational modifications required for proper folding and stability of active proteins. Among the many items regarded as recombinant protein production, this review compares the different expression systems with green microalgae like Dunaliella by viewing the nuclear/chloroplast transformation challenges/benefits, related selection markers/reporter genes, and crucial factors/strategies affecting the increase of foreign protein expression in microalgae transformants. Some important factors were discussed regarding the increase of protein yielding in microalgae transformants including: transformation-associated genotypic modifications, endogenous regulatory factors, promoters, codon optimization, enhancer elements, and milking of recombinant protein. PMID:25115849

  19. Glycosylation characterization of recombinant human erythropoietin produced in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bing; Burnina, Irina; Stadheim, Terrance A; Li, Huijuan

    2013-12-01

    Glycosylation plays a critical role in the in vivo efficacy of both endogenous and recombinant erythropoietin (EPO). Using mass spectrometry, we characterized the N-/O-linked glycosylation of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) produced in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris and compared with the glycosylation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-derived rhEPO. While the three predicted N-linked glycosylation sites (Asn24, Asn38 and Asn83) showed complete site occupancy, Pichia- and CHO-derived rhEPO showed distinct differences in the glycan structures with the former containing sialylated bi-antennary glycoforms and the latter containing a mixture of sialylated bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary structures. Additionally, the N-linked glycans from Pichia-produced rhEPO were similar across all three sites. A low level of O-linked mannosylation was detected on Pichia-produced rhEPO at position Ser126, which is also the O-linked glycosylation site for endogenous human EPO and CHO-derived rhEPO. In summary, the mass spectrometric analyses revealed that rhEPO derived from glycoengineered Pichia has a highly uniform bi-antennary N-linked glycan composition and preserves the orthogonal O-linked glycosylation site present on endogenous human EPO and CHO-derived rhEPO. PMID:24338886

  20. Recombineering in Corynebacterium glutamicum combined with optical nanosensors: a general strategy for fast producer strain generation.

    PubMed

    Binder, Stephan; Siedler, Solvej; Marienhagen, Jan; Bott, Michael; Eggeling, Lothar

    2013-07-01

    Recombineering in bacteria is a powerful technique for genome reconstruction, but until now, it was not generally applicable for development of small-molecule producers because of the inconspicuous phenotype of most compounds of biotechnological relevance. Here, we establish recombineering for Corynebacterium glutamicum using RecT of prophage Rac and combine this with our recently developed nanosensor technology, which enables the detection and isolation of productive mutants at the single-cell level via fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We call this new technology RecFACS, which we use for genomic site-directed saturation mutagenesis without relying on pre-constructed libraries to directly isolate L-lysine-producing cells. A mixture of 19 different oligonucleotides was used targeting codon 81 in murE of the wild-type, at a locus where one single mutation is known to cause L-lysine production. Using RecFACS, productive mutants were screened and isolated. Sequencing revealed 12 different amino acid exchanges in the targeted murE codon, which caused different L-lysine production titers. Apart from introducing a rapid genome construction technology for C. glutamicum, the present work demonstrates that RecFACS is suitable to simply create producers as well as genetic diversity in one single step, thus establishing a new general concept in synthetic biology. PMID:23630315

  1. Biological treatment of produced water in a sequencing batch reactor by a consortium of isolated halophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pendashteh, A R; Fakhru'l-Razi, A; Chuah, T G; Radiah, A B Dayang; Madaeni, S S; Zurina, Z A

    2010-10-01

    Produced water or oilfield wastewater is the largest volume ofa waste stream associated with oil and gas production. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological pretreatment of synthetic and real produced water in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to remove hydrocarbon compounds. The SBR was inoculated with isolated tropical halophilic microorganisms capable of degrading crude oil. A total sequence of 24 h (60 min filling phase; 21 h aeration; 60 min settling and 60 min decant phase) was employed and studied. Synthetic produced water was treated with various organic loading rates (OLR) (0.9 kg COD m(-3) d(-1), 1.8 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and 3.6 kg COD m(-3) d(-1)) and different total dissolved solids (TDS) concentration (35,000 mg L(-1), 100,000 mg L(-1), 150,000 mg L(-1), 200,000 mg L(-1) and 250,000 mg L(-1)). It was found that with an OLR of 0.9 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and 1.8 kg COD m(-3) d(-1), average oil and grease (O&G) concentrations in the effluent were 7 mg L(-1) and 12 mg L(-1), respectively. At TDS concentration of 35,000 mg L(-1) and at an OLR of 1.8 kg COD m(-3)d(-1), COD and O&G removal efficiencies were more than 90%. However, with increase in salt content to 250,000 mg L(-1), COD and O&G removal efficiencies decreased to 74% and 63%, respectively. The results of biological treatment of real produced water showed that the removal rates of the main pollutants of wastewater, such as COD, TOC and O&G, were above 81%, 83%, and 85%, respectively. PMID:21046953

  2. Clinical development of plant-produced recombinant pharmaceuticals: vaccines, antibodies and beyond.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Streatfield, Stephen J; Kushnir, Natasha

    2011-03-01

    In the last few years, plants have become an increasingly attractive platform for recombinant protein production. This builds on two decades of research, starting with transgenic approaches to develop oral vaccines in which antigens or therapeutics can be delivered in processed plant biomass, and progressing to transient expression approaches whereby high yields of purified targets are administered parenterally. The advantages of plant-based expression systems include high scalability, low upstream costs, biocontainment, lack of human or animal pathogens, and ability to produce target proteins with desired structures and biological functions. Using transgenic and transient expression in whole plants or plant cell culture, a variety of recombinant subunit vaccine candidates, therapeutic proteins, including monoclonal antibodies, and dietary proteins have been produced. Some of these products have been tested in early phase clinical trials, and show safety and efficacy. Among those are mucosal vaccines for diarrheal diseases, hepatitis B and rabies; injectable vaccines for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, H1N1 and H5N1 strains of influenza A virus, and Newcastle disease in poultry; and topical antibodies for the treatment of dental caries and HIV. As lead plant-based products have entered clinical trials, there has been increased emphasis on manufacturing under current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) guidelines, and the preparation and presentation to the relevant government agencies of regulatory packages. PMID:21346417

  3. Proteomic differences in recombinant CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Sommeregger, Wolfgang; Mayrhofer, Patrick; Steinfellner, Willibald; Reinhart, David; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula; Kunert, Renate

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian hosts for the production of biopharmaceuticals. To overcome unfavorable features of CHO cells, a lot of effort is put into cell engineering to improve phenotype. "Omics" studies investigating elevated growth rate and specific productivities as well as extracellular stimulus have already revealed many interesting engineering targets. However, it remains largely unknown how physicochemical properties of the recombinant product itself influence the host cell. In this study, we used quantitative label-free LC-MS proteomic analyses to investigate product-specific proteome differences in CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments. We established recombinant CHO cells producing the two antibodies, 3D6 and 2F5, both as single-chain Fv-Fc homodimeric antibody fragments (scFv-Fc). We applied three different vector strategies for transgene delivery (i.e., plasmid, bacterial artificial chromosome, recombinase-mediated cassette exchange), selected two best performing clones from transgene variants and transgene delivery methods and investigated three consecutively passaged cell samples by label-free proteomic analysis. LC-MS-MS profiles were compared in several sample combinations to gain insights into different aspects of proteomic changes caused by overexpression of two different heterologous proteins. This study suggests that not only the levels of specific product secretion but the product itself has a large impact on the proteome of the cell. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1902-1912. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26913574

  4. Measurement of the degree of polarization of the spectra from laser produced recombining Al plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Dong-Eon

    2002-07-01

    Using a polarization-resolved UV-visible spectrometer, the degree of polarization of the spectra from laser produced Al plasmas was measured. The polarization resolution was achieved by using either a dichroic polarizer or a calcite crystal. The degree of polarization of Al III 4s(2)S(1/2)-4p(2)P(o)(3/2) transition at 569.66 nm was measured at different positions from a target surface. The degree of polarization was observed to be 2.1+/-0.13% at a distance of 220 microm from the target and decreased as the distance from the target increased, vanishing at a distance of about 1.3 mm from the target. To avoid the possible error due to the shot-to-shot variation of the line intensity, a calcite crystal was used to simultaneously observe the two polarization components, obtaining a similar result. The electron temperature of about 3 eV and the density of 2 x 10(17) cm(-3) measured spectroscopically indicates that the plasma was in the recombining phase. This is a report on the observation of the polarization of a transition in a laser-produced recombining Al plasma. PMID:12241524

  5. QSAR study and the hydrolysis activity prediction of three alkaline lipases from different lipase-producing microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis activities of three alkaline lipases, L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 secreted by different lipase-producing microorganisms isolated from the Bay of Bohai, P. R. China were characterized with 16 kinds of esters. It was found that all the lipases have the ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of the glycerides, methyl esters, ethyl esters, especially for triglycerides, which shows that they have broad substrate spectra, and this property is very important for them to be used in detergent industry. Three QSAR models were built for L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 respectively with GFA using Discovery studio 2.1. The models equations 1, 2 and 3 can explain 95.80%, 97.45% and 97.09% of the variances (R2adj) respectively while they could predict 95.44%, 89.61% and 93.41% of the variances (R2cv) respectively. With these models the hydrolysis activities of these lipases to mixed esters were predicted and the result showed that the predicted values are in good agreement with the measured values, which indicates that this method can be used as a simple tool to predict the lipase activities for single or mixed esters. PMID:23016923

  6. QSAR study and the hydrolysis activity prediction of three alkaline lipases from different lipase-producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haikuan; Wang, Xiaojie; Li, Xiaolu; Zhang, Yehong; Dai, Yujie; Guo, Changlu; Zheng, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis activities of three alkaline lipases, L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 secreted by different lipase-producing microorganisms isolated from the Bay of Bohai, P. R. China were characterized with 16 kinds of esters. It was found that all the lipases have the ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of the glycerides, methyl esters, ethyl esters, especially for triglycerides, which shows that they have broad substrate spectra, and this property is very important for them to be used in detergent industry. Three QSAR models were built for L-A1, L-A2 and L-A3 respectively with GFA using Discovery studio 2.1. The models equations 1, 2 and 3 can explain 95.80%, 97.45% and 97.09% of the variances (R(2)(adj)) respectively while they could predict 95.44%, 89.61% and 93.41% of the variances (R(2)(cv)) respectively. With these models the hydrolysis activities of these lipases to mixed esters were predicted and the result showed that the predicted values are in good agreement with the measured values, which indicates that this method can be used as a simple tool to predict the lipase activities for single or mixed esters. PMID:23016923

  7. Constructing a recombinant hyaluronic acid biosynthesis operon and producing food-grade hyaluronic acid in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Juzheng; Ling, Peixue; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural high molecular weight polysaccharide, is produced by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. However, Streptococcus has several drawbacks including its potential to produce exotoxins, so there is demand for an alternative HA source. Here, a recombinant HA biosynthesis operon, as well as the HA biosynthesis operon of S. zooepidemicus were introduced into L. lactis using the nisin-controlled expression system, respectively. HA was successfully synthesized by recombinant L. lactis. Furthermore, overexpression of the endogenous enzymes directing the synthesis of precursor sugars was effective at increasing HA production, and increasing the supply of UDP-activated monosaccharide donors aided synthesis of monodisperse HA polysaccharides. Besides GRAS host strain (L. lactis) and NICE system, the selecting marker (lacF gene) of the recombinant strain is also food grade. Therefore, HA produced by recombinant L. lactis overcomes the problems associated with Streptococcus and provides a source of food-grading HA appropriate for widespread biotechnological applications. PMID:25447786

  8. Inhibition of microorganisms involved in deterioration of an archaeological site by silver nanoparticles produced by a green synthesis method.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-González, Rogelio; Martínez-Gómez, Miriam Araceli; González-Chávez, Ma Del Carmen A; Mendoza Hernández, José Carlos

    2016-09-15

    The Citadel, part of the pre-Hispanic city of Teotihuacan and listed as a World Heritage Site, harbors irreplaceable archaeological walls and murals. This city was abandoned by the 7th century and its potential deterioration represents a noteworthy loss of the world's cultural heritage. This research consisted of isolation and identification of bacteria and fungi contributing to this deterioration from walls of a pre-Hispanic city. In addition, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) produced, using a green synthesis method, were tested as potential inhibitors of microbes. AgNP of different sizes and concentrations were tested using in situ assays. Leaf aqueous extracts from two plants species (Foeniculum vulgare and Tecoma stans) and two extraction procedures were used in the NP synthesis. The potential of AgNP as preventive/corrective treatments to protect stucco materials from biodeterioration, as well as the microbial inhibition on three stone materials (stucco, basalt and calcite) was analyzed. Twenty-three bacterial species belonging to eight genera and fourteen fungal species belonging to seven genera were isolated from colored stains, patinas and biofilms produced on the surfaces of archaeological walls from the pre-Hispanic city, Teotihuacan. AgNP from F. vulgare were more effective for in vitro microbial growth inhibition than those from T. stans. Bacteria were less sensitive to AgNP than fungi; however, sensitivity mainly depended on the microbial strain and the plant extract used to prepare AgNP. The use of AgNP as a preventive or corrective treatment to decrease microbial colonization in three kinds of stone used in historical walls was successful. Calcite was more colonized by Alternaria alternata, but less by Pectobacterium carotovorum. This is the first study at different scales (in vitro and tests on different stone types) of inhibition of biodeterioration-causing microorganisms isolated from an archaeological site by green synthesized AgNP. PMID:27015961

  9. The human potential of a recombinant pandemic influenza vaccine produced in tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Madhun, Abdullah S.; Brokstad, Karl A.; Montomoli, Emanuele; Yusibov, Vidadi; Cox, Rebecca J.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid production of influenza vaccine antigen is an important challenge when a new pandemic occurs. Production of recombinant antigens in plants is a quick, cost effective and up scalable new strategy for influenza vaccine production. In this study, we have characterized a recombinant influenza haemagglutinin antigen (HAC1) that was derived from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pdmH1N1) virus and expressed in tobacco plants. Volunteers vaccinated with the 2009 pdmH1N1 oil-in-water adjuvanted vaccine provided serum and lymphocyte samples that were used to study the immunogenic properties of the HAC1 antigen in vitro. By 7 d post vaccination, the vaccine fulfilled the licensing criteria for antibody responses to the HA detected by haemagglutination inhibition and single radial hemolysis. By ELISA and ELISPOT analysis we showed that HAC1 was recognized by specific serum antibodies and antibody secreting cells, respectively. We conducted a kinetic analysis and found a peak of serum HAC1 specific antibody response between day 14 and 21 post vaccination by ELISA. We also detected elevated production of IL-2 and IFNγ and low frequencies of CD4+ T cells producing single or multiple Th1 cytokines after stimulating PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) with the HAC1 antigen in vitro. This indicates that the antigen can interact with T cells, although confirming that an effective adjuvant would be required to improve the T-cell stimulation of plant based vaccines. We conclude that the tobacco derived recombinant HAC1 antigen is a promising vaccine candidate recognized by both B and T cells. PMID:22634440

  10. Recombinant conotoxin, TxVIA, produced in yeast has insecticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bruce, C; Fitches, E C; Chougule, N; Bell, H A; Gatehouse, J A

    2011-07-01

    Conotoxins are a diverse collection of more than 50,000 peptides produced by predatory marine snails of the genus Conus in order to immobilize their prey. Many conotoxins modulate the activity of ion channels, and show high specificity to their targets; as a result, some have valuable pharmaceutical applications. However, obtaining active peptide is difficult and to date has only been achieved though natural collection, chemical synthesis, or the use of prokaryotic expression systems, which often have the disadvantage of requiring subsequent steps to correctly fold the peptide. This paper reports the production of a conotoxin, TxVIA from Conus textile, as a biologically active recombinant protein, using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. The presence of the pro-peptide was found to be necessary for the expression of biologically active conotoxin. We also show that TxVIA is not, as previously reported, mollusc-specific, but also shows insecticidal activity when injected into lepidopteran (cabbage moth) and dipteran (house fly) larvae. In contrast, recombinant TxVIA was not found to be molluscicidal to the grey field slug Deroceras reticulatum. PMID:21640131

  11. Protoplast fusion and gene recombination in the uncommon Actinomycete Planobispora rosea producing GE2270.

    PubMed

    Beltrametti, Fabrizio; Barucco, Daniele; Rossi, Roberta; Selva, Enrico; Marinelli, Flavia

    2007-07-01

    An efficient method for protoplast generation for the uncommon actinomycete Planobispora rosea, the producer of the thiazolylpeptide antibiotic GE2270, was developed using a combination of hen egg white lysozyme and Streptomyces globisporus mutanolysin. This method converted more than 70% of vegetative mycelium to protoplasts, which were then regenerated with 50% efficiency in an optimized medium. When P. rosea protoplasts were efficiently fused, recombination between different antibiotic (streptomycin and gentamicin) resistance markers originated sensitive strains (str(s)gen(s)) at frequencies as high as 18% and double resistant fusants (str(r)gen(r)) at frequencies as high as 29%. Double resistant fusants showed GE2270 productivity intermediate between the productivity of the parental strains. Protoplast generation and fusion in P. rosea makes whole genome shuffling feasible as an approach to be used alternately with classical random mutagenesis in industrial strain improvement programs. PMID:17721003

  12. Expression and Characterization of Recombinant Serratia liquefaciens Nucleases Produced with Baculovirus-mediated Silkworm Expression System.

    PubMed

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Lee, Jae Man; Tatsuke, Tuneyuki; Mon, Hiroaki; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    Baculovirus-Bombyx mori protein expression system has mainly been used for translation of eukaryotic proteins. In contrast, information pertaining to bacterial protein expression using this system is not sufficient. Therefore, recombinant nucleases from Serratia liquefaciens (rSlNucAs) were expressed in a Baculovirus-B. mori protein expression system. rSlNucAs containing the native signal peptide (rSlNucA-NSP) or silkworm 30-K signal peptide (rSlNucA-30K) at the NH2-terminus were constructed to enable secretion into the extracellular fraction. Both rSlNucA-30K and rSlNucA-NSP were successfully secreted into hemolymph of B. mori larvae. Affinity-purified rSlNucAs showed high nuclease activity. Optimum pH was 7.5 and half of maximum activity was maintained between pH 7.0 and 9.5. Optimum temperature was 35 °C. rSlNucAs showed sufficient activity in twofold-diluted radioimmunoprecipitation assay buffer and undiluted, mild lysis buffer. Genomic DNA of Escherichia coli was efficiently digested by rSlNucAs in the bacterial lysate. The results in this study suggest that rSlNucAs expressed by the Baculovirus-B. mori protein expression system will be a useful tool in molecular biology. Functional recombinant protein of bacteria was produced by Baculovirus-B. mori protein expression system. This system may be highly suitable for bacterial extracellular protein secreted via Sec pathway. PMID:27059494

  13. Construction and characterization of recombinant Vibrio cholerae strains producing inactive cholera toxin analogs.

    PubMed

    Häse, C C; Thai, L S; Boesman-Finkelstein, M; Mar, V L; Burnette, W N; Kaslow, H R; Stevens, L A; Moss, J; Finkelstein, R A

    1994-08-01

    The catalytic A subunit of cholera toxin (CT-A) is capable of ADP-ribosylating the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, which regulates cell adenylyl cyclase, leading to the life-threatening diarrhea of cholera. Amino acids involved in the enzymatic activity of CT-A have previously been identified. By means of site-directed mutagenesis, an analog of the CT-A subunit gene was created with codon substitutions for both Arg-7 and Glu-112, each of which has been shown to produce subunits lacking ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The mutated gene fragment was exchanged for the wild-type copy in the previously cloned ctxAB operon from El Tor biotype, Ogawa serotype Vibrio cholerae strain 3083, which produces CT-2. Further, the zonula occludens toxin gene, zot, was inactivated by an insertional mutation to create the new plasmid construct pCT-2*. Additionally, a DNA fragment encoding the B subunit of CT-1 (CT produced by classical biotype, Inaba serotype V. cholerae strain 569B) was exchanged for the homologous part in pCT-2*, resulting in the creation of pCT-1*. These plasmid constructs were introduced into the CT-negative V. cholerae mutant strain JBK70 (E1 Tor biotype, Inaba serotype); CT-A-B+ derivatives CVD101 and CVD103 of classical biotype Ogawa and Inaba serotype strains 395 and 569B, respectively; El Tor biotype Inaba and Ogawa serotype strains C6706 and C7258, respectively, recently isolated in Peru; and O139 (synonym Bengal) strain SG25-1 from the current epidemic in India. Recombinant toxins (CT-1* and CT-2*), partially purified from culture supernatants of transformed JBK70, were shown to be inactive on mouse Y1 adrenal tumor cells and in an in vitro ADP-ribosyltransferase assay. CT-1* and CT-2* reacted with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against both A and B subunits of CT. The toxin analogs reacted with antibodies against CT-A and CT-B on cellulose acetate strips and in a GM1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; they reacted appropriately with B

  14. Cytoprotective Effect of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Produced in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Bah, Mamudou; Archer-Hartmann, Stephanie; Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Azadi, Parastoo; Ishihara, Mayumi; Sane, David C.; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-01-01

    Asialo-erythropoietin, a desialylated form of human erythropoietin (EPO) lacking hematopoietic activity, is receiving increased attention because of its broader protective effects in preclinical models of tissue injury. However, attempts to translate its protective effects into clinical practice is hampered by unavailability of suitable expression system and its costly and limit production from expensive mammalian cell-made EPO (rhuEPOM) by enzymatic desialylation. In the current study, we took advantage of a plant-based expression system lacking sialylating capacity but possessing an ability to synthesize complex N-glycans to produce cytoprotective recombinant human asialo-rhuEPO. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing asialo-rhuEPO were generated by stably co-expressing human EPO and β1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalT) genes under the control of double CaMV 35S and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate gene (GapC) promoters, respectively. Plant-produced asialo-rhuEPO (asialo-rhuEPOP) was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. Detailed N-glycan analysis using NSI-FTMS and MS/MS revealed that asialo-rhuEPOP bears paucimannosidic, high mannose-type and complex N-glycans. In vitro cytoprotection assays showed that the asialo-rhuEPOP (20 U/ml) provides 2-fold better cytoprotection (44%) to neuronal-like mouse neuroblastoma cells from staurosporine-induced cell death than rhuEPOM (21%). The cytoprotective effect of the asialo-rhuEPOP was found to be mediated by receptor-initiated phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and suppression of caspase 3 activation. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that plants are a suitable host for producing cytoprotective rhuEPO derivative. In addition, the general advantages of plant-based expression system can be exploited to address the cost and scalability issues related to its production. PMID:24124563

  15. A New Defective Helper RNA to Produce Recombinant Sindbis Virus that Infects Neurons but does not Propagate

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, Justus M.; Garcia da Silva, Pedro; Zador, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant Sindbis viruses are important tools in neuroscience because they combine rapid and high transgene expression with a capacity to carry large transgenes. Currently, two packaging systems based on the defective helper (DH) RNAs DH(26S)5’SIN and DH-BB(tRNA;TE12) are available for generating recombinant Sindbis virus that is neurotropic (able to infect neurons and potentially other cells). Both systems produce a fraction of viral particles that can propagate beyond the primary infected neuron. When injected into mouse brain, viruses produced using these DH RNAs produce transgene expression at the injection site, but also elsewhere in the brain. Such ectopic labeling caused recombinant Sindbis viruses to be classified as anterograde viruses with limited retrograde spread, and can complicate the interpretation of neuroanatomical and other experiments. Here we describe a new DH RNA, DH-BB(5’SIN;TE12ORF), that can be used to produce virus that is both neurotropic and propagation-incompetent. We show in mice that DH-BB(5’SIN;TE12ORF)-packaged virus eliminates infection of cells outside the injection site. We also provide evidence that ectopically labeled cells observed in previous experiments with recombinant Sindbis virus resulted from secondary infection by propagation-competent virus, rather than from inefficient retrograde spread. Virus produced with our new packaging system retains all the advantages of previous recombinant Sindbis viruses, but minimizes the risks of confounding results with unwanted ectopic labeling. It should therefore be considered in future studies in which a neurotropic, recombinant Sindbis virus is needed. PMID:27252627

  16. Detection and typing of herpes simplex viruses by using recombinant immunoglobulin fragments produced in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, P; Rossolini, G M; Cresti, S; Santangelo, R; Burton, D R; Williamson, R A; Sanna, P P; Fadda, G

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-seven bacterial clones producing human recombinant monoclonal antibody Fab fragments (rFabs) reactive to herpes simplex virus (HSV) antigens were selected from a human combinatorial antibody library constructed in a phage-display vector by a panning procedure against an HSV lysate. Thirty-four of the HSV-specific rFabs were able to specifically recognize HSV-infected cells in indirect immunofluorescence (IF) assays; of these, 25 recognized cells infected by either HSV type 1 (HSV-1) or HSV-2, while 9 recognized only HSV-1-infected cells. One HSV type-common rFab (rFab H37) and one HSV-1-specific rFab (rFab H85) were further evaluated as reagents for viral detection and typing by IF staining in 134 HSV-positive (72 HSV-1 and 62 HSV-2) viral cultures from clinical specimens. The results obtained with these two rFabs were fully consistent with those obtained with a commercial preparation of fluorescein-labeled anti-HSV type-specific murine monoclonal antibodies. The detection sensitivity with the type-common rFab in indirect IF assays was higher overall than that provided by the type-specific murine monoclonal antibodies. Preparations of rFabs suitable for IF staining can be easily and inexpensively obtained in a clinical microbiology laboratory from Escherichia coli cultures. Similar HSV-specific rFabs, therefore, could be advantageous for in vitro diagnostic purposes. PMID:9163470

  17. Spider silk fibers spun from soluble recombinant silk produced in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lazaris, Anthoula; Arcidiacono, Steven; Huang, Yue; Zhou, Jiang-Feng; Duguay, Francois; Chretien, Nathalie; Welsh, Elizabeth A; Soares, Jason W; Karatzas, Costas N

    2002-01-18

    Spider silks are protein-based "biopolymer" filaments or threads secreted by specialized epithelial cells as concentrated soluble precursors of highly repetitive primary sequences. Spider dragline silk is a flexible, lightweight fiber of extraordinary strength and toughness comparable to that of synthetic high-performance fibers. We sought to "biomimic" the process of spider silk production by expressing in mammalian cells the dragline silk genes (ADF-3/MaSpII and MaSpI) of two spider species. We produced soluble recombinant (rc)-dragline silk proteins with molecular masses of 60 to 140 kilodaltons. We demonstrated the wet spinning of silk monofilaments spun from a concentrated aqueous solution of soluble rc-spider silk protein (ADF-3; 60 kilodaltons) under modest shear and coagulation conditions. The spun fibers were water insoluble with a fine diameter (10 to 40 micrometers) and exhibited toughness and modulus values comparable to those of native dragline silks but with lower tenacity. Dope solutions with rc-silk protein concentrations >20% and postspinning draw were necessary to achieve improved mechanical properties of the spun fibers. Fiber properties correlated with finer fiber diameter and increased birefringence. PMID:11799236

  18. Characterization of recombinant human diamine oxidase (rhDAO) produced in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells.

    PubMed

    Gludovacz, Elisabeth; Maresch, Daniel; Bonta, Maximilian; Szöllösi, Helen; Furtmüller, Paul G; Weik, Robert; Altmann, Friedrich; Limbeck, Andreas; Borth, Nicole; Jilma, Bernd; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-06-10

    Human diamine oxidase (hDAO) efficiently degrades polyamines and histamine. Reduced enzyme activities might cause complications during pregnancy and be involved in histamine intolerance. So far hDAO has been characterized after isolation from either native sources or the heterologous production in insect cells. Accessibility to human enzyme is limited and insect cells produce non-human glycosylation patterns that may alter its biochemical properties. We present the heterologous expression of hDAO in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and a three step purification protocol. Analysis of metal content using ICP-MS revealed that 93% of the active sites were occupied by copper. Topaquinone (TPQ) cofactor content was determined using phenylhydrazine titration. Ninety-four percent of DAO molecules contained TPQ and therefore the copper content at the active site was indirectly confirmed. Mass spectrometric analysis was conducted to verify sequence integrity of the protein and to assess the glycosylation profile. Electronic circular dichroism and UV-vis spectra data were used to characterize structural properties. The substrate preference and kinetic parameters were in accordance with previous publications. The establishment of a recombinant production system for hDAO enables us to generate decent amounts of protein with negligible impurities to address new scientific questions. PMID:27063138

  19. A recombinant Bacillus anthracis strain producing the Clostridium perfringens Ib component induces protection against iota toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Sirard, J C; Weber, M; Duflot, E; Popoff, M R; Mock, M

    1997-01-01

    The Bacillus anthracis toxinogenic Sterne strain is currently used as a live veterinary vaccine against anthrax. The capacity of a toxin-deficient derivative strain to produce a heterologous antigen by using the strong inducible promoter of the B. anthracis pag gene was investigated. The expression of the foreign gene ibp, encoding the Ib component of iota toxin from Clostridium perfringens, was analyzed. A pag-ibp fusion was introduced by allelic exchange into a toxin-deficient Sterne strain, thereby replacing the wild-type pag gene. This recombinant strain, called BAIB, was stable and secreted large quantities of Ib protein in induced culture conditions. Mice given injections of live BAIB spores developed an antibody response specific to the Ib protein. The pag-ibp fusion was therefore functional both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the immunized animals were protected against a challenge with C. perfringens iota toxin or with the homologous Clostridium spiroforme toxin. The protective immunity was mediated by neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, B. anthracis is promising for the development of live veterinary vaccines. PMID:9169728

  20. Microorganism immobilization

    DOEpatents

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.

    1981-01-01

    Live metabolically active microorganisms are immobilized on a solid support by contacting particles of aggregate material with a water dispersible polyelectrolyte such as gelatin, crosslinking the polyelectrolyte by reacting it with a crosslinking agent such as glutaraldehyde to provide a crosslinked coating on the particles of aggregate material, contacting the coated particles with live microorganisms and incubating the microorganisms in contact with the crosslinked coating to provide a coating of metabolically active microorganisms. The immobilized microorganisms have continued growth and reproduction functions.

  1. A Gateway recombination herpesvirus cloning system with negative selection that produces vectorless progeny.

    PubMed

    Kunec, Dusan; van Haren, Sandra; Burgess, Shane C; Hanson, Larry A

    2009-01-01

    Crossover recombination based on the lambda phage integration/excision functions enables insertion of a gene of interest into a specific locus by a simple one-step in vitro recombination reaction. Recently, a highly efficient recombination system for targeted mutagenesis, which utilizes lambda phage crossover recombination cloning, has been described for a human herpesvirus 2 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). The disadvantages of the system are that it allows only neutral selection (loss of green fluorescent protein) of desired recombinants and that it regenerates herpesvirus progeny containing the BAC sequence inserted in the herpesvirus genome. In this study, the existing channel catfish herpesvirus (CCV) infectious clone (in the form of overlapping fragments) was modified to allow introduction of foreign genes by modified lambda phage crossover recombination cloning. This novel system enables negative and neutral selection and regenerates vectorless herpesvirus progeny. Construction of two CCV mutants expressing lacZ, one from the native CCV ORF5 promoter and the other from the immediate-early cytomegalovirus promoter, demonstrated the efficiency and reliability of this system. This novel cloning system enables rapid incorporation, direct delivery and high-level expression of foreign genes by a herpesvirus. This system has broad utility and could be used to facilitate development of recombinant viruses, viral vectors and better vaccines. PMID:18948138

  2. Recombinant Strain of Bacillus thuringiensis Producing Cyt1A, Cry11B, and the Bacillus sphaericus Binary Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Woo; Bideshi, Dennis K.; Federici, Brian A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel recombinant Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain that produces the B. sphaericus binary toxin, Cyt1Aa, and Cry11Ba is described. The toxicity of this strain (50% lethal concentration [LC50] = 1.7 ng/ml) against fourth-instar Culex quinquefasciatus was higher than that of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis IPS-82 (LC50 = 7.9 ng/ml) or B. sphaericus 2362 (LC50 = 12.6 ng/ml). PMID:12571069

  3. Native-sized recombinant spider silk protein produced in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli results in a strong fiber.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Xia; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Ki, Chang Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Kaplan, David L; Lee, Sang Yup

    2010-08-10

    Spider dragline silk is a remarkably strong fiber that makes it attractive for numerous applications. Much has thus been done to make similar fibers by biomimic spinning of recombinant dragline silk proteins. However, success is limited in part due to the inability to successfully express native-sized recombinant silk proteins (250-320 kDa). Here we show that a 284.9 kDa recombinant protein of the spider Nephila clavipes is produced and spun into a fiber displaying mechanical properties comparable to those of the native silk. The native-sized protein, predominantly rich in glycine (44.9%), was favorably expressed in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli within which the glycyl-tRNA pool was elevated. We also found that the recombinant proteins of lower molecular weight versions yielded inferior fiber properties. The results provide insight into evolution of silk protein size related to mechanical performance, and also clarify why spinning lower molecular weight proteins does not recapitulate the properties of native fibers. Furthermore, the silk expression, purification, and spinning platform established here should be useful for sustainable production of natural quality dragline silk, potentially enabling broader applications. PMID:20660779

  4. High-efficiency homologous recombination in the oil-producing alga Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Oliver; Benemann, Christina S E; Niyogi, Krishna K; Vick, Bertrand

    2011-12-27

    Algae have reemerged as potential next-generation feedstocks for biofuels, but strain improvement and progress in algal biology research have been limited by the lack of advanced molecular tools for most eukaryotic microalgae. Here we describe the development of an efficient transformation method for Nannochloropsis sp., a fast-growing, unicellular alga capable of accumulating large amounts of oil. Moreover, we provide additional evidence that Nannochloropsis is haploid, and we demonstrate that insertion of transformation constructs into the nuclear genome can occur by high-efficiency homologous recombination. As examples, we generated knockouts of the genes encoding nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, resulting in strains that were unable to grow on nitrate and nitrate/nitrite, respectively. The application of homologous recombination in this industrially relevant alga has the potential to rapidly advance algal functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:22123974

  5. High-efficiency homologous recombination in the oil-producing alga Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Oliver; Benemann, Christina S. E.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Vick, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Algae have reemerged as potential next-generation feedstocks for biofuels, but strain improvement and progress in algal biology research have been limited by the lack of advanced molecular tools for most eukaryotic microalgae. Here we describe the development of an efficient transformation method for Nannochloropsis sp., a fast-growing, unicellular alga capable of accumulating large amounts of oil. Moreover, we provide additional evidence that Nannochloropsis is haploid, and we demonstrate that insertion of transformation constructs into the nuclear genome can occur by high-efficiency homologous recombination. As examples, we generated knockouts of the genes encoding nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, resulting in strains that were unable to grow on nitrate and nitrate/nitrite, respectively. The application of homologous recombination in this industrially relevant alga has the potential to rapidly advance algal functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:22123974

  6. Nano-structured calcite produced by micro-organisms in ancient and modern loess in Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Chen, T.; Lu, H.; Wang, X.

    2005-12-01

    The results from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission gun scanning microscopy (FEG-SEM) investigation show that there are calcite nano-fibers (CNFs) formed during pedogenic process. The CNFs are widely distributed in the loess and red clay samples of Caoxian, Luochuan, Lingtai, Lantian, and Xifeng profiles as well as the samples of modern surface loess soils in Chinese Loess Plateau. Diameters of all the NFCs are about 40 nm, the length of the CNFs ranges from tens nanometer to several micrometers. Elongation direction of NFCs is unusual near parallel (105)* or (115)*. Crystals of NFCs arrange as bird net like and lattice-like frameworks. X-ray EDS spectra show the weak peaks of magnesium, phosphorous, and sulfur. Our investigation indicates that CNFs are in pore space of loess and paleosol and made up most of carbonate except for caliche nodular layers. Concentration of NFCs in the loess layers are significantly higher than those of paleosol layers because of leaching of carbonate in the paleosol forming environment (warn and wet paleoclimate). The "nanobacteria-like CNFs are well crystalline calcite single crystals with smoothes surfaces. The morphologies of CNFs are very unusual and different from the calcite single crystals observed in most geological environments. The CNFs are directly related to microbial activities in both ancient and modern loess. It is proposed that the intervention of organic compounds derived from microbial activities control the formation of the calcite nano-fibers. Both morphology and bulk composition of CNFs indicate that the formation of the CNFs involves bio-organics derived from microorganisms in loess deposit environment. Formation conditions of the calcite nano-fibers may information about paleoclimate, paleo-environment and paleoecology. So, the discovery of CNFs in loess-paloesol sequences can provide a new route for reconstruct paleoclimate by oxygen and carbon isotope from the CNFs.

  7. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes producing human phospholipase inhibitor polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, B.P.; Pepinsky, R.B.; Garwin, J.L.

    1989-11-07

    This patent describes a recombinant DNA molecule. In comprises a DNA sequence coding for a phospholopase inhibitor polypeptide and being selected from the group consisting of: the cDNA insert of ALC, DNA sequences which code on expression for a phospholopase inhibitor, and DNA sequences which are degenerate as a result of the genetic code to either of the foregoing DNA sequences and which code on expression for a phospholipase inhibitor.

  8. [Produce of marker-free transgenic tobacco plants by FLP/frt recombination system].

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiao-Yi; Li, Bei; Zhang, Ju-Ren

    2006-09-01

    Selectable marker genes that usually encode antibiotic or herbicide resistances are widely used for the selection of the transgenic plants, but they become unnecessary and undesirable after transformation selection. An important strategy to improve the transgenic plants' biosafety is to eliminate the marker genes after successful selection. In the FLP/frt site-specific system of the 2 microm plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the FLP enzyme efficiently catalyzes recombination between two directly repeated FLP recombination target (frt) sites, eliminating the sequence between them. By controlled expression of the FLP recombinase and specific allocation of the frt sites within transgenic constructs, the system can be applied to eliminate the marker genes after selection. Through a series of procedures, the plant FLP/frt site-specific recombination system was constructed, which included the frt containing vector pCAMBIA1300-betA-frt-als-frt and the FLP expression vector pCAMBIA1300-hsp-FLP-hpt. The FLP recombinase gene was introduced into transgenic (betA-frt-als-frt) tobacco plants by re-transformation. In re-transgenic plants, after heat shock treatment, the marker gene als flanked by two identical orientation frt sites could be excised by the inducible expression of FLP recombinase under the control of hsp promoter. Excision of the als gene was found in 41% re-transgenic tobacco plants, which indicated that this systerm could make a great contribution to obtain the marker free transgenic plants. PMID:17037196

  9. [Recombinant strain producing thermostable lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus immobilized into nanocarbon silica matrices and properties of the prepared biocatalyzers].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, G A; Beklemishev, A B; Perminova, L V; Chuenko, T V; Ivanov, I D; Moiseenkov, S I; Kuznetsov, V L

    2013-01-01

    Multicomponent composite biocatalyzers with lipolytic activity have been studied. These biocatalyzers were prepared through the immobilization of a recombinant producer strain of thermostable lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus into SiO2 xerogel, which contains a nanocarbon component, i.e., multilayered carbon nanotubes with varying diameters, and also bulblike structured carbon nanospheres ("nanobulb"). The properties of lipase were studied both in cell suspensions of a recombinant producer strain constructed based on E. coli BL21(DE3) and in the immobilized state with regard to the structure and dispersibility of the nanocarbon component used in the composition of the biocatalyzers. It was shown that the recombinant intracellular lipase exerted its activity in a reaction of tributirin hydrolysis on average comprising 50 U/mg of dried cells and had a high level of thermostability. Upon heating in olive oil at 100 degrees C, the inactivation constant and the period of semi-inactivation comprised 6 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 2 h, respectively, exceeding by one order the thermostability of lipase in a buffer solution. Biocatalyzers that contained aggregated "thick" nanotubes with a diameter of 20-22 nm had the maximum initial activity-250 U/g. PMID:23882949

  10. Profiling highly conserved microrna expression in recombinant IgG-producing and parental Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nan; Davis, Angela; Bahr, Scott; Borgschulte, Trissa; Achtien, Katherine; Kayser, Kevin

    2011-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in global gene regulation. Researchers in recombinant protein production have proposed miRNAs as biomarkers and cell engineering targets. However, miRNA expression remains understudied in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, one of the most commonly used host cell systems for therapeutic protein production. To profile highly conserved miRNA expression, we used the miRCURY™ miRNA array for screening miRNAs in CHO cells. The selection criteria for further miRNA profiling included positive hybridization signals and experimentally validated predicted regulatory targets. On the basis of screening, we selected 16 miRNAs for quantitative RT-PCR profiling. We profiled miR expression in parental CHO DG44 and CHO K1 cell lines as well as four recombinant DG44-derived CHO lines producing a recombinant human IgG. We observed that miR-221 and miR-222 were significantly downregulated in all IgG-producing cell lines when compared with parental DG44, whereas miR-125b was significantly downregulated in one IgG-producing line. In another IgG-producing line, miR-19a was significantly upregulated. miRNA expression was also profiled in two of these lines that were amplified by stepwise increase of methotrexate. In both amplified cell lines, let-7b and miR-221 were significantly downregulated. In parental CHO K1, let-7b, miR-15b, and miR-17 were significantly downregulated when compared with DG44. The results reported here are the first steps toward profiling highly conserved miRNAs and studying the clonal difference in miRNA expression in CHO cells and may shed light on using miRNAs in cell engineering. PMID:21692195

  11. High Prevalence of Infectious Diseases and Drug-Resistant Microorganisms in Asylum Seekers Admitted to Hospital; No Carbapenemase Producing Enterobacteriaceae until September 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ravensbergen, Sofanne J.; Lokate, Mariëtte; Cornish, Darren; Kloeze, Eveline; Ott, Alewijn; Friedrich, Alex W.; van Hest, Rob; Akkerman, Onno W.; de Lange, Wiel C.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Bathoorn, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The current refugee crisis emphasizes the need for information on infectious diseases and resistant microorganisms in asylum seekers with possible consequences for public health and infection control. Methods We collected data from asylum seekers admitted to our university hospital or who presented at the Emergency Department (n = 273). We collected general and demographic characteristics including country of origin, the reason of presentation, and the screening results of multi-drug resistant organisms. Results 67% of the patients were male with a median age of the study group of 24 years (IQR 15–33); 48% of the patients had an infectious disease—predominantly malaria with P. vivax or tuberculosis. Patients also reported with diseases which are less common—e.g. leishmaniasis, or even conditions rarely diagnosed in Europe—e.g. louse borne relapsing fever. A carriage rate of 31% for multi-drug resistant microorganisms (MDRO) was observed, with ESBL-expressing E.coli (n = 20) being the most common MDRO. No carriage of Carbapenemase Producing Enterobacteriaceae was found. Conclusion The current refugee crisis in Europe challenges hospitals to quickly identify and respond to communicable diseases and the carriage of MDRO. A rapid response is necessary to optimize the treatment of infectious diseases amongst asylum seekers to maximize infection control. PMID:27144599

  12. Identifying inhibitory effects of lignocellulosic by-products on growth of lactic acid producing micro-organisms using a rapid small-scale screening method.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, Edwin C; Vaessen, Evelien; Weusthuis, Ruud A; Eggink, Gerrit

    2016-06-01

    Sugars obtained from pretreated lignocellulose are interesting as substrate for the production of lactic acid in fermentation processes. However, by-products formed during pretreatment of lignocellulose can inhibit microbial growth. In this study, a small-scale rapid screening method was used to identify inhibitory effects of single and combined by-products on growth of lactic acid producing micro-organisms. The small-scale screening was performed in 48-well plates using 5 bacterial species and 12 by-products. Large differences were observed in inhibitory effects of by-products between different species. Predictions can be made for growth behaviour of different micro-organisms on acid pretreated or alkaline pretreated bagasse substrates using data from the small-scale screening. Both individual and combined inhibition effects were shown to be important parameters to predict growth. Synergy between coumaric acid, formic acid and acetic acid is a key inhibitory parameter in alkaline pretreated lignocellulose, while furfural is a key inhibitor in acid pretreated lignocellulose. PMID:26990397

  13. Decreased fluidity of cell membranes causes a metal ion deficiency in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peitong; Sun, Liang; Sun, Yuxia; Shang, Fei; Yan, Guoliang

    2016-04-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional responses of S. cerevisiae to heterologous carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The results show that the genes involved in metal ion transport were specifically up-regulated in the recombinant strain, and metal ions, including Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+), were deficient in the recombinant strain compared to the ion content of the parent strain. The decrease in metal ions was ascribed to a decrease in cell membrane (CM) fluidity caused by lower levels of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol. This was confirmed by the observation that metal ion levels were restored when CM fluidity was increased by supplying linoleic acid. In addition, a 24.3 % increase in the β-carotene concentration was observed. Collectively, our results suggest that heterologous production of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae can induce cellular stress by rigidifying the CM, which can lead to a deficiency in metal ions. Due to the importance of CM fluidity in cellular physiology, maintaining normal CM fluidity might be a potential approach to improving carotenoid production in genetically engineered S. cerevisiae. PMID:26749524

  14. Utilization of site-specific recombination for generating therapeutic protein producing cell lines.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Margie; Corisdeo, Susanne; McGee, Clair; Kraichely, Denny

    2010-07-01

    The AttSite Recombinase Technology from Intrexon, Blacksburg, VA, utilizes specific DNA sequences and proprietary recombinase enzymes to catalyze the insertion of a gene of interest at a specific location in the host cell genome. Using this technology, we have developed Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines that have incorporated attB recombination sites at highly transcriptionally active loci or 'hot spots' within the cell genome. Subsequently, these attB site containing host cell lines could then be used for the expression of future Centocor products. Candidate production cell lines would be generated by a simple recombination event. Since the therapeutic gene of interest would preferentially integrate into the pre-selected high-expressing attB site, candidate cell lines would consistently express high levels of the gene of interest. We have been able to demonstrate that the AttSite Recombinase Technology could be a valid approach for the development of high-expressing production cell lines. PMID:20300883

  15. Rational engineering of recombinant picornavirus capsids to produce safe, protective vaccine antigen.

    PubMed

    Porta, Claudine; Kotecha, Abhay; Burman, Alison; Jackson, Terry; Ren, Jingshan; Loureiro, Silvia; Jones, Ian M; Fry, Elizabeth E; Stuart, David I; Charleston, Bryan

    2013-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease remains a major plague of livestock and outbreaks are often economically catastrophic. Current inactivated virus vaccines require expensive high containment facilities for their production and maintenance of a cold-chain for their activity. We have addressed both of these major drawbacks. Firstly we have developed methods to efficiently express recombinant empty capsids. Expression constructs aimed at lowering the levels and activity of the viral protease required for the cleavage of the capsid protein precursor were used; this enabled the synthesis of empty A-serotype capsids in eukaryotic cells at levels potentially attractive to industry using both vaccinia virus and baculovirus driven expression. Secondly we have enhanced capsid stability by incorporating a rationally designed mutation, and shown by X-ray crystallography that stabilised and wild-type empty capsids have essentially the same structure as intact virus. Cattle vaccinated with recombinant capsids showed sustained virus neutralisation titres and protection from challenge 34 weeks after immunization. This approach to vaccine antigen production has several potential advantages over current technologies by reducing production costs, eliminating the risk of infectivity and enhancing the temperature stability of the product. Similar strategies that will optimize host cell viability during expression of a foreign toxic gene and/or improve capsid stability could allow the production of safe vaccines for other pathogenic picornaviruses of humans and animals. PMID:23544011

  16. Enhancing isomaltulose production by recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase: culture medium optimization containing agricultural wastes and cell immobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Xu, Hong; Yu, Jianguang; Wang, Yanyuan; Feng, Xiaohai; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2013-10-01

    Isomaltulose is a structural isomer of sucrose commercially used in food industries. In this work, recombinant Escherichia coli producing sucrose isomerase (SIase) was used to convert sucrose into isomaltulose. To develop an economical industrial medium, untreated cane molasses (10.63 g l⁻¹), yeast extract (25.93 g l⁻¹), and corn steep liquor (10.45 g l⁻¹) were used as main culture compositions for SIase production. The relatively high SIase activity (14.50 ± 0.11 U mg DCW⁻¹) was obtained by the recombinant cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on SIase production by engineered E. coli using untreated cane molasses. The recombinant E. coli cells expressing the SIase gene were immobilized in calcium alginate gel in order to improve the efficiency of recycling. The immobilization was most effective with 2 % (w/v) sodium alginate and 3 % (w/v) calcium chloride. The optimal initial biomass for immobilization was 20 % (w/v, wet wt.), with a hardening time of 8 h for cell immobilization. The immobilized E. coli cells exhibited good stability for 30 batches with the productivity of 0.45 g isomaltulose g pellet⁻¹ h⁻¹. A continuous isomaltulose formation process using a column reactor remained stable for 40 days with 83 ± 2 % isomaltulose yield, which would be beneficial for economical production of isomaltulose. PMID:23300051

  17. Evaluation of Time-Temperature Integrators (TTIs) with Microorganism-Entrapped Microbeads Produced Using Homogenization and SPG Membrane Emulsification Techniques.

    PubMed

    Rahman, A T M Mijanur; Lee, Seung Ju; Jung, Seung Won

    2015-12-28

    A comparative study was conducted to evaluate precision and accuracy in controlling the temperature dependence of encapsulated microbial time-temperature integrators (TTIs) developed using two different emulsification techniques. Weissela cibaria CIFP 009 cells, immobilized within 2% Na-alginate gel microbeads using homogenization (5,000, 7,000, and 10,000 rpm) and Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane technologies (10 μm), were applied to microbial TTIs. The prepared micobeads were characterized with respect to their size, size distribution, shape and morphology, entrapment efficiency, and bead production yield. Additionally, fermentation process parameters including growth rate were investigated. The TTI responses (changes in pH and titratable acidity (TA)) were evaluated as a function of temperature (20°C, 25°C, and 30°C). In comparison with conventional methods, SPG membrane technology was able not only to produce highly uniform, small-sized beads with the narrowest size distribution, but also the bead production yield was found to be nearly 3.0 to 4.5 times higher. However, among the TTIs produced using the homogenization technique, poor linearity (R(2)) in terms of TA was observed for the 5,000 and 7,000 rpm treatments. Consequently, microbeads produced by the SPG membrane and by homogenization at 10,000 rpm were selected for adjusting the temperature dependence. The Ea values of TTIs containing 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 g microbeads, prepared by SPG membrane and conventional methods, were estimated to be 86.0, 83.5, and 76.6 kJ/mol, and 85.5, 73.5, and 62.2 kJ/mol, respectively. Therefore, microbial TTIs developed using SPG membrane technology are much more efficient in controlling temperature dependence. PMID:26370796

  18. The recombined cccDNA produced using minicircle technology mimicked HBV genome in structure and function closely.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyan; Chen, Ping; Hou, Xiaohu; Xu, Wenjuan; Wang, Dan; Wang, Tian-Yan; Zhang, Liping; Zheng, Gang; Gao, Zhi-Liang; He, Cheng-Yi; Zhou, Boping; Chen, Zhi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is drug-resistant and responsible for viral persistence. To facilitate the development of anti-cccDNA drugs, we developed a minicircle DNA vector (MC)-based technology to produce large quantity of recombined cccDNA (rcccDNA) resembling closely to its wild-type counterpart both in structure and function. The rcccDNA differed to the wild-type cccDNA (wtcccDNA) only in that it carried an extra 36-bp DNA recombinant product attR upstream of the preC/C gene. Using a procedure similar to standard plasmid production, milligrams of rcccDNA can be generated in common laboratories conveniently. The rcccDNA demonstrated many essential biological features of wtcccDNA, including: (1) undergoing nucleation upon nucleus entry; (2) serving as template for production of all HBV RNAs and proteins; (3) deriving virions capable of infecting tree shrew, and subsequently producing viral mRNAs, proteins, rcccDNA and infectious virions. As an example to develop anti-cccDNA drugs, we used the Crispr/Cas9 system to provide clear-cut evidence that rcccDNA was cleaved by this DNA editing tool in vitro. In summary, we have developed a convenient technology to produce large quantity of rcccDNA as a surrogate of wtcccDNA for investigating HBV biology and developing treatment to eradicate this most wide-spreading virus. PMID:27174254

  19. The recombined cccDNA produced using minicircle technology mimicked HBV genome in structure and function closely

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoyan; Chen, Ping; Hou, Xiaohu; Xu, Wenjuan; Wang, Dan; Wang, Tian-yan; Zhang, Liping; Zheng, Gang; Gao, Zhi-liang; He, Cheng-Yi; Zhou, Boping; Chen, Zhi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is drug-resistant and responsible for viral persistence. To facilitate the development of anti-cccDNA drugs, we developed a minicircle DNA vector (MC)-based technology to produce large quantity of recombined cccDNA (rcccDNA) resembling closely to its wild-type counterpart both in structure and function. The rcccDNA differed to the wild-type cccDNA (wtcccDNA) only in that it carried an extra 36-bp DNA recombinant product attR upstream of the preC/C gene. Using a procedure similar to standard plasmid production, milligrams of rcccDNA can be generated in common laboratories conveniently. The rcccDNA demonstrated many essential biological features of wtcccDNA, including: (1) undergoing nucleation upon nucleus entry; (2) serving as template for production of all HBV RNAs and proteins; (3) deriving virions capable of infecting tree shrew, and subsequently producing viral mRNAs, proteins, rcccDNA and infectious virions. As an example to develop anti-cccDNA drugs, we used the Crispr/Cas9 system to provide clear-cut evidence that rcccDNA was cleaved by this DNA editing tool in vitro. In summary, we have developed a convenient technology to produce large quantity of rcccDNA as a surrogate of wtcccDNA for investigating HBV biology and developing treatment to eradicate this most wide-spreading virus. PMID:27174254

  20. A fast and simple method to eliminate Cpn60 from functional recombinant proteins produced by E. coli Arctic Express.

    PubMed

    Belval, Lorène; Marquette, Arnaud; Mestre, Pere; Piron, Marie-Christine; Demangeat, Gérard; Merdinoglu, Didier; Chich, Jean-François

    2015-05-01

    A frequent problem of recombinant protein production is their insolubility. To address this issue, engineered Escherichiacoli strains like Arctic Express that produce an exogenous chaperone facilitating protein folding, have been designed. A drawback is the frequent contamination of the protein by chaperones. A simple method, using urea at a sub-denaturing concentration, allows unbinding of Cpn60 from expressed protein. This method was successfully used to purify 2 proteins, an enzyme and a viral protein. The enzyme was fully active. The nature of interaction forces between enzyme and Cpn60 was investigated. The method is likely applicable to purify other proteins. PMID:25655203

  1. Transient Glyco-Engineering to Produce Recombinant IgA1 with Defined N- and O-Glycans in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dicker, Martina; Tschofen, Marc; Maresch, Daniel; König, Julia; Juarez, Paloma; Orzaez, Diego; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases, such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG), less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumor activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered ΔXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that ΔXT/FT N. benthamiana plants can be engineered toward the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans. PMID:26858738

  2. Toxicity of Methylated Bismuth Compounds Produced by Intestinal Microorganisms to Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a Member of the Physiological Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Beatrix; Diaz-Bone, Roland A.; Pieper, Dominik; Hollmann, Markus; Hensel, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Methanoarchaea have an outstanding capability to methylate numerous metal(loid)s therefore producing toxic and highly mobile derivatives. Here, we report that the production of methylated bismuth species by the methanoarchaeum Methanobrevibacter smithii, a common member of the human intestine, impairs the growth of members of the beneficial intestinal microbiota at low concentrations. The bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which is of great importance for the welfare of the host due to its versatile digestive abilities and its protective function for the intestine, is highly sensitive against methylated, but not against inorganic, bismuth species. The level of methylated bismuth species produced by the methanoarchaeum M. smithii in a coculture experiment causes a reduction of the maximum cell density of B. thetaiotaomicron. This observation suggests that the production of methylated organometal(loid) species in the human intestine, caused by the activity of methanoarchaea, may affect the health of the host. The impact of the species to reduce the number of the physiological intestinal microbiota brings an additional focus on the potentially harmful role of methanoarchaea in the intestine of a higher organism. PMID:21966291

  3. Oral immunization of fish against iridovirus infection using recombinant antigen produced from rice callus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Y J; Kwon, T H; Seo, J Y; Kim, T J

    2013-10-25

    Fish iridoviruses cause systemic diseases with high morbidity and mortality in various species of wild and farm-raised fish, resulting in severe economic losses, and no large-scale protective vaccine program or therapy is currently available. In this study, we expressed a recombinant major capsid protein (rMCP) of rock bream iridovirus in transgenic rice callus. The rMCP in lyophilized rice callus powder was added to feed to induce intestinal mucosal immunity for protection against and/or to reduce the severity of the iridovirus infection. We found that fish (Rock bream) immunized orally with rMCP underwent successful induction of antibodies (P<0.05) and were protected (P<0.001) against viral challenge. These results suggest that oral administration of rMCP as an antigen is a useful method to implement a vaccine program against iridovirus and other marine viral diseases. PMID:24021312

  4. EFFECTS OF A LIGNIN PEROXIDASE-EXPRESSING RECOMBINANT STREPTOMYCES LIVIDANS TK23.1 ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING AND THE NUMBERS AND ACTIVITIES OF MICROORGANISMS IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recombinant actinomycete, Streptomyces lividans TK23.1, expressing a pIJ702-encoded extracellular lignin peroxidase gene cloned from the chromosome of Streptomyces virodosporus T7A, was released into soil in flask- and microcosm-scale studies to determine its effects on humific...

  5. Dendritic Cell Activity Driven by Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Producing Human IL-18, in Healthy BCG Vaccinated Adults

    PubMed Central

    Szpakowski, Piotr; Biet, Franck; Locht, Camille; Paszkiewicz, Małgorzata; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Allain, Fabrice; Fol, Marek; Pestel, Joël; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains an enormous global burden, despite wide vaccination coverage with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available against this disease, indicating that BCG-driven immunity is insufficient to protect the human population against tuberculosis. In this study we constructed recombinant BCG producing human IL-18 (rBCGhIL-18) and investigated whether human IL-18 produced by rBCGhIL-18 modulates DC functions and enhances Th1 responses to mycobacterial antigens in humans. We found that the costimulatory CD86 and CD80 molecules were significantly upregulated on rBCGhIL-18-infected DCs, whereas the stimulation of DCs with nonrecombinant BCG was less effective. In contrast, both BCG strains decreased the DC-SIGN expression on human DCs. The rBCGhIL-18 increased IL-23, IL-10, and IP-10 production by DCs to a greater extent than nonrecombinant BCG. In a coculture system of CD4+ T cells and loaded DCs, rBCGhIL-18 favoured strong IFN-γ but also IL-10 production by naive T cells but not by memory T cells. This was much less the case for nonrecombinant BCG. Thus the expression of IL-18 by recombinant BCG increases IL-23, IP-10, and IL-10 expression by human DCs and enhances their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 expression by naive T cells, without affecting the maturation phenotype of the DCs. PMID:26339658

  6. Sequence analysis of the gene for a novel superantigen produced by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and expression of the recombinant protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuhiko, Ito; Abe, Jun; Kohsaka, Takao

    1995-06-01

    We previously reported that the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis produces a superantigen (YPM, Y. pseudotuberculosis-derived mitogen) that expands T cells bearing V{beta}s 3, 9, 13.1, and 13.2 in an MHC class II-dependent manner. Based on the previously determined N-terminal 23 amino acids of YPM (T-D-Y-D-N-T-L-N-S-I-P-S-L-R-I-P-N-I-A-T-Y-T-G- (one-letter code)), we cloned the ypm gene and analyzed the nucleotide sequence. The gene encodes a 151-amino acid protein with a 20-amino acid signal peptide at its N terminus. The recombinant YPM expressed by the cloned gene exerted a mitogenic activity on human PBMC at a concentration of approximately 1 pg/ml. T cells bearing V{beta} 13.3 were preferentially expanded as well as T cells bearing the same V{beta} repertoires stimulated by native YPM. T cells were stimulated by the recombinant YPM in the presence of either fixed or unfixed HLA class II-transfected mouse fibroblasts. Furthermore, sequence diversity in the junctional region of the TCR {beta}-chain containing the V{beta}3 element could be observed after stimulation by the recombinant YPM. These results indicate that YPM belongs to the category of superantigens and should be included as a novel member. The amino acid sequence of the mature protein showed no significant homology to other superantigens derived from Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. This observation, together with the substantially smaller m.w. suggest that ypm must have evolved from a different ancestral gene. 67 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Sexual reproduction and recombination in the aflatoxin-producing fungus Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal phylum Ascomycota comprises a large proportion of species with no known sexual stage, despite high genetic variability in field populations. One such asexual species, Aspergillus parasiticus, is a potent producer of carcinogenic and hepatotoxic aflatoxins, polyketide-derived secondary me...

  8. Expression of recombinant organophosphorus hydrolase in the original producer of the enzyme, Sphingobium fuliginis ATCC 27551.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kosuke; Ohmori, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Iwata, Natsumi; Seto, Yasuo; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    The plasmid encoding His-tagged organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) cloned from Sphingobium fuliginis was modified to be transferred back to this bacterium. The replication function of S. amiense plasmid was inserted at downstream of OPH gene, and S. fuliginis was transformed with this plasmid. The transformant produced larger amount of active OPH with His-tag than E. coli. PMID:26784883

  9. Why do microorganisms produce rhamnolipids?

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2012-02-01

    We review the environmental role of rhamnolipids in terms of microbial life and activity. A large number of previous research supports the idea that these glycolipids mediate the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by bacterial cells. This feature might be of highest priority for bioremediation of spilled hydrocarbons. However, current evidence confirms that rhamnolipids primarily play a role in surface-associated modes of bacterial motility and are involved in biofilm development. This might be an explanation why no direct pattern of hydrocarbon degradation was often observed after rhamnolipids supplementation. This review gives insight into the current state of knowledge on how rhamnolipids operate in the microbial world. PMID:22347773

  10. Optimizing promoters and secretory signal sequences for producing ethanol from inulin by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying Kluyveromyces marxianus inulinase.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Dae-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Inulin is a polyfructan that is abundant in plants such as Jerusalem artichoke, chicory and dahlia. Inulinase can easily hydrolyze inulin to fructose, which is consumed by microorganisms. Generally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an industrial workhorse strain for bioethanol production, is known for not having inulinase activity. The inulinase gene from Kluyveromyces marxianus (KmINU), with the ability of converting inulin to fructose, was introduced into S. cerevisiae D452-2. The inulinase gene was fused to three different types of promoter (GPD, PGK1, truncated HXT7) and secretory signal sequence (KmINU, MFα1, SUC2) to generate nine expression cassettes. The inulin fermentation performance of the nine transformants containing different promoter and signal sequence combinations for inulinase production were compared to select an optimized expression system for efficient inulin fermentation. Among the nine inulinase-producing transformants, the S. cerevisiae carrying the PGK1 promoter and MFα1 signal sequence (S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM) showed not only the highest specific KmINU activity, but also the best inulin fermentation capability. Finally, a batch fermentation of the selected S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM in a bioreactor with 188.2 g/L inulin was performed to produce 80.2 g/L ethanol with 0.43 g ethanol/g inulin of ethanol yield and 1.22 g/L h of ethanol productivity. PMID:25142154

  11. Site-specific chemical modification of recombinant proteins produced in mammalian cells by using the genetically encoded aldehyde tag.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Shui, Wenqing; Carlson, Brian L; Hu, Nancy; Rabuka, David; Lee, Julia; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2009-03-01

    The properties of therapeutic proteins can be enhanced by chemical modification. Methods for site-specific protein conjugation are critical to such efforts. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant proteins expressed in mammalian cells can be site-specifically modified by using a genetically encoded aldehyde tag. We introduced the peptide sequence recognized by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE), which can be as short as 6 residues, into heterologous proteins expressed in mammalian cells. Cotranslational modification of the proteins by FGE produced products bearing a unique aldehyde group. Proteins bearing this "aldehyde tag" were chemically modified by selective reaction with hydrazide- or aminooxy-functionalized reagents. We applied the technique to site-specific modification of monoclonal antibodies, the fastest growing class of biopharmaceuticals, as well as membrane-associated and cytosolic proteins expressed in mammalian cells. PMID:19202059

  12. A Cell Line Producing Recombinant Nerve Growth Factor Evokes Growth Responses in Intrinsic and Grafted Central Cholinergic Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernfors, Patrik; Ebendal, Ted; Olson, Lars; Mouton, Peter; Stromberg, Ingrid; Persson, Hakan

    1989-06-01

    The rat β nerve growth factor (NGF) gene was inserted into a mammalian expression vector and cotransfected with a plasmid conferring resistance to neomycin into mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. From this transfection a stable cell line was selected that contains several hundred copies of the rat NGF gene and produces excess levels of recombinant NGF. Such genetically modified cells were implanted into the rat brain as a probe for in vivo effects of NGF on central nervous system neurons. In a model of the cortical cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer disease, we demonstrate a marked increase in the survival of, and fiber outgrowth from, grafts of fetal basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as well as stimulation of fiber formation by intact adult intrinsic cholinergic circuits in the cerebral cortex. Adult cholinergic interneurons in intact striatum also sprout vigorously toward implanted fibroblasts. Our results suggest that this model has implications for future treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Co-expression of ferrochelatase allows for complete heme incorporation into recombinant proteins produced in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Kabir, Mariam; Airola, Michael V.; Patel, Bhumit A.; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Dennis L.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Over-expression of heme binding proteins in E. coli often results in sub-optimal heme incorporation and the amount of heme-bound protein produced usually varies with the protein of interest. Complete heme incorporation is important for biochemical characterization, spectroscopy, structural studies, and for the production of homogeneous commercial proteins with high activity. We have determined that recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli often contain less than a full complement of heme because they rather are partially incorporated with free-base porphyrin. Porphyrin-incorporated proteins have similar spectral characteristics as the desired heme-loaded targets, and thus are difficult to detect, even in purified samples. We present a straightforward and inexpensive solution to this problem that involves the co-expression of native ferrochelatase with the protein of interest. The method is shown to be effective for proteins that contain either Cys- or His- ligated hemes. PMID:20303407

  14. Yeast-produced recombinant virus-like particles of coxsackievirus A6 elicited protective antibodies in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Shen, Chaoyun; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lili; Lan, Ke; Liu, Qingwei; Huang, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Coxsackievirus A6 (CA6) has recently emerged as the predominant pathogen of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), causing significant morbidity in children and adults. The increasing prevalence of CA6 infection and its associated disease burden underscore the need for effective CA6 vaccines. However, CA6 grows poorly in cultured cells, making it difficult to develop inactivated whole-virus or live attenuated vaccines. Here we report the development of a recombinant virus-like particle (VLP) based CA6 vaccine. CA6 VLPs were produced in Pichia pastoris yeast transformed with a vector encoding both P1 and 3CD proteins of CA6. Immunization with CA6 VLPs elicited CA6-specific serum antibodies in mice. Passive transfer of anti-VLP antisera protected recipient mice against lethal CA6 challenge. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CA6 VLPs represent a viable CA6 vaccine candidate which warrants further preclinical and clinical development. PMID:27315772

  15. High Throughput Quantitative Expression Screening and Purification Applied to Recombinant Disulfide-rich Venom Proteins Produced in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Natalie J.; Nozach, Hervé; Blemont, Marilyne; Vincentelli, Renaud

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, purifying proteins is sometimes challenging since many proteins are expressed in an insoluble form. When working with difficult or multiple targets it is therefore recommended to use high throughput (HTP) protein expression screening on a small scale (1-4 ml cultures) to quickly identify conditions for soluble expression. To cope with the various structural genomics programs of the lab, a quantitative (within a range of 0.1-100 mg/L culture of recombinant protein) and HTP protein expression screening protocol was implemented and validated on thousands of proteins. The protocols were automated with the use of a liquid handling robot but can also be performed manually without specialized equipment. Disulfide-rich venom proteins are gaining increasing recognition for their potential as therapeutic drug leads. They can be highly potent and selective, but their complex disulfide bond networks make them challenging to produce. As a member of the FP7 European Venomics project (www.venomics.eu), our challenge is to develop successful production strategies with the aim of producing thousands of novel venom proteins for functional characterization. Aided by the redox properties of disulfide bond isomerase DsbC, we adapted our HTP production pipeline for the expression of oxidized, functional venom peptides in the E. coli cytoplasm. The protocols are also applicable to the production of diverse disulfide-rich proteins. Here we demonstrate our pipeline applied to the production of animal venom proteins. With the protocols described herein it is likely that soluble disulfide-rich proteins will be obtained in as little as a week. Even from a small scale, there is the potential to use the purified proteins for validating the oxidation state by mass spectrometry, for characterization in pilot studies, or for sensitive

  16. Functional characterization of the recombinant HIV-neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5 produced in maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Sabalza, M; Madeira, L; van Dolleweerd, C; Ma, J K; Capell, T; Christou, P

    2012-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be used as microbicides to help prevent the spread of HIV in human populations. As an industry standard, HIV-neutralizing mAbs are produced as recombinant proteins in mammalian cells, but the high manufacturing costs and limited capacity reduce the ability of target populations in developing countries to gain access to these potentially life-saving medicines. Plants offer a more cost-effective and deployable production platform because they can be grown inexpensively and on a large scale in the region where the products are required. Here we show that the maize-derived HIV-neutralizing mAb 2F5 is assembled correctly in planta and binds to its antigen with the same affinity as 2F5 produced in mammalian cells. Although 2F5 has been produced at high levels in non-plant platforms, the yield in maize seeds is lower than previously achieved with another HIV-neutralizing mAb, 2G12. This suggests that the intrinsic properties of the antibody (e.g. sensitivity to specific proteases) and the environment provided by the production host (e.g. the relative abundance of different proteases, potential transgene silencing) may combine to limit the accumulation of some antibodies on a case-by-case basis. PMID:22965278

  17. Classifying Microorganisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn J.; Lang, Michael; Goodmanis, Ben

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on an activity in which students sample air at school and generate ideas about how to classify the microorganisms they observe. The results are used to compare air quality among schools via the Internet. Supports the development of scientific inquiry and technology skills. (DDR)

  18. Quantitative Determination of Bandpasses for Producing Vegetation Indices from Recombined NEON Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulslander, D.

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral imaging systems can be used to produce spectral reflectance curves giving rich information about composition, relative abundances of materials, mixes and combinations. However, as each spectral return from these systems is a vector with several hundred elements, they can be very difficult to process and analyze, and problemeatic to compare within, across, and between datasets over time and space. Vegetation indices (e.g. NDVI, ARVI, EVI, et al) attempt to combine spectral features in to single-value scores. When derived from calibrated and atmospherically compensated reflectance data, these indices can be quantitatively compared. Historically, these indices have been calculated from multispectral sensor data. These sensors have a handful (4 to 16 or so) of bandbasses ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm FWHM covering specific spectral regions for a variety of reasons, including both intended applications and system limitations. Hyperspectral sensors, however, cover the spectrum with many, many narrow (5 to 10 nm) bandpasses. This allows for analyses using the full, detailed spectral curve, or combination of the bands in to regions by averaging or in to composites using transforms or other techniques. This raises the question of exactly which bands should be used and combined in what manner for ideally deriving well-known vegetation indices typically made from multispectral data. In this study we use derivatives and other curve and signal analysis techniques to analyze vegetation reflectance spectra to quantitatively define optimal bandpasses for several vegetation indices and combine the 5 nm hypserspectral bandpasses of the NEON Imaging Spectrometer to synthesize them.

  19. Mechanical properties of regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibers and recombinant silk fibers produced by transgenic silkworms.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenghua; Kikuchi, Yuka; Kojima, Katsura; Tamura, Toshiki; Kuwabara, Nobuo; Nakamura, Takashi; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Regenerated silk fibroin fibers from the cocoons of silkworm, Bombyx mori, were prepared with hexafluoro solvents, 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) or hexafluoroacetone-trihydrate (HFA), as dope solvents and methanol as coagulation solvent. The regenerated fiber prepared from the HFIP solution showed slightly larger tensile strength when the draw ratio is 1:3 than that of native silk fiber, but the strength of the regenerated fiber with draw ratio 1:3 from the HFA solution is much lower than that of native silk fiber. This difference in the tensile strength of the regenerated silk fibers between two dope solvents comes from the difference in the long-range orientation of the crystalline region rather than that of short-range structural environment such as the fraction of beta-sheet structure. The increase in the biodegradation was observed for the regenerated silk fiber compared with native silk fiber. Preparations of regenerated silk fibroin fibers containing spider silk sequences were obtained by mixing silk fibroins and silk-like proteins with characteristic sequences from a spider, Naphila clavipes, to produce drag-line silk in E. coli in the fluoro solvents. A small increase in the tensile strength was obtained by adding 5% (w/w) of the silk-like protein to the silk fibroin. The production of silk fibroin fibers with these spider silk sequences was also performed with transgenic silkworms. Small increase in the tensile strength of the fibers was obtained without significant change in the elongation-at-break. PMID:20178693

  20. Effectiveness of the E2-Classical Swine Fever Virus Recombinant Vaccine Produced and Formulated within Whey from Genetically Transformed Goats

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, O.; Barrera, M.; Farnós, O.; Parra, N. C.; Salgado, E. R.; Saavedra, P. A.; Meza, C. D.; Rivas, C. I.; Cortez-San Martín, M.

    2014-01-01

    Subunit recombinant vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are a promising alternative to overcome practical and biosafety issues with inactivated vaccines. One of the strategies in evaluation under field conditions is the use of a new marker E2-based vaccine produced in the milk of adenovirally transduced goats. Previously we had demonstrated the efficacy of this antigen, which conferred early protection and long-lasting immunity in swine against CSFV infection. Here, we have used a simpler downstream process to obtain and formulate the recombinant E2 glycoprotein expressed in the mammary gland. The expression levels reached approximately 1.7 mg/ml, and instead of chromatographic separation of the antigen, we utilized a clarification process that eliminates the fat content, retains a minor amount of caseins, and includes an adenoviral inactivation step that improves the biosafety of the final formulation. In a vaccination and challenge experiment in swine, different doses of the E2 antigen contained within the clarified whey generated an effective immune response of neutralizing antibodies that protected all of the animals against a lethal challenge with CSFV. During the immunization and after challenge, the swine were monitored for adverse reactions related to the vaccine or symptoms of CSF, respectively. No adverse reactions or clinical signs of disease were observed in vaccinated animals, in which no replication of CSFV could be detected after challenge. Overall, we consider that the simplicity of the procedures proposed here is a further step toward the introduction and implementation of a commercial subunit vaccine against CSF. PMID:25274802

  1. Effectiveness of the E2-classical swine fever virus recombinant vaccine produced and formulated within whey from genetically transformed goats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, O; Barrera, M; Farnós, O; Parra, N C; Salgado, E R; Saavedra, P A; Meza, C D; Rivas, C I; Cortez-San Martín, M; Toledo, J R

    2014-12-01

    Subunit recombinant vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are a promising alternative to overcome practical and biosafety issues with inactivated vaccines. One of the strategies in evaluation under field conditions is the use of a new marker E2-based vaccine produced in the milk of adenovirally transduced goats. Previously we had demonstrated the efficacy of this antigen, which conferred early protection and long-lasting immunity in swine against CSFV infection. Here, we have used a simpler downstream process to obtain and formulate the recombinant E2 glycoprotein expressed in the mammary gland. The expression levels reached approximately 1.7 mg/ml, and instead of chromatographic separation of the antigen, we utilized a clarification process that eliminates the fat content, retains a minor amount of caseins, and includes an adenoviral inactivation step that improves the biosafety of the final formulation. In a vaccination and challenge experiment in swine, different doses of the E2 antigen contained within the clarified whey generated an effective immune response of neutralizing antibodies that protected all of the animals against a lethal challenge with CSFV. During the immunization and after challenge, the swine were monitored for adverse reactions related to the vaccine or symptoms of CSF, respectively. No adverse reactions or clinical signs of disease were observed in vaccinated animals, in which no replication of CSFV could be detected after challenge. Overall, we consider that the simplicity of the procedures proposed here is a further step toward the introduction and implementation of a commercial subunit vaccine against CSF. PMID:25274802

  2. Rapid, scalable, and low-cost purification of recombinant adeno-associated virus produced by baculovirus expression vector system

    PubMed Central

    Buclez, Pierre-Olivier; Dias Florencio, Gabriella; Relizani, Karima; Beley, Cyriaque; Garcia, Luis; Benchaouir, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) are largely used for gene transfer in research, preclinical developments, and clinical trials. Their broad in vivo biodistribution and long-term efficacy in postmitotic tissues make them good candidates for numerous gene transfer applications. Upstream processes able to produce large amounts of rAAV were developed, particularly those using baculovirus expression vector system. In parallel, downstream processes present a large panel of purification methods, often including multiple and time consuming steps. Here, we show that simple tangential flow filtration, coupled with an optimized iodixanol-based isopycnic density gradient, is sufficient to purify several liters of crude lysate produced by baculovirus expression vector system in only one working day, leading to high titers and good purity of rAAV products. Moreover, we show that the viral vectors retain their in vitro and in vivo functionalities. Our results demonstrate that simple, rapid, and relatively low-cost methods can easily be implemented for obtaining a high-quality grade of gene therapy products based on rAAV technology. PMID:27226971

  3. Detailed analysis of metagenome datasets obtained from biogas-producing microbial communities residing in biogas reactors does not indicate the presence of putative pathogenic microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years biogas plants in Germany have been supposed to be involved in amplification and dissemination of pathogenic bacteria causing severe infections in humans and animals. In particular, biogas plants are discussed to contribute to the spreading of Escherichia coli infections in humans or chronic botulism in cattle caused by Clostridium botulinum. Metagenome datasets of microbial communities from an agricultural biogas plant as well as from anaerobic lab-scale digesters operating at different temperatures and conditions were analyzed for the presence of putative pathogenic bacteria and virulence determinants by various bioinformatic approaches. Results All datasets featured a low abundance of reads that were taxonomically assigned to the genus Escherichia or further selected genera comprising pathogenic species. Higher numbers of reads were taxonomically assigned to the genus Clostridium. However, only very few sequences were predicted to originate from pathogenic clostridial species. Moreover, mapping of metagenome reads to complete genome sequences of selected pathogenic bacteria revealed that not the pathogenic species itself, but only species that are more or less related to pathogenic ones are present in the fermentation samples analyzed. Likewise, known virulence determinants could hardly be detected. Only a marginal number of reads showed similarity to sequences described in the Microbial Virulence Database MvirDB such as those encoding protein toxins, virulence proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. Conclusions Findings of this first study of metagenomic sequence reads of biogas producing microbial communities suggest that the risk of dissemination of pathogenic bacteria by application of digestates from biogas fermentations as fertilizers is low, because obtained results do not indicate the presence of putative pathogenic microorganisms in the samples analyzed. PMID:23557021

  4. Preparation of Specific Polyclonal Antibody Against the Recombinant Mutacin Produced by sfGFP Fusion Protein Technology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Homsi, Lamis; Al-Okla, Souad; Abbady, Abdul Q.

    2015-01-01

    Mutacin I, a bacteriocin produced by streptococcus mutans, displays an antimicrobial activity against many gram positive and some gram negative bacteria. Because of its medical importance, production of this short peptide in large scale for future applications is a significant challenge. This work described the improvement of a novel system to produce the recombinant mutacin using fusion protein technology. The short peptide was expressed directly as a fusion protein with a superfolder form of the green florescent protein (sfGFP), resulting in a high yield expression of soluble sfGFP-mutacin fusion protein (30 kDa) in the cytoplasm of E. coli. Mutacin was released from the fusion by enzymatic cleavage at the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease recognition site and separated from the carrier sfGFP by nickel affinity and gel filtration chromatography. An additional advantage of this fusion system was tested in the generation of mutacin-specific polyclonal antibodies. Specific anti-mutacin IgGs were affinity purified, and were able to recognize the mutacin-sfGFP fusion protein or the cleaved forms of mutacin. Even though it was efficiently produced (25 mg/L) by this method, pure mutacin was devoid of antibiotic activity. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis revealed the absence of thioether bonds in the purified mutacin, which are critical for final structure and function of this antibiotic. Determining whether the activity of pure mutacin could be recovered by the reformation of such structures by chemical reaction needs more investigations. The development of this system will provide large quantities of mutacin for future studies and applications as broad spectrum antibacterial peptide. PMID:26668664

  5. Recombinant Nox4 cytosolic domain produced by a cell or cell-free base systems exhibits constitutive diaphorase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Zhang, Leilei; Lhomme, Stanislas; Mouz, Nicolas

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A comparison of two bacterial cell and cell-free protein expression systems is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins are produced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nox4 has a constitutive diaphorase activity which is independent of cytosolic factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isoform Nox4B is unable to initiate the first electronic transfer step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of Nox4 oxidase activity. -- Abstract: The membrane protein NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase Nox4 constitutively generates reactive oxygen species differing from other NADPH oxidases activity, particularly in Nox2 which needs a stimulus to be active. Although the precise mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species by Nox2 is well characterized, the electronic transfer throughout Nox4 remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the initial electronic transfer step (diaphorase activity) of the cytosolic tail of Nox4. For this purpose, we developed two different approaches to produce soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins. We synthesized soluble recombinant proteins either by in vitro translation or by bacteria induction. While proteins obtained by bacteria induction demonstrate an activity of 4.4 {+-} 1.7 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 20.5 {+-} 2.8 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c, the soluble proteins produced by cell-free expression system exhibit a diaphorase activity with a turn-over of 26 {+-} 2.6 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 48 {+-} 20.2 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c. Furthermore, the activity of the soluble proteins is constitutive and does not need any stimulus. We also show that the cytosolic tail of the isoform Nox4B lacking the first NADPH binding site is unable to demonstrate any diaphorase activity pointing out the

  6. Industrial Microorganisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phaff, Herman J.

    1981-01-01

    Describes industrially important yeasts, molds, bacteria, and actinomycetes. Discussed in detail are microbial products, such as primary metabolites, secondary metabolites, enzymes, and capsular polysaccharides. Traces the historical background of human cell culture, mentioning recombinant DNA research and hybridization of normal mammalian cells…

  7. A novel expression vector, designated as pHisJM, for producing recombinant His-fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Junko; Takayama, Eiji; Satoh, Ayano; Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko; Suzuki, Kimihiro; Matsumoto, Isamu

    2004-10-01

    Compared to glutathione S -transferase (GST), tagging with hexahistidine residues (His) has several merits: low levels of toxicity and immunogenicity, a smaller size and no electric charge. We have constructed a novel expression vector, designated as pHisJM (EMBL/GenBank/DDJB accession no. AB116367), for producing recombinant His-fusion proteins. This vector was constructed by replacing GST and multiple cloning site (MCS) cassettes in pGEX-5X-3 with those of hexahistidine and MCS derived from pRSET C vector. Human annexin IV (Anx IV) was used as target protein. His-Anx IV fusion protein was expressed using pHisJM and gave a 40 kDa band when immuno-stained with anti-His mAb or anti-Anx IV mAb as predicted. To compare expression efficiency, a Anx IV cDNA inserted-pHisJM or pGEX-5X-3 was transformed into Escherichia coli DH5alpha, JM109, BL21 and BL21(DE3). Using pHisJM, Anx IV protein was highly expressed in all cell strains. In addition to the merits of using His-tag, pHisJM has several advantages: 1) it has high expression efficiency; 2) it can be used in any Escherichia coli strain; and 3) it can be used in a single strain of Escherichia coli in all steps from plasmid construction to the expression of the target gene. PMID:15604794

  8. Monitoring of horizontal gene transfer from agricultural microorganisms to soil bacteria and analysis of microbial community in soils.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Eun; Moon, Jae Sun; Choi, Won Sik; Lee, Sang Han; Kim, Sung Uk

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the possibility of horizontal gene transfer between agricultural microorganisms and soil microorganisms in the environment, Bacillus subtilis KB producing iturin and the PGPR recombinant strain Pseudomonas fluorescens MX1 were used as model microorganisms. The soil samples of cucumber or tomato plants cultivated in pots and the greenhouse for a six month period were investigated by PCR, real-time PCR, Southern hybridization, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting. Our data from Southern blotting and TRFLP patterns suggest that the model bacteria do not give significant impacts on the other bacteria in the pots and greenhouse during cultivation. PMID:22534306

  9. Development of microorganisms for cellulose-biofuel consolidated bioprocessings: metabolic engineers’ tricks

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoli, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose waste biomass is the most abundant and attractive substrate for “biorefinery strategies” that are aimed to produce high-value products (e.g. solvents, fuels, building blocks) by economically and environmentally sustainable fermentation processes. However, cellulose is highly recalcitrant to biodegradation and its conversion by biotechnological strategies currently requires economically inefficient multistep industrial processes. The need for dedicated cellulase production continues to be a major constraint to cost-effective processing of cellulosic biomass. Research efforts have been aimed at developing recombinant microorganisms with suitable characteristics for single step biomass fermentation (consolidated bioprocessing, CBP). Two paradigms have been applied for such, so far unsuccessful, attempts: a) “native cellulolytic strategies”, aimed at conferring high-value product properties to natural cellulolytic microorganisms; b) “recombinant cellulolytic strategies”, aimed to confer cellulolytic ability to microorganisms exhibiting high product yields and titers. By starting from the description of natural enzyme systems for plant biomass degradation and natural metabolic pathways for some of the most valuable product (i.e. butanol, ethanol, and hydrogen) biosynthesis, this review describes state-of-the-art bottlenecks and solutions for the development of recombinant microbial strains for cellulosic biofuel CBP by metabolic engineering. Complexed cellulases (i.e. cellulosomes) benefit from stronger proximity effects and show enhanced synergy on insoluble substrates (i.e. crystalline cellulose) with respect to free enzymes. For this reason, special attention was held on strategies involving cellulosome/designer cellulosome-bearing recombinant microorganisms. PMID:24688667

  10. Purification and characterization of Streptococcus sobrinus dextranase produced in recombinant Escherichia coli and sequence analysis of the dextranase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Wanda, S Y; Curtiss, R

    1994-01-01

    The plasmid (pYA902) with the dextranase (dex) gene of Streptococcus sobrinus UAB66 (serotype g) produces a C-terminal truncated dextranase enzyme (Dex) with a multicomplex mass form which ranges from 80 to 130 kDa. The Escherichia coli-produced enzyme was purified and characterized, and antibodies were raised in rabbits. Purified dextranase has a native-form molecular mass of 160 to 260 kDa and specific activity of 4,000 U/mg of protein. Potential immunological cross-reactivity between dextranase and the SpaA protein specified by various recombinant clones was studied by using various antisera and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. No cross-reactivity was observed. Optimal pH (5.3) and temperature (39 degrees C) and the isoelectric points (3.56, 3.6, and 3.7) were determined and found to be similar to those for dextranase purified from S. sobrinus. The dex DNA restriction map was determined, and several subclones were obtained. The nucleotide sequence of the dex gene was determined by using subclones pYA993 and pYA3009 and UAB66 chromosomal DNA. The open reading frame for dex was 4,011 bp, ending with a stop codon TAA. A ribosome-binding site and putative promoter preceding the start codon were identified. The deduced amino acid sequence of Dex revealed the presence of a signal peptide of 30 amino acids. The cleavage site for the signal sequence was determined by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis for Dex produced in E. coli chi 2831(pYA902). The C terminus consists of a serine- and threonine-rich region followed by the peptide LPKTGD, 3 charged amino acids, 19 amino acids with a strongly hydrophobic character, and a charged pentapeptide tail, which are proposed to correspond to the cell wall-spanning region, the LPXTGX consensus sequence, and the membrane-anchoring domains of surface-associated proteins of gram-positive cocci. Images PMID:8021165

  11. Scaled-up manufacturing of recombinant antibodies produced by plant cells in a 200-L orbitally-shaken disposable bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Raven, Nicole; Rasche, Stefan; Kuehn, Christoph; Anderlei, Tibor; Klöckner, Wolf; Schuster, Flora; Henquet, Maurice; Bosch, Dirk; Büchs, Jochen; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Tobacco BY-2 cells have emerged as a promising platform for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins, offering efficient protein secretion, favourable growth characteristics and cultivation in containment under a controlled environment. The cultivation of BY-2 cells in disposable bioreactors is a useful alternative to conventional stainless steel stirred-tank reactors, and orbitally-shaken bioreactors could provide further advantages such as simple bag geometry, scalability and predictable process settings. We carried out a scale-up study, using a 200-L orbitally-shaken bioreactor holding disposable bags, and BY-2 cells producing the human monoclonal antibody M12. We found that cell growth and recombinant protein accumulation were comparable to standard shake flask cultivation, despite a 200-fold difference in cultivation volume. Final cell fresh weights of 300-387 g/L and M12 yields of ∼20 mg/L were achieved with both cultivation methods. Furthermore, we established an efficient downstream process for the recovery of M12 from the culture broth. The viscous spent medium prevented clarification using filtration devices, but we used expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography with SP Sepharose as an alternative for the efficient capture of the M12 antibody. EBA was introduced as an initial purification step prior to protein A affinity chromatography, resulting in an overall M12 recovery of 75-85% and a purity of >95%. Our results demonstrate the suitability of orbitally-shaken bioreactors for the scaled-up cultivation of plant cell suspension cultures and provide a strategy for the efficient purification of antibodies from the BY-2 culture medium. PMID:25117428

  12. TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination Produces Site-Directed DNA Base Change and Herbicide-Resistant Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; Chen, Chih Ying; Yang, Bing

    2016-05-20

    Over the last decades, much endeavor has been made to advance genome editing technology due to its promising role in both basic and synthetic biology. The breakthrough has been made in recent years with the advent of sequence-specific endonucleases, especially zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) guided nucleases (e.g., Cas9). In higher eukaryotic organisms, site-directed mutagenesis usually can be achieved through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair to the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by the exogenously applied nucleases. However, site-specific gene replacement or genuine genome editing through homologous recombination (HR) repair to DSBs remains a challenge. As a proof of concept gene replacement through TALEN-based HR in rice (Oryza sativa), we successfully produced double point mutations in rice acetolactate synthase gene (OsALS) and generated herbicide resistant rice lines by using TALENs and donor DNA carrying the desired mutations. After ballistic delivery into rice calli of TALEN construct and donor DNA, nine HR events with different genotypes of OsALS were obtained in T0 generation at the efficiency of 1.4%-6.3% from three experiments. The HR-mediated gene edits were heritable to the progeny of T1 generation. The edited T1 plants were as morphologically normal as the control plants while displayed strong herbicide resistance. The results demonstrate the feasibility of TALEN-mediated genome editing in rice and provide useful information for further genome editing by other nuclease-based genome editing platforms. PMID:27180265

  13. Site-specific analysis of N-linked oligosaccharides of recombinant lysosomal arylsulfatase A produced in different cell lines.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Stephan; Matthes, Frank; Hyden, Pia; Andersson, Claes; Fogh, Jens; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Braulke, Thomas; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Matzner, Ulrich

    2010-02-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A (ASA). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is a therapeutic option for MLD and other lysosomal disorders. This therapy depends on N-linked oligosaccharide-mediated delivery of intravenously injected recombinant enzyme to the lysosomes of patient cells. Because of the importance of N-linked oligosaccharide side chains in ERT, we examined the composition of the three N-linked glycans of four different recombinant ASAs in a site-specific manner. Depending on the culture conditions and the cell line expressing the enzyme, we detected a high variability of the high-mannose-type N-glycans which prevail at all glycosylation sites. Our data show that the composition of the glycans is largely determined by substantial trimming in the medium. The susceptibility for trimming is different for the glycans at the three N-glycosylation sites. Interestingly, which of the glycans is most susceptible to trimming also depends on production conditions. CHO cells cultured under bioreactor conditions yielded recombinant ASA with the most preserved N-glycan structures, the highest mannose-6-phosphate content and the highest similarity to non-recombinant enzyme. Notably, roughly one-third of the N-glycans released from the three glycosylation sites were fucosylated. In the last years, numerous recombinant lysosomal enzymes were used for preclinical ERT trials. Our data show that the oligosaccharide structures were very different in these trials making it difficult to draw common conclusions from the various investigations. PMID:19864504

  14. Molecular farming of human cytokines and blood products from plants: challenges in biosynthesis and detection of plant-produced recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Nicolau B; Vianna, Giovanni R; da Almeida Lima, Thaina; Rech, Elíbio

    2014-01-01

    Plants have emerged as an attractive alternative to the traditional mammalian cell cultures or microbial cell-based systems system for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. Through recombinant DNA technology, plants can be engineered to produce large quantities of pharmaceuticals and industrial proteins of high quality at low costs. The recombinant production, by transgenic plants, of therapeutic proteins normally present in human plasma, such as cytokines, coagulation factors, anticoagulants, and immunoglobulins, represents a response to the ongoing challenges in meeting the demand for therapeutic proteins to treat serious inherited or acquired bleeding and immunological diseases. As the clinical utilization of fractionated plasma molecules is limited by high production costs, using recombinant biopharmaceuticals derived from plants represents a feasible alternative to provide efficient treatment. Plant-derived pharmaceuticals also reduce the potential risks to patients of infection with pathogens or unwanted immune responses due to immunogenic antigens. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in molecular farming of cytokines. We also examine the technological basis, upcoming challenges, and perspectives for the biosynthesis and detection of these molecules in different plant production platforms. PMID:24376137

  15. Producing Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus in Foster Cells: Overcoming Production Limitations Using a Baculovirus–Insect Cell Expression Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Virag, Tamas; Cecchini, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Establishing pharmacological parameters, such as efficacy, routes of administration, and toxicity, for recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors is a prerequisite for gaining acceptance for clinical applications. In fact, even a therapeutic window, that is, the dose range between therapeutic efficacy and toxicity, has yet to be determined for rAAV in vivo. Multiphase clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of recombinant AAV-based therapeutics will require unprecedented vector production capacity to meet the needs of preclinical toxicology studies, and the progressive clinical protocol phases of safety/dose escalation (phase I), efficacy (phase II), and high-enrollment, multicenter evaluations (phase III). Methods of rAAV production capable of supporting such trials must be scalable, robust, and efficient. We have taken advantage of the ease of scalability of nonadherent cell culture techniques coupled with the inherent efficiency of viral infection to develop an rAAV production method based on recombinant baculovirus-mediated expression of AAV components in insect-derived suspension cells. PMID:19604040

  16. Characterization and downstream mannose phosphorylation of human recombinant α-L-iduronidase produced in Arabidopsis complex glycan-deficient (cgl) seeds

    PubMed Central

    He, Xu; Pierce, Owen; Haselhorst, Thomas; von Itzstein, Mark; Kolarich, Daniel; Packer, Nicolle H; Gloster, Tracey M; Vocadlo, David J; Qian, Yi; Brooks, Doug; Kermode, Allison R

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) I is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) (EC 3.2.1.76); enzyme replacement therapy is the conventional treatment for this genetic disease. Arabidopsis cgl mutants are characterized by a deficiency of the activity of N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase I (EC 2.4.1.101), the first enzyme in the pathway of hybrid and complex N-glycan biosynthesis. To develop a seed-based platform for the production of recombinant IDUA for potential treatment of MPS I, cgl mutant seeds were generated to express human IDUA at high yields and to avoid maturation of the N-linked glycans on the recombinant human enzyme. Enzyme kinetic data showed that cgl-IDUA has similar enzymatic properties to the commercial recombinant IDUA derived from cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (Aldurazyme™). The N-glycan profile showed that cgl-derived IDUA contained predominantly high-mannose-type N-glycans (94.5%), and the residual complex/hybrid N-glycan-containing enzyme was efficiently removed by an additional affinity chromatography step. Furthermore, purified cgl-IDUA was amenable to sequential in vitro processing by soluble recombinant forms of the two enzymes that mediate the addition of the mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) tag in mammalian cells—UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N−acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)−1−phosphotransferase—and GlcNAc−1−phosphodiester α−N−acetylglucosaminidase (the ‘uncovering enzyme’). Arabidopsis seeds provide an alternative system for producing recombinant lysosomal enzymes for enzyme replacement therapy; the purified enzymes can be subjected to downstream processing to create the M6P, a recognition marker essential for efficient receptor-mediated uptake into lysosomes of human cells. PMID:23898885

  17. Fusion of the Dhfr/Mtx and IR/MAR Gene Amplification Methods Produces a Rapid and Efficient Method for Stable Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Daisuke; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    Amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (Dhfr) by methotrexate (Mtx) exposure is commonly used for recombinant protein expression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, this method is both time- and labor-intensive, and the high-producing cells that are generated are frequently unstable in culture. Another gene amplification method is based on using a plasmid bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a matrix attachment region (MAR), which result in the spontaneous initiation of gene amplification in transfected cells. The IR/MAR and Dhfr/Mtx methods of gene amplification are based on entirely different principles. In this study, we combine these two methods to yield a novel method, termed the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method, which was used to express three proteins, the Fc receptor, GFP, and recombinant antibody. The fusion method resulted in a dramatic increase in expression of all three proteins in two CHO sub-lines, DXB-11, and DG44. The IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion amplified the genes rapidly and efficiently, and produced larger amounts of antibody than the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. While the amplified structure produced by the Dhfr/Mtx method was highly unstable, and the antibody production rate rapidly decreased with the culture time of the cells, the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method resulted in stable amplification and generated clonal cells that produced large amounts of antibody protein over a long period of time. In summary, the novel IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method enables isolation of stable cells that produce larger amounts of a target recombinant protein more rapidly and easily than either the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. PMID:23300841

  18. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes for producing bovine growth hormone-like polypeptides in high yield

    SciTech Connect

    Buell, G.N.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a process for increasing the yield of a bovine growth hormone-like polypeptide to at least 100 times that of a bovine growth hormone-like polypeptide encoded by a DNA sequence. The process comprises the steps of culturing a host transformed with a recombinant DNA molecule comprising DNA sequence encoding a Met ..lambda.. or ..lambda.. bovine growth hormone-like polypetide operatively linked to an expression control sequence. The ..lambda.. is an amino terminal deletion from the amino acid sequence of mature bovine growth hormone.

  19. Co-cultivation of Aspergillus nidulans Recombinant Strains Produces an Enzymatic Cocktail as Alternative to Alkaline Sugarcane Bagasse Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Lima, Matheus S; Damasio, André R de L; Crnkovic, Paula M; Pinto, Marcelo R; da Silva, Ana M; da Silva, Jean C R; Segato, Fernando; de Lucas, Rosymar C; Jorge, João A; Polizeli, Maria de L T de M

    2016-01-01

    Plant materials represent a strategic energy source because they can give rise to sustainable biofuels through the fermentation of their carbohydrates. A clear example of a plant-derived biofuel resource is the sugar cane bagasse exhibiting 60-80% of fermentable sugars in its composition. However, the current methods of plant bioconversion employ severe and harmful chemical/physical pretreatments raising biofuel cost production and environmental degradation. Replacing these methods with co-cultivated enzymatic cocktails is an alternative. Here we propose a pretreatment for sugarcane bagasse using a multi-enzymatic cocktail from the co-cultivation of four Aspergillus nidulans recombinant strains. The co-cultivation resulted in the simultaneous production of GH51 arabinofuranosidase (AbfA), GH11 endo-1,4-xylanase (XlnA), GH43 endo-1,5-arabinanase (AbnA) and GH12 xyloglucan specific endo-β-1,4-glucanase (XegA). This core set of recombinant enzymes was more efficient than the alternative alkaline method in maintaining the cellulose integrity and exposing this cellulose to the following saccharification process. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis revealed residual byproducts on the alkali pretreated biomass, which were not found in the enzymatic pretreatment. Therefore, the enzymatic pretreatment was residue-free and seemed to be more efficient than the applied alkaline method, which makes it suitable for bioethanol production. PMID:27199917

  20. Specific features of recombination processes in CdTe films produced in different temperature conditions of growth and subsequent annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Ermolovich, I. B.; Milenin, V. V.; Red'ko, R. A. Red'ko, S. M.

    2009-08-15

    The steady-state and kinetic characteristics of photoconductivity and photoluminescence and the thermally stimulated conductivity spectra of the GdTe layers deposited by vacuum evaporation onto heated substrates are studied in relation to the substrate temperature. The measurements are carried out at temperatures, illuminations, and wavelengths ranging from 4.2 to 400 K, from 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 23} photon/cm{sup 2}, and from0.4 to 2.5 {mu}m, respectively. A certain optimal range of substrate temperatures T{sub s} {approx} 450-550 deg. C, at which the as-prepared layers exhibit a high resistivity, a high photosensitivity, and the best structural quality, is established. In the spectra of these layers, a new luminescence band at hv{sub m} = 1.09 eV is observed along with the known photoluminescence band at hv{sub m} = 1.42 eV. It is established that this new band is due to intracenter transitions rather than recombination transitions. The nature of radiative recombination centers in the layers is discussed. It is suggested that the d electrons of cations can be involved in the formation of chemical bonds of local centers in CdTe.

  1. Co-cultivation of Aspergillus nidulans Recombinant Strains Produces an Enzymatic Cocktail as Alternative to Alkaline Sugarcane Bagasse Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Matheus S.; Damasio, André R. de L.; Crnkovic, Paula M.; Pinto, Marcelo R.; da Silva, Ana M.; da Silva, Jean C. R.; Segato, Fernando; de Lucas, Rosymar C.; Jorge, João A.; Polizeli, Maria de L. T. de M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant materials represent a strategic energy source because they can give rise to sustainable biofuels through the fermentation of their carbohydrates. A clear example of a plant-derived biofuel resource is the sugar cane bagasse exhibiting 60–80% of fermentable sugars in its composition. However, the current methods of plant bioconversion employ severe and harmful chemical/physical pretreatments raising biofuel cost production and environmental degradation. Replacing these methods with co-cultivated enzymatic cocktails is an alternative. Here we propose a pretreatment for sugarcane bagasse using a multi-enzymatic cocktail from the co-cultivation of four Aspergillus nidulans recombinant strains. The co-cultivation resulted in the simultaneous production of GH51 arabinofuranosidase (AbfA), GH11 endo-1,4-xylanase (XlnA), GH43 endo-1,5-arabinanase (AbnA) and GH12 xyloglucan specific endo-β-1,4-glucanase (XegA). This core set of recombinant enzymes was more efficient than the alternative alkaline method in maintaining the cellulose integrity and exposing this cellulose to the following saccharification process. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis revealed residual byproducts on the alkali pretreated biomass, which were not found in the enzymatic pretreatment. Therefore, the enzymatic pretreatment was residue-free and seemed to be more efficient than the applied alkaline method, which makes it suitable for bioethanol production. PMID:27199917

  2. The pURI family of expression vectors: a versatile set of ligation independent cloning plasmids for producing recombinant His-fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Curiel, José Antonio; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2011-03-01

    A family of restriction enzyme- and ligation-independent cloning vectors has been developed for producing recombinant His-tagged fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. These are based on pURI2 and pURI3 expression vectors which have been previously used for the successful production of recombinant proteins at the milligram scale. The newly designed vectors combines two different promoters (lpp(p)-5 and T7 RNA polymerase Ø10), two different endoprotease recognition sites for the His₆-tag removal (enterokinase and tobacco etch virus), different antibiotic selectable markers (ampicillin and erythromycin resistance), and different placements of the His₆-tag (N- and C-terminus). A single gene can be cloned and further expressed in the eight pURI vectors by using six nucleotide primers, avoiding the restriction enzyme and ligation steps. A unique NotI site was introduced to facilitate the selection of the recombinant plasmid. As a case study, the new vectors have been used to clone the gene coding for the phenolic acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum. Interestingly, the obtained results revealed markedly different production levels of the target protein, emphasizing the relevance of the cloning strategy on soluble protein production yield. Efficient purification and tag removal steps showed that the affinity tag and the protease cleavage sites functioned properly. The novel family of pURI vectors designed for parallel cloning is a useful and versatile tool for the production and purification of a protein of interest. PMID:21055470

  3. Recombinant Scorpine Produced Using SUMO Fusion Partner in Escherichia coli Has the Activities against Clinically Isolated Bacteria and Inhibits the Plasmodium falciparum Parasitemia In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yaping; Zhou, Huayun; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Scorpine, a small cationic peptide from the venom of Pandinus imperator, which has been shown to have anti-bacterial and anti-plasmodial activities, has potential important applications in the pharmaceutical industries. However, the isolation of scorpine from natural sources is inefficient and time-consuming. Here, we first report the expression and purification of recombinant scorpine in Escherichia coli, using small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion partner. The fusion protein was expressed in soluble form in E. coli, and expression was verified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis. The fusion protein was purified to 90% purity by nickel–nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni2+–NTA) resin chromatography. After the SUMO-scorpine fusion protein was cleaved by the SUMO protease, the cleaved sample was reapplied to a Ni2+–NTA column. Tricine/SDS-PAGE gel results indicated that Scorpine had been purified successfully to more than 95% purity. The recombinantly expressed Scorpine showed anti-bacterial activity against two standard bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 and Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, and clinically isolated bacteria including S. aureus S, S. aureus R, A. baumannii S, and A. baumannii R. It also produced 100% reduction in Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia in vitro. Thus, the expression strategy presented in this study allowed convenient high yield and easy purification of recombinant Scorpine for pharmaceutical applications in the future. PMID:25068263

  4. Recombinant scorpine produced using SUMO fusion partner in Escherichia coli has the activities against clinically isolated bacteria and inhibits the Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; He, Xinlong; Gu, Yaping; Zhou, Huayun; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Scorpine, a small cationic peptide from the venom of Pandinus imperator, which has been shown to have anti-bacterial and anti-plasmodial activities, has potential important applications in the pharmaceutical industries. However, the isolation of scorpine from natural sources is inefficient and time-consuming. Here, we first report the expression and purification of recombinant scorpine in Escherichia coli, using small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion partner. The fusion protein was expressed in soluble form in E. coli, and expression was verified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis. The fusion protein was purified to 90% purity by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni2+-NTA) resin chromatography. After the SUMO-scorpine fusion protein was cleaved by the SUMO protease, the cleaved sample was reapplied to a Ni2+-NTA column. Tricine/SDS-PAGE gel results indicated that Scorpine had been purified successfully to more than 95% purity. The recombinantly expressed Scorpine showed anti-bacterial activity against two standard bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 and Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, and clinically isolated bacteria including S. aureus S, S. aureus R, A. baumannii S, and A. baumannii R. It also produced 100% reduction in Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia in vitro. Thus, the expression strategy presented in this study allowed convenient high yield and easy purification of recombinant Scorpine for pharmaceutical applications in the future. PMID:25068263

  5. Reexamination of recent experimental results in surface-wave-produced argon plasmas at 2.45 GHz: Comparison with the diffusion-recombination model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, A.; Gamero, A.; Cotrino, J.; Colomer, V.

    1988-10-01

    In this paper we comment on recently reported experimental data about some characteristic magnitudes of plasma columns produced and maintained by surface microwaves. We then compare them with theoretical values obtained from the diffusion-recombination model of Mateev, Zhelyazkov, and Atanassov [J. Appl. Phys. 54, 3049 (1988)] and Zhelyazkov, Benova, and Atanassov [J. Appl. Phys. 59, 1466 (1986)] for the same magnitudes, in a wide range of operating conditions. Such a comparison allows us to make conclusions about the results of the model and its hypothesis.

  6. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from glycerol by recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae ΔdhaTΔyqhD which can produce vitamin B₁₂ naturally.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Somasundar; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Ko, Yeounjoo; Jae, Kyeung-Eun; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Kumar, Vinod; Park, Sunghoon

    2013-02-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is an important platform chemical that can be used to synthesize a range of chemical compounds. A previous study demonstrated that recombinant Escherichia coli stains can produce 3-HP from glycerol in the presence of vitamin B₁₂ (coenzyme B₁₂), when overexpressed with a coenzyme B₁₂-dependent glycerol dehydratase (DhaB) and an aldehyde dehydrogenase. The present study examined the production of 3-HP in recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains, which naturally synthesizes vitamin B₁₂ and does not require supplementation of the expensive vitamin. The NAD⁺-dependent gamma-glutamyl-gamma-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase (PuuC) of K. pneumoniae alone or with its DhaB was overexpressed homologously, and two major oxidoreductases, DhaT and YqhD, were disrupted. Without vitamin B₁₂ addition, the recombinant K. pneumoniae ΔdhaTΔyqhD overexpressing PuuC could produce ∼3.8 g/L 3-HP in 12 h of flask culture. However, this was possible only under the appropriate aeration conditions; 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) (instead of 3-HP) was mainly produced when aeration was insufficient, whereas a very small amount of both 3-HP and 1,3-PDO were produced when aeration was too high. The production of a small amount of 3-HP under improper aeration conditions was attributed to either slow NAD⁺ regeneration (under low aeration) or reduced vitamin B₁₂ synthesis (under high aeration). In a glycerol fed-batch bioreactor experiment under a constant DO of 5%, the strain, K. pneumoniae ΔdhaTΔyqhD, overexpressing both PuuC and DhaB could produce >28 g/L 3-HP in 48 h with a yield of >40% on glycerol. Only small amount of 3-HP was produced when cultivation was carried out at a constant aeration of 1 vvm or constant 10% DO. These results show that K. pneumoniae is potentially useful for the production of 3-HP in an economical culture medium that does not require vitamin B₁₂. The results also suggest that the aeration

  7. Correction: BTI-Tnao38, a new cell line derived from Trichoplusia ni, is permissive for AcMNPV infection and produces high levels of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshi; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Shiying; Chen, Yun-Ru; Blissard, Gary W

    2012-01-01

    After publication we discovered an error in the identification of the origin of the cell line reported in our article in BMC Biotechnology (2010, 10:50), entitled "Ao38, a new cell line from eggs of the black witch moth, Ascalapha odorata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is permissive for AcMNPV infection and produces high levels of recombinant proteins". Upon analysis of primary A. odorata cultures, we found that they were contaminated with cells of Trichoplusia ni origin. The origin of the Ao38 cell line was determined as T. ni using three marker genes and the Ao38 cell line was renamed BTI-Tnao38. References to the origin of the cell line as Ascalapha odorata should be replaced with "a cell line of Trichoplusia ni origin". The absence of TNCL virus detection in the BTI-Tnao38 (Ao38) cell line was confirmed using a highly sensitive RT-PCR protocol capable of detecting TNCL virus RNA at approximately 0.018 copies/cell. Because of these observations, we have revised the title of the original article to "Correction: BTI-Tnao38, a new cell line derived from Trichoplusia ni, is permissive for AcMNPV infection and produces high levels of recombinant proteins" and two additional authors were added to reflect their contributions to the analysis of this cell line. PMID:22531032

  8. Use of a Chimeric Hsp70 to Enhance the Quality of Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Protein Produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Makhoba, Xolani Henry; Burger, Adélle; Coertzen, Dina; Zininga, Tawanda; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Shonhai, Addmore

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (PfAdoMetDC) from Plasmodium falciparum is a prospective antimalarial drug target. The production of recombinant PfAdoMetDC for biochemical validation as a drug target is important. The production of PfAdoMetDC in Escherichia coli has been reported to result in unsatisfactory yields and poor quality product. The co-expression of recombinant proteins with molecular chaperones has been proposed as one way to improve the production of the former in E. coli. E. coli heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL-GroES and DnaJ have previously been used to enhance production of some recombinant proteins. However, the outcomes were inconsistent. An Hsp70 chimeric protein, KPf, which is made up of the ATPase domain of E. coli DnaK and the substrate binding domain of P. falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) has been previously shown to exhibit chaperone function when it was expressed in E. coli cells whose resident Hsp70 (DnaK) function was impaired. We proposed that because of its domain constitution, KPf would most likely be recognised by E. coli Hsp70 co-chaperones. Furthermore, because it possesses a substrate binding domain of plasmodial origin, KPf would be primed to recognise recombinant PfAdoMetDC expressed in E. coli. First, using site-directed mutagenesis, followed by complementation assays, we established that KPf with a mutation in the hydrophobic residue located in its substrate binding cavity was functionally compromised. We further co-expressed PfAdoMetDC with KPf, PfHsp70 and DnaK in E. coli cells either in the absence or presence of over-expressed GroEL-GroES chaperonin. The folded and functional status of the produced PfAdoMetDC was assessed using limited proteolysis and enzyme assays. PfAdoMetDC co-expressed with KPf and PfHsp70 exhibited improved activity compared to protein co-expressed with over-expressed DnaK. Our findings suggest that chimeric KPf may be an ideal Hsp70 co-expression partner for the production of recombinant plasmodial

  9. Use of a Chimeric Hsp70 to Enhance the Quality of Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Protein Produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Makhoba, Xolani Henry; Burger, Adélle; Coertzen, Dina; Zininga, Tawanda; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Shonhai, Addmore

    2016-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (PfAdoMetDC) from Plasmodium falciparum is a prospective antimalarial drug target. The production of recombinant PfAdoMetDC for biochemical validation as a drug target is important. The production of PfAdoMetDC in Escherichia coli has been reported to result in unsatisfactory yields and poor quality product. The co-expression of recombinant proteins with molecular chaperones has been proposed as one way to improve the production of the former in E. coli. E. coli heat shock proteins DnaK, GroEL-GroES and DnaJ have previously been used to enhance production of some recombinant proteins. However, the outcomes were inconsistent. An Hsp70 chimeric protein, KPf, which is made up of the ATPase domain of E. coli DnaK and the substrate binding domain of P. falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) has been previously shown to exhibit chaperone function when it was expressed in E. coli cells whose resident Hsp70 (DnaK) function was impaired. We proposed that because of its domain constitution, KPf would most likely be recognised by E. coli Hsp70 co-chaperones. Furthermore, because it possesses a substrate binding domain of plasmodial origin, KPf would be primed to recognise recombinant PfAdoMetDC expressed in E. coli. First, using site-directed mutagenesis, followed by complementation assays, we established that KPf with a mutation in the hydrophobic residue located in its substrate binding cavity was functionally compromised. We further co-expressed PfAdoMetDC with KPf, PfHsp70 and DnaK in E. coli cells either in the absence or presence of over-expressed GroEL-GroES chaperonin. The folded and functional status of the produced PfAdoMetDC was assessed using limited proteolysis and enzyme assays. PfAdoMetDC co-expressed with KPf and PfHsp70 exhibited improved activity compared to protein co-expressed with over-expressed DnaK. Our findings suggest that chimeric KPf may be an ideal Hsp70 co-expression partner for the production of recombinant plasmodial

  10. Methanococcus vannielii selenium-binding protein (SeBP): Chemical reactivity of recombinant SeBP produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Patteson, Kemberly G.; Trivedi, Neel; Stadtman, Thressa C.

    2005-01-01

    A selenium-binding protein (SeBP) from Methanococcus vannielii was recently identified, and its gene was isolated and overexpressed in Escherichia coli [Self, W. T., Pierce, R. & Stadtman, T. C. (2004) IUBMB Life 56, 501–507]. SeBP and recombinant SeBP (rSeBP) migrated as ≈42-kDa species on native gels and as ≈33-kDa species on SDS gels. rSeBP consists of identical 8.8-kDa subunits, each containing a single cysteine residue. rSeBP isolated in the absence of reducing agents contained oxidized cysteine (89%) and very little bound selenium (0.05 eq or less per subunit). Complete reduction of the oxidized cysteine residues in rSeBP with Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine required addition of a denaturant, such as 1 M guanidine-hydrochloride. With selenite as the selenium source and the isolated reduced protein as sole reductant, binding of one selenium per tetramer under anaerobic conditions required four cysteine thiol groups, one on each subunit. In the corresponding reaction, with reduced glutathione (GSH), equimolar amounts of selenodiglutathione (GSSeSG) and glutathione disulfide are formed from selenite and 4 GSH. At GSH-to-selenite ratios >4:1, conversion of GSSeSG to a perselenide derivative, GSSe–, occurs. However, with the reduced rSeBP as sole electron donor in the reaction with selenite, further conversion of the R-SSeS-R product apparently did not occur. Prior alkylation of the cysteine thiol groups in reduced rSeBP prevented selenite reduction and selenium binding under comparable conditions. PMID:16103372

  11. The future of starch bioengineering: GM microorganisms or GM plants?

    PubMed Central

    Hebelstrup, Kim H.; Sagnelli, Domenico; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Plant starches regularly require extensive modification to permit subsequent applications. Such processing is usually done by the use of chemical and/or physical treatments. The use of recombinant enzymes produced by large-scale fermentation of GM microorganisms is increasingly used in starch processing and modification, sometimes as an alternative to chemical or physical treatments. However, as a means to impart the modifications as early as possible in the starch production chain, similar recombinant enzymes may also be expressed in planta in the developing starch storage organ such as in roots, tubers and cereal grains to provide a GM crop as an alternative to the use of enzymes from GM microorganisms. We here discuss these techniques in relation to important structural features and modifications of starches such as: starch phosphorylation, starch hydrolysis, chain transfer/branching and novel concepts of hybrid starch-based polysaccharides. In planta starch bioengineering is generally challenged by yield penalties and inefficient production of the desired product. However, in some situations, GM crops for starch bioengineering without deleterious effects have been achieved. PMID:25954284

  12. A recombinant Leishmania antigen that stimulates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to express a Th1-type cytokine profile and to produce interleukin 12

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Leishmania braziliensis causes cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis in humans. Most patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis heal spontaneously and may therefore have developed protective immunity. There appears to be a mixed cytokine profile associated with active cutaneous or mucosal disease, and a dominant T helper (Th)1-type response associated with healing. Leishmanial antigens that elicit these potent proliferative and cytokine responses from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are now being identified. Herein, we report on the cloning and expression of a L. braziliensis gene homologous to the eukaryotic ribosomal protein eIF4A (LeIF) and patient PBMC responses to rLeIF. Patients with mucosal and self-healing cutaneous disease had significantly higher proliferative responses than those with cutaneous lesions. Whereas the parasite lysate stimulated patient PBMC to produce a mixed Th1/Th2-type cytokine profile, LeIF stimulated the production of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha but not IL-4 or IL-10. Recombinant LeIF (rLeIF) downregulated both IL-10 mRNA in the "resting" PBMC of leishmaniasis patients and LPS-induced IL-10 production by patient PBMC. rLeIF also stimulated the production of IL-12 in cultured PBMC from both patients and uninfected individuals. The production of IFN-gamma by patient PBMC stimulated with either rLeIF or parasite lysate was IL-12 dependent, whereas anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody only partially blocked the LeIF-induced production of IL-12. In vitro production of both IFN-gamma and IL-12 was abrogated by exogenous human recombinant IL-10. Therefore, we have identified a recombinant leishmanial antigen that elicits IL-12 production and Th1-type responses in patients as well as IL-12 production in normal human PBMC. PMID:7699334

  13. Microorganisms detected by enzyme-catalyzed reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vango, S. P.; Weetall, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Enzymes detect the presence of microorganisms in soils. The enzyme lysozymi is used to release the enzyme catalase from the microorganisms in a soil sample. The catalase catalyzes the decomposition of added hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen which is detected manometrically. The partial pressure of the oxygen serves as an index of the samples bacteria content.

  14. Spontaneous hybrids between native and exotic Rubus in the Western United States produce offspring both by apomixis and by sexual recombination.

    PubMed

    Clark, L V; Jasieniuk, M

    2012-11-01

    Facultative asexual reproduction is a trait commonly found in invasive species. With a combination of sexual and asexual reproductive modes, such species may adapt to new environments via sexual recombination during range expansion, while at the same time having the benefits of asexuality such as the maintenance of fitness effects that depend upon heterozygosity. In the Western United States, native species of Rubus (Rosaceae) reproduce sexually whereas exotic naturalized Rubus species reproduce by pseudogamous apomixis. We hypothesized that new asexual lineages of Rubus could arise from hybridization in this range. To detect hybridization between native and exotic Rubus, we genotyped 579 individuals collected across California, Oregon and Washington with eight nuclear microsatellites and two chloroplast markers. Principal Coordinate Analysis and Bayesian clustering revealed a limited amount of hybridization of the native R. ursinus with the exotic R. armeniacus and R. pensilvanicus, as well as cultivated varieties. Genetic distances between these hybrids and their offspring indicated that both R. ursinus × R. armeniacus and R. ursinus × R. pensilvanicus produced a mix of apomictic and sexual seeds, with sexual seeds being more viable. Although neither of these hybrid types is currently considered invasive, they model the early stages of evolution of new invasive lineages, given the potential for fixed heterosis and the generation of novel genotypes. The hybrids also retain the ability to increase their fitness via sexual recombination and natural selection. Mixed reproductive systems such as those described here may be an important step in the evolution of asexual invasive species. PMID:22850699

  15. Engineering new metabolic capabilities in bacteria: lessons from recombinant cellulolytic strategies.

    PubMed

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Lamberti, Cristina; Pessione, Enrica

    2012-02-01

    Cellulose waste biomass is the most attractive substrate for 'biorefinery strategies' producing high-value products (e.g. fuels or plastics) by fermentation. However, traditional biomass bioconversions are economically inefficient multistep processes. Thus far, no microorganisms able to perform single-step fermentation into products (consolidated bioprocessing; CBP) have been isolated. Metabolic engineering is currently employed to develop recombinant microorganisms suitable for CBP. The heterologous expression of extracellular proteins (e.g. cellulases or hemicellulases) is the key feature of recombinant cellulolytic strategies, conferring cellulolytic ability to microorganisms exhibiting high product yields and titers. Although more molecular tools are becoming available, efficient heterologous expression of secreted proteins is still a challenge. The present review summarizes both bottlenecks and solutions of organism engineering for biomass biorefinery strategies. PMID:21930321

  16. How microorganisms avoid phagocyte attraction.

    PubMed

    Bestebroer, Jovanka; De Haas, Carla J C; Van Strijp, Jos A G

    2010-05-01

    Microorganisms have developed several mechanisms to modulate the host immune system to increase their survival and propagation in the host. Their presence in the host is not only revealed by self-produced peptides but also through host-derived chemokines and active complement fragments. These so-called chemoattractants are recognized by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on leukocyte cell membranes. Activation of GPCRs triggers leukocyte activation and guides their recruitment to the site of infection. Therefore, GPCRs play a central role in leukocyte trafficking leading to microbial clearance. It is therefore not surprising that microorganisms are able to sabotage this arm of the immune response. Different microorganisms have evolved a variety of tactics to modulate GPCR activation. Here, we review the mechanisms and proteins used by major human pathogens and less virulent microorganisms that affect GPCR signaling. While viruses generally produce receptor and chemoattractant mimics, parasites and bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Bordetella pertussis secrete proteins that affect receptor signaling, directly antagonize receptors, cleave stimuli, and even prevent stimulus generation. As the large arsenal of GPCR modulators aids prolonged microbial persistence in the host, their study provides us a better understanding of microbial pathogenesis. PMID:20059549

  17. Construction of a Recombinant Leuconostoc mesenteroides CJNU 0147 Producing 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-Naphthoic Acid, a Bifidogenic Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (DHNA), a precursor of menaquinone (vitamin K2), has an effect on growth stimulation of bifidobacteria and prevention of osteoporosis, making it a promising functional food material. Therefore, we tried to clone the menB gene encoding DHNA synthase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides CJNU 0147. Based on the genome sequence of Leu. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 (GenBank accession no., CP000414), a primer set (Leu_menBfull_F and Leu_menBfull_R) was designed for the PCR amplification of menB gene of CJNU 0147. A DNA fragment (1,190 bp), including the menB gene, was amplified, cloned into pGEM-T Easy vector, and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of MenB (DHNA synthase) protein of CJNU 0147 had a 98% similarity to the corresponding protein of ATCC 8293. The menB gene was subcloned into pCW4, a lactic acid bacteria - E. coli shuttle vector, and transferred to CJNU 0147. The transcription of menB gene of CJNU 0147 (pCW4::menB) was increased, when compared with those of CJNU 0147 (pCW4) and CJNU 0147 (−). The DHNA was produced from it at a detectable level, indicating that the cloned menB gene of CJNU 0147 encoded a DHNA synthase which is responsible for the production of DHNA, resulting in an increase of bifidogenic growth stimulation activity. PMID:26877648

  18. λ Recombination and Recombineering.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kenan C

    2016-05-01

    The bacteriophage λ Red homologous recombination system has been studied over the past 50 years as a model system to define the mechanistic details of how organisms exchange DNA segments that share extended regions of homology. The λ Red system proved useful as a system to study because recombinants could be easily generated by co-infection of genetically marked phages. What emerged from these studies was the recognition that replication of phage DNA was required for substantial Red-promoted recombination in vivo, and the critical role that double-stranded DNA ends play in allowing the Red proteins access to the phage DNA chromosomes. In the past 16 years, however, the λ Red recombination system has gained a new notoriety. When expressed independently of other λ functions, the Red system is able to promote recombination of linear DNA containing limited regions of homology (∼50 bp) with the Escherichia coli chromosome, a process known as recombineering. This review explains how the Red system works during a phage infection, and how it is utilized to make chromosomal modifications of E. coli with such efficiency that it changed the nature and number of genetic manipulations possible, leading to advances in bacterial genomics, metabolic engineering, and eukaryotic genetics. PMID:27223821

  19. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Caro, Janicce I.; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffery T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, like aboard the International Space Station or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of the Synthetic Biology project, Cow in a Column, was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel-through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) in order to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products. For future work, the production of the casein protein for milk would require the development of a genetically modified organism, which was beyond the scope of the original project. Additional trials would be needed to further refine the required

  20. Identification and characterization of a -1 reading frameshift in the heavy chain constant region of an IgG1 recombinant monoclonal antibody produced in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zhirui; Wu, Qindong; Wang, Tongtong

    2016-01-01

    Frameshifts lead to complete alteration of the intended amino acid sequences, and therefore may affect the biological activities of protein therapeutics and pose potential immunogenicity risks. We report here the identification and characterization of a novel -1 frameshift variant in a recombinant IgG1 therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells during the cell line selection studies. The variant was initially observed as an atypical post-monomer fragment peak in size exclusion chromatography. Characterization of the fragment peak using intact and reduced liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses determined that the fragment consisted of a normal light chain disulfide-linked to an aberrant 26 kDa fragment that could not be assigned to any HC fragment even after considering common modifications. Further analysis using LC-MS/MS peptide mapping revealed that the aberrant fragment contained the expected HC amino acid sequence (1-232) followed by a 20-mer novel sequence corresponding to expression of heavy chain DNA sequence in the -1 reading frame. Examination of the DNA sequence around the frameshift initiation site revealed that a mononucleotide repeat GGGGGG located in the IgG1 HC constant region was most likely the structural root cause of the frameshift. Rapid identification of the frameshift allowed us to avoid use of a problematic cell line containing the frameshift as the production cell line. The frameshift reported here may be observed in other mAb products and the hypothesis-driven analytical approaches employed here may be valuable for rapid identification and characterization of frameshift variants in other recombinant proteins. PMID:26652198

  1. Influence of specific growth rate on specific productivity and glycosylation of a recombinant avidin produced by a Pichia pastoris Mut+ strain.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Jonas; Balazs, Krisztina; Jungo, Carmen; Urfer, Julien; Wegmann, Carole; Zocchi, Andrea; Marison, Ian W; von Stockar, Urs

    2008-02-01

    A recombinant avidin-producing Mut+ Pichia pastoris strain was used as a model organism to study the influence of the methanol feeding strategy on the specific product productivity (q(p)) and protein glycosylation. Fed-batch cultivations performed at various specific growth rates (micro) and residual methanol concentrations showed that the specific avidin productivity is growth-dependent. The specific productivity increases strongly with the specific growth rate for micro ranging from 0 to 0.02 h(-1), and increases only slightly with the specific growth rate above this limit. N-terminal glycosylation was also found to be influenced by the specific growth rate, since 9-mannose glycans were the most abundant form at low growth rates, whereas 10-mannose carbohydrate chains were favored at higher micro. These results show that culture parameters, such as the specific growth rate, may significantly affect the activity of glycoproteins produced in Pichia pastoris. In terms of process optimization, this suggests that a compromise on the specific growth rate may have to be found, in certain cases, to work with an acceptable productivity while avoiding the addition of many mannoses. PMID:17636485

  2. Airborne microorganisms from waste containers.

    PubMed

    Jedlicka, Sabrina S; Stravitz, David M; Lyman, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    In physician's offices and biomedical labs, biological waste is handled every day. This waste is disposed of in waste containers designed for holding red autoclave bags. The containers used in these environments are closed hands-free containers, often with a step pedal. While these containers protect the user from surface-borne microorganisms, the containers may allow airborne microorganisms to escape via the open/close mechanism because of the air current produced upon open/close cycles. In this study, the air current was shown to be sufficient to allow airborne escape of microorganisms held in the container, including Aspergillus niger. However, bacterial cultures, such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis did not escape. This may be due to the choice of bacterial cultures and the absence of solid waste, such as dust or other particulate matter in the waste containers, that such strains of bacteria could travel on during aerosolization. We compared these results to those obtained using a re-designed receptacle, which mimimizes air currents, and detected no escaping microorganisms. This study highlights one potential source of airborne contamination in labs, hospitals, and other environments that dispose of biological waste. PMID:23047084

  3. Recombinant organisms capable of fermenting cellobiose

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Lai, Xiaokuang; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; York, Sean W.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant microorganism which expresses pyruvate decarboxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase, Klebsiella phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and Klebsiella (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II, wherein said phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and said (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II are heterologous to said microorganism and wherein said microorganism is capable of utilizing both hemicellulose and cellulose, including cellobiose, in the production of ethanol.

  4. Microorganisms and Chemical Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the importance of microorganisms in chemical pollution and pollution abatement. Selected chemical pollutants are chosen to illustrate that microorganisms synthesize hazardous substances from reasonably innocuous precursors, while others act as excellent environmental decontaminating agents by removing undesirable natural and synthetic…

  5. Characterization of recombinant plant cinnamate 4-hydroxylase produced in yeast. Kinetic and spectral properties of the major plant P450 of the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Urban, P; Werck-Reichhart, D; Teutsch, H G; Durst, F; Regnier, S; Kazmaier, M; Pompon, D

    1994-06-15

    Helianthus tuberosus cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (CYP73 or CA4H), a member of the P450 superfamily which catalyses the first oxidative step of the phenylpropanoid pathway in higher plants by transforming cinnamate into p-coumarate, was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The PCR-amplified CA4H open reading frame was inserted into pYeDP60 under the transcriptional control of a galactose-inducible artificial promoter. Engineered S. cerevisiae strains producing human P450 reductase or normal or overproduced amounts of yeast P450 reductase were transformed to express recombinant CA4H. When grown on galactose, yeast cells produced CA4H holoprotein bound to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane as judged from the reduced iron/carbon monoxide difference spectrum centered at 452 nm and from typical cinnamate 4-hydroxylase activity upon coupling with the different P450 reductases and NADPH. Some CA4H protein was found also addressed to the yeast mitochondria but as a low-activity form. The spectral and kinetic characterizations of the yeast-produced CA4H in different redox protein environments are presented using both assays on yeast microsomal fractions and bioconversions on living cells. Results indicate that the microsomal system constituted by the overexpressed yeast P450 reductase and CA4H is characterized by a 1:1 coupling between NADPH oxidation and cinnamate hydroxylation and by one of the highest turnover numbers reported for an NADPH-dependent P450 reaction. Based on spectral perturbation and inhibition studies, coumarate appeared to have no detectable affinity for the enzyme. A possible geometry of the substrate recognition pocket is discussed in the light of these data. PMID:8026495

  6. Functionalized silk assembled from a recombinant spider silk fusion protein (Z-4RepCT) produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Ronnie; Lau, Cheuk H; Ishida, Takuya; Ramström, Margareta; Sandgren, Mats; Hedhammar, My

    2016-05-01

    Functional biological materials are a growing research area with potential applicability in medicine and biotechnology. Using genetic engineering, the possibility to introduce additional functions into spider silk-based materials has been realized. Recently, a recombinant spider silk fusion protein, Z-4RepCT, was produced intracellularly in Escherichia coli and could after purification self-assemble into silk-like fibers with ability to bind antibodies via the IgG-binding Z domain. In this study, the use of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris for production of Z-4RepCT has been investigated. Temperature, pH and production time were influencing the amount of soluble Z-4RepCT retrieved from the extracellular fraction. Purification of secreted Z-4RepCT resulted in a mixture of full-length and degraded silk proteins that failed to self-assemble into fibers. A position in the C-terminal domain of 4RepCT was identified as being subjected to proteolytic cleavage by proteases in the Pichia culture supernatant. Moreover, the C-terminal domain was subjected to glycosylation during production in P. pastoris. These observed alterations of the CT domain are suggested to contribute to the failure in fiber assembly. As alternative approach, Z-4RepCT retrieved from the intracellular fraction, which was less degraded, was used and shown to retain ability to assemble into silk-like fibers after enzymatic deglycosylation. PMID:26814048

  7. IL-10-IFN-γ Double Producers CD4+ T Cells Are Induced by Immunization with an Amastigote Stage Specific Derived Recombinant Protein of Trypanosoma Cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Flores-García, Yevel; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    During the acute phase of infection, T. cruzi replicates extensively and releases immunomodulatory molecules that delay parasite-specific responses mediated by effector T cells. This mechanism of evasion allows the parasite to spread in the host. Parasite molecules that regulate the host immune response during Chagas'disease have not been fully identified. GPI-anchored mucins, glycoinositolphospholipids, and glycoproteins comprise some of the most abundant T. cruzi surface molecules. IL-10 IFN-γ-secreting CD4+ T cells are activated during chronic infections and are responsible for prolonged persistence of parasite and for host protection against severe inflammatory responses. In this work we evaluated the role of rMBP::SSP4 protein of T. cruzi, a recombinant protein derived from a GPI anchored antigen, SSP4, as an immunomodulator molecule, finding that it was able to induce high concentrations of IL-10 and IFN-γ both in vivo and in vitro; during this last condition, both cytokines were produced by IL-10-IFN-γ-secreting CD4+ T cells. PMID:21927578

  8. A single-step procedure of recombinant library construction for the selection of efficiently produced llama VH binders directed against cancer markers.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Damjana; Frković-Grazio, Snjezana; Baty, Daniel; Truan, Gilles; Komel, Radovan; Pompon, Denis

    2009-10-31

    Heavy chain antibodies are naturally occurring in camelidae (camels and llamas). Their variable domain (VHH) can be efficiently produced as a recombinant protein in E. coli with a large range of applications in the fields of diagnostics and immunotherapy. Standard cloning approach involves resolution of VHH from the heavy chain variable domain of conventional antibodies (VH) by a nested PCR amplification followed by a phage display based selection. Present work illustrates that in contrast to usual finding, specific, good affinity and efficiently expressed VH domain of conventional antibodies can be selected from the co-amplification products of VH and VHH cDNAs. Sequence analysis illustrated that following the two first rounds of selection against cancer markers, similar number of VH and VHH binders were observed. However, after a third round, the more specific binders directed against p53, VEGF, BCL-2 proteins surprisingly contain only VH specific hallmarks. Characterisation of the specificity, affinity and productivity of selected VH binders is described. Because llama VHs show higher sequence and structural homology with the human VH III group than llama VHHs (Vu et al., 1997), they constitute very interesting agents in therapeutic applications, especially in human immunotherapy and cancer treatment. PMID:19744487

  9. Micro-organ device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); von Gustedt-Gonda, legal representative, Iris (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  10. Micro-Organ Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  11. Enhanced production of carboxymethylcellulase of a marine microorganism, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis A-53 in a pilot-scaled bioreactor by a recombinant Escherichia coli JM109/A-53 from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Bo-Hwa; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Jin-Woo

    2013-05-01

    A gene encoding the carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) of a marine bacterium, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis A-53, was cloned in Escherichia coli JMB109 and the recombinant strain was named as E. coli JMB109/A-53. The optimal conditions of rice bran, ammonium chloride, and initial pH of the medium for cell growth, extracted by Design Expert Software based on response surface methodology, were 100.0 g/l, 7.5 g/l, and 7.0, respectively, whereas those for production of CMCase were 100.0 g/l, 7.5 g/l, and 8.0. The optimal temperatures for cell growth and the production of CMCase by E. coli JM109/A-53 were found to be and 40 and 35 °C, respectively. The optimal agitation speed and aeration rate of a 7 l bioreactor for cell growth were 400 rpm and 1.5 vvm, whereas those for production of CMCase were 400 rpm and 0.5 vvm. The optimal inner pressure for cell growth was 0.06 MPa, which was the same as that for production of CMCase. The production of CMCase by E. coli JM109/A-53 under optimized conditions was 880.2 U/ml, which was 2.9 times higher than that before optimization. In this study, rice bran and ammonium chloride were developed as carbon and nitrogen source for production of CMCase by a recombinant E. coli JM109/A-53 and the productivity of E. coli JM109/A-53 was 5.9 times higher than that of B. subtilis subp. subtilis A-53. PMID:23334472

  12. Improvement in the stability and functionality of Nicotiana tabacum produced recombinant TRAIL through employment of endoplasmic reticulum expression and ascorbate buffer mediated extraction strategies

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Hamid Reza; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Vahidi, Hossein; Barar, Jaleh; Kazemi, Bahram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In order to employ Nicotiana tabacum cells as a profitable natural bioreactor for production of bio-functional "Soluble human TRAIL" (ShTRAIL), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeted expression and innovative extraction procedures were exploited. Methods: At first, the ShTRAIL encoding gene was sub-cloned into designed H2 helper vector to equip it with potent TMV omega leader sequences, ER sorting signal peptide, poly-histidine tag and ER retention signal peptide (KDEL). Then, the ER targeted ShTRAIL cassette was sequentially sub-cloned into "CaMV-35S" helper and "pGreen-0179" final expression vectors. Afterward, Agrobacterium mediated transformation method was adopted to express the ShTRAIL in the ER of N. tabacum . Next, the ShTRAIL protein was extracted through both phosphate and innovative ascorbate extraction buffers. Subsequently, oligomerization state of the ShTRAIL was evaluated through cross-linking assay and western blot analysis. Then, semi-quantitative western blot analysis was performed to estimate the ShTRAIL production. Finally, biological activity of the ShTRAIL was evaluated through MTT assay. Results: The phosphate buffer extracted ShTRAIL was produced in dimmer form, whereas the ShTRAIL extracted with ascorbate buffer generated trimer form. The ER targeted ShTRAIL strategy increased the ShTRAIL’s production level up to about 20 μg/g of fresh weight of N. tabacum . MTT assay indicated that ascorbate buffer extracted ShTRAIL could prohibit proliferation of A549 cell line. Conclusion: Endoplasmic reticulum expression and reductive ascorbate buffer extraction procedure can be employed to enhance the stability and overall production level of bio-functional recombinant ShTRAIL from transgenic N. tabacum cells. PMID:25337465

  13. Measuring micro-organism gas production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Pearson, A. O.; Mills, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Transducer, which senses pressure buildup, is easy to assemble and use, and rate of gas produced can be measured automatically and accurately. Method can be used in research, in clinical laboratories, and for environmental pollution studies because of its ability to detect and quantify rapidly the number of gas-producing microorganisms in water, beverages, and clinical samples.

  14. Fossil Microorganisms in Archaean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astafleva, Marina; Hoover, Richard; Rozanov, Alexei; Vrevskiy, A.

    2006-01-01

    Ancient Archean and Proterozoic rocks are the model objects for investigation of rocks comprising astromaterials. The first of Archean fossil microorganisms from Baltic shield have been reported at the last SPIE Conference in 2005. Since this confeence biomorphic structures have been revealed in Archean rocks of Karelia. It was determined that there are 3 types of such bion structures: 1. structures found in situ, in other words microorganisms even-aged with rock matrix, that is real Archean fossils biomorphic structures, that is to say forms inhabited early formed rocks, and 3. younger than Archean-Protherozoic minerali microorganisms, that is later contamination. We made attempt to differentiate these 3 types of findings and tried to understand of burial of microorganisms. The structures belongs (from our point of view) to the first type, or real Archean, forms were under examination. Practical investigation of ancient microorganisms from Green-Stone-Belt of Northern Karelia turns to be very perspective. It shows that even in such ancient time as Archean ancient diverse world existed. Moreover probably such relatively highly organized cyanobacteria and perhaps eukaryotic formes existed in Archean world.

  15. Recombinant Zymomonas for pentose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, S.K.; Zhang, M.; Eddy, C.K.; Deanda, K.A.; Finkelstein, M.

    1996-05-07

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment a pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment this pentose to produce ethanol. A representative example is Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with E. coli xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase and transketolase genes. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. This newly created microorganism is useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol. 2 figs.

  16. Recombinant zymomonas for pentose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, Stephen K.; Zhang, Min; Eddy, Christina K.; Deanda, Kristine A.; Finkelstein, Mark

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment a pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment this pentose to produce ethanol. A representative example is Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with E. coli xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase and transketolase genes. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. This newly created microorganism is useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol.

  17. Micro-Organ Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steven R.; Leslie, Julia; Chang, Robert C.; Starly, Binil; Sun, Wei; Culbertson, Christopher; Holtorf, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organ devices (MODs) are being developed to satisfy an emerging need for small, lightweight, reproducible, biological-experimentati on apparatuses that are amenable to automated operation and that imp ose minimal demands for resources (principally, power and fluids). I n simplest terms, a MOD is a microfluidic device containing a variety of microstructures and assemblies of cells, all designed to mimic a complex in vivo microenvironment by replicating one or more in vivo micro-organ structures, the architectures and composition of the extr acellular matrices in the organs of interest, and the in vivo fluid flows. In addition to microscopic flow channels, a MOD contains one or more micro-organ wells containing cells residing in microscopic e xtracellular matrices and/or scaffolds, the shapes and compositions o f which enable replication of the corresponding in vivo cell assembl ies and flows.

  18. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  19. Immunosorbent Assay Based on Recombinant Hemagglutinin Protein Produced in a High-Efficiency Mammalian Expression System for Surveillance of Measles Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bouche, Fabienne; Ammerlaan, Wim; Berthet, Francoise; Houard, Sophie; Schneider, Francois; Muller, Claude P.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant hemagglutinin (H) protein of the measles virus (MV) was produced in mammalian cells with a high-yield expression system based on the Semliki Forest virus replicon. Crude membrane preparations of H protein-transfected BHK-21 cells were used to coat microtiter plates to measure specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in 228 serologically defined serum samples mainly from measles late-convalescent adults. The titers by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the H protein (H-ELISA) closely correlated with neutralization test (NT) titers (R2 = 0.66), hemagglutination inhibition test (HI) titers (R2 = 0.64), with the titers from a certified commercial ELISA based on whole MV-infected cells (MV-ELISA; R2 = 0.45). The correlations described above were better than those of the commercial MV-ELISA titers with the NT (R2 = 0.52) or HI (R2 = 0.48) titers. By using the 2nd International Standard for anti-measles serum, the detection level of the assay corresponds to 215 mIU/ml for undiluted serum, which corresponds to the estimated threshold for protective immunity. The specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value were, in general, better for the H-ELISA than for a commercial MV-ELISA, independent of whether HI, NT, or HI and NT were used as “gold standards.” In contrast, the H-ELISA proved to be slightly less sensitive than the MV-ELISA (sensitivities, 98.6 versus 99.5%, respectively; P was not significant). The assays did not differ significantly in the number of serum samples with positive HI and NT results (n = 212) which measured false negative (H-ELISA, 2 of 212 [0.94%]; MV-ELISA, 1 of 212 [0.47%]), but the H-ELISA detected significantly more measles-susceptible individuals than the MV-ELISA (10 of 11 versus 3 of 11, respectively; P < 0.05) among the individuals whose sera had negative HI and NT results. Our data demonstrate that the H-protein preparation that we describe could be a cost-effective alternative to current whole-virus-based ELISAs for

  20. Microorganisms and Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    Provides information to update Institute of Biology's Studies in Biology No. 111, "Microorganisms and Man," by W. C. Noble and Jay Naidoo (Edward Arnold, 1979). Topics include: (1) food poisoning; (2) airborn infections in man; (3) infection in animals and plants; and (4) biodegradation and biosynthesis. (JN)

  1. Fermentations with new recombinant organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bothast, R.J.; Nichols, N.N.; Dien, B.S.

    1999-10-01

    US fuel ethanol production in 1998 exceeded the record production of 1.4 billion gallons set in 1995. Most of this ethanol was produced from over 550 million bushels of corn. Expanding fuel ethanol production will require developing lower-cost feedstocks, and only lignocellulosic feedstocks are available in sufficient quantities to substitute for corn starch. Major technical hurdles to converting lignocellulose to ethanol include the lack of low-cost efficient enzymes for saccharification of biomass to fermentable sugars and the development of microorganisms for the fermentation of these mixed sugars. To date, the most successful research approaches to develop novel biocatalysts that will efficiently ferment mixed sugar syrups include isolation of novel yeasts that ferment xylose, genetic engineering of Escherichia coli and other gram negative bacteria for ethanol production, and genetic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis for pentose utilization. The authors have evaluated the fermentation of corn fiber hydrolyzates by the various strains developed. E. coli K011, E. coli SL40, E. coli FBR3, Zymomonas CP4 (pZB5), and Saccharomyces 1400 (pLNH32) fermented corn fiber hydrolyzates to ethanol in the range of 21--34 g/L with yields ranging from 0.41 to 0.50 g of ethanol per gram of sugar consumed. Progress with new recombinant microorganisms has been rapid and will continue with the eventual development of organisms suitable for commercial ethanol production. Each research approach holds considerable promise, with the possibility existing that different industrially hardened strains may find separate applications in the fermentation of specific feedstocks.

  2. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmele, Michele; Morford, Megan; Khodadad, Christina; Spencer, Lashelle; Richards, Jeffrey; Strayer, Richard; Caro, Janicce; Hummerick, Mary; Wheeler, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, such as aboard the International Space Station (ISS) or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of this project was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel- through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms.

  3. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  4. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  5. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  6. Recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan by Agrobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zichao; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2007-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a sugar polymer of a repeating disaccharide, beta1-3 D-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) beta1-4 D-glucuronic acid (GlcA). It finds applications in numerous biomedical procedures such as ophthalmic surgery and osteoarthritis treatment. Until recently, the only commercial sources were extraction of rooster combs and from fermentation of pathogenic Streptococcus. In this work, we demonstrate that metabolic engineering strategies enable the recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan in a safe microorganism. Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 is a commercial production strain for a food polymer, Curdlan. A broad host range expression vector was successfully developed to express the 3 kb HA synthase gene from Pasteurella multocida, along with a kfiD gene encoding UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli K5 strain. Coexpression of these two heterologous enzymes enables Agrobacterium to produce HA. Hyaluronan was accumulated up to 0.3 g/L in shaker flask cultivation. The molecular weight of the polymer from various Agrobacterium strains is in the range of 0.7-2 MD. To our knowledge, this is the first successful recombinant hyaluronan synthesis in a Gram-negative bacterium that naturally produces a food product. The ease of genetic modifications provides future opportunities to tailor properties of polymers for specific applications. PMID:17705506

  7. Inactivation of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra N.; Schenk, Marcela; Raffellini, Silvia; López-Malo, Aurelio

    Minimal processing techniques for food preservation allow better retention of product flavor, texture, color, and nutrient content than comparable conventional treatments. A wide range of novel alternative physical factors have been intensely investigated in the last two decades. These physical factors can cause inactivation of microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ultrasound, pulsed light, and ultraviolet light). These technologies have been reported to reduce microorganism population in foods while avoiding the deleterious effects of severe heating on quality. Among technologies, high-energy ultrasound (i.e., intensities higher than 1 W/cm2, frequencies between 18 and 100 kHz) has attracted considerable interest for food preservation applications (Mason et al., 1996; Povey and Mason, 1998).

  8. Detecting the presence of microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, Judd R. (Inventor); Stoner, Glenn E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The presence of microorganisms in a sample is determined by culturing microorganisms in a growth medium which is in contact with a measuring electrode and a reference electrode and detecting a change in potential between the electrodes caused by the presence of the microorganisms in the medium with a high impedance potentiometer.

  9. Butanol tolerance in microorganisms

    DOEpatents

    Bramucci, Michael G.; Nagarajan, Vasantha

    2016-03-01

    Provided herein are recombinant yeast host cells and methods for their use for production of fermentation products from a pyruvate utilizing pathway. Yeast host cells provided herein comprise reduced pyruvate decarboxylase activity and modified adenylate cyclase activity. In embodiments, yeast host cells provided herein comprise resistance to butanol and increased biomass production.

  10. Mass Spectrometer for Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria and other micro-organisms identified continously with aid of new technique for producing samples for mass spectrometer. Technique generates aerosol of organisms and feeds to spectrometer. Given species of organism produces characteristic set of peaks in mass spectrum and thereby identified. Technique useful for monitoring bacterial makeup in environmental studies and in places where cleanliness is essential, such as hospital operating rooms, breweries, and pharmaceutical plants.

  11. Consolidated bioprocessing method using thermophilic microorganisms

    DOEpatents

    Mielenz, Jonathan Richard

    2016-02-02

    The present invention is directed to a method of converting biomass to biofuel, and particularly to a consolidated bioprocessing method using a co-culture of thermophilic and extremely thermophilic microorganisms which collectively can ferment the hexose and pentose sugars produced by degradation of cellulose and hemicelluloses at high substrate conversion rates. A culture medium therefor is also provided as well as use of the methods to produce and recover cellulosic ethanol.

  12. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  13. Lantibiotic production by pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Karen M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2012-09-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesised, post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides produced by Gram positive bacteria, many which have broad-ranging antimicrobial activities. Lantibiotics have long been the subject of investigation with a view to their application as food preservatives or chemotherapeutic agents for clinical and veterinary medicine, while the associated biosynthetic machinery has been employed for peptide engineering purposes. However, although many lantibiotics are produced by generally regarded as safe or food-grade bacteria, it is increasingly apparent that a number of Gram positive pathogens, including strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus uberis and Enterococcus faecalis, also produce these compounds. It is proposed that production of these antimicrobials may provide the associated microorganisms with a competitive advantage when colonizing/infecting a host, thereby enhancing the virulence of the producing strain. Here we review the production of lantibiotics by these pathogens and discuss how their production may contribute to their disease-causing potential. PMID:22708496

  14. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  15. Antimicrobial metabolites from marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Habbu, Prasanna; Warad, Vijayanand; Shastri, Rajesh; Madagundi, Smita; Kulkarni, Venkatrao H

    2016-02-01

    Marine ecological niches have recently been described as "particularly promising" sources for search of new antimicrobials to combat antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms. Marine organisms are excellent sources for many industrial products, but they are partly explored. Over 30 000 compounds have been isolated from marine sources. Bacteria, fungi, and cyanobacteria obtained from various marine sources secret several industrially useful bioactive compounds, possessing antibacterial, antifungal, and antimycobacterial activities. Sustainable cultivation methods for promising marine organisms and biotechnological processes for selected compounds can be developed, along with the establishment of biosensors for monitoring the target compounds. The semisynthetic modifications of marine-based bioactive compounds produce their new derivatives, structural analogs and mimetics that could serve as novel lead compounds against resistant pathogens. The present review focuses on promising antimicrobial compounds isolated from marine microbes from 1991-2013. PMID:26968676

  16. Application of Recombinant Human Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) Produced in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) for Maintenance of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Youngblood, Bradford A.; Alfano, Randall; Pettit, Steve C.; Zhang, Deshui; Dallmann, H. Garry; Huang, Ning; MacDonald, Clinton C.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into any somatic cell type, and thus have potential to treat a number of diseases that are currently incurable. Application of these cells for clinical or industrial uses would require an increase in production to yield adequate numbers of viable cells. However, the relatively high costs of cytokines and growth factors required for maintenance of stem cells in the undifferentiated state have the potential to limit translational research. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a member of the IL-6 cytokine family, is a key regulator in the maintenance of naïve states for both human and mouse stem cells. In this study, we describe a new recombinant human LIF (rhLIF) using a plant-based (rice) expression system. We found that rice-derived rhLIF possessed the same specific activity as commercial E. coli-derived LIF and was capable of supporting mouse embryonic stem cell proliferation in the undifferentiated state as evidenced from pluripotency marker level analysis. Retention of the pluripotent state was found to be indistinguishable between rice-derived rhLIF and other recombinant LIF proteins currently on the market. PMID:24380819

  17. GENERATION OF RECOMBINANT BACULOVIRUS VIA LIPOSOME MEDIATED TRANSFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baculovirus expression vectors have become a popular method of producing recombinant proteins. Production of recombinant virus requires the transfection of both the native viral DNA and a transfer plasmid into insect cells where recombination takes place. While several methods of...

  18. Extremely thermophilic microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms for production of fuels and industrial chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Zeldes, Benjamin M.; Keller, Matthew W.; Loder, Andrew J.; Straub, Christopher T.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes from extremely thermophilic microorganisms have been of technological interest for some time because of their ability to catalyze reactions of industrial significance at elevated temperatures. Thermophilic enzymes are now routinely produced in recombinant mesophilic hosts for use as discrete biocatalysts. Genome and metagenome sequence data for extreme thermophiles provide useful information for putative biocatalysts for a wide range of biotransformations, albeit involving at most a few enzymatic steps. However, in the past several years, unprecedented progress has been made in establishing molecular genetics tools for extreme thermophiles to the point that the use of these microorganisms as metabolic engineering platforms has become possible. While in its early days, complex metabolic pathways have been altered or engineered into recombinant extreme thermophiles, such that the production of fuels and chemicals at elevated temperatures has become possible. Not only does this expand the thermal range for industrial biotechnology, it also potentially provides biodiverse options for specific biotransformations unique to these microorganisms. The list of extreme thermophiles growing optimally between 70 and 100°C with genetic toolkits currently available includes archaea and bacteria, aerobes and anaerobes, coming from genera such as Caldicellulosiruptor, Sulfolobus, Thermotoga, Thermococcus, and Pyrococcus. These organisms exhibit unusual and potentially useful native metabolic capabilities, including cellulose degradation, metal solubilization, and RuBisCO-free carbon fixation. Those looking to design a thermal bioprocess now have a host of potential candidates to choose from, each with its own advantages and challenges that will influence its appropriateness for specific applications. Here, the issues and opportunities for extremely thermophilic metabolic engineering platforms are considered with an eye toward potential technological advantages for high

  19. Molecular analysis of a Clostridium butyricum NCIMB 7423 gene encoding 4-alpha-glucanotransferase and characterization of the recombinant enzyme produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goda, S K; Eissa, O; Akhtar, M; Minton, N P

    1997-10-01

    An Escherichia coli clone was detected in a Clostridium butyricum NCIMB 7423 plasmid library capable of degrading soluble amylose. Deletion subcloning of its recombinant plasmid indicated that the gene(s) responsible for amylose degradation was localized on a 1.8 kb NspHI-Scal fragment. This region was sequenced in its entirety and shown to encompass a large ORF capable of encoding a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 57,184 Da. Although the deduced amino acid sequence showed only weak similarity with known amylases, significant sequences identity was apparent with the 4-alpha-glucano-transferase enzymes of Streptococcus pneumoniae (46.9%), potato (42.9%) and E. coli (16.2%). The clostridial gene (designated maIQ) was followed by a second ORF which, through its homology to the equivalent enzymes of E. coli and S. pneumoniae, was deduced to encode maltodextrin phosphorylase (MaIP). The translation stop codon of MaIQ overlapped the translation start codon of the putative maIP gene, suggesting that the two genes may be both transcriptionally and translationally coupled. 4-alpha-Glucanotransferase catalyses a disproportionation reaction in which single or multiple glucose units from oligosaccharides are transferred to the 4-hydroxyl group of acceptor sugars. Characterization of the recombinant C. butyricum enzyme demonstrated that glucose, maltose and maltotriose could act as acceptor, whereas of the three only maltotriose could act as donor. The enzyme therefore shares properties with the E. coli MaIQ protein, but differs significantly from the glucanotransferase of Thermotoga maritima, which is unable to use maltotriose as donor or glucose as acceptor. Physiologically, the concerted action of 4-alpha-glucanotransferase and maltodextrin phosphorylase provides C. butyricum with a mechanism of utilizing amylose/maltodextrins with little drain on cellular ATP reserves. PMID:9353929

  20. The recombination of genetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic recombination is the major mechanism by which new arrangements of genetic elements are produced in all living organisms, from the simplest bacterial viruses to humans. This volume presents an overview of the types of recombination found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  1. Recombinant Botulinum Toxoids: A Practical Guide for Production.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal S G; Moreira, Clóvis; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P; Mendonça, Marcelo; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacillus that produces a potent neurotoxin. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are classified from serotypes A to H, and even though they have similar mechanisms of action, they show preferential hosts. In veterinary medicine, BoNT serotypes C and D are the most important, once several animal species are susceptible to them. Since BoNTs are the most potent toxins known in nature, the best way to control botulism in animals is through vaccination. However, current commercial vaccines are based on inactivated toxins (toxoids) and cells (bacterins) and present many drawbacks, such as a time-consuming production with variable antigen yield and biosafety risks. Recombinant vaccines, especially those produced by Escherichia coli expression system, have proved to be an interesting alternative to overcome these problems. E. coli is a very well-known microorganism that allows the production of large amounts of nontoxic recombinant antigens in a short period using simple culture medium reducing the production complexity and decreasing most of the biosafety risks involved in the process. We describe herein a method for the production of recombinant vaccines for veterinary medicine application, involving initial steps of gene design up to vaccine formulation and evaluation itself. PMID:27076326

  2. Microorganisms having enhanced resistance to acetate and methods of use

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Yang, Shihui

    2014-10-21

    The present invention provides isolated or genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced resistance to acetate as a result of increased expression of a sodium proton antiporter. The present invention also provides methods for producing such microbial strains, as well as related promoter sequences and expression vectors. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using microorganisms with enhanced resistance to acetate.

  3. Marine Microorganisms: perspectives for getting involved in cellulosic ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The production of ethanol has been considered as an alternative to replace part of the petroleum derivate. Brazil and the US are the leading producers, but more environmentally friendly alternatives are needed. Lignocellulose has an enormous potential but technology has to be still improve in order to economically produce ethanol. The present paper reviews the potential and problems of this technology and proposes the study of a group of microorganisms with the largest genetic pool, marine microorganism. PMID:22931793

  4. Microorganism Utilization for Synthetic Milk Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morford, Megan A.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Mccoy, LaShelle E.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Strayer, Richard F.; Caro, Janicce L.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    A desired architecture for long duration spaceflight, such as aboard the International Space Station (ISS) or for future missions to Mars, is to provide a supply of fresh food crops for the astronauts. However, some crops can create a high proportion of inedible plant waste. The main goal of this project was to produce the components of milk (sugar, lipid, protein) from inedible plant waste by utilizing microorganisms (fungi, yeast, bacteria). Of particular interest was utilizing the valuable polysaccharide, cellulose, found in plant waste, to naturally fuel- through microorganism cellular metabolism- the creation of sugar (glucose), lipid (milk fat), and protein (casein) to produce a synthetic edible food product. Environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, carbon source, aeration, and choice microorganisms were optimized in the laboratory and the desired end-products, sugars and lipids, were analyzed. Trichoderma reesei, a known cellulolytic fungus, was utilized to drive the production of glucose, with the intent that the produced glucose would serve as the carbon source for milk fat production and be a substitute for the milk sugar lactose. Lipid production would be carried out by Rhodosporidium toruloides, yeast known to accumulate those lipids that are typically found in milk fat. Results showed that glucose and total lipid content were below what was expected during this phase of experimentation. In addition, individual analysis of six fatty acids revealed that the percentage of each fatty acid was lower than naturally produced bovine milk. Overall, this research indicates that microorganisms could be utilized to breakdown inedible solid waste to produce useable products.

  5. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ward, Donald E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Chang, Lara S.; Levy, Ryan D.; Michel, Joshua K.; Conners, Shannon B.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic microorganisms from the euryarchaeotal genus Pyrococcus , the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus , and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima . An overview of the proteases in these organisms is given based on those proteases that have been characterized and on putativemore » proteases that have been identified from genomic sequences, but have yet to be characterized. The analysis revealed both similarities and differences in the mechanisms utilized for proteolysis by each of these hyperthermophiles and indicated how these mechanisms relate to proteolysis in less thermophilic cells and organisms.« less

  6. Gravitaxis in unicellular microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hader, D P

    1999-01-01

    Orientation of organisms with respect to the gravitational field of the Earth has been studied for more than 100 years in a number of unicellular microorganisms including flagellates and ciliates. Several hypotheses have been developed how the weak stimulus is perceived. Intracellular statoliths have been found to be involved in gravitaxis of Loxodes, while no specialized organelles have been detected in other ciliates, e.g. Paramecium. Also in the slime mold Physarum no specialized gravireceptors have been identified yet. In the flagellate Euglena gracilis the whole cell body, which is denser than the surrounding medium, seems to act as a statolith pressing onto the lower membrane where it activates mechanosensitive ion channels. Similar results were obtained for the ciliate Paramecium. In contrast to the flagellate Euglena, several ciliates have been found to show gravikinesis, which is defined as a dependence of the swimming velocity on the direction of movement in the gravity field. PMID:11542630

  7. Gravitaxis in unicellular microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.

    1999-01-01

    Orientation of organisms with respect to the gravitational field of the Earth has been studied for more than 100 years in a number of unicellular microorganisms including flagellates and ciliates. Several hypotheses have been developed how the weak stimulus is perceived. Intracellular statoliths have been found to be involved in gravitaxis of Loxodes, while no specialized organelles have been detected in other ciliates, e.g. Paramecium. Also in the slime mold Physarum no specialized gravireceptors have been identified yet. In the flagellate Euglena gracilis the whole cell body, which is denser than the surrounding medium, seems to act as a statolith pressing onto the lower membrane where it activates mechanosensitive ion channels. Similar results were obtained for the ciliate Paramecium. In contrast to the flagellate Euglena, several ciliates have been found to show gravikinesis, which is defined as a dependence of the swimming velocity on the direction of movement in the gravity field.

  8. Biosynthesis of trans-4-hydroxyproline by recombinant strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (trans-Hyp), one of the hydroxyproline (Hyp) isomers, is a useful chiral building block in the production of many pharmaceuticals. Although there are some natural biosynthetic pathways of trans-Hyp existing in microorganisms, the yield is still too low to be scaled up for industrial applications. Until now the production of trans-Hyp is mainly from the acid hydrolysis of collagen. Due to the increasing environmental concerns on those severe chemical processes and complicated downstream separation, it is essential to explore some environment-friendly processes such as constructing new recombinant strains to develop efficient process for trans-Hyp production. Result In this study, the genes of trans-proline 4-hydroxylase (trans-P4H) from diverse resources were cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum and Escherichia coli, respectively. The trans-Hyp production by these recombinant strains was investigated. The results showed that all the genes from different resources had been expressed actively. Both the recombinant C. glutamicum and E. coli strains could produce trans-Hyp in the absence of proline and 2-oxoglutarate. Conclusions The whole cell microbial systems for trans-Hyp production have been successfully constructed by introducing trans-P4H into C. glutamicum and E. coli. Although the highest yield was obtained in recombinant E. coli, using recombinant C. glutamicum strains to produce trans-Hyp was a new attempt. PMID:24885047

  9. Pentose fermentation by recombinant zymomonas

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, Stephen K.; Zhang, Min; Eddy, Christina K.; Deanda, Kristine A.; Finkelstein, Mark; Mohagheghi, Ali; Newman, Mildred M.; McMillan, James D.

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol.

  10. Recombinant Zymomonas for pentose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, Stephen K.; Zhang, Min; Eddy, Christina K.; Deanda, Kristine A.

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol.

  11. Recombinant Zymomonas for pentose fermentation

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, S.K.; Min Zhang; Eddy, C.K.; Deanda, K.A.

    1998-03-10

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol. 7 figs.

  12. Pentose fermentation by recombinant Zymomonas

    DOEpatents

    Picataggio, S.K.; Zhang, M.; Eddy, C.K.; Deanda, K.A.; Finkelstein, M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Newman, M.M.; McMillan, J.D.

    1998-01-27

    The invention relates to microorganisms which normally do not ferment pentose sugar and which are genetically altered to ferment pentose sugar to produce ethanol, and fermentation processes utilizing the same. Examples include Zymomonas mobilis which has been transformed with combinations of E. coli genes for xylose isomerase, xylulokinase, transaldolase, transketolase, L-arabinose isomerase, L-ribulokinase, and L-ribulose 5-phosphate 4-epimerase. Expression of the added genes are under the control of Zymomonas mobilis promoters. These newly created microorganisms are useful for fermenting pentoses and glucose, produced by hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose, to produce ethanol. 7 figs.

  13. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Akano, T.; Fukatsu, K.; Miyasaka, H. |

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen is a clean energy alternative to the fossil fuels, the main source of greenhouse gas emissions. We developed a stable system for the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen using photosynthetic microorganisms. Our system consists of the following three stages: (1) Photosynthetic starch accumulation in green microalgae (400 L x2); (2) Dark anaerobic fermentation of the algal starch biomass to produce hydrogen and organic compounds (155 L x2); and (3) Further conversion of the organic compounds to produce hydrogen using photosynthetic bacteria (three types of reactors, parallel plate, raceway, and tubular). We constructed a test plant of this process at Nankoh power plant of Kansai Electric Power Company in Osaka, Japan, and carried out a series of tests using CO{sub 2} obtained from a chemical absorption pilot-plant. The photobiological hydrogen production process used a combination of a marine alga, Chlamydomonas sp. MGA 161 and marine photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas sp. W-1S. The dark anaerobic fermentation of algal starch biomass was also investigated. Sustained and stable starch accumulation, starch degradation in the algal cell, and hydrogen production from algal fermentation and photosynthetic bacteria in the light were demonstrated during several experiments. 3 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Cosmological Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wan Yan

    2008-11-01

    In this thesis we focus on studying the physics of cosmological recombination and how the details of recombination affect the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We present a detailed calculation of the spectral line distortions on the CMB spectrum arising from the Lyman-alpha and the lowest two-photon transitions in the recombination of hydrogen (H), and the corresponding lines from helium (He). The peak of these distortions mainly comes from the Lyman-alpha transition and occurs at about 170 microns, which is the Wien part of the CMB. The major theoretical limitation for extracting cosmological parameters from the CMB sky lies in the precision with which we can calculate the cosmological recombination process. With this motivation, we perform a multi-level calculation of the recombination of H and He with the addition of the spin-forbidden transition for neutral helium (He I), plus the higher order two-photon transitions for H and among singlet states of He I. We find that the inclusion of the spin-forbidden transition results in more than a percent change in the ionization fraction, while the other transitions give much smaller effects. Last we modify RECFAST by introducing one more parameter to reproduce recent numerical results for the speed-up of helium recombination. Together with the existing hydrogen `fudge factor', we vary these two parameters to account for the remaining dominant uncertainties in cosmological recombination. By using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method with Planck forecast data, we find that we need to determine the parameters to better than 10% for He I and 1% for H, in order to obtain negligible effects on the cosmological parameters.

  15. Heterologous expression of newly identified galectin-8 from sea urchin embryos produces recombinant protein with lactose binding specificity and anti-adhesive activity

    PubMed Central

    Karakostis, Kostantinos; Costa, Caterina; Zito, Francesca; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Galectin family members specifically bind beta-galactoside derivatives and are involved in different cellular events, including cell communication, signalling, apoptosis, and immune responses. Here, we report a tandem-repeat type galectin from the Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin embryo, referred to as Pl-GAL-8. The 933nt sequence encodes a protein of 34.73 kDa, containing the conserved HFNPRF and WGxExR motifs in the two highly similar carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRD). The three-dimensional protein structure model of the N-CRD confirms the high evolutionary conservation of carbohydrate binding sites. The temporal gene expression is regulated during development and transcripts localize at the tip of the archenteron at gastrula stage, in a subset of the secondary mesenchyme cells that differentiate into blastocoelar (immune) cells. Functional studies using a recombinant Pl-GAL-8 expressed in bacteria demonstrate its hemo-agglutinating activity on human red blood cells through the binding to lactose, as well as its ability in inhibiting the adhesion of human Hep-G2 cells to the substrate. The recent implications in autoimmune diseases and inflammatory disorders make Gal-8 an attractive candidate for therapeutic purposes. Our results offer a solid basis for addressing the use of the new Pl-GAL-8 in functional and applicative studies, respectively in the developmental and biomedical fields. PMID:26640155

  16. Subtype specificity of anti-HBs antibodies produced by human B-cell lines isolated from normal individuals vaccinated with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Shokri, Fazel

    2002-05-22

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) constitutes of an immunodominant determinant common to all subtypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and four major subtypic determinants. Subtype specificity of the human antibody response to HBsAg has already been partially studied in vivo at serum level. No comprehensive data, however, is available at the cellular level. In this study, the methods of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformation and limiting dilution assay (LDA) were used to establish a large number of B-cell lines secreting anti-HBs antibody from 34 adult individuals who were good-responders to the recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (HBsAg/adw). Specificity of 222 B-cell lines was assayed by sandwich ELISA and immunoblotting, of which 216 samples (97.3%) were identified to be anti-a, 5 samples (2.3%) as anti-d and one sample (0.4%) as anti-w. The isotype of most of the anti-HBs antibodies was IgG and belonged to the IgG1 subclass. These findings which have not already been extensively investigated at the cellular level in human confirm and extend previous circumstantial results achieved in mouse and further prove the immunodominant role of the "a" determinant of HBsAg in antibody response in human. PMID:12009275

  17. Microorganism lipid droplets and biofuel development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingmei; Zhang, Congyan; Shen, Xipeng; Zhang, Xuelin; Cichello, Simon; Guan, Hongbin; Liu, Pingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD) is a cellular organelle that stores neutral lipids as a source of energy and carbon. However, recent research has emerged that the organelle is involved in lipid synthesis, transportation, and metabolism, as well as mediating cellular protein storage and degradation. With the exception of multi-cellular organisms, some unicellular microorganisms have been observed to contain LDs. The organelle has been isolated and characterized from numerous organisms. Triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in LDs can be in excess of 50% of the dry weight in some microorganisms, and a maximum of 87% in some instances. These microorganisms include eukaryotes such as yeast and green algae as well as prokaryotes such as bacteria. Some organisms obtain carbon from CO2 via photosynthesis, while the majority utilizes carbon from various types of biomass. Therefore, high TAG content generated by utilizing waste or cheap biomass, coupled with an efficient conversion rate, present these organisms as bio-tech ‘factories’ to produce biodiesel. This review summarizes LD research in these organisms and provides useful information for further LD biological research and microorganism biodiesel development. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(12): 575-581] PMID:24355300

  18. Radiation sensitivity of hyperthermal composting microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Il; Yoon, Min-Chul; Kim, Jae-Hun; Yamashita, Masamichi; Kim, Geun Joong; Lee, Ju-Woon

    In the space station and vehicles designed for long human mission, high-temperature compost is a promising technology for decomposing organic waste and producing the fertilizers. In space, the microorganisms could have the changed biological activities or even be mutated by ionizing irradiation. Therefore, in this study, the effect of gamma irradiation on the sensitivity of bacteria in hyperthermal composting was investigated. The sequence analysis of the amplified 16s rDNA genes and amoA gene were used for the identification of composting microorganisms. Viability of microorganisms in compost soil after gamma irradiation was directly visualized with LIVE/DEAD Baclight viability kit. The dominant bacterial genera are Weissella cibaria and Leuconostoc sp. and fungus genera are Metschnikowia bicuspidate and Pichia guilliermondii, respectively. By the gamma irradiation up to the dose of 1 kGy, the microbial population was not changed. Also, the enzyme activities of amylase and cellulose were sustained by the gamma irradiation. These results show that these hyperthermia microorganisms might have the high resistance to gamma radiation and could be used for agriculture in the Space Station.

  19. Population dynamics of transgenic microorganisms in the different microecosystem conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, L. Yu.; Lobova, T. I.; Krylova, T. Yu.; Kargatova, T. V.; Maksimova, E. E.; Boyandin, A. N.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    The role of key environmental factors in adaptation of spore-forming and non-spore-forming transgenic microorganisms (TM) have been studied in model ecosystems. Model TM Escherichia coli Z905 (bearing plasmid genes of bacterial luminescence Ap rLux +) has been found to have a higher adaptation potential than TM Bacillus subtilis 2335/105 (bearing genes of human α 2-interferon Km rInf +), planned for employment as a living vaccine under varying environmental conditions. Effects of abiotic factors on migration of natural and recombinant plasmids between microorganisms under model ecosystem conditions has been estimated. The transgenic microorganisms with low copy number survived better under introduction conditions in the microcosms studied. This trend has been shown to be independent of the microcosm type and its complexity.

  20. Recombination within a nucleotide-binding-site/leucine-rich-repeat gene cluster produces new variants conditioning resistance to soybean mosaic virus in soybeans.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, A J; Jeong, S C; Gore, M A; Yu, Y G; Buss, G R; Tolin, S A; Maroof, M A Saghai

    2004-01-01

    The soybean Rsv1 gene for resistance to soybean mosaic virus (SMV; Potyvirus) has previously been described as a single-locus multi-allelic gene mapping to molecular linkage group (MLG) F. Various Rsv1 alleles condition different responses to the seven (G1-G7) described strains of SMV, including extreme resistance, localized and systemic necrosis, and mosaic symptoms. We describe the cloning of a cluster of NBS-LRR resistance gene candidates from MLG F of the virus-resistant soybean line PI96983 and demonstrate that multiple genes within this cluster interact to condition unique responses to SMV strains. In addition to cloning 3gG2, a strong candidate for the major Rsv1 resistance gene from PI96983, we describe various unique resistant and necrotic reactions coincident with the presence or absence of other members of this gene cluster. Responses of recombinant lines from a high-resolution mapping population of PI96983 (resistant) x Lee 68 (susceptible) demonstrate that more than one gene in this region of the PI96983 chromosome conditions resistance and/or necrosis to SMV. In addition, the soybean cultivars Marshall and Ogden, which carry other previously described Rsv1 alleles, are shown to possess the 3gG2 gene in a NBS-LRR gene cluster background distinct from PI96983. These observations suggest that two or more related non-TIR-NBS-LRR gene products are likely involved in the allelic response of several Rsv1-containing lines to SMV. PMID:15020438

  1. New Skin Test for Detection of Bovine Tuberculosis on the Basis of Antigen-Displaying Polyester Inclusions Produced by Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuxiong; Parlane, Natalie A.; Lee, Jason; Wedlock, D. Neil; Buddle, Bryce M.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in cattle lacks specificity if animals are sensitized to environmental mycobacteria, as some antigens in purified protein derivative (PPD) prepared from Mycobacterium bovis are present in nonpathogenic mycobacteria. Three immunodominant TB antigens, ESAT6, CFP10, and Rv3615c, are present in members of the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex but absent from the majority of environmental mycobacteria. These TB antigens have the potential to enhance skin test specificity. To increase their immunogenicity, these antigens were displayed on polyester beads by translationally fusing them to a polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase which mediated formation of antigen-displaying inclusions in recombinant Escherichia coli. The most common form of these inclusions is poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) (PHB). The respective fusion proteins displayed on these PHB inclusions (beads) were identified using tryptic peptide fingerprinting analysis in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The surface exposure and accessibility of antigens were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Polyester beads displaying all three TB antigens showed greater reactivity with TB antigen-specific antibody than did beads displaying only one TB antigen. This was neither due to cross-reactivity of antibodies with the other two antigens nor due to differences in protein expression levels between beads displaying single or three TB antigens. The triple-antigen-displaying polyester beads were used for skin testing of cattle and detected all cattle experimentally infected with M. bovis with no false-positive reactions observed in those sensitized to environmental mycobacteria. The results suggested applicability of TB antigen-displaying polyester inclusions as diagnostic reagents for distinguishing TB-infected from noninfected animals. PMID:24532066

  2. Genetic recombination in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed Central

    Parag, Y

    1978-01-01

    Low-frequency (10(-6)) genetic recombination was observed in a cephamycin-producing strain of Streptomyces griseus. The recombinants were predominantly heteroclones. Heteroclone analysis was performed involving four heteroclones of one cross. In 100 mutants correlation was found between the type of auxotrophy and the level of antibiotic activity. A cross of this strain with a streptomycin-producing strain of S. griesus is described. PMID:415037

  3. Intrathecally produced IgG and IgM antibodies to recombinant VlsE, VlsE peptide, recombinant OspC and whole cell extracts in the diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Gerold; Lusa, Lara; Ogrinc, Katarina; Markowicz, Mateusz; Strle, Franc

    2014-04-01

    Detection of intrathecally produced specific antibodies (AI) is essential in the diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB); however, the performance of various newer AI detection methods has not been systematically assessed. Here we assessed and compared advanced test systems for detecting borrelia IgG-AI and IgM-AI. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from well-defined LNB and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) patients, 25 each, were tested with three antibody detection systems, one based on chemiluminescence (CLA) and two based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), employing different antigens for detection of IgG and IgM antibodies. In samples from patients with LNB, IgG-AI was detected in 20 samples by CLA, 19 by ELISA1, and 22 by ELISA2, and IgM-AI was detected in 16 samples by CLA, six by ELISA1, and 11 by ELISA2. In samples from TBE patients, IgG-AI was positive in one case by CLA and ELISA2, and in 7 cases by ELISA1, whereas IgM-AI was positive in one case by CLA and in none by ELISA. IgG-AI and IgM-AI were not detected within the first week of disease. Duration of disease correlated with IgG-AI while IgM-AI results were heterogeneous for each test assay. Moreover, the levels of IgG-AI, but not IgM-AI, correlated with protein concentration in CSF. IgG is the relevant immunoglobulin isotype for detecting intrathecal synthesis of borrelia antibodies. The highest sensitivity and specificity were achieved by the antibody detection assay using VlsE IR6 peptide. Detection of IgM-AI yielded heterogenous results and did not support the laboratory diagnosis of LNB. PMID:24363169

  4. Engineering Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for producing recombinant proteins with simple glycoforms by zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated gene knockout of mannosyl (alpha-1,3-)-glycoprotein beta-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (Mgat1).

    PubMed

    Sealover, Natalie R; Davis, Angela M; Brooks, Jeanne K; George, Henry J; Kayser, Kevin J; Lin, Nan

    2013-08-10

    While complex N-linked glycoforms are often desired in biotherapeutic protein production, proteins with simple, homogeneous glycan structure have implications for X-ray crystallography and for recombinant therapeutics targeted to the mannose receptor of antigen presenting cells. Mannosyl (alpha-1,3-)-glycoprotein beta-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (Mgat1, also called GnTI) adds N-acetylglucosamine to the Man5GlcNAc2 (Man5) N-glycan structure as part of complex N-glycan synthesis. Here, we report the use of zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) genome editing technology to create Mgat1 disrupted Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. These cell lines allow for the production of recombinant proteins with Man5 as the predominant N-linked glycosylation species. This method provides advantages over previously reported methods to create Mgat1-deficient cell lines. The use of ZFN-based genome editing eliminates potential regulatory concerns associated with random chemical mutagenesis, while retaining the robust growth and productivity characteristics of the parental cell lines. These Mgat1 disrupted cell lines may be used to produce mannose receptor-targeted therapeutic proteins. Cell line generation work can be performed in both Mgat1 disrupted and wild-type host cell lines to conduct X-ray crystallography studies of protein therapeutics in the same cell line used for production. PMID:23777858

  5. Production of cellulosic ethanol and enzyme from waste fiber sludge using SSF, recycling of hydrolytic enzymes and yeast, and recombinant cellulase-producing Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Cavka, Adnan; Alriksson, Björn; Rose, Shaunita H; van Zyl, Willem H; Jönsson, Leif J

    2014-08-01

    Bioethanol and enzymes were produced from fiber sludges through sequential microbial cultivations. After a first simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with yeast, the bioethanol concentrations of sulfate and sulfite fiber sludges were 45.6 and 64.7 g/L, respectively. The second SSF, which included fresh fiber sludges and recycled yeast and enzymes from the first SSF, resulted in ethanol concentrations of 38.3 g/L for sulfate fiber sludge and 24.4 g/L for sulfite fiber sludge. Aspergillus niger carrying the endoglucanase-encoding Cel7B gene of Trichoderma reesei was grown in the spent fiber sludge hydrolysates. The cellulase activities obtained with spent hydrolysates of sulfate and sulfite fiber sludges were 2,700 and 2,900 nkat/mL, respectively. The high cellulase activities produced by using stillage and the significant ethanol concentrations produced in the second SSF suggest that onsite enzyme production and recycling of enzyme are realistic concepts that warrant further attention. PMID:24862324

  6. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  7. Oral immunization of interleukin-4 (IL-4) knockout mice with a recombinant Salmonella strain or cholera toxin reveals that CD4+ Th2 cells producing IL-6 and IL-10 are associated with mucosal immunoglobulin A responses.

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, N; Yamamoto, M; Vancott, J L; Chatfield, S N; Roberts, M; Bluethmann, H; Hiroi, T; Kiyono, H; McGhee, J R

    1996-01-01

    Mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses are often associated with Th2-type cells and derived cytokines, and interleukin-4 (IL-4) knockout (IL-4-/-) mice with impaired Th2 cells respond poorly to oral antigens. However, we have noted that IL-4-/- mice have normal mucosal IgA levels, which led us to query whether different oral delivery systems could elicit mucosal immunity. Two oral regimens were used: (i) a live recombinant Salmonella strain which expresses fragment C (ToxC) of tetanus toxin, and (ii) soluble tetanus toxoid (TT) with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. Oral immunization of IL-4-/- mice with recombinant Salmonella vaccine expressing ToxC induced brisk mucosal IgA and serum IgG (mainly IgG2a) anti-TT antibody responses. TT-specific CD4+ T cells from spleen or Peyer's patches produced gamma interferon, indicative of Th1 responses; however, IL-6 and IL-10 were also seen. Oral immunization of IL-4-/- mice with TT and CT induced weak mucosal IgA to TT; however, brisk IgA anti-CT-B responses and CT-B-specific CD4+ T cells producing IL-6 and IL-10 were also noted. These results show that although IL-4-dependent antibody responses are impaired, mucosal IgA responses are induced in IL-4-/- mice. These result suggest that certain cytokines, i.e., IL-6 and IL-10 from Th2-type cells, play an important compensatory role in the induction and regulation of mucosal IgA responses. PMID:8613355

  8. Stethoscopes as potential intrahospital carriers of pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Campos-Murguía, Alejandro; León-Lara, Ximena; Muñoz, Juan M; Macías, Alejandro E; Alvarez, José A

    2014-01-01

    Stethoscopes can take part in the transmission of health care-associated infections. We cultured 112 stethoscopes by direct imprint on blood agar to estimate the prevalence of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Forty-eight (47%) produced 50 potentially pathogenic microorganisms; from these, 43 (86%) were Staphylococcus aureus, of which 18 (42%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus. We concluded that stethoscopes should be considered as potential fomites and must be disinfected routinely before and after each patient contact. PMID:24176606

  9. Microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to inhibitors and stress

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Steven D.; Yang, Shihui

    2014-07-29

    The present invention provides genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced tolerance to stress and/or inhibitors such as sodium acetate and vanillin. The enhanced tolerance can be achieved by increasing the expression of a protein of the Sm-like superfamily such as a bacterial Hfq protein and a fungal Sm or Lsm protein. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using the genetically modified microorganisms of the present invention.

  10. Sensor arrays for detecting microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A sensor array for detecting a microorganism comprising first and second sensors electrically connected to an electrical measuring apparatus, wherein the sensors comprise a region of nonconducting organic material and a region of conducting material compositionally that is different than the nonconducting organic material and an electrical path through the regions of nonconducting organic material and the conducting material. A system for identifying microorganisms using the sensor array, a computer and a pattern recognition algorithm, such as a neural net are also disclosed.