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Sample records for microrna gene clusters

  1. A tripartite clustering analysis on microRNA, gene and disease model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chengcheng; Liu, Ying

    2012-02-01

    Alteration of gene expression in response to regulatory molecules or mutations could lead to different diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered to be involved in regulation of gene expression and a wide variety of diseases. In a tripartite biological network of human miRNAs, their predicted target genes and the diseases caused by altered expressions of these genes, valuable knowledge about the pathogenicity of miRNAs, involved genes and related disease classes can be revealed by co-clustering miRNAs, target genes and diseases simultaneously. Tripartite co-clustering can lead to more informative results than traditional co-clustering with only two kinds of members and pass the hidden relational information along the relation chain by considering multi-type members. Here we report a spectral co-clustering algorithm for k-partite graph to find clusters with heterogeneous members. We use the method to explore the potential relationships among miRNAs, genes and diseases. The clusters obtained from the algorithm have significantly higher density than randomly selected clusters, which means members in the same cluster are more likely to have common connections. Results also show that miRNAs in the same family based on the hairpin sequences tend to belong to the same cluster. We also validate the clustering results by checking the correlation of enriched gene functions and disease classes in the same cluster. Finally, widely studied miR-17-92 and its paralogs are analyzed as a case study to reveal that genes and diseases co-clustered with the miRNAs are in accordance with current research findings. PMID:22809308

  2. microRNAs in the Same Clusters Evolve to Coordinately Regulate Functionally Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yirong; Luo, Junjie; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small noncoding RNAs. The genomic locations of animal miRNAs are significantly clustered in discrete loci. We found duplication and de novo formation were important mechanisms to create miRNA clusters and the clustered miRNAs tend to be evolutionarily conserved. We proposed a "functional co-adaptation" model to explain how clustering helps newly emerged miRNAs survive and develop functions. We presented evidence that abundance of miRNAs in the same clusters were highly correlated and those miRNAs exerted cooperative repressive effects on target genes in human tissues. By transfecting miRNAs into human and fly cells and extensively profiling the transcriptome alteration with deep-sequencing, we further demonstrated the functional co-adaptation between new and old miRNAs in the miR-17-92 cluster. Our population genomic analysis suggest that positive Darwinian selection might be the driving force underlying the formation and evolution of miRNA clustering. Our model provided novel insights into mechanisms and evolutionary significance of miRNA clustering. PMID:27189568

  3. microRNAs in the Same Clusters Evolve to Coordinately Regulate Functionally Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yirong; Luo, Junjie; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small noncoding RNAs. The genomic locations of animal miRNAs are significantly clustered in discrete loci. We found duplication and de novo formation were important mechanisms to create miRNA clusters and the clustered miRNAs tend to be evolutionarily conserved. We proposed a “functional co-adaptation” model to explain how clustering helps newly emerged miRNAs survive and develop functions. We presented evidence that abundance of miRNAs in the same clusters were highly correlated and those miRNAs exerted cooperative repressive effects on target genes in human tissues. By transfecting miRNAs into human and fly cells and extensively profiling the transcriptome alteration with deep-sequencing, we further demonstrated the functional co-adaptation between new and old miRNAs in the miR-17–92 cluster. Our population genomic analysis suggest that positive Darwinian selection might be the driving force underlying the formation and evolution of miRNA clustering. Our model provided novel insights into mechanisms and evolutionary significance of miRNA clustering. PMID:27189568

  4. MicroRNA Clusters in the Adult Mouse Heart: Age-Associated Changes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Azhar, Gohar; Williams, Emmanuel D.; Rogers, Steven C.; Wei, Jeanne Y.

    2015-01-01

    The microRNAs and microRNA clusters have been implicated in normal cardiac development and also disease, including cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and arrhythmias. Since a microRNA cluster has from two to dozens of microRNAs, the expression of a microRNA cluster could have a substantial impact on its target genes. In the present study, the configuration and distribution of microRNA clusters in the mouse genome were examined at various inter-microRNA distances. Three important microRNA clusters that are significantly impacted during adult cardiac aging, the miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25, were also examined in terms of their genomic location, RNA transcript character, sequence homology, and their relationship with the corresponding microRNA families. Multiple microRNAs derived from the three clusters potentially target various protein components of the cdc42-SRF signaling pathway, which regulates cytoskeleton dynamics associated with cardiac structure and function. The data indicate that aging impacted the expression of both guide and passenger strands of the microRNA clusters; nutrient stress also affected the expression of the three microRNA clusters. The miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 clusters are likely to impact the Cdc42-SRF signaling pathway and thereby affect cardiac morphology and function during pathological conditions and the aging process. PMID:26221604

  5. Novel and Recently Evolved MicroRNA Clusters Regulate Expansive F-BOX Gene Networks through Phased Small Interfering RNAs in Wild Diploid Strawberry1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Rui; Ye, Songqing; Liu, Zongrang; Meyers, Blake C.; Liu, Zhongchi

    2015-01-01

    The wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) has recently emerged as an excellent model for cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) as well as other Rosaceae fruit crops due to its short seed-to-fruit cycle, diploidy, and sequenced genome. Deep sequencing and parallel analysis of RNA ends were used to identify F. vesca microRNAs (miRNAs) and their target genes, respectively. Thirty-eight novel and 31 known miRNAs were identified. Many known miRNAs targeted not only conserved mRNA targets but also developed new target genes in F. vesca. Significantly, two new clusters of miRNAs were found to collectively target 94 F-BOX (FBX) genes. One of the miRNAs in the new cluster is 22 nucleotides and triggers phased small interfering RNA production from six FBX genes, which amplifies the silencing to additional FBX genes. Comparative genomics revealed that the main novel miRNA cluster evolved from duplications of FBX genes. Finally, conserved trans-acting siRNA pathways were characterized and confirmed with distinct features. Our work identified novel miRNA-FBX networks in F. vesca and shed light on the evolution of miRNAs/phased small interfering RNA networks that regulate large gene families in higher plants. PMID:26143249

  6. Novel and Recently Evolved MicroRNA Clusters Regulate Expansive F-BOX Gene Networks through Phased Small Interfering RNAs in Wild Diploid Strawberry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Rui; Ye, Songqing; Liu, Zongrang; Meyers, Blake C; Liu, Zhongchi

    2015-09-01

    The wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) has recently emerged as an excellent model for cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) as well as other Rosaceae fruit crops due to its short seed-to-fruit cycle, diploidy, and sequenced genome. Deep sequencing and parallel analysis of RNA ends were used to identify F. vesca microRNAs (miRNAs) and their target genes, respectively. Thirty-eight novel and 31 known miRNAs were identified. Many known miRNAs targeted not only conserved mRNA targets but also developed new target genes in F. vesca. Significantly, two new clusters of miRNAs were found to collectively target 94 F-BOX (FBX) genes. One of the miRNAs in the new cluster is 22 nucleotides and triggers phased small interfering RNA production from six FBX genes, which amplifies the silencing to additional FBX genes. Comparative genomics revealed that the main novel miRNA cluster evolved from duplications of FBX genes. Finally, conserved trans-acting siRNA pathways were characterized and confirmed with distinct features. Our work identified novel miRNA-FBX networks in F. vesca and shed light on the evolution of miRNAs/phased small interfering RNA networks that regulate large gene families in higher plants. PMID:26143249

  7. The MicroRNA-23b/27b/24 Cluster Promotes Breast Cancer Lung Metastasis by Targeting Metastasis-suppressive Gene Prosaposin

    PubMed Central

    Ell, Brian; Qiu, Qiong; Wei, Yong; Mercatali, Laura; Ibrahim, Toni; Amadori, Dino; Kang, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to function as key regulators of tumor progression and metastasis. Recent studies have indicated that the miRNAs comprising the miR-23b/27b/24 cluster might influence tumor metastasis, although the precise nature of this regulation remains unclear. Here, expression of the miR-23b/27b/24 cluster is found to correlate with metastatic potential in mouse and human breast cancer cell lines and is elevated in metastatic lung lesions in human breast cancer patients. Ectopic expression of the miRNAs in the weakly metastatic mouse 4TO7 mammary tumor cell line had no effect on proliferation or morphology of tumor cells in vitro but was found to increase lung metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis. Furthermore, gene expression profiling analysis of miRNA overexpressing 4TO7 cells revealed the direct targeting of prosaposin (PSAP), which encodes a secreted protein found to be inversely correlated with metastatic progression in human breast cancer patients. Importantly, ectopic expression of PSAP was able to suppress the metastatic phenotype in highly metastatic 4T1 and MDA-MB-231 SCP28 cells, as well as in cells ectopically expressing miR-23b/27b/24. These findings support a metastasis-promoting function of the miR-23b/27b/24 cluster of miRNAs, which functions in part through the direct inhibition of PSAP. PMID:24966325

  8. Evolutionary Changes of the Target Sites of Two MicroRNAs Encoded in the Hox Gene Cluster of Drosophila and Other Insect Species

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Sayaka; Nozawa, Masafumi; Nei, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In animals, the target sites of a miR are generally located in the 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of messenger RNAs. However, how the target sites change during evolution is largely unknown. MiR-iab-4 and miR-iab-4as are known to regulate the expression of two Hox genes, Abd-A and Ubx, in Drosophila melanogaster. We have therefore studied the evolutionary changes of these two miR genes and their target sites of the Hox genes in Drosophila, other insect species, and Daphnia. Our homology search identified a single copy of each miR gene located in the same genomic position of the Hox gene cluster in all species examined. The seed nucleotide sequence was also the same for all species. Searching for the target sites in all Hox genes, we found several target sites of miR-iab-4 and miR-iab-4as in Antp in addition to Abd-A and Ubx in most insect species examined. Our phylogenetic analysis of target sites in Abd-A, Ubx, and Antp showed that the old target sites, which existed before the divergence of the 12 Drosophila species, have been well maintained in most species under purifying selection. By contrast, new target sites, which were generated during Drosophila evolution, were often lost in some species and mostly located in unalignable regions of the 3′ UTRs. These results indicate that these regions can be a potential source of generating new target sites, which results in multiple target genes for each miR in animals. PMID:21187351

  9. MicroRNA: Mechanism of Gene Regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA (miR) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts through activation of a specific cellular pathway. The small RNA classified as miR are short sequences of 18-26 nucleotide long, encoded by nuclear genes with distinctive...

  10. Identification of the miR-106b∼25 MicroRNA Cluster as a Proto-Oncogenic PTEN-Targeting Intron That Cooperates with Its Host Gene MCM7 in Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Poliseno, Laura; Salmena, Leonardo; Riccardi, Luisa; Fornari, Alessandro; Song, Min Sup; Hobbs, Robin M.; Sportoletti, Paolo; Varmeh, Shorheh; Egia, Ainara; Fedele, Giuseppe; Rameh, Lucia; Loda, Massimo; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) is a tumor suppressor that antagonizes signaling through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase–Akt pathway. We have demonstrated that subtle decreases in PTEN abundance can have critical consequences for tumorigenesis. Here, we used a computational approach to identify miR-22, miR-25, and miR-302 as three PTEN-targeting microRNA (miRNA) families found within nine genomic loci. We showed that miR-22 and the miR-106b∼25 cluster are aberrantly overexpressed in human prostate cancer, correlate with abundance of the miRNA processing enzyme DICER, and potentiate cellular transformation both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the intronic miR-106b∼25 cluster cooperates with its host gene MCM7 in cellular transformation both in vitro and in vivo, so that the concomitant overexpression of MCM7 and the miRNA cluster triggers prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in transgenic mice. Therefore, the MCM7 gene locus delivers two simultaneous oncogenic insults when amplified or overexpressed in human cancer. Thus, we have uncovered a proto-oncogenic miRNA-dependent network for PTEN regulation and defined the MCM7 locus as a critical factor in initiating prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:20388916

  11. Endogenous MCM7 MicroRNA Cluster as a Novel Platform to Multiplex Small Interfering and Nucleolar RNAs for Combinational HIV-1 Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Janet; Zhang, Jane; Li, Haitang; Ouellet, Dominique L.; DiGiusto, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Combinational therapy with small RNA inhibitory agents against multiple viral targets allows efficient inhibition of viral production by controlling gene expression at critical time points. Here we explore combinations of different classes of therapeutic anti-HIV-1 RNAs expressed from within the context of an intronic MCM7 (minichromosome maintenance complex component-7) platform that naturally harbors 3 microRNAs (miRNAs). We replaced the endogenous miRNAs with anti-HIV small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting HIV-1 tat and rev messages that function to induce post-transcriptional gene silencing by the RNA interference pathway, a nucleolar-localizing RNA ribozyme that targets the conserved U5 region of HIV-1 transcripts for degradation, and finally nucleolar trans-activation response (TAR) and Rev-binding element (RBE) RNA decoys designed to sequester HIV-1 Tat and Rev proteins inside the nucleolus. We demonstrate the versatility of the MCM7 platform in expressing and efficiently processing the siRNAs as miRNA mimics along with nucleolar small RNAs. Furthermore, three of the combinatorial constructs tested potently suppressed viral replication during a 1-month HIV challenge, with greater than 5-log inhibition compared with untransduced, HIV-1-infected CEM T lymphocytes. One of the most effective constructs contains an anti-HIV siRNA combined with a nucleolar-localizing U5 ribozyme and TAR decoy. This represents the first efficacious example of combining Drosha-processed siRNAs with small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP)-processed nucleolar RNA chimeras from a single intron platform for effective inhibition of viral replication. Moreover, we demonstrated enrichment/selection for cells expressing levels of the antiviral RNAs that provide optimal inhibition under the selective pressure of HIV. The combinations of si/snoRNAs represent a new paradigm for combinatorial RNA-based gene therapy applications. PMID:22834872

  12. MicroRNAs 296 and 298 are imprinted and part of the GNAS/Gnas cluster and miR-296 targets IKBKE and Tmed9

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Joan E.; Eaton, Sally A.; Underhill, Peter; Williams, Debbie; Peters, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is the phenomenon whereby a subset of genes is differentially expressed according to parental origin. Imprinted genes tend to occur in clusters, and microRNAs are associated with the majority of well-defined clusters of imprinted genes. We show here that two microRNAs, miR-296 and miR-298, are part of the imprinted Gnas/GNAS clusters in both mice and humans. Both microRNAs show imprinted expression and are expressed from the paternally derived allele, but not the maternal allele. They arise from a long, noncoding antisense transcript, Nespas, with a promoter more than 27 kb away. Nespas had been shown previously to act in cis to regulate imprinted gene expression within the Gnas cluster. Using microarrays and luciferase assays, IKBKE, involved in many signaling pathways, and Tmed9, a protein transporter, were verified as new targets of miR-296. Thus, Nespas has two clear functions: as a cis-acting regulator within an imprinted gene cluster and as a precursor of microRNAs that modulate gene expression in trans. Furthermore, imprinted microRNAs, including miR-296 and miR-298, impose a parental specific modulation of gene expression of their target genes. PMID:22114321

  13. The Two Stem Cell MicroRNA Gene Clusters C19MC and miR-371-3 Are Activated by Specific Chromosomal Rearrangements in a Subgroup of Thyroid Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Rippe, Volkhard; Dittberner, Lea; Lorenz, Verena N.; Drieschner, Norbert; Nimzyk, Rolf; Sendt, Wolfgang; Junker, Klaus; Belge, Gazanfer; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid adenomas are common benign human tumors with a high prevalence of about 5% of the adult population even in iodine sufficient areas. Rearrangements of chromosomal band 19q13.4 represent a frequent clonal cytogenetic deviation in these tumors making them the most frequent non-random chromosomal translocations in human epithelial tumors at all. Two microRNA (miRNA) gene clusters i.e. C19MC and miR-371-3 are located in close proximity to the breakpoint region of these chromosomal rearrangements and have been checked for a possible up-regulation due to the genomic alteration. In 4/5 cell lines established from thyroid adenomas with 19q13.4 rearrangements and 5/5 primary adenomas with that type of rearrangement both the C19MC and miR-371-3 cluster were found to be significantly overexpressed compared to controls lacking that particular chromosome abnormality. In the remaining cell line qRT-PCR revealed overexpression of members of the miR-371-3 cluster only which might be due to a deletion accompanying the chromosomal rearrangement in that case. In depth molecular characterization of the breakpoint in a cell line from one adenoma of this type reveals the existence of large Pol-II mRNA fragments as the most likely source of up-regulation of the C19MC cluster. The up-regulation of the clusters is likely to be causally associated with the pathogenesis of the corresponding tumors. Of note, the expression of miRNAs miR-520c and miR-373 is known to characterize stem cells and in terms of molecular oncology has been implicated in invasive growth of epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo thus allowing to delineate a distinct molecular subtype of thyroid adenomas. Besides thyroid adenomas rearrangements of 19q13.4 are frequently found in other human neoplasias as well, suggesting that activation of both clusters might be a more general phenomenon in human neoplasias. PMID:20209130

  14. Gene regulation by dietary microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zempleni, Janos; Baier, Scott R; Howard, Katherine M; Cui, Juan

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) silence genes through destabilizing mRNA or preventing translation of mRNA, thereby playing an essential role in gene silencing. Traditionally, miRNAs have been considered endogenous regulators of genes, i.e., miRNAs synthesized by an organism regulate the genes in that organism. Recently, that dogma has been challenged in studies suggesting that food-borne miRNAs are bioavailable and affect gene expression in mice and humans. While the evidence in support of this theory may be considered weak for miRNAs that originate in plants, there is compelling evidence to suggest that humans use bovine miRNAs in cow's milk and avian miRNAs in chicken eggs for gene regulation. Importantly, evidence also suggests that mice fed a miRNA-depleted diet cannot compensate for dietary depletion by increased endogenous synthesis. Bioinformatics predictions implicate bovine miRNAs in the regulation of genes that play roles in human health and development. Current challenges in this area of research include that some miRNAs are unable to establish a cause-and-effect between miRNA depletion and disease in miRNA knockout mice, and sequence similarities and identities for bovine and human miRNAs render it difficult to distinguish between exogenous and endogenous miRNAs. Based on what is currently known about dietary miRNAs, the body of evidence appears to be sufficient to consider milk miRNA bioactive compounds in foods, and to increase research activities in this field. PMID:26222444

  15. Computational prediction of microRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Jana; Langenberger, David; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The computational identification of novel microRNA (miRNA) genes is a challenging task in bioinformatics. Massive amounts of data describing unknown functional RNA transcripts have to be analyzed for putative miRNA candidates with automated computational pipelines. Beyond those miRNAs that meet the classical definition, high-throughput sequencing techniques have revealed additional miRNA-like molecules that are derived by alternative biogenesis pathways. Exhaustive bioinformatics analyses on such data involve statistical issues as well as precise sequence and structure inspection not only of the functional mature part but also of the whole precursor sequence of the putative miRNA. Apart from a considerable amount of species-specific miRNAs, the majority of all those genes are conserved at least among closely related organisms. Some miRNAs, however, can be traced back to very early points in the evolution of eukaryotic species. Thus, the investigation of the conservation of newly found miRNA candidates comprises an important step in the computational annotation of miRNAs.Topics covered in this chapter include a review on the obvious problem of miRNA annotation and family definition, recommended pipelines of computational miRNA annotation or detection, and an overview of current computer tools for the prediction of miRNAs and their limitations. The chapter closes discussing how those bioinformatic approaches address the problem of faithful miRNA prediction and correct annotation. PMID:24639171

  16. Discovery of MicroRNA169 Gene Copies in Genomes of Flowering Plants through Positional Information

    PubMed Central

    Calviño, Martín; Messing, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Expansion and contraction of microRNA (miRNA) families can be studied in sequenced plant genomes through sequence alignments. Here, we focused on miR169 in sorghum because of its implications in drought tolerance and stem-sugar content. We were able to discover many miR169 copies that have escaped standard genome annotation methods. A new miR169 cluster was found on sorghum chromosome 1. This cluster is composed of the previously annotated sbi-MIR169o together with two newly found MIR169 copies, named sbi-MIR169t and sbi-MIR169u. We also found that a miR169 cluster on sorghum chr7 consisting of sbi-MIR169l, sbi-MIR169m, and sbi-MIR169n is contained within a chromosomal inversion of at least 500 kb that occurred in sorghum relative to Brachypodium, rice, foxtail millet, and maize. Surprisingly, synteny of chromosomal segments containing MIR169 copies with linked bHLH and CONSTANS-LIKE genes extended from Brachypodium to dictotyledonous species such as grapevine, soybean, and cassava, indicating a strong conservation of linkages of certain flowering and/or plant height genes and microRNAs, which may explain linkage drag of drought and flowering traits and would have consequences for breeding new varieties. Furthermore, alignment of rice and sorghum orthologous regions revealed the presence of two additional miR169 gene copies (miR169r and miR169s) on sorghum chr7 that formed an antisense miRNA gene pair. Both copies are expressed and target different set of genes. Synteny-based analysis of microRNAs among different plant species should lead to the discovery of new microRNAs in general and contribute to our understanding of their evolution. PMID:23348041

  17. Discovery of MicroRNA169 gene copies in genomes of flowering plants through positional information.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Martín; Messing, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Expansion and contraction of microRNA (miRNA) families can be studied in sequenced plant genomes through sequence alignments. Here, we focused on miR169 in sorghum because of its implications in drought tolerance and stem-sugar content. We were able to discover many miR169 copies that have escaped standard genome annotation methods. A new miR169 cluster was found on sorghum chromosome 1. This cluster is composed of the previously annotated sbi-MIR169o together with two newly found MIR169 copies, named sbi-MIR169t and sbi-MIR169u. We also found that a miR169 cluster on sorghum chr7 consisting of sbi-MIR169l, sbi-MIR169m, and sbi-MIR169n is contained within a chromosomal inversion of at least 500 kb that occurred in sorghum relative to Brachypodium, rice, foxtail millet, and maize. Surprisingly, synteny of chromosomal segments containing MIR169 copies with linked bHLH and CONSTANS-LIKE genes extended from Brachypodium to dictotyledonous species such as grapevine, soybean, and cassava, indicating a strong conservation of linkages of certain flowering and/or plant height genes and microRNAs, which may explain linkage drag of drought and flowering traits and would have consequences for breeding new varieties. Furthermore, alignment of rice and sorghum orthologous regions revealed the presence of two additional miR169 gene copies (miR169r and miR169s) on sorghum chr7 that formed an antisense miRNA gene pair. Both copies are expressed and target different set of genes. Synteny-based analysis of microRNAs among different plant species should lead to the discovery of new microRNAs in general and contribute to our understanding of their evolution. PMID:23348041

  18. Identification of microRNA Genes in Three Opisthorchiids

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Vladimir Y.; Afonnikov, Dmitry A.; Vasiliev, Gennady V.; Kashina, Elena V.; Sripa, Banchob; Mordvinov, Viacheslav A.; Katokhin, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Opisthorchis felineus, O. viverrini, and Clonorchis sinensis (family Opisthorchiidae) are parasitic flatworms that pose a serious threat to humans in some countries and cause opisthorchiasis/clonorchiasis. Chronic disease may lead to a risk of carcinogenesis in the biliary ducts. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that control gene expression at post-transcriptional level and are implicated in the regulation of various cellular processes during the parasite- host interplay. However, to date, the miRNAs of opisthorchiid flukes, in particular those essential for maintaining their complex biology and parasitic mode of existence, have not been satisfactorily described. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a SOLiD deep sequencing-bioinformatic approach, we identified 43 novel and 18 conserved miRNAs for O. felineus (miracidia, metacercariae and adult worms), 20 novel and 16 conserved miRNAs for O. viverrini (adult worms), and 33 novel and 18 conserved miRNAs for C. sinensis (adult worms). The analysis of the data revealed differences in the expression level of conserved miRNAs among the three species and among three the developmental stages of O. felineus. Analysis of miRNA genes revealed two gene clusters, one cluster-like region and one intronic miRNA in the genome. The presence and structure of the two gene clusters were validated using a PCR-based approach in the three flukes. Conclusions This study represents a comprehensive description of miRNAs in three members of the family Opistorchiidae, significantly expands our knowledge of miRNAs in multicellular parasites and provides a basis for understanding the structural and functional evolution of miRNAs in these metazoan parasites. Results of this study also provides novel resources for deeper understanding the complex parasite biology, for further research on the pathogenesis and molecular events of disease induced by the liver flukes. The present data may also facilitate the development of novel

  19. The microRNA-132 and microRNA-212 cluster regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and survival with age by buffering FOXO3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Arnav; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Sinha, Nikita; Marinov, Georgi K.; Mann, Mati; Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Galimidi, Rachel P.; Du, Xiaomi; Erikci, Erdem; Regev, Aviv; Chowdhury, Kamal; Baltimore, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary MicroRNAs are critical post-transcriptional regulators of hematopoietic cell-fate decisions, though little remains known about their role in aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We found that the microRNA-212/132 cluster (Mirc19) is enriched in HSCs and is up-regulated during aging. Both over-expression and deletion of microRNAs in this cluster leads to inappropriate hematopoiesis with age. Enforced expression of miR-132 in the bone marrow of mice led to rapid HSC cycling and depletion. A genetic deletion of Mirc19 in mice resulted in HSCs that had altered cycling, function, and survival in response to growth factor starvation. We found that miR-132 exerted its effect on aging HSCs by targeting the transcription factor FOXO3, a known aging associated gene. Our data demonstrates that Mirc19 plays a role in maintaining balanced hematopoietic output by buffering FOXO3 expression. We have thus identified it as a potential target that may play a role in age-related hematopoietic defects. PMID:26084022

  20. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-03-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes. PMID:25644246

  1. Genetic variants in microRNA genes: impact on microRNA expression, function, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cammaerts, Sophia; Strazisar, Mojca; De Rijk, Peter; Del Favero, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression and like any other gene, their coding sequences are subject to genetic variation. Variants in miRNA genes can have profound effects on miRNA functionality at all levels, including miRNA transcription, maturation, and target specificity, and as such they can also contribute to disease. The impact of variants in miRNA genes is the focus of the present review. To put these effects into context, we first discuss the requirements of miRNA transcripts for maturation. In the last part an overview of available databases and tools and experimental approaches to investigate miRNA variants related to human disease is presented. PMID:26052338

  2. Sho-saiko-to, a traditional herbal medicine, regulates gene expression and biological function by way of microRNAs in primary mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sho-saiko-to (SST) (also known as so-shi-ho-tang or xiao-chai-hu-tang) has been widely prescribed for chronic liver diseases in traditional Oriental medicine. Despite the substantial amount of clinical evidence for SST, its molecular mechanism has not been clearly identified at a genome-wide level. Methods By using a microarray, we analyzed the temporal changes of messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA expression in primary mouse hepatocytes after SST treatment. The pattern of genes regulated by SST was identified by using time-series microarray analysis. The biological function of genes was measured by pathway analysis. For the identification of the exact targets of the microRNAs, a permutation-based correlation method was implemented in which the temporal expression of mRNAs and microRNAs were integrated. The similarity of the promoter structure between temporally regulated genes was measured by analyzing the transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region. Results The SST-regulated gene expression had two major patterns: (1) a temporally up-regulated pattern (463 genes) and (2) a temporally down-regulated pattern (177 genes). The integration of the genes and microRNA demonstrated that 155 genes could be the targets of microRNAs from the temporally up-regulated pattern and 19 genes could be the targets of microRNAs from the temporally down-regulated pattern. The temporally up-regulated pattern by SST was associated with signaling pathways such as the cell cycle pathway, whereas the temporally down-regulated pattern included drug metabolism-related pathways and immune-related pathways. All these pathways could be possibly associated with liver regenerative activity of SST. Genes targeted by microRNA were moreover associated with different biological pathways from the genes not targeted by microRNA. An analysis of promoter similarity indicated that co-expressed genes after SST treatment were clustered into subgroups, depending on the temporal

  3. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by microRNA in intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    HU, PENG; FENG, BO; WANG, GUANGLIN; NING, BIN; JIA, TANGHONG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of the development of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) by bioinformatics based on microarray datasets. GSE 19943 and GSE 34095 datasets downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus data were used to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in IDD. The correlation between microRNAs and target genes was investigated using different algorithms. The underlying molecular mechanisms of the target genes were then explored using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway and Gene Ontology function enrichment analysis. A total of 9 differentially expressed microRNAs, including 3 down- and 6 upregulated microRNAs and 850 DEGs were identified in tissue from patients with IDD. Two regulation networks of the target genes by microRNAs were constructed, including 33 upregulated microRNA-target gene pairs and 4 downregulated microRNA-target gene pairs. Certain target genes had been demonstrated to be involved in IDD progression via various pathways, including in the cell cycle and pathways in cancer. In addition, two important microRNAs (microRNA-222 and microRNA-589) were identified that were pivotal for the development of IDD, and their target genes, CDKNAB and SMAD4. In conclusion, a comprehensive miRNA-target gene regulatory network was constructed, which was found to be important in IDD progression. PMID:26134418

  4. MicroRNA-10 modulates Hox genes expression during Nile tilapia embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Juliana; Pinhal, Danillo; Moxon, Simon; Campos, Camila Lovaglio; Münsterberg, Andrea; Martins, Cesar

    2016-05-01

    Hox gene clusters encode a family of transcription factors that govern anterior-posterior axis patterning during embryogenesis in all bilaterian animals. The time and place of Hox gene expression are largely determined by the relative position of each gene within its cluster. Furthermore, Hox genes were shown to have their expression fine-tuned by regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs). However, the mechanisms of miRNA-mediated regulation of these transcription factors during fish early development remain largely unknown. Here we have profiled three highly expressed miR-10 family members of Nile tilapia at early embryonic development, determined their genomic organization as well as performed functional experiments for validation of target genes. Quantitative analysis during developmental stages showed miR-10 family expression negatively correlates with the expression of HoxA3a, HoxB3a and HoxD10a genes, as expected for bona fide miRNA-mRNA interactions. Moreover, luciferase assays demonstrated that HoxB3a and HoxD10a are targeted by miR-10b-5p. Overall, our data indicate that the miR-10 family directly regulates members of the Hox gene family during Nile tilapia embryogenesis. PMID:26980108

  5. Guidelines for the functional annotation of microRNAs using the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Rachael P; Sitnikov, Dmitry; Orlic-Milacic, Marija; Balakrishnan, Rama; D'Eustachio, Peter; Gillespie, Marc E; Howe, Doug; Kalea, Anastasia Z; Maegdefessel, Lars; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Petri, Victoria; Smith, Jennifer R; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wood, Valerie; Zampetaki, Anna; Mayr, Manuel; Lovering, Ruth C

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNA regulation of developmental and cellular processes is a relatively new field of study, and the available research data have not been organized to enable its inclusion in pathway and network analysis tools. The association of gene products with terms from the Gene Ontology is an effective method to analyze functional data, but until recently there has been no substantial effort dedicated to applying Gene Ontology terms to microRNAs. Consequently, when performing functional analysis of microRNA data sets, researchers have had to rely instead on the functional annotations associated with the genes encoding microRNA targets. In consultation with experts in the field of microRNA research, we have created comprehensive recommendations for the Gene Ontology curation of microRNAs. This curation manual will enable provision of a high-quality, reliable set of functional annotations for the advancement of microRNA research. Here we describe the key aspects of the work, including development of the Gene Ontology to represent this data, standards for describing the data, and guidelines to support curators making these annotations. The full microRNA curation guidelines are available on the GO Consortium wiki (http://wiki.geneontology.org/index.php/MicroRNA_GO_annotation_manual). PMID:26917558

  6. Guidelines for the functional annotation of microRNAs using the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    D'Eustachio, Peter; Smith, Jennifer R.; Zampetaki, Anna

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA regulation of developmental and cellular processes is a relatively new field of study, and the available research data have not been organized to enable its inclusion in pathway and network analysis tools. The association of gene products with terms from the Gene Ontology is an effective method to analyze functional data, but until recently there has been no substantial effort dedicated to applying Gene Ontology terms to microRNAs. Consequently, when performing functional analysis of microRNA data sets, researchers have had to rely instead on the functional annotations associated with the genes encoding microRNA targets. In consultation with experts in the field of microRNA research, we have created comprehensive recommendations for the Gene Ontology curation of microRNAs. This curation manual will enable provision of a high-quality, reliable set of functional annotations for the advancement of microRNA research. Here we describe the key aspects of the work, including development of the Gene Ontology to represent this data, standards for describing the data, and guidelines to support curators making these annotations. The full microRNA curation guidelines are available on the GO Consortium wiki (http://wiki.geneontology.org/index.php/MicroRNA_GO_annotation_manual). PMID:26917558

  7. Identification of microRNAs expressed highly in pancreatic islet-like cell clusters differentiated from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Zhi; Yu, Sung-Liang; Singh, Sher; Kao, Li-Pin; Tsai, Zong-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Shoei-Lung Li, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune destruction of pancreatic islet beta cell disease, making it important to find a new alternative source of the islet beta cells to replace the damaged cells. hES (human embryonic stem) cells possess unlimited self-renewal and pluripotency and thus have the potential to provide an unlimited supply of different cell types for tissue replacement. The hES-T3 cells with normal female karyotype were first differentiated into EBs (embryoid bodies) and then induced to generate the T3pi (pancreatic islet-like cell clusters derived from T3 cells), which expressed pancreatic islet cell-specific markers of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. The expression profiles of microRNAs and mRNAs from the T3pi were analysed and compared with those of undifferentiated hES-T3 cells and differentiated EBs. MicroRNAs negatively regulate the expression of protein-coding mRNAs. The T3pi showed very high expression of microRNAs, miR-186, miR-199a and miR-339, which down-regulated the expression of LIN28, PRDM1, CALB1, GCNT2, RBM47, PLEKHH1, RBPMS2 and PAK6. Therefore, these microRNAs and their target genes are very likely to play important regulatory roles in the development of pancreas and/or differentiation of islet cells, and they may be manipulated to increase the proportion of beta cells and insulin synthesis in the differentiated T3pi for cell therapy of type I diabetics. PMID:20735361

  8. Identification of clustered microRNAs using an ab initio prediction method

    PubMed Central

    Sewer, Alain; Paul, Nicodème; Landgraf, Pablo; Aravin, Alexei; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Brownstein, Michael J; Tuschl, Thomas; van Nimwegen, Erik; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2005-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous 21 to 23-nucleotide RNA molecules that regulate protein-coding gene expression in plants and animals via the RNA interference pathway. Hundreds of them have been identified in the last five years and very recent works indicate that their total number is still larger. Therefore miRNAs gene discovery remains an important aspect of understanding this new and still widely unknown regulation mechanism. Bioinformatics approaches have proved to be very useful toward this goal by guiding the experimental investigations. Results In this work we describe our computational method for miRNA prediction and the results of its application to the discovery of novel mammalian miRNAs. We focus on genomic regions around already known miRNAs, in order to exploit the property that miRNAs are occasionally found in clusters. Starting with the known human, mouse and rat miRNAs we analyze 20 kb of flanking genomic regions for the presence of putative precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs). Each genome is analyzed separately, allowing us to study the species-specific identity and genome organization of miRNA loci. We only use cross-species comparisons to make conservative estimates of the number of novel miRNAs. Our ab initio method predicts between fifty and hundred novel pre-miRNAs for each of the considered species. Around 30% of these already have experimental support in a large set of cloned mammalian small RNAs. The validation rate among predicted cases that are conserved in at least one other species is higher, about 60%, and many of them have not been detected by prediction methods that used cross-species comparisons. A large fraction of the experimentally confirmed predictions correspond to an imprinted locus residing on chromosome 14 in human, 12 in mouse and 6 in rat. Our computational tool can be accessed on the world-wide-web. Conclusion Our results show that the assumption that many miRNAs occur in clusters is fruitful for the discovery of

  9. Persistence drives gene clustering in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Gang; Rocha, Eduardo PC; Danchin, Antoine

    2008-01-01

    Background Gene clustering plays an important role in the organization of the bacterial chromosome and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain its extent. However, the controversies raised about the validity of each of these mechanisms remind us that the cause of this gene organization remains an open question. Models proposed to explain clustering did not take into account the function of the gene products nor the likely presence or absence of a given gene in a genome. However, genomes harbor two very different categories of genes: those genes present in a majority of organisms – persistent genes – and those present in very few organisms – rare genes. Results We show that two classes of genes are significantly clustered in bacterial genomes: the highly persistent and the rare genes. The clustering of rare genes is readily explained by the selfish operon theory. Yet, genes persistently present in bacterial genomes are also clustered and we try to understand why. We propose a model accounting specifically for such clustering, and show that indispensability in a genome with frequent gene deletion and insertion leads to the transient clustering of these genes. The model describes how clusters are created via the gene flux that continuously introduces new genes while deleting others. We then test if known selective processes, such as co-transcription, physical interaction or functional neighborhood, account for the stabilization of these clusters. Conclusion We show that the strong selective pressure acting on the function of persistent genes, in a permanent state of flux of genes in bacterial genomes, maintaining their size fairly constant, that drives persistent genes clustering. A further selective stabilization process might contribute to maintaining the clustering. PMID:18179692

  10. MicroRNA and gene expression patterns in the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Ping; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Stroncek, David F

    2009-01-01

    Background The unique features of human embryonic stem (hES) cells make them the best candidate resource for both cell replacement therapy and development research. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the simultaneous maintenance of their self-renewal properties and undifferentiated state remain unclear. Non-coding microRNAs (miRNA) which regulate mRNA cleavage and inhibit encoded protein translation exhibit temporal or tissue-specific expression patterns and they play an important role in development timing. Results In this study, we analyzed miRNA and gene expression profiles among samples from 3 hES cell lines (H9, I6 and BG01v), differentiated embryoid bodies (EB) derived from H9 cells at different time points, and 5 adult cell types including Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMVEC), Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC), Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells (UASMC), Normal Human Astrocytes (NHA), and Lung Fibroblasts (LFB). This analysis rendered 104 miRNAs and 776 genes differentially expressed among the three cell types. Selected differentially expressed miRNAs and genes were further validated and confirmed by quantitative real-time-PCR (qRT-PCR). Especially, members of the miR-302 cluster on chromosome 4 and miR-520 cluster on chromosome 19 were highly expressed in undifferentiated hES cells. MiRNAs in these two clusters displayed similar expression levels. The members of these two clusters share a consensus 7-mer seed sequence and their targeted genes had overlapping functions. Among the targeted genes, genes with chromatin structure modification function are enriched suggesting a role in the maintenance of chromatin structure. We also found that the expression level of members of the two clusters, miR-520b and miR-302c, were negatively correlated with their targeted genes based on gene expression analysis Conclusion We identified the expression patterns of miRNAs and gene transcripts in the undifferentiation of human embryonic

  11. MicroRNA GENE EXPRESSION SIGNATURES IN THE DEVELOPING NEURAL TUBE

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Brock, Guy; Appana, Savitri; Webb, Cynthia; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neurulation requires precise, spatio-temporal expression of numerous genes and coordinated interaction of signal transduction and gene regulatory networks, disruption of which may contribute to the etiology of neural tube (NT) defects. MicroRNAs are key modulators of cell and tissue differentiation. In order to define potential roles of miRNAs in development of the murine NT, miRNA microarray analysis was conducted to establish expression profiles, and identify miRNA target genes and functional gene networks. METHODS miRNA expression profiles in murine embryonic NTs derived from gestational days 8.5, 9.0 and 9.5 were defined and compared utilizing miRXplore™ microarrays from Miltenyi Biotech GmbH. Gene expression changes were verified by TaqMan™ quantitative Real-Time PCR. clValid R package and the UPGMA (hierarchical) clustering method were utilized for cluster analysis of the microarray data. Functional associations among selected miRNAs were examined via Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. RESULTS miRXplore™ chips enabled examination of 609 murine miRNAs. Expression of approximately 12% of these was detected in murine embryonic NTs. Clustering analysis revealed several developmentally regulated expression clusters among these expressed genes. Target analysis of differentially expressed miRNAs enabled identification of numerous target genes associated with cellular processes essential for normal NT development. Utilization of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed interactive biological networks which connected differentially expressed miRNAs with their target genes, and highlighted functional relationships. CONCLUSIONS The present study defined unique gene expression signatures of a range of miRNAs in the developing NT during the critical period of NT morphogenesis. Analysis of miRNA target genes and gene interaction pathways revealed that specific miRNAs may direct expression of numerous genes encoding proteins which have been shown to be indispensable

  12. microRNA and gene networks in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minghui; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Kunhao; Wang, Ning; Li, Yang

    2013-10-01

    To date, scientists have obtained a substantial amount of knowledge with regard to genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in pancreatic cancer (PC). However, deciphering the regulatory mechanism of these genes and miRNAs remains difficult. In the present study, three regulatory networks consisting of a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network, were constructed in order to identify the mechanisms and certain key miRNA and gene pathways in PC. The interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes and an miRNA and its host gene were investigated. The present study compared and analyzed the similarities and differences between the three networks in order to distinguish the key pathways. Certain pathways involving the differentially-expressed genes and miRNAs demonstrated specific features. TP53 and hsa-miR-125b were observed to form a self-adaptation association. A further 16 significant differentially-expressed miRNAs were obtained and it was observed that an miRNA and its host gene exhibit specific features in PC, for example, hsa-miR-196a-1 and its host gene, HOXB7, form a self-adaptation association. The differentially-expressed network partially illuminated the mechanism of PC. The present study provides comprehensive data that is associated with PC and may aid future studies in obtaining pertinent data results with regards to PC. In the future, an improved understanding of PC may be obtained through an increased knowledge of the occurrence, mechanism, improvement, metastasis and treatment of the disease. PMID:24137477

  13. Identification of conserved and novel microRNAs in Manduca sexta and their possible roles in the expression regulation of immunity-related genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiufeng; Zheng, Yun; Jagadeeswaran, Guru; Ren, Ren; Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Jiang, Haobo

    2014-04-01

    The tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta has served as a model for insect biochemical and physiological research for decades. However, knowledge of the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by microRNAs is still rudimentary in this species. Our previous study (Zhang et al., 2012) identified 163 conserved and 13 novel microRNAs in M. sexta, most of which were present at low levels in pupae. To identify additional M. sexta microRNAs and more importantly to examine their possible roles in the expression regulation of immunity-related genes, we constructed four small RNA libraries using fat body and hemocytes from naïve or bacteria-injected larvae and obtained 32.9 million reads of 18-31 nucleotides by Illumina sequencing. Mse-miR-929 and mse-miR-1b (antisense microRNA of mse-miR-1) were predicted in the previous study and now found to be conserved microRNAs in the tissue samples. We also found four novel microRNAs, two of which result from a gene cluster. Mse-miR-281-star, mse-miR-965-star, mse-miR-31-star, and mse-miR-9b-star were present at higher levels than their respective mature strands. Abundance changes of microRNAs were observed after the immune challenge. Based on the quantitative data of mRNA levels in control and induced fat body and hemocytes as well as the results of microRNA target site prediction, we suggest that certain microRNAs and microRNA*s regulate gene expression for pattern recognition, prophenoloxidase activation, cellular responses, antimicrobial peptide synthesis, and conserved intracellular signal transduction (Toll, IMD, JAK-STAT, MAPK-JNK-p38, and small interfering RNA pathways). In summary, this study has enriched our knowledge on M. sexta microRNAs and how some of them may participate in the expression regulation of immunity-related genes. PMID:24508515

  14. Birth and expression evolution of mammalian microRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Julien; Lemoine, Frédéric; Soumillon, Magali; Liechti, Angélica; Weier, Manuela; Guschanski, Katerina; Hu, Haiyang; Khaitovich, Philipp; Kaessmann, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are major post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, yet their origins and functional evolution in mammals remain little understood due to the lack of appropriate comparative data. Using RNA sequencing, we have generated extensive and comparable miRNA data for five organs in six species that represent all main mammalian lineages and birds (the evolutionary outgroup) with the aim to unravel the evolution of mammalian miRNAs. Our analyses reveal an overall expansion of miRNA repertoires in mammals, with threefold accelerated birth rates of miRNA families in placentals and marsupials, facilitated by the de novo emergence of miRNAs in host gene introns. Generally, our analyses suggest a high rate of miRNA family turnover in mammals with many newly emerged miRNA families being lost soon after their formation. Selectively preserved mammalian miRNA families gradually evolved higher expression levels, as well as altered mature sequences and target gene repertoires, and were apparently mainly recruited to exert regulatory functions in nervous tissues. However, miRNAs that originated on the X chromosome evolved high expression levels and potentially diverse functions during spermatogenesis, including meiosis, through selectively driven duplication-divergence processes. Overall, our study thus provides detailed insights into the birth and evolution of mammalian miRNA genes and the associated selective forces. PMID:23034410

  15. Microarray based analysis of gene regulation by microRNA in intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Feng, Bo; Wang, Guanglin; Ning, Bin; Jia, Tanghong

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of the development of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) by bioinformatics based on microarray datasets. GSE 19943 and GSE 34095 datasets downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus data were used to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in IDD. The correlation between microRNAs and target genes was investigated using different algorithms. The underlying molecular mechanisms of the target genes were then explored using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway and Gene Ontology function enrichment analysis. A total of 9 differentially expressed microRNAs, including 3 down‑ and 6 upregulated microRNAs and 850 DEGs were identified in tissue from patients with IDD. Two regulation networks of the target genes by microRNAs were constructed, including 33 upregulated microRNA‑target gene pairs and 4 downregulated microRNA‑target gene pairs. Certain target genes had been demonstrated to be involved in IDD progression via various pathways, including in the cell cycle and pathways in cancer. In addition, two important microRNAs (microRNA‑222 and microRNA‑589) were identified that were pivotal for the development of IDD, and their target genes, CDKNAB and SMAD4. In conclusion, a comprehensive miRNA‑target gene regulatory network was constructed, which was found to be important in IDD progression. PMID:26134418

  16. Altered Spinal MicroRNA-146a and the MicroRNA-183 Cluster Contribute to Osteoarthritic Pain in Knee Joints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Kc, Ranjan; Gibson, Gary; Chen, Di; Corbett, Grant T; Pahan, Kalipada; Fayyaz, Sana; Kim, Jae-Sung; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Suh, Joon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Examine whether altered expression of microRNAs in central nervous system components is pathologically linked to chronic knee joint pain in osteoarthritis. Methods A surgical animal model for knee joint OA was generated by medial meniscus transection in rats followed by behavioral pain tests. Relationships between pathological changes in knee joint and development of chronic joint pain were examined by histology and imaging analyses. Alterations in microRNAs associated with OA-evoked pain sensation were determined in bilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal dorsal horn by microRNA array followed by individual microRNA analyses. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of selected microRNAs (miR-146a and miR-183 cluster) were conducted to identify target pain mediators regulated by these selective microRNAs in glial cells. Results The ipsilateral hind leg displayed significantly increased hyperalgesia after 4 weeks of surgery and sensitivity was sustained for the remainder of the 8 week experimental period (F=341, P<0.001). The development of OA-induced chronic pain was correlated with pathological changes in the knee joints as assessed by histological and imaging analyses. MicroRNA analyses showed that miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster were markedly reduced in the sensory neurons in DRG (L4/L5) and spinal cord from animals experiencing knee joint OA pain. The downregulation of miR-146a and/or the miR-183 cluster in the central compartments (DRG and spinal cord) are closely associated with the upregulation of inflammatory pain mediators. The corroboration between decreases in these signature microRNAs and their specific target pain mediators were further confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function analyses in glia, the major cellular component of the central nervous system (CNS). Conclusion MicroRNA therapy using miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster could be powerful therapeutic intervention for OA in alleviating joint pain and concomitantly regenerating

  17. MicroRNAs Form Triplexes with Double Stranded DNA at Sequence-Specific Binding Sites; a Eukaryotic Mechanism via which microRNAs Could Directly Alter Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Christy R.; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Waddell, M. Brett; Ridout, Granger; Naeve, Deanna; Leuze, Michael; LoCascio, Philip F.; Panetta, John C.; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Naeve, Clayton W.; Uberbacher, Edward C.; Bonten, Erik J.; Evans, William E.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are important regulators of gene expression, acting primarily by binding to sequence-specific locations on already transcribed messenger RNAs (mRNA) and typically down-regulating their stability or translation. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs may also play a role in up-regulating mRNA transcription levels, although a definitive mechanism has not been established. Double-helical DNA is capable of forming triple-helical structures through Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen interactions in the major groove of the duplex, and we show physical evidence (i.e., NMR, FRET, SPR) that purine or pyrimidine-rich microRNAs of appropriate length and sequence form triple-helical structures with purine-rich sequences of duplex DNA, and identify microRNA sequences that favor triplex formation. We developed an algorithm (Trident) to search genome-wide for potential triplex-forming sites and show that several mammalian and non-mammalian genomes are enriched for strong microRNA triplex binding sites. We show that those genes containing sequences favoring microRNA triplex formation are markedly enriched (3.3 fold, p<2.2 × 10−16) for genes whose expression is positively correlated with expression of microRNAs targeting triplex binding sequences. This work has thus revealed a new mechanism by which microRNAs could interact with gene promoter regions to modify gene transcription. PMID:26844769

  18. MicroRNAs Form Triplexes with Double Stranded DNA at Sequence-Specific Binding Sites; a Eukaryotic Mechanism via which microRNAs Could Directly Alter Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Paugh, Steven W; Coss, David R; Bao, Ju; Laudermilk, Lucas T; Grace, Christy R; Ferreira, Antonio M; Waddell, M Brett; Ridout, Granger; Naeve, Deanna; Leuze, Michael; LoCascio, Philip F; Panetta, John C; Wilkinson, Mark R; Pui, Ching-Hon; Naeve, Clayton W; Uberbacher, Edward C; Bonten, Erik J; Evans, William E

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs are important regulators of gene expression, acting primarily by binding to sequence-specific locations on already transcribed messenger RNAs (mRNA) and typically down-regulating their stability or translation. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs may also play a role in up-regulating mRNA transcription levels, although a definitive mechanism has not been established. Double-helical DNA is capable of forming triple-helical structures through Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen interactions in the major groove of the duplex, and we show physical evidence (i.e., NMR, FRET, SPR) that purine or pyrimidine-rich microRNAs of appropriate length and sequence form triple-helical structures with purine-rich sequences of duplex DNA, and identify microRNA sequences that favor triplex formation. We developed an algorithm (Trident) to search genome-wide for potential triplex-forming sites and show that several mammalian and non-mammalian genomes are enriched for strong microRNA triplex binding sites. We show that those genes containing sequences favoring microRNA triplex formation are markedly enriched (3.3 fold, p<2.2 × 10(-16)) for genes whose expression is positively correlated with expression of microRNAs targeting triplex binding sequences. This work has thus revealed a new mechanism by which microRNAs could interact with gene promoter regions to modify gene transcription. PMID:26844769

  19. MicroRNAs form triplexes with double stranded DNA at sequence-specific binding sites; a eukaryotic mechanism via which microRNAs could directly alter gene expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Paugh, Steven W.; Coss, David R.; Bao, Ju; Laudermilk, Lucas T.; Grace, Christy R.; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Waddell, M. Brett; Ridout, Granger; Naeve, Deanna; Leuze, Michael Rex; et al

    2016-02-04

    MicroRNAs are important regulators of gene expression, acting primarily by binding to sequence-specific locations on already transcribed messenger RNAs (mRNA). Recent studies indicate that microRNAs may also play a role in up-regulating mRNA transcription levels, although a definitive mechanism has not been established. Double-helical DNA is capable of forming triple-helical structures through Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen interactions in the major groove of the duplex, and we show physical evidence that microRNAs form triple-helical structures with duplex DNA, and identify microRNA sequences that favor triplex formation. We developed an algorithm (Trident) to search genome-wide for potential triplex-forming sites and show thatmore » several mammalian and non-mammalian genomes are enriched for strong microRNA triplex binding sites. We show that those genes containing sequences favoring microRNA triplex formation are markedly enriched (3.3 fold, p<2.2 x 10-16) for genes whose expression is positively correlated with expression of microRNAs targeting triplex binding sequences. As a result, this work has thus revealed a new mechanism by which microRNAs can interact with gene promoter regions to modify gene transcription.« less

  20. MicroRNA-183-96-182 Cluster Regulates Bovine Granulosa Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Transition by Coordinately Targeting FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhn, Samuel; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Hoelker, Michael; Rings, Franca; Neuhoff, Christiane; Tholen, Ernst; Schellander, Karl; Tesfaye, Dawit

    2016-06-01

    Large-scale expression profiling of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) in bovine granulosa cells from dominant and subordinate follicles on Day 19 of the estrous cycle revealed enriched micro-RNA-183-96-182 cluster miRNAs in preovulatory dominant follicles that coordinately regulate the forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) gene. However, little is known about the role of this cluster in bovine granulosa cell function. We used an in vitro granulosa cell culture model to investigate this role. Granulosa cells aspirated from small growing follicles (3-5 mm in diameter) were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium/F-12 medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum and transfected with locked nucleic acid-based miRNA mimics, inhibitors, and corresponding negative controls. Overexpression of the miRNA cluster resulted in suppression of FOXO1 mRNA and protein, whereas inhibition of the cluster increased expression of FOXO1 mRNA. Overexpression also increased the relative rate of cell proliferation, whereas inhibition slowed it down. Similarly, the proportion of cells under G0/G1 arrest declined, whereas the ratio of cells in S phase increased in response to miR-183-96-182 overexpression. Selective knockdown of FOXO1 mRNA using anti-FOXO1 small interfering RNA increased the rate of granulosa cell proliferation, decreased the proportion of cells under G0/G1 arrest, and increased the proportion of cells in the S phase of cell cycle. Our data suggest that miR-183-96-182 cluster miRNAs promote proliferation and G1/S transition of bovine granulosa cells by coordinately targeting FOXO1, suggesting a critical role in granulosa cell function. MicroRNA-183-96-182 cluster regulates bovine granulosa cell function by targeting FOXO1 gene. PMID:27122636

  1. City block distance and rough-fuzzy clustering for identification of co-expressed microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sushmita; Maji, Pradipta

    2014-06-01

    The microRNAs or miRNAs are short, endogenous RNAs having ability to regulate mRNA expression at the post-transcriptional level. Various studies have revealed that miRNAs tend to cluster on chromosomes. The members of a cluster that are in close proximity on chromosomes are highly likely to be processed as co-transcribed units. Therefore, a large proportion of miRNAs are co-expressed. Expression profiling of miRNAs generates a huge volume of data. Complicated networks of miRNA-mRNA interaction increase the challenges of comprehending and interpreting the resulting mass of data. In this regard, this paper presents a clustering algorithm in order to extract meaningful information from miRNA expression data. It judiciously integrates the merits of rough sets, fuzzy sets, the c-means algorithm, and the normalized range-normalized city block distance to discover co-expressed miRNA clusters. While the membership functions of fuzzy sets enable efficient handling of overlapping partitions in a noisy environment, the concept of lower and upper approximations of rough sets deals with uncertainty, vagueness, and incompleteness in cluster definition. The city block distance is used to compute the membership functions of fuzzy sets and to find initial partition of a data set, and therefore helps to handle minute differences between two miRNA expression profiles. The effectiveness of the proposed approach, along with a comparison with other related methods, is demonstrated for several miRNA expression data sets using different cluster validity indices. Moreover, the gene ontology is used to analyze the functional consistency and biological significance of generated miRNA clusters. PMID:24682049

  2. The tumor-suppressive microRNA-23b/27b cluster regulates the MET oncogene in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Ichiro; Koshizuka, Keiichi; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Kikkawa, Naoko; Matsushita, Ryosuke; Kurozumi, Akira; Kato, Mayuko; Okato, Atsushi; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Seki, Naohiko

    2016-09-01

    Our recent studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression signatures in human cancers revealed that two clustered miRNAs, microRNA-23b (miR-23b) and microRNA-27b (miR‑27b), were significantly reduced in cancer tissues. Few reports have provided functional analyses of these clustered miRNAs in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-23b and miR-27b in OSCC and to identify novel miR-23b/27b-mediated cancer pathways and target genes involved in OSCC oncogenesis and metastasis. Expression levels of miR-23b and miR-27b were significantly reduced in OSCC specimens. Restoration of miR-23b or miR-27b in cancer cells revealed that both miRNAs significantly inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. Our in silico analyses and luciferase reporter assays showed that the receptor tyrosine kinase MET, was directly regulated by these miRNAs. Moreover, downregulating the MET gene by use of siRNA significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion by OSCC cells. The identification of novel molecular pathways regulated by miR-23b and miR-27b may lead to a better understanding of the oncogenesis and metastasis of this disease. PMID:27573718

  3. Methylation of microRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development in andromonoecious poplar

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Ci, Dong; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed sex-specific DNA methylation and expression of candidate genes in bisexual flowers of andromonoecious poplar, but the regulatory relationship between methylation and microRNAs (miRNAs) remains unclear. To investigate whether the methylation of miRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development, the methylome, microRNA, and transcriptome were examined in female and male flowers of andromonoecious poplar. 27 636 methylated coding genes and 113 methylated miRNA genes were identified. In the coding genes, 64.5% of the methylated reads mapped to the gene body region; by contrast, 60.7% of methylated reads in miRNA genes mainly mapped in the 5′ and 3′ flanking regions. CHH methylation showed the highest methylation levels and CHG showed the lowest methylation levels. Correlation analysis showed a significant, negative, strand-specific correlation of methylation and miRNA gene expression (r=0.79, P <0.05). The methylated miRNA genes included eight long miRNAs (lmiRNAs) of 24 nucleotides and 11 miRNAs related to flower development. miRNA172b might play an important role in the regulation of bisexual flower development-related gene expression in andromonoecious poplar, via modification of methylation. Gynomonoecious, female, and male poplars were used to validate the methylation patterns of the miRNA172b gene, implying that hyper-methylation in andromonoecious and gynomonoecious poplar might function as an important regulator in bisexual flower development. Our data provide a useful resource for the study of flower development in poplar and improve our understanding of the effect of epigenetic regulation on genes other than protein-coding genes. PMID:25617468

  4. Identification of Reference Genes for Relative Quantification of Circulating MicroRNAs in Bovine Serum

    PubMed Central

    Bae, In-Seon; Chung, Ki Yong; Yi, Jongmin; Kim, Tae Il; Choi, Hwa-Sik; Cho, Young-Moo; Choi, Inho; Kim, Sang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs in body fluids have been implicated as promising biomarkers for physiopathology disorders. Currently, the expression levels of circulating microRNAs are estimated by reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Use of appropriate reference microRNAs for normalization is critical for accurate microRNA expression analysis. However, no study has systematically investigated reference genes for evaluating circulating microRNA expression in cattle. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of appropriate reference microRNAs for use in the normalization of circulating microRNA levels in bovine serum. We evaluated the expression stability of ten candidate reference genes in bovine serum by using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Data were analyzed using geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper statistical algorithms. The results consistently showed that a combination of miR-93 and miR-127 provided the most stably expressed reference. The suitability of these microRNAs was validated, and even when compared among different genders or breeds, the combination of miR-93 and miR-127 was ranked as the most stable microRNA reference. Therefore, we conclude that this combination is the optimal endogenous reference for reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction-based detection of microRNAs in bovine serum. The data presented in this study are crucial to successful biomarker discovery and validation for the diagnosis of physiopathological conditions in cattle. PMID:25826387

  5. Composition and Expression of Conserved MicroRNA Genes in Diploid Cotton (Gossypium) Species

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lei; Kakrana, Atul; Arikit, Siwaret; Meyers, Blake C.; Wendel, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are ubiquitous in plant genomes but vary greatly in their abundance within and conservation among plant lineages. To gain insight into the evolutionary birth/death dynamics of microRNA families, we sequenced small RNA and 5′-end PARE libraries generated from two closely related species of Gossypium. Here, we demonstrate that 33 microRNA families, with similar copy numbers and average evolutionary rates, are conserved in the two congeneric cottons. Analysis of the presence/absence of these microRNA families in other land plants sheds light on their depth of phylogenetic origin and lineage-specific loss/gain. Conserved microRNA families in Gossypium exhibit a striking interspecific asymmetry in expression, potentially connected to relative proximity to neighboring transposable elements. A complex correlated expression pattern of microRNA target genes with their controlling microRNAs indicates that possible functional divergence of conserved microRNA families can also exist even within a single plant genus. PMID:24281048

  6. Evolution of the Aflatoxin Gene Cluster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Why Aspergillus species produce aflatoxin remains an unsolved question. In this report, we suggest that evolution of the aflatoxin biosynthesis gene cluster has been a multistep process. More than 300 million years ago, a primordial cluster of genes allowed production of anthraquinones that may ha...

  7. Biological cluster evaluation for gene function prediction.

    PubMed

    Klie, Sebastian; Nikoloski, Zoran; Selbig, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput omics techniques render it possible to decode the function of genes by using the "guilt-by-association" principle on biologically meaningful clusters of gene expression data. However, the existing frameworks for biological evaluation of gene clusters are hindered by two bottleneck issues: (1) the choice for the number of clusters, and (2) the external measures which do not take in consideration the structure of the analyzed data and the ontology of the existing biological knowledge. Here, we address the identified bottlenecks by developing a novel framework that allows not only for biological evaluation of gene expression clusters based on existing structured knowledge, but also for prediction of putative gene functions. The proposed framework facilitates propagation of statistical significance at each of the following steps: (1) estimating the number of clusters, (2) evaluating the clusters in terms of novel external structural measures, (3) selecting an optimal clustering algorithm, and (4) predicting gene functions. The framework also includes a method for evaluation of gene clusters based on the structure of the employed ontology. Moreover, our method for obtaining a probabilistic range for the number of clusters is demonstrated valid on synthetic data and available gene expression profiles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Finally, we propose a network-based approach for gene function prediction which relies on the clustering of optimal score and the employed ontology. Our approach effectively predicts gene function on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae data set and is also employed to obtain putative gene functions for an Arabidopsis thaliana data set. PMID:20059365

  8. Pichia stipitis genomics, transcriptomics, and gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Thomas W; Van Vleet, Jennifer R Headman

    2009-01-01

    Genome sequencing and subsequent global gene expression studies have advanced our understanding of the lignocellulose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis. These studies have provided an insight into its central carbon metabolism, and analysis of its genome has revealed numerous functional gene clusters and tandem repeats. Specialized physiological traits are often the result of several gene products acting together. When coinheritance is necessary for the overall physiological function, recombination and selection favor colocation of these genes in a cluster. These are particularly evident in strongly conserved and idiomatic traits. In some cases, the functional clusters consist of multiple gene families. Phylogenetic analyses of the members in each family show that once formed, functional clusters undergo duplication and differentiation. Genome-wide expression analysis reveals that regulatory patterns of clusters are similar after they have duplicated and that the expression profiles evolve along with functional differentiation of the clusters. Orthologous gene families appear to arise through tandem gene duplication, followed by differentiation in the regulatory and coding regions of the gene. Genome-wide expression analysis combined with cross-species comparisons of functional gene clusters should reveal many more aspects of eukaryotic physiology. PMID:19659741

  9. The microRNA-212/132 cluster regulates B cell development by targeting Sox4

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Arnav; Mann, Mati; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Marinov, Georgi K.; Majumdar, Devdoot; Garcia-Flores, Yvette; Du, Xiaomi; Erikci, Erdem; Chowdhury, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as key regulators of B cell fate decisions and immune function. Deregulation of several microRNAs in B cells leads to the development of autoimmune disease and cancer in mice. We demonstrate that the microRNA-212/132 cluster (miR-212/132) is induced in B cells in response to B cell receptor signaling. Enforced expression of miR-132 results in a block in early B cell development at the prepro–B cell to pro–B cell transition and induces apoptosis in primary bone marrow B cells. Importantly, loss of miR-212/132 results in accelerated B cell recovery after antibody-mediated B cell depletion. We find that Sox4 is a target of miR-132 in B cells. Co-expression of SOX4 with miR-132 rescues the defect in B cell development from overexpression of miR-132 alone, thus suggesting that miR-132 may regulate B lymphopoiesis through Sox4. In addition, we show that the expression of miR-132 can inhibit cancer development in cells that are prone to B cell cancers, such as B cells expressing the c-Myc oncogene. We have thus uncovered miR-132 as a novel contributor to B cell development. PMID:26371188

  10. Cross Talk Between MicroRNA and Coding Cancer Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kunej, T; Godnic, I; Horvat, S; Zorc, M; Calin, GA

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and post-transcriptional gene regulators shown to be involved in pathogenesis of all types of human cancers. Their aberrant expression as tumor suppressors can lead to cancerogenesis by inhibiting malignant potential, or when acting as oncogenes, by activating malignant potential. Differential expression of miRNA genes in tumorous tissues can occur due to several factors including positional effects when mapping to cancer-associated genomic regions, epigenetic mechanisms and malfunctioning of the miRNA processing machinery, all of which can contribute to a complex miRNA-mediated gene network misregulation. They may increase or decrease expression of protein-coding genes, can target 3’-UTR or other genic regions (5'-UTR, promoter, coding sequences), and can function in various subcellular compartments, developmental and metabolic processes. Because expanding research on miRNA-cancer associations has already produced large amounts of data, our main objective here was to summarize main findings and critically examine the intricate network connecting the miRNAs and coding genes in regulatory mechanisms, their function and phenotypic consequences for cancer. By examining such interactions we aimed to gain insights for development of new diagnostic markers as well as identify potential venues for more selective tumor therapy. To enable efficient examination of the main past and current miRNA discoveries, we developed a web based miRNA timeline tool that will be regularly updated (http://www.integratomics-time.com/miRNA_timeline). Further development of this tool will be directed at providing additional analyses to clarify complex network interactions between miRNAs, other classes of ncRNAs and protein coding genes and their involvement in development of diseases including cancer. This tool therefore provides curated relevant information about the miRNA basic research and therapeutic application all at hand on

  11. Analysis of microarray-identified genes and microRNAs associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Yin, Fuqiang; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential microRNAs and genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer through web-available microarrays. The drug resistant-related microRNA microarray dataset GS54665 and mRNA dataset GSE33482, GSE28646, and GSE15372 were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Dysregulated microRNAs/genes were screened with GEO2R and were further identified in SKOV3 (SKOV3/DDP) and A2780 (A2780/DDP) cells by real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR), and then their associations with drug resistance was analyzed by comprehensive bioinformatic analyses. Nine microRNAs (microRNA-199a-5p, microRNA-199a-3p, microRNA-199b-3p, microRNA-215, microRNA-335, microRNA-18b, microRNA-363, microRNA-645 and microRNA-141) and 38 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cells, with seven genes (NHSL1, EPHA3, USP51, ZSCAN4, EPHA7, SNCA and PI15) exhibited exactly the same expression trends in all three microarrays. Biological process annotation and pathway enrichment analysis of the 9 microRNAs and 38 genes identified several drug resistant-related signaling pathways, and the microRNA-mRNA interaction revealed the existence of a targeted regulatory relationship between the 9 microRNAs and most of the 38 genes. The expression of 9 microRNAs and the 7 genes by qRT-PCR in SKOV3/DDP and A2780/DDP cells indicating a consistent expression profile with the microarrays. Among those, the expression of EPHA7 and PI15 were negatively correlated with that of microRNA-141, and they were also identified as potential targets of this microRNA via microRNA-mRNA interaction. We thus concluded that microRNA-141, EPHA7, and PI15 might jointly participate in the regulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer and serve as potential targets in targeted therapies. PMID:26261572

  12. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  13. Role of MicroRNAs in Controlling Gene Expression in Different Segments of the Human Epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Belleannée, Clémence; Calvo, Ezéquiel; Thimon, Véronique; Cyr, Daniel G.; Légaré, Christine; Garneau, Louis; Sullivan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms implicated in regionalized gene expression in the human epididymis have not yet been fully elucidated. Interestingly, more than 200 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in the human epididymis and could be involved in the regulation of mRNA stability and post-transcriptional expression in this organ. Methods Using a miRNA microarray approach, we investigated the correlation between miRNA signatures and gene expression profiles found in three distinct regions (caput, corpus and cauda) of human epididymides from 3 donors. In silico prediction of transcript miRNA targets was performed using TargetScan and Miranda software's. FHCE1 immortalized epididymal cell lines were cotransfected with mimic microRNAs and plasmid constructs containing the 3′UTR of predicted target genes downstream of the luciferase gene. Results We identified 35 miRNAs differentially expressed in the distinct segments of the epididymis (fold change ≥2, P-value≤0.01). Among these miRNAs, miR-890, miR-892a, miR-892b, miR-891a, miR-891b belonging to the same epididymis-enriched cluster located on the X chromosome, are significantly more expressed in the corpus and cauda regions than in the caput. Interestingly, a strong negative correlation (r = −0,89, P-value≤0.001) was found between the pattern of expression of miR-892b and its potential mRNA target Esrrg (Estrogen Related Receptor Gamma) and with miR-145 and Cldn10 mRNA (r = −0,92, P-value≤0.001). We confirmed that miR-145 and miR-892b inhibit the expression of the luciferase reporter via Cldn10 and Esrrg 3′ UTRs, respectively. Conclusion Our study shows that the expression of miRNAs is segmented along the human epididymis and correlates with the pattern of target gene expression in different regions. Therefore, epididymal miRNAs may be in control of the maintenance of gene expression profile in the epididymis, which dictates segment-specific secretion of proteins and establishes

  14. MicroRNA-421 Gene Polymorphism in Gastric Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Yu, Nong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND As a common malignant tumor, gastric carcinoma requires early diagnosis to improve treatment efficacy. MicroRNA (miR) molecules have highly conserved nucleotide sequences and can negatively regulate target gene expression at the translational level. miR-421 has been suggested to be related with gastric cancer occurrence. The gene polymorphism of miR-421, however, has not been reported. This study thus investigated the G/C polymorphism of miR-421 and its role in progression and prognosis of gastric cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 96 gastric cancer patients were recruited in this study and tumor samples were collected from surgical resection. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of miR-421 was determined by DNA sequencing for analyzing the correlation between lymph node metastasis and miR-421 genotypes. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between genotype and risk factors of gastric cancer. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was also performed to compare GG and GC carriers. RESULTS Differential expression patterns existed between gastric cancer tissues and normal gastric mucosa. Logistic regression analysis showed GC and GG genotypes were risk factors for gastric cancer. Patients with lymph node metastasis had higher GG genotype frequency compared to those without metastasis. In survival analysis, GG carriers had shorter survival time than GC carriers. Furthermore, GG genotype was correlated with tumor prognosis (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS G allele of miR-421 is a risk factor for gastric cancer. GG genotype is correlated with lymph node metastasis and prognosis, indicating it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. PMID:27133200

  15. Clustering of gene ontology terms in genomes.

    PubMed

    Tiirikka, Timo; Siermala, Markku; Vihinen, Mauno

    2014-10-25

    Although protein coding genes occupy only a small fraction of genomes in higher species, they are not randomly distributed within or between chromosomes. Clustering of genes with related function(s) and/or characteristics has been evident at several different levels. To study how common the clustering of functionally related genes is and what kind of functions the end products of these genes are involved, we collected gene ontology (GO) terms for complete genomes and developed a method to detect previously undefined gene clustering. Exhaustive analysis was performed for seven widely studied species ranging from human to Escherichia coli. To overcome problems related to varying gene lengths and densities, a novel method was developed and a fixed number of genes were analyzed irrespective of the genome span covered. Statistically very significant GO term clustering was apparent in all the investigated genomes. The analysis window, which ranged from 5 to 50 consecutive genes, revealed extensive GO term clusters for genes with widely varying functions. Here, the most interesting and significant results are discussed and the complete dataset for each analyzed species is available at the GOme database at http://bioinf.uta.fi/GOme. The results indicated that clusters of genes with related functions are very common, not only in bacteria, in which operons are frequent, but also in all the studied species irrespective of how complex they are. There are some differences between species but in all of them GO term clusters are common and of widely differing sizes. The presented method can be applied to analyze any genome or part of a genome for which descriptive features are available, and thus is not restricted to ontology terms. This method can also be applied to investigate gene and protein expression patterns. The results pave a way for further studies of mechanisms that shape genome structure and evolutionary forces related to them. PMID:24995610

  16. The rolB gene activates the expression of genes encoding microRNA processing machinery.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Victor P; Veremeichik, Galina N; Shkryl, Yuri N

    2015-04-01

    The rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes renders cells more tolerant of environmental stresses and increases their defense potential. However, these effects, coupled with the developmental abnormalities caused by rolB, have not yet been explained. In rolB-transformed Arabidopsis thaliana cells, we detected a 2.2 to 7-fold increase in the expression of genes encoding core and accessory proteins (DCL1, SE, HYL1, AGO1, TGH, DDL, HEN1, AGO4 and RDR2) of the microRNA processing machinery. However, the rolB gene did not affect the expression of DCL2, DCL3 and HST. The diverse and complex effects of rolB on transformed plant cells may be attributable to changes caused by this gene in particular RNA silencing pathways. PMID:25491479

  17. MicroRNA: mechanism of gene regulation and application to livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA (miR) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts through activation of a specific cellular pathway. The small RNA classified as miR are short sequences of 18-26 nucleotide long, encoded by nuclear genes with distinctive...

  18. Regulatory network of microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lu-Chen; Xu, Zhi-Wen; Wang, Kun-Hao; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Wang, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in human oncology. However, most of the biological factors are reported in disperse form which makes it hard to discover the pathology. In this study, genes and miRNAs involved in human endometrial cancer(EC) were collected and formed into regulatory networks following their interactive relations, including miRNAs targeting genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs included in their host genes. Networks are constructed hierarchically at three levels: differentially expressed, related and global. Among the three, the differentially expressed network is the most important and fundamental network that contains the key genes and miRNAs in EC. The target genes, TFs and miRNAs are differentially expressed in EC so that any mutation in them may impact on EC development. Some key pathways in networks were highlighted to analyze how they interactively influence other factors and carcinogenesis. Upstream and downstream pathways of the differentially expressed genes and miRNAs were compared and analyzed. The purpose of this study was to partially reveal the deep regulatory mechanisms in EC using a new method that combines comprehensive genes and miRNAs together with their relationships. It may contribute to cancer prevention and gene therapy of EC. PMID:25684474

  19. Chicken rRNA Gene Cluster Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dyomin, Alexander G.; Koshel, Elena I.; Kiselev, Artem M.; Saifitdinova, Alsu F.; Galkina, Svetlana A.; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Kostareva, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, whose activity results in nucleolus formation, constitute an extremely important part of genome. Despite the extensive exploration into avian genomes, no complete description of avian rRNA gene primary structure has been offered so far. We publish a complete chicken rRNA gene cluster sequence here, including 5’ETS (1836 bp), 18S rRNA gene (1823 bp), ITS1 (2530 bp), 5.8S rRNA gene (157 bp), ITS2 (733 bp), 28S rRNA gene (4441 bp) and 3’ETS (343 bp). The rRNA gene cluster sequence of 11863 bp was assembled from raw reads and deposited to GenBank under KT445934 accession number. The assembly was validated through in situ fluorescent hybridization analysis on chicken metaphase chromosomes using computed and synthesized specific probes, as well as through the reference assembly against de novo assembled rRNA gene cluster sequence using sequenced fragments of BAC-clone containing chicken NOR (nucleolus organizer region). The results have confirmed the chicken rRNA gene cluster validity. PMID:27299357

  20. MicroRNA gene expression during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of human acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garzon, R; Pichiorri, F; Palumbo, T; Visentini, M; Aqeilan, R; Cimmino, A; Wang, H; Sun, H; Volinia, S; Alder, H; Calin, G A; Liu, C-G; Andreeff, M; Croce, C M

    2007-06-14

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs of 19-25 nucleotides that are involved in the regulation of critical cell processes such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and differentiation. However, little is known about the role of miRNAs in granulopoiesis. Here, we report the expression of miRNAs in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients and cell lines during all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment by using a miRNA microarrays platform and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We found upregulation of miR-15a, miR-15b, miR-16-1, let-7a-3, let-7c, let-7d, miR-223, miR-342 and miR-107, whereas miR-181b was downregulated. Among the upregulated miRNAs, miR-107 is predicted to target NFI-A, a gene that has been involved in a regulatory loop involving miR-223 and C/EBPa during granulocytic differentiation. Indeed, we have confirmed that miR-107 targets NF1-A. To get insights about ATRA regulation of miRNAs, we searched for ATRA-modulated transcription factors binding sites in the upstream genomic region of the let-7a-3/let-7b cluster and identified several putative nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) consensus elements. The use of reporter gene assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that one proximal NF-kappaB binding site is essential for the transactivation of the let-7a-3/let-7b cluster. Finally, we show that ATRA downregulation of RAS and Bcl2 correlate with the activation of known miRNA regulators of those proteins, let-7a and miR-15a/miR-16-1, respectively. PMID:17260024

  1. Clustering gene expression data using graph separators.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Bangaly; Pinet, Nicolas; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Sigayret, Alain; Berry, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has used graphs to modelize expression data from microarray experiments, in view of partitioning the genes into clusters. In this paper, we introduce the use of a decomposition by clique separators. Our aim is to improve the classical clustering methods in two ways: first we want to allow an overlap between clusters, as this seems biologically sound, and second we want to be guided by the structure of the graph to define the number of clusters. We test this approach with a well-known yeast database (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our results are good, as the expression profiles of the clusters we find are very coherent. Moreover, we are able to organize into another graph the clusters we find, and order them in a fashion which turns out to respect the chronological order defined by the the sporulation process. PMID:18391236

  2. Establishment of cells to monitor Microprocessor through fusion genes of microRNA and GFP

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, Motomu; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Adachi, Koichi; Miyata, Maiko; Huang, Peng; Ishiguro, Naoki; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Iwamoto, Takashi

    2008-08-08

    Microprocessor, the complex of Drosha and DGCR8, promotes the processing of primary microRNA to precursor microRNA, which is a crucial step for microRNA maturation. So far, no convenient assay systems have been developed for observing this step in vivo. Here we report the establishment of highly sensitive cellular systems where we can visually monitor the function of Microprocessor. During a series of screening of transfectants with fusion genes of the EGFP cDNA and primary microRNA genes, we have obtained certain cell lines where introduction of siRNA against DGCR8 or Drosha strikingly augments GFP signals. In contrast, these cells have not responded to Dicer siRNA; thus they have a unique character that GFP signals should be negatively and specifically correlated to the action of Microprocessor among biogenesis of microRNA. These cell lines can be useful tools for real-time analysis of Microprocessor action in vivo and identifying its novel modulators.

  3. Cortical Tubers: Windows into Dysregulation of Epilepsy Risk and Synaptic Signaling Genes by MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Dombkowski, Alan A; Batista, Carlos E; Cukovic, Daniela; Carruthers, Nicholas J; Ranganathan, Ramya; Shukla, Upasana; Stemmer, Paul M; Chugani, Harry T; Chugani, Diane C

    2016-03-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem genetic disorder caused by mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 genes. Over 80% of TSC patients are affected by epilepsy, but the molecular events contributing to seizures in TSC are not well understood. Recent reports have demonstrated that the brain is enriched with microRNA activity, and they are critical in neural development and function. However, little is known about the role of microRNAs in TSC. Here, we report the characterization of aberrant microRNA activity in cortical tubers resected from 5 TSC patients surgically treated for medically intractable epilepsy. By comparing epileptogenic tubers with adjacent nontuber tissue, we identified a set of 4 coordinately overexpressed microRNAs (miRs 23a, 34a, 34b*, 532-5p). We used quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic profiling to investigate the combined effect of the 4 microRNAs on target proteins. The proportion of repressed proteins among the predicted targets was significantly greater than in the overall proteome and was highly enriched for proteins involved in synaptic signal transmission. Among the combinatorial targets were TSC1, coding for the protein hamartin, and several epilepsy risk genes. We found decreased levels of hamartin in epileptogenic tubers and confirmed targeting of the TSC1 3' UTR by miRs-23a and 34a. PMID:25452577

  4. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate-induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of highly conserved, small non-coding RNAs (~22 nucleotides) that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. MicroRNAs are encoded by specific genes in the genome, which are transcribed as primary transcripts called primary miRNA. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) bind to compl...

  5. The microRNA-183 cluster: the family that plays together stays together

    PubMed Central

    Dambal, Shweta; Shah, Mit; Mihelich, Brittany; Nonn, Larisa

    2015-01-01

    The microRNA (miR)183 cluster, which is comprised of miRs-183, -96 and -182, is also a miR family with sequence homology. Despite the strong similarity in the sequences of these miRs, minute differences in their seed sequences result in both overlapping and distinct messenger RNA targets, which are often within the same pathway. These miRs have tightly synchronized expression during development and are required for maturation of sensory organs. In comparison to their defined role in normal development, the miR-183 family is frequently highly expressed in a variety of non-sensory diseases, including cancer, neurological and auto-immune disorders. Here, we discuss the conservation of the miR-183 cluster and the functional role of this miR family in normal development and diseases. We also describe the regulation of vital cellular pathways by coordinated expression of these miR siblings. This comprehensive review sheds light on the likely reasons why the genomic organization and seeming redundancy of the miR-183 family cluster was conserved through 600 million years of evolution. PMID:26170234

  6. Next-generation sequencing of the porcine skeletal muscle transcriptome for computational prediction of microRNA gene targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts. Inhibition is exerted through targeting of a microRNA-protein complex by base-pairing of the microRNA sequence to cognate recognition sequences in the 3’ untranslated region (...

  7. The expression of a viral microRNA is regulated by clustering to allow optimal B cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Haar, Janina; Contrant, Maud; Bernhardt, Katharina; Feederle, Regina; Diederichs, Sven; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2016-02-18

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms B cells by expressing latent proteins and the BHRF1 microRNA cluster. MiR-BHRF1-3, its most transforming member, belongs to the recently identified group of weakly expressed microRNAs. We show here that miR-BHRF1-3 displays an unusually low propensity to form a stem-loop structure, an effect potentiated by miR-BHRF1-3's proximity to the BHRF1 polyA site. Cloning miR-BHRF1-2 or a cellular microRNA, but not a ribozyme, 5' of miR-BHRF1-3 markedly enhanced its expression. However, a virus carrying mutated miR-BHRF1-2 seed regions expressed miR-BHRF1-3 at normal levels and was fully transforming. Therefore, miR-BHRF1-2's role during transformation is independent of its seed regions, revealing a new microRNA function. Increasing the distance between miR-BHRF1-2 and miR-BHRF1-3 in EBV enhanced miR-BHRF1-3's expression but decreased its transforming potential. Thus, the expression of some microRNAs must be restricted to a narrow range, as achieved by placing miR-BHRF1-3 under the control of miR-BHRF1-2. PMID:26635399

  8. Target Gene and Function Prediction of Differentially Expressed MicroRNAs in Lactating Mammary Glands of Dairy Goats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhi-Bin; Chen, Cun-Xian; Wang, Gui-Zhi; Wang, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that can regulate gene expression, and they can be involved in the regulation of mammary gland development. The differential expression of miRNAs during mammary gland development is expected to provide insight into their roles in regulating the homeostasis of mammary gland tissues. To screen out miRNAs that should have important regulatory function in the development of mammary gland from miRNA expression profiles and to predict their function, in this study, the target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs in the lactating mammary glands of Laoshan dairy goats are predicted, and then the functions of these miRNAs are analyzed via bioinformatics. First, we screen the expression patterns of 25 miRNAs that had shown significant differences during the different lactation stages in the mammary gland. Then, these miRNAs are clustered according to their expression patterns. Computational methods were used to obtain 215 target genes for 22 of these miRNAs. Combining gene ontology annotation, Fisher's exact test, and KEGG analysis with the target prediction for these miRNAs, the regulatory functions of miRNAs belonging to different clusters are predicted. PMID:24195063

  9. MicroRNA 17-92 cluster mediates ETS1 and ETS2-dependent RAS-oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed

    Kabbout, Mohamed; Dakhlallah, Duaa; Sharma, Sudarshana; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Srinivasan, Ruchika; Piper, Melissa; Marsh, Clay B; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    The ETS-family transcription factors Ets1 and Ets2 are evolutionarily conserved effectors of the RAS/ERK signaling pathway, but their function in Ras cellular transformation and biology remains unclear. Taking advantage of Ets1 and Ets2 mouse models to generate Ets1/Ets2 double knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we demonstrate that deletion of both Ets1 and Ets2 was necessary to inhibit HrasG12V induced transformation both in vitro and in vivo. HrasG12V expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts increased ETS1 and ETS2 expression and binding to cis-regulatory elements on the c-Myc proximal promoter, and consequently induced a robust increase in MYC expression. The expression of the oncogenic microRNA 17-92 cluster was increased in HrasG12V transformed cells, but was significantly reduced when ETS1 and ETS2 were absent. MYC and ETS1 or ETS2 collaborated to increase expression of the oncogenic microRNA 17-92 cluster in HrasG12V transformed cells. Enforced expression of exogenous MYC or microRNA 17-92 rescued HrasG12V transformation in Ets1/Ets2-null cells, revealing a direct function for MYC and microRNA 17-92 in ETS1/ETS2-dependent HrasG12V transformation. PMID:24968297

  10. Network analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAO; XU, ZHIWEN; MA, MENGYAO; WANG, NING; WANG, KUNHAO

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies on the morbidity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) have identified several genes, microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) and transcription factors (TFs) that influence the pathogenesis of NPC. However, summarizing all the regulatory networks involved in NPC is challenging. In the present study, the genes, miRNAs and TFs involved in NPC were considered as the nodes of the so-called regulatory network, and the associations between them were investigated. To clearly represent these associations, three regulatory networks were built seperately, namely, the differentially expressed network, the associated network and the global network. The differentially expressed network is the most important one of these three networks, since its nodes are differentially expressed genes whose mutations may lead to the development of NPC. Therefore, by modifying the aberrant expression of those genes that are differentially expressed in this network, their dysregulation may be corrected and the tumorigenesis of NPC may thus be prevented. Analysis of the aforementioned three networks highlighted the importance of certain pathways, such as self-adaptation pathways, in the development of NPC. For example, cyclin D1 (CCND1) was observed to regulate Homo sapiens-miR-20a, which in turn targeted CCND1. The present study conducted a systematic analysis of the pathogenesis of NPC through the three aforementioned regulatory networks, and provided a theoretical model for biologists. Future studies are required to evaluate the influence of the highlighted pathways in NPC. PMID:27313701

  11. A bioinformatics tool for linking gene expression profiling results with public databases of microRNA target predictions.

    PubMed

    Creighton, Chad J; Nagaraja, Ankur K; Hanash, Samir M; Matzuk, Martin M; Gunaratne, Preethi H

    2008-11-01

    MicroRNAs are short (approximately 22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs that regulate the stability and translation of mRNA targets. A number of computational algorithms have been developed to help predict which microRNAs are likely to regulate which genes. Gene expression profiling of biological systems where microRNAs might be active can yield hundreds of differentially expressed genes. The commonly used public microRNA target prediction databases facilitate gene-by-gene searches. However, integration of microRNA-mRNA target predictions with gene expression data on a large scale using these databases is currently cumbersome and time consuming for many researchers. We have developed a desktop software application which, for a given target prediction database, retrieves all microRNA:mRNA functional pairs represented by an experimentally derived set of genes. Furthermore, for each microRNA, the software computes an enrichment statistic for overrepresentation of predicted targets within the gene set, which could help to implicate roles for specific microRNAs and microRNA-regulated genes in the system under study. Currently, the software supports searching of results from PicTar, TargetScan, and miRanda algorithms. In addition, the software can accept any user-defined set of gene-to-class associations for searching, which can include the results of other target prediction algorithms, as well as gene annotation or gene-to-pathway associations. A search (using our software) of genes transcriptionally regulated in vitro by estrogen in breast cancer uncovered numerous targeting associations for specific microRNAs-above what could be observed in randomly generated gene lists-suggesting a role for microRNAs in mediating the estrogen response. The software and Excel VBA source code are freely available at http://sigterms.sourceforge.net. PMID:18812437

  12. Clustering Genes of Common Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Kevin; Suchan, Tomasz; Alvarez, Nadir; Goldman, Nick; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference can potentially result in a more accurate tree using data from multiple loci. However, if the loci are incongruent—due to events such as incomplete lineage sorting or horizontal gene transfer—it can be misleading to infer a single tree. To address this, many previous contributions have taken a mechanistic approach, by modeling specific processes. Alternatively, one can cluster loci without assuming how these incongruencies might arise. Such “process-agnostic” approaches typically infer a tree for each locus and cluster these. There are, however, many possible combinations of tree distance and clustering methods; their comparative performance in the context of tree incongruence is largely unknown. Furthermore, because standard model selection criteria such as AIC cannot be applied to problems with a variable number of topologies, the issue of inferring the optimal number of clusters is poorly understood. Here, we perform a large-scale simulation study of phylogenetic distances and clustering methods to infer loci of common evolutionary history. We observe that the best-performing combinations are distances accounting for branch lengths followed by spectral clustering or Ward’s method. We also introduce two statistical tests to infer the optimal number of clusters and show that they strongly outperform the silhouette criterion, a general-purpose heuristic. We illustrate the usefulness of the approach by 1) identifying errors in a previous phylogenetic analysis of yeast species and 2) identifying topological incongruence among newly sequenced loci of the globeflower fly genus Chiastocheta. We release treeCl, a new program to cluster genes of common evolutionary history (http://git.io/treeCl). PMID:26893301

  13. Clustering Genes of Common Evolutionary History.

    PubMed

    Gori, Kevin; Suchan, Tomasz; Alvarez, Nadir; Goldman, Nick; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    Phylogenetic inference can potentially result in a more accurate tree using data from multiple loci. However, if the loci are incongruent-due to events such as incomplete lineage sorting or horizontal gene transfer-it can be misleading to infer a single tree. To address this, many previous contributions have taken a mechanistic approach, by modeling specific processes. Alternatively, one can cluster loci without assuming how these incongruencies might arise. Such "process-agnostic" approaches typically infer a tree for each locus and cluster these. There are, however, many possible combinations of tree distance and clustering methods; their comparative performance in the context of tree incongruence is largely unknown. Furthermore, because standard model selection criteria such as AIC cannot be applied to problems with a variable number of topologies, the issue of inferring the optimal number of clusters is poorly understood. Here, we perform a large-scale simulation study of phylogenetic distances and clustering methods to infer loci of common evolutionary history. We observe that the best-performing combinations are distances accounting for branch lengths followed by spectral clustering or Ward's method. We also introduce two statistical tests to infer the optimal number of clusters and show that they strongly outperform the silhouette criterion, a general-purpose heuristic. We illustrate the usefulness of the approach by 1) identifying errors in a previous phylogenetic analysis of yeast species and 2) identifying topological incongruence among newly sequenced loci of the globeflower fly genus Chiastocheta We release treeCl, a new program to cluster genes of common evolutionary history (http://git.io/treeCl). PMID:26893301

  14. Stem cells and germ cells: microRNA and gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Dyce, Paul William; Toms, Derek; Li, Julang

    2010-04-01

    The study of primordial germ cell development in vivo is hampered by their low numbers and inaccessibility. Recent research has shown the ability of embryonic and adult stem cells to differentiate into primordial germ cells and more mature gametes and this generation of germ cells in vitro may be an attractive model for their study. One of the biggest challenges facing in vitro differentiation of stem cells into primordial germ cells is the lack of markers to clearly distinguish the two. As both cell types originate early in embryonic development they share many pluripotent markers such as OCT4, VASA, FRAGILIS, and NANOG. Genome wide microarray profiling has been used to identify transcriptome patterns unique to primordial germ cells. A more thorough analysis of the temporal and quantitative expression of a panel of genes may be more robust in distinguishing these two cell populations. MicroRNAs, short RNA molecules that have been shown to regulate translation through interactions with mRNA transcripts, have also recently come under investigation for the role they may play in pluripotency. Attempts to elucidate key microRNAs responsible for both stem cell and primordial germ cell characteristics have recently been undertaken. Unique microRNAs, either individually or as global profiles, may also help to distinguish differentiated primordial germ cells from stem cells in vitro. This review will examine gene expression and microRNA signatures in stem cells and germ cells as ways to distinguish these closely related cell types. PMID:20183803

  15. Validation of Suitable Reference Genes for Assessing Gene Expression of MicroRNAs in Lonicera japonica

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaolong; Liu, Juan; Wang, Xumin; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Guoliang; Zhou, Junhui; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Tiying; Jiang, Chao; Zha, Liangping; Huang, Luqi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which play crucial regulatory roles in plant secondary metabolism and responses to the environment, could be developed as promising biomarkers for different varieties and production areas of herbal medicines. However, limited information is available for miRNAs from Lonicera japonica, which is widely used in East Asian countries owing to various pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Selection of suitable reference genes for quantification of target miRNA expression through quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of secondary metabolic regulation in different tissues and varieties of L. japonica. For precise normalization of gene expression data in L. japonica, 16 candidate miRNAs were examined in three tissues, as well as 21 cultivated varieties collected from 16 production areas, using GeNorm, NormFinder, and RefFinder algorithms. Our results revealed combination of u534122 and u3868172 as the best reference genes across all samples. Their specificity was confirmed by detecting the cycling threshold (Ct) value ranges in different varieties of L. japonica collected from diverse production areas, suggesting the use of these two reference miRNAs is sufficient for accurate transcript normalization with different tissues, varieties, and production areas. To our knowledge, this is the first report on validation of reference miRNAs in honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.). Restuls from this study can further facilitate discovery of functional regulatory miRNAs in different varieties of L. japonica. PMID:27507983

  16. Validation of Suitable Reference Genes for Assessing Gene Expression of MicroRNAs in Lonicera japonica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaolong; Liu, Juan; Wang, Xumin; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Guoliang; Zhou, Junhui; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Tiying; Jiang, Chao; Zha, Liangping; Huang, Luqi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which play crucial regulatory roles in plant secondary metabolism and responses to the environment, could be developed as promising biomarkers for different varieties and production areas of herbal medicines. However, limited information is available for miRNAs from Lonicera japonica, which is widely used in East Asian countries owing to various pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Selection of suitable reference genes for quantification of target miRNA expression through quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of secondary metabolic regulation in different tissues and varieties of L. japonica. For precise normalization of gene expression data in L. japonica, 16 candidate miRNAs were examined in three tissues, as well as 21 cultivated varieties collected from 16 production areas, using GeNorm, NormFinder, and RefFinder algorithms. Our results revealed combination of u534122 and u3868172 as the best reference genes across all samples. Their specificity was confirmed by detecting the cycling threshold (C t) value ranges in different varieties of L. japonica collected from diverse production areas, suggesting the use of these two reference miRNAs is sufficient for accurate transcript normalization with different tissues, varieties, and production areas. To our knowledge, this is the first report on validation of reference miRNAs in honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.). Restuls from this study can further facilitate discovery of functional regulatory miRNAs in different varieties of L. japonica. PMID:27507983

  17. Switches in gene expression including microRNA and a large number of distinct mRNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2008-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the kinetics of gene expression depends on the interplay of messenger RNAs (mRNAs), proteins, and nonprotein coding RNAs, or, more specifically, microRNAs. Some microRNAs may target hundreds of mRNAs. To describe this case, the author proposes a kinetic model implying that the microRNA synthesis is suppressed by the protein produced via the translation of one of the target mRNAs. With physically reasonable model parameters, the model predicts bistability or, in other words, switches in the expression of hundreds of genes.

  18. MicroRNA Gene Expression Signature Driven by miR-9 Overexpression in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yanaihara, Nozomu; Noguchi, Yukiko; Saito, Misato; Takenaka, Masataka; Takakura, Satoshi; Yamada, Kyosuke; Okamoto, Aikou

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified microRNA (miRNA) involvement in human cancers. This study aimed to elucidate potential clinical and biological associations of ovarian cancer-related miRNA gene expression profiles in high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) and ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC). Accordingly, we investigated 27 patients with ovarian cancer (12 HGSC and 15 OCCC cases) using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the cancer-related miRNA expressions. Gene Cluster 3.0 was used for hierarchical clustering analysis, and differentially expressed miRNAs between HGSC and OCCC were identified by the class comparison analysis using BRB-ArrayTools. An unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis identified two distinct miRNA expression clusters, with histological subtype-related significant differences in the associations between clusters and clinicopathological features. A comparison of miRNA expression in HGSCs and OCCCs identified five miRNAs (miR-132, miR-9, miR-126, miR-34a, and miR-21), with OCCCs demonstrating a statistically higher expression. Further investigation of the biological significance of miR-9 overexpression in OCCC revealed that miR-9 inhibition reduced the cell invasion ability and upregulated E-cadherin expression. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we further demonstrated the direct binding of miR-9 to E-cadherin. Global cancer-related miRNA expression analysis identified statistically unique profiles that could discriminate ovarian cancer histotypes. In OCCC, miR-9 overexpression may affect pathogenesis by targeting E-cadherin, thereby inducing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Therefore, miR-9 may be a promising therapeutic target strategy for OCCC. PMID:27612152

  19. Regulation of MicroRNAs, and the Correlations of MicroRNAs and Their Targeted Genes by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Li, Lan; Min, Ling-Jiang; Zhu, Lian-Qin; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Liu, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Ge, Wei; Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Jing-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) have been applied in numerous industrial products and personal care products like sunscreens and cosmetics. The released ZnO NPs from consumer and household products into the environment might pose potential health issues for animals and humans. In this study the expression of microRNAs and the correlations of microRNAs and their targeted genes in ZnO NPs treated chicken ovarian granulosa cells were investigated. ZnSO4 was used as the sole Zn2+ provider to differentiate the effects of NPs from Zn2+. It was found that ZnO-NP-5 μg/ml specifically regulated the expression of microRNAs involved in embryonic development although ZnO-NP-5 μg/ml and ZnSO4-10 μg/ml treatments produced the same intracellular Zn concentrations and resulted in similar cell growth inhibition. And ZnO-NP-5 μg/ml also specifically regulated the correlations of microRNAs and their targeted genes. This is the first investigation that intact NPs in ZnO-NP-5 μg/ml treatment specifically regulated the expression of microRNAs, and the correlations of microRNAs and their targeted genes compared to that by Zn2+. This expands our knowledge for biological effects of ZnO NPs and at the same time it raises the health concerns that ZnO NPs might adversely affect our biological systems, even the reproductive systems through regulation of specific signaling pathways. PMID:27196542

  20. Regulation of MicroRNAs, and the Correlations of MicroRNAs and Their Targeted Genes by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Ovarian Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Li, Lan; Min, Ling-Jiang; Zhu, Lian-Qin; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Liu, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Ge, Wei; Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Jing-Cai; Hao, Zhi-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) have been applied in numerous industrial products and personal care products like sunscreens and cosmetics. The released ZnO NPs from consumer and household products into the environment might pose potential health issues for animals and humans. In this study the expression of microRNAs and the correlations of microRNAs and their targeted genes in ZnO NPs treated chicken ovarian granulosa cells were investigated. ZnSO4 was used as the sole Zn2+ provider to differentiate the effects of NPs from Zn2+. It was found that ZnO-NP-5 μg/ml specifically regulated the expression of microRNAs involved in embryonic development although ZnO-NP-5 μg/ml and ZnSO4-10 μg/ml treatments produced the same intracellular Zn concentrations and resulted in similar cell growth inhibition. And ZnO-NP-5 μg/ml also specifically regulated the correlations of microRNAs and their targeted genes. This is the first investigation that intact NPs in ZnO-NP-5 μg/ml treatment specifically regulated the expression of microRNAs, and the correlations of microRNAs and their targeted genes compared to that by Zn2+. This expands our knowledge for biological effects of ZnO NPs and at the same time it raises the health concerns that ZnO NPs might adversely affect our biological systems, even the reproductive systems through regulation of specific signaling pathways. PMID:27196542

  1. Estrogen Receptor α Controls a Gene Network in Luminal-Like Breast Cancer Cells Comprising Multiple Transcription Factors and MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Cicatiello, Luigi; Mutarelli, Margherita; Grober, Oli M.V.; Paris, Ornella; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Ravo, Maria; Tarallo, Roberta; Luo, Shujun; Schroth, Gary P.; Seifert, Martin; Zinser, Christian; Luisa Chiusano, Maria; Traini, Alessandra; De Bortoli, Michele; Weisz, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Luminal-like breast tumor cells express estrogen receptor α (ERα), a member of the nuclear receptor family of ligand-activated transcription factors that controls their proliferation, survival, and functional status. To identify the molecular determinants of this hormone-responsive tumor phenotype, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis was performed in estrogen stimulated MCF-7 and ZR-75.1 cells by integrating time-course mRNA expression profiling with global mapping of genomic ERα binding sites by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel sequencing, microRNA expression profiling, and in silico analysis of transcription units and receptor binding regions identified. All 1270 genes that were found to respond to 17β-estradiol in both cell lines cluster in 33 highly concordant groups, each of which showed defined kinetics of RNA changes. This hormone-responsive gene set includes several direct targets of ERα and is organized in a gene regulation cascade, stemming from ligand-activated receptor and reaching a large number of downstream targets via AP-2γ, B-cell activating transcription factor, E2F1 and 2, E74-like factor 3, GTF2IRD1, hairy and enhancer of split homologue-1, MYB, SMAD3, RARα, and RXRα transcription factors. MicroRNAs are also integral components of this gene regulation network because miR-107, miR-424, miR-570, miR-618, and miR-760 are regulated by 17β-estradiol along with other microRNAs that can target a significant number of transcripts belonging to one or more estrogen-responsive gene clusters. PMID:20348243

  2. Genome-wide analysis implicates microRNAs and their target genes in the development of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Forstner, A J; Hofmann, A; Maaser, A; Sumer, S; Khudayberdiev, S; Mühleisen, T W; Leber, M; Schulze, T G; Strohmaier, J; Degenhardt, F; Treutlein, J; Mattheisen, M; Schumacher, J; Breuer, R; Meier, S; Herms, S; Hoffmann, P; Lacour, A; Witt, S H; Reif, A; Müller-Myhsok, B; Lucae, S; Maier, W; Schwarz, M; Vedder, H; Kammerer-Ciernioch, J; Pfennig, A; Bauer, M; Hautzinger, M; Moebus, S; Priebe, L; Sivalingam, S; Verhaert, A; Schulz, H; Czerski, P M; Hauser, J; Lissowska, J; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Brennan, P; McKay, J D; Wright, A; Mitchell, P B; Fullerton, J M; Schofield, P R; Montgomery, G W; Medland, S E; Gordon, S D; Martin, N G; Krasnov, V; Chuchalin, A; Babadjanova, G; Pantelejeva, G; Abramova, L I; Tiganov, A S; Polonikov, A; Khusnutdinova, E; Alda, M; Cruceanu, C; Rouleau, G A; Turecki, G; Laprise, C; Rivas, F; Mayoral, F; Kogevinas, M; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, M; Propping, P; Becker, T; Rietschel, M; Cichon, S; Schratt, G; Nöthen, M M

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and highly heritable neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 1%. Molecular genetic studies have identified the first BD susceptibility genes. However, the disease pathways remain largely unknown. Accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, contribute to basic mechanisms underlying brain development and plasticity, suggesting their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders, including BD. In the present study, gene-based analyses were performed for all known autosomal microRNAs using the largest genome-wide association data set of BD to date (9747 patients and 14 278 controls). Associated and brain-expressed microRNAs were then investigated in target gene and pathway analyses. Functional analyses of miR-499 and miR-708 were performed in rat hippocampal neurons. Ninety-eight of the six hundred nine investigated microRNAs showed nominally significant P-values, suggesting that BD-associated microRNAs might be enriched within known microRNA loci. After correction for multiple testing, nine microRNAs showed a significant association with BD. The most promising were miR-499, miR-708 and miR-1908. Target gene and pathway analyses revealed 18 significant canonical pathways, including brain development and neuron projection. For miR-499, four Bonferroni-corrected significant target genes were identified, including the genome-wide risk gene for psychiatric disorder CACNB2. First results of functional analyses in rat hippocampal neurons neither revealed nor excluded a major contribution of miR-499 or miR-708 to dendritic spine morphogenesis. The present results suggest that research is warranted to elucidate the precise involvement of microRNAs and their downstream pathways in BD. PMID:26556287

  3. Integrated gene set analysis for microRNA studies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Panadero, Joaquin; Dopazo, Joaquin; Montaner, David

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Functional interpretation of miRNA expression data is currently done in a three step procedure: select differentially expressed miRNAs, find their target genes, and carry out gene set overrepresentation analysis. Nevertheless, major limitations of this approach have already been described at the gene level, while some newer arise in the miRNA scenario. Here, we propose an enhanced methodology that builds on the well-established gene set analysis paradigm. Evidence for differential expression at the miRNA level is transferred to a gene differential inhibition score which is easily interpretable in terms of gene sets or pathways. Such transferred indexes account for the additive effect of several miRNAs targeting the same gene, and also incorporate cancellation effects between cases and controls. Together, these two desirable characteristics allow for more accurate modeling of regulatory processes. Results: We analyze high-throughput sequencing data from 20 different cancer types and provide exhaustive reports of gene and Gene Ontology-term deregulation by miRNA action. Availability and Implementation: The proposed methodology was implemented in the Bioconductor library mdgsa. http://bioconductor.org/packages/mdgsa. For the purpose of reproducibility all of the scripts are available at https://github.com/dmontaner-papers/gsa4mirna Contact: david.montaner@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27324197

  4. The role, mechanism and potentially novel biomarker of microRNA-17-92 cluster in macrosomia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Chen, Liping; Qiuqin Tang; Wu, Wei; Hao Gu; Lou Liu; Jie Wu; Hua Jiang; Hongjuan Ding; Xia, Yankai; Chen, Daozhen; Hu, Yali; Wang, Xinru

    2015-01-01

    Macrosomia is one of the most common perinatal complications of pregnancy and has life-long health implications for the infant. microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to regulate placental development, yet the role of miRNAs in macrosomia remains poorly understood. Here we investigated the role of miR-17-92 cluster in macrosomia. The expression levels of five miRNAs in miR-17-92 cluster were significantly elevated in placentas of macrosomia, which may due to the up-regulation of miRNA-processing enzyme Drosha and Dicer. Cell cycle pathway was identified to be the most relevant pathways regulated by miR-17-92 cluster miRNAs. Importantly, miR-17-92 cluster increased proliferation, attenuated cell apoptosis and accelerated cells entering S phase by targeting SMAD4 and RB1 in HTR8/SVneo cells. Furthermore, we found that expression of miR-17-92 cluster in serum had a high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for macrosomia (AUC: 80.53%; sensitivity: 82.61%; specificity: 69.57%). Our results suggested that miR-17-92 cluster contribute to macrosomia development by targeting regulators of cell cycle pathway. Our findings not only provide a novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of macrosomia, but also the clinical value of miR-17-92 cluster as a predictive biomarker for macrosomia. PMID:26598317

  5. The rise of operon-like gene clusters in plants.

    PubMed

    Boycheva, Svetlana; Daviet, Laurent; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Fitzpatrick, Teresa B

    2014-07-01

    Gene clusters are common features of prokaryotic genomes also present in eukaryotes. Most clustered genes known are involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Although horizontal gene transfer is a primary source of prokaryotic gene cluster (operon) formation and has been reported to occur in eukaryotes, the predominant source of cluster formation in eukaryotes appears to arise de novo or through gene duplication followed by neo- and sub-functionalization or translocation. Here we aim to provide an overview of the current knowledge and open questions related to plant gene cluster functioning, assembly, and regulation. We also present potential research approaches and point out the benefits of a better understanding of gene clusters in plants for both fundamental and applied plant science. PMID:24582794

  6. microRNAs: a new emerging class of players for disease diagnostics and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baohong; Farwell, M A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract microRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of non-protein-coding small RNAs, which regulate the expression of more than 30% protein-coding genes. The unique expression profiles of different miRNAs in different types of cancers and at different stages in one cancer type suggest that miRNAs can function as novel biomarkers for disease diagnostics and may present a new strategy for miRNA gene therapy. Anti-miRNAs and antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) have been employed to inhibit specific miRNA expression in vitro and in vivo for investigational and clinical purposes. Although miRNA-based diagnostics and gene therapy are still in their infancy, their huge potentials will meet our need for future disease diagnostics and gene therapy. High efficient delivery of miRNAs into targeted sites, designing accurate anti-miRNA/ASOs, and related biosafety issues are three major challenges in this field. PMID:18088390

  7. Altered Gene Expression Associated with microRNA Binding Site Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Võsa, Urmo; Esko, Tõnu; Kasela, Silva; Annilo, Tarmo

    2015-01-01

    Allele-specific gene expression associated with genetic variation in regulatory regions can play an important role in the development of complex traits. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in microRNA (miRNA) response elements (MRE-SNPs) that either disrupt a miRNA binding site or create a new miRNA binding site can affect the allele-specific expression of target genes. By integrating public expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data, miRNA binding site predictions, small RNA sequencing, and Argonaute crosslinking immunoprecipitation (AGO-CLIP) datasets, we identified genetic variants that can affect gene expression by modulating miRNA binding efficiency. We also identified MRE-SNPs located in regions associated with complex traits, indicating possible causative mechanisms associated with these loci. The results of this study expand the current understanding of gene expression regulation and help to interpret the mechanisms underlying eQTL effects. PMID:26496489

  8. An approach for clustering gene expression data with error information

    PubMed Central

    Tjaden, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Background Clustering of gene expression patterns is a well-studied technique for elucidating trends across large numbers of transcripts and for identifying likely co-regulated genes. Even the best clustering methods, however, are unlikely to provide meaningful results if too much of the data is unreliable. With the maturation of microarray technology, a wealth of research on statistical analysis of gene expression data has encouraged researchers to consider error and uncertainty in their microarray experiments, so that experiments are being performed increasingly with repeat spots per gene per chip and with repeat experiments. One of the challenges is to incorporate the measurement error information into downstream analyses of gene expression data, such as traditional clustering techniques. Results In this study, a clustering approach is presented which incorporates both gene expression values and error information about the expression measurements. Using repeat expression measurements, the error of each gene expression measurement in each experiment condition is estimated, and this measurement error information is incorporated directly into the clustering algorithm. The algorithm, CORE (Clustering Of Repeat Expression data), is presented and its performance is validated using statistical measures. By using error information about gene expression measurements, the clustering approach is less sensitive to noise in the underlying data and it is able to achieve more accurate clusterings. Results are described for both synthetic expression data as well as real gene expression data from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion The additional information provided by replicate gene expression measurements is a valuable asset in effective clustering. Gene expression profiles with high errors, as determined from repeat measurements, may be unreliable and may associate with different clusters, whereas gene expression profiles with low errors can be

  9. Pervasive microRNA Duplication in Chelicerates: Insights from the Embryonic microRNA Repertoire of the Spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Daniel J.; Ninova, Maria; Hilbrant, Maarten; Arif, Saad; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Ronshaugen, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair P.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small (∼22 nt) noncoding RNAs that repress translation and therefore regulate the production of proteins from specific target mRNAs. microRNAs have been found to function in diverse aspects of gene regulation within animal development and many other processes. Among invertebrates, both conserved and novel, lineage specific, microRNAs have been extensively studied predominantly in holometabolous insects such as Drosophila melanogaster. However little is known about microRNA repertoires in other arthropod lineages such as the chelicerates. To understand the evolution of microRNAs in this poorly sampled subphylum, we characterized the microRNA repertoire expressed during embryogenesis of the common house spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum. We identified a total of 148 microRNAs in P. tepidariorum representing 66 families. Approximately half of these microRNA families are conserved in other metazoans, while the remainder are specific to this spider. Of the 35 conserved microRNAs families 15 had at least two copies in the P. tepidariorum genome. A BLAST-based approach revealed a similar pattern of duplication in other spiders and a scorpion, but not among other chelicerates and arthropods, with the exception of a horseshoe crab. Among the duplicated microRNAs we found examples of lineage-specific tandem duplications, and the duplication of entire microRNA clusters in three spiders, a scorpion, and in a horseshoe crab. Furthermore, we found that paralogs of many P. tepidariorum microRNA families exhibit arm switching, which suggests that duplication was often followed by sub- or neofunctionalization. Our work shows that understanding the evolution of microRNAs in the chelicerates has great potential to provide insights into the process of microRNA duplication and divergence and the evolution of animal development. PMID:27324919

  10. Pervasive microRNA Duplication in Chelicerates: Insights from the Embryonic microRNA Repertoire of the Spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Leite, Daniel J; Ninova, Maria; Hilbrant, Maarten; Arif, Saad; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Ronshaugen, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair P

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small (∼22 nt) noncoding RNAs that repress translation and therefore regulate the production of proteins from specific target mRNAs. microRNAs have been found to function in diverse aspects of gene regulation within animal development and many other processes. Among invertebrates, both conserved and novel, lineage specific, microRNAs have been extensively studied predominantly in holometabolous insects such as Drosophila melanogaster However little is known about microRNA repertoires in other arthropod lineages such as the chelicerates. To understand the evolution of microRNAs in this poorly sampled subphylum, we characterized the microRNA repertoire expressed during embryogenesis of the common house spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum We identified a total of 148 microRNAs in P. tepidariorum representing 66 families. Approximately half of these microRNA families are conserved in other metazoans, while the remainder are specific to this spider. Of the 35 conserved microRNAs families 15 had at least two copies in the P. tepidariorum genome. A BLAST-based approach revealed a similar pattern of duplication in other spiders and a scorpion, but not among other chelicerates and arthropods, with the exception of a horseshoe crab. Among the duplicated microRNAs we found examples of lineage-specific tandem duplications, and the duplication of entire microRNA clusters in three spiders, a scorpion, and in a horseshoe crab. Furthermore, we found that paralogs of many P. tepidariorum microRNA families exhibit arm switching, which suggests that duplication was often followed by sub- or neofunctionalization. Our work shows that understanding the evolution of microRNAs in the chelicerates has great potential to provide insights into the process of microRNA duplication and divergence and the evolution of animal development. PMID:27324919

  11. Genome Wide Expression Profiling of Cancer Cell Lines Cultured in Microgravity Reveals Significant Dysregulation of Cell Cycle and MicroRNA Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Shyamsunder, Pavithra; Arun, Rajpranap; Santhakumar, Rajalakshmi; Kapadia, Nand Kishore; Kumar, Ravi; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Zero gravity causes several changes in metabolic and functional aspects of the human body and experiments in space flight have demonstrated alterations in cancer growth and progression. This study reports the genome wide expression profiling of a colorectal cancer cell line-DLD-1, and a lymphoblast leukemic cell line-MOLT-4, under simulated microgravity in an effort to understand central processes and cellular functions that are dysregulated among both cell lines. Altered cell morphology, reduced cell viability and an aberrant cell cycle profile in comparison to their static controls were observed in both cell lines under microgravity. The process of cell cycle in DLD-1 cells was markedly affected with reduced viability, reduced colony forming ability, an apoptotic population and dysregulation of cell cycle genes, oncogenes, and cancer progression and prognostic markers. DNA microarray analysis revealed 1801 (upregulated) and 2542 (downregulated) genes (>2 fold) in DLD-1 cultures under microgravity while MOLT-4 cultures differentially expressed 349 (upregulated) and 444 (downregulated) genes (>2 fold) under microgravity. The loss in cell proliferative capacity was corroborated with the downregulation of the cell cycle process as demonstrated by functional clustering of DNA microarray data using gene ontology terms. The genome wide expression profile also showed significant dysregulation of post transcriptional gene silencing machinery and multiple microRNA host genes that are potential tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes including MIR22HG, MIR17HG and MIR21HG. The MIR22HG, a tumor-suppressor gene was one of the highest upregulated genes in the microarray data showing a 4.4 log fold upregulation under microgravity. Real time PCR validated the dysregulation in the host gene by demonstrating a 4.18 log fold upregulation of the miR-22 microRNA. Microarray data also showed dysregulation of direct targets of miR-22, SP1, CDK6 and CCNA2. PMID:26295583

  12. Genome Wide Expression Profiling of Cancer Cell Lines Cultured in Microgravity Reveals Significant Dysregulation of Cell Cycle and MicroRNA Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Shyamsunder, Pavithra; Arun, Rajpranap; Santhakumar, Rajalakshmi; Kapadia, Nand Kishore; Kumar, Ravi; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Zero gravity causes several changes in metabolic and functional aspects of the human body and experiments in space flight have demonstrated alterations in cancer growth and progression. This study reports the genome wide expression profiling of a colorectal cancer cell line-DLD-1, and a lymphoblast leukemic cell line-MOLT-4, under simulated microgravity in an effort to understand central processes and cellular functions that are dysregulated among both cell lines. Altered cell morphology, reduced cell viability and an aberrant cell cycle profile in comparison to their static controls were observed in both cell lines under microgravity. The process of cell cycle in DLD-1 cells was markedly affected with reduced viability, reduced colony forming ability, an apoptotic population and dysregulation of cell cycle genes, oncogenes, and cancer progression and prognostic markers. DNA microarray analysis revealed 1801 (upregulated) and 2542 (downregulated) genes (>2 fold) in DLD-1 cultures under microgravity while MOLT-4 cultures differentially expressed 349 (upregulated) and 444 (downregulated) genes (>2 fold) under microgravity. The loss in cell proliferative capacity was corroborated with the downregulation of the cell cycle process as demonstrated by functional clustering of DNA microarray data using gene ontology terms. The genome wide expression profile also showed significant dysregulation of post transcriptional gene silencing machinery and multiple microRNA host genes that are potential tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes including MIR22HG, MIR17HG and MIR21HG. The MIR22HG, a tumor-suppressor gene was one of the highest upregulated genes in the microarray data showing a 4.4 log fold upregulation under microgravity. Real time PCR validated the dysregulation in the host gene by demonstrating a 4.18 log fold upregulation of the miR-22 microRNA. Microarray data also showed dysregulation of direct targets of miR-22, SP1, CDK6 and CCNA2. PMID:26295583

  13. Isolation and identification of gene-specific microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Lung; Chang, Donald C; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2013-01-01

    Computer programming has identified hundreds of genomic hairpin sequences, many with functions remain to be determined. Because direct transfection of hairpin-like miRNA precursors (pre)-miRNAs in mammalian cells is not always sufficient to trigger effective RNA-induced gene silencing complex (RISC) assembly, a key step for RNA interference (RNAi)-related gene silencing, we developed an intronic miRNA-expressing system to overcome this problem by inserting a hairpin-like pre-miRNA structure into the intron region of a gene and successfully increased the efficiency and effectiveness of miRNA-associated RNAi induction in vitro and in vivo. This intronic miRNA biogenesis has been found to depend on a coupled interaction of nascent precursor messenger RNA transcription and intron excision within a specific nuclear region proximal to genomic perichromatin fibrils. The intronic miRNA was transcribed by RNA type II polymerases, coexpressed with a primary gene transcript, and excised out of its encoding gene transcript by intracellular RNA splicing and processing mechanisms. Currently, some ribonuclease III endonucleases have been found to be involved in the processing of spliced introns and probably facilitating the intronic miRNA maturation. Using this miRNA generation system, we have shown for the first time that the intron-derived miRNAs were able to induce strong RNAi effects in not only human and mouse cells but also zebrafishes, chicken embryos, and adult mice. We have also developed an miRNA isolation protocol, based on the complementarity between the designed miRNA and its target gene sequence, to purify and identify the mature miRNAs generated by the intronic miRNA-expressing system. Several intronic miRNA identities and structures are currently confirmed to be active in vitro and in vivo. According to this proven-of-principle method, we now have full knowledge to design pre-miRNA inserts that are more efficient and effective for the intronic mi

  14. MicroRNAs and Their Target Genes in Gingival Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Stoecklin-Wasmer, C.; Guarnieri, P.; Celenti, R.; Demmer, R.T.; Kebschull, M.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2012-01-01

    To gain insights into the in vivo function of miRNAs in the context of periodontitis, we examined the occurrence of miRNAs in healthy and diseased gingival tissues and validated their in silico-predicted targets through mRNA profiling using whole-genome microarrays in the same specimens. Eighty-six individuals with periodontitis contributed 198 gingival papillae: 158 ‘diseased’ (bleeding-on-probing, PD > 4 mm, and AL ≥ 3 mm) and 40 ‘healthy’ (no bleeding, PD ≤ 4 mm, and AL ≤ 2 mm). Expression of 1,205 miRNAs was assessed by microarrays, followed by selected confirmation by quantitative RT-PCR. Predicted miRNA targets were identified and tested for enrichment by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Enriched gene sets were grouped in functional categories by DAVID and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. One hundred fifty-nine miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between healthy and diseased gingiva. Four miRNAs (hsa-miR-451, hsa-miR-223, hsa-miR-486-5p, hsa-miR-3917) were significantly overexpressed, and 7 (hsa-miR-1246, hsa-miR-1260, hsa-miR-141, hsa-miR-1260b, hsa-miR-203, hsa-miR-210, hsa-miR-205*) were underexpressed by > 2-fold in diseased vs. healthy gingiva. GSEA and additional filtering identified 60 enriched miRNA gene sets with target genes involved in immune/inflammatory responses and tissue homeostasis. This is the first study that concurrently examined miRNA and mRNA expression in gingival tissues and will inform mechanistic experimentation to dissect the role of miRNAs in periodontal tissue homeostasis and pathology. PMID:22879578

  15. High expression of microRNA-183/182/96 cluster as a prognostic biomarker for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Cailu; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Jin; Huang, Zhongying; Li, Xing; Wu, Mingqing; Li, Shuaijie; Tang, Hailin; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    More sensitive and effective diagnostic markers for the detection of breast cancer are urgently needed. The microRNA-183/182/96 cluster has been reported to be involved in tumorigenesis and progression in a variety of cancers, and it is a promising cancer prognostic biomarker. The goal of this study was to determine the expression levels of the miR-183/182/96 cluster in breast cancer tissues and evaluate its prognostic role in breast cancer. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis (qRT-PCR) was used to detect the expression levels of the miR-183/182/96 cluster in 41 breast cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues (control tissues) and also in different mammary cell lines. In situ hybridization (ISH) of the miR-183/182/96 cluster on 131 tissue microarrays (TMAs) was used to statistically analyze its prognostic role. The miR-183/182/96 cluster levels were significantly higher in breast cancer tissues than in control tissues. The miR-183/182/96 cluster was also upregulated in human breast cancer cell lines. An increased miR-183/182/96 cluster level was correlated with local relapse, distant metastasis and poor clinical outcomes. Our findings improve our understanding of the expression level of the miR-183/182/96 cluster in breast cancer and clarify the role of the miR-183/182/96 cluster as a novel prognostic biomarker for breast cancer. PMID:27071841

  16. High expression of microRNA-183/182/96 cluster as a prognostic biomarker for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Cailu; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Jin; Huang, Zhongying; Li, Xing; Wu, Mingqing; Li, Shuaijie; Tang, Hailin; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    More sensitive and effective diagnostic markers for the detection of breast cancer are urgently needed. The microRNA-183/182/96 cluster has been reported to be involved in tumorigenesis and progression in a variety of cancers, and it is a promising cancer prognostic biomarker. The goal of this study was to determine the expression levels of the miR-183/182/96 cluster in breast cancer tissues and evaluate its prognostic role in breast cancer. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis (qRT-PCR) was used to detect the expression levels of the miR-183/182/96 cluster in 41 breast cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues (control tissues) and also in different mammary cell lines. In situ hybridization (ISH) of the miR-183/182/96 cluster on 131 tissue microarrays (TMAs) was used to statistically analyze its prognostic role. The miR-183/182/96 cluster levels were significantly higher in breast cancer tissues than in control tissues. The miR-183/182/96 cluster was also upregulated in human breast cancer cell lines. An increased miR-183/182/96 cluster level was correlated with local relapse, distant metastasis and poor clinical outcomes. Our findings improve our understanding of the expression level of the miR-183/182/96 cluster in breast cancer and clarify the role of the miR-183/182/96 cluster as a novel prognostic biomarker for breast cancer. PMID:27071841

  17. MicroRNA-Target Network Inference and Local Network Enrichment Analysis Identify Two microRNA Clusters with Distinct Functions in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sass, Steffen; Pitea, Adriana; Unger, Kristian; Hess, Julia; Mueller, Nikola S.; Theis, Fabian J.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs represent ~22 nt long endogenous small RNA molecules that have been experimentally shown to regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. One main interest in miRNA research is the investigation of their functional roles, which can typically be accomplished by identification of mi-/mRNA interactions and functional annotation of target gene sets. We here present a novel method “miRlastic”, which infers miRNA-target interactions using transcriptomic data as well as prior knowledge and performs functional annotation of target genes by exploiting the local structure of the inferred network. For the network inference, we applied linear regression modeling with elastic net regularization on matched microRNA and messenger RNA expression profiling data to perform feature selection on prior knowledge from sequence-based target prediction resources. The novelty of miRlastic inference originates in predicting data-driven intra-transcriptome regulatory relationships through feature selection. With synthetic data, we showed that miRlastic outperformed commonly used methods and was suitable even for low sample sizes. To gain insight into the functional role of miRNAs and to determine joint functional properties of miRNA clusters, we introduced a local enrichment analysis procedure. The principle of this procedure lies in identifying regions of high functional similarity by evaluating the shortest paths between genes in the network. We can finally assign functional roles to the miRNAs by taking their regulatory relationships into account. We thoroughly evaluated miRlastic on a cohort of head and neck cancer (HNSCC) patients provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We inferred an mi-/mRNA regulatory network for human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated miRNAs in HNSCC. The resulting network best enriched for experimentally validated miRNA-target interaction, when compared to common methods. Finally, the local enrichment step identified two functional clusters of mi

  18. Inferring the Recent Duplication History of a Gene Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Giltae; Zhang, Louxin; Vinař, Tomáš; Miller, Webb

    Much important evolutionary activity occurs in gene clusters, where a copy of a gene may be free to evolve new functions. Computational methods to extract evolutionary information from sequence data for such clusters are currently imperfect, in part because accurate sequence data are often lacking in these genomic regions, making the existing methods difficult to apply. We describe a new method for reconstructing the recent evolutionary history of gene clusters. The method’s performance is evaluated on simulated data and on actual human gene clusters.

  19. MicroRNA-155 confers encephalogenic potential to Th17 cells by promoting effector gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruozhen; Huffaker, Thomas B; Kagele, Dominique A; Runtsch, Marah C; Bake, Erin; Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Round, June L; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2013-06-15

    Th17 cells are central to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, and recently specific noncoding microRNAs have been shown to regulate their development. However, it remains unclear whether microRNAs are also involved in modulating Th17 cell effector functions. Consequently, we examined the role of miR-155 in differentiated Th17 cells during their induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Using adoptive transfer experiments, we found that highly purified, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein Ag-specific Th17 cells lacking miR-155 were defective in their capacity to cause experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Gene expression profiling of purified miR-155(-/-)IL-17F(+) Th17 cells identified a subset of effector genes that are dependent on miR-155 for their proper expression through a mechanism involving repression of the transcription factor Ets1. Among the genes reduced in the absence of miR-155 was IL-23R, resulting in miR-155(-/-) Th17 cells being hyporesponsive to IL-23. Taken together, our study demonstrates a critical role for miR-155 in Th17 cells as they unleash autoimmune inflammation and finds that this occurs through a signaling network involving miR-155, Ets1, and the clinically relevant IL-23-IL-23R pathway. PMID:23686497

  20. Families of microRNAs Expressed in Clusters Regulate Cell Signaling in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Servín-González, Luis Steven; Granados-López, Angelica Judith; López, Jesús Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells have developed advantages to acquire hallmarks of cancer like apoptosis resistance, increased proliferation, migration, and invasion through cell signaling pathway misregulation. The sequential activation of genes in a pathway is regulated by miRNAs. Loss or gain of miRNA expression could activate or repress a particular cell axis. It is well known that aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Individual miRNA expression is reported without considering that miRNAs are grouped in clusters and may have similar functions, such as the case of clusters with anti-oncomiRs (23b~27b~24-1, miR-29a~29b-1, miR-29b-2~29c, miR-99a~125b-2, miR-99b~125a, miR-100~125b-1, miR-199a-2~214, and miR-302s) or oncomiRs activity (miR-1-1~133a-2, miR-1-2~133a-1, miR-133b~206, miR-17~92, miR-106a~363, miR183~96~182, miR-181a-1~181b-1, and miR-181a-2~181b-2), which regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), NOTCH, proteasome-culling rings, and apoptosis cell signaling. In this work we point out the pathways regulated by families of miRNAs grouped in 20 clusters involved in cervical cancer. Reviewing how miRNA families expressed in cluster-regulated cell path signaling will increase the knowledge of cervical cancer progression, providing important information for therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic methodology design. PMID:26057746

  1. Families of microRNAs Expressed in Clusters Regulate Cell Signaling in Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Servín-González, Luis Steven; Granados-López, Angelica Judith; López, Jesús Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells have developed advantages to acquire hallmarks of cancer like apoptosis resistance, increased proliferation, migration, and invasion through cell signaling pathway misregulation. The sequential activation of genes in a pathway is regulated by miRNAs. Loss or gain of miRNA expression could activate or repress a particular cell axis. It is well known that aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Individual miRNA expression is reported without considering that miRNAs are grouped in clusters and may have similar functions, such as the case of clusters with anti-oncomiRs (23b~27b~24-1, miR-29a~29b-1, miR-29b-2~29c, miR-99a~125b-2, miR-99b~125a, miR-100~125b-1, miR-199a-2~214, and miR-302s) or oncomiRs activity (miR-1-1~133a-2, miR-1-2~133a-1, miR-133b~206, miR-17~92, miR-106a~363, miR183~96~182, miR-181a-1~181b-1, and miR-181a-2~181b-2), which regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), NOTCH, proteasome-culling rings, and apoptosis cell signaling. In this work we point out the pathways regulated by families of miRNAs grouped in 20 clusters involved in cervical cancer. Reviewing how miRNA families expressed in cluster-regulated cell path signaling will increase the knowledge of cervical cancer progression, providing important information for therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic methodology design. PMID:26057746

  2. GAMUT: GPU accelerated microRNA analysis to uncover target genes through CUDA-miRanda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-coding sequences such as microRNAs have important roles in disease processes. Computational microRNA target identification (CMTI) is becoming increasingly important since traditional experimental methods for target identification pose many difficulties. These methods are time-consuming, costly, and often need guidance from computational methods to narrow down candidate genes anyway. However, most CMTI methods are computationally demanding, since they need to handle not only several million query microRNA and reference RNA pairs, but also several million nucleotide comparisons within each given pair. Thus, the need to perform microRNA identification at such large scale has increased the demand for parallel computing. Methods Although most CMTI programs (e.g., the miRanda algorithm) are based on a modified Smith-Waterman (SW) algorithm, the existing parallel SW implementations (e.g., CUDASW++ 2.0/3.0, SWIPE) are unable to meet this demand in CMTI tasks. We present CUDA-miRanda, a fast microRNA target identification algorithm that takes advantage of massively parallel computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). CUDA-miRanda specifically focuses on the local alignment of short (i.e., ≤ 32 nucleotides) sequences against longer reference sequences (e.g., 20K nucleotides). Moreover, the proposed algorithm is able to report multiple alignments (up to 191 top scores) and the corresponding traceback sequences for any given (query sequence, reference sequence) pair. Results Speeds over 5.36 Giga Cell Updates Per Second (GCUPs) are achieved on a server with 4 NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. Compared to the original miRanda algorithm, which is evaluated on an Intel Xeon E5620@2.4 GHz CPU, the experimental results show up to 166 times performance gains in terms of execution time. In addition, we have verified that the exact same targets were predicted in both CUDA-miRanda and the original mi

  3. RFMirTarget: Predicting Human MicroRNA Target Genes with a Random Forest Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Mariana R.; da Fonseca, Guilherme C.; Loss-Morais, Guilherme; Alves, Ronnie; Margis, Rogerio; Bazzan, Ana L. C.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key regulators of eukaryotic gene expression whose fundamental role has already been identified in many cell pathways. The correct identification of miRNAs targets is still a major challenge in bioinformatics and has motivated the development of several computational methods to overcome inherent limitations of experimental analysis. Indeed, the best results reported so far in terms of specificity and sensitivity are associated to machine learning-based methods for microRNA-target prediction. Following this trend, in the current paper we discuss and explore a microRNA-target prediction method based on a random forest classifier, namely RFMirTarget. Despite its well-known robustness regarding general classifying tasks, to the best of our knowledge, random forest have not been deeply explored for the specific context of predicting microRNAs targets. Our framework first analyzes alignments between candidate microRNA-target pairs and extracts a set of structural, thermodynamics, alignment, seed and position-based features, upon which classification is performed. Experiments have shown that RFMirTarget outperforms several well-known classifiers with statistical significance, and that its performance is not impaired by the class imbalance problem or features correlation. Moreover, comparing it against other algorithms for microRNA target prediction using independent test data sets from TarBase and starBase, we observe a very promising performance, with higher sensitivity in relation to other methods. Finally, tests performed with RFMirTarget show the benefits of feature selection even for a classifier with embedded feature importance analysis, and the consistency between relevant features identified and important biological properties for effective microRNA-target gene alignment. PMID:23922946

  4. An Encapsulation of Gene Signatures for Hepatocellular Carcinoma, MicroRNA-132 Predicted Target Genes and the Corresponding Overlaps

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Ren, Fanghui; Liang, Haiwei; Dang, Yiwu; Rong, Minhua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies have demonstrated that microRNA-132 plays a vital part in and is actively associated with several cancers, with its tumor-suppressive role in hepatocellular carcinoma confirmed. The current study employed multiple bioinformatics techniques to establish gene signatures for hepatocellular carcinoma, microRNA-132 predicted target genes and the corresponding overlaps. Methods Various assays were performed to explore the role and cellular functions of miR-132 in HCC and a successive panel of tasks was completed, including NLP analysis, miR-132 target genes prediction, comprehensive analyses (gene ontology analysis, pathway analysis, network analysis and connectivity analysis), and analytical integration. Later, HCC-related and miR-132-related potential targets, pathways, networks and highlighted hub genes were revealed as well as those of the overlapped section. Results MiR-132 was effective in both impeding cell growth and boosting apoptosis in HCC cell lines. A total of fifty-nine genes were obtained from the analytical integration, which were considered to be both HCC- and miR-132-related. Moreover, four specific pathways were unveiled in the network analysis of the overlaps, i.e. adherens junction, VEGF signaling pathway, neurotrophin signaling pathway, and MAPK signaling pathway. Conclusions The tumor-suppressive role of miR-132 in HCC has been further confirmed by in vitro experiments. Gene signatures in the study identified the potential molecular mechanisms of HCC, miR-132 and their established associations, which might be effective for diagnosis, individualized treatments and prognosis of HCC patients. However, combined detections of miR-132 with other bio-indicators in clinical practice and further in vitro experiments are needed. PMID:27467251

  5. The microRNA156 and microRNA172 gene regulation cascades at post-germinative stages in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in developmental programs of plants including seed germination and post-germination. Here, we provide evidence that two different miRNA pathways, miR156 and miR172, interact during the post-germination stages in Arabidopsis. Mutant seedlings expressing miR156resistant...

  6. Genome-wide profiles of methylation, microRNAs, and gene expression in chemoresistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Dong-Xu; Gu, Feng; Gao, Fei; Hao, Jun-jun; Gong, Desheng; Gu, Xiao-Ting; Mao, Ai-Qin; Jin, Jian; Fu, Li; Ma, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemoresistance is regulated by complex genetic and epigenetic networks. In this study, the features of gene expression, methylation, and microRNA (miRNA) expression were investigated with high-throughput sequencing in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells resistant to adriamycin (MCF-7/ADM) and paclitaxel (MCF-7/PTX). We found that: ① both of the chemoresistant cell lines had similar, massive changes in gene expression, methylation, and miRNA expression versus chemosensitive controls. ② Pairwise integration of the data highlighted sets of genes that were regulated by either methylation or miRNAs, and sets of miRNAs whose expression was controlled by DNA methylation in chemoresistant cells. ③ By combining the three sets of high-throughput data, we obtained a list of genes whose expression was regulated by both methylation and miRNAs in chemoresistant cells; ④ Expression of these genes was then validated in clinical breast cancer samples to generate a 17-gene signature that showed good predictive and prognostic power in triple-negative breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline-taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In conclusion, our results have generated a new workflow for the integrated analysis of the effects of miRNAs and methylation on gene expression during the development of chemoresistance. PMID:27094684

  7. MicroRNA and gene networks in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kunhao; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ting; Zhu, Minghui

    2014-11-01

    Molecular biologists have collected considerable data regarding the involvement of genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer. However the underlying mechanisms of cancer with regard to genes and miRNAs remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and construct regulatory networks of genes and miRNAs to gradually reveal the underlying mechanisms of DLBCL development. The first differential expression network that is presented is an experimentally validated network of miRNAs and genes. This network presents known biological regulatory associations among miRNAs and genes in the human body. The second network is a DLBCL differential expression network. Differentially expressed gene and miRNA data regarding DLBCL were collected and, based on the first network and the differentially expressed data, the second network was inferred, which demonstrates the irregular regulatory associations that may lead to the occurrence of DLBCL. The third network is a DLBCL-associated network. This network is comprised of non-differentially expressed genes and miRNAs that contribute to numerous DLBCL processes. The similarities and differences among the three networks were extracted and compared to distinguish key regulatory associations; furthermore, important signaling pathways in DLBCL were identified. The present study partially clarified the pathogenesis of DLBCL and provided an improved understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms, as well as a potential treatment for DLBCL. PMID:25289101

  8. Genome-wide profiles of methylation, microRNAs, and gene expression in chemoresistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Dong-Xu; Gu, Feng; Gao, Fei; Hao, Jun-Jun; Gong, Desheng; Gu, Xiao-Ting; Mao, Ai-Qin; Jin, Jian; Fu, Li; Ma, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemoresistance is regulated by complex genetic and epigenetic networks. In this study, the features of gene expression, methylation, and microRNA (miRNA) expression were investigated with high-throughput sequencing in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells resistant to adriamycin (MCF-7/ADM) and paclitaxel (MCF-7/PTX). We found that: ① both of the chemoresistant cell lines had similar, massive changes in gene expression, methylation, and miRNA expression versus chemosensitive controls. ② Pairwise integration of the data highlighted sets of genes that were regulated by either methylation or miRNAs, and sets of miRNAs whose expression was controlled by DNA methylation in chemoresistant cells. ③ By combining the three sets of high-throughput data, we obtained a list of genes whose expression was regulated by both methylation and miRNAs in chemoresistant cells; ④ Expression of these genes was then validated in clinical breast cancer samples to generate a 17-gene signature that showed good predictive and prognostic power in triple-negative breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline-taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In conclusion, our results have generated a new workflow for the integrated analysis of the effects of miRNAs and methylation on gene expression during the development of chemoresistance. PMID:27094684

  9. MicroRNAs of the miR379–410 cluster: New players in embryonic neurogenesis and regulators of neuronal function

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The imprinted miR379–410 cluster contains 38 microRNAs (miRNAs) that are involved in diverse neurodevelopmental processes and are important regulators of neuronal function. The implications of these miRNAs in neurological diseases have been recently recognized.In the present minireview, the current findings regarding the brain-specific functions of miR379–410 cluster miRNAs are summarized and discussed.

  10. Super-paramagnetic clustering of yeast gene expression profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getz, G.; Levine, E.; Domany, E.; Zhang, M. Q.

    2000-04-01

    High-density DNA arrays, used to monitor gene expression at a genomic scale, have produced vast amounts of information which require the development of efficient computational methods to analyze them. The important first step is to extract the fundamental patterns of gene expression inherent in the data. This paper describes the application of a novel clustering algorithm, super-paramagnetic clustering (SPC) to analysis of gene expression profiles that were generated recently during a study of the yeast cell cycle. SPC was used to organize genes into biologically relevant clusters that are suggestive for their co-regulation. Some of the advantages of SPC are its robustness against noise and initialization, a clear signature of cluster formation and splitting, and an unsupervised self-organized determination of the number of clusters at each resolution. Our analysis revealed interesting correlated behavior of several groups of genes which has not been previously identified.

  11. Potential clinical insights into microRNAs and their target genes in esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Su Q; Wang, He M; Cao, Xiu F

    2011-12-01

    Esophageal carcinoma (EC) are characterized by dysregulation of microRNAs, which play an important roles as a posttranscriptional regulators in protein synthesis, and are involved in cellular processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Recently, altered miRNAs expression has been comprehensively studied in EC by high-throughput technology. Increased understanding of miRNAs target genes and their potential regulatory mechanisms have clarified the miRNAs activities and may provide exciting opportunities for cancer diagnosis and miRNA-based genetherapy. Here, we reviewed the most recently discovered miRNA target genes, with particular emphasis on the deciphering of their possible mechanisms and the potential roles in miRNAs-based tumour therapeutics. PMID:21870994

  12. Problem-Solving Test: The Role of a Micro-RNA in the Regulation of "fos" Gene Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    The "fos" proto-oncogene codes for a component of the AP1 transcription factor, an important regulator of gene expression and cell proliferation. Dysregulation of AP1 function may lead to the malignant transformation of the cell. The present test describes an experiment in which the role of a micro-RNA (miR-7b) in the regulation of "fos" gene…

  13. Distinct microRNA Expression in Human Airway Cells of Asthmatic Donors Identifies a Novel Asthma-associated Gene

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airway inflammation is the hallmark of asthma and suggests a dysregulation of homeostatic mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression, necessary for the proper function of cellular processes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that differences between healthy...

  14. De novo Reconstruction of the Pig Skeletal Muscle Transcriptome for Identification of MicroRNA Gene Targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA (miR) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts. Inhibition is exerted through targeting of a miR-protein complex by base-pairing of the miR sequence to cognate recognition sequences in the mRNA. Target identification...

  15. MicroRNA-497 impairs the growth of chemoresistant neuroblastoma cells by targeting cell cycle, survival and vascular permeability genes

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Aroa; París-Coderch, Laia; Jubierre, Luz; Martínez, Alba; Zhou, Xiangyu; Piskareva, Olga; Bray, Isabella; Vidal, Isaac; Almazán-Moga, Ana; Molist, Carla; Roma, Josep; Bayascas, José R.; Casanovas, Oriol; Stallings, Raymond L.; de Toledo, José Sánchez; Gallego, Soledad; Segura, Miguel F.

    2016-01-01

    Despite multimodal therapies, a high percentage of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) become refractory to current treatments, most of which interfere with cell cycle and DNA synthesis or function, activating the DNA damage response (DDR). In cancer, this process is frequently altered by deregulated expression or function of several genes which contribute to multidrug resistance (MDR). MicroRNAs are outstanding candidates for therapy since a single microRNA can modulate the expression of multiple genes of the same or different pathways, thus hindering the development of resistance mechanisms by the tumor. We found several genes implicated in the MDR to be overexpressed in high-risk NB which could be targeted by microRNAs simultaneously. Our functional screening identified several of those microRNAs that reduced proliferation of chemoresistant NB cell lines, the best of which was miR-497. Low expression of miR-497 correlated with poor patient outcome. The overexpression of miR-497 reduced the proliferation of multiple chemoresistant NB cell lines and induced apoptosis in MYCN-amplified cell lines. Moreover, the conditional expression of miR-497 in NB xenografts reduced tumor growth and inhibited vascular permeabilization. MiR-497 targets multiple genes related to the DDR, cell cycle, survival and angiogenesis, which renders this molecule a promising candidate for NB therapy. PMID:26824183

  16. Prokaryotic Gene Clusters: A Rich Toolbox for Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Michael; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria construct elaborate nanostructures, obtain nutrients and energy from diverse sources, synthesize complex molecules, and implement signal processing to react to their environment. These complex phenotypes require the coordinated action of multiple genes, which are often encoded in a contiguous region of the genome, referred to as a gene cluster. Gene clusters sometimes contain all of the genes necessary and sufficient for a particular function. As an evolutionary mechanism, gene clusters facilitate the horizontal transfer of the complete function between species. Here, we review recent work on a number of clusters whose functions are relevant to biotechnology. Engineering these clusters has been hindered by their regulatory complexity, the need to balance the expression of many genes, and a lack of tools to design and manipulate DNA at this scale. Advances in synthetic biology will enable the large-scale bottom-up engineering of the clusters to optimize their functions, wake up cryptic clusters, or to transfer them between organisms. Understanding and manipulating gene clusters will move towards an era of genome engineering, where multiple functions can be “mixed-and-matched” to create a designer organism. PMID:21154668

  17. No Evidence that MicroRNAs Coevolve with Genes Located in Copy Number Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jovelin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a widespread class of regulatory noncoding RNAs with key roles in physiology and development, conferring robustness to noise in regulatory networks. Consistent with this buffering function, it was recently suggested that human miRNAs coevolve with genes in copy number regions (copy number variation [CNV] genes) to reduce dosage imbalance. Here, I compare miRNA regulation between CNV and non-CNV genes in four model organisms. miRNA regulation of CNV genes is elevated in human and fly but reduced in nematode and zebrafish. By analyzing 31 human CNV data sets, careful analysis of human and chimpanzee orthologs, resampling genes within species and comparing structural variant types, I show that the apparent coevolution between CNV genes and miRNAs is due to the strong dependency between 3′-untranslated region length and miRNA target prediction. Deciphering the interplay between CNVs and miRNAs will likely require a deeper understanding of how miRNAs are embedded in regulatory circuits. PMID:25804521

  18. Evolution of Arabidopsis MIR genes generates novel microRNA classes.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Franck; Blevins, Todd; Ailhas, Jérôme; Boller, Thomas; Meins, Frederick

    2008-11-01

    In Arabidopsis, canonical 21-nt miRNAs are generated by Dicer-like (DCL) 1 from hairpin precursors. We have identified a novel class of functional 23- to 25-nt long-miRNAs that is generated independently from the same miRNA precursors by DCL3. Long-miRNAs are developmentally regulated and in some cases have been conserved during evolution implying that they have biological functions. Plant microRNA genes (MIR) have been proposed to evolve by inverted duplication of the target gene. We found that recently evolved MIR genes consistently give rise to long-miRNAs, while ancient MIR genes give rise predominantly to canonical miRNAs. Transcripts from inverted repeats representing evolving proto-MIR genes were processed by DCL3 into long-miRNAs and also by DCL1, DCL2 or DCL4 depending on hairpin stem length to produce different sizes of miRNAs. Our results suggest that evolution of MIR genes is associated with gradual, overlapping changes in DCL usage resulting in specific size classes of miRNAs. PMID:18842626

  19. No Evidence that MicroRNAs Coevolve with Genes Located in Copy Number Regions.

    PubMed

    Jovelin, Richard

    2015-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a widespread class of regulatory noncoding RNAs with key roles in physiology and development, conferring robustness to noise in regulatory networks. Consistent with this buffering function, it was recently suggested that human miRNAs coevolve with genes in copy number regions (copy number variation [CNV] genes) to reduce dosage imbalance. Here, I compare miRNA regulation between CNV and non-CNV genes in four model organisms. miRNA regulation of CNV genes is elevated in human and fly but reduced in nematode and zebrafish. By analyzing 31 human CNV data sets, careful analysis of human and chimpanzee orthologs, resampling genes within species and comparing structural variant types, I show that the apparent coevolution between CNV genes and miRNAs is due to the strong dependency between 3'-untranslated region length and miRNA target prediction. Deciphering the interplay between CNVs and miRNAs will likely require a deeper understanding of how miRNAs are embedded in regulatory circuits. PMID:25804521

  20. MicroRNA-148b and microRNA-152 reactivate tumor suppressor genes through suppression of DNA methyltransferase-1 gene in pancreatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Masoumeh; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Arzanani, Mohsen Karimi; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Fard-Esfahani, Pezhman; Zeinali, Sirous

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT-1) is observed mostly in pancreatic cancer and it can cause tumor suppressor genes silencing in this disease. Recent studies suggest that abnormal expressions of microRNAs (miRs) are involved in pathogenesis of different types of human cancers including pancreatic cancer. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of miR-148b and -152 on reverting the tumorigenic phenotype of pancreatic cancer cell lines. In order to investigate whether miR-148b and -152 are involved in the regulation of DNMT-1, luciferase reporter assay was used and confirmed that the DNMT-1 mRNA could be a target for miR-148b and miR-152. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-148b and -152 in pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA PaCa-2 and AsPC-1) decreased DNMT-1 expression (53% and 59% respectively), returned DNA methylation to normal patterns and induced re-expression of tumor suppressor genes, like BNIP3 (4.7- and 3.8-fold) and SPARC (5.3- and 2.9-fold) for miR-148b and -152 respectively. Moreover, the introduced miR-148b and -152 could inhibit the proliferation of MIA PaCa-2 (35% and 37% respectively) and AsPC-1 (39% and 40% respectively) cell lines. The apoptosis rates of MIA PaCa-1 after treatment with miR-148b and -152 were 10% and 8% respectively; while these rates in AsPC-1 were 16% and 11% respectively. Conclusively these findings mean that miRs that are targeting DNMT-1 and modifying methylation status of tumor suppressor genes such as BNIP3 and SPARC can be applied in killing the pancreatic cancer cells and decreasing the tumorigenicity of these cells. PMID:24448385

  1. Bioinformatics Prediction of Polyketide Synthase Gene Clusters from Mycosphaerella fijiensis

    PubMed Central

    Noar, Roslyn D.; Daub, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of black Sigatoka disease of banana, is a Dothideomycete fungus closely related to fungi that produce polyketides important for plant pathogenicity. We utilized the M. fijiensis genome sequence to predict PKS genes and their gene clusters and make bioinformatics predictions about the types of compounds produced by these clusters. Eight PKS gene clusters were identified in the M. fijiensis genome, placing M. fijiensis into the 23rd percentile for the number of PKS genes compared to other Dothideomycetes. Analysis of the PKS domains identified three of the PKS enzymes as non-reducing and two as highly reducing. Gene clusters contained types of genes frequently found in PKS clusters including genes encoding transporters, oxidoreductases, methyltransferases, and non-ribosomal peptide synthases. Phylogenetic analysis identified a putative PKS cluster encoding melanin biosynthesis. None of the other clusters were closely aligned with genes encoding known polyketides, however three of the PKS genes fell into clades with clusters encoding alternapyrone, fumonisin, and solanapyrone produced by Alternaria and Fusarium species. A search for homologs among available genomic sequences from 103 Dothideomycetes identified close homologs (>80% similarity) for six of the PKS sequences. One of the PKS sequences was not similar (< 60% similarity) to sequences in any of the 103 genomes, suggesting that it encodes a unique compound. Comparison of the M. fijiensis PKS sequences with those of two other banana pathogens, M. musicola and M. eumusae, showed that these two species have close homologs to five of the M. fijiensis PKS sequences, but three others were not found in either species. RT-PCR and RNA-Seq analysis showed that the melanin PKS cluster was down-regulated in infected banana as compared to growth in culture. Three other clusters, however were strongly upregulated during disease development in banana, suggesting that they may encode

  2. Bioinformatics Prediction of Polyketide Synthase Gene Clusters from Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    PubMed

    Noar, Roslyn D; Daub, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of black Sigatoka disease of banana, is a Dothideomycete fungus closely related to fungi that produce polyketides important for plant pathogenicity. We utilized the M. fijiensis genome sequence to predict PKS genes and their gene clusters and make bioinformatics predictions about the types of compounds produced by these clusters. Eight PKS gene clusters were identified in the M. fijiensis genome, placing M. fijiensis into the 23rd percentile for the number of PKS genes compared to other Dothideomycetes. Analysis of the PKS domains identified three of the PKS enzymes as non-reducing and two as highly reducing. Gene clusters contained types of genes frequently found in PKS clusters including genes encoding transporters, oxidoreductases, methyltransferases, and non-ribosomal peptide synthases. Phylogenetic analysis identified a putative PKS cluster encoding melanin biosynthesis. None of the other clusters were closely aligned with genes encoding known polyketides, however three of the PKS genes fell into clades with clusters encoding alternapyrone, fumonisin, and solanapyrone produced by Alternaria and Fusarium species. A search for homologs among available genomic sequences from 103 Dothideomycetes identified close homologs (>80% similarity) for six of the PKS sequences. One of the PKS sequences was not similar (< 60% similarity) to sequences in any of the 103 genomes, suggesting that it encodes a unique compound. Comparison of the M. fijiensis PKS sequences with those of two other banana pathogens, M. musicola and M. eumusae, showed that these two species have close homologs to five of the M. fijiensis PKS sequences, but three others were not found in either species. RT-PCR and RNA-Seq analysis showed that the melanin PKS cluster was down-regulated in infected banana as compared to growth in culture. Three other clusters, however were strongly upregulated during disease development in banana, suggesting that they may encode

  3. A Large Gene Cluster for the Clostridium cellulovorans Cellulosome

    PubMed Central

    Tamaru, Yutaka; Karita, Shuichi; Ibrahim, Atef; Chan, Helen; Doi, Roy H.

    2000-01-01

    A large gene cluster for the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulosome has been cloned and sequenced upstream and downstream of the cbpA and exgS genes (C.-C. Liu and R. H. Doi, Gene 211:39–47, 1998). Gene walking revealed that the engL gene cluster (Y. Tamaru and R. H. Doi, J. Bacteriol. 182:244–247, 2000) was located downstream of the cbpA-exgS genes. Further DNA sequencing revealed that this cluster contains the genes for the scaffolding protein CbpA, the exoglucanase ExgS, several endoglucanases of family 9, the mannanase ManA, and the hydrophobic protein HbpA containing a surface layer homology domain and a hydrophobic (or cohesin) domain. The sequence of the clustered genes is cbpA-exgS-engH-engK-hbpA-engL-manA-engM-engN and is about 22 kb in length. The engN gene did not have a complete catalytic domain, indicating that engN is a truncated gene. This large gene cluster is flanked at the 5′ end by a putative noncellulosomal operon consisting of nifV-orf1-sigX-regA and at the 3′ end by noncellulosomal genes with homology to transposase (trp) and malate permease (mle). Since gene clusters for the cellulosome are also found in C. cellulolyticum and C. josui, they seem to be typical of mesophilic clostridia, indicating that the large gene clusters may arise from a common ancestor with some evolutionary modifications. PMID:11004194

  4. Managing Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Special Focus in MicroRNA Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Passadouro, Marta; Faneca, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease and the fourth most lethal cancer in developed countries. Despite all progress in medicine and in understanding the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis, pancreatic cancer still has a poor prognosis, the median survival after diagnosis being around 3 to 6 months and the survival rate of 5 years being less than 4%. For pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which represents more than 90% of new pancreatic cancer cases, the prognosis is worse than for the other cancers with a patient mortality of approximately 99%. Therefore, there is a pressing need for developing new and efficient therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. In this regard, microRNAs not only have been seen as potential diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers but also as promising therapeutic agents. In this context, this review provides an examination of the most frequently deregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) in PDAC and their putative molecular targets involved in the signaling pathways of pancreatic
carcinogenesis. Additionally, it is presented a summary of gene therapy clinical trials involving miRNAs and it is illustrated the therapeutic potential associated to these small non-coding RNAs, for PDAC treatment. The facts presented here constitute a strong evidence of the remarkable opportunity associated to the application of microRNA-based therapeutic strategies as a novel approach for cancer therapy. PMID:27187371

  5. Managing Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Special Focus in MicroRNA Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Passadouro, Marta; Faneca, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease and the fourth most lethal cancer in developed countries. Despite all progress in medicine and in understanding the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis, pancreatic cancer still has a poor prognosis, the median survival after diagnosis being around 3 to 6 months and the survival rate of 5 years being less than 4%. For pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which represents more than 90% of new pancreatic cancer cases, the prognosis is worse than for the other cancers with a patient mortality of approximately 99%. Therefore, there is a pressing need for developing new and efficient therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. In this regard, microRNAs not only have been seen as potential diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers but also as promising therapeutic agents. In this context, this review provides an examination of the most frequently deregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) in PDAC and their putative molecular targets involved in the signaling pathways of pancreatic
carcinogenesis. Additionally, it is presented a summary of gene therapy clinical trials involving miRNAs and it is illustrated the therapeutic potential associated to these small non-coding RNAs, for PDAC treatment. The facts presented here constitute a strong evidence of the remarkable opportunity associated to the application of microRNA-based therapeutic strategies as a novel approach for cancer therapy. PMID:27187371

  6. MicroRNA-182 drives metastasis of primary sarcomas by targeting multiple genes

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Mohit; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Zhang, Minsi; Li, Zhizhong; Dodd, Rebecca D.; Cason, David; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Van Mater, David; Gladdy, Rebecca; Lev, Dina C.; Cardona, Diana M.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis causes most cancer deaths, but is incompletely understood. MicroRNAs can regulate metastasis, but it is not known whether a single miRNA can regulate metastasis in primary cancer models in vivo. We compared the expression of miRNAs in metastatic and nonmetastatic primary mouse sarcomas and found that microRNA-182 (miR-182) was markedly overexpressed in some tumors that metastasized to the lungs. By utilizing genetically engineered mice with either deletion of or overexpression of miR-182 in primary sarcomas, we discovered that deletion of miR-182 substantially decreased, while overexpression of miR-182 considerably increased, the rate of lung metastasis after amputation of the tumor-bearing limb. Additionally, deletion of miR-182 decreased circulating tumor cells (CTCs), while overexpression of miR-182 increased CTCs, suggesting that miR-182 regulates intravasation of cancer cells into the circulation. We identified 4 miR-182 targets that inhibit either the migration of tumor cells or the degradation of the extracellular matrix. Notably, restoration of any of these targets in isolation did not alter the metastatic potential of sarcoma cells injected orthotopically, but the simultaneous restoration of all 4 targets together substantially decreased the number of metastases. These results demonstrate that a single miRNA can regulate metastasis of primary tumors in vivo by coordinated regulation of multiple genes. PMID:25180607

  7. Development of hybrid baculovirus vectors for artificial MicroRNA delivery and prolonged gene suppression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Ling; Luo, Wen-Yi; Lo, Wen-Hsin; Lin, Kun-Ju; Sung, Li-Yu; Shih, Yung-Shen; Chang, Yu-Han; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2011-12-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) plays essential roles in regulating gene expression, but miRNA delivery remains a hurdle, thus entailing a vector system for efficient transfer. Baculovirus emerges as a promising gene delivery vector but its inherent transient expression restricts its applications in some scenarios. Therefore, this study primarily aimed to develop baculovirus as a miRNA expression vector for prolonged gene suppression. We constructed recombinant baculoviruses carrying artificial egfp-targeting miRNA sequences within the miR155 backbone, which after expression by the cytomegalovirus promoter could knockdown the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. By swapping the mature miRNA sequences, the baculovirus miRNA shuttle effectively repressed the overexpression of endogenous TNF-α in arthritic synoviocytes without inducing apoptosis. To prolong the baculovirus-mediated expression, we further developed a hybrid baculovirus vector that exploited the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon for gene integration and sustained miRNA expression. The hybrid baculovirus vector that combined the miR155 scaffold and SB transposon effectively repressed the transgene expression for a prolonged period of time, hence diversifying the applications of baculovirus to indications necessitating prolonged gene regulation such as arthritis. PMID:21732325

  8. Cooperative gene regulation by microRNA pairs and their identification using a computational workflow

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Ulf; Lai, Xin; Winter, Felix; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio; Gupta, Shailendra K.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an integral part of gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been shown that pairs of miRNAs can repress the translation of a target mRNA in a cooperative manner, which leads to an enhanced effectiveness and specificity in target repression. However, it remains unclear which miRNA pairs can synergize and which genes are target of cooperative miRNA regulation. In this paper, we present a computational workflow for the prediction and analysis of cooperating miRNAs and their mutual target genes, which we refer to as RNA triplexes. The workflow integrates methods of miRNA target prediction; triplex structure analysis; molecular dynamics simulations and mathematical modeling for a reliable prediction of functional RNA triplexes and target repression efficiency. In a case study we analyzed the human genome and identified several thousand targets of cooperative gene regulation. Our results suggest that miRNA cooperativity is a frequent mechanism for an enhanced target repression by pairs of miRNAs facilitating distinctive and fine-tuned target gene expression patterns. Human RNA triplexes predicted and characterized in this study are organized in a web resource at www.sbi.uni-rostock.de/triplexrna/. PMID:24875477

  9. Knockdown of Polyphenol Oxidase Gene Expression in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) with Artificial MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chi, Ming; Bhagwat, Basdeo; Tang, Guiliang; Xiang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    It is of great importance and interest to develop crop varieties with low polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity for the food industry because PPO-mediated oxidative browning is a main cause of post-harvest deterioration and quality loss of fresh produce and processed foods. We recently demonstrated that potato tubers with reduced browning phenotypes can be produced by inhibition of the expression of several PPO gene isoforms using artificial microRNA (amiRNA) technology. The approach introduces a single type of 21-nucleotide RNA population to guide silencing of the PPO gene transcripts in potato tissues. Some advantages of the technology are: small RNA molecules are genetically transformed, off-target gene silencing can be avoided or minimized at the stage of amiRNA designs, and accuracy and efficiency of the processes can be detected at every step using molecular biological techniques. Here we describe the methods for transformation and regeneration of potatoes with amiRNA vectors, detection of the expression of amiRNAs, identification of the cleaved product of the target gene transcripts, and assay of the expression level of PPO gene isoforms in potatoes. PMID:26843174

  10. Regulation of proinflammatory genes by the circulating microRNA hsa-miR-939.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Marguerite K; Ramanathan, Sujay; Touati, Andrew; Zhou, Yiqian; Thanawala, Rushi U; Alexander, Guillermo M; Sacan, Ahmet; Ajit, Seena K

    2016-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs are beneficial biomarkers because of their stability and dysregulation in diseases. Here we sought to determine the role of miR-939, a miRNA downregulated in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Hsa-miR-939 is predicted to target several proinflammatory genes, including IL-6, VEGFA, TNFα, NFκB2, and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2A). Binding of miR-939 to the 3' untranslated region of these genes was confirmed by reporter assay. Overexpression of miR-939 in vitro resulted in reduction of IL-6, NOS2A and NFκB2 mRNAs, IL-6, VEGFA, and NOS2 proteins and NFκB activation. We observed a significant decrease in the NOS substrate l-arginine in plasma from CRPS patients, suggesting reduced miR-939 levels may contribute to an increase in endogenous NOS2A levels and NO, and thereby to pain and inflammation. Pathway analysis showed that miR-939 represents a critical regulatory node in a network of inflammatory mediators. Collectively, our data suggest that miR-939 may regulate multiple proinflammatory genes and that downregulation of miR-939 in CRPS patients may increase expression of these genes, resulting in amplification of the inflammatory pain signal transduction cascade. Circulating miRNAs may function as crucial signaling nodes, and small changes in miRNA levels may influence target gene expression and thus disease. PMID:27498764

  11. The Three Paralogous MicroRNA Clusters in Development and Disease, miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25

    PubMed Central

    Sehic, Amer

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) form a class of noncoding RNA genes whose products are small single-stranded RNAs that are involved in the regulation of translation and degradation of mRNAs. There is a fine balance between deregulation of normal developmental programs and tumor genesis. An increasing body of evidence suggests that altered expression of miRNAs is entailed in the pathogenesis of human cancers. Studies in mouse and human cells have identified the miR-17-92 cluster as a potential oncogene. The miR-17-92 cluster is often amplified or overexpressed in human cancers and has recently emerged as the prototypical oncogenic polycistron miRNA. The functional analysis of miR-17-92 is intricate by the existence of two paralogues: miR-106a-363 and miR-106b-25. During early evolution of vertebrates, it is likely that the three clusters commenced via a series of duplication and deletion occurrences. As miR-106a-363 and miR-106b-25 contain miRNAs that are very similar, and in some cases identical, to those encoded by miR-17-92, it is feasible that they regulate a similar set of genes and have overlapping functions. Further understanding of these three clusters and their functions will increase our knowledge about cancer progression. The present review discusses the characteristics and functions of these three miRNA clusters. PMID:27127675

  12. The multifactorial nature of microRNAs in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Welten, S M J; Goossens, E A C; Quax, P H A; Nossent, A Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular remodelling is a multifactorial process that involves both adaptive and maladaptive changes of the vessel wall through, among others, cell proliferation and migration, but also apoptosis and necrosis of the various cell types in the vessel wall. Vascular remodelling can be beneficial, e.g. during neovascularization after ischaemia, as well as pathological, e.g. during atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation. In recent years, it has become clear that microRNAs are able to target many genes that are involved in vascular remodelling processes and either can promote or inhibit structural changes of the vessel wall. Since many different processes of vascular remodelling are regulated by similar mechanisms and factors, both positive and negative vascular remodelling can be affected by the same microRNAs. A large number of microRNAs has been linked to various aspects of vascular remodelling and indeed, several of these microRNAs regulate multiple vascular remodelling processes, including both the adaptive processes angiogenesis and arteriogenesis as well as maladaptive processes of atherosclerosis, restenosis and aneurysm formation. Here, we discuss the multifactorial role of microRNAs and microRNA clusters that were reported to play a role in multiple forms of vascular remodelling and are clearly linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The microRNAs reviewed are miR-126, miR-155 and the microRNA gene clusters 17-92, 23/24/27, 143/145 and 14q32. Understanding the contribution of these microRNAs to the entire spectrum of vascular remodelling processes is important, especially as these microRNAs may have great potential as therapeutic targets for treatment of various CVDs. PMID:26912672

  13. Transient gene and microRNA expression profile changes of confluent human fibroblast cells in spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Lu, Tao; Wong, Michael; Wang, Xiaoyu; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Story, Michael; Wu, Honglu

    2016-06-01

    Microgravity, or an altered gravity environment different from the 1 g of the Earth, has been shown to influence global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells. However, most of the reported studies that have been conducted in space or by using simulated microgravity on the ground have focused on the growth or differentiation of these cells. It has not been specifically addressed whether nonproliferating cultured cells will sense the presence of microgravity in space. In an experiment conducted onboard the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblast cells were fixed after being cultured in space for 3 and 14 d, respectively, to investigate changes in gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles in these cells. Results of the experiment showed that on d 3, both the flown and ground cells were still proliferating slowly, as measured by the percentage of Ki-67(+) cells. Gene and miRNA expression data indicated activation of NF-κB and other growth-related pathways that involve hepatocyte growth factor and VEGF as well as the down-regulation of the Let-7 miRNA family. On d 14, when the cells were mostly nonproliferating, the gene and miRNA expression profile of the flight sample was indistinguishable from that of the ground sample. Comparison of gene and miRNA expressions in the d 3 samples, with respect to d 14, revealed that most of the changes observed on d 3 were related to cell growth for both the flown and ground cells. Analysis of cytoskeletal changes via immunohistochemistry staining of the cells with antibodies for α-tubulin and fibronectin showed no difference between the flown and ground samples. Taken together, our study suggests that in true nondividing human fibroblast cells in culture, microgravity experienced in space has little effect on gene and miRNA expression profiles.-Zhang, Y., Lu, T., Wong, M., Wang, X., Stodieck, L., Karouia, F., Story, M., Wu, H. Transient gene and microRNA expression profile changes of

  14. MicroRNA miR-16-1 regulates CCNE1 (cyclin E1) gene expression in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zubillaga-Guerrero, Ma Isabel; Alarcón-Romero, Luz del Carmen; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Bermúdez-Morales, Víctor Hugo; Deas, Jessica; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in diverse biological processes through regulation of gene expression. The microRNA profile has been shown to be altered in cervical cancer (CC). MiR-16-1 belongs to the miR-16 cluster and has been implicated in various aspects of carcinogenesis including cell proliferation and regulation of apoptosis; however, its function and molecular mechanism in CC is not clear. Cyclin E1 (CCNE1) is a positive regulator of the cell cycle that controls the transition of cells from G1 to S phase. In CC, CCNE1 expression is frequently upregulated, and is an indicator for poor outcome in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Thus, in the present brief communication, we determine whether the CCNE1 gene is regulated by miR-16-1 in CC cells. To identify the downstream cellular target genes for upstream miR-16-1, we silenced endogenous miR-16-1 expression in cell lines derived from CC (C-33 A HPV-, CaSki HPV16+, SiHa HPV16+, and HeLa HPV18+ cells), using siRNAs expressed in plasmids. Using a combined bioinformatic analysis and RT-qPCR, we determined that the CCNE1 gene is targeted by miR-16-1 in CC cells. SiHa, CaSki, and HeLa cells demonstrated an inverse correlation between miR-16-1 expression and CCNE1 mRNA level. Thus, miR-16-1 post-transcriptionally down-regulates CCNE1 gene expression. These results, suggest that miR-16-1 plays a vital role in modulating cell cycle processes in CC. PMID:26629104

  15. MicroRNA miR-16-1 regulates CCNE1 (cyclin E1) gene expression in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zubillaga-Guerrero, Ma Isabel; Alarcón-Romero, Luz Del Carmen; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Bermúdez-Morales, Víctor Hugo; Deas, Jessica; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in diverse biological processes through regulation of gene expression. The microRNA profile has been shown to be altered in cervical cancer (CC). MiR-16-1 belongs to the miR-16 cluster and has been implicated in various aspects of carcinogenesis including cell proliferation and regulation of apoptosis; however, its function and molecular mechanism in CC is not clear. Cyclin E1 (CCNE1) is a positive regulator of the cell cycle that controls the transition of cells from G1 to S phase. In CC, CCNE1 expression is frequently upregulated, and is an indicator for poor outcome in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Thus, in the present brief communication, we determine whether the CCNE1 gene is regulated by miR-16-1 in CC cells. To identify the downstream cellular target genes for upstream miR-16-1, we silenced endogenous miR-16-1 expression in cell lines derived from CC (C-33 A HPV-, CaSki HPV16+, SiHa HPV16+, and HeLa HPV18+ cells), using siRNAs expressed in plasmids. Using a combined bioinformatic analysis and RT-qPCR, we determined that the CCNE1 gene is targeted by miR-16-1 in CC cells. SiHa, CaSki, and HeLa cells demonstrated an inverse correlation between miR-16-1 expression and CCNE1 mRNA level. Thus, miR-16-1 post-transcriptionally down-regulates CCNE1 gene expression. These results, suggest that miR-16-1 plays a vital role in modulating cell cycle processes in CC. PMID:26629104

  16. Network analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    XUE, LUCHEN; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; WANG, SHANG

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the roles played by various genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in neoplasms, including anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). However, the specific regulatory mechanisms involving these genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, associated biological factors (miRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes) from existing studies of human AA were combined methodically through the interactions between genes and miRNAs, as opposed to studying one or several. Three regulatory networks, including abnormally expressed, related and global networks were constructed with the aim of identifying significant gene and miRNA pathways. Each network is composed of three associations between miRNAs targeted at genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs located on their host genes. Among these, the abnormally expressed network, which involves the pathways of previously identified abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs, partially indicated the regulatory mechanism underlying AA. The network contains numerous abnormal regulation associations when AA emerges. By modifying the abnormally expressed network factors to a normal expression pattern, the faulty regulation may be corrected and tumorigenesis of AA may be prevented. Certain specific pathways are highlighted in AA, for example PTEN which is targeted by miR-21 and miR-106b, regulates miR-25 which in turn targets TP53. PTEN and miR-21 have been observed to form feedback loops. Furthermore, by comparing and analyzing the pathway predecessors and successors of abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs in three networks, similarities and differences of regulatory pathways may be identified and proposed. In summary, the present study aids in elucidating the occurrence, mechanism, prevention and treatment of AA. These results may aid further investigation into therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:27347075

  17. A knowledge-based clustering algorithm driven by Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jill; Cline, Melissa; Martin, John; Finkelstein, David; Awad, Tarif; Kulp, David; Siani-Rose, Michael A

    2004-08-01

    We have developed an algorithm for inferring the degree of similarity between genes by using the graph-based structure of Gene Ontology (GO). We applied this knowledge-based similarity metric to a clique-finding algorithm for detecting sets of related genes with biological classifications. We also combined it with an expression-based distance metric to produce a co-cluster analysis, which accentuates genes with both similar expression profiles and similar biological characteristics and identifies gene clusters that are more stable and biologically meaningful. These algorithms are demonstrated in the analysis of MPRO cell differentiation time series experiments. PMID:15468759

  18. Sponge Transgenic Mouse Model Reveals Important Roles for the MicroRNA-183 (miR-183)/96/182 Cluster in Postmitotic Photoreceptors of the Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qubo; Sun, Wenyu; Okano, Kiichiro; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Ning; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNA-183 (miR-183), miR-96, and miR-182 comprising the miR-183/96/182 cluster are highly expressed in photoreceptor cells. Although in vitro data have indicated an important role for this cluster in the retina, details of its in vivo biological activity are still unknown. To observe the impact of the miR-183/96/182 cluster on retinal maintenance and light adaptation, we generated a sponge transgenic mouse model that disrupted the activities of the three-component microRNAs simultaneously and selectively in the retina. Although our morphological and functional studies showed no differences between transgenic and wild type mice under normal laboratory lighting conditions, sponge transgenic mice displayed severe retinal degeneration after 30 min of exposure to 10,000 lux light. Histological studies showed that the outer nuclear layer thickness was dramatically reduced in the superior retina of transgenic mice. Real time PCR experiments in both the sponge transgenic mouse model and different microRNA stable cell lines identified Arrdc3, Neurod4, and caspase-2 (Casp2) as probable downstream targets of this cluster, a result also supported by luciferase assay and immunoblotting analyses. Further studies indicated that expression of both the cluster and Casp2 increased in response to light exposure. Importantly, Casp2 expression was enhanced in transgenic mice, and inhibition of Casp2 partially rescued their light-induced retinal degeneration. By connecting the microRNA and apoptotic pathways, these findings imply an important role for the miR-183/96/182 cluster in acute light-induced retinal degeneration of mice. This study demonstrates a clear involvement of miRs in the physiology of postmitotic cells in vivo. PMID:21768104

  19. Sesterterpene ophiobolin biosynthesis involving multiple gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Hangzhen; Yin, Ru; Liu, Yongfeng; Meng, Huiying; Zhou, Xianqiang; Zhou, Guolin; Bi, Xupeng; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Tonghan; Zhu, Weiming; Deng, Zixin; Hong, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are the most diverse and abundant natural products among which sesterterpenes account for less than 2%, with very few reports on their biosynthesis. Ophiobolins are tricyclic 5–8–5 ring sesterterpenes with potential pharmaceutical application. Aspergillus ustus 094102 from mangrove rizhosphere produces ophiobolin and other terpenes. We obtained five gene cluster knockout mutants, with altered ophiobolin yield using genome sequencing and in silico analysis, combined with in vivo genetic manipulation. Involvement of the five gene clusters in ophiobolin synthesis was confirmed by investigation of the five key terpene synthesis relevant enzymes in each gene cluster, either by gene deletion and complementation or in vitro verification of protein function. The results demonstrate that ophiobolin skeleton biosynthesis involves five gene clusters, which are responsible for C15, C20, C25, and C30 terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:27273151

  20. Sesterterpene ophiobolin biosynthesis involving multiple gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hangzhen; Yin, Ru; Liu, Yongfeng; Meng, Huiying; Zhou, Xianqiang; Zhou, Guolin; Bi, Xupeng; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Tonghan; Zhu, Weiming; Deng, Zixin; Hong, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are the most diverse and abundant natural products among which sesterterpenes account for less than 2%, with very few reports on their biosynthesis. Ophiobolins are tricyclic 5-8-5 ring sesterterpenes with potential pharmaceutical application. Aspergillus ustus 094102 from mangrove rizhosphere produces ophiobolin and other terpenes. We obtained five gene cluster knockout mutants, with altered ophiobolin yield using genome sequencing and in silico analysis, combined with in vivo genetic manipulation. Involvement of the five gene clusters in ophiobolin synthesis was confirmed by investigation of the five key terpene synthesis relevant enzymes in each gene cluster, either by gene deletion and complementation or in vitro verification of protein function. The results demonstrate that ophiobolin skeleton biosynthesis involves five gene clusters, which are responsible for C15, C20, C25, and C30 terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:27273151

  1. Predicting associations between microRNAs and target genes in breast cancer by bioinformatics analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tianying; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yonggang; Yu, Xiucui

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer among females. However, the association between microRNAs (miRNAs) and target genes in breast tumorigenesis is poorly studied. The original data set GSE26659 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and then the differentially expressed miRNAs among 77 breast cancer patients and 17 controls were identified using the Limma package in R software. Furthermore, breast cancer-related differentially expressed miRNAs were selected from a human miRNA disease database and their target genes were selected from five miRNA databases. Then, functional analysis was performed for the target genes followed by construction of a miRNA-target gene network. A total of 34 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, including 13 breast cancer-related miRNAs. Moreover, the target genes of the 13 miRNAs were significantly enriched in regulation of transcription (P=7.43E-09) and pathways related to cancer (P=3.33E-11). Finally, eight upregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-425) and five downregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-143, hsa-miR-145 and hsa-miR-125b) were identified in the miRNA-target gene network. In conclusion, using bioinformatics approaches, we demonstrate that the changes in regulation of transcription and cancer pathways may play significant roles in the process of breast cancerogenesis. Differentially expressed miRNAs and their target genes may be new targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:27446395

  2. Nearest Neighbor Networks: clustering expression data based on gene neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Huttenhower, Curtis; Flamholz, Avi I; Landis, Jessica N; Sahi, Sauhard; Myers, Chad L; Olszewski, Kellen L; Hibbs, Matthew A; Siemers, Nathan O; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Coller, Hilary A

    2007-01-01

    Background The availability of microarrays measuring thousands of genes simultaneously across hundreds of biological conditions represents an opportunity to understand both individual biological pathways and the integrated workings of the cell. However, translating this amount of data into biological insight remains a daunting task. An important initial step in the analysis of microarray data is clustering of genes with similar behavior. A number of classical techniques are commonly used to perform this task, particularly hierarchical and K-means clustering, and many novel approaches have been suggested recently. While these approaches are useful, they are not without drawbacks; these methods can find clusters in purely random data, and even clusters enriched for biological functions can be skewed towards a small number of processes (e.g. ribosomes). Results We developed Nearest Neighbor Networks (NNN), a graph-based algorithm to generate clusters of genes with similar expression profiles. This method produces clusters based on overlapping cliques within an interaction network generated from mutual nearest neighborhoods. This focus on nearest neighbors rather than on absolute distance measures allows us to capture clusters with high connectivity even when they are spatially separated, and requiring mutual nearest neighbors allows genes with no sufficiently similar partners to remain unclustered. We compared the clusters generated by NNN with those generated by eight other clustering methods. NNN was particularly successful at generating functionally coherent clusters with high precision, and these clusters generally represented a much broader selection of biological processes than those recovered by other methods. Conclusion The Nearest Neighbor Networks algorithm is a valuable clustering method that effectively groups genes that are likely to be functionally related. It is particularly attractive due to its simplicity, its success in the analysis of large datasets

  3. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteriamore » from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.« less

  4. MicroRNAs of Gallid and Meleagrid herpesviruses show generally conserved genomic locations and are virus-specific.

    PubMed

    Waidner, Lisa A; Morgan, Robin W; Anderson, Amy S; Bernberg, Erin L; Kamboj, Sachin; Garcia, Maricarmen; Riblet, Silva M; Ouyang, Ming; Isaacs, Grace K; Markis, Milos; Meyers, Blake C; Green, Pamela J; Burnside, Joan

    2009-05-25

    Many herpesviruses, including Marek's disease viruses (MDV1 and MDV2), encode microRNAs. In this study, we report microRNAs of two related herpesviruses, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) and herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT), as well as additional MDV2 microRNAs. The genome locations, but not microRNA sequences, are conserved among all four of these avian herpesviruses. Most are clustered in the repeats flanking the unique long region (I/TR(L)), except in ILTV which lacks these repeats. Two abundant ILTV microRNAs are antisense to the immediate early gene ICP4. A homologue of host microRNA, gga-miR-221, was found among the HVT microRNAs. Additionally, a cluster of HVT microRNAs was found in a region containing two locally duplicated segments, resulting in paralogous HVT microRNAs with 96-100% identity. The prevalence of microRNAs in the genomic repeat regions as well as in local repeats suggests the importance of genetic plasticity in herpesviruses for microRNA evolution and preservation of function. PMID:19328516

  5. RNA Genes: Retroelements and Virally Retroposable microRNAs in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yoichi R.

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are capable of undergoing self-renewal, and their developmental ability is known as the stemness. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) as regulators have been isolated from ESCs. Although Dicer and DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (DGCR8) are essential factors for the biogeneration of miRNA, Dicer-knockout (KO) ESCs have showed to fail to express differentiation markers and DGCR8-KO ESCs have showed to be arrest in the G1 phase. Furthermore, Dicer-KO ESCs lost the ability to epigenetically silence retroelemtns (REs). REs are expressed and transposed in ESCs, whose transcripts control expression of miRNAs, and their transposable retroelement (TE) expression is, therefore related to ESC proliferation and differentiation, suggesting that the interplay between miRNAs and REs may have a deep responsibility for the stemness including a short G1/S transition and for RE regulation in ESCs. PMID:20835360

  6. Genomic Gene Clustering Analysis of Pathways in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer M.; Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic clustering of genes in a pathway is commonly found in prokaryotes due to transcriptional operons, but these are not present in most eukaryotes. Yet, there might be clustering to a lesser extent of pathway members in eukaryotic genomes, that assist coregulation of a set of functionally cooperating genes. We analyzed five sequenced eukaryotic genomes for clustering of genes assigned to the same pathway in the KEGG database. Between 98% and 30% of the analyzed pathways in a genome were found to exhibit significantly higher clustering levels than expected by chance. In descending order by the level of clustering, the genomes studied were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Drosophila melanogaster. Surprisingly, there is not much agreement between genomes in terms of which pathways are most clustered. Only seven of 69 pathways found in all species were significantly clustered in all five of them. This species-specific pattern of pathway clustering may reflect adaptations or evolutionary events unique to a particular lineage. We note that although operons are common in C. elegans, only 58% of the pathways showed significant clustering, which is less than in human. Virtually all pathways in S. cerevisiae showed significant clustering. PMID:12695325

  7. Defective Regulation of MicroRNA Target Genes in Myoblasts from Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy Patients*

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Petr; Stankevicins, Luiza; Ansseau, Eugenie; Petrov, Andrei; Barat, Ana; Dessen, Philippe; Robert, Thomas; Turki, Ahmed; Lazar, Vladimir; Labourer, Emmanuel; Belayew, Alexandra; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S.

    2013-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant hereditary neuromuscular disorder linked to the deletion of an integral number of 3.3-kb-long macrosatellite repeats (D4Z4) within the subtelomeric region of chromosome 4q. Most genes identified in this region are overexpressed in FSHD myoblasts, including the double homeobox genes DUX4 and DUX4c. We have carried out a simultaneous miRNome/transcriptome analysis of FSHD and control primary myoblasts. Of 365 microRNAs (miRNAs) analyzed in this study, 29 were found to be differentially expressed between FSHD and normal myoblasts. Twenty-one microRNAs (miR-1, miR-7, miR-15a, miR-22, miR-30e, miR-32, miR-107, miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-139, miR-152, miR-206, miR-223, miR-302b, miR-331, miR-362, miR-365, miR-382, miR-496, miR-532, miR-654, and miR-660) were up-regulated, and eight were down-regulated (miR-15b, miR-20b, miR-21, miR-25, miR-100, miR-155, miR-345, and miR-594). Twelve of the miRNAs up-regulated in FHSD were also up-regulated in the cells ectopically expressing DUX4c, suggesting that this gene could regulate miRNA gene transcription. The myogenic miRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 were highly expressed in FSHD myoblasts, which nonetheless did not prematurely enter myogenic differentiation. This could be accounted for by the fact that in FSHD myoblasts, functionally important target genes, including cell cycle, DNA damage, and ubiquitination-related genes, escape myogenic microRNA-induced repression. PMID:24145033

  8. MicroRNA-24/MODY Gene Regulatory Pathway Mediates Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunxia; You, Weiyan; Wang, Hongdong; Li, Yating; Qiao, Nan; Shi, Yuguang; Zhang, Chenyu; Bleich, David; Han, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Overnutrition and genetics both contribute separately to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, but how these factors interact is unclear. This study was aimed at determining whether microRNAs (miRNAs) provide a link between these factors. In this study, miRNA-24 (miR-24) was highly expressed in pancreatic β-cells and further upregulated in islets from genetic fatty (db/db) or mice fed a high-fat diet, and islets subject to oxidative stress. Overexpression of miR-24 inhibited insulin secretion and β-cell proliferation, potentially involving 351 downregulated genes. By using bioinformatic analysis combined with luciferase-based promoter activity assays and quantitative real-time PCR assays, we identified two maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) genes as direct targets of miR-24. Silencing either of these MODY genes (Hnf1a and Neurod1) mimicked the cellular phenotype caused by miR-24 overexpression, whereas restoring their expression rescued β-cell function. Our findings functionally link the miR-24/MODY gene regulatory pathway to the onset of type 2 diabetes and create a novel network between nutrient overload and genetic diabetes via miR-24. PMID:23761103

  9. MicroRNAs: potential regulators of renal development genes that contribute to CAKUT

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, April K.; Ho, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the leading cause of childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD). While mutations in several renal development genes have been identified as causes for CAKUT, most cases have not yet been linked to known mutations. Furthermore, the genotype-phenotype correlation is variable, suggesting that there are additional factors that impact the severity of CAKUT. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, and are involved in many developmental processes. Although little is known about the function of specific miRNAs in kidney development, several have recently been shown to regulate the expression of, and/or are regulated by, crucial renal development genes present in other organ systems. In this review, we discuss how miRNA regulation of common developmental signaling pathways may be applicable to renal development. We focus on genes that are known to contribute to CAKUT in humans, for which miRNA interactions in other contexts have been identified, with miRNAs that are present in the kidney. We hypothesize that miRNA-mediated processes play a role in kidney development through similar mechanisms, and speculate that genotypic variations in these small RNAs or their targets could be associated with CAKUT. PMID:23996519

  10. The use of artificial microRNA technology to control gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Eamens, Andrew L; McHale, Marcus; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an effective trigger of RNA silencing, and several classes of endogenous small RNA (sRNA), processed from dsRNA substrates by DICER-like (DCL) endonucleases, are essential in controlling gene expression. One such sRNA class, the microRNAs (miRNAs) control the expression of closely related genes to regulate all aspects of plant development, including the determination of leaf shape, leaf polarity, flowering time, and floral identity. A single miRNA sRNA silencing signal is processed from a long precursor transcript of nonprotein-coding RNA, termed the primary miRNA (pri-miRNA). A region of the pri-miRNA is partially self-complementary allowing the transcript to fold back onto itself to form a stem-loop structure of imperfectly dsRNA. Artificial miRNA (amiRNA) technology uses endogenous pri-miRNAs, in which the miRNA and miRNA* (passenger strand of the miRNA duplex) sequences have been replaced with corresponding amiRNA/amiRNA* sequences that direct highly efficient RNA silencing of the targeted gene. Here, we describe the rules for amiRNA design, as well as outline the PCR and bacterial cloning procedures involved in the construction of an amiRNA plant expression vector to control target gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24057368

  11. Gene and MicroRNA Transcriptional Signatures of Angiotensin II in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Jawahar L.; Mercanti, Federico; Stone, Annjannette; Wang, Xianwei; Ding, Zufeng; Romeo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Growth of atherosclerotic plaque requires neovascularization (angiogenesis). To elucidate the involvement of angiotensin II (Ang II) in angiogenesis, we performed gene microarray and microRNA (miRNA) polymerase chain reaction array analyses on human coronary artery endothelial cells exposed to moderate concentration of Ang II for 2 and 12 hours. At 12, but not 2, hours, cultures treated with Ang II exhibited shifts in transcriptional activity involving 267 genes (>1.5-fold difference; P < 0.05). Resulting transcriptome was most significantly enriched for genes associated with blood vessel development, angiogenesis, and regulation of proliferation. Majority of upregulated genes implicated in angiogenesis shared a commonality of being either regulators (HES1, IL-18, and CXCR4) or targets (ADM, ANPEP, HES1, KIT, NOTCH4, PGF, and SOX18) of STAT3. In line with these findings, STAT3 inhibition attenuated Ang II–dependent stimulation of tube formation in Matrigel assay. Expression analysis of miRNAs transcripts revealed that the pattern of differential expression for miRNAs was largely consistent with proangiogenic response with a prominent theme of upregulation of miRs targeting PTEN (miR-19b-3p, miR-21-5p, 23b-3p, and 24-3p), many of which are directly or indirectly STAT3 dependent. We conclude that STAT3 signaling may be an intrinsic part of Ang II–mediated proangiogenic response in human endothelial cells. PMID:24853489

  12. Mining cancer gene expression databases for latent information on intronic microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Monterisi, Simona; D'Ario, Giovanni; Dama, Elisa; Rotmensz, Nicole; Confalonieri, Stefano; Tordonato, Chiara; Troglio, Flavia; Bertalot, Giovanni; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Viale, Giuseppe; Nicassio, Francesco; Vecchi, Manuela; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Around 50% of all human microRNAs reside within introns of coding genes and are usually co-transcribed. Gene expression datasets, therefore, should contain a wealth of miRNA-relevant latent information, exploitable for many basic and translational research aims. The present study was undertaken to investigate this possibility. We developed an in silico approach to identify intronic-miRNAs relevant to breast cancer, using public gene expression datasets. This led to the identification of a miRNA signature for aggressive breast cancer, and to the characterization of novel roles of selected miRNAs in cancer-related biological phenotypes. Unexpectedly, in a number of cases, expression regulation of the intronic-miRNA was more relevant than the expression of their host gene. These results provide a proof of principle for the validity of our intronic miRNA mining strategy, which we envision can be applied not only to cancer research, but also to other biological and biomedical fields. PMID:25459350

  13. MicroRNAs shape circadian hepatic gene expression on a transcriptome-wide scale

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ngoc-Hien; Arpat, Alaaddin Bulak; De Matos, Mara; Gatfield, David

    2014-01-01

    A considerable proportion of mammalian gene expression undergoes circadian oscillations. Post-transcriptional mechanisms likely make important contributions to mRNA abundance rhythms. We have investigated how microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to core clock and clock-controlled gene expression using mice in which miRNA biogenesis can be inactivated in the liver. While the hepatic core clock was surprisingly resilient to miRNA loss, whole transcriptome sequencing uncovered widespread effects on clock output gene expression. Cyclic transcription paired with miRNA-mediated regulation was thus identified as a frequent phenomenon that affected up to 30% of the rhythmic transcriptome and served to post-transcriptionally adjust the phases and amplitudes of rhythmic mRNA accumulation. However, only few mRNA rhythms were actually generated by miRNAs. Overall, our study suggests that miRNAs function to adapt clock-driven gene expression to tissue-specific requirements. Finally, we pinpoint several miRNAs predicted to act as modulators of rhythmic transcripts, and identify rhythmic pathways particularly prone to miRNA regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02510.001 PMID:24867642

  14. Comparative Analysis of Gene Expression Data Reveals Novel Targets of Senescence-Associated microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Marco; Comegna, Marika; Succoio, Mariangela; Leggiero, Eleonora; Pastore, Lucio; Faraonio, Raffaella; Cimino, Filiberto; Passaro, Fabiana

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, cellular senescence is viewed as a complex mechanism involved in different processes, ranging from tumor suppression to induction of age-related degenerative alterations. Senescence-inducing stimuli are myriad and, recently, we and others have demonstrated the role exerted by microRNAs in the induction and maintenance of senescence, by the identification of a subset of Senescence-Associated microRNAs (SAmiRs) up-regulated during replicative or stress-induced senescence and able to induce a premature senescent phenotype when over-expressed in human primary cells. With the intent to find novel direct targets of two specific SAmiRs, SAmiR-494 and -486-5p, and cellular pathways which they are involved in, we performed a comparative analysis of gene expression profiles available in literature to select genes down-regulated upon replicative senescence of human primary fibroblasts. Among them, we searched for SAmiR’s candidate targets by analyzing with different target prediction algorithms their 3’UTR for the presence of SAmiR-binding sites. The expression profiles of selected candidates have been validated on replicative and stress-induced senescence and the targeting of the 3’UTRs was assessed by luciferase assay. Results allowed us to identify Cell Division Cycle Associated 2 (CDCA2) and Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation type 4 (ID4) as novel targets of SAmiR-494 and SAmiR-486-5p, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the over-expression of CDCA2 in human primary fibroblasts was able to partially counteract etoposide-induced senescence by mitigating the activation of DNA Damage Response. PMID:24905922

  15. Network and pathway analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YING; ZHAO, SHISHUN; XU, ZHIWEN

    2016-01-01

    To date, there has been rapid development with regard to gene and microRNA (miR/miRNA) research in gliomas. However, the regulatory mechanisms of the associated genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, the genes, miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs) were considered as elements in the regulatory network, and focus was placed on the associations between TFs and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and miRNAs and host genes. In order to show the regulatory correlation clearly, all the elements were investigated and three regulatory networks, namely the differentially-expressed, related and global networks, were constructed. Certain important pathways were highlighted, with analysis of the similarities and differences among the networks. Next, the upstream and downstream elements of differentially-expressed genes, miRNAs and predicted TFs were listed. The most notable aspect of the present study was the three levels of network, particularly the differentially-expressed network, since the differentially-expressed associations that these networks provide appear at the initial stages of cancers such as glioma. If the states of the differentially-expressed associations can be adjusted to the normal state via alterations in regulatory associations, which were also recorded in the study networks and tables, it is likely that cancer can be regulated or even avoided. In the present study, the differentially-expressed network illuminated the pathogenesis of glioma; for example, a TF can regulate one or more miRNAs, and a target gene can be targeted by one or more miRNAs. Therefore, the host genes and target genes, the host genes and TFs, and the target genes and TFs indirectly affect each other through miRNAs. The association also exists between TFs and TFs, target genes and target genes, and host genes and host genes. The present study also demonstrated self-adaption associations and circle-regulations. The related network further described the regulatory mechanism

  16. The duplication of the Hox gene clusters in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Prohaska, Sonja J; Stadler, Peter F

    2004-06-01

    Higher teleost fishes, including zebrafish and fugu, have duplicated their Hox genes relative to the gene inventory of other gnathostome lineages. The most widely accepted theory contends that the duplicate Hox clusters orginated synchronously during a single genome duplication event in the early history of ray-finned fishes. In this contribution we collect and re-evaluate all publicly available sequence information. In particular, we show that the short Hox gene fragments from published PCR surveys of the killifish Fundulus heteroclitus, the medaka Oryzias latipes and the goldfish Carassius auratus can be used to determine with little ambiguity not only their paralog group but also their membership in a particular cluster.Together with a survey of the genomic sequence data from the pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis we show that at least percomorpha, and possibly all eutelosts, share a system of 7 or 8 orthologous Hox gene clusters. There is little doubt about the orthology of the two teleost duplicates of the HoxA and HoxB clusters. A careful analysis of both the coding sequence of Hox genes and of conserved non-coding sequences provides additional support for the "duplication early" hypothesis that the Hox clusters in teleosts are derived from eight ancestral clusters by means of subsequent gene loss; the data remain ambiguous, however, in particular for the HoxC clusters.Assuming the "duplication early" hypothesis we use the new evidence on the Hox gene complements to determine the phylogenetic positions of gene-loss events in the wake of the cluster duplication. Surprisingly, we find that the resolution of redundancy seems to be a slow process that is still ongoing. A few suggestions on which additional sequence data would be most informative for resolving the history of the teleostean Hox genes are discussed. PMID:18202881

  17. DICER Inactivation Identifies Pancreatic β-Cell “Disallowed” Genes Targeted by MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Sanchez, Aida; Nguyen-Tu, Marie-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are the body's sole source of circulating insulin and essential for the maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis. Levels of up to 66 “disallowed” genes, which are strongly expressed and play housekeeping roles in most other mammalian tissues, are unusually low in β-cells. The molecular mechanisms involved in repressing these genes are largely unknown. Here, we explore the role in gene disallowance of microRNAs (miRNAs), a type of small noncoding RNAs that silence gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are essential for β-cell development and function. To selectively deplete miRNAs from adult β-cells, the miRNA-processing enzyme DICER was inactivated by deletion of the RNase III domain with a tamoxifen-inducible Pdx1CreER transgene. In this model, β-cell dysfunction was apparent 2 weeks after recombination and preceded a decrease in insulin content and loss of β-cell mass. Of the 14 disallowed genes studied, quantitative RT-quantitative real-time PCR revealed that 6 genes (Fcgrt, Igfbp4, Maf, Oat, Pdgfra, and Slc16a1) were up-regulated (1.4- to 2.1-fold, P < .05) at this early stage. Expression of luciferase constructs bearing the 3′-untranslated regions of the corresponding mRNAs in wild-type or DICER-null β-cells demonstrated that Fcgrt, Oat, and Pdgfra are miRNA direct targets. We thus reveal a role for miRNAs in the regulation of disallowed genes in β-cells and provide evidence for a novel means through which noncoding RNAs control the functional identity of these cells independently of actions on β-cell mass. PMID:26038943

  18. Network analysis of microRNAs, genes and their regulation in human bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Kunhao; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Minghui

    2013-11-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is the fifth most common malignancy occurring worldwide and a significant cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Although BC is a serious health issue, studies available concerning the relationship of genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and their host genes has been lacking. In the present study, we assessed experimentally validated data from various sources that reported the effect of miRNA on various diseases, miRNA targeting of mRNAs, and combined these data with initial transcription factor (TF) binding site predictions within miRNA promoter regions. Topology networks obtained in this study included the differentially expressed, BC-associated and global networks. The three networks may be used to assess the effect of miRNAs and their regulation in human BC. By comparing and analyzing the similarities and differences among the three networks, key nodes with the largest potential of affecting the behavior of a particular network were identified. The results also showed potentially substantially influential miRNAs and TFs, which revealed subnetworks demonstrating the mechanisms involved as well as regulatory miRNA network motifs in human BC. Regulatory pathways regarding differentially expressed elements, such as genes and miRNAs, demonstrate self-adapting associations including, self-adapting associations and feedback loops in genes MYC, TP53, PTEN and 10 differentially expressed miRNAs. The differentially expressed network partially identified the BC mechanism. miRNA-targeted human BC genes were also enriched in highly relevant pathways, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. The present study systematically delineated the pathogenesis of BC and provided theoretical foundations for gene therapy investigators to focu attention on key genes and miRNAs in future studies. PMID:24649053

  19. MicroRNA target prediction by expression analysis of host genes.

    PubMed

    Gennarino, Vincenzo Alessandro; Sardiello, Marco; Avellino, Raffaella; Meola, Nicola; Maselli, Vincenza; Anand, Santosh; Cutillo, Luisa; Ballabio, Andrea; Banfi, Sandro

    2009-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that control gene expression by inducing RNA cleavage or translational inhibition. Most human miRNAs are intragenic and are transcribed as part of their hosting transcription units. We hypothesized that the expression profiles of miRNA host genes and of their targets are inversely correlated and devised a novel procedure, HOCTAR (host gene oppositely correlated targets), which ranks predicted miRNA target genes based on their anti-correlated expression behavior relative to their respective miRNA host genes. HOCTAR is the first tool for systematic miRNA target prediction that utilizes the same set of microarray experiments to monitor the expression of both miRNAs (through their host genes) and candidate targets. We applied the procedure to 178 human intragenic miRNAs and found that it performs better than currently available prediction softwares in pinpointing previously validated miRNA targets. The high-scoring HOCTAR predicted targets were enriched in Gene Ontology categories, which were consistent with previously published data, as in the case of miR-106b and miR-93. By means of overexpression and loss-of-function assays, we also demonstrated that HOCTAR is efficient in predicting novel miRNA targets and we identified, by microarray and qRT-PCR procedures, 34 and 28 novel targets for miR-26b and miR-98, respectively. Overall, we believe that the use of HOCTAR significantly reduces the number of candidate miRNA targets to be tested compared to the procedures based solely on target sequence recognition. Finally, our data further confirm that miRNAs have a significant impact on the mRNA levels of most of their targets. PMID:19088304

  20. Biologically supervised hierarchical clustering algorithms for gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Boratyn, Grzegorz M; Datta, Susmita; Datta, Somnath

    2006-01-01

    Cluster analysis has become a standard part of gene expression analysis. In this paper, we propose a novel semi-supervised approach that offers the same flexibility as that of a hierarchical clustering. Yet it utilizes, along with the experimental gene expression data, common biological information about different genes that is being complied at various public, Web accessible databases. We argue that such an approach is inherently superior than the standard unsupervised approach of grouping genes based on expression data alone. It is shown that our biologically supervised methods produce better clustering results than the corresponding unsupervised methods as judged by the distance from the model temporal profiles. R-codes of the clustering algorithm are available from the authors upon request. PMID:17947147

  1. MicroRNAs Suppress NB Domain Genes in Tomato That Confer Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Park, Gyungsoon; Atamian, Hagop S.; Han, Cliff S.; Stajich, Jason E.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2014-10-16

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) suppress the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of genes in plants. Several miRNA families target genes encoding nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) plant innate immune receptors. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici causes vascular wilt disease in tomato. Here, we explored a role for miRNAs in tomato defense against F. oxysporum using comparative miRNA profiling of susceptible (Moneymaker) and resistant (Motelle) tomato cultivars. slmiR482f and slmiR5300 were repressed during infection of Motelle with F. oxysporum. Two predicted mRNA targets each of slmiR482f and slmiR5300 exhibited increased expression in Motelle and the ability of these four targets to be regulated by the miRNAs was confirmed by co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of the targets in the resistant Motelle cultivar revealed a role in fungal resistance for all four genes. All four targets encode proteins with full or partial nucleotide-binding (NB) domains. One slmiR5300 target corresponds to tm-2, a susceptible allele of the Tomato Mosaic Virus resistance gene, supporting functions in immunity to a fungal pathogen. The observation that none of the targets correspond to I-2, the only known resistance (R) gene for F. oxysporum in tomato, supports roles for additional R genes in the immune response. In conclusion, taken together, our findings suggest that Moneymaker is highly susceptible because its potential resistance is insufficiently expressed due to the action of miRNAs.

  2. MicroRNAs Suppress NB Domain Genes in Tomato That Confer Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Park, Gyungsoon; Atamian, Hagop S.; Han, Cliff S.; Stajich, Jason E.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2014-10-16

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) suppress the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of genes in plants. Several miRNA families target genes encoding nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) plant innate immune receptors. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici causes vascular wilt disease in tomato. Here, we explored a role for miRNAs in tomato defense against F. oxysporum using comparative miRNA profiling of susceptible (Moneymaker) and resistant (Motelle) tomato cultivars. slmiR482f and slmiR5300 were repressed during infection of Motelle with F. oxysporum. Two predicted mRNA targets each of slmiR482f and slmiR5300 exhibited increased expression in Motelle and the ability of these four targets to be regulatedmore » by the miRNAs was confirmed by co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of the targets in the resistant Motelle cultivar revealed a role in fungal resistance for all four genes. All four targets encode proteins with full or partial nucleotide-binding (NB) domains. One slmiR5300 target corresponds to tm-2, a susceptible allele of the Tomato Mosaic Virus resistance gene, supporting functions in immunity to a fungal pathogen. The observation that none of the targets correspond to I-2, the only known resistance (R) gene for F. oxysporum in tomato, supports roles for additional R genes in the immune response. In conclusion, taken together, our findings suggest that Moneymaker is highly susceptible because its potential resistance is insufficiently expressed due to the action of miRNAs.« less

  3. MicroRNAs Suppress NB Domain Genes in Tomato That Confer Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Park, Gyungsoon; Atamian, Hagop S.; Han, Cliff S.; Stajich, Jason E.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Borkovich, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) suppress the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of genes in plants. Several miRNA families target genes encoding nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) plant innate immune receptors. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici causes vascular wilt disease in tomato. We explored a role for miRNAs in tomato defense against F. oxysporum using comparative miRNA profiling of susceptible (Moneymaker) and resistant (Motelle) tomato cultivars. slmiR482f and slmiR5300 were repressed during infection of Motelle with F. oxysporum. Two predicted mRNA targets each of slmiR482f and slmiR5300 exhibited increased expression in Motelle and the ability of these four targets to be regulated by the miRNAs was confirmed by co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of the targets in the resistant Motelle cultivar revealed a role in fungal resistance for all four genes. All four targets encode proteins with full or partial nucleotide-binding (NB) domains. One slmiR5300 target corresponds to tm-2, a susceptible allele of the Tomato Mosaic Virus resistance gene, supporting functions in immunity to a fungal pathogen. The observation that none of the targets correspond to I-2, the only known resistance (R) gene for F. oxysporum in tomato, supports roles for additional R genes in the immune response. Taken together, our findings suggest that Moneymaker is highly susceptible because its potential resistance is insufficiently expressed due to the action of miRNAs. PMID:25330340

  4. Identification, Expression and Target Gene Analyses of MicroRNAs in Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Zhongchen; He, Wenyin; Liu, Lin; Zheng, Sichun; Huang, Lihua; Feng, Qili

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs widely present in animals and plants and involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene transcripts. In this study we identified and validated 58 miRNAs from an EST dataset of Spodoptera litura based on the computational and experimental analysis of sequence conservation and secondary structure of miRNA by comparing the miRNA sequences in the miRbase. RT-PCR was conducted to examine the expression of these miRNAs and stem-loop RT-PCR assay was performed to examine expression of 11 mature miRNAs (out of the 58 putative miRNA) that showed significant changes in different tissues and stages of the insect development. One hundred twenty eight possible target genes against the 11 miRNAs were predicted by using computational methods. Binding of one miRNA (sli-miR-928b) with the three possible target mRNAs was confirmed by Southern blotting, implying its possible function in regulation of the target genes. PMID:22662202

  5. Two host microRNAs influence WSSV replication via STAT gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. During viral infection, viruses utilize hosts to enhance their replication by altering cellular miRNAs. The Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway plays crucial roles in the antiviral responses. In this study, two miRNAs (miR-9041 and miR-9850) from Macrobrachium rosenbergii were found to promote white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) replication. The up-regulation of miR-9041 or miR-9850 suppresses STAT expression in the gills of M. rosenbergii, which subsequently down-regulates the expression of its downstream dynamin (Dnm) genes: Dnm1, Dnm2, and Dnm3. Knockdown of miR-9041 and miR-9850 restricts WSSV replication by up-regulating STAT and Dnm gene expression. The silencing of STAT, Dnm1, Dnm2, or Dnm3 led to an increase of the number of WSSV copies in shrimp. The injection of recombinant Dnm1, Dnm2, or Dnm3 proteins could inhibit WSSV replication in vivo. Overall, our research indicates the roles of host miRNAs in the enhancement of WSSV replication by regulating the host JAK/STAT pathway. PMID:27029712

  6. Two host microRNAs influence WSSV replication via STAT gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. During viral infection, viruses utilize hosts to enhance their replication by altering cellular miRNAs. The Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway plays crucial roles in the antiviral responses. In this study, two miRNAs (miR-9041 and miR-9850) from Macrobrachium rosenbergii were found to promote white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) replication. The up-regulation of miR-9041 or miR-9850 suppresses STAT expression in the gills of M. rosenbergii, which subsequently down-regulates the expression of its downstream dynamin (Dnm) genes: Dnm1, Dnm2, and Dnm3. Knockdown of miR-9041 and miR-9850 restricts WSSV replication by up-regulating STAT and Dnm gene expression. The silencing of STAT, Dnm1, Dnm2, or Dnm3 led to an increase of the number of WSSV copies in shrimp. The injection of recombinant Dnm1, Dnm2, or Dnm3 proteins could inhibit WSSV replication in vivo. Overall, our research indicates the roles of host miRNAs in the enhancement of WSSV replication by regulating the host JAK/STAT pathway. PMID:27029712

  7. Microprocessor mediates transcriptional termination in long noncoding microRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Ashish; Dhir, Somdutta; Proudfoot, Nick J.; Jopling, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) play a major role in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Mammalian miRNA biogenesis begins with co-transcriptional cleavage of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcripts by the Microprocessor complex. While most miRNA are located within introns of protein coding genes, a substantial minority of miRNA originate from long non coding (lnc) RNA where transcript processing is largely uncharacterized. We show, by detailed characterization of liver-specific lnc-pri-miR-122 and genome-wide analysis in human cell lines, that most lnc-pri-miRNA do not use the canonical cleavage and polyadenylation (CPA) pathway, but instead use Microprocessor cleavage to terminate transcription. This Microprocessor inactivation leads to extensive transcriptional readthrough of lnc-pri-miRNA and transcriptional interference with downstream genes. Consequently we define a novel RNase III-mediated, polyadenylation-independent mechanism of Pol II transcription termination in mammalian cells. PMID:25730776

  8. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Genes Essential for Influenza A (H7N9) Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Stefan; Wu, Weilin; Jones, Cheryl; Perwitasari, Olivia; Mahalingam, Suresh; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens of humans and animals. While seasonal influenza viruses infect humans every year, occasionally animal-origin viruses emerge to cause pandemics with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates. In March 2013, the public health authorities of China reported three cases of laboratory confirmed human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus, and subsequently there have been many cases reported across South East Asia and recently in North America. Most patients experience severe respiratory illness, and morbidity with mortality rates near 40%. No vaccine is currently available and the use of antivirals is complicated due the frequent emergence of drug resistant strains. Thus, there is an imminent need to identify new drug targets for therapeutic intervention. In the current study, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was performed using microRNA (miRNA) inhibitors to identify new host miRNA targets that reduce influenza H7N9 replication in human respiratory (A549) cells. Validation studies lead to a top hit, hsa-miR-664a-3p, that had potent antiviral effects in reducing H7N9 replication (TCID50 titers) by two logs. In silico pathway analysis revealed that this microRNA targeted the LIF and NEK7 genes with effects on pro-inflammatory factors. In follow up studies using siRNAs, anti-viral properties were shown for LIF. Furthermore, inhibition of hsa-miR-664a-3p also reduced virus replication of pandemic influenza A strains H1N1 and H3N2. PMID:27166678

  9. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Genes Essential for Influenza A (H7N9) Replication.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stefan; Wu, Weilin; Jones, Cheryl; Perwitasari, Olivia; Mahalingam, Suresh; Tripp, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens of humans and animals. While seasonal influenza viruses infect humans every year, occasionally animal-origin viruses emerge to cause pandemics with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates. In March 2013, the public health authorities of China reported three cases of laboratory confirmed human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus, and subsequently there have been many cases reported across South East Asia and recently in North America. Most patients experience severe respiratory illness, and morbidity with mortality rates near 40%. No vaccine is currently available and the use of antivirals is complicated due the frequent emergence of drug resistant strains. Thus, there is an imminent need to identify new drug targets for therapeutic intervention. In the current study, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was performed using microRNA (miRNA) inhibitors to identify new host miRNA targets that reduce influenza H7N9 replication in human respiratory (A549) cells. Validation studies lead to a top hit, hsa-miR-664a-3p, that had potent antiviral effects in reducing H7N9 replication (TCID50 titers) by two logs. In silico pathway analysis revealed that this microRNA targeted the LIF and NEK7 genes with effects on pro-inflammatory factors. In follow up studies using siRNAs, anti-viral properties were shown for LIF. Furthermore, inhibition of hsa-miR-664a-3p also reduced virus replication of pandemic influenza A strains H1N1 and H3N2. PMID:27166678

  10. Reciprocal regulation of autism-related genes MeCP2 and PTEN via microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Jing-Wen; Yuan, Bo; Cheng, Tian-Lin; Qiu, Zi-Long; Zhou, Wen-Hao

    2016-01-01

    MeCP2 encodes a methyl-CpG-binding protein that plays a critical role in repressing gene expression, mutations of which lead to Rett syndrome and autism. PTEN is a critical tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated in human cancers and autism spectrum disorders. Various studies have shown that both MeCP2 and PTEN proteins play important roles in brain development. Here we find that MeCP2 and PTEN reciprocally regulate expression of each other via microRNAs. Knockdown of MeCP2 leads to upregulation of microRNA-137, which in turn represses expression of PTEN, thus PTEN would be down-regulated when MeCP2 is knockdown. Furthermore, we find that deletion of PTEN leads to phosphorylation of Serine 133 of CREB, then increases the expression of microRNA-132. miR-132 inhibits the expression of MeCP2 by targeting on the 3'UTR of MeCP2 mRNA. Our work shows that two critical disorders-related gene MeCP2 and PTEN reciprocally regulate expression of each other by distinct mechanisms, suggesting that rare mutations in various disorders may lead to dysregulation of other critical genes and yield unexpected consequences. PMID:26843422

  11. Reciprocal regulation of autism-related genes MeCP2 and PTEN via microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Jing-Wen; Yuan, Bo; Cheng, Tian-Lin; Qiu, Zi-Long; Zhou, Wen-Hao

    2016-01-01

    MeCP2 encodes a methyl-CpG-binding protein that plays a critical role in repressing gene expression, mutations of which lead to Rett syndrome and autism. PTEN is a critical tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated in human cancers and autism spectrum disorders. Various studies have shown that both MeCP2 and PTEN proteins play important roles in brain development. Here we find that MeCP2 and PTEN reciprocally regulate expression of each other via microRNAs. Knockdown of MeCP2 leads to upregulation of microRNA-137, which in turn represses expression of PTEN, thus PTEN would be down-regulated when MeCP2 is knockdown. Furthermore, we find that deletion of PTEN leads to phosphorylation of Serine 133 of CREB, then increases the expression of microRNA-132. miR-132 inhibits the expression of MeCP2 by targeting on the 3′UTR of MeCP2 mRNA. Our work shows that two critical disorders-related gene MeCP2 and PTEN reciprocally regulate expression of each other by distinct mechanisms, suggesting that rare mutations in various disorders may lead to dysregulation of other critical genes and yield unexpected consequences. PMID:26843422

  12. Regulation of proinflammatory genes by the circulating microRNA hsa-miR-939

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Marguerite K.; Ramanathan, Sujay; Touati, Andrew; Zhou, Yiqian; Thanawala, Rushi U.; Alexander, Guillermo M.; Sacan, Ahmet; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs are beneficial biomarkers because of their stability and dysregulation in diseases. Here we sought to determine the role of miR-939, a miRNA downregulated in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Hsa-miR-939 is predicted to target several proinflammatory genes, including IL-6, VEGFA, TNFα, NFκB2, and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2A). Binding of miR-939 to the 3′ untranslated region of these genes was confirmed by reporter assay. Overexpression of miR-939 in vitro resulted in reduction of IL-6, NOS2A and NFκB2 mRNAs, IL-6, VEGFA, and NOS2 proteins and NFκB activation. We observed a significant decrease in the NOS substrate l-arginine in plasma from CRPS patients, suggesting reduced miR-939 levels may contribute to an increase in endogenous NOS2A levels and NO, and thereby to pain and inflammation. Pathway analysis showed that miR-939 represents a critical regulatory node in a network of inflammatory mediators. Collectively, our data suggest that miR-939 may regulate multiple proinflammatory genes and that downregulation of miR-939 in CRPS patients may increase expression of these genes, resulting in amplification of the inflammatory pain signal transduction cascade. Circulating miRNAs may function as crucial signaling nodes, and small changes in miRNA levels may influence target gene expression and thus disease. PMID:27498764

  13. SMART: unique splitting-while-merging framework for gene clustering.

    PubMed

    Fa, Rui; Roberts, David J; Nandi, Asoke K

    2014-01-01

    Successful clustering algorithms are highly dependent on parameter settings. The clustering performance degrades significantly unless parameters are properly set, and yet, it is difficult to set these parameters a priori. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose a unique splitting-while-merging clustering framework, named "splitting merging awareness tactics" (SMART), which does not require any a priori knowledge of either the number of clusters or even the possible range of this number. Unlike existing self-splitting algorithms, which over-cluster the dataset to a large number of clusters and then merge some similar clusters, our framework has the ability to split and merge clusters automatically during the process and produces the the most reliable clustering results, by intrinsically integrating many clustering techniques and tasks. The SMART framework is implemented with two distinct clustering paradigms in two algorithms: competitive learning and finite mixture model. Nevertheless, within the proposed SMART framework, many other algorithms can be derived for different clustering paradigms. The minimum message length algorithm is integrated into the framework as the clustering selection criterion. The usefulness of the SMART framework and its algorithms is tested in demonstration datasets and simulated gene expression datasets. Moreover, two real microarray gene expression datasets are studied using this approach. Based on the performance of many metrics, all numerical results show that SMART is superior to compared existing self-splitting algorithms and traditional algorithms. Three main properties of the proposed SMART framework are summarized as: (1) needing no parameters dependent on the respective dataset or a priori knowledge about the datasets, (2) extendible to many different applications, (3) offering superior performance compared with counterpart algorithms. PMID:24714159

  14. Increase of microRNA-210, Decrease of Raptor Gene Expression and Alteration of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Regulated Proteins following Mithramycin Treatment of Human Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Nicoletta; Finotti, Alessia; Ferracin, Manuela; Lampronti, Ilaria; Zuccato, Cristina; Breveglieri, Giulia; Brognara, Eleonora; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Expression and regulation of microRNAs is an emerging issue in erythroid differentiation and globin gene expression in hemoglobin disorders. In the first part of this study microarray analysis was performed both in mithramycin-induced K562 cells and erythroid precursors from healthy subjects or β-thalassemia patients producing low or high levels of fetal hemoglobin. We demonstrated that: (a) microRNA-210 expression is higher in erythroid precursors from β-thalassemia patients with high production of fetal hemoglobin; (b) microRNA-210 increases as a consequence of mithramycin treatment of K562 cells and human erythroid progenitors both from healthy and β-thalassemia subjects; (c) this increase is associated with erythroid induction and elevated expression of γ-globin genes; (d) an anti-microRNA against microRNA-210 interferes with the mithramycin-induced changes of gene expression. In the second part of the study we have obtained convergent evidences suggesting raptor mRNA as a putative target of microRNA-210. Indeed, microRNA-210 binding sites of its 3’-UTR region were involved in expression and are targets of microRNA-210-mediated modulation in a luciferase reporter assays. Furthermore, (i) raptor mRNA and protein are down-regulated upon mithramycin-induction both in K562 cells and erythroid progenitors from healthy and β-thalassemia subjects. In addition, (ii) administration of anti-microRNA-210 to K562 cells decreased endogenous microRNA-210 and increased raptor mRNA and protein expression. Finally, (iii) treatment of K562 cells with premicroRNA-210 led to a decrease of raptor mRNA and protein. In conclusion, microRNA-210 and raptor are involved in mithramycin-mediated erythroid differentiation of K562 cells and participate to the fine-tuning and control of γ-globin gene expression in erythroid precursor cells. PMID:25849663

  15. MicroRNA Expression in the Glaucomatous Retina

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Hari; Cepurna, William O.; Johnson, Elaine C.; Morrison, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNAs are small, endogenous noncoding RNAs that modulate posttranscriptional gene expression. Although the contribution of microRNAs to the pathogenesis of glaucomatous damage is unknown, supporting evidence from central nervous system (CNS) research suggests they may play a role. It was therefore hypothesized that microRNAs known to be altered in CNS injury are also altered in experimental glaucoma. Methods Intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated in rats by unilateral injection of hypertonic saline and IOP monitored for 5 weeks. After rats were killed, retrobulbar optic nerve sections were graded for damage. MicroRNA was extracted from whole retinae of eyes with advanced nerve damage (n = 8) and from normal, noninjected control eyes (n = 8). Quantitative PCRs were performed using a panel of 17 microRNAs, reported from CNS research to be implicated in mechanisms also linked to glaucomatous damage. Computationally and experimentally derived gene targets were identified for the differentially expressed microRNAs. These were then integrated with existing gene array data. Functional interpretation was performed using the Molecular Signatures Database and DAVID Functional Annotation Clustering. Results Eight microRNAs were significantly downregulated in glaucomatous retinae compared with controls (miR-181c, miR-497, miR-204, let-7a, miR-29b, miR-16, miR106b, and miR-25); miR-27a was significantly upregulated. Enrichment of targets associated with extracellular matrix/cell proliferation, immune system, and regulation of apoptosis were observed. Cholesterol homeostasis and mTORC-1 pathways showed reduced expression. Conclusions MicroRNAs are differentially expressed in retinae of eyes with advanced glaucomatous damage compared with normal controls. Integrating microRNA with gene expression data may improve understanding of the complex biological responses produced by chronically elevated IOP. PMID:26720444

  16. Identification of Nitrogen-Fixing Genes and Gene Clusters from Metagenomic Library of Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Huaqun; Liang, Yili; Cong, Jing; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is an essential function of acid mine drainage (AMD) microbial communities. However, most acidophiles in AMD environments are uncultured microorganisms and little is known about the diversity of nitrogen-fixing genes and structure of nif gene cluster in AMD microbial communities. In this study, we used metagenomic sequencing to isolate nif genes in the AMD microbial community from Dexing Copper Mine, China. Meanwhile, a metagenome microarray containing 7,776 large-insertion fosmids was constructed to screen novel nif gene clusters. Metagenomic analyses revealed that 742 sequences were identified as nif genes including structural subunit genes nifH, nifD, nifK and various additional genes. The AMD community is massively dominated by the genus Acidithiobacillus. However, the phylogenetic diversity of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms is much higher than previously thought in the AMD community. Furthermore, a 32.5-kb genomic sequence harboring nif, fix and associated genes was screened by metagenome microarray. Comparative genome analysis indicated that most nif genes in this cluster are most similar to those of Herbaspirillum seropedicae, but the organization of the nif gene cluster had significant differences from H. seropedicae. Sequence analysis and reverse transcription PCR also suggested that distinct transcription units of nif genes exist in this gene cluster. nifQ gene falls into the same transcription unit with fixABCX genes, which have not been reported in other diazotrophs before. All of these results indicated that more novel diazotrophs survive in the AMD community. PMID:24498417

  17. Optimal consistency in microRNA expression analysis using reference-gene-based normalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Gardiner, Erin J; Cairns, Murray J

    2015-05-01

    Normalization of high-throughput molecular expression profiles secures differential expression analysis between samples of different phenotypes or biological conditions, and facilitates comparison between experimental batches. While the same general principles apply to microRNA (miRNA) normalization, there is mounting evidence that global shifts in their expression patterns occur in specific circumstances, which pose a challenge for normalizing miRNA expression data. As an alternative to global normalization, which has the propensity to flatten large trends, normalization against constitutively expressed reference genes presents an advantage through their relative independence. Here we investigated the performance of reference-gene-based (RGB) normalization for differential miRNA expression analysis of microarray expression data, and compared the results with other normalization methods, including: quantile, variance stabilization, robust spline, simple scaling, rank invariant, and Loess regression. The comparative analyses were executed using miRNA expression in tissue samples derived from subjects with schizophrenia and non-psychiatric controls. We proposed a consistency criterion for evaluating methods by examining the overlapping of differentially expressed miRNAs detected using different partitions of the whole data. Based on this criterion, we found that RGB normalization generally outperformed global normalization methods. Thus we recommend the application of RGB normalization for miRNA expression data sets, and believe that this will yield a more consistent and useful readout of differentially expressed miRNAs, particularly in biological conditions characterized by large shifts in miRNA expression. PMID:25797570

  18. Mammalian microRNAs: experimental evaluation of novel and previously annotated genes

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, H. Rosaria; Schoenfeld, Lori W.; Ruby, J. Graham; Auyeung, Vincent C.; Spies, Noah; Baek, Daehyun; Johnston, Wendy K.; Russ, Carsten; Luo, Shujun; Babiarz, Joshua E.; Blelloch, Robert; Schroth, Gary P.; Nusbaum, Chad; Bartel, David P.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs that derive from distinctive hairpin transcripts. To learn more about the miRNAs of mammals, we sequenced 60 million small RNAs from mouse brain, ovary, testes, embryonic stem cells, three embryonic stages, and whole newborns. Analysis of these sequences confirmed 398 annotated miRNA genes and identified 108 novel miRNA genes. More than 150 previously annotated miRNAs and hundreds of candidates failed to yield sequenced RNAs with miRNA-like features. Ectopically expressing these previously proposed miRNA hairpins also did not yield small RNAs, whereas ectopically expressing the confirmed and newly identified hairpins usually did yield small RNAs with the classical miRNA features, including dependence on the Drosha endonuclease for processing. These experiments, which suggest that previous estimates of conserved mammalian miRNAs were inflated, provide a substantially revised list of confidently identified murine miRNAs from which to infer the general features of mammalian miRNAs. Our analyses also revealed new aspects of miRNA biogenesis and modification, including tissue-specific strand preferences, sequential Dicer cleavage of a metazoan precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA), consequential 5′ heterogeneity, newly identified instances of miRNA editing, and evidence for widespread pre-miRNA uridylation reminiscent of miRNA regulation by Lin28. PMID:20413612

  19. Application of MicroRNA in Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Disease Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhan-Peng; Neppl, Ronald L.; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small ~22 nt noncoding RNAs. miRNAs regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional levels by destabilization and degradation of the target mRNA or by translational repression. Numerous studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are essential for normal mammalian development and organ function. Deleterious changes in miRNA expression play an important role in human diseases. We and others have previously reported several muscle-specific miRNAs, including miR-1/206, miR-133, and miR-208. These muscle-specific miRNAs are essential for normal myoblast differentiation and proliferation, and they have also been implicated in various cardiac and skeletal muscular diseases. miRNA-based gene therapies hold great potential for the treatment of cardiac and skeletal muscle disease(s). Herein, we introduce the methods commonly applied to study the biological role of miRNAs, as well as the techniques utilized to manipulate miRNA expression. PMID:21194029

  20. Identification and characterization of microRNAs and their target genes from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Ma, Xiu Ying; Yang, You Bing; Ren, Hong Tao; Sun, Xi Hong; Wang, Li Rui

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small single-stranded, endogenous 21-22 nt non-coding RNAs that regulate their target mRNA levels by causing either inactivation or degradation of the mRNAs. In recent years, miRNA genes have been identified from mammals, insects, worms, plants, and viruses. In this research, bioinformatics approaches were used to predict potential miRNAs and their targets in Nile tilapia from the expressed sequence tag (EST) and genomic survey sequence (GSS) database, respectively, based on the conservation of miRNAs in many animal species. A total of 19 potential miRNAs were detected following a range of strict filtering criteria. To test the validity of the bioinformatics method, seven predicted Nile tilapia miRNA genes were selected for further biological validation, and their mature miRNA transcripts were successfully detected by stem-loop RT-PCR experiments. Using these potential miRNAs, we found 56 potential targets in this species. Most of the target mRNAs appear to be involved in development, metabolism, signal transduction, transcription regulation and stress responses. Overall, our findings will provide an important foundation for further research on miRNAs function in the Nile tilapia. PMID:27305701

  1. Characterization of the largest effector gene cluster of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Brefort, Thomas; Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Neidig, Nina; Doehlemann, Gunther; Vincon, Volker; Kahmann, Regine

    2014-07-01

    In the genome of the biotrophic plant pathogen Ustilago maydis, many of the genes coding for secreted protein effectors modulating virulence are arranged in gene clusters. The vast majority of these genes encode novel proteins whose expression is coupled to plant colonization. The largest of these gene clusters, cluster 19A, encodes 24 secreted effectors. Deletion of the entire cluster results in severe attenuation of virulence. Here we present the functional analysis of this genomic region. We show that a 19A deletion mutant behaves like an endophyte, i.e. is still able to colonize plants and complete the infection cycle. However, tumors, the most conspicuous symptoms of maize smut disease, are only rarely formed and fungal biomass in infected tissue is significantly reduced. The generation and analysis of strains carrying sub-deletions identified several genes significantly contributing to tumor formation after seedling infection. Another of the effectors could be linked specifically to anthocyanin induction in the infected tissue. As the individual contributions of these genes to tumor formation were small, we studied the response of maize plants to the whole cluster mutant as well as to several individual mutants by array analysis. This revealed distinct plant responses, demonstrating that the respective effectors have discrete plant targets. We propose that the analysis of plant responses to effector mutant strains that lack a strong virulence phenotype may be a general way to visualize differences in effector function. PMID:24992561

  2. Biosynthetic Gene Cluster for the Polyenoyltetramic Acid α-Lipomycin

    PubMed Central

    Bihlmaier, C.; Welle, E.; Hofmann, C.; Welzel, K.; Vente, A.; Breitling, E.; Müller, M.; Glaser, S.; Bechthold, A.

    2006-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces aureofaciens Tü117 produces the acyclic polyene antibiotic α-lipomycin. The entire biosynthetic gene cluster (lip gene cluster) was cloned and characterized. DNA sequence analysis of a 74-kb region revealed the presence of 28 complete open reading frames (ORFs), 22 of them belonging to the biosynthetic gene cluster. Central to the cluster is a polyketide synthase locus that encodes an eight-module system comprised of four multifunctional proteins. In addition, one ORF shows homology to those for nonribosomal peptide synthetases, indicating that α-lipomycin belongs to the classification of hybrid peptide-polyketide natural products. Furthermore, the lip cluster includes genes responsible for the formation and attachment of d-digitoxose as well as ORFs that resemble those for putative regulatory and export functions. We generated biosynthetic mutants by insertional gene inactivation. By analysis of culture extracts of these mutants, we could prove that, indeed, the genes involved in the biosynthesis of lipomycin had been cloned, and additionally we gained insight into an unusual biosynthesis pathway. PMID:16723573

  3. Detecting sequence homology at the gene cluster level with MultiGeneBlast.

    PubMed

    Medema, Marnix H; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    The genes encoding many biomolecular systems and pathways are genomically organized in operons or gene clusters. With MultiGeneBlast, we provide a user-friendly and effective tool to perform homology searches with operons or gene clusters as basic units, instead of single genes. The contextualization offered by MultiGeneBlast allows users to get a better understanding of the function, evolutionary history, and practical applications of such genomic regions. The tool is fully equipped with applications to generate search databases from GenBank or from the user's own sequence data. Finally, an architecture search mode allows searching for gene clusters with novel configurations, by detecting genomic regions with any user-specified combination of genes. Sources, precompiled binaries, and a graphical tutorial of MultiGeneBlast are freely available from http://multigeneblast.sourceforge.net/. PMID:23412913

  4. Clustered Genes Involved in Cyclopiazonic Acid Production are Next to the Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an indole-tetramic acid toxin, is produced by many species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. In addition to CPA Aspergillus flavus produces polyketide-derived carcinogenic aflatoxins (AFs). AF biosynthesis genes form a gene cluster in a subtelomeric region. Isolates of A. fla...

  5. MicroRNA 218 Acts as a Tumor Suppressor by Targeting Multiple Cancer Phenotype-associated Genes in Medulloblastoma*

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Sujatha; Birks, Diane K.; Balakrishnan, Ilango; Alimova, Irina; Harris, Peter S.; Patel, Purvi R.; Handler, Michael H.; Dubuc, Adrian; Taylor, Michael D.; Foreman, Nicholas K.; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs has been implicated in many cancers. We recently demonstrated differential expression of several microRNAs in medulloblastoma. In this study, the regulation and function of microRNA 218 (miR-218), which is significantly underexpressed in medulloblastoma, was evaluated. Re-expression of miR-218 resulted in a significant decrease in medulloblastoma cell growth, cell colony formation, cell migration, invasion, and tumor sphere size. We used C17.2 neural stem cells as a model to show that increased miR-218 expression results in increased cell differentiation and also decreased malignant transformation when transfected with the oncogene REST. These results suggest that miR-218 acts as a tumor suppressor in medulloblastoma. MicroRNAs function by down-regulating translation of target mRNAs. Targets are determined by imperfect base pairing of the microRNA to the 3′-UTR of the mRNA. To comprehensively identify actual miR-218 targets, medulloblastoma cells overexpressing miR-218 and control cells were subjected to high throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation, a technique that identifies the mRNAs bound to the RNA-induced silencing complex component protein Argonaute 2. High throughput sequencing of mRNAs identified 618 genes as targets of miR-218 and included both previously validated targets and many targets not predicted computationally. Additional work further confirmed CDK6, RICTOR, and CTSB (cathepsin B) as targets of miR-218 and examined the functional role of one of these targets, CDK6, in medulloblastoma. PMID:23212916

  6. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular

  7. Circulating cell-free mature microRNAs and their target gene prediction in bovine metritis

    PubMed Central

    Kasimanickam, Vanmathy; Kastelic, John

    2016-01-01

    Uterine infections in dairy cows are common after calving, reduce fertility and cause substantial economic losses. Conventional diagnosis (based on clinical signs) and treatment can be challenging. Serum microRNA (miRNA) profiles serve as non-invasive biomarkers in several pathological conditions including inflammatory diseases. The objective was to identify differentially expressed serum miRNAs in cows with metritis and normal uterus (four cows per group), integrate miRNAs to their target genes, and categorize target genes for biological processes involved in bacterial infection and inflammatory responses. Out of 84 bovine-specific, prioritized miRNAs analyzed, 30 were differentially expressed between metritis and normal cows (p ≤ 0.05, fold regulation ≥2 magnitudes). Bta-miR-15b, bta-miR-17-3p, bta-miR-16b, bta-miR-148a, bta-miR-26b, bta-miR-101 and bta-miR-29b were highly up-regulated whereas bta-miR-148b, bta-miR-199a-3p, bta-miR-122, bta-miR-200b and bta-miR-10a were highly down-regulated in cows with metritis compared to cows with normal uterus. Highly scored target genes of up-regulated and down-regulated miRNAs were categorized for various biological processes, including biological regulation, cellular process, developmental process, metabolic process, localization, multicellular organismal process, response to stimulus, immune system process, cellular components organization, apoptotic process, biological adhesion, developmental process, and locomotion that are critical to combat bacterial infections and provoke inflammatory responses. PMID:27404038

  8. MicroRNA-322 protects hypoxia-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes via BDNF gene

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liguo; Song, Shigang; Lv, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiomyocytes apoptosis under hypoxia condition contributes significantly to various cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the role of microRNA-322 (miR-322) in regulating hypoxia-induced apoptosis in neonatal murine cardiomyocytes in vitro. Method: Cardiomyocytes of C57BL/6J mice were treated with hypoxia condition in vitro. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was measured by TUNEL assay. Gene expression pattern of miR-322 was measured by qRT-PCR. Stable downregulation of miR-322 in cardiomyocytes were achieved by lentiviral transduction, and the effect of miR-322 downregulation on hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis was investigated. Possible regulation of miR-322 on its downstream target gene, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was investigated in cardiomyocytes. BDNF was then genetically silenced by siRNA to evaluate its role in miR-137 mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis protection under hypoxia condition. Results: Under hypoxia condition, significant apoptosis was induced and miR-322 was significantly upregulated in cardiomyocytes in vitro. Through lentiviral transduction, miR-322 was efficiently knocked down in cardiomyocytes. Downregulation of miR-322 protected hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Luciferase assay showed BDNF was the target gene of miR-322. QRT-PCR showed BDNF expression was associated with miR-322 regulation on hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Silencing BDNF in cardiomyocyte through siRNA transfection reversed the protective effect of miR-322 downregulation on hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: Our study revealed that miR-322, in association with BDNF, played important role in regulating hypoxia-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocyte. PMID:27398164

  9. Circulating cell-free mature microRNAs and their target gene prediction in bovine metritis.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, Vanmathy; Kastelic, John

    2016-01-01

    Uterine infections in dairy cows are common after calving, reduce fertility and cause substantial economic losses. Conventional diagnosis (based on clinical signs) and treatment can be challenging. Serum microRNA (miRNA) profiles serve as non-invasive biomarkers in several pathological conditions including inflammatory diseases. The objective was to identify differentially expressed serum miRNAs in cows with metritis and normal uterus (four cows per group), integrate miRNAs to their target genes, and categorize target genes for biological processes involved in bacterial infection and inflammatory responses. Out of 84 bovine-specific, prioritized miRNAs analyzed, 30 were differentially expressed between metritis and normal cows (p ≤ 0.05, fold regulation ≥2 magnitudes). Bta-miR-15b, bta-miR-17-3p, bta-miR-16b, bta-miR-148a, bta-miR-26b, bta-miR-101 and bta-miR-29b were highly up-regulated whereas bta-miR-148b, bta-miR-199a-3p, bta-miR-122, bta-miR-200b and bta-miR-10a were highly down-regulated in cows with metritis compared to cows with normal uterus. Highly scored target genes of up-regulated and down-regulated miRNAs were categorized for various biological processes, including biological regulation, cellular process, developmental process, metabolic process, localization, multicellular organismal process, response to stimulus, immune system process, cellular components organization, apoptotic process, biological adhesion, developmental process, and locomotion that are critical to combat bacterial infections and provoke inflammatory responses. PMID:27404038

  10. Variants of MicroRNA Genes: Gender-Specific Associations with Multiple Sclerosis Risk and Severity.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Ivan; Bashinskaya, Vitalina; Kulakova, Olga; Baulina, Natalia; Popova, Ekaterina; Boyko, Alexey; Favorova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neuro-inflammatory disease arising from complex interactions of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Variations in genes of some microRNAs--key post-transcriptional regulators of many genes--can influence microRNAs expression/function and contribute to MS via expression changes of protein-coding target mRNA genes. We performed an association study of polymorphous variants of MIR146A rs2910164, MIR196A2 rs11614913, MIR499A rs3746444 MIR223 rs1044165 and their combinations with MS risk and severity. 561 unrelated patients with bout-onset MS and 441 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. We observed associations of MS risk with allele MIR223*T and combination (MIR223*T + MIR146A*G/G) carriage in the entire groups and in women at Bonferroni-corrected significance level (pcorr < 0.05). Besides, MIR146A*G/G association with MS was observed in women with nominal significance (pf = 0.025). No MS associations were found in men. A more severe MS course (MSSS value > 3.5) was associated with the carriage of MIR499A*C/T and, less reliably, of MIR499A*C (pcorr = 0.006 and pcorr = 0.024, respectively) and with the carriage of combinations (MIR499A*C/T + MIR196A2*C) and (MIR499A*C + MIR196A2*C) (pcorr = 0.00078 and pcorr = 0.0059, respectively). These associations also showed gender specificity, as they were not significant in men and substantially reinforced in women. The strongest association with MS severity was observed in women for combination (MIR499A*C/T + MIR196A2*C): pcorr = 4.43 × 10(-6) and OR = 3.23 (CI: 1.99-5.26). PMID:26305248

  11. Analysis of Deregulated microRNAs and Their Target Genes in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kupcinskas, Juozas; Link, Alexander; Kiudelis, Gediminas; Jonaitis, Laimas; Jarmalaite, Sonata; Kupcinskas, Limas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Skieceviciene, Jurgita

    2015-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are widely studied non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression. MiRNAs are deregulated in different tumors including gastric cancer (GC) and have potential diagnostic and prognostic implications. The aim of our study was to determine miRNA profile in GC tissues, followed by evaluation of deregulated miRNAs in plasma of GC patients. Using available databases and bioinformatics methods we also aimed to evaluate potential target genes of confirmed differentially expressed miRNA and validate these findings in GC tissues. Methods The study included 51 GC patients and 51 controls. Initially, we screened miRNA expression profile in 13 tissue samples of GC and 12 normal gastric tissues with TaqMan low density array (TLDA). In the second stage, differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in a replication cohort using qRT-PCR in tissue and plasma samples. Subsequently, we analyzed potential target genes of deregulated miRNAs using bioinformatics approach, determined their expression in GC tissues and performed correlation analysis with targeting miRNAs. Results Profiling with TLDA revealed 15 deregulated miRNAs in GC tissues compared to normal gastric mucosa. Replication analysis confirmed that miR-148a-3p, miR-204-5p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 were consistently deregulated in GC tissues. Analysis of GC patients’ plasma samples showed significant down-regulation of miR-148a-3p, miR-375 and up-regulation of miR-223-3p compared to healthy subjects. Further, using bioinformatic tools we identified targets of replicated miRNAs and performed disease-associated gene enrichment analysis. Ultimately, we evaluated potential target gene BCL2 and DNMT3B expression by qRT-PCR in GC tissue, which correlated with targeting miRNA expression. Conclusions Our study revealed miRNA profile in GC tissues and showed that miR-148a-3p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 are deregulated in GC plasma samples, but these circulating miRNAs showed relatively weak diagnostic

  12. Identification of crucial microRNAs and genes in hypoxia-induced human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Deng, Lili; Su, Dongju; Xiao, Jinling; Ge, Dongjie; Bao, Yongxia; Jing, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Variations of microRNA (miRNA) expression profile in hypoxic lung cancer cells have not been studied so far. Therefore, using miRNA microarray technology, this study aimed to study the miRNA expression profile and investigate the potential crucial miRNAs and their target genes in hypoxia-induced human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Materials and methods Based on miRNA microarray, miRNA expression profiling of hypoxia-induced lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells was obtained. After identification of differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRNAs) in hypoxic cells, target genes of DE-miRNAs were predicted, and functional enrichment analysis of targets was conducted. Furthermore, the expression levels of DE-miRNAs and their target genes were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, using miRNA mimics, the effect of overexpressed DE-miRNAs on A549 cell behaviors (cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis) was evaluated. Results In total, 14 DE-miRNAs (nine upregulated miRNAs and five downregulated miRNAs) were identified in hypoxic cells, compared with normoxic cells. Target genes of both upregulated and downregulated miRNAs were enriched in the functions such as chromatin modification, and pathways such as Wnt signaling pathway and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway. The expression levels of several miRNAs and their target genes were confirmed, including hsa-miR-301b/FOXF2, hsa-miR-148b-3p/WNT10B, hsa-miR-769-5p/(SMAD2, ARID1A), and hsa-miR-622. Among them, hsa-miR-301b was verified to regulate FOXF2, and hsa-miR-769-5p was verified to modulate ARID1A. In addition, the overexpression of hsa-miR-301b and hsa-miR-769-5p significantly affected the cell cycle of A549 cells, but not cell proliferation and apoptosis. Conclusion miRNA expression profile was changed in hypoxia-induced lung cancer cells. Those validated miRNAs and genes may play crucial roles in the response of lung cancer cells to hypoxia. PMID:27524914

  13. Phage cluster relationships identified through single gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic comparison of bacteriophages requires whole genome approaches such as dotplot analysis, genome pairwise maps, and gene content analysis. Currently mycobacteriophages, a highly studied phage group, are categorized into related clusters based on the comparative analysis of whole genome sequences. With the recent explosion of phage isolation, a simple method for phage cluster prediction would facilitate analysis of crude or complex samples without whole genome isolation and sequencing. The hypothesis of this study was that mycobacteriophage-cluster prediction is possible using comparison of a single, ubiquitous, semi-conserved gene. Tape Measure Protein (TMP) was selected to test the hypothesis because it is typically the longest gene in mycobacteriophage genomes and because regions within the TMP gene are conserved. Results A single gene, TMP, identified the known Mycobacteriophage clusters and subclusters using a Gepard dotplot comparison or a phylogenetic tree constructed from global alignment and maximum likelihood comparisons. Gepard analysis of 247 mycobacteriophage TMP sequences appropriately recovered 98.8% of the subcluster assignments that were made by whole-genome comparison. Subcluster-specific primers within TMP allow for PCR determination of the mycobacteriophage subcluster from DNA samples. Using the single-gene comparison approach for siphovirus coliphages, phage groupings by TMP comparison reflected relationships observed in a whole genome dotplot comparison and confirm the potential utility of this approach to another widely studied group of phages. Conclusions TMP sequence comparison and PCR results support the hypothesis that a single gene can be used for distinguishing phage cluster and subcluster assignments. TMP single-gene analysis can quickly and accurately aid in mycobacteriophage classification. PMID:23777341

  14. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis.

    PubMed

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-07-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  15. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    PubMed Central

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-01-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  16. microRNAs and the evolution of complex multicellularity: identification of a large, diverse complement of microRNAs in the brown alga Ectocarpus

    PubMed Central

    Tarver, James E.; Cormier, Alexandre; Pinzón, Natalia; Taylor, Richard S.; Carré, Wilfrid; Strittmatter, Martina; Seitz, Hervé; Coelho, Susana M.; Cock, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    There is currently convincing evidence that microRNAs have evolved independently in at least six different eukaryotic lineages: animals, land plants, chlorophyte green algae, demosponges, slime molds and brown algae. MicroRNAs from different lineages are not homologous but some structural features are strongly conserved across the eukaryotic tree allowing the application of stringent criteria to identify novel microRNA loci. A large set of 63 microRNA families was identified in the brown alga Ectocarpus based on mapping of RNA-seq data and nine microRNAs were confirmed by northern blotting. The Ectocarpus microRNAs are highly diverse at the sequence level with few multi-gene families, and do not tend to occur in clusters but exhibit some highly conserved structural features such as the presence of a uracil at the first residue. No homologues of Ectocarpus microRNAs were found in other stramenopile genomes indicating that they emerged late in stramenopile evolution and are perhaps specific to the brown algae. The large number of microRNA loci in Ectocarpus is consistent with the developmental complexity of many brown algal species and supports a proposed link between the emergence and expansion of microRNA regulatory systems and the evolution of complex multicellularity. PMID:26101255

  17. microRNAs and the evolution of complex multicellularity: identification of a large, diverse complement of microRNAs in the brown alga Ectocarpus.

    PubMed

    Tarver, James E; Cormier, Alexandre; Pinzón, Natalia; Taylor, Richard S; Carré, Wilfrid; Strittmatter, Martina; Seitz, Hervé; Coelho, Susana M; Cock, J Mark

    2015-07-27

    There is currently convincing evidence that microRNAs have evolved independently in at least six different eukaryotic lineages: animals, land plants, chlorophyte green algae, demosponges, slime molds and brown algae. MicroRNAs from different lineages are not homologous but some structural features are strongly conserved across the eukaryotic tree allowing the application of stringent criteria to identify novel microRNA loci. A large set of 63 microRNA families was identified in the brown alga Ectocarpus based on mapping of RNA-seq data and nine microRNAs were confirmed by northern blotting. The Ectocarpus microRNAs are highly diverse at the sequence level with few multi-gene families, and do not tend to occur in clusters but exhibit some highly conserved structural features such as the presence of a uracil at the first residue. No homologues of Ectocarpus microRNAs were found in other stramenopile genomes indicating that they emerged late in stramenopile evolution and are perhaps specific to the brown algae. The large number of microRNA loci in Ectocarpus is consistent with the developmental complexity of many brown algal species and supports a proposed link between the emergence and expansion of microRNA regulatory systems and the evolution of complex multicellularity. PMID:26101255

  18. MicroRNA-16 suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition‑related gene expression in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Li, Xu; Zhu, Yu; Yang, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Glioma is one of the most prevalent types of brain tumor and is associated with the highest mortality rate of all CNS cancers. Epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been recognized as an important factor in tumor metastasis. Previously, it has been demonstrated that microRNA-16 (miR-16) has an important role in tumor metastasis in human cancer cell lines. However, the role of miR-16 in epithelial‑mesenchymal transition of human glioma cells remains unclear. In the present study, U87 and U251 glioma cell lines overexpressing miR-16 were established and it was identified that miR-16 suppressed invasion, adhesion, cell cycle, production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and transforming growth factor-β, and EMT-related gene expression, including vimentin, β-catenin and E-cadherin in miR-16 overexpressing U87 and U251 glioma cells. Furthermore, miR-16 suppressed EMT mainly through the downregulation of p-FAK and p-Akt expression, and nuclear factor-κB and Slug transcriptional activity. Therefore, miR-16 may be an important therapeutic target and predictor for glioma therapy. PMID:25242314

  19. Prediction of microRNA target genes using an efficient genetic algorithm-based decision tree

    PubMed Central

    Rabiee-Ghahfarrokhi, Behzad; Rafiei, Fariba; Niknafs, Ali Akbar; Zamani, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression in almost all plants and animals. They play an important role in key processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and pathogen–host interactions. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which miRNAs act are not fully understood. The first step toward unraveling the function of a particular miRNA is the identification of its direct targets. This step has shown to be quite challenging in animals primarily because of incomplete complementarities between miRNA and target mRNAs. In recent years, the use of machine-learning techniques has greatly increased the prediction of miRNA targets, avoiding the need for costly and time-consuming experiments to achieve miRNA targets experimentally. Among the most important machine-learning algorithms are decision trees, which classify data based on extracted rules. In the present work, we used a genetic algorithm in combination with C4.5 decision tree for prediction of miRNA targets. We applied our proposed method to a validated human datasets. We nearly achieved 93.9% accuracy of classification, which could be related to the selection of best rules. PMID:26649272

  20. MicroRNAs and their target gene networks in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Redova, Martina; Svoboda, Marek; Slaby, Ondrej

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} MiRNAs are related to the processes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis in RCC. {yields} MiRNAs expression profiles are associated with several RCC-specific genetic alterations. {yields} It has been well documented that several miRNAs are downstream effector molecules of the HIF-induced hypoxia response. {yields} MiR-200 family is linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition which is one of the most significant pathogenetic mechanism in RCC. {yields} Mechanistic studies in RCC have provided the rationale of using miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding short single stranded RNAs in the size range 19-25 nucleotides that are associated with gene regulation at the transcriptional and translational level. Recent studies have proved that miRNAs play important roles in a large number of biological processes, including cellular differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, etc. Changes in their expression were found in a variety of human cancers, including renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis. Specific miRNA alterations were associated with key pathogenetic mechanisms of renal cell carcinoma like hypoxia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in renal cell carcinoma with an emphasis on miRNAs potential to serve as a powerful biomarker of disease and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  1. MicroRNA gene expression signatures in long-surviving malignant pleural mesothelioma patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruby C Y; Kirschner, Michaela B; Cheng, Yuen Yee; van Zandwijk, Nico; Reid, Glen

    2016-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a tumor originating in the mesothelium, the membrane lining the thoracic cavities, and is induced by exposure to asbestos. Australia suffers one of the world's highest rates of MPM and the incidence is yet to peak. The prognosis for patients with MPM is poor and median survival following diagnosis is 4-18 months. Currently, no or few effective therapies exist for MPM. Trials of targeted agents such as antiangiogenic agents (VEGF, EGFR) or ribonuclease inhibitors (ranpirnase) largely failed to show efficacy in MPM Tsao et al. (2009) [1]. A recent study, however, showed that cisplatin/pemetrexed + bevacizumab (a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibit VEGF) treatment has a survival benefit of 2.7 months Zalcman et al. (2016) [2]. It remains to be seen if this targeted therapy will be accepted as a new standard for MPM. Thus the unmet needs of MPM patients remain very pronounced and almost every patient will be confronted with drug resistance and recurrence of disease. We have identified unique gene signatures associated with prolonged survival in mesothelioma patients undergoing radical surgery (EPP, extrapleural pneumonectomy), as well as patients who underwent palliative surgery (pleurectomy/decortication). In addition to data published in Molecular Oncology, 2015;9:715-26 (GSE59180) Kirschner et al. (2015) , we describe here additional data using a system-based approach that support our previous observations. This data provides a resource to further explore microRNA dynamics in MPM. PMID:27408810

  2. Genomic architecture and inheritance of human ribosomal RNA gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Stults, Dawn M.; Killen, Michael W.; Pierce, Heather H.; Pierce, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    The finishing of the Human Genome Project largely completed the detailing of human euchromatic sequences; however, the most highly repetitive regions of the genome still could not be assembled. The 12 gene clusters producing the structural RNA components of the ribosome are critically important for cellular viability, yet fall into this unassembled region of the Human Genome Project. To determine the extent of human variation in ribosomal RNA gene content (rDNA) and patterns of rDNA cluster inheritance, we have determined the physical lengths of the rDNA clusters in peripheral blood white cells of healthy human volunteers. The cluster lengths exhibit striking variability between and within human individuals, ranging from 50 kb to >6 Mb, manifest essentially complete heterozygosity, and provide each person with their own unique rDNA electrophoretic karyotype. Analysis of these rDNA fingerprints in multigenerational human families demonstrates that the rDNA clusters are subject to meiotic rearrangement at a frequency >10% per cluster, per meiosis. With this high intrinsic recombinational instability, the rDNA clusters may serve as a unique paradigm of potential human genomic plasticity. PMID:18025267

  3. Roles of avian herpesvirus microRNAs in infection, latency, and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Robin W; Burnside, Joan

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been reported for the avian herpesviruses Marek's disease virus 1 (MDV1; oncogenic), Marek's disease virus 2 (MDV2; non-oncogenic), herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT), and infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). No obvious phylogenetic relationships exist among the avian herpesvirus microRNAs, but the general genomic locations of microRNA clusters are conserved, with microRNAs being located in the repeat regions of the genomes. In some cases, microRNAs are antisense to open reading frames. Among MDV1 field isolates with different virulence properties, microRNAs are highly conserved, and variations that have been observed lie in putative promoter regions. One cluster of MDV1 microRNAs lies upstream of the meq gene, and this cluster is more highly expressed in tumors caused by an extremely virulent MDV1 isolate compared to tumors caused by a less virulent isolate. Several of the avian herpesvirus microRNAs are orthologs of microRNAs in other species. For example, mdv1-miR-M4 shares a seed sequence with gga-miR-155 (also shared with Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) kshv-miR-K12), mdv2-miR-M21 shares a seed with miR-29b, and hvt-miR-H14 shares a seed sequence with miR-221. Functional analyses of avian herpesvirus microRNAs include a variety of in vitro assays to demonstrate potential function as well as the use of mutants that can exploit the ability to assess phenotypes experimentally in the natural host. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled:MicroRNA's in viral gene regulation. PMID:21683170

  4. Identification of androgenic gland microRNA and their target genes to discover sex-related microRNA in the oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense.

    PubMed

    Jin, S B; Fu, H T; Jiang, S F; Xiong, Y W; Qiao, H; Zhang, W Y; Gong, Y S; Wu, Y

    2015-01-01

    The oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, is an important aquaculture species in China. The androgenic gland produces hormones that play crucial roles in the differentiation of crustaceans to the male sex. MicroRNA (miRNA) post-transcriptionally regulates many protein-coding genes, influencing important biological and metabolic processes. However, currently, there is no published data identifying miRNA in M. nipponense. In this study, we identified novel miRNA in the androgenic gland of M. nipponense. Using the high-throughput Illumina Solexa system, 1077 miRNA were identified from small RNA libraries by aligning with the de novo androgenic gland transcriptome of M. nipponense (obtained from RNA-Seq) and the sequences in the miRBase21 database. A total of 8,248, 76,011, and 78,307 target genes were predicted in the EST and SRA sequences provided in the NCBI database, and the androgenic gland transcriptome of M. nipponense, respectively. Some potential sex-related miRNA were identified based on the function of the predicted target genes. The results of our study provide new information regarding the miRNA expression in M. nipponense, which could be the basis for further genetic studies on decapod crustaceans. PMID:26782487

  5. The impact of microRNA gene regulation on the survival and function of mature cell types in the eye.

    PubMed

    Sundermeier, Thomas R; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate multiple genes, often within the same pathway, fine-tuning expression of key factors and stabilizing gene networks against aberrant fluctuations. The demanding physiologic functions of photoreceptor cells and the retinal pigmented epithelium necessitate precise gene regulation to maintain their homeostasis and function, thus rendering these postmitotic cells vulnerable to premature death in retinal degenerative disorders. Recent studies of the physiologic impact of miRNAs in these cells clearly demonstrate that miRNAs are an essential component of that gene regulation. These important advances provide the foundation for future exploration of miRNA-regulated gene networks in the eye to facilitate the development of miRNA-targeted therapeutics to combat blinding diseases. PMID:26399786

  6. Tiny giants of gene regulation: experimental strategies for microRNA functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Steinkraus, Bruno R.; Toegel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The discovery over two decades ago of short regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) has led to the inception of a vast biomedical research field dedicated to understanding these powerful orchestrators of gene expression. Here we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the methods and techniques underpinning the experimental pipeline employed for exploratory miRNA studies in animals. Some of the greatest challenges in this field have been uncovering the identity of miRNA–target interactions and deciphering their significance with regard to particular physiological or pathological processes. These endeavors relied almost exclusively on the development of powerful research tools encompassing novel bioinformatics pipelines, high‐throughput target identification platforms, and functional target validation methodologies. Thus, in an unparalleled manner, the biomedical technology revolution unceasingly enhanced and refined our ability to dissect miRNA regulatory networks and understand their roles in vivo in the context of cells and organisms. Recurring motifs of target recognition have led to the creation of a large number of multifactorial bioinformatics analysis platforms, which have proved instrumental in guiding experimental miRNA studies. Subsequently, the need for discovery of miRNA–target binding events in vivo drove the emergence of a slew of high‐throughput multiplex strategies, which now provide a viable prospect for elucidating genome‐wide miRNA–target binding maps in a variety of cell types and tissues. Finally, deciphering the functional relevance of miRNA post‐transcriptional gene silencing under physiological conditions, prompted the evolution of a host of technologies enabling systemic manipulation of miRNA homeostasis as well as high‐precision interference with their direct, endogenous targets. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:311–362. doi: 10.1002/wdev.223 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26950183

  7. Candidate Gene and MicroRNA Expression in Fetal Membranes and Preterm Delivery Risk.

    PubMed

    Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Hensley, Mark; Qiu, Chunfang; Abetew, Dejene F; Hevner, Karin; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-06-01

    We investigated candidate gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in amnion and chorion in relation to risk of preterm delivery (PTD). Amnion and chorion were separated from placenta and collected at delivery from participants who delivered at term (N = 10) and from participants who delivered preterm following spontaneous labor (sPTL-PTD; N = 10), premature rupture of membranes (PPROM-PTD; N = 10), and preeclampsia (PE-PTD; N = 10). Expression of genes (metalloproteinase [MMP] 2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of MMP-1) and miRNAs (miR-199a*, -202*, -210, -214, -223, and -338) was profiled using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Adjusted multinomial logistic regression models were used to calculate relative risk ratios (RRR), 95% confidence intervals, and P values. Among controls, the expression of miR-199a*, -202*, and -214 was lower in the amnion compared with their expression in the chorion, whereas the expression of miR-210 was higher in the amnion compared with its expression in the chorion (all P values < .05). In the amnion, MMP-9 expression was associated with PTD risk (overall P value = .0092), and MMP-9 expression was positively associated with the risk of PPROM-PTD (RRR: 31.10) and inversely associated with the risk of PE-PTD (RRR:6.55e-6), although individual associations were not statistically significant. In addition, in the amnion, the expression of miR-210 (RRR: 0.45; overall P value = .0039) was inversely associated with the risk of PE-PTD, and miR-223 was inversely associated with all subtypes of PTD (overall P value = .0400). The amnion and chorion differ in their miRNA expression. The expression of MMP-9, miR-210, and -223 in the amnion is associated with PTD risk. PMID:26507872

  8. Variants of MicroRNA Genes: Gender-Specific Associations with Multiple Sclerosis Risk and Severity

    PubMed Central

    Kiselev, Ivan; Bashinskaya, Vitalina; Kulakova, Olga; Baulina, Natalia; Popova, Ekaterina; Boyko, Alexey; Favorova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neuro-inflammatory disease arising from complex interactions of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Variations in genes of some microRNAs—key post-transcriptional regulators of many genes—can influence microRNAs expression/function and contribute to MS via expression changes of protein-coding target mRNA genes. We performed an association study of polymorphous variants of MIR146A rs2910164, MIR196A2 rs11614913, MIR499A rs3746444 MIR223 rs1044165 and their combinations with MS risk and severity. 561 unrelated patients with bout-onset MS and 441 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. We observed associations of MS risk with allele MIR223*T and combination (MIR223*T + MIR146A*G/G) carriage in the entire groups and in women at Bonferroni-corrected significance level (pcorr < 0.05). Besides, MIR146A*G/G association with MS was observed in women with nominal significance (pf = 0.025). No MS associations were found in men. A more severe MS course (MSSS value > 3.5) was associated with the carriage of MIR499A*C/T and, less reliably, of MIR499A*C (pcorr = 0.006 and pcorr = 0.024, respectively) and with the carriage of combinations (MIR499A*C/T + MIR196A2*C) and (MIR499A*C + MIR196A2*C) (pcorr = 0.00078 and pcorr = 0.0059, respectively). These associations also showed gender specificity, as they were not significant in men and substantially reinforced in women. The strongest association with MS severity was observed in women for combination (MIR499A*C/T + MIR196A2*C): pcorr = 4.43 × 10−6 and OR = 3.23 (CI: 1.99–5.26). PMID:26305248

  9. Tiny giants of gene regulation: experimental strategies for microRNA functional studies.

    PubMed

    Steinkraus, Bruno R; Toegel, Markus; Fulga, Tudor A

    2016-01-01

    The discovery over two decades ago of short regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) has led to the inception of a vast biomedical research field dedicated to understanding these powerful orchestrators of gene expression. Here we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the methods and techniques underpinning the experimental pipeline employed for exploratory miRNA studies in animals. Some of the greatest challenges in this field have been uncovering the identity of miRNA-target interactions and deciphering their significance with regard to particular physiological or pathological processes. These endeavors relied almost exclusively on the development of powerful research tools encompassing novel bioinformatics pipelines, high-throughput target identification platforms, and functional target validation methodologies. Thus, in an unparalleled manner, the biomedical technology revolution unceasingly enhanced and refined our ability to dissect miRNA regulatory networks and understand their roles in vivo in the context of cells and organisms. Recurring motifs of target recognition have led to the creation of a large number of multifactorial bioinformatics analysis platforms, which have proved instrumental in guiding experimental miRNA studies. Subsequently, the need for discovery of miRNA-target binding events in vivo drove the emergence of a slew of high-throughput multiplex strategies, which now provide a viable prospect for elucidating genome-wide miRNA-target binding maps in a variety of cell types and tissues. Finally, deciphering the functional relevance of miRNA post-transcriptional gene silencing under physiological conditions, prompted the evolution of a host of technologies enabling systemic manipulation of miRNA homeostasis as well as high-precision interference with their direct, endogenous targets. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26950183

  10. microRNA-17 Is the Most Up-Regulated Member of the miR-17-92 Cluster during Early Colon Cancer Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Kirsten Nguyen; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Lindebjerg, Jan; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Holst, René; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated microRNAs play a role in the development and progression of colon cancer, but little is known about their tissue and cell distribution in the continuum of normal mucosa through the premalignant adenoma to invasive adenocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to examine the expression pattern of the miR-17-92 cluster (miR-17, miR-18, miR-19, miR-20 and miR-92) as well as miR-21, miR-31, miR-135b, and miR-145 in early clinically diagnosed colon cancer. MicroRNAs were analysed by chromogenic in situ hybridisation in the normal-adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence of nine adenocarcinomas developed in mucosal colon polyps. Subsequently, the expression of selected microRNAs was validated in 24 mucosal colon cancer polyps. Expression of miR-17 was confined to the epithelial cells, and the expression levels increased in the transitional zone from normal to adenomatous tissue. The miR-17-92 cluster members, miR-19b, miR-20a, and miR-92a, followed the same expression pattern, but miR-17 was the most predominant. An increased expression of miR-21 was found in the tumour-associated stroma with the most dramatic increase from adenoma to adenocarcinoma, while the number of positive miR-145 fibroblast-like cells in the normal lamina propria (stroma) decreased in a stepwise manner throughout the normal-adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence. It is concluded that the expression of miR-17, miR-21, and miR-145 changes at early stages of the normal-adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence. Thus, these microRNAs may play a role in the development of colon cancer. PMID:26465597

  11. Gene Expression Changes in the Septum: Possible Implications for MicroRNAs in Sculpting the Maternal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changjiu; Saul, Michael C.; Driessen, Terri; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    The transition from the non-maternal to the maternal state is characterized by a variety of CNS alterations that support the care of offspring. The septum (including lateral and medial portions) is a brain region previously linked to various emotional and motivational processes, including maternal care. In this study, we used microarrays (PLIER algorithm) to examine gene expression changes in the septum of postpartum mice and employed gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to identify possible regulators of altered gene expression. Genes of interest identified as differentially regulated with microarray analysis were validated with quantitative real-time PCR. We found that fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7) and galanin (Gal) were downregulated, whereas insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (Igfbp3) was upregulated in postpartum mice compared to virgin females. These genes were previously found to be differentially regulated in other brain regions during lactation. We also identified altered expression of novel genes not previously linked to maternal behavior, but that could play a role in postpartum processes, including glutamate-ammonia ligase (Glul) and somatostatin receptor 1 (Sstr1) (both upregulated in postpartum). Genes implicated in metabolism, cell differentiation, or proliferation also exhibited altered expression. Unexpectedly, enrichment analysis revealed a high number of microRNAs, transcription factors, or conserved binding sites (177 with corrected P-value <0.05) that were significantly linked to maternal upregulated genes, while none were linked to downregulated genes. MicroRNAs have been linked to placenta and mammary gland development, but this is the first indication they may also play a key role in sculpting the maternal brain. Together, this study provides new insights into genes (along with possible mechanisms for their regulation) that are involved in septum-mediated adaptations during the postpartum period. PMID:22701680

  12. The Fusarium graminearum Genome Reveals More Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters and Hints of Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Philip; Münsterkötter, Martin; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Schmeitzl, Clemens; Varga, Elisabeth; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard; Güldener, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolite biosynthesis genes are of major interest due to the pharmacological properties of their products (like mycotoxins and antibiotics). The genome of the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum codes for a large number of candidate enzymes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. However, the chemical nature of most enzymatic products of proteins encoded by putative secondary metabolism biosynthetic genes is largely unknown. Based on our analysis we present 67 gene clusters with significant enrichment of predicted secondary metabolism related enzymatic functions. 20 gene clusters with unknown metabolites exhibit strong gene expression correlation in planta and presumably play a role in virulence. Furthermore, the identification of conserved and over-represented putative transcription factor binding sites serves as additional evidence for cluster co-regulation. Orthologous cluster search provided insight into the evolution of secondary metabolism clusters. Some clusters are characteristic for the Fusarium phylum while others show evidence of horizontal gene transfer as orthologs can be found in representatives of the Botrytis or Cochliobolus lineage. The presented candidate clusters provide valuable targets for experimental examination. PMID:25333987

  13. Epigenetic silencing of genes and microRNAs within the imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 region at human chromosome 14.32 in giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Growing evidence exists that the neoplastic stromal cell population (GCTSC) within giant cell tumors (GCT) originates from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). In a previous study we identified a microRNA signature that differentiates between these cell types. Five differentially expressed microRNAs are located within the Dlk1-Dio3 region on chromosome 14. Aberrant regulation within this region is known to influence cell growth, differentiation and the development of cancer. The aim of this study was to elucidate the involvement of deregulations within the Dlk1-Dio3 region in GCT pathogenesis. Methods Quantitative gene and microRNA expression analyses were performed on GCTSCs and MSCs with or without treatment with epigenetic modifiers. Methylation analysis of differentially methylated regions was performed by bisulfite sequencing. Results In addition to microRNA silencing we detected a significant downregulation of Dlk1, Meg3 and Meg8 in GCTSCs compared to MSCs. DNA methylation analyses of the Meg3-DMR and IG-DMR revealed a frequent hypermethylation within the IG-DMR in GCTs. Epigenetic modification could restore expression of some but not all analyzed genes and microRNAs suggesting further regulatory mechanisms. Conclusion Epigenetic silencing of genes and microRNAs within the Dlk1-Dio3 region is a common event in GCTSCs, in part mediated by hypermethylation within the IG-DMR. The identified genes, micro RNAs and microRNA target genes might be valuable targets for the development of improved strategies for GCT diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25005035

  14. A Resampling Based Clustering Algorithm for Replicated Gene Expression Data.

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Li, Chun; Hu, Jie; Fan, Xiaodan

    2015-01-01

    In gene expression data analysis, clustering is a fruitful exploratory technique to reveal the underlying molecular mechanism by identifying groups of co-expressed genes. To reduce the noise, usually multiple experimental replicates are performed. An integrative analysis of the full replicate data, instead of reducing the data to the mean profile, carries the promise of yielding more precise and robust clusters. In this paper, we propose a novel resampling based clustering algorithm for genes with replicated expression measurements. Assuming those replicates are exchangeable, we formulate the problem in the bootstrap framework, and aim to infer the consensus clustering based on the bootstrap samples of replicates. In our approach, we adopt the mixed effect model to accommodate the heterogeneous variances and implement a quasi-MCMC algorithm to conduct statistical inference. Experiments demonstrate that by taking advantage of the full replicate data, our algorithm produces more reliable clusters and has robust performance in diverse scenarios, especially when the data is subject to multiple sources of variance. PMID:26671802

  15. Quantitative Methylation Analysis of the PCDHB Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Banelli, Barbara; Romani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Long Range Epigenetic Silencing (LRES) is a repressed chromatin state of large chromosomal regions caused by DNA hypermethylation and histone modifications and is commonly observed in cancer. At 5q31 a LRES region of 800 kb includes three multi-gene clusters (PCDHA@, PCDHB@, and PCDHG@, respectively). Multiple experimental evidences have led to consider the PCDHB cluster as a DNA methylation marker of aggressiveness in neuroblastoma, second most common solid tumor in childhood. Because of its potential involvement not only in neuroblastoma but also in other malignancies, an easy and fast assay to screen the DNA methylation content of the PCDHB cluster might be useful for the precise stratification of the patients into risk groups and hence for choosing the most appropriate therapeutic protocol. Accordingly, we have developed a simple and cost-effective Pyrosequencing(®) assay to evaluate the methylation level of 17 genes in the protocadherin B cluster (PCDHB@). The rationale behind this Pyrosequencing assay can in principle be applied to analyze the DNA methylation level of any gene cluster with high homologies for screening purposes. PMID:26103900

  16. Cloning and Heterologous Expression of the Grecocycline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bilyk, Oksana; Sekurova, Olga N.; Zotchev, Sergey B.; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast is a rapid and inexpensive method for cloning and assembly of large DNA fragments, which relies on natural homologous recombination. Two vectors, based on p15a and F-factor replicons that can be maintained in yeast, E. coli and streptomycetes have been constructed. These vectors have been successfully employed for assembly of the grecocycline biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. Acta 1362. Fragments of the cluster were obtained by PCR and transformed together with the “capture” vector into the yeast cells, yielding a construct carrying the entire gene cluster. The obtained construct was heterologously expressed in S. albus J1074, yielding several grecocycline congeners. Grecocyclines have unique structural moieties such as a dissacharide side chain, an additional amino sugar at the C-5 position and a thiol group. Enzymes from this pathway may be used for the derivatization of known active angucyclines in order to improve their desired biological properties. PMID:27410036

  17. Discovery of the lomaiviticin biosynthetic gene cluster in Salinispora pacifica

    PubMed Central

    Janso, Jeffrey E.; Haltli, Brad A.; Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Kulowski, Kerry; Waldman, Abraham J.; Zha, Li; Nakamura, Hitomi; Bernan, Valerie S.; He, Haiyin; Carter, Guy T.; Koehn, Frank E.; Balskus, Emily P.

    2014-01-01

    The lomaiviticins are a family of cytotoxic marine natural products that have captured the attention of both synthetic and biological chemists due to their intricate molecular scaffolds and potent biological activities. Here we describe the identification of the gene cluster responsible for lomaiviticin biosynthesis in Salinispora pacifica strains DPJ-0016 and DPJ-0019 using a combination of molecular approaches and genome sequencing. The link between the lom gene cluster and lomaiviticin production was confirmed using bacterial genetics, and subsequent analysis and annotation of this cluster revealed the biosynthetic basis for the core polyketide scaffold. Additionally, we have used comparative genomics to identify candidate enzymes for several unusual tailoring events, including diazo formation and oxidative dimerization. These findings will allow further elucidation of the biosynthetic logic of lomaiviticin assembly and provide useful molecular tools for application in biocatalysis and synthetic biology. PMID:25045187

  18. Duplications of hox gene clusters and the emergence of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Soshnikova, Natalia; Dewaele, Romain; Janvier, Philippe; Krumlauf, Robb; Duboule, Denis

    2013-06-15

    The vertebrate body plan is characterized by an increased complexity relative to that of all other chordates and large-scale gene amplifications have been associated with key morphological innovations leading to their remarkable evolutionary success. Here, we use compound full Hox clusters deletions to investigate how Hox genes duplications may have contributed to the emergence of vertebrate-specific innovations. We show that the combined deletion of HoxA and HoxB leads to an atavistic heart phenotype, suggesting that the ancestral HoxA/B cluster was co-opted to help in diversifying the complex organ in vertebrates. Other phenotypic effects observed seem to illustrate the resurgence of ancestral (plesiomorphic) features. This indicates that the duplications of Hox clusters were associated with the recruitment or formation of novel cis-regulatory controls, which were key to the evolution of many vertebrate features and hence to the evolutionary radiation of this group. PMID:23501471

  19. Cloning and Heterologous Expression of the Grecocycline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Bilyk, Oksana; Sekurova, Olga N; Zotchev, Sergey B; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast is a rapid and inexpensive method for cloning and assembly of large DNA fragments, which relies on natural homologous recombination. Two vectors, based on p15a and F-factor replicons that can be maintained in yeast, E. coli and streptomycetes have been constructed. These vectors have been successfully employed for assembly of the grecocycline biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. Acta 1362. Fragments of the cluster were obtained by PCR and transformed together with the "capture" vector into the yeast cells, yielding a construct carrying the entire gene cluster. The obtained construct was heterologously expressed in S. albus J1074, yielding several grecocycline congeners. Grecocyclines have unique structural moieties such as a dissacharide side chain, an additional amino sugar at the C-5 position and a thiol group. Enzymes from this pathway may be used for the derivatization of known active angucyclines in order to improve their desired biological properties. PMID:27410036

  20. Identification and analysis of the resorcinomycin biosynthetic gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Ooya, Koichi; Ogasawara, Yasushi; Noike, Motoyoshi; Dairi, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Resorcinomycin (1) is composed of a nonproteinogenic amino acid, (S)-2-(3,5-dihydroxy-4-isopropylphenyl)-2-guanidinoacetic acid (2), and glycine. A biosynthetic gene cluster was identified in a genome database of Streptoverticillium roseoverticillatum by searching for orthologs of the genes responsible for biosynthesis of pheganomycin (3), which possesses a (2)-derivative at its N-terminus. The cluster contained a gene encoding an ATP-grasp-ligase (res5), which was suggested to catalyze the peptide bond formation between 2 and glycine. A res5-deletion mutant lost 1 productivity but accumulated 2 in the culture broth. However, recombinant RES5 did not show catalytic activity to form 1 with 2 and glycine as substrates. Moreover, heterologous expression of the cluster resulted in accumulation of only 2 and no production of 1 was observed. These results suggested that a peptide with glycine at its N-terminus may be used as a nucleophile and then maturated by a peptidase encoded by a gene outside of the cluster. PMID:26034896

  1. Deregulated KLF4 Expression in Myeloid Leukemias Alters Cell Proliferation and Differentiation through MicroRNA and Gene Targets

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valerie A.; Cummings, Carrie L.; Korb, Brendan; Boaglio, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by increased proliferation and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors mediated, in part, by altered myeloid transcription factor expression. Decreased Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) expression has been observed in AML, but how decreased KLF4 contributes to AML pathogenesis is largely unknown. We demonstrate decreased KLF4 expression in AML patient samples with various cytogenetic aberrations, confirm that KLF4 overexpression promotes myeloid differentiation and inhibits cell proliferation in AML cell lines, and identify new targets of KLF4. We have demonstrated that microRNA 150 (miR-150) expression is decreased in AML and that reintroducing miR-150 expression induces myeloid differentiation and inhibits proliferation of AML cells. We show that KLF family DNA binding sites are necessary for miR-150 promoter activity and that KLF2 or KLF4 overexpression induces miR-150 expression. miR-150 silencing, alone or in combination with silencing of CDKN1A, a well-described KLF4 target, did not fully reverse KLF4-mediated effects. Gene expression profiling and validation identified putative KLF4-regulated genes, including decreased MYC and downstream MYC-regulated gene expression in KLF4-overexpressing cells. Our findings indicate that decreased KLF4 expression mediates antileukemic effects through regulation of gene and microRNA networks, containing miR-150, CDKN1A, and MYC, and provide mechanistic support for therapeutic strategies increasing KLF4 expression. PMID:26644403

  2. Cell-specific expression of artificial microRNAs targeting essential genes exhibit potent antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chenyu; Liu, Hao; Chen, Ping; Ye, Jingjia; Teng, Lisong; Jia, Zhenyu; Cao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    To achieve specific and potent antitumor effect of hepatocyte carcinoma cells, replication defective adenoviral vectors, namely rAd/AFP-amiRG, rAd/AFP-amiRE and rAd/AFP-amiRP, were constructed which were armed with artificial microRNAs (amiRs) targeting essential functional genes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E and DNA polymerase α respectively under the control of a recombinant promoter comprised of human α-fetoprotein enhancer and basal promoter. The AFP enhancer/promoter showed specific high transcription activity in AFP-positive HCC cells Hep3B, HepG2 and SMMC7721, while low in AFP-negative cell Bcap37. All artificial microRNAs exhibited efficient knockdown of target genes. Decreased ATP production and protein synthesis was observed in rAd/AFP-amiRG and rAd/AFP-amiRE treated HCC cells. All three recombinant adenoviruses showed efficient blockage of cell cycle progression and significant suppression of HCC cells in vitro. In nude mice model bearing Hep3B xenograft, administration of rAd/AFP-amiRG showed potent antitumor effect. The strategy of tumor-specific knockdown of genes essential for cell survival and proliferation may suggest a novel promising approach for HCC gene therapy. PMID:25691059

  3. MicroRNA Maturation and MicroRNA Target Gene Expression Regulation Are Severely Disrupted in Soybean dicer-like1 Double Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, Shaun J.; Michno, Jean-Michel; Campbell, Benjamin W.; Gil-Humanes, Javier; Mathioni, Sandra M.; Hammond, Reza; Gutierrez-Gonzalez, Juan J.; Donohue, Ryan C.; Kantar, Michael B.; Eamens, Andrew L.; Meyers, Blake C.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Stupar, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Small nonprotein-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) are present in most eukaryotes and are central effectors of RNA silencing-mediated mechanisms for gene expression regulation. In plants, DICER-LIKE1 (DCL1) is the founding member of a highly conserved family of RNase III-like endonucleases that function as core machinery proteins to process hairpin-like precursor transcripts into mature miRNAs, small regulatory RNAs, 21–22 nucleotides in length. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were used to generate single and double-mutants of putative soybean DCL1 homologs, DCL1a and DCL1b, to confirm their functional role(s) in the soybean miRNA pathway. Neither DCL1 single mutant, dcl1a or dcl1b plants, exhibited a pronounced morphological or molecular phenotype. However, the dcl1a/dcl1b double mutant expressed a strong morphological phenotype, characterized by reduced seed size and aborted seedling development, in addition to defective miRNA precursor transcript processing efficiency and deregulated miRNA target gene expression. Together, these findings indicate that the two soybean DCL1 paralogs, DCL1a and DCL1b, largely play functionally redundant roles in the miRNA pathway and are essential for normal plant development. PMID:26681515

  4. MicroRNA degeneracy and pluripotentiality within a Lavallière-tie architecture confers robustness to gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Bhajun, Ricky; Guyon, Laurent; Gidrol, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Modularity, feedback control, functional redundancy and bowtie architecture have been proposed as key factors that confer robustness to complex biological systems. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are highly conserved but functionally dispensable. These antinomic properties suggest that miRNAs fine-tune gene expression rather than act as genetic switches. We synthesize published and unpublished data and hypothesize that miRNA pluripotentiality acts to buffer gene expression, while miRNA degeneracy tunes the expression of targets, thus providing robustness to gene expression networks. Furthermore, we propose a Lavallière-tie architecture by integrating signal transduction, miRNAs and protein expression data to model complex gene expression networks. PMID:27038488

  5. Retention of genes in a secondary metabolite gene cluster that has degenerated in multiple lineages of the Ascomycota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal secondary metabolite (SM) gene clusters encode proteins involved in SM biosynthesis, protection against SMs, and regulation of cluster gene transcription. RNA-Seq analysis of Fusarium langsethiae (class Sordariomycetes) revealed a cluster of six genes that were highly expressed during growth...

  6. The Minor MHC Class I Gene UDA of Ducks Is Regulated by Let-7 MicroRNA.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing Fuk; Parks-Dely, Julie A; Magor, Brad G; Magor, Katharine E

    2016-08-15

    In many nonmammalian vertebrates, the genomic organization of the MHC class I region leads to biased expression of a single classical MHC class I gene coevolving with TAP transporters, whereas class I genes are poorly expressed. This contrasts to the three codominantly expressed classical MHC class I genes in humans and mice. In a sequenced haplotype from White Pekin duck, Anas platyrhynchos, there is one predominantly expressed MHC class I, UAA, although they have five MHC class I genes in the complex, arranged TAP1-TAP2-UAA-UBA-UCA-UDA-UEA The UAA gene, situated proximal to the TAP2 gene, is expressed at levels 10-fold greater than that of another expressed gene, UDA. Three duck MHC class I genes (UBA, UCA, and UEA) are predicted to be partially or completely inactivated by promoter defects, introduction of in-frame stop codon, or the lack of a polyadenylation signal. In this study, we confirm that UBA, UCA, and UEA are indeed inactivated through genetic defects at the promoter, whereas UAA and UDA have functionally equivalent promoters. To examine promoter accessibility, we performed bisulfite sequencing and show that none of the MHC class I promoters are inactivated by methylation. We determine that UDA is differentially regulated through its 3' untranslated region. Namely, expression of UDA is downregulated by let-7 microRNA, whereas the predominantly expressed MHC class I UAA is not. Regulation of UDA by let-7 microRNA suggests that the lower expression level is maintained for its function in immunity. PMID:27430716

  7. Hedgehog Signaling Strength Is Orchestrated by the mir-310 Cluster of MicroRNAs in Response to Diet

    PubMed Central

    Çiçek, Ibrahim Ömer; Karaca, Samir; Brankatschk, Marko; Eaton, Suzanne; Urlaub, Henning; Shcherbata, Halyna R.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) only two decades ago, they have emerged as an essential component of the gene regulatory machinery. miRNAs have seemingly paradoxical features: a single miRNA is able to simultaneously target hundreds of genes, while its presence is mostly dispensable for animal viability under normal conditions. It is known that miRNAs act as stress response factors; however, it remains challenging to determine their relevant targets and the conditions under which they function. To address this challenge, we propose a new workflow for miRNA function analysis, by which we found that the evolutionarily young miRNA family, the mir-310s (mir-310/mir-311/mir-312/mir-313), are important regulators of Drosophila metabolic status. mir-310s-deficient animals have an abnormal diet-dependent expression profile for numerous diet-sensitive components, accumulate fats, and show various physiological defects. We found that the mir-310s simultaneously repress the production of several regulatory factors (Rab23, DHR96, and Ttk) of the evolutionarily conserved Hedgehog (Hh) pathway to sharpen dietary response. As the mir-310s expression is highly dynamic and nutrition sensitive, this signal relay model helps to explain the molecular mechanism governing quick and robust Hh signaling responses to nutritional changes. Additionally, we discovered a new component of the Hh signaling pathway in Drosophila, Rab23, which cell autonomously regulates Hh ligand trafficking in the germline stem cell niche. How organisms adjust to dietary fluctuations to sustain healthy homeostasis is an intriguing research topic. These data are the first to report that miRNAs can act as executives that transduce nutritional signals to an essential signaling pathway. This suggests miRNAs as plausible therapeutic agents that can be used in combination with low calorie and cholesterol diets to manage quick and precise tissue-specific responses to nutritional changes. PMID:26801178

  8. MicroRNA-190 regulates FOXP2 genes in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wen-Zhuo; Yu, Tao; An, Qi; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Zhu; Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate how microRNA-190 (miR-190) regulates FOXP2 genes in gastric cancer (GC) cell line SGC7901. Methods We identified that miR-190 could target FOXP2 genes by using dual luciferase enzyme assay. Precursor fragment transfection of miR-190 was performed with GC cell line SGC7901 and human gastric mucosal cell line GES-1. miR-190 expression was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and FOXP2 protein expression was measured by Western blotting. Results FOXP2-3′-untranslated region (UTR) in miR-190 transfection group was significantly decreased as compared with other groups. There were no significant differences in fluorescence signals of FOXP2mut-3′-UTR in each group. Therefore, it was assumed that miR-190 can target FOXP2 genes. Through RT-PCR verification, it was observed that the expression level of miR-190 was significantly higher in GC cell line SGC7901 than in human gastric mucosa cell line GES-1 after transfection with miR-190 mimics. The expression level of miR-190 was significantly higher in GES-1 cells than in SGC7901 cells after transfection with miR-190 inhibitors. Western blotting results showed the expression level of FOXP2 was significantly lower in GC cell line SGC7901 than in GES-1 cells. Compared with blank, mimics control, and inhibitors control groups, the miR-190 mimics group showed significantly enhanced proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities, while miR-190 inhibitors group showed decreased abilities toward proliferation, migration, and invasion (P<0.05). The transcription level of miR-190 and the expression level of FOXP2 in tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues in GC patients were verified to be consistent with those of cell line experiments. Conclusion Upregulation of miR-190 can lead to downregulation of FOXP2 protein expression. miR-190 may serve as a potential target for GC diagnosis. PMID:27382302

  9. Identification and Profiling of microRNAs and Their Target Genes from Developing Caprine Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xingtang; Zhao, Yulong; Chen, Xiaohui; Sun, Jiajie; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jianjin; Wang, Yongan; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Goat is an important agricultural animal for meat production. Functional studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play an important role in various biological processes. Although studies on miRNAs expression profiles have been performed in various animals, relatively limited information about goat muscle miRNAs has been reported. To investigate the miRNAs involved in regulating different periods of skeletal muscle development, we herein performed a comprehensive research for expression profiles of caprine miRNAs during two developmental stages of skeletal muscles: fetal stage and six month-old stage. As a result, 15,627,457 and 15,593,721 clean reads were obtained from the fetal goat library (FC) and the six month old goat library (SMC), respectively. 464 known miRNAs and 83 novel miRNA candidates were identified. Furthermore, by comparing the miRNA profile, 336 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified and then the potential targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted. To understand the regulatory network of miRNAs during muscle development, the mRNA expression profiles for the two development stages were characterized and 7322 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Then the potential targets of miRNAs were compared to the DEGs, the intersection of the two gene sets were screened out and called differentially expressed targets (DE-targets), which were involved in 231 pathways. Ten of the 231 pathways that have smallest P-value were shown as network figures. Based on the analysis of pathways and networks, we found that miR-424-5p and miR-29a might have important regulatory effect on muscle development, which needed to be further studied. This study provided the first global view of the miRNAs in caprine muscle tissues. Our results help elucidation of complex regulatory networks between miRNAs and mRNAs and for the study of muscle development. PMID

  10. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  11. Evolution of chemical diversity by coordinated gene swaps in type II polyketide gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Hillenmeyer, Maureen E.; Vandova, Gergana A.; Berlew, Erin E.; Charkoudian, Louise K.

    2015-01-01

    Natural product biosynthetic pathways generate molecules of enormous structural complexity and exquisitely tuned biological activities. Studies of natural products have led to the discovery of many pharmaceutical agents, particularly antibiotics. Attempts to harness the catalytic prowess of biosynthetic enzyme systems, for both compound discovery and engineering, have been limited by a poor understanding of the evolution of the underlying gene clusters. We developed an approach to study the evolution of biosynthetic genes on a cluster-wide scale, integrating pairwise gene coevolution information with large-scale phylogenetic analysis. We used this method to infer the evolution of type II polyketide gene clusters, tracing the path of evolution from the single ancestor to those gene clusters surviving today. We identified 10 key gene types in these clusters, most of which were swapped in from existing cellular processes and subsequently specialized. The ancestral type II polyketide gene cluster likely comprised a core set of five genes, a roster that expanded and contracted throughout evolution. A key C24 ancestor diversified into major classes of longer and shorter chain length systems, from which a C20 ancestor gave rise to the majority of characterized type II polyketide antibiotics. Our findings reveal that (i) type II polyketide structure is predictable from its gene roster, (ii) only certain gene combinations are compatible, and (iii) gene swaps were likely a key to evolution of chemical diversity. The lessons learned about how natural selection drives polyketide chemical innovation can be applied to the rational design and guided discovery of chemicals with desired structures and properties. PMID:26499248

  12. Functional polymorphisms in microRNA gene and hepatitis B risk among Asian population: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G Q; Meng, H; Wang, J R; Sun, F X; Wang, X J; Wang, R B; Wang, X B

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mutations in microRNA gene can alter expression, which may interact to increase the risk of developing various diseases, including hepatitis B. However, published results are inconclusive or ambiguous. The aim of this review and meta-analysis is to more precisely estimate the association between polymorphisms in microRNA genes and hepatitis B risk. A digital search was performed of the MEDLINE EMBASE, CNKI, and CBM databases to identify relevant articles published up to February 18, 2014. Ten case-control studies were included, with a total of 6042 patients with hepatitis B and 6834 healthy controls. Nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the miRNA gene were examined, including miR-34b/c [rs4938723 (T>C)], miR-196a-2 [rs11614913 (C>T)], miR-146a [rs2910164 (G>C)], miR-499 [rs3746444 (T>C)], miR-122 [rs3783553 (ins/del)], miR-149 [rs2292832 (C>T)], miR-106b-25 [rs999885 (A>G)], miR-let-7c [rs6147150 (ins/del)], and miR-218 [rs11134527 (A>G)]. The meta-analysis results indicated that the miR-196a-2*T, miR-122*del, miR-106b-25*A, and miR-let-7c*del alleles/carriers increase the risk of hepatitis B among the Asian population. However, the miR-146a, miR- 499, miR-149, miR-218, and miR-34b/c polymorphisms may not be linked with the risk of hepatitis B. Further investigations are warranted to determine the exact associations between microRNA mutations and hepatitis B susceptibility. PMID:25966251

  13. Characteristics of microRNA co-target networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Yong

    2011-07-01

    The database of microRNAs and their predicted target genes in humans were used to extract a microRNA co-target network. Based on the finding that more than two miRNAs can target the same gene, we constructed a microRNA co-target network and analyzed it from the perspective of the complex network. We found that a network having a positive assortative mixing can be characterized by small-world and scale-free characteristics which are found in most complex networks. The network was further analyzed by the nearest-neighbor average connectivity, and it was shown that the more assortative a microRNA network is, the wider the range of increasing average connectivity. In particular, an assortative network has a power-law relationship of the average connectivity with a positive exponent. A percolation analysis of the network showed that, although the network is diluted, there is no percolation transition in the network. From these findings, we infer that the microRNAs in the network are clustered together, forming a core group. The same analyses carried out on different species confirmed the robustness of the main results found in the microRNA networks of humans.

  14. MicroRNAs in cancer: from developmental genes in worms to their clinical application in patients

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, M; Calin, G A

    2015-01-01

    Several discoveries have paved the way to personalise cancer medicine and a tremendous gain of knowledge in genomics and molecular mechanisms of cancer progression cumulated over the last years. Big stories in biology commonly start in a simple model system. No wonder microRNAs have been identified as regulators of embryonic development in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. From the first identification in worms to the first-in-man microRNA-based clinical trial in humans, almost 20 years passed. In this review we follow the story of understanding microRNA alterations in cancer, describe recent developments in the microRNA field and critically discuss their potential as diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutics factors in cancer medicine. We will explain the rationale behind the use of microRNAs in cancer diagnosis and prognosis prediction, but also discuss the limitations and pitfalls associated with this. Novel developments of combined microRNA/siRNA pharmacological approaches will be discussed and most recently data about MXR34, the first-tested microRNA drug will be described. PMID:26158421

  15. Identification of Reliable Reference Genes for Quantification of MicroRNAs in Serum Samples of Sulfur Mustard-Exposed Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Gharbi, Sedigheh; Shamsara, Mehdi; Khateri, Shahriar; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbanmehr, Nassim; Tavallaei, Mahmood; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objective In spite of accumulating information about pathological aspects of sulfur mustard (SM), the precise mechanism responsible for its effects is not well understood. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are promising biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. Accurate normalization using appropriate reference genes, is a critical step in miRNA expression studies. In this study, we aimed to identify appropriate reference gene for microRNA quantification in serum samples of SM victims. Materials and Methods In this case and control experimental study, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we evaluated the suitability of a panel of small RNAs including SNORD38B, SNORD49A, U6, 5S rRNA, miR-423-3p, miR-191, miR-16 and miR-103 in sera of 28 SM-exposed veterans of Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988) and 15 matched control volunteers. Different statistical algorithms including geNorm, Normfinder, best-keeper and comparative delta-quantification cycle (Cq) method were employed to find the least variable reference gene. Results miR-423-3p was identified as the most stably expressed reference gene, and miR- 103 and miR-16 ranked after that. Conclusion We demonstrate that non-miRNA reference genes have the least stabil- ity in serum samples and that some house-keeping miRNAs may be used as more reliable reference genes for miRNAs in serum. In addition, using the geometric mean of two reference genes could increase the reliability of the normalizers. PMID:26464821

  16. Sarcoma Cell Line Screen of Oncology Drugs and Investigational Agents Identifies Patterns Associated with Gene and microRNA Expression.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Polley, Eric; Kunkel, Mark; Evans, David; Silvers, Thomas; Delosh, Rene; Laudeman, Julie; Ogle, Chad; Reinhart, Russell; Selby, Michael; Connelly, John; Harris, Erik; Monks, Anne; Morris, Joel

    2015-11-01

    The diversity in sarcoma phenotype and genotype make treatment of this family of diseases exceptionally challenging. Sixty-three human adult and pediatric sarcoma lines were screened with 100 FDA-approved oncology agents and 345 investigational agents. The investigational agents' library enabled comparison of several compounds targeting the same molecular entity allowing comparison of target specificity and heterogeneity of cell line response. Gene expression was derived from exon array data and microRNA expression was derived from direct digital detection assays. The compounds were screened against each cell line at nine concentrations in triplicate with an exposure time of 96 hours using Alamar blue as the endpoint. Results are presented for inhibitors of the following targets: aurora kinase, IGF-1R, MEK, BET bromodomain, and PARP1. Chemical structures, IC50 heat maps, concentration response curves, gene expression, and miR expression heat maps are presented for selected examples. In addition, two cases of exceptional responders are presented. The drug and compound response, gene expression, and microRNA expression data are publicly available at http://sarcoma.cancer.gov. These data provide a unique resource to the cancer research community. PMID:26351324

  17. Identification of MicroRNAs in Meloidogyne incognita Using Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunsheng; Mao, Zhenchuan; Yan, Jin; Cheng, Xinyue; Liu, Feng; Xiao, Luo; Dai, Liangying; Luo, Feng; Xie, Bingyan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important regulatory roles in eukaryotic lineages. In this paper, we employed deep sequencing technology to sequence and identify microRNAs in M. incognita genome, which is one of the important plant parasitic nematodes. We identified 102 M. incognita microRNA genes, which can be grouped into 71 nonredundant miRNAs based on mature sequences. Among the 71 miRANs, 27 are known miRNAs and 44 are novel miRNAs. We identified seven miRNA clusters in M. incognita genome. Four of the seven clusters, miR-100/let-7, miR-71-1/miR-2a-1, miR-71-2/miR-2a-2 and miR-279/miR-2b are conserved in other species. We validated the expressions of 5 M. incognita microRNAs, including 3 known microRNAs (miR-71, miR-100b and let-7) and 2 novel microRNAs (NOVEL-1 and NOVEL-2), using RT-PCR. We can detect all 5 microRNAs. The expression levels of four microRNAs obtained using RT-PCR were consistent with those obtained by high-throughput sequencing except for those of let-7. We also examined how M. incognita miRNAs are conserved in four other nematodes species: C. elegans, A. suum, B. malayi and P. pacificus. We found that four microRNAs, miR-100, miR-92, miR-279 and miR-137, exist only in genomes of parasitic nematodes, but do not exist in the genomes of the free living nematode C. elegans. Our research created a unique resource for the research of plant parasitic nematodes. The candidate microRNAs could help elucidate the genomic structure, gene regulation, evolutionary processes, and developmental features of plant parasitic nematodes and nematode-plant interaction. PMID:26241472

  18. Cluster of genes controlling proline degradation in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Ratzkin, B; Roth, J

    1978-01-01

    A cluster of genes essential for degradation of proline to glutamate (put) is located between the pyrC and pyrD loci at min 22 of the Salmonella chromosome. A series of 25 deletion mutants of this region have been isolated and used to construct a fine-structure map of the put genes. The map includes mutations affecting the proline degradative activities, proline oxidase and pyrroline-5-carboxylic dehydrogenase. Also included are mutations affecting the major proline permease and a regulatory mutation that affects both enzyme and permease production. The two enzymatic activities appear to be encoded by a single gene (putA). The regulatory mutation maps between the putA gene and the proline permease gene (putP). PMID:342507

  19. Identification of genes and gene clusters involved in mycotoxin synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research methods to identify and characterize genes involved in mycotoxin biosynthetic pathways have evolved considerably over the years. Before whole genome sequences were available (e.g. pre-genomics), work focused primarily on chemistry, biosynthetic mutant strains and molecular analysis of sing...

  20. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  1. Hepatic expression of inflammatory genes and microRNAs in pigs with high "cholesteryl ester transfer protein" (CETP) activity.

    PubMed

    Cirera, Susanna; Tørsleff, Benedicte C Juul; Ritz, Christian; Fredholm, Merete; Heegaard, Peter M H; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Human obesity and obesity-related diseases (ORD) are growing health problems worldwide and represent a major public health challenge. Most of these diseases are complex conditions, influenced by many genes (including microRNAs) and environmental factors. Many metabolic perturbations are associated with obesity; e.g., low levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) are high risk factors of cardiovascular events. A number of genetic, lifestyle, and environmental factors have been shown to contribute to the lowering of HDL-cholesterol. One of these factors is cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) promoting the redistribution of cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and phospholipids between plasma proteins. Moreover, obesity and ORD are often linked with chronic low-grade inflammation leading to insulin resistance and endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to detect differences in the hepatic expression of genes involved in low-grade inflammation and of obesity- and cholesterol-related microRNAs in two mixed breed populations of pigs (Yorkshire-Göttingen minipig, YM and Duroc-Göttingen minipig, DM) including males and females, with extreme phenotypes for CETP activity levels (designated as CETP-high and CETP-low, respectively). Furthermore, breed and gender differences were also investigated. We found significant difference (P < 0.05) in hepatic expression levels of several mRNAs and microRNAs between the CETP-high and -low groups (C5, IL1RN, IL18, and miR-223-5p); between the two mixed breeds (IL1RAP and miR-140-5p); and between gender (APOA1, IL1RN, and FBLN1). Furthermore, when taking breed into account we show that the transcriptional levels of TNF, miR20a, miR33b, and miR130a differed between the two CETP groups. We conclude that increased CETP activity is accompanied by a modest differential hepatic expression of several microRNAs and inflammatory-related genes. Furthermore, our study demonstrates that when modeling the analysis

  2. Evolution of MicroRNA Genes in Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana: An Update of the Inverted Duplication Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Jiang, Wen-kai; Gao, Li-zhi

    2011-01-01

    The origin and evolution of microRNA (miRNA) genes, which are of significance in tuning and buffering gene expressions in a number of critical cellular processes, have long attracted evolutionary biologists. However, genome-wide perspectives on their origins, potential mechanisms of their de novo generation and subsequent evolution remain largely unsolved in flowering plants. Here, genome-wide analyses of Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana revealed apparently divergent patterns of miRNA gene origins. A large proportion of miRNA genes in O. sativa were TE-related and MITE-related miRNAs in particular, whereas the fraction of these miRNA genes much decreased in A. thaliana. Our results show that the majority of TE-related and pseudogene-related miRNA genes have originated through inverted duplication instead of segmental or tandem duplication events. Based on the presented findings, we hypothesize and illustrate the four likely molecular mechanisms to de novo generate novel miRNA genes from TEs and pseudogenes. Our rice genome analysis demonstrates that non-MITEs and MITEs mediated inverted duplications have played different roles in de novo generating miRNA genes. It is confirmed that the previously proposed inverted duplication model may give explanations for non-MITEs mediated duplication events. However, many other miRNA genes, known from the earlier proposed model, were rather arisen from MITE transpositions into target genes to yield binding sites. We further investigated evolutionary processes spawned from de novo generated to maturely-formed miRNA genes and their regulatory systems. We found that miRNAs increase the tunability of some gene regulatory systems with low gene copy numbers. The results also suggest that gene balance effects may have largely contributed to the evolution of miRNA regulatory systems. PMID:22194805

  3. Prognostic Role of MicroRNA-200c-141 Cluster in Various Human Solid Malignant Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-yang; Li, Hui; Bu, Jie; Xiong, Liang; Guo, Hong-bin; Liu, Li-hong; Xiao, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The miR-200 family has emerged recently as a noticeable marker for predicting cancer prognosis and tumor progression. We aimed to review the evidence of miR-200c-141 genomic cluster as prognostic biomarkers in cancers. The results suggested that high level of miR-200c had no significant impact on OS (HR = 1.14 [0.77–1.69], P = 0.501) and DFS/PFS (HR = 0.72 [0.45–1.14], P = 0.161). Stratified analyses revealed that high miR-200c expression was significantly related to poor OS in serum/plasma (HR = 2.12 [1.62–2.77], P = 0.000) but not in tissues (HR = 0.89 [0.58–1.37], P = 0.599). High miR-200c expression was significantly associated with favorable DFS/PFS in tissues (HR = 0.56 [0.43–0.73], P = 0.000) but worse DFS/PFS in serum/plasma (HR = 1.90 [1.08–3.36], P = 0.027). For miR-141, we found that high miR-141 expression predicted no significant impact on OS (HR = 1.18 [0.74–1.88], P = 0.482) but poor DFS/PFS (HR = 1.11 [1.04–1.20], P = 0.003). Similarly, subgroup analyses showed that high miR-141 expression predicted poor OS in serum/plasma (HR = 4.34 [2.30–8.21], P = 0.000) but not in tissues (HR = 1.00 [0.92–1.09], P = 0.093). High miR-141 expression was significantly associated with worse DFS/PFS in tissues (HR = 1.12 [1.04–1.20], P = 0.002) but not in serum/plasma (HR = 0.90 [0.44–1.83], P = 0.771). Our findings indicated that, compared to their tissue counterparts, the expression level of miR-200c and miR-141 in peripheral blood may be more effective for monitoring cancer prognosis. High miR-141 expression was better at predicting tumor progression than survival for malignant tumors. PMID:26556949

  4. Reconstructing Histories of Complex Gene Clusters on a Phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa; Song, Giltae; Siepel, Adam

    Clusters of genes that have evolved by repeated segmental duplication present difficult challenges throughout genomic analysis, from sequence assembly to functional analysis. These clusters are one of the major sources of evolutionary innovation, and they are linked to multiple diseases, including HIV and a variety of cancers. Understanding their evolutionary histories is a key to the application of comparative genomics methods in these regions of the genome. We propose a probabilistic model of gene cluster evolution on a phylogeny, and an MCMC algorithm for reconstruction of duplication histories from genomic sequences in multiple species. Several projects are underway to obtain high quality BAC-based assemblies of duplicated clusters in multiple species, and we anticipate use of our methods in their analysis. Supplementary materials are located at http://compbio.fmph.uniba.sk/suppl/09recombcg/

  5. Expression of microRNA processing machinery genes in rhesus monkey oocytes and embryos of different developmental potentials

    PubMed Central

    MTANGO, NAMDORI R.; POTIREDDY, SANTHI; LATHAM, KEITH E.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs that silence gene expression. In animal cells, miRNAs bind to the 3′ untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and inhibit their translation. The correct regulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs is believed to be important for oocyte maturation, early development and implantation. We examined the expression of 25 mRNAs involved in the microRNA processing pathway in a non human primate oocyte and embryo model. We observed that mRNAs related to miRNA splicing are downregulated during oocyte maturation while those related to miRNA processing are upregulated, indicating that there may exist a temporal difference in their activities related to transcriptional activity in germinal vesicle stage oocytes. We also observed that the vast majority of mRNAs examined were insensitive to α-amanitin at the 8-16 cell stage. The expression data did not reveal a major impact of embryo culture, and hormonal stimulation protocol affected only a small number of mRNAs, suggesting that the components of the pathway may be accumulated in the oocyte during oogenesis and resistant to exogenous insults. In comparison to published mouse array data, we observed species differences and similarities in the temporal expression patterns of some genes, suggesting that miRNA processing may be regulated differently. These data extend our understanding of the potential roles of miRNA during primate embryogenesis. PMID:18646051

  6. Human metallothionein genes are clustered on chromosome 16.

    PubMed Central

    Karin, M; Eddy, R L; Henry, W M; Haley, L L; Byers, M G; Shows, T B

    1984-01-01

    The metallothioneins are a family of heavy-metal binding proteins of low molecular weight. They function in the regulation of trace metal metabolism and in the protection against toxic heavy metal ions. In man, the metallothioneins are encoded by at least 10-12 genes separated into two groups, MT-I and MT-II. To understand the genomic organization of these genes and their involvement in hereditary disorders of trace metal metabolism, we have determined their chromosomal location. Using human-mouse cell hybrids and hybridization probes derived from cloned and functional human MT1 and MT2 genes, we show that the functional human genes are clustered on human chromosome 16. Analysis of RNA from somatic cell hybrids indicated that hybrids that contained human chromosome 16 expressed both human MT1 and MT2 mRNA, and this expression is regulated by both heavy metal ions and glucocorticoid hormones. Images PMID:6089206

  7. Bi-clustering of Gene Expression Data Using Conditional Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olomola, Afolabi; Dua, Sumeet

    The inherent sparseness of gene expression data and the rare exhibition of similar expression patterns across a wide range of conditions make traditional clustering techniques unsuitable for gene expression analysis. Biclustering methods currently used to identify correlated gene patterns based on a subset of conditions do not effectively mine constant, coherent, or overlapping biclusters, partially because they perform poorly in the presence of noise. In this paper, we present a new methodology (BiEntropy) that combines information entropy and graph theory techniques to identify co-expressed gene patterns that are relevant to a subset of the sample. Our goal is to discover different types of biclusters in the presence of noise and to demonstrate the superiority of our method over existing methods in terms of discovering functionally enriched biclusters. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method using both synthetic and real data.

  8. Micro-RNA-31 controls hair cycle-associated changes in gene expression programs of the skin and hair follicle

    PubMed Central

    Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Ahmed, Mohammed I.; Vlahov, Nikola V.; Fessing, Michael Y.; Gill, Jason H.; Sharov, Andrey A.; Botchkareva, Natalia V.

    2010-01-01

    The hair follicle is a cyclic biological system that progresses through stages of growth, regression, and quiescence, which involves dynamic changes in a program of gene regulation. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are critically important for the control of gene expression and silencing. Here, we show that global miRNA expression in the skin markedly changes during distinct stages of the hair cycle in mice. Furthermore, we show that expression of miR-31 markedly increases during anagen and decreases during catagen and telogen. Administration of antisense miR-31 inhibitor into mouse skin during the early- and midanagen phases of the hair cycle results in accelerated anagen development, and altered differentiation of hair matrix keratinocytes and hair shaft formation. Microarray, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that miR-31 negatively regulates expression of Fgf10, the components of Wnt and BMP signaling pathways Sclerostin and BAMBI, and Dlx3 transcription factor, as well as selected keratin genes, both in vitro and in vivo. Using luciferase reporter assay, we show that Krt16, Krt17, Dlx3, and Fgf10 serve as direct miR-31 targets. Thus, by targeting a number of growth regulatory molecules and cytoskeletal proteins, miR-31 is involved in establishing an optimal balance of gene expression in the hair follicle required for its proper growth and hair fiber formation.—Mardaryev, A. N., Ahmed, M. I., Vlahov, N. V., Fessing, M. Y., Gill, J. H., Sharov, A. A., and Botchkareva, N. V. Micro-RNA-31 controls hair cycle-associated changes in gene expression programs of the skin and hair follicle. PMID:20522784

  9. Noninvasive visualization of microRNA-16 in the chemoresistance of gastric cancer using a dual reporter gene imaging system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu; Song, Xinxing; Li, Xiujuan; Xin, Jing; Wang, Shenxu; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Wu, Kaichun; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie; Cao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated to play a central role in the development of drug resistance in a variety of malignancies. However, many studies were conducted at the in vitro level and could not provide the in vivo information on the functions of miRNAs in the anticancer drug resistance. Here, we introduced a dual reporter gene imaging system for noninvasively monitoring the kinetic expression of miRNA-16 during chemoresistance in gastric cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and firefly luciferase (Fluc) genes were linked to form hNIS/Fluc double fusion reporter gene and then generate human gastric cancer cell line NF-3xmir16 and its multidrug resistance cell line NF-3xmir16/VCR. Radioiodide uptake and Fluc luminescence signals in vitro correlated well with viable cell numbers. The luciferase activities and radioiodide uptake in NF-3xmir16 cells were remarkably repressed by exogenous or endogenous miRNA-16. The NF-3xmir16/VCR cells showed a significant increase of (131)I uptake and luminescence intensity compared to NF-3xmir16 cells. The radioactivity from in vivo (99m)Tc-pertechnetate imaging and the intensity from bioluminescence imaging were also increased in NF-3xmir16/VCR compared with that in NF-3xmir16 tumor xenografts. Furthermore, using this reporter gene system, we found that etoposide (VP-16) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) activated miRNA-16 expression in vitro and in vivo, and the upregulation of miRNA-16 is p38MAPK dependent but NF-κB independent. This dual imaging reporter gene may be served as a novel tool for in vivo imaging of microRNAs in the chemoresistance of cancers, as well as for early detection and diagnosis in clinic. PMID:23613938

  10. Efficient use of artificial micro-RNA to downregulate the expression of genes at the post-transcriptional level in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, A; Rauf, M; Ghafoor, S; Khattak, M N K; Hameed, M W; Shah, H; Jan, S; Muhammad, K; Rehman, A; Inamullah

    2016-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are cellular components regulating gene expression at the post-transcription level. In the present study, artificial micro-RNAs were used to decrease the transcript level of two genes, AtExpA8 (encoding an expansin) and AHL25 (encoding an AT-hook motif nuclear localized protein) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The backbone of the Arabidopsis endogenous MIR319a micro-RNA was used in a site-directed mutagenesis approach for the generation of artificial micro-RNAs targeting two genes. The recombinant cassettes were expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in individual A. thaliana plants. Transgenic lines of the third generation were tested by isolating total RNA and by subsequent cDNA synthesis using oligo-dT18 primers and mRNAs as templates. The expression of the two target genes was checked through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to confirm reduced transcript levels for AtExpA8 and AHL25. Downregulation of AtExpA8 resulted in the formation of short hypocotyls compared with those of the wild-type control in response to low pH and high salt concentration. This technology could be used to prevent the expression of exogenous and invading genes posing a threat to the normal cellular physiology of the host plant. PMID:27173203