Science.gov

Sample records for microsatellite paternity analysis

  1. Multiple paternity in loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) nests on Melbourne Beach, Florida: a microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Moore, M K; Ball, R M

    2002-02-01

    Many aspects of sea turtle biology are difficult to measure in these enigmatic migratory species, and this lack of knowledge continues to hamper conservation efforts. The first study of paternity in a sea turtle species used allozyme analysis to suggest multiple paternity in loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) clutches in Australia. Subsequent studies indicated that the frequency of multiple paternity varies from species to species and perhaps location to location. This study examined fine-scale population structure and paternal contribution to loggerhead clutches on Melbourne Beach, FL, USA using microsatellite markers. Mothers and offspring from 70 nests collected at two locations were analysed using two to four polymorphic microsatellite loci. Fine-scale population differentiation was not evident between the sampled locations, separated by 8 km. Multiple paternity was common in loggerhead nests on Melbourne Beach; 22 of 70 clutches had more than one father, and six had more than two fathers. This is the first time that more than two fathers have been detected for offspring in individual sea turtle nests. Paternal genotypes could not be assigned with confidence in clutches with more than two fathers, leaving the question of male philopatry unanswered. Given the high incidence of multiple paternity, we conclude that males are not a limiting resource for this central Florida nesting aggregate. PMID:11856428

  2. Paternity analysis using microsatellite markers to identify pollen donors in an olive grove.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Sonali; Guerin, Jenny; Collins, Graham; Ford, Chris; Sedgley, Margaret

    2005-10-01

    Olive (Olea europaea L.) is a wind-pollinated, allogamous species that is generally not considered to be self-compatible. In addition, cross-incompatibilities exist between cultivars that can result in low fruit set if compatible pollinisers are not planted nearby. In this study, microsatellite markers were used to identify 17 genotypes that were potential pollen donors in a commercial olive orchard. DNA typing with the same primers was also applied to 800 olive embryos collected from five cultivars in the grove over 2 years of study. Pollen donors for the cultivars Barnea, Corregiola, Kalamata, Koroneiki, and Mission were estimated by paternity analysis, based on the parental contribution of alleles in the genotypes of the embryos. The exclusion probability for the marker set was 0.998 and paternity was assigned on the basis of the 'most likely method'. Different pollen donors were identified for each of the maternal cultivars indicating that cross-compatibilities and incompatibilities varied between the genotypes studied. Cross-pollination was the principal method of fertilization, as selfing was only observed in two of the embryos studied and both of these were from the cultivar Mission. This is the first report where these techniques have been applied to survey the pollination patterns in an olive grove. The results indicate that careful planning in orchard design is required for efficient pollination between olive cultivars. PMID:16133312

  3. Where have all the fathers gone? An extensive microsatellite analysis of paternity in the grey seal (Halichoerus grypus).

    PubMed

    Worthington Wilmer, J; Allen, P J; Pomeroy, P P; Twiss, S D; Amos, W

    1999-09-01

    Microsatellites were used to conduct an extensive analysis of paternity of grey seals from two Scottish breeding colonies at North Rona (n = 1189) and the Isle of May (n = 694), spanning more than a decade. A maximum of 46% of pups at North Rona and 29% of pups at the Isle of May could be allocated a father, even though the majority of candidate males for specific study sites within each colony were believed to have been sampled. Based on the paternities which could be assigned, both colonies showed evidence of reproductive skew, apparently due to the presence of approximately five males who were exceptionally successful. Some males were assigned paternities at least 10 years before, and colleagues 10 years after, being sampled, implying a reproductive lifespan of at least 10 years, and there are indications that the real maximum lies in the range 15-20 years. Male grey seals appear to have at least two breeding strategies they can adopt. On land, some males benefit from a traditionally polygynous system. However, between 50 and 70% of grey seal pups born at a particular colony are not fathered by males who are likely to be sampled by us, implying that these males seldom venture ashore here. We conclude that aquatic mating may play a much larger role in the grey seal than has previously been thought. PMID:10564447

  4. Paternity Analysis of the Olive Variety “Istrska Belica” and Identification of Pollen Donors by Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Jakše, Jernej

    2014-01-01

    The leading olive variety in Slovenia is “Istrska belica” (Olea europaea L.), which currently represents 70% of all olive trees in productive orchards. Paternity analysis based on microsatellite markers was used for genotyping and identification of the potential pollen donors of “Istrska belica” and for assessing the proportion of self-fertilization in monovarietal olive orchards in the Slovene Istria. Seven microsatellite loci were used for genotyping thirty-one olive embryos from “Istrska belica” trees and for all potential pollen donor varieties, which are grown in the region and could participate as pollinators. Genotyping results and allele identification were performed using the FaMoz software. The most probable pollen donor was assigned to 39% of all analyzed embryos. Among all analyzed embryos no single case of self-fertilization was confirmed. According to the present results, the variety “Istrska belica” was in all cases fertilized by foreign pollen. The results will contribute to defining the new guidelines for farmers regarding the proper management and growing practice in monovarietal olive groves. PMID:25097869

  5. Extrapair paternity and maternity in the three-toed woodpecker, Picoides tridactylus: insights from microsatellite-based parentage analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Hua; Välimäki, Kaisa; Piha, Markus; Pakkala, Timo; Merilä, Juha

    2009-01-01

    Molecular techniques have revealed that avian mating systems are more diverse and complex than previously thought. We used microsatellite markers to determine genetic parentage, the prevalence of extrapair paternity and quasi-parasitism (i.e. situations where a male's extrapair mate lay in his nest) in a socially monogamous population of three-toed woodpeckers (Picoides tridactylus) in southern Finland. A total of 129 adults and nestlings, representing 5-9 families annually from 2004-2007, were genotyped at up to ten microsatellite loci. The results of genetic assignment tests confirmed that monogamous parentage characterized the majority (84.6%, 22/26) of broods, and that most (93.8%, 75/80) nestlings were the offspring of their social parents. Two of 80 nestlings (2.5%) in two of 26 broods (7.7%) were sired by extrapair males and quasi-parasitism occurred in 3.8% (3/80) of nestlings and 7.7% (2/26) of broods. Hence, the levels of extrapair parentage were low, possibly because both genetic polygyny and polyandry are constrained by the high paternal effort required for parental care. The co-occurrence of low levels of extrapair paternity and quasi-parasitism are discussed in light of ecological and behavioural factors characterizing the species biology. PMID:19924300

  6. Paternity identification in sugarcane polycrosses by using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xavier, M A; Pinto, L R; Fávero, T M; Perecin, D; Carlini-Garcia, L A; Landell, M G A

    2014-01-01

    Although polycrosses have been used to test the potential of cross-combination of a large number of sugarcane parents, the male parent of the half-sib progenies produced is unknown. The present study aimed to integrate the molecular marker technology to the sugarcane polycross approach by the application of microsatellite markers to identify the male parent of 41 elite clones derived from polycross families. Ten microsatellite [single sequence repeats (SSRs)] primer pairs were used to identify the most likely male parent considering markers present in the selected clone but absent in the female parent. The number of alleles generated by the 10 microsatellite primer pairs ranged from 102 (cross-pollination lantern 4) to 120 (cross-pollination lantern 2) with an average of 113.25 alleles per SSR. The average genetic similarity among the involved parents in the polycrosses was 45.9%. The results of the analysis of the SSR markers absent in the female parent and present only in the selected clone as well as the genetic similarity values allowed the identification of the most likely male parent in 73% of the total clones evaluated and also to detect probable contaminations. The obtained results highlight the importance of using molecular marker technology in the identification and confirmation of the male parent of high-performance clones derived from polycrosses in the sugarcane breeding programs. PMID:24737475

  7. Multiple paternity and female-biased mutation at a microsatellite locus in the olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea).

    PubMed

    Hoekert, W E J; Neuféglise, H; Schouten, A D; Menken, S B J

    2002-08-01

    Multiple paternity in the olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) population nesting in Suriname was demonstrated using two microsatellite loci, viz., Ei8 and Cm84. The large number of offspring sampled per clutch (70 on average, ranging from 15 to 103) and the number of alleles found at the two loci (18 and eight alleles, respectively) enabled unambiguous assessment of the occurrence of multiple paternity. In two out of 10 clutches analysed, the offspring had been sired by at least two males, which was confirmed at both loci. In both clutches, unequal paternity occurred: 73% and 92% of the offspring had been sired by the primary male. The probability of detecting multiple paternity was 0.903, and therefore there is a small chance that multiple paternity occurred but remained undetected in some of the eight clutches that appeared to be singly sired. Analysis of 703 offspring revealed a high mutation rate for locus Ei8 (micro = 2.3 x 10(-2)) with all 33 mutations occurring in maternal alleles. In particular, one allele of 274 bp mutated at a high frequency in a clutch to which the mother contributed the allele, but in another clutch where the father contributed the same allele, no such mutations were observed. Inferred allele-specific mutation rates for Ei8 and expected numbers of mutations per clutch confirmed that maternal alleles for Ei8 are more likely to mutate in the olive ridley sea turtle than paternal alleles. Possible explanations are discussed. PMID:12136412

  8. Pattern discovery for microsatellite genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavakiotis, Ioannis; Triantafyllidis, Alexandros; Samaras, Patroklos; Voulgaridis, Antonios; Karaiskou, Nikoletta; Konstantinidis, Evangelos; Vlahavas, Ioannis

    2014-03-01

    Microsatellite loci comprise an important part of eukaryotic genomes. Their applications in biology as genetic markers are related to numerous fields ranging from paternity analyses to construction of genetic maps and linkage to human disease. Existing software solutions which offer pattern discovery algorithms for the correct identification and downstream analysis of microsatellites are scarce and are proving to be inefficient to analyze large, exponentially increasing, sequenced genomes. Moreover, such analyses can be very difficult for bioinformatically inexperienced biologists. In this paper we present Microsatellite Genome Analysis (MiGA) software for the detection of all microsatellite loci in genomic data through a user friendly interface. The algorithm searches exhaustively and rapidly for most microsatellites. Contrary to other applications, MiGA takes into consideration the following three most important aspects: the efficiency of the algorithm, the usability of the software and the plethora of offered summary statistics. All of the above, help biologists to obtain basic quantitative and qualitative information regarding the presence of microsatellites in genomic data as well as downstream processes, such as selection of specific microsatellite loci for primer design and comparative genome analysis. PMID:24529207

  9. Microsatellite Evidence for High Frequency of Multiple Paternity in the Marine Gastropod Rapana venosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Background Inferring of parentage in natural populations is important in understanding the mating systems of a species, which have great effects on its genetic structure and evolution. Muricidae, a large group (approximately 1,600 species) of marine gastropods, are poorly investigated in patterns of multiple paternity and sperm competition based on molecular techniques. The veined Rapa whelk, Rapana venosa, a commercially important muricid species with internal fertilization, is an ideal species to study the occurrence and frequency of multiple paternity and to facilitate understanding of their reproductive strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed five highly polymorphic microsatellites in R. venosa and applied them to identify multiple paternity in 19 broods (1381 embryos) collected from Dandong, China. Multiple paternity was detected in 17 (89.5%) of 19 broods. The number of sires per brood ranged from 1 to 7 (4.3 on average). Of the 17 multiply sired broods, 16 (94.1%) were significantly skewed from equal paternal contributions, and had a dominant sire which was also dominant in each assayed capsule. Conclusions Our results indicate that a high level of multiple paternity occurs in the wild population of R. venosa. Similar patterns of multiple paternity in the 2–6 assayed capsules from each brood imply that fertilization events within the body of a female occur mostly (but not entirely) as random draws from a “well-but-not-perfectly blended sperm pool” of her several mates. Strongly skewed distributions of fertilization success among sires also suggest that sperm competition and/or cryptic female choice might be important for post-copulatory paternity biasing in this species. PMID:24466127

  10. Mutation rate analysis at 19 autosomal microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Cai-Yong; Ji, Qiang; Li, Kai; Fan, Han-Ting; Yu, Yan-Fang; Bu, Fan-Li; Hu, Ling-Li; Wang, Jian-Wen; Mu, Hao-Fang; Haigh, Steven; Chen, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a large sample size is needed to reliably estimate population- and locus-specific microsatellite mutation rates. Therefore, we conducted a long-term collaboration study and performed a comprehensive analysis on the mutation characteristics of 19 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci. The STR loci located on 15 of 22 autosomal chromosomes were analyzed in a total of 21,106 samples (11,468 parent-child meioses) in a Chinese population. This provided 217,892 allele transfers at 19 STR loci. An overall mutation rate of 1.20 × 10(-3) (95% CI, 1.06-1.36 × 10(-3) ) was observed in the populations across 18 of 19 STR loci, except for the TH01 locus with no mutation found. Most STR mutations (97.7%) were single-step mutations, and only a few mutations (2.30%) comprised two and multiple steps. Interestingly, approximately 93% of mutation events occur in the male germline. The mutation ratios increased with the paternal age at child birth (r = 0.99, p<0.05), but not maternal age. Last, with the combination analysis of the data from the southern Chinese population, we drew a picture of 19 STR mutations in China. In conclusion, the data from this study will provide useful information in parentage testing, kinship analysis, and population genetics. PMID:25820688

  11. Genetic maternity and paternity in a local population of armadillos assessed by microsatellite DNA markers and field data.

    PubMed

    Prodhl, P A; Loughry, W J; McDonough, C M; Nelson, W S; Thompson, E A; Avise, J C

    1998-01-01

    Genetic data from polymorphic microsatellite loci were employed to estimate paternity and maternity in a local population of nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) in northern Florida. The parentage assessments took advantage of maximum likelihood procedures developed expressly for situations when individuals of neither gender can be excluded a priori as candidate parents. The molecular data for 290 individuals, interpreted alone and in conjunction with detailed biological and spatial information for the population, demonstrate high exclusion probabilities and reasonably strong likelihoods of genetic parentage assignment in many cases; low mean probabilities of successful reproductive contribution to the local population by individual armadillo adults in a given year; and statistically significant microspatial associations of parents and their offspring. Results suggest that molecular assays of highly polymorphic genetic systems can add considerable power to assessments of biological parentage in natural populations even when neither parent is otherwise known. PMID:18811420

  12. Informativeness of minisatellite and microsatellite markers for genetic analysis in papaya.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, G A F; Dantas, J L L; Oliveira, E J

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate information on minisatellite and microsatellite markers in papaya (Carica papaya L.). Forty minisatellites and 91 microsatellites were used for genotyping 24 papaya accessions. Estimates of genetic diversity, genetic linkage and analyses of population structure were compared. A lower average number of alleles per locus was observed in minisatellites (3.10) compared with microsatellites (3.57), although the minisatellites showed rarer alleles (18.54 %) compared with microsatellite (13.85 %). Greater expected (He = 0.52) and observed (Ho = 0.16) heterozygosity was observed in the microsatellites compared with minisatellites (He = 0.42 and Ho = 0.11), possibly due to the high number of hermaphroditic accessions, resulting in high rates of self-fertilization. The polymorphic information content and Shannon-Wiener diversity were also higher for microsatellites (from 0.47 to 1.10, respectively) compared with minisatellite (0.38 and 0.85, respectively). The probability of paternity exclusion was high for both markers (>0.999), and the combined probability of identity was from 1.65(-13) to 4.33(-38) for mini- and micro-satellites, respectively, which indicates that both types of markers are ideal for genetic analysis. The Bayesian analysis indicated the formation of two groups (K = 2) for both markers, although the minisatellites indicated a substructure (K = 4). A greater number of accessions with a low probability of assignment to specific groups were observed for microsatellites. Collectively, the results indicated higher informativeness of microsatellites. However, the lower informative power of minisatellites may be offset by the use of larger number of loci. Furthermore, minisatellites are subject to less error in genotyping because there is greater power to detect genotyping systems when larger motifs are used. PMID:26280323

  13. [Family law, witness of the analysis of prenatal paternity].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez López, Raquel; Marfil, Jorge A; González Poveda, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    The authors analyse from a scientific and legal perspective, how paternity analysis in the prenatal period can be reliably performed exactly the same as with newborns, and therefore, establish kinship in accordance with established regulations. In other words, there is an option for those who might not want to wait until birth to establish kinship. PMID:19860347

  14. Microsatellite analysis provides efficient confirmation of fetal trophoblast isolation from maternal circulation.

    PubMed

    Koumantaki, Y; Sifakis, S; Dragatis, G; Matalliotakis, I; Froudarakis, G; Papadopoulou, E; Koumantakis, E

    2001-07-01

    Fetal trophoblasts can be found in maternal circulation from an early stage of pregnancy and thus provide a potential source of DNA for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have developed a two-step method for trophoblast isolation between the 8th and 12th week of pregnancy. Blood was sampled from 14 women undergoing termination of pregnancy or spontaneous abortion. Immunomagnetic beads precoated with HLA class I and II, and with anti-cytokeratin-18 monoclonal antibodies, were used to remove CD8+ and other maternal cells, and to select for fetal trophoblasts, respectively. Microsatellite analysis was performed on DNA extracted from the isolated, maternal, paternal and placental cells after PCR amplification. Recovery of the trophoblasts was confirmed in 13/14 cases (93%) by the identification of an identical microsatellite pattern for fetal and placental cells. Further evidence was the presence of heterozygous alleles of both maternal and paternal origin. The correct prediction of gender in all five male fetuses was an additional confirmation of trophoblast recovery. We conclude that trophoblasts can be effectively isolated from maternal blood in the first trimester, and by using polymorphic microsatellite markers to confirm sample purity, this method has potential future application in prenatal diagnosis. PMID:11494293

  15. Microsatellite analysis of medfly bioinfestations in California.

    PubMed

    Bonizzoni, M; Zheng, L; Guglielmino, C R; Haymer, D S; Gasperi, G; Gomulski, L M; Malacrida, A R

    2001-10-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, is a destructive agricultural pest with a long history of invasion success. This pest has been affecting different regions of the United States for the past 30 years, but a number of studies of medfly bioinfestations has focused on the situation in California. Although some progress has been made in terms of establishing the origin of infestations, the overall status of this pest in this area remains controversial. Specifically, do flies captured over the years represent independent infestations or the persistence of a resident population? We present an effort to answer this question based on the use of multilocus genotyping. Ten microsatellite loci were used to analyse 109 medflies captured in several infestations within California between 1992 and 1998. Using these same markers, 242 medflies from regions of the world having 'established' populations of this pest including Hawaii, Guatemala, El Salvador, Ecuador, Brazil, Argentina and Peru, were also analysed. Although phylogenetic analysis, amova analysis, the IMMANC assignment test and geneclass exclusion test analysis suggest that some of the medflies captured in California are derived from independent invasion events, analysis of specimens from the Los Angeles basin provides support for the hypothesis that an endemic population, probably derived from Guatemala, has been established. PMID:11742551

  16. Male biological clock: a critical analysis of advanced paternal age.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Chiba, Koji; Butler, Peter; Lamb, Dolores J

    2015-06-01

    Extensive research defines the impact of advanced maternal age on couples' fecundity and reproductive outcomes, but significantly less research has been focused on understanding the impact of advanced paternal age. Yet it is increasingly common for couples at advanced ages to conceive children. Limited research suggests that the importance of paternal age is significantly less than that of maternal age, but advanced age of the father is implicated in a variety of conditions affecting the offspring. This review examines three aspects of advanced paternal age: the potential problems with conception and pregnancy that couples with advanced paternal age may encounter, the concept of discussing a limit to paternal age in a clinical setting, and the risks of diseases associated with advanced paternal age. As paternal age increases, it presents no absolute barrier to conception, but it does present greater risks and complications. The current body of knowledge does not justify dissuading older men from trying to initiate a pregnancy, but the medical community must do a better job of communicating to couples the current understanding of the risks of conception with advanced paternal age. PMID:25881878

  17. Establishing paternity in whooping cranes (Grus Americana) by DNA analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longmire, J.L.; Gee, G.F.; Hardekopf, C.L.; Mark, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting was used to study paternity and genetic variability within a captive flock of Whooping Cranes (Grus americana). Fingerprint patterns for 42 individuals were obtained by digesting genomic crane DNAs with HaeIII followed by electrophoresis, blotting, and hybridization to the M13 minisatellite probe. Despite finding reduced levels of genetic variation in the Whooping Crane due to a population 'bottleneck,' these polymorphisms were successfully used to determine paternity in six of seven cases of captive propagation where the maternal-offspring relationship was known, but where the sire was unknown. These determinations of paternity are required for effective genetic management of. the crane flock. These results also revealed a number of heterozygous minisatellite loci that will be valuable in future assessments of genetic variability in this endangered species.

  18. Microsatellite analysis of Saccharomyces uvarum diversity.

    PubMed

    Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; Salin, Franck; Börlin, Marine; Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika; Jeune, Christine Le; Legras, Jean-Luc

    2016-03-01

    Considered as a sister species of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. uvarum is, to a lesser extent, an interesting species for fundamental and applied research studies. Despite its potential interest as a new gene pool for fermenting agents, the intraspecific molecular genetic diversity of this species is still poorly investigated. In this study, we report the use of nine microsatellite markers to describe S. uvarum genetic diversity and population structure among 108 isolates from various geographical and substrate origins (wine, cider and natural sources). Our combined microsatellite markers set allowed differentiating 89 genotypes. In contrast to S. cerevisiae genetic diversity, wild and human origin isolates were intertwined. A total of 75% of strains were proven to be homozygotes and estimated heterozygosity suggests a selfing rate above 0.95 for the different population tested here. From this point of view, the S. uvarum life cycle appears to be more closely related to S. paradoxus or S. cerevisiae of natural resources than S. cerevisiae wine isolates. Population structure could not be correlated to distinct geographic or technological origins, suggesting lower differentiation that may result from a large exchange between human and natural populations mediated by insects or human activities. PMID:26772797

  19. Prenatal and newborn paternity testing with DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Csete, K; Beer, Zs; Varga, T

    2005-01-17

    In rape against youthful girls which yields pregnancy after the abortion DNA examinations can be performed from the aborted foetal material to provide evidence of paternity of the suspect. In our present work we demonstrate six cases: four of them are rape cases and two where the mother abandoned her newborn baby. These cases proved that DNA-STR profiles can be determined from foetus after the abortion and perpetrator of a rape can be found. Due to our result we suggest that not only placenta but also bloody vernix caseosa is useful tissue for identifying the putative mother because vernix caseosa can be the carrier of the mother's blood. PMID:15694732

  20. [Screening of peafowl microsatellite primers and analysis of genetic diversity].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wen-Bin; Chen, Guo-Hong; Shu, Jing-Ting; Xu, Qi; Li, Hui-Fang

    2006-10-01

    The applicability of chicken microsatellite primers to peafowl population was analyzed in the present paper, and the results showed 14 of 29 pairs of microsatellite primers from chicken could amplify peafowl DNA and produce specific allele patterns. A mean of 1.71 alleles was found for each locus. Seven pairs were highly polymorphic, and MCW0080 and MCW0098 were ideal markers for peafowl. Genetic diversity analysis within and between the green peafowl and the blue peafowl populations demonstrated that the expected heterozygosity of two peafowl populations were 0.2482 and 0.2744, respectively. The inbreeding index (FST), Reynolds' genetic distance and gene flow between the two populations were 0.078, 0.0603 and 3.896 respectively. These results indicate that the heterozygosity and the genetic diversity of these two peafowl populations were very low, and suggest a tendency towards intermixing. PMID:17035182

  1. Meta-analysis of Paternal Age and Schizophrenia Risk in Male Versus Female Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian; Messias, Erick; Miettunen, Jouko; Alaräisänen, Antti; Järvelin, Marjo-Riita; Koponen, Hannu; Räsänen, Pirkko; Isohanni, Matti; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Advanced paternal age (APA) is a reported risk factor for schizophrenia in the offspring. We performed a meta-analysis of this association, considering the effect of gender and study design. Methods: We identified articles by searching Pub Med, PsychInfo, ISI, and EMBASE, and the reference lists of identified studies. Previously unpublished data from the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort (NFBC 1966) study were also included. Results: There were 6 cohort studies and 6 case–control studies that met the inclusion criteria. In both study designs, there was a significant increase in risk of schizophrenia in the offspring of older fathers (≥30) compared to a reference paternal age of 25–29, with no gender differences. The relative risk (RR) in the oldest fathers (≥50) was 1.66 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.46–1.89, P < 0.01]. A significant increase in risk was also found for younger fathers (<25) in males (RR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.02–1.14, P = 0.01) but not females (RR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.97–1.14, P = 0.28). The population attributable risk percentage (PAR%) was 10% for paternal age ≥30 and 5% for paternal age <25. Discussion: Both APA (≥30) and younger paternal age (<25) increase the risk of schizophrenia; younger paternal age may be associated with an increased risk in males but not females. This risk factor increases the risk of schizophrenia as much as any single candidate gene of risk. The mechanism of these associations is not known and may differ for older and younger fathers. PMID:20185538

  2. Analysis of new microsatellite markers developed from reported sequences of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiyang; Jiang, Liming; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xubo; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2010-12-01

    The expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, were selected from GenBank to identify simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites. A bioinformatic analysis of 11111 ESTs identified 751 SSR-containing ESTs, including 440 dinucleotide, 254 trinucleotide, 53 tetranucleotide, 95 pentanucleotide and 40 hexanucleotide microsatellites respectively. The CA/TG and GA/TC repeats were the most abundant microsatellites. AT-rich types were predominant among trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellites. PCR primers were designed to amplify 10 identified microsatellites loci. The PCR results from eight pairs of primers showed polymorphisms in wild populations. In 30 wild individuals, the mean observed and expected heterozygosities of these 8 polymorphic SSRs were 0.71 and 0.83 respectively and the average PIC value was 0.8. These microsatellite markers should prove to be a useful addition to the microsatellite markers that are now available for this species.

  3. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of ...

  4. Statistical approaches to paternity analysis in natural populations and applications to the North Atlantic humpback whale.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, R; Mattila, D K; Clapham, P J; Palsbøll, P J

    2001-01-01

    We present a new method for paternity analysis in natural populations that is based on genotypic data that can take the sampling fraction of putative parents into account. The method allows paternity assignment to be performed in a decision theoretic framework. Simulations are performed to evaluate the utility and robustness of the method and to assess how many loci are necessary for reliable paternity inference. In addition we present a method for testing hypotheses regarding relative reproductive success of different ecologically or behaviorally defined groups as well as a new method for estimating the current population size of males from genotypic data. This method is an extension of the fractional paternity method to the case where only a proportion of all putative fathers have been sampled. It can also be applied to provide abundance estimates of the number of breeding males from genetic data. Throughout, the methods were applied to genotypic data collected from North Atlantic humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) to test if the males that appear dominant during the mating season have a higher reproductive success than the subdominant males. PMID:11290722

  5. polypatex: an r package for paternity exclusion in autopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Alexander B; Elliott, Carole; Hopley, Tara; Lovell, David; Young, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Microsatellite markers have demonstrated their value for performing paternity exclusion and hence exploring mating patterns in plants and animals. Methodology is well established for diploid species, and several software packages exist for elucidating paternity in diploids; however, these issues are not so readily addressed in polyploids due to the increased complexity of the exclusion problem and a lack of available software. We introduce polypatex, an r package for paternity exclusion analysis using microsatellite data in autopolyploid, monoecious or dioecious/bisexual species with a ploidy of 4n, 6n or 8n. Given marker data for a set of offspring, their mothers and a set of candidate fathers, polypatex uses allele matching to exclude candidates whose marker alleles are incompatible with the alleles in each offspring-mother pair. polypatex can analyse marker data sets in which allele copy numbers are known (genotype data) or unknown (allelic phenotype data) - for data sets in which allele copy numbers are unknown, comparisons are made taking into account all possible genotypes that could arise from the compared allele sets. polypatex is a software tool that provides population geneticists with the ability to investigate the mating patterns of autopolyploids using paternity exclusion analysis on data from codominant markers having multiple alleles per locus. PMID:26613799

  6. Microsatellite (simple sequence repeat) marker-based paternity analysis of a seven-parent sugarcane polycross

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is not feasible to make all possible cross combinations among elite parents used in sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeding programs, particularly within a single year. Hence, the polycross approach has been used to maximize the number of cross combinations that can be represented among progeny. Th...

  7. Paternity and relatedness in wild chimpanzee communities

    PubMed Central

    Vigilant, Linda; Hofreiter, Michael; Siedel, Heike; Boesch, Christophe

    2001-01-01

    The genetic structure of three contiguous wild chimpanzee communities in West Africa was examined to determine the extent to which the community, the mixed-sex social unit of chimpanzees, represents a closed reproductive unit. An analysis of paternity for 41 offspring resulted in 34 cases of paternity assignment to an adult male belonging to the same community. Among the 14 offspring for which all potential within-community fathers have been tested, one likely case of extra-group paternity (EGP) has been identified, suggesting an incidence of EGP of 7%. This more extensive analysis contradicts a previous genetic study of the Taï chimpanzees that inferred 50% extra-group fathers. We suggest, based on direct comparison of results for 33 individuals at 1 microsatellite locus and direct comparison of paternity assignments for 11 offspring, that the error rate in the previous study was too high to produce accurate genotypes and assignments of paternity and hence caused the false inference of a high rate of EGP. Thus, the community is the primary but not exclusive unit for reproduction in wild chimpanzees, and females do not typically reproduce with outside males. Despite the inferred low level of gene flow from extra-community males, relatedness levels among the community males are not significantly higher than among community females, and the distribution of genetic relationships within the group suggests that, rather than a primarily male-bonded social structure, the group is bonded through relationships between males and females. Kinship may explain cooperative behaviors directed against other communities, but is unlikely to explain the high levels of affiliation and cooperation seen for male within-community interactions. PMID:11606765

  8. Detection of Bladder CA by Microsatellite Analysis (MSA) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Goal 1: To determine sensitivity and specificity of microsatellite analysis (MSA) of urine sediment, using a panel of 15 microsatellite markers, in detecting bladder cancer in participants requiring cystoscopy. This technique will be compared to the diagnostic standard of cystoscopy, as well as to urine cytology. Goal 2: To determine the temporal performance characteristics of microsatellite analysis of urine sediment. Goal 3: To determine which of the 15 individual markers or combination of markers that make up the MSA test are most predictive of the presence of bladder cancer.

  9. Challenges in analysis and interpretation of microsatellite data for population genetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Alexander I; Carbone, Ignazio

    2014-01-01

    Advancing technologies have facilitated the ever-widening application of genetic markers such as microsatellites into new systems and research questions in biology. In light of the data and experience accumulated from several years of using microsatellites, we present here a literature review that synthesizes the limitations of microsatellites in population genetic studies. With a focus on population structure, we review the widely used fixation (FST) statistics and Bayesian clustering algorithms and find that the former can be confusing and problematic for microsatellites and that the latter may be confounded by complex population models and lack power in certain cases. Clustering, multivariate analyses, and diversity-based statistics are increasingly being applied to infer population structure, but in some instances these methods lack formalization with microsatellites. Migration-specific methods perform well only under narrow constraints. We also examine the use of microsatellites for inferring effective population size, changes in population size, and deeper demographic history, and find that these methods are untested and/or highly context-dependent. Overall, each method possesses important weaknesses for use with microsatellites, and there are significant constraints on inferences commonly made using microsatellite markers in the areas of population structure, admixture, and effective population size. To ameliorate and better understand these constraints, researchers are encouraged to analyze simulated datasets both prior to and following data collection and analysis, the latter of which is formalized within the approximate Bayesian computation framework. We also examine trends in the literature and show that microsatellites continue to be widely used, especially in non-human subject areas. This review assists with study design and molecular marker selection, facilitates sound interpretation of microsatellite data while fostering respect for their practical limitations, and identifies lessons that could be applied toward emerging markers and high-throughput technologies in population genetics. PMID:25540699

  10. Discounting, preferences, and paternalism in cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Tinghög, Gustav

    2012-09-01

    When assessing the cost effectiveness of health care programmes, health economists typically presume that distant events should be given less weight than present events. This article examines the moral reasonableness of arguments advanced for positive discounting in cost-effectiveness analysis both from an intergenerational and an intrapersonal perspective and assesses if arguments are equally applicable to health and monetary outcomes. The article concludes that behavioral effects related to time preferences give little or no reason for why society at large should favour the present over the future when making intergenerational choices regarding health. The strongest argument for discounting stems from the combined argument of diminishing marginal utility in the presence of growth. However, this hinges on the assumption of actual growth in the relevant good. Moreover, current modern democracy may be insufficiently sensitive to the concerns of future generations. The second part of the article categorises preference failures (which justify paternalistic responses) into two distinct groups, myopic and acratic. The existence of these types of preference failures makes elicited time preferences of little normative relevance when making decisions regarding the social discount rate, even in an intrapersonal context. As with intergenerational discounting, the combined arguments of growth and diminishing marginal utility offer the strongest arguments for discounting in the intrapersonal context. However, there is no prima facie reason to assume that this argument should apply equally to health and monetary values. To be sure, selecting an approach towards discounting health is a complex matter. However, the life-or-death implications of any approach require that the discussion not be downplayed to merely a technical matter for economists to settle. PMID:21909720

  11. Multiple paternity and hybridization in two smooth-hound sharks

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Ilaria A. M.; Riginella, Emilio; Gristina, Michele; Rasotto, Maria B.; Zane, Lorenzo; Mazzoldi, Carlotta

    2015-01-01

    Multiple paternity appears to be a common trait of elasmobranch mating systems, with its occurrence likely driven by convenience, due to females seeking to minimize the stress of male harassment. Here we use molecular markers to analyse the frequency of multiple paternity in two related viviparous sharks, Mustelus mustelus and Mustelus punctulatus. We first applied molecular methods to assign pregnant females, embryos and additional reference adults (N = 792) to one of the two species. Paternity analysis was performed using a total of 9 polymorphic microsatellites on 19 females and 204 embryos of M. mustelus, and on 13 females and 303 embryos of M. punctulatus. Multiple paternity occurs in both species, with 47% of M. mustelus and 54% of M. punctulatus litters sired by at least two fathers. Female fecundity is not influenced by multiple mating and in 56% of polyandrous litters paternity is skewed, with one male siring most of the pups. Genetic analyses also revealed hybridization between the two species, with a M. punctulatus female bearing pups sired by a M. mustelus male. The frequency of polyandrous litters in these species is consistent with aspects of their reproductive biology, such as synchronous ovulation and possible occurrence of breeding aggregations. PMID:26257113

  12. Potential linkage between compound microsatellites and recombination in geminiviruses: Evidence from comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    George, B; Alam, Ch Mashhood; Kumar, R Vinoth; Gnanasekaran, Prabu; Chakraborty, S

    2015-08-01

    The compound microsatellites consist of two or more individual microsatellites, originate from mutation or imperfection in simple repeat sequences. The reports on systematic analysis of the occurrence, size and density of compound microsatellite (cSSR) types are very rare. Our study indicates that cSSRs are clustered at specific regions in the begomovirus genomes. cSSRs were overrepresented in majority of begomovirus genomes indicating that they might have some functional significance. Further, non-random distribution pattern of cSSR in begomovirus genomes was significantly correlated with the recombination breakpoint positions in the genome. The analysis of cSSR regions in the viral genome indicates the presence of stem loop (hairpin) secondary structure. The significance of these findings in biology of geminiviruses is discussed based on our present understanding of recombination and repetitive DNA. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis suggesting the possible association between recombination and microsatellites in any viral genome. PMID:25817404

  13. Microsatellite loci analysis for individual identification in Shiba Inu

    PubMed Central

    ARATA, Sayaka; ASAHI, Ai; TAKEUCHI, Yukari; MORI, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Eighteen autosomal microsatellite loci were examined using 275 Shiba Inus in Japan. Eighteen dogs representing eight trios were obtained from four breeders to calculate mutation rates, and 257 dogs kept by owners were collected through veterinary clinics throughout Japan to calculate population genetic parameters and estimate discrimination power. After two loci (INU005 and AHTk253) were excluded, average expected heterozygosity (He), polymorphic information content (PIC) and fixation index (F) were 0.665, 0.623 and 0.046, respectively. The combined power of discrimination over the 16 microsatellite markers was more than 0.9999. Therefore, it is suggested that these 16 microsatellite loci recommended by the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) are applicable for individual identification and parentage testing of domestic Shiba Inu in Japan. PMID:26537551

  14. Microsatellite loci analysis for individual identification in Shiba Inu.

    PubMed

    Arata, Sayaka; Asahi, Ai; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    Eighteen autosomal microsatellite loci were examined using 275 Shiba Inus in Japan. Eighteen dogs representing eight trios were obtained from four breeders to calculate mutation rates, and 257 dogs kept by owners were collected through veterinary clinics throughout Japan to calculate population genetic parameters and estimate discrimination power. After two loci (INU005 and AHTk253) were excluded, average expected heterozygosity (He), polymorphic information content (PIC) and fixation index (F) were 0.665, 0.623 and 0.046, respectively. The combined power of discrimination over the 16 microsatellite markers was more than 0.9999. Therefore, it is suggested that these 16 microsatellite loci recommended by the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) are applicable for individual identification and parentage testing of domestic Shiba Inu in Japan. PMID:26537551

  15. Chromosome 16 in primary prostate cancer: a microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Osman, I; Scher, H; Dalbagni, G; Reuter, V; Zhang, Z F; Cordon-Cardo, C

    1997-05-16

    Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of prostate cancer specimens have revealed nonrandom chromosomal deletions, affecting chromosomes 7q, 8p, 10q and 16q. Based on these data, we designed this study to further characterize the altered region(s) on chromosome 16 by evaluating 16 microsatellite markers on a population composed of 32 paired normal and primary prostatic tumor samples. The 16 microsatellites selected mapped to 11 distinct loci on 16q and 5 loci on 16p. No alterations were identified affecting 16p. However, 16 of 31 (51%) informative cases showed molecular alterations in at least one of the loci analyzed on 16q, consisting of 18 deletions and 11 bandshifts. Moreover, most of the deletions clustered at 6 microsatellite loci, mapping to the 16q22.1-23.1 region. Our results suggest that microsatellite alterations on the long arm of chromosome 16 are frequent events in prostate cancer, and that the 16q22.1-23.1 region might harbor a tumor suppressor gene involved in prostate cancer. PMID:9178811

  16. Segregation analysis of microsatellite (SSR) markers in sugarcane polyploids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers have been extensively used in sugarcane breeding research, little is known about its inheritance mechanism. To address this problem, a high throughput molecular genotyping experiment was conducted on 964 single pollen grains and a 288-self progeny S1 map...

  17. Segregation analysis of microsatellite (SSR) markers in sugarcane polyploids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers have been extensively used in sugarcane breeding research, little is known about how SSR markers are being transmitted into reproductive and zygotic cells. To illustrate this, a high-throughput molecular genotyping experiment was conducted on 964 individ...

  18. Investigation of paternity with alleged father deceased or missing: analysis of success at the end of the report.

    PubMed

    Basgalupp, Suelen Porto; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Schumacher, Simone; Gastaldo, André Zoratto; Santos Silva, Deborah Soares Bispo; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2014-09-01

    In this work we present a retrospective study of 858 cases of paternity investigation performed in Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil, from 2007 to 2012, where the alleged father was deceased or missing. These cases represent 3.3% (858/26187) of paternity tests performed in that period. Considering the analysis of 17 DNA short tandem repeat loci, we present here the proportion of cases with conclusive results according to the number of relatives of the unavailable alleged father investigated and their kinship. The results show 81.0% (695/858) of cases with conclusive results and their characteristics. PMID:24929954

  19. Comparative analysis of microsatellite variability in five macaw species (Psittaciformes, Psittacidae): Application for conservation.

    PubMed

    Presti, Flavia T; Oliveira-Marques, Adriana R; Caparroz, Renato; Biondo, Cibele; Miyaki, Cristina Y

    2011-04-01

    Cross-amplification was tested and variability in microsatellite primers (designed for Neotropical parrots) compared, in five macaw species, viz., three endangered blue macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii [extinct in the wild], Anodorhynchus leari [endangered] and Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus [vulnerable]), and two unthreatened red macaws (Ara chloropterus and Ara macao). Among the primers tested, 84.6% successfully amplified products in C. spixii, 83.3% in A. leari, 76.4% in A. hyacinthinus, 78.6% in A. chloropterus and 71.4% in A. macao. The mean expected heterozygosity estimated for each species, and based on loci analyzed in all the five, ranged from 0.33 (A. hyacinthinus) to 0.85 (A. macao). As expected, the results revealed lower levels of genetic variability in threatened macaw species than in unthreatened. The low combined probability of genetic identity and the moderate to high potential for paternity exclusion, indicate the utility of the microsatellite loci set selected for each macaw species in kinship and population studies, thus constituting an aid in planning in-situ and ex-situ conservation. PMID:21734841

  20. Comparative analysis of microsatellite variability in five macaw species (Psittaciformes, Psittacidae): Application for conservation

    PubMed Central

    Presti, Flavia T.; Oliveira-Marques, Adriana R.; Caparroz, Renato; Biondo, Cibele; Miyaki, Cristina Y.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-amplification was tested and variability in microsatellite primers (designed for Neotropical parrots) compared, in five macaw species, viz., three endangered blue macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii [extinct in the wild], Anodorhynchus leari [endangered] and Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus [vulnerable]), and two unthreatened red macaws (Ara chloropterus and Ara macao). Among the primers tested, 84.6% successfully amplified products in C. spixii, 83.3% in A. leari, 76.4% in A. hyacinthinus, 78.6% in A. chloropterus and 71.4% in A. macao. The mean expected heterozygosity estimated for each species, and based on loci analyzed in all the five, ranged from 0.33 (A. hyacinthinus) to 0.85 (A. macao). As expected, the results revealed lower levels of genetic variability in threatened macaw species than in unthreatened. The low combined probability of genetic identity and the moderate to high potential for paternity exclusion, indicate the utility of the microsatellite loci set selected for each macaw species in kinship and population studies, thus constituting an aid in planning in-situ and ex-situ conservation. PMID:21734841

  1. Vitis vinifera must varietal authentication using microsatellite DNA analysis (SSR).

    PubMed

    Faria, M A; Magalhães, R; Ferreira, M A; Meredith, C P; Monteiro, F F

    2000-04-01

    A microsatellite DNA-based method for Vitis vinifera grape must authentication is presented. Five of the most important port wine producing grape cultivars (Tinta Roriz, Tinto Cão, Touriga Francesa, Touriga Nacional, and Tinta Barroca) were typed at four microsatellite loci described by Bowers et al. (Genome 1996, 39, 628-633) and Thomas and Scott (Theor. Appl. Genet. 1993, 86, 985-990). The corresponding 5 varietal musts and 26 must mixtures that result from the combination of the five varieties were also typed at the four loci. There were no differences between the corresponding leaf and varietal must profiles. All must combinations showed the expected band profiles corresponding to the sum of the varietal band profile components. Among the 26 must mixtures, 8 could be discriminated using the four loci. PMID:10775355

  2. Paternal Child Care and Relationship Quality: A Longitudinal Analysis of Reciprocal Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schober, Pia S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored reciprocal associations between paternal child-care involvement and relationship quality by following British couples from the birth of a child until he or she reached school age. It extends the literature by distinguishing between paternal engagement in absolute terms and relative to the mother and by considering relationship…

  3. Paternal exposure to Agent Orange and spina bifida: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Anh Duc; Taylor, Richard; Roberts, Christine L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct a meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies that examine the association between Agent Orange (AO) exposure and the risk of spina bifida. Relevant studies were identified through a computerized literature search of Medline and Embase from 1966 to 2008; a review of the reference list of retrieved articles and conference proceedings; and by contacting researchers for unpublished studies. Both fixed-effects and random-effects models were used to pool the results of individual studies. The Cochrane Q test and index of heterogeneity (I(2)) were used to evaluate heterogeneity, and a funnel plot and Egger's test were used to evaluate publication bias. Seven studies, including two Vietnamese and five non-Vietnamese studies, involving 330 cases and 134,884 non-cases were included in the meta-analysis. The overall relative risk (RR) for spina bifida associated with paternal exposure to AO was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.48-2.74), with no statistical evidence of heterogeneity across studies. Non-Vietnamese studies showed a slightly higher summary RR (RR = 2.22; 95% CI: 1.38-3.56) than Vietnamese studies (RR = 1.92 95% CI: 1.29-2.86). When analyzed separately, the overall association was statistically significant for the three case-control studies (Summary Odds Ratio = 2.25, 95% CI: 1.31-3.86) and the cross sectional study (RR = 1.97, 95% CI: 1.31-2.96), but not for the three cohort studies (RR: 2.11; 95% CI: 0.78-5.73). Paternal exposure to AO appears to be associated with a statistically increased risk of spina bifida. PMID:19894129

  4. Microsatellite analysis in the genome of Acanthaceae: An in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaliswamy, Priyadharsini; Vellingiri, Srividhya; Nathan, Bharathi; Selvaraj, Saravanakumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acanthaceae is one of the advanced and specialized families with conventionally used medicinal plants. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play a major role as molecular markers for genome analysis and plant breeding. The microsatellites existing in the complete genome sequences would help to attain a direct role in the genome organization, recombination, gene regulation, quantitative genetic variation, and evolution of genes. Objective: The current study reports the frequency of microsatellites and appropriate markers for the Acanthaceae family genome sequences. Materials and Methods: The whole nucleotide sequences of Acanthaceae species were obtained from National Center for Biotechnology Information database and screened for the presence of SSRs. SSR Locator tool was used to predict the microsatellites and inbuilt Primer3 module was used for primer designing. Results: Totally 110 repeats from 108 sequences of Acanthaceae family plant genomes were identified, and the occurrence of dinucleotide repeats was found to be abundant in the genome sequences. The essential amino acid isoleucine was found rich in all the sequences. We also designed the SSR-based primers/markers for 59 sequences of this family that contains microsatellite repeats in their genome. Conclusion: The identified microsatellites and primers might be useful for breeding and genetic studies of plants that belong to Acanthaceae family in the future. PMID:25709226

  5. Single-male paternity in coelacanths.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Kathrin P; Blassmann, Katrin; Hissmann, Karen; Schauer, Jürgen; Shunula, Peter; el Kharousy, Zahor; Ngatunga, Benjamin P; Fricke, Hans; Schartl, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Latimeria chalumnae, a 'living fossil,' is of great scientific interest, as it is closely related to the aquatic ancestors of land-living tetrapods. Latimeria show internal fertilization and bear live young, but their reproductive behaviour is poorly known. Here we present for the first time a paternity analysis of the only available material from gravid females and their offspring. We genotype two L. chalumnae females and their unborn brood for 14 microsatellite loci. We find that the embryos are closely related to each other and never show more than three different alleles per locus, providing evidence for a single father siring all of the offspring. We reconstruct the father's genotype but cannot identify it in the population. These data suggest that coelacanths have a monogamous mating system and that individual relatedness is not important for mate choice. PMID:24048316

  6. Comparative Analysis of the Korean Population of Magnaporthe oryzae by Multilocus Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, inflicts serious damage to global rice production. Due to high variability of this fungal pathogen, resistance of newly-released rice cultivars is easily broken down. To understand the population structure of M. oryzae, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the Korean population using multilocus microsatellite typing. Eleven microsatellite markers were applied to the population of 190 rice isolates which had been collected in Korea for two decades since the 1980’s. Average values of gene diversity and allele frequency were 0.412 and 6.5, respectively. Comparative analysis of the digitized allele information revealed that the Korean population exhibited a similar level of allele diversity to the integrated diversity of the world populations, suggesting a particularly high diversity of the Korean population. Therefore, these microsatellite markers and the comprehensive collection of field isolates will be useful genetic resources to identify the genetic diversity of M. oryzae population. PMID:25288972

  7. Mosaic paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Diana; Atwal, Paldeep Singh; Angell, Cathy; Gadi, Inder; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-10-01

    We report on a 6-month-old girl with two apparent cell lines; one with trisomy 21, and the other with paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy (GWUPiD), identified using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based microarray and microsatellite analysis of polymorphic loci. The patient has Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) due to paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) at chromosome location 11p15 (UPD 11p15), which was confirmed through methylation analysis. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is present, which is associated with paternal UPD 11p15.5; and she likely has medullary nephrocalcinosis, which is associated with paternal UPD 20, although this was not biochemically confirmed. Angelman syndrome (AS) analysis was negative but this testing is not completely informative; she has no specific features of AS. Clinical features of this patient include: dysmorphic features consistent with trisomy 21, tetralogy of Fallot, hemihypertrophy, swirled skin hyperpigmentation, hepatoblastoma, and Wilms tumor. Her karyotype is 47,XX,+21[19]/46,XX[4], and microarray results suggest that the cell line with trisomy 21 is biparentally inherited and represents 40-50% of the genomic material in the tested specimen. The difference in the level of cytogenetically detected mosaicism versus the level of mosaicism observed via microarray analysis is likely caused by differences in the test methodologies. While a handful of cases of mosaic paternal GWUPiD have been reported, this patient is the only reported case that also involves trisomy 21. Other GWUPiD patients have presented with features associated with multiple imprinted regions, as does our patient. PMID:26219535

  8. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers and analysis of genetic variability in Curculigo latifolia Dryand.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Nahid; Abdullah, Nur Ashikin Psyquay; Saleh, Ghizan; Abdullah, Thohirah Lee

    2012-11-01

    Curculin, a sweet protein found in Curculigo latifolia fruit has great potential for the pharmaceutical industry. This protein interestingly has been found to have both sweet taste and taste-modifying capacities comparable with other natural sweeteners. According to our knowledge this is the first reported case on the isolation of microsatellite loci in this genus. Hence, the current development of microsatellite markers for C. latifolia will facilitate future population genetic studies and breeding programs for this valuable plant. In this study 11 microsatellite markers were developed using 3' and 5' ISSR markers. The primers were tested on 27 accessions from all states of Peninsular Malaysia. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven, with allele size ranging from 141 to 306 bp. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged between 0.00-0.65 and 0.38-0.79, respectively. The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 and the Shannon's information index ranged from 0.82 to 1.57. These developed polymorphic microsatellites were used for constructing a dendrogram by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analysis using the Dice's similarity coefficient. Accessions association according to their geographical origin was observed. Based on characteristics of isolated microsatellites for C. latifolia accessions all genotype can be distinguished using these 11 microsatellite markers. These polymorphic markers could also be applied to studies on uniformity determination and somaclonal variation of tissue culture plantlets, varieties identification, genetic diversity, analysis of phylogenetic relationship, genetic linkage maps and quantitative trait loci in C. latifolia. PMID:22752726

  9. Meta-analysis of microsatellite data from US and Brazil sheep breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to adapt a methodology for merging independent microsatellite data sets and exploring the differences between Brazilian (BZ) and US hair breeds of sheep. Eleven markers were in common for the US-BZ dataset and were merged for analysis of genetic structure and diversity. It ...

  10. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers Derived from the Whole Genome Analysis of Taenia solium

    PubMed Central

    Pajuelo, Mónica J.; Eguiluz, María; Dahlstrom, Eric; Requena, David; Guzmán, Frank; Ramirez, Manuel; Sheen, Patricia; Frace, Michael; Sammons, Scott; Cama, Vitaliano; Anzick, Sarah; Bruno, Dan; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Wilkins, Patricia; Nash, Theodore; Gonzalez, Armando; García, Héctor H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Porcella, Steve; Zimic, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections with Taenia solium are the most common cause of adult acquired seizures worldwide, and are the leading cause of epilepsy in developing countries. A better understanding of the genetic diversity of T. solium will improve parasite diagnostics and transmission pathways in endemic areas thereby facilitating the design of future control measures and interventions. Microsatellite markers are useful genome features, which enable strain typing and identification in complex pathogen genomes. Here we describe microsatellite identification and characterization in T. solium, providing information that will assist in global efforts to control this important pathogen. Methods For genome sequencing, T. solium cysts and proglottids were collected from Huancayo and Puno in Peru, respectively. Using next generation sequencing (NGS) and de novo assembly, we assembled two draft genomes and one hybrid genome. Microsatellite sequences were identified and 36 of them were selected for further analysis. Twenty T. solium isolates were collected from Tumbes in the northern region, and twenty from Puno in the southern region of Peru. The size-polymorphism of the selected microsatellites was determined with multi-capillary electrophoresis. We analyzed the association between microsatellite polymorphism and the geographic origin of the samples. Results The predicted size of the hybrid (proglottid genome combined with cyst genome) T. solium genome was 111 MB with a GC content of 42.54%. A total of 7,979 contigs (>1,000 nt) were obtained. We identified 9,129 microsatellites in the Puno-proglottid genome and 9,936 in the Huancayo-cyst genome, with 5 or more repeats, ranging from mono- to hexa-nucleotide. Seven microsatellites were polymorphic and 29 were monomorphic within the analyzed isolates. T. solium tapeworms were classified into two genetic groups that correlated with the North/South geographic origin of the parasites. Conclusions/Significance The availability of draft genomes for T. solium represents a significant step towards the understanding the biology of the parasite. We report here a set of T. solium polymorphic microsatellite markers that appear promising for genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:26697878

  11. Development of microsatellite markers from an enriched genomic library for genetic analysis of melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ritschel, Patricia Silva; Lins, Tulio Cesar de Lima; Tristan, Rodrigo Lourenço; Buso, Gláucia Salles Cortopassi; Buso, José Amauri; Ferreira, Márcio Elias

    2004-01-01

    Background Despite the great advances in genomic technology observed in several crop species, the availability of molecular tools such as microsatellite markers has been limited in melon (Cucumis melo L.) and cucurbit species. The development of microsatellite markers will have a major impact on genetic analysis and breeding of melon, especially on the generation of marker saturated genetic maps and implementation of marker assisted breeding programs. Genomic microsatellite enriched libraries can be an efficient alternative for marker development in such species. Results Seven hundred clones containing microsatellite sequences from a Tsp-AG/TC microsatellite enriched library were identified and one-hundred and forty-four primer pairs designed and synthesized. When 67 microsatellite markers were tested on a panel of melon and other cucurbit accessions, 65 revealed DNA polymorphisms among the melon accessions. For some cucurbit species, such as Cucumis sativus, up to 50% of the melon microsatellite markers could be readily used for DNA polymophism assessment, representing a significant reduction of marker development costs. A random sample of 25 microsatellite markers was extracted from the new microsatellite marker set and characterized on 40 accessions of melon, generating an allelic frequency database for the species. The average expected heterozygosity was 0.52, varying from 0.45 to 0.70, indicating that a small set of selected markers should be sufficient to solve questions regarding genotype identity and variety protection. Genetic distances based on microsatellite polymorphism were congruent with data obtained from RAPD marker analysis. Mapping analysis was initiated with 55 newly developed markers and most primers showed segregation according to Mendelian expectations. Linkage analysis detected linkage between 56% of the markers, distributed in nine linkage groups. Conclusions Genomic library microsatellite enrichment is an efficient procedure for marker development in melon. One-hundred and forty-four new markers were developed from Tsp-AG/TC genomic library. This is the first reported attempt of successfully using enriched library for microsatellite marker development in the species. A sample of the microsatellite markers tested proved efficient for genetic analysis of melon, including genetic distance estimates and identity tests. Linkage analysis indicated that the markers developed are dispersed throughout the genome and should be very useful for genetic analysis of melon. PMID:15149552

  12. Microsatellite analysis of population structure in Canadian polar bears.

    PubMed

    Paetkau, D; Calvert, W; Stirling, I; Strobeck, C

    1995-06-01

    Attempts to study the genetic population structure of large mammals are often hampered by the low levels of genetic variation observed in these species. Polar bears have particularly low levels of genetic variation with the result that their genetic population structure has been intractable. We describe the use of eight hypervariable microsatellite loci to study the genetic relationships between four Canadian polar bear populations: the northern Beaufort Sea, southern Beaufort Sea, western Hudson Bay, and Davis Strait-Labrador Sea. These markers detected considerable genetic variation, with average heterozygosity near 60% within each population. Interpopulation differences in allele frequency distribution were significant between all pairs of populations, including two adjacent populations in the Beaufort Sea. Measures of genetic distance reflect the geographic distribution of populations, but also suggest patterns of gene flow which are not obvious from geography and may reflect movement patterns of these animals. Distribution of variation is sufficiently different between the Beaufort Sea populations and the two more eastern ones that the region of origin for a given sample can be predicted based on its expected genotype frequency using an assignment test. These data indicate that gene flow between local populations is restricted despite the long-distance seasonal movements undertaken by polar bears. PMID:7663752

  13. [Basic concepts about paternity testing].

    PubMed

    Lagos, Marcela; Poggi, Helena; Mellado, Cecilia

    2011-04-01

    Nowadays, the analysis of genetic markers is a very important and validated tool for the identification of individuals, and for paternity testing. To do so, highly variable regions of the human genome are analyzed, making it possible to obtain the genetic profile of an individual, and to distinguish between different individuals. The methodology used is basically the same all over the world, consisting in the analysis of 13 to 15 markers. To assign biological paternity the child must have inherited the characteristics from the alleged father in each of the genetic markers analyzed. This analysis achieves a certainty higher than with any other test, which is expressed as the probability of paternity. This probability has to be at least 99.9%, but greater probabilities are usually obtained, especially if the mother is included in the analysis. If the characteristics of two or more genetic markers from the alleged father are absent in the child, biological paternity is excluded. PMID:21879196

  14. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in chloroplast genomes of lower and higher plants.

    PubMed

    George, Biju; Bhatt, Bhavin S; Awasthi, Mayur; George, Binu; Singh, Achuit K

    2015-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), contain repetitive DNA sequence where tandem repeats of one to six base pairs are present number of times. Chloroplast genome sequences have been  shown to possess extensive variations in the length, number and distribution of SSRs. However, a comparative analysis of chloroplast microsatellites is not available. Considering their potential importance in generating genomic diversity, we have systematically analysed the abundance and distribution of simple and compound microsatellites in 164 sequenced chloroplast genomes from wide range of plants. The key findings of these studies are (1) a large number of mononucleotide repeats as compared to SSR(2-6)(di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexanucleotide repeats) are present in all chloroplast genomes investigated, (2) lower plants such as algae show wide variation in relative abundance, density and distribution of microsatellite repeats as compared to flowering plants, (3) longer SSRs are excluded from coding regions of most chloroplast genomes, (4) GC content has a weak influence on number, relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide as well as SSR(2-6). However, GC content strongly showed negative correlation with relative density (R (2) = 0.5, P < 0.05) and relative abundance (R (2) = 0.6, P < 0.05) of cSSRs. In summary, our comparative studies of chloroplast genomes illustrate the variable distribution of microsatellites and revealed that chloroplast genome of smaller plants possesses relatively more genomic diversity compared to higher plants. PMID:25999216

  15. Do Paternal Arrest and Imprisonment Lead to Child Behaviour Problems and Substance Use? A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinner, Stuart A.; Alati, Rosa; Najman, Jake M.; Williams, Gail M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Children of prisoners are at increased risk of impaired health, behavioural problems and substance misuse; however, the causal pathways to these problems are unclear. Under some circumstances, parental imprisonment may result in improved outcomes for the child. This study investigates the impact of paternal arrest and imprisonment on…

  16. Do Paternal Arrest and Imprisonment Lead to Child Behaviour Problems and Substance Use? A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinner, Stuart A.; Alati, Rosa; Najman, Jake M.; Williams, Gail M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Children of prisoners are at increased risk of impaired health, behavioural problems and substance misuse; however, the causal pathways to these problems are unclear. Under some circumstances, parental imprisonment may result in improved outcomes for the child. This study investigates the impact of paternal arrest and imprisonment on

  17. The use of microsatellite analysis in Solanum tuberosum l. in vitro plantlets derived from cryopreserved germplasm.

    PubMed

    Harding, K; Benson, E E

    2001-01-01

    This study reports the application of the encapsulation/dehydration cryopreservation and microsatellite analysis to the conservation of Solanum tuberosum cultivars Brodick and Golden Wonder. Cryopreserved shoot-tips were capable of up to 40% shoot and plantlet regeneration in Brodick and >60 % for Golden Wonder. Microsatellite analysis was used with genomic DNA of Golden Wonder and Desiree to establish DNA sequence length polymorphisms. As the basis of stability assessments this technique was applied to: (i) individual, field-grown, plants of Golden Wonder; (ii) individual Golden Wonder plants derived from a single parental tuber progeny; (iii) plantlets derived from in vitro cultures of Golden Wonder and Brodick and (iv) Golden Wonder and Brodick plantlets derived from cryopreserved germplasm PMID:11788860

  18. Microsatellite DNA analysis does not distinguish malignant from benign pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Economidou, F; Tzortzaki, E G; Schiza, S; Antoniou, K M; Neofytou, E; Zervou, M; Lambiri, I; Siafakas, N M

    2007-12-01

    Distinguishing malignant from benign pleural effusions using routine cytology is a common diagnostic problem. Recently, genetic alterations, including microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), have been described in malignant pleural effusions and proposed as methods improving diagnostics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a panel of molecular markers for the detection of genetic alterations of cells in pleural effusions and to determine their diagnostic value as an additional test to cytologic examination. Pleural fluid and peripheral blood from 48 patients (36 male and 12 female, median age 71 years) were analyzed. Twenty-six patients had malignant pleural effusion, including 23 lung cancer and three metastatic non-pulmonary carcinoma. The control group consisted of 22 patients with benign pleural effusions. Only 14 malignancy-associated pleural effusions were cytology-positive for malignant cells (54%), whereas all benign pleural effusions were negative. DNA was extracted from all the samples and analysed for MSI and/or LOH using the following microsatellite markers: D3S1234, D9S171, D12S363, D17S250, D5S346 and TP53Alu, located at five chromosomal regions: 3p, 9p, 12q, 17q, 5q. Microsatellite analysis of the pleural fluid pellet exhibited genetic alterations in two neoplastic pleural fluid cases and in one inflammatory case. Two out of 26 (7.6%) patients with malignant pleural effusion showed genetic alterations. One exhibited MSI in three different microsatellite markers (D17S250, D9S171, D3S134) and the other showed LOH in marker D3S134. One out of 22 (4.5%) patients with benign pleural effusion showed LOH in marker D3S134. In conclusion, genetic alterations at the level of microsatellite DNA, were detected only in very few cases of malignant pleural effusions, and in one case of benign pleural effusion. Thus, our data suggest that microsatellite DNA analysis does not facilitate the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion. PMID:17982637

  19. Mechanical Aspects of Design, Analysis, and Testing for the NORSAT-1 Microsatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanji, Shahil

    NORSAT-1 is a multi-payload microsatellite mission funded by the Norwegian Space Center, with three overall objectives: investigating solar radiation, space plasma research, and developing improved methods for detection and management of ship traffic. The successful development of the NORSAT-1 platform aims to lay the groundwork for additional low-cost microsatellites in the NORSAT series, and expand the Norwegian presence in space and space-based ship tracking technologies. This thesis provides some insight into the NORSAT-1 satellite platform design, and focuses heavily on the mechanical aspects of design, analysis, and testing. The structural design is detailed from the early conceptual design phases, and follows the development to the manufacturing, integration, and testing of the flight spacecraft. Validation of the design through finite element modeling is presented, along with the development and design of two honeycomb composite solar panels, and two deployable whip antennas.

  20. Genome-wide scan for analysis of simple and imperfect microsatellites in diverse carlaviruses.

    PubMed

    Alam, Chaudhary Mashhood; Singh, Avadhesh Kumar; Sharfuddin, Choudhary; Ali, Safdar

    2014-01-01

    An exhaustive compilation and analysis of incidence, distribution and variation of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in viruses are required to understand the evolution and functional aspects of repetitive sequences. Present study focuses on the analysis of SSRs in 32 species of carlaviruses. The full length genome sequences were assessed from NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.-gov/) and analyzed using IMEx software. Variance in incidence of SSRs was observed, independent of genome size. Though the conversion of SSRs to imperfect microsatellite or compound SSR is low; compound microsatellites constituted by variant motifs accounted for up to 12.5% of the SSRs. Mononucleotide A/T is most prevalent followed by dinucleotide GT/TG and trinucleotide AAG/GAA in these genomes. The SSR and cSSR are predominantly localized to the coding region RDRP (RNA dependent RNA polymerase) and ORF-6 (open reading frame). The relative frequency of different classes of simple and compound microsatellites has been highlighted in accordance with the biology of carlavirus. Characterization of such variations would be pivotal for deciphering the enigma of these widely used, but incompletely understood sequences. PMID:24291012

  1. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster genome: abundance, distribution, and potential for marker development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Qi, Haigang; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are a ubiquitous component of the eukaryote genome and constitute one of the most popular sources of molecular markers for genetic studies. However, no data are currently available regarding microsatellites across the entire genome in oysters, despite their importance to the aquaculture industry. We present the first genome-wide investigation of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas by analysis of the complete genome, resequencing, and expression data. The Pacific oyster genome is rich in microsatellites. A total of 604 653 repeats were identified, in average of one locus per 815 base pairs (bp). A total of 12 836 genes had coding repeats, and 7 332 were expressed normally, including genes with a wide range of molecular functions. Compared with 20 different species of animals, microsatellites in the oyster genome typically exhibited 1) an intermediate overall frequency; 2) relatively uniform contents of (A)n and (C)n repeats and abundant long (C)n repeats (≥24 bp); 3) large average length of (AG)n repeats; and 4) scarcity of trinucleotide repeats. The microsatellite-flanking regions exhibited a high degree of polymorphism with a heterozygosity rate of around 2.0%, but there was no correlation between heterozygosity and microsatellite abundance. A total of 19 462 polymorphic microsatellites were discovered, and dinucleotide repeats were the most active, with over 26% of loci found to harbor allelic variations. In all, 7 451 loci with high potential for marker development were identified. Better knowledge of the microsatellites in the oyster genome will provide information for the future design of a wide range of molecular markers and contribute to further advancements in the field of oyster genetics, particularly for molecular-based selection and breeding.

  2. Identification of geographically distributed sub-populations of Leishmania (Leishmania) major by microsatellite analysis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Leishmania) major, one of the agents causing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in humans, is widely distributed in the Old World where different species of wild rodent and phlebotomine sand fly serve as animal reservoir hosts and vectors, respectively. Despite this, strains of L. (L.) major isolated from many different sources over many years have proved to be relatively uniform. To investigate the population structure of the species highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were employed for greater discrimination among it's otherwise closely related strains, an approach applied successfully to other species of Leishmania. Results Multilocus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT) based on 10 different microsatellite markers was applied to 106 strains of L. (L.) major from different regions where it is endemic. On applying a Bayesian model-based approach, three main populations were identified, corresponding to three separate geographical regions: Central Asia (CA); the Middle East (ME); and Africa (AF). This was congruent with phylogenetic reconstructions based on genetic distances. Re-analysis separated each of the populations into two sub-populations. The two African sub-populations did not correlate well with strains' geographical origin. Strains falling into the sub-populations CA and ME did mostly group according to their place of isolation although some anomalies were seen, probably, owing to human migration. Conclusion The model- and distance-based analyses of the microsatellite data exposed three main populations of L. (L.) major, Central Asia, the Middle East and Africa, each of which separated into two sub-populations. This probably correlates with the different species of rodent host. PMID:18577226

  3. Male mating success in an aquatically mating pinniped, the harbour seal (Phoca vitulina), assessed by microsatellite DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Coltman, D W; Bowen, W D; Wright, J M

    1998-05-01

    Similar to many other pinniped species, harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) mate exclusively at sea. Here we present the first attempt to measure male mating success in an aquatically mating pinniped. Male mating success was estimated by paternity analysis in two cohorts of pups born at Sable Island, Nova Scotia, Canada, using microsatellite DNA markers. The genotypes of 275 pups born in 1994 and 1995 were compared to those of 90 candidate males at six microsatellite loci using a likelihood approach to resolve paternity. Paternity could be assigned for two, 22, 40 and 85 pups at confidence levels of 95, 80, 65 and 50%, respectively. Most successful males were assigned the paternity of a single offspring, suggesting a low variance in male mating success relative to most pinniped species. The proportion of paternal half sibs within cohorts and between maternally related sibs estimated by maximum likelihood were not significantly different from zero. It is thus unlikely that most offspring were sired by a small number of highly successful unsampled males, and that female harbour seals do not usually exhibit fidelity to the same male in sequential breeding seasons. A low level of polygyny in Sable Island harbour seals is consistent with predictions based on their breeding ecology, as females are highly mobile and widely dispersed in the aquatic mating environment at Sable Island. PMID:9633104

  4. Application of Microsatellite Markers in Conservation Genetics and Fisheries Management: Recent Advances in Population Structure Analysis and Conservation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Muneer, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are the most popular and versatile genetic marker with myriads of applications in population genetics, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology. These are the arrays of DNA sequences, consisting of tandemly repeating mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide units, which are distributed throughout the genomes of most eukaryotic species. Microsatellites are codominant in nature, highly polymorphic, easily typed, and Mendelian inherited, all properties which make them very suitable for the study of population structure and pedigree analysis and capable of detecting differences among closely related species. PCR for microsatellites can be automated for identifying simple sequence repeat polymorphism. Small amount of blood samples or alcohol preserved tissue is adequate for analyzing them. Most of the microsatellites are noncoding, and therefore variations are independent of natural selection. These properties make microsatellites ideal genetic markers for conservation genetics and fisheries management. This review addresses the applications of microsatellite markers in conservation genetics and recent advances in population structure analysis in the context of fisheries management. PMID:24808959

  5. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Telfer, Emily J.; Stovold, Grahame T.; Li, Yongjun; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B.; Grattapaglia, Dario G.; Dungey, Heidi S.

    2015-01-01

    Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K). The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi-species SNP resource available with the EuCHIP60k, opens a whole new array of opportunities for high-throughput, genome-wide or targeted genotyping in species of Eucalyptus. PMID:26158446

  6. Defining Contributions of Paternally Methylated Imprinted Genes at the Igf2-H19 and Dlk1-Gtl2 Domains to Mouse Placentation by Transcriptomic Analysis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Manabu; Morita, Shinnosuke; Takahashi, Nozomi; Kono, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    Parental genome functions in ontogeny are determined by interactions among transcripts from the maternal and paternal genomes, which contain many genes whose expression is strictly dependent on their parental origin as a result of genomic imprinting. Comprehensive recognition of the interactions between parental genomes is important for understanding genomic imprinting in mammalian development. The placenta is a key organ for exploring the biological significance of genomic imprinting. To decipher the unknown roles of paternally methylated imprinted genes on chromosomes 7 and 12 in mouse placentation, we performed a transcriptomic analysis on placentae in three types of bimaternal conceptuses that contained genomes derived from both non-growing and fully grown oocytes. Furthermore, we used the Ingenuity pathway analysis software to predict key networks and identify functions specific to paternally methylated imprinted genes regulated by the Igf2-H19 imprinting control region and Dlk1-Dio3 imprinting control region. The data suggested that dynamic conversion of the gene expression profile by restoring the expression of paternally methylated imprinted genes resulted in phenotypic improvements in bimaternal placentae. These results provide a framework to further explore the role of epigenetic modifications in paternal genome during mouse placentation. PMID:19380578

  7. Associations between maternal and paternal parenting behaviors, anxiety and its precursors in early childhood: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Möller, Eline L; Nikolić, Milica; Majdandžić, Mirjana; Bögels, Susan M

    2016-04-01

    In this meta-analysis we investigated differential associations between maternal and paternal parenting behaviors (overcontrol, overprotection, overinvolvement, autonomy granting, challenging parenting) and anxiety and its precursors (fearful temperament, behavioral inhibition, shyness) in children (0-5years). Two meta-analyses were conducted, one for mothers (k=28, N=5,728), and one for fathers (k=12, N=1,019). In general, associations between parenting and child anxiety were small. Associations between child anxiety and overcontrol, overprotection, and overinvolvement did not differ for mothers and fathers. Maternal autonomy granting was not significantly related to child anxiety, and no studies examined fathers' autonomy granting. A significant difference was found for challenging parenting; mothers' challenging parenting was not significantly related to child anxiety, whereas fathers' challenging parenting was related to less child anxiety. Post-hoc meta-analyses revealed that mothers' and fathers' parenting was more strongly related to children's anxiety symptoms than to child anxiety precursors. Moreover, the association between parenting and child anxiety symptoms was stronger for fathers than for mothers. In conclusion, although parenting plays only a small role in early childhood anxiety, fathers' parenting is at least as important as mothers'. Paternal challenging behavior even seems more important than maternal challenging behavior. Research is needed to determine whether challenging fathering can prevent child anxiety development. PMID:26978324

  8. Segregation analysis of microsatellite (SSR) markers in sugarcane polyploids.

    PubMed

    Lu, X; Zhou, H; Pan, Y-B; Chen, C Y; Zhu, J R; Chen, P H; Li, Y-R; Cai, Q; Chen, R K

    2015-01-01

    No information is available on segregation analysis of DNA markers involving both pollen and self-progeny. Therefore, we used capillary electrophoresis- and fluorescence-based DNA fingerprinting together with single pollen collection and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to investigate simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker segregation among 964 single pollens and 288 self-progenies (S1) of sugarcane cultivar LCP 85-384. Twenty SSR DNA fragments (alleles) were amplified by five polymorphic SSR markers. Only one non-parental SSR allele was observed in 2392 PCRs. SSR allele inheritance was in accordance with Mendelian laws of segregation and independent assortment. Highly significant correlation coefficients were found between frequencies of observed and expected genotypes in pollen and S1 populations. Within the S1 population, the most frequent genotype of each SSR marker was the parental genotype of the same marker. The number of genotypes was higher in pollen than S1 population. PIC values of the five SSR markers were greater in pollen than S1 populations. Eleven of 20 SSR alleles (55%) were segregated in accordance with Mendelian segregation ratios expected from pollen and S1 populations of a 2n = 10x polyploid. Six of 20 SSR alleles were segregated in a 3:1 (presence:absence) ratio and were simplex markers. Four and one alleles were segregated in 77:4 and 143:1 ratios and considered duplex and triplex markers, respectively. Segregation ratios of remaining alleles were unexplainable. The results provide information about selection of crossing parents, estimation of seedling population optimal size, and promotion of efficient selection, which may be valuable for sugarcane breeders. PMID:26782486

  9. Genetic Diversity and Geographic Population Structure of Bovine Neospora caninum Determined by Microsatellite Genotyping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; García-Culebras, Alicia; Moore, Dadín P.; González-Warleta, Marta; Cuevas, Carmen; Schares, Gereon; Katzer, Frank; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; Mezo, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The cyst-forming protozoan parasite Neosporacaninum is one of the main causes of bovine abortion worldwide and is of great economic importance in the cattle industry. Recent studies have revealed extensive genetic variation among N. caninum isolates based on microsatellite sequences (MSs). MSs may be suitable molecular markers for inferring the diversity of parasite populations, molecular epidemiology and the basis for phenotypic variations in N. caninum, which have been poorly defined. In this study, we evaluated nine MS markers using a panel of 11 N. caninum-derived reference isolates from around the world and 96 N. caninum bovine clinical samples and one ovine clinical sample collected from four countries on two continents, including Spain, Argentina, Germany and Scotland, over a 10-year period. These markers were used as molecular tools to investigate the genetic diversity, geographic distribution and population structure of N. caninum. Multilocus microsatellite genotyping based on 7 loci demonstrated high levels of genetic diversity in the samples from all of the different countries, with 96 microsatellite multilocus genotypes (MLGs) identified from 108 N. caninum samples. Geographic sub-structuring was present in the country populations according to pairwise FST. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Neighbor Joining tree topologies also suggested MLG segregation partially associated with geographical origin. An analysis of the MLG relationships, using eBURST, confirmed that the close genetic relationship observed between the Spanish and Argentinean populations may be the result of parasite migration (i.e., the introduction of novel MLGs from Spain to South America) due to cattle movement. The eBURST relationships also revealed genetically different clusters associated with the abortion. The presence of linkage disequilibrium, the co-existence of specific MLGs to individual farms and eBURST MLG relationships suggest a predominant clonal propagation for Spanish N. caninum MLGs in cattle. PMID:23940816

  10. Genetic diversity and geographic population structure of bovine Neospora caninum determined by microsatellite genotyping analysis.

    PubMed

    Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; García-Culebras, Alicia; Moore, Dadín P; González-Warleta, Marta; Cuevas, Carmen; Schares, Gereon; Katzer, Frank; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; Mezo, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    The cyst-forming protozoan parasite Neosporacaninum is one of the main causes of bovine abortion worldwide and is of great economic importance in the cattle industry. Recent studies have revealed extensive genetic variation among N. caninum isolates based on microsatellite sequences (MSs). MSs may be suitable molecular markers for inferring the diversity of parasite populations, molecular epidemiology and the basis for phenotypic variations in N. caninum, which have been poorly defined. In this study, we evaluated nine MS markers using a panel of 11 N. caninum-derived reference isolates from around the world and 96 N. caninum bovine clinical samples and one ovine clinical sample collected from four countries on two continents, including Spain, Argentina, Germany and Scotland, over a 10-year period. These markers were used as molecular tools to investigate the genetic diversity, geographic distribution and population structure of N. caninum. Multilocus microsatellite genotyping based on 7 loci demonstrated high levels of genetic diversity in the samples from all of the different countries, with 96 microsatellite multilocus genotypes (MLGs) identified from 108 N. caninum samples. Geographic sub-structuring was present in the country populations according to pairwise F(ST). Principal component analysis (PCA) and Neighbor Joining tree topologies also suggested MLG segregation partially associated with geographical origin. An analysis of the MLG relationships, using eBURST, confirmed that the close genetic relationship observed between the Spanish and Argentinean populations may be the result of parasite migration (i.e., the introduction of novel MLGs from Spain to South America) due to cattle movement. The eBURST relationships also revealed genetically different clusters associated with the abortion. The presence of linkage disequilibrium, the co-existence of specific MLGs to individual farms and eBURST MLG relationships suggest a predominant clonal propagation for Spanish N. caninum MLGs in cattle. PMID:23940816

  11. Biomarkers and microsatellite instability analysis of curettings can predict the behavior of FIGO stage I endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Steinbakk, Anita; Malpica, Anais; Slewa, Aida; Skaland, Ivar; Gudlaugsson, Einar; Janssen, Emiel A M; Løvslett, Kjell; Fiane, Bent; Kruse, Arnold Jan; Feng, Weiwei; Yinhua, Yu; Baak, Jan P

    2011-09-01

    The prognostic value of molecular biomarkers, microsatellite instability, DNA ploidy and morphometric mean shortest nuclear axis in endometrial cancer is conflicting, possibly due to the fact that different studies have used mixtures of histotypes, FIGO stages and different non-standardized non-automated methods. We have evaluated the prognostic value of classical prognostic factors, molecular biomarkers, microsatellite instability, DNA ploidy and morphometric mean shortest nuclear axis in a population-based cohort of FIGO stage I endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinomas. Curettings of 224 FIGO stage I endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma patients were reviewed. Clinical information, including follow-up, was obtained from the patients' charts. Microsatellite instability and morphometric mean shortest nuclear axis were obtained in whole tissue sections and molecular biomarkers using tissue microarrays. DNA ploidy was analyzed by image cytometry. Univariate (Kaplan-Meier method) and multivariate (Cox model) survival analysis was performed. With median follow-up of 66 months (1-209), 14 (6%) patients developed metastases. Age, microsatellite instability, molecular biomarkers (p16, p21, p27, p53 and survivin) and morphometric mean shortest nuclear axis had prognostic value. With multivariate analysis, combined survivin, p21 and microsatellite instability overshadowed all other variables. Patients in which any of these features had favorable values had an excellent prognosis, in contrast to those with either high survivin or low p21 (97 vs 78% survival, P<0.0001, hazard ratio=7.8). Combined high survivin and low p21 values and microsatellite instability high identified a small subgroup with an especially poor prognosis (survival rate 57%, P=0.01, hazard ratio=5.6). We conclude that low p21 and high survivin expression are poor prognosis indicators in FIGO stage I endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma, especially when high microsatellite instability occurs. PMID:21552210

  12. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs) are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD) was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop. PMID:22305491

  13. Microsatellite and Mitochondrial Diversity Analysis of Native Pigs of Indo-Burma Biodiversity Hotspot.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Nihar Ranjan; Nesa, Nashimun; Naskar, Soumen; Banik, Santanu; Pankaj, Prabhat Kumar; Sahoo, Monalisa

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of genetic diversity in indigenous animals is an important and essential task for animal genetic improvement studies as well as conservation decision-making. The genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships among geographically and phenotypically distinct three pig breeds/types native to Indo-Burma and Eastern Himalayan global biodiversity hotspots were determined by genotyping with a panel of 22 ISAG recommended microsatellite loci as well as sequencing partial MTRNR1gene. The mean number of alleles per locus, effective number of alleles and observed heterozygosity were found to be 11.27 ± 0.85, 5.29 ± 0.34, and 0.795 ± 0.01, respectively. The moderate FST value (0.115 ± 0.01) indicated a fair degree of genetic differentiation among the native breeds. The Nei's unbiased genetic identity estimates indicated less genetic distance (0.2909) between Niang Megha and Tenyi Vo pigs than the both individually with Ghoongroo breed. The divergence time was also estimated from the microsatellite analysis. Analysis of MTRNR1gene revealed distinct clustering of native Indian pigs with Chinese pigs over European pigs. The study revealed the abundance of genetic variation within native Indian pigs and their relationships as well as genetic distances. PMID:26695527

  14. Selection of an effective microsatellite marker system for genetic control and analysis of gerbil populations in China.

    PubMed

    Du, X Y; Li, W; Sa, X Y; Li, C L; Lu, J; Wang, Y Z; Chen, Z W

    2015-01-01

    Although gerbils have been widely used in many areas of biological research over many years, there is currently no effective genetic quality control system available. In the present study, we sought to establish a microsatellite marker system for quality control and conducted an optimized analysis of 137 microsatellite loci in two laboratory gerbil populations and one wild population. Independent sample t-tests on the mean effective allele number, mean of Shannon's information index, and mean HE suggested that 28 of the 137 microsatellite markers were informative for gerbil genetic control. Analysis of 4 laboratory gerbil populations and 1 wild population using the 28 microsatellite loci indicated that allele numbers varied from 1.9639 (Guangzhou, GZ) to 6.6071 (North-West wild, NW). The average of HO versus HE was 0.6236/0.3802, 0.6671/0.4159, 0.4185/0.3464, 0.4592/0.3821, and 0.3972/0.4167 for the Beijing, NW, Hangzhou, Dalian, and GZ populations, respectively. The GZ population showed the greatest differentiation, having higher RST and Nei's standard genetic distances. An AMO-VA revealed high genetic differentiation among the five populations (FST = 0.296). The microsatellite system established here is effective and will be important in future studies for genetic quality control and monitoring of gerbil breeds. PMID:26400333

  15. Differentiation of the Italian wolf and the domestic dog based on microsatellite analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dolf, Gaudenz; Schläpfer, Jörg; Gaillard, Claude; Randi, Ettore; Lucchini, Vittorio; Breitenmoser, Urs; Stahlberger-Saitbekova, Nasikhat

    2000-01-01

    The Italian wolf is in the process of regaining the Alpine region which comes into conflict with the extensive sheep keeping practiced in Switzerland during the summer. As in Switzerland, the wolf is a protected species, the government reimburses losses caused by wolves. Therefore we wanted to know whether the Italian wolf could be distinguished from the domestic dog by microsatellite analysis if DNA samples of the predators could be secured. The evaluation of combined genotypes for the microsatellites CanBern6, CPH4, CPH7, CPH9, CPH12, CPH22 and ZuBeCa1 made it possible to identify an individual as either a domestic dog or an Italian wolf. The assignment of an individual to either one of the two populations is based on the logarithm of the likelihood ratio of an individual being an Italian wolf rather than a domestic dog, given a specific combined genotype. The distribution of the Italian wolf combined genotypes (n = 42) is clearly distinct from the distribution of the domestic dog combined genotypes (n = 90). The likelihood ratio for the "worst" Italian wolf combined genotype was 2.3 E+5 and for the "worst" domestic dog combined genotype was 3.8 E-5. PMID:14736381

  16. Differentiation of the Italian wolf and the domestic dog based on microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Dolf, G; Schläpfer, J; Gaillard, C; Randi, E; Lucchini, V; Breitenmoser, U; Stahlberger-Saitbekova, N

    2000-01-01

    The Italian wolf is in the process of regaining the Alpine region which comes into conflict with the extensive sheep keeping practiced in Switzerland during the summer. As in Switzerland, the wolf is a protected species, the government reimburses losses caused by wolves. Therefore we wanted to know whether the Italian wolf could be distinguished from the domestic dog by microsatellite analysis if DNA samples of the predators could be secured. The evaluation of combined genotypes for the microsatellites CanBern6, CPH4, CPH7, CPH9, CPH12, CPH22 and ZuBeCa1 made it possible to identify an individual as either a domestic dog or an Italian wolf. The assignment of an individual to either one of the two populations is based on the logarithm of the likelihood ratio of an individual being an Italian wolf rather than a domestic dog, given a specific combined genotype. The distribution of the Italian wolf combined genotypes (n=42) is clearly distinct from the distribution of the domestic dog combined genotypes (n=90). The likelihood ratio for the "worst" Italian wolf combined genotype was 2.3 E+5 and for the "worst" domestic dog combined genotype was 3.8 E-5. PMID:14736381

  17. Analysis of genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei using microsatellite markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Weiji; Li, Weiya; Zhang, Quanqi; Kong, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Seven microsatellite markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei, which were introduced from Central and South America to China. All seven microsatellite loci were polymorphic, with polymorphism information content ( PIC) values ranging from 0.593 to 0.952. Totally 92 alleles were identified, and the number of alleles ( Na) and effective alleles ( Ne) varied between 4 and 21 and 2.7 and 14.6, respectively. Observed heterozygosity ( H o) values were lower than the expected heterozygosity ( H e) values (0.526-0.754), which indicated that the seven stocks possessed a rich genetic diversity. Thirty-seven tests were detected for reasonable significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. F is values were positive at five loci, suggesting that there was a relatively high degree of inbreeding within stocks. Pairwise F st values ranged from 0.0225 to 0.151, and most of the stock pairs were moderately differentiated. Genetic distance and cluster analysis using UPGMA revealed a close genetic relationship of L. vannamei between Pop2 and Pop3. AMOVA indicated that the genetic variation among stocks (11.3%) was much lower than that within stocks (88.7%). Although the seven stocks had a certain degree of genetic differentiation and a rich genetic diversity, there is an increasing risk of decreased performance due to inbreeding in subsequent generations.

  18. Evaluation of bull prolificacy on commercial beef cattle ranches using DNA paternity analysis.

    PubMed

    Van Eenennaam, A L; Weber, K L; Drake, D J

    2014-06-01

    SNP-based DNA testing was used to assign paternity to 5,052 calves conceived in natural service multisire breeding pastures from 3 commercial ranches in northern California representing 15 calf crops over 3 yr. Bulls present for 60 to 120 d at a 25:1 cow to bull ratio in both fall and spring breeding seasons in ∼40 ha or smaller fenced breeding pastures sired a highly variable (P < 0.001) number of calves (Ncalf), ranging from 0 (4.4% of bulls present in any given breeding season) to 64 calves per bull per breeding season, with an average of 18.9 ± 13.1. There was little variation in Ncalf among ranches (P = 0.90), years (P = 0.96), and seasons (P = 0.94). Bulls varied widely (P < 0.01) in the average individual 205-d adjusted weaning weight (I205) of progeny, and I205 varied between years (P < 0.01) and seasons (P < 0.01) but not ranches (P = 0.29). The pattern for cumulative total 205-d adjusted weaning weight of all progeny sired by a bull (T205) was highly correlated to Ncalf, with small differences between ranches (P = 0.35), years (P = 0.66), and seasons (P = 0.20) but large differences (P < 0.01) between bulls, ranging from an average of 676 to 8,838 kg per bull per calf crop. The peak Ncalf occurred at about 5 yr of age for bulls ranging from 2 to 11 yr of age. Weekly conception rates as assessed by date of calving varied significantly and peaked at wk 3 of the calving season. The distribution of calves born early in the calving season was disproportionately skewed toward the highly prolific bulls. The DNA paternity testing of the subset of those calves born in wk 3 of the calving season was highly predictive of overall bull prolificacy and may offer a reduced-cost DNA-based option for assessing prolificacy. Prolificacy of young bulls in their first breeding season was positively linearly related (P < 0.05) to subsequent breeding seasons, explaining about 20% of the subsequent variation. Prolificacy was also positively linearly related (P < 0.05) to scrotal circumference (SC) EPD for Angus bulls that had SC EPD Beef Improvement Federation accuracies greater than 0.05. Varying prolificacy of herd bulls has implications for the genetic composition of replacement heifers, with the genetics of those bulls siring an increased number of calves being disproportionately represented in the early-born replacement heifer pool. PMID:24753384

  19. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Bertholletia excelsa (Lecythidaceae) population genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sujii, P S; Inglis, P W; Ciampi, A Y; Solferini, V N; Azevedo, V C R

    2013-01-01

    Seven polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed and validated for Bertholletia excelsa (Brazil nut tree) population genetic studies. This species is a widespread monotypic Amazonian tree with high non-timber economic value. Unfortunately, Brazil nut production is currently less than 25% of historical production levels, because of extensive deforestation. All pairs of primers produced clearly interpretable and polymorphic bands. No linkage disequilibrium was observed in an analysis of 46 individuals from one population, three to seven alleles per locus were observed; the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.378 to 0.978, with significant heterozygote excess for four loci. An analysis of individuals from two populations showed private alleles at all loci. These primer pairs will be useful for population studies, especially for comparing samples from different parts of the Amazon forest. PMID:24301788

  20. Genotype Reconstruction of Paternity in European Lobsters (Homarus gammarus).

    PubMed

    Ellis, Charlie D; Hodgson, David J; André, Carl; Sørdalen, Tonje K; Knutsen, Halvor; Griffiths, Amber G F

    2015-01-01

    Decapod crustaceans exhibit considerable variation in fertilisation strategies, ranging from pervasive single paternity to the near-ubiquitous presence of multiple paternity, and such knowledge of mating systems and behaviour are required for the informed management of commercially-exploited marine fisheries. We used genetic markers to assess the paternity of individual broods in the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, a species for which paternity structure is unknown. Using 13 multiplexed microsatellite loci, three of which are newly described in this study, we genotyped 10 eggs from each of 34 females collected from an Atlantic peninsula in the south-western United Kingdom. Single reconstructed paternal genotypes explained all observed progeny genotypes in each of the 34 egg clutches, and each clutch was fertilised by a different male. Simulations indicated that the probability of detecting multiple paternity was in excess of 95% if secondary sires account for at least a quarter of the brood, and in excess of 99% where additional sire success was approximately equal. Our results show that multiple paternal fertilisations are either absent, unusual, or highly skewed in favour of a single male among H. gammarus in this area. Potential mechanisms upholding single paternal fertilisation are discussed, along with the prospective utility of parentage assignments in evaluations of hatchery stocking and other fishery conservation approaches in light of this finding. PMID:26566271

  1. Genotype Reconstruction of Paternity in European Lobsters (Homarus gammarus)

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Charlie D.; Hodgson, David J.; André, Carl; Sørdalen, Tonje K.; Knutsen, Halvor; Griffiths, Amber G. F.

    2015-01-01

    Decapod crustaceans exhibit considerable variation in fertilisation strategies, ranging from pervasive single paternity to the near-ubiquitous presence of multiple paternity, and such knowledge of mating systems and behaviour are required for the informed management of commercially-exploited marine fisheries. We used genetic markers to assess the paternity of individual broods in the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, a species for which paternity structure is unknown. Using 13 multiplexed microsatellite loci, three of which are newly described in this study, we genotyped 10 eggs from each of 34 females collected from an Atlantic peninsula in the south-western United Kingdom. Single reconstructed paternal genotypes explained all observed progeny genotypes in each of the 34 egg clutches, and each clutch was fertilised by a different male. Simulations indicated that the probability of detecting multiple paternity was in excess of 95% if secondary sires account for at least a quarter of the brood, and in excess of 99% where additional sire success was approximately equal. Our results show that multiple paternal fertilisations are either absent, unusual, or highly skewed in favour of a single male among H. gammarus in this area. Potential mechanisms upholding single paternal fertilisation are discussed, along with the prospective utility of parentage assignments in evaluations of hatchery stocking and other fishery conservation approaches in light of this finding. PMID:26566271

  2. In-silico analysis of simple and imperfect microsatellites in diverse tobamovirus genomes.

    PubMed

    Alam, Chaudhary Mashhood; Singh, Avadhesh Kumar; Sharfuddin, Choudhary; Ali, Safdar

    2013-11-10

    An in-silico analysis of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in 30 species of tobamoviruses was done. SSRs (mono to hexa) were present with variant frequency across species. Compound microsatellites, primarily of variant motifs accounted for up to 11.43% of the SSRs. Motif duplications were observed for A, T, AT, and ACA repeats. (AG)-(TC) was the most prevalent SSR-couple. SSRs were differentially localized in the coding region with ~54% on the 128 kDa protein while 20.37% was exclusive to 186 kDa protein. Characterization of such variations is important for elucidating the origin, sequence variations, and structure of these widely used, but incompletely understood sequences. PMID:23981776

  3. Genetic diversity analysis of six Spanish native cattle breeds using microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Martín-Burriel, I; García-Muro, E; Zaragoza, P

    1999-06-01

    Six native Spanish cattle breeds have been characterized by using 30 microsatellite markers. The studied populations can be divided into three groups: Brown orthoid (Asturian Mountain, Asturian Lowland and the Nord-west Brown Group), Red convex (Pyrenean and Menorquina) and the Iberian bovine (Fighting bull). Allele frequencies were calculated and used for the characterization of the breeds and the study of their genetic relationships. Different genetic distance measures were calculated and used for dendogram construction. The closest populations were those representing Asturian breeds, the most divergent being Menorquina and Fighting Bull. The latter also showed the lowest diversity values (mean number of alleles per locus and heterozygosity). Genetic distances obtained between the other populations under analysis were similar to those reported for different European cattle breeds. This work analyzes the recent origin of these populations and contributes to the knowledge and genetic characterization of European native breeds. PMID:10442978

  4. System Performance Analysis of Three Dimensional Reaction Wheel for the Attitude Control of Microsatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasawa, Yoji; Tsuda, Yuichi

    This paper presents a novel attitude control device which is called three dimensional reaction wheel (3DRW). 3DRW consists of only one levitated spherical mass which can rotate around arbitrary axes. This leads to the reduction of the weight and volume of the device as compared to existing reaction wheel. Furthermore, this device has no mechanical contact between rotor and stator, so the failure caused by the mechanical contact would be reduced. In this paper, the results of the analysis and experiment on the dynamics and control of 3DRW are shown. In the experiments of the rotation control, the air bearing system is used. Using this device, the characteristics of rotation of the spherical mass are obtained. To verify the feasibility of the concept of 3DRW, the experiments of angular velocity feedback control are carried out. The results of experiments are applied to the numerical simulation of the attitude control for microsatellites, and the feasibility of 3DRW is verified.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis and species allocation of individual equids using microsatellite data.

    PubMed

    Krger, K; Gaillard, C; Stranzinger, G; Rieder, S

    2005-04-01

    The taxonomic status of all equid species is not completely unravelled. This is of practical relevance for conservation initiatives of endangered, fragmented equid populations, such as the Asiatic wild asses (in particular Equus hemionus onager and E. hemionus kulan). In this study, a marker panel consisting of 31 microsatellite loci was used to assess species demarcation and phylogeny, as well as allocation of individuals (n = 120) to specific populations of origin (n = 11). Phylogenetic analysis revealed coalescence times comparable with those previously published from fossil records and mtDNA data. Using Bayesian approaches, it was possible to distinguish between the studied equids, although individual assignment levels varied. The observed results support the maintenance of separate captive conservation herds for E. hemionus onager and E. hemionus kulan. The first molecular genetic results for E. hemionus luteus remained contradictory, as they unexpectedly indicated a closer genetic relationship between E. hemionus luteus and E. kiang holderi compared with the other hemiones. PMID:16130461

  6. Narrow genetic basis for the Australian dingo confirmed through analysis of paternal ancestry.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Arman; Oskarsson, Mattias; Natanaelsson, Christian; Wilton, Alan N; Ahmadian, Afshin; Savolainen, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The dingo (Canis lupus dingo) is an iconic animal in the native culture of Australia, but archaeological and molecular records indicate a relatively recent history on the continent. Studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) imply that the current dingo population was founded by a small population of already tamed dogs from Southeast Asia. However, the maternal genetic data might give a unilateral picture, and the gene pool has yet to be screened for paternal ancestry. We sequenced 14,437 bp of the Y-chromosome (Y-chr) from two dingoes and one New Guinea Singing Dog (NGSD). This positioned dingo and NGSD within the domestic dog Y-chr phylogeny, and produced one haplotype not detected before. With this data, we characterized 47 male dingoes in 30 Y-chr single-nucleotide polymorphism sites using protease-mediated allele-specific extension technology. Only two haplotypes, H3 and H60, were found among the dingoes, at frequencies of 68.1 and 31.9 %, respectively, compared to 27 haplotypes previously established in the domestic dog. While H3 is common among Southeast Asian dogs, H60 was specifically found in dingoes and the NGSD, but was related to Southeast Asian dog Y-chr haplotypes. H3 and H60 were observed exclusively in the western and eastern parts of Australia, respectively, but had a common range in Southeast. Thus, the Y-chr diversity was very low, similar to previous observations for d-loop mtDNA. Overall genetic evidence suggests a very restricted introduction of the first dingoes into Australia, possibly from New Guinea. This study further confirms the dingo as an isolated feral dog. PMID:22618967

  7. Genetic Variation Between Two Cucumber Genotypes Inferred from Genome-wide Microsatellite Polymorphism Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variability at microsatellite loci has been used widely to infer the extent of genetic diversity among related plant taxa. However, typically, only the most polymorphic loci in the genome were analyzed that may result in a biased, and generally overestimated picture of genome-wide microsatellite div...

  8. The impact of extensive clonal growth on fine-scale mating patterns: a full paternity analysis of a lily-of-the-valley population (Convallaria majalis)

    PubMed Central

    Vandepitte, Katrien; De Meyer, Tim; Jacquemyn, Hans; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Honnay, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The combination of clonality and a mating system promoting outcrossing is considered advantageous because outcrossing avoids the fitness costs of selfing within clones (geitonogamy) while clonality assures local persistence and increases floral display. The spatial spread of genetically identical plants (ramets) may, however, also decrease paternal diversity (the number of sires fertilizing a given dam) and fertility, particularly towards the centre of large clumped clones. This study aimed to quantify the impact of extensive clonal growth on fine-scale paternity patterns in a population of the allogamous Convallaria majalis. Methods A full analysis of paternity was performed by genotyping all flowering individuals and all viable seeds produced during a single season using AFLP. Mating patterns were examined and the spatial position of ramets was related to the extent of multiple paternity, fruiting success and seed production. Key Results The overall outcrossing rate was high (91 %) and pollen flow into the population was considerable (27 %). Despite extensive clonal growth, multiple paternity was relatively common (the fraction of siblings sharing the same father was 0·53 within ramets). The diversity of offspring collected from reproductive ramets surrounded by genetically identical inflorescences was as high as among offspring collected from ramets surrounded by distinct genets. There was no significant relationship between the similarity of the pollen load received by two ramets and the distance between them. Neither the distance of ramets with respect to distinct genets nor the distance to the genet centre significantly affected fruiting success or seed production. Conclusions Random mating and considerable pollen inflow most probably implied that pollen dispersal distances were sufficiently high to mitigate local mate scarcity despite extensive clonal spread. The data provide no evidence for the intrusion of clonal growth on fine-scale plant mating patterns. PMID:23439847

  9. Multiple paternity in the freshwater snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    PubMed Central

    Soper, Deanna M; Delph, Lynda F; Lively, Curt M

    2012-01-01

    Mating multiply may incur costs, such as exposure to predators and to sexually transmitted diseases. Nevertheless, it may be favored, in spite of these costs, as a way to increase the genetic diversity of offspring through fertilization by multiple males. Here, we tested for multiple paternity in a freshwater snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), which is host to several species of sterilizing trematode worms. Using microsatellites markers, we found multiple paternity in two different snail populations, with as many as seven males fertilizing a single female. In addition, high evenness of sire fertilization was found within individual broods. Multiple paternity can occur for a variety of reasons; however, given that these populations experience high risk of infection by a sterilizing trematode, one potential explanation may be that multiple paternity and high evenness of sire fertilizations increase the chances of the production of parasite-resistant offspring. PMID:23301182

  10. Genetic linkage analysis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using human chromosome 21 microsatellite DNA markers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Sapp, P.; O`Regan, J.; McKenna-Yasek, D.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Haines, J.L.; Gusella, J.F.; Horvitz, H.R.; Brown, R.H. Jr.

    1994-05-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig`s Disease) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motorneurons in the brain and spinal cord. We previously reported linkage of a gene for familial ALS (FALS) to human chromosome 21 using 4 restriction fragment length polymorphism DNA markers and identified disease-associated mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1 gene in some ALS families. We report here the genetic linkage data that led us to examine the SOD-1 gene for mutations. We also report a new microsatellite DNA marker for D21S63, derived from the cosmid PW517. Ten microsatellite DNA markers, including the new marker D21S63, were used to reinvestigate linkage of FALS to chromosome 21. Genetic linkage analysis performed with 13 ALS familes for these 10 DNA markers confirmed the presence of a FALS gene on chromosome 21. The highest total 2-point LOD score for all families was 4.33, obtained at a distance of 10 cM from the marker D21S223. For 5 ALS families linked to chromosome 21, a peak 2-point LOD score of 5.94 was obtained at the DNA marker D21S223. A multipoint score of 6.50 was obtained with the markers D21S213, D21S223, D21S167, and FALS for 5 chromosome 21-linked ALS families. The haplotypes of these families for the 10 DNA markers reveal recombination events that further refined the location of the FALS gene to a segment of approximately 5 megabases (Mb) between D21S213 and D21S219. The only characterized gene within this segment was SOD-1, the structural gene for Cu, Zn SOD. 30 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Microsatellite analysis of spatial structure among seedlings in populations of Pinus strobus (pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Walter, Rosemarie; Epperson, Bryan K

    2004-04-01

    In a detailed analysis of how limited seed dispersal can create spatial structuring of genetic variation, several nuclear microsatellites were assayed in seedlings from two forests of Pinus strobus, one old growth (OG) and the other (second site, SS) logged in ca. 1900. By using loci with a large number of alleles and new statistical methods on averaged spatial correlation coefficients, unusually precise estimates of spatial genetic structure were obtained, even though the structure was expected to be very weak. This high precision allowed the spatial patterns to be contrasted across loci and populations. At the OG site, the average spatial correlation coefficient for short distances (<15 m) exceeded its random expected value by 0.035, providing an indirect estimate of ca. 230 for Wright's neighborhood size. The value is similar to that estimated in a previous study of adult trees at OG and probably represents the natural level of spatial structure. A very similar value, 0.030, was obtained for seedlings at SS, despite the fact that unlike OG, genotypes of adults are randomly distributed, a likely result of logging. The results show that a single cycle of limited seed dispersal recreated the natural level of spatial structuring. In addition, one microsatellite, Rps50, had far greater amounts of allele variation, likely implicating it as having a higher mutation rate. The spatial structure of Rps50 also was significantly reduced, in a way that could be consistent with theoretical effects of high mutation rates (up to μ = 10(-2)). The choice of markers may influence estimates of spatial genetic structure. For example, if Rps50 is omitted the values are nearly doubled to 0.058 and 0.051 for SS and OG, respectively, both indicating a much smaller neighborhood size of ca. 100. PMID:21653410

  12. Single-molecule PCR analysis of an unstable microsatellite for detecting mutations in sperm of mice exposed to chemical mutagens.

    PubMed

    Beal, Marc A; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; Campbell, Caleigh; Williams, Andrew; Somers, Christopher M; Marchetti, Francesco; Yauk, Carole L

    2015-05-01

    Single-molecule PCR (SM-PCR) analysis of long and repetitive DNA sequences, known as expanded simple tandem repeats (ESTRs), has been the most efficient method for studying germline mutation induction in endogenous sequences to date. However, the long length of these sequences makes mutation detection imprecise and laborious, and they have been characterized only in mice. Here, we explore the use of unstable microsatellite sequences that can be typed with high precision by capillary electrophoresis as alternative loci for detecting germline mutations. We screened 24 microsatellite loci across inbred mouse strains and identified Mm2.2.1 as the most polymorphic microsatellite locus. We then optimized SM-PCR of Mm2.2.1 to detect mutations in sperm. SM-PCR analysis of sperm from untreated B6C3F1 and Muta(™)Mouse samples revealed mutation frequencies that are consistent with rates derived from family pedigree analysis (∼ 5 × 10(-3)). To determine whether this locus can be used to detect chemically induced germline mutations, Muta(™)Mouse males were exposed by oral gavage to a single dose of 100mg/kg of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) or to 100mg/kg of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) for 28 days alongside vehicle treated controls. Sperm were collected 10 weeks post-ENU exposure to sample sperm exposed as spermatogonial stem cells and 6 weeks post-BaP exposure to sample sperm that were dividing spermatogonia when the exposure was terminated. Both treatments resulted in a significant (approximately 2-fold) increase in mutation frequency in sperm compared to the control animals. The work establishes the utility of this microsatellite for studying mutation induction in the germ cells of mice. Because microsatellites are found in virtually every species, this approach holds promise for other organisms, including humans. PMID:25863182

  13. Microsatellite analysis of Damask rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) accessions from various regions in Iran reveals multiple genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Alireza; Tabaei-Aghdaei, Seyed Reza; Khosh-Khui, Morteza; Omidbaigi, Reza; Naghavi, Mohammad Reza; Esselink, Gerhard D; Smulders, Marinus JM

    2007-01-01

    Background Damask roses (Rosa damascena Mill.) are mainly used for essential oil production. Previous studies have indicated that all production material in Bulgaria and Turkey consists of only one genotype. Nine polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to analyze the genetic diversity of 40 accessions of R. damascena collected across major and minor rose oil production areas in Iran. Results All microsatellite markers showed a high level of polymorphism (5–15 alleles per microsatellite marker, with an average of 9.11 alleles per locus). Cluster analysis of genetic similarities revealed that these microsatellites identified a total of nine different genotypes. The genotype from Isfahan province, which is the major production area, was by far the most common genotype (27/40 accessions). It was identical to the Bulgarian genotype. Other genotypes (each represented by 1–4 accessions) were collected from minor production areas in several provinces, notably in the mountainous Northwest of Iran. Conclusion This is the first study that uncovered genetic diversity within Damask rose. Our results will guide new collection activities to establish larger collections and manage the Iranian Damask rose genetic resources. The genotypes identified here may be directly useful for breeding. PMID:17346330

  14. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of wheat-barley hybrids using genomic in situ hybridization and barley microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Malysheva, L; Sjakste, T; Matzk, F; Röder, M; Ganal, M

    2003-04-01

    In the present investigation, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and barley microsatellite markers were used to analyse the genome constitution of wheat-barley hybrids from two backcross generations (BC1 and BC2). Two BC1 plants carried 3 and 6 barley chromosomes, respectively, according to GISH data. Additional chromosomal fragments were detected using microsatellites. Five BC2 plants possessed complete barley chromosomes or chromosome segments and six BC2 plants did not preserve barley genetic material. Molecular markers revealed segments of the barley genome with the size of one marker only, which probably resulted from recombination between wheat and barley chromosomes. The screening of backcrossed populations from intergeneric hybrids could be effectively conducted using both genomic in situ hybridization and molecular microsatellite markers. GISH images presented a general overview of the genome constitution of the hybrid plants, while microsatellite analysis revealed the genetic identity of the alien chromosomes and chromosomal segments introgressed. These methods were complementary and provided comprehensive information about the genomic constitution of the plants produced. PMID:12723047

  15. Population genetic structure and phylogeography of cyprinid fish, Labeo dero (Hamilton, 1822) inferred from allozyme and microsatellite DNA marker analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Anshumala; Mohindra, Vindhya; Singh, Rajeev K; Lal, Kuldeep K; Punia, Peyush; Bhaskar, Ranjana; Mandal, Anup; Narain, Lalit; Lakra, W S

    2011-06-01

    We examined population structure of Labeo dero (Hamilton, 1822) from different riverine locations in India using 10 polymorphic allozyme and eight microsatellite loci. For analysis, 591 different tissue samples were obtained from commercial catches covering a wide geographic range. Allozyme variability (An = 1.28-1.43, Ho = 0.029-0.071) was much lower than for microsatellites (An = 4.625-6.125, Ho = 0.538-0.633). Existence of rare alleles was found at three allozyme (MDH-2, GPI and PGDH) and at two microsatellite loci (R-3 and MFW-15). Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.05, after the critical probability levels were adjusted for sequential Bonferroni adjustment) could be detected at three loci (EST-1, -2 and XDH) whereas, after correction for null alleles, two microsatellite loci (MFW-1,-15) deviated from HWE in the river Yamuna. Fst for all the samples combined over all allozyme loci was found to be 0.059 suggesting that 5.9% of the total variation was due to genetic differentiation while microsatellite analysis yielded 0.019 which was concordant to mean Rst (0.02). Hierarchical partition of genetic diversity (AMOVA) showed that greater variability (approx. 95%) was due to within population component than between geographical regions. Based on distribution of genetic differentiation detected by both markers, at least five different genetic stocks of L. dero across its natural distribution could be identified. These results are useful for the evaluation and conservation of L. dero in natural water bodies. PMID:21132388

  16. Genetic diversity analysis in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) using AFLP and transferable microsatellite markers from azuki bean (Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi).

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Gopalakrishna, T

    2009-02-01

    Genetic diversity in 20 elite blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) genotypes was studied using microsatellite and AFLP markers. Thirty-six microsatellite markers from azuki bean (Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi) were successfully amplified across the 20 blackgram genotypes and 33 microsatellite markers showed polymorphism. A total of 137 microsatellite alleles were generated with an average of 4.1 alleles per locus. The number of alleles ranged from two to nine and the polymorphic information content value for the microsatellite markers varied from 0.10 to 0.87 with an average of 0.49. Microsatellite markers were highly informative and a combination of only three microsatellite markers (CEDG264, CEDG173, and CEDG044) was sufficient to discriminate all 20 blackgram genotypes. In the case of AFLP, 11 primer pairs generated 324 polymorphic marker fragments. The polymorphic information content values for AFLP primer combinations ranged from 0.21 to 0.34 with an average of 0.29. Similarity measures and clustering analyses were made using microsatellite and AFLP data separately. The resulting dendrograms distributed the 20 blackgram genotypes into five main clusters. The dendrograms were comparable with each other with the Mantel test between the cophenetic matrices of microsatellite data and AFLP data showing moderate correlation (r = 0.64). The results of the principal components analysis were well congruent with the dendrograms. In the dendrograms as well as in the principal components analyses, genotype Trombay wild (Vigna mungo var. silvestris) was placed separately from rest of the genotypes. This study demonstrated that the azuki bean microsatellite markers are highly polymorphic and informative and can be successfully used for genome analysis in blackgram. Results indicate that sufficient variability is present in the blackgram genotypes and would be helpful in the selection of suitable parents for breeding purposes and gene mapping studies. PMID:19234560

  17. Paternal obesity negatively affects male fertility and assisted reproduction outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jared M; Lane, Michelle; Owens, Julie A; Bakos, Hassan W

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review investigated the effect of paternal obesity on reproductive potential. Databases searched were Pubmed, Ovid, Web of Science, Scopus, Cinahl and Embase. Papers were critically appraised by two reviewers, and data were extracted using a standardized tool. Outcomes were: likelihood of infertility, embryo development, clinical pregnancy, live birth, pregnancy viability, infant development, sperm; concentration, morphology, motility, volume, DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and seminal plasma factors. Thirty papers were included, with a total participant number of 115,158. Obese men were more likely to experience infertility (OR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.53-1.79), their rate of live birth per cycle of assisted reproduction technology (ART) was reduced (OR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.44-0.97) and they had a 10% absolute risk increase of pregnancy non-viability. Additionally, obese men had an increased percentage of sperm with low MMP, DNA fragmentation, and abnormal morphology. Clinically significant differences were not found for conventional semen parameters. From these findings it can be concluded that male obesity is associated with reduced reproductive potential. Furthermore, it may be informative to incorporate DNA fragmentation analysis and MMP assessment into semen testing, especially for obese men whose results suggest they should have normal fertility. PMID:26380863

  18. Microsatellite markers for an endemic Atlantic Forest tree, Manilkara multifida (Sapotaceae).

    PubMed

    Moraes, Ramiris C S; Vivas, Caio V; Oliveira, Fernanda A; Menezes, Ivandilson P P; van den Berg, Cassio; Gaiotto, Fernanda A

    2013-01-01

    Manilkara multifida is a tropical tree that is endemic to the Atlantic forests of southern Bahia, Brazil. Currently, populations of this species are restricted to fragmented landscapes that are susceptible to anthropogenic disturbances. Considering this issue, and that there is no genetic information available for this endangered species, we developed microsatellite markers for M. multifida to provide resources for future conservation genetics studies. Using an enriched genomic library, we isolated eight polymorphic microsatellite loci and optimized the amplification conditions for M. multifida. For each locus, we estimated the number of alleles, H E and H O, paternity exclusion Q, individual identity I and fixation index F, and examined the presence of null alleles. The mean number of alleles was 11.9, and the heterozygosity was high at all loci (average H E = 0.809 and H O = 0.777). The combined values for both paternity exclusion and individual identity were Q = 0.9959 and I = 5.45 × 10(-11), respectively. No evidence of null alleles was detected. The results of our analysis indicated that all eight microsatellites are promising for assessing questions involving inbreeding, gene flow, co-ancestry and mating patterns in M. multifida. PMID:23487575

  19. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains. PMID:27035434

  20. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains. PMID:27035434

  1. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of Arabian horse populations.

    PubMed

    Khanshour, Anas; Conant, Eleanore; Juras, Rytis; Cothran, Ernest Gus

    2013-01-01

    The Arabian horse ignites imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries, and recent genetic work has examined the diversity and ancestry of a few of these populations in isolation. Here, we explore 7 different populations of Arabians represented by 682 horses. Three of these are Middle Eastern populations from near the historical origin of the breed, including Syrian, Persian, and Saudi Arabian. The remaining Western populations are found in Europe (the Shagya Arabian and Polish Arabian) and in America (American Arabian). Analysis of genetic structure was carried out using 15 microsatellite loci. Genetic distances, analysis of molecular variance, factorial correspondence analysis, and a Bayesian method were applied. The results consistently show higher level of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations than the Western populations. The Western Arabian populations were the main source among population variation. Genetic differentiation was not strong among all Middle Eastern populations, but all American Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations and were somewhat uniform among themselves. Here, we explore the diversities of many different populations of Arabian horses and find that populations not from the Middle East have noticeably lower levels of diversity, which may adversely affect the health of these populations. PMID:23450090

  2. Multipath fading analysis of telemetry signals power fluctuations from Universitetsky microsatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhparonov, Vladimir; Millán Adán, Espinoza; Vicente Vivas, Esaú

    2012-03-01

    The article deals with the results of the fading fluctuations analysis for telemetry signals in the 2 m and 70 cm bands from the first Moscow State University microsatellite better known as "Universitetsky". Radio telemetry signals were received from the microsatellite for around 2 years, collecting and recording the power signal data of almost 7500 satellite overpasses. The received signals from about 2300 satellite overpasses had a very low signal to noise ratio (SNR) that caused high transmission losses. The rest of the signals had a SNR high enough to complete the transmission without losses. The main objective of this paper was to find the fading fluctuations caused both by diffusion and by the presence of Gaussian and non Gaussian noise in telemetry signal power data. The purpose was both to characterize the communication channel as well as to elaborate solutions both to improve the communication quality as well as to identify no homogeneous zones in the ionosphere environment. The signal power analysis was based in the observation of statistical characteristics from different power signal components, in particular the components influenced by diffusion and non Gaussian noise. The employed methodology follows the next steps: removing the power signal envelope; taking away the Gaussian noise; obtaining the statistical characteristics from non Gaussian noise, Gaussian noise and envelope; finally identifying the LOS and NLOS signal fading components. For this purpose, the wavelet technique was used to perform the signal decomposition. In particular, the discrete wavelet transform DWT was utilized to carry out the signal de-noising. Then, the results were statistically treated in order to obtain a diffusion index for Rician fading, which are associated with fading in atmosphere and ionosphere layers. In this way the communications channel among satellite and ground station was characterized and a BER parameter was obtained for every satellite overpass, which means an outstanding result when considering that just few papers describe such results for satellite systems. The obtained results are valid not only for satellite communications systems but also for wireless communications systems. These results are the basis for future communications system design, which in our case pursues to reduce the BER parameter in the satellite link. The referred system will employ adaptive error coding schemes as well as channel analyzer algorithms based in the theory exposed in this paper.

  3. Genetic Diversity Analysis of South and East Asian Duck Populations Using Highly Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dongwon; Bhuiyan, Md. Shamsul Alam; Sultana, Hasina; Heo, Jung Min; Lee, Jun Heon

    2016-01-01

    Native duck populations have lower productivity, and have not been developed as much as commercials duck breeds. However, native ducks have more importance in terms of genetic diversity and potentially valuable economic traits. For this reason, population discriminable genetic markers are needed for conservation and development of native ducks. In this study, 24 highly polymorphic microsatellite (MS) markers were investigated using commercial ducks and native East and South Asian ducks. The average polymorphic information content (PIC) value for all MS markers was 0.584, indicating high discrimination power. All populations were discriminated using 14 highly polymorphic MS markers by genetic distance and phylogenetic analysis. The results indicated that there were close genetic relationships among populations. In the structure analysis, East Asian ducks shared more haplotypes with commercial ducks than South Asian ducks, and they had more independent haplotypes than others did. These results will provide useful information for genetic diversity studies in ducks and for the development of duck traceability systems in the market. PMID:26949947

  4. Spatio-temporal Genetic Structuring of Leishmania major in Tunisia by Microsatellite Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harrabi, Myriam; Bettaieb, Jihène; Ghawar, Wissem; Toumi, Amine; Zaâtour, Amor; Yazidi, Rihab; Chaâbane, Sana; Chalghaf, Bilel; Hide, Mallorie; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Ben Salah, Afif

    2015-01-01

    In Tunisia, cases of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major are increasing and spreading from the south-west to new areas in the center. To improve the current knowledge on L. major evolution and population dynamics, we performed multi-locus microsatellite typing of human isolates from Tunisian governorates where the disease is endemic (Gafsa, Kairouan and Sidi Bouzid governorates) and collected during two periods: 1991–1992 and 2008–2012. Analysis (F-statistics and Bayesian model-based approach) of the genotyping results of isolates collected in Sidi Bouzid in 1991–1992 and 2008–2012 shows that, over two decades, in the same area, Leishmania parasites evolved by generating genetically differentiated populations. The genetic patterns of 2008–2012 isolates from the three governorates indicate that L. major populations did not spread gradually from the south to the center of Tunisia, according to a geographical gradient, suggesting that human activities might be the source of the disease expansion. The genotype analysis also suggests previous (Bayesian model-based approach) and current (F-statistics) flows of genotypes between governorates and districts. Human activities as well as reservoir dynamics and the effects of environmental changes could explain how the disease progresses. This study provides new insights into the evolution and spread of L. major in Tunisia that might improve our understanding of the parasite flow between geographically and temporally distinct populations. PMID:26302440

  5. Genetic Diversity Analysis of South and East Asian Duck Populations Using Highly Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongwon; Bhuiyan, Md Shamsul Alam; Sultana, Hasina; Heo, Jung Min; Lee, Jun Heon

    2016-04-01

    Native duck populations have lower productivity, and have not been developed as much as commercials duck breeds. However, native ducks have more importance in terms of genetic diversity and potentially valuable economic traits. For this reason, population discriminable genetic markers are needed for conservation and development of native ducks. In this study, 24 highly polymorphic microsatellite (MS) markers were investigated using commercial ducks and native East and South Asian ducks. The average polymorphic information content (PIC) value for all MS markers was 0.584, indicating high discrimination power. All populations were discriminated using 14 highly polymorphic MS markers by genetic distance and phylogenetic analysis. The results indicated that there were close genetic relationships among populations. In the structure analysis, East Asian ducks shared more haplotypes with commercial ducks than South Asian ducks, and they had more independent haplotypes than others did. These results will provide useful information for genetic diversity studies in ducks and for the development of duck traceability systems in the market. PMID:26949947

  6. An Extensive Analysis of Y-Chromosomal Microsatellite Haplotypes in Globally Dispersed Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Manfred; Krawczak, Michael; Excoffier, Laurent; Dieltjes, Patrick; Corach, Daniel; Pascali, Vincente; Gehrig, Christian; Bernini, Luigi F.; Jespersen, Jørgen; Bakker, Egbert; Roewer, Lutz; de Knijff, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The genetic variance at seven Y-chromosomal microsatellite loci (or short tandem repeats [STRs]) was studied among 986 male individuals from 20 globally dispersed human populations. A total of 598 different haplotypes were observed, of which 437 (73.1%) were each found in a single male only. Population-specific haplotype-diversity values were .86–.99. Analyses of haplotype diversity and population-specific haplotypes revealed marked population-structure differences between more-isolated indigenous populations (e.g., Central African Pygmies or Greenland Inuit) and more-admixed populations (e.g., Europeans or Surinamese). Furthermore, male individuals from isolated indigenous populations shared haplotypes mainly with male individuals from their own population. By analysis of molecular variance, we found that 76.8% of the total genetic variance present among these male individuals could be attributed to genetic differences between male individuals who were members of the same population. Haplotype sharing between populations, ΦST statistics, and phylogenetic analysis identified close genetic affinities among European populations and among New Guinean populations. Our data illustrate that Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes are an ideal tool for the study of the genetic affinities between groups of male subjects and for detection of population structure. PMID:11254455

  7. High prevalence of multiple paternity in the invasive crayfish species, Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Yue, Gen Hua; Li, Jia Le; Wang, Chun Ming; Xia, Jun Hong; Wang, Gen Lin; Feng, Jian Bing

    2010-01-01

    Reproductive strategy is a central feature of the ecology of invasive species as it determines the potential for population increase and range expansion. The red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, has invaded many countries and caused serious problems in freshwater ecosystems. However, little is known about the effects of environmental conditions on crayfish paternity and offspring traits in the wild. We studied these reproductive characteristics of P. clarkii in wild populations from two different habitats (ponds and ditches) in three locations with different environmental conditions in China. Genotyping of 1,436 offspring and 30 mothers of 30 broods was conducted by using four microsatellites. An analysis of genotyping results revealed that gravid females were the exclusive mother of the progeny they tended. Twenty-nine of 30 mothers had mated with multiple (2-4) males, each of which contributed differently to the number of offspring in a brood. The average number of fathers per brood and the number of offspring per brood were similar (P>0.05) among six sampling sites, indicating that in P. clarkii multiple paternity and offspring number per brood are independent of environmental conditions studied. Indirect benefits from increasing the genetic diversity of broods, male and sperm competition, and cryptic female choice are a possible explanation for the high level multiple paternity and different contribution of fathers to offspring in this species. PMID:20186292

  8. Paternity fraud and compensation for misattributed paternity.

    PubMed

    Draper, Heather

    2007-08-01

    Claims for reimbursement of child support, the reversal of property settlements and compensation can arise when misattributed paternity is discovered. The ethical justifications for such claims seem to be related to the financial cost of bringing up children, the absence of choice about taking on these expenses, the hard work involved in child rearing, the emotional attachments that are formed with children, the obligation of women to make truthful claims about paternity, and the deception involved in infidelity. In this paper it is argued that there should not be compensation for infidelity and that reimbursement is appropriate where the claimant has made child support payments but has not taken on the social role of father. Where the claimant's behaviour suggests a social view of fatherhood, on the other hand, claims for compensation are less coherent. Where the genetic model of fatherhood dominates, the "other" man (the woman's lover and progenitor of the children) might also have a claim for the loss of the benefits of fatherhood. It is concluded that claims for reimbursement and compensation in cases of misattributed paternity produce the same distorted and thin view of what it means to be a father that paternity testing assumes, and underscores a trend that is not in the interests of children. PMID:17664309

  9. Paternity fraud and compensation for misattributed paternity

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Claims for reimbursement of child support, the reversal of property settlements and compensation can arise when misattributed paternity is discovered. The ethical justifications for such claims seem to be related to the financial cost of bringing up children, the absence of choice about taking on these expenses, the hard work involved in child rearing, the emotional attachments that are formed with children, the obligation of women to make truthful claims about paternity, and the deception involved in infidelity. In this paper it is argued that there should not be compensation for infidelity and that reimbursement is appropriate where the claimant has made child support payments but has not taken on the social role of father. Where the claimant's behaviour suggests a social view of fatherhood, on the other hand, claims for compensation are less coherent. Where the genetic model of fatherhood dominates, the “other” man (the woman's lover and progenitor of the children) might also have a claim for the loss of the benefits of fatherhood. It is concluded that claims for reimbursement and compensation in cases of misattributed paternity produce the same distorted and thin view of what it means to be a father that paternity testing assumes, and underscores a trend that is not in the interests of children. PMID:17664309

  10. Microsatellite and Wolbachia analysis in Rhagoletis cerasi natural populations: population structuring and multiple infections

    PubMed Central

    Augustinos, Antonios A; Asimakopoulou, Anastasia K; Moraiti, Cleopatra A; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos T; Bourtzis, Kostas

    2014-01-01

    Rhagoletis cerasi (Diptera: Tephritidae) is a major pest of sweet and sour cherries in Europe and parts of Asia. Despite its economic significance, there is a lack of studies on the genetic structure of R. cerasi populations. Elucidating the genetic structure of insects of economic importance is crucial for developing phenological-predictive models and environmental friendly control methods. All natural populations of R. cerasi have been found to harbor the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis, which widely affects multiple biological traits contributing to the evolution of its hosts, and has been suggested as a tool for the biological control of insect pests and disease vectors. In the current study, the analysis of 18 R. cerasi populations collected in Greece, Germany, and Russia using 13 microsatellite markers revealed structuring of R. cerasi natural populations, even at close geographic range. We also analyzed the Wolbachia infection status of these populations using 16S rRNA-, MLST- and wsp-based approaches. All 244 individuals screened were positive for Wolbachia. Our results suggest the fixation of the wCer1 strain in Greece while wCer2, wCer4, wCer5, and probably other uncharacterized strains were also detected in multiply infected individuals. The role of Wolbachia and its potential extended phenotypes needs a thorough investigation in R. cerasi. Our data suggest an involvement of this symbiont in the observed restriction in the gene flow in addition to a number of different ecological factors. PMID:24963388

  11. Microsatellite and Wolbachia analysis in Rhagoletis cerasi natural populations: population structuring and multiple infections.

    PubMed

    Augustinos, Antonios A; Asimakopoulou, Anastasia K; Moraiti, Cleopatra A; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos T; Bourtzis, Kostas

    2014-05-01

    Rhagoletis cerasi (Diptera: Tephritidae) is a major pest of sweet and sour cherries in Europe and parts of Asia. Despite its economic significance, there is a lack of studies on the genetic structure of R. cerasi populations. Elucidating the genetic structure of insects of economic importance is crucial for developing phenological-predictive models and environmental friendly control methods. All natural populations of R. cerasi have been found to harbor the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis, which widely affects multiple biological traits contributing to the evolution of its hosts, and has been suggested as a tool for the biological control of insect pests and disease vectors. In the current study, the analysis of 18 R. cerasi populations collected in Greece, Germany, and Russia using 13 microsatellite markers revealed structuring of R. cerasi natural populations, even at close geographic range. We also analyzed the Wolbachia infection status of these populations using 16S rRNA-, MLST- and wsp-based approaches. All 244 individuals screened were positive for Wolbachia. Our results suggest the fixation of the wCer1 strain in Greece while wCer2, wCer4, wCer5, and probably other uncharacterized strains were also detected in multiply infected individuals. The role of Wolbachia and its potential extended phenotypes needs a thorough investigation in R. cerasi. Our data suggest an involvement of this symbiont in the observed restriction in the gene flow in addition to a number of different ecological factors. PMID:24963388

  12. Population genetic structure of chub mackerel Scomber japonicus in the Northwestern Pacific inferred from microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiao; Yanagimoto, Takashi; Song, Na; Gao, Tian-Xiang

    2015-02-01

    Marine pelagic fishes are usually characterized by subtle but complex patterns of genetic differentiation, which are influenced by both historical process and contemporary gene flow. Genetic population differentiation of chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus, was examined across most of its range in the Northwestern Pacific by screening variation of eight microsatellite loci. Our genetic analysis detected a weak but significant genetic structure of chub mackerel, which was characterized by areas of gene flow and isolation by distance. Consistent with previous estimates of stock structure, we found genetic discontinuity between Japan and China samples. Local-scale pattern of genetic differentiation was observed between samples from the Bohai Sea and North Yellow Sea and those from the East China Sea, which we ascribed to differences in spawning time and migratory behavior. Furthermore, the observed homogeneity among collections of chub mackerel from the East and South China Seas could be the result of an interaction between biological characteristics and marine currents. The present study underlies the importance of understanding the biological significance of genetic differentiation to establish management strategies for exploited fish populations. PMID:25366174

  13. Genetic diversity analysis of traditional and improved Indonesian rice (Oryza sativa L.) germplasm using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Michael J; Septiningsih, Endang M; Suwardjo, Fatimah; Santoso, Tri J; Silitonga, Tiur S; McCouch, Susan R

    2007-02-01

    The archipelago of Indonesia has a long history of rice production across a broad range of rice-growing environments resulting in a diverse array of local Indonesian rice varieties. Although some have been incorporated into modern breeding programs, the vast majority of these landraces remain untapped. To better understand this rich source of genetic diversity we have characterized 330 rice accessions, including 246 Indonesian landraces and 63 Indonesian improved cultivars, using 30 fluorescently-labeled microsatellite markers. The landraces were selected across 21 provinces and include representatives of the classical subpopulations of cere, bulu, and gundil rices. A total of 394 alleles were detected at the 30 simple sequence repeat loci, with an average number of 13 alleles per locus across all accessions, and an average polymorphism information content value of 0.66. Genetic diversity analysis characterized the Indonesian landraces as 68% indica and 32% tropical japonica, with an indica gene diversity of 0.53 and a tropical japonica gene diversity of 0.56, and a Fst of 0.38 between the two groups. All of the improved varieties sampled were indica, and had an average gene diversity of 0.46. A set of high quality Indonesian varieties, including Rojolele, formed a separate cluster within the tropical japonicas. This germplasm presents a valuable source of diversity for future breeding and association mapping efforts. PMID:17136372

  14. High resolution melt-curve analysis to fine map a locus controlling the paternal sorting of mitochondria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitochondria are required for normal growth and development and play an important role in programmed cell death and aging. The mitochondrial DNA is maternally transmitted in the vast majority of eukaryotes. One exception is cucumber (Cucumis sativus), whose mitochondrial DNA is paternally transmit...

  15. Development of Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Moges, Asmare D.; Admassu, Belayneh; Belew, Derbew; Yesuf, Mohammed; Njuguna, Joyce; Kyalo, Martina; Ghimire, Sita R.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for citrus plant pathogenic fungus, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and were used to analyze genetic diversity and population structure of 163 isolates from four different geographical regions of Ethiopia. These loci produced a total of 118 alleles with an average of 5.13 alleles per microsatellite marker. The polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.104 to 0.597 with an average of 0.371. The average observed heterozygosity across all loci varied from 0.046 to 0.058. The gene diversity among the loci ranged from 0.106 to 0.664. Unweighted Neighbor-joining and population structure analysis grouped these 163 isolates into three major groups. The clusters were not according to the geographic origin of the isolates. Analysis of molecular variance showed 85% of the total variation within populations and only 5% among populations. There was low genetic differentiation in the total populations (FST = 0.049) as evidenced by high level of gene flow estimate (Nm = 4.8 per generation) among populations. The results show that Ethiopian C. gloeosporioides populations are generally characterized by a low level of genetic diversity. The newly developed microsatellite markers were useful in analyzing the genetic diversity and population structure of the C. gloeosporioides populations. Information obtained from this study could be useful as a base to design strategies for better management of leaf and fruit spot disease of citrus in Ethiopia. PMID:26978654

  16. Molecular tracking of mountain lions in the Yosemite valley region in California: genetic analysis using microsatellites and faecal DNA.

    PubMed

    Ernest, H B; Penedo, M C; May, B P; Syvanen, M; Boyce, W M

    2000-04-01

    Twelve microsatellite loci were characterized in California mountain lions (Puma concolor) and sufficient polymorphism was found to uniquely genotype 62 animals sampled at necropsy. Microsatellite genotypes obtained using mountain lion faecal DNA matched those from muscle for all of 15 individuals examined. DNA from potential prey species and animals whose faeces could be misidentified as mountain lion faeces were reliably distinguished from mountain lions using this microsatellite panel. In a field application of this technique, 32 faecal samples were collected from hiking trails in the Yosemite Valley region where seven mountain lions previously had been captured, sampled, and released. Twelve samples yielded characteristic mountain lion genotypes, three displayed bobcat-type genotypes, and 17 did not amplify. The genotype of one of the 12 mountain lion faecal samples was identical to one of the mountain lions that previously had been captured. Three of the 12 faecal samples yielded identical genotypes, and eight new genotypes were detected in the remaining samples. This analysis provided a minimum estimate of 16 mountain lions (seven identified by capture and nine identified by faecal DNA) living in or travelling through Yosemite Valley from March 1997 to August 1998. Match probabilities (probabilities that identical DNA genotypes would be drawn at random a second time from the population) indicated that the samples with identical genotypes probably came from the same mountain lion. Our results demonstrate that faecal DNA analysis is an effective method for detecting and identifying individual mountain lions. PMID:10736046

  17. Map and Analysis of Microsatellites in Genome of Populus: the First Sequenced Perennial Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuxian; Yin, Tongming

    2007-01-01

    We mapped and analyzed the microsatellites throughout 284295605 base pairs of the unambiguously assembled sequence scaffolds along 19 chromosomes of the haploid poplar genome. Totally, we found 150985 SSRs with repeat unit lengths between 2 and 5 bp. The established microsatellite physical map demonstrated that SSRs were distributed relatively evenly across the genome of Populus. On average, These SSRs occurred every 1883 bp within the poplar genome and the SSR densities in intergenic regions, introns, exons and UTRs were 85.4%, 10.7%, 2.7% and 1.2%, respectively. We took di-, tri-, tetra-and pentamers as the four classes of repeat units and found that the density of each class of SSRs decreased with the repeat unit lengths except for the tetranucleotide repeats. It was noteworthy that the length diversification of microsatellite sequences was negatively correlated with their repeat unit length and the SSRs with shorter repeat units gained repeats faster than the SSRs with longer repeat units. We also found that the GC content of poplar sequence significantly correlated with densities of SSRs with uneven repeat unit lengths (tri- and penta-), but had no significant correlation with densities of SSRs with even repeat unit lengths (di- and tetra-). In poplar genome, there were evidences that the occurrence of different microsatellites was under selection and the GC content in SSR sequences was found to significantly relate to the functional importance of microsatellites.

  18. Development of microsatellite markers for, and a preliminary population genetic analysis of, the white-backed planthopper.

    PubMed

    Sun, J-T; Jiang, X-Y; Wang, M-M; Hong, X-Y

    2014-12-01

    For a better understanding of the population structure and dispersal rates of Sogatella furcifera, we developed 21 novel polymorphic expressed sequence tags (EST) derived microsatellites, which were successfully amplified in four multiplex polymerase chain reaction sets. These new microsatellites were firstly assessed in 20 individuals sampled from Wenshan in China. The results showed that all 21 loci were highly polymorphic; the number of alleles ranged from 3 to 9, with an average of 4.8 alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.200 to 0.900 and from 0.184 to 0.799, respectively. Nineteen of the 21 microsatellites without null allele, were subsequently used for population genetic structure analyses of five S. furcifera populations sampled in south region of China (sites up to 1314 kilometers apart). The observed and expected heterozygosity for each population ranged from 0.436 to 0.494 and from 0.454 to 0.482, respectively. The level of population differentiation was very low, with an average pairwise F ST of 0.002. Bayesian cluster analysis result suggested that the five S. furcifera populations formed one genetic cluster. Discriminant analysis of principle components detected three genetic clusters. The spread of the three clusters across the five populations explained the lack of population differentiation and the Bayesian cluster result. All the results indicated that long-distance migration of this pest allowed genetic mixing between populations from remote geographical origins. These new microsatellites will be powerful tools for population genetics studies of S. furcifera. PMID:25208970

  19. Genetic structure of the Korean black scraper Thamnaconus modestus inferred from microsatellite marker analysis.

    PubMed

    An, Hye Suck; Lee, Jang Wook; Park, Jung Yeon; Jung, Hyung Taek

    2013-05-01

    The Korean black scraper, Thamnaconus modestus, is one of the most economically important maricultural fish species in Korea. However, the annual catch of this fish has been continuously declining over the past several decades. In this study, the genetic diversity and relationships among four wild populations and two hatchery stocks of Korean black scraper were assessed based on 16 microsatellite (MS) markers. A total of 319 different alleles were detected over all loci with an average of 19.94 alleles per locus. The hatchery stocks [mean number of alleles (N(A)) = 12, allelic richness (A(R)) = 12, expected heterozygosity (He) = 0.834] showed a slight reduction (P > 0.05) in genetic variability in comparison with wild populations (mean N(A) = 13.86, A(R) = 12.35, He = 0.844), suggesting a sufficient level of genetic variation in the hatchery populations. Similarly low levels of inbreeding and significant Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deviations were detected in both wild and hatchery populations. The genetic subdivision among all six populations was low but significant (overall F(ST) = 0.008, P < 0.01). Pairwise F(ST), a phylogenetic tree, and multidimensional scaling analysis suggested the existence of three geographically structured populations based on different sea basin origins, although the isolation-by-distance model was rejected. This result was corroborated by an analysis of molecular variance. This genetic differentiation may result from the co-effects of various factors, such as historical dispersal, local environment and ocean currents. These three geographical groups can be considered as independent management units. Our results show that MS markers may be suitable not only for the genetic monitoring of hatchery stocks but also for revealing the population structure of Korean black scraper populations. These results will provide critical information for breeding programs, the management of cultured stocks and the conservation of this species. PMID:23471506

  20. Comparative genomic analysis reveals species-dependent complexities that explain difficulties with microsatellite marker development in molluscs

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, C E; Allcock, A L; Johnson, M P; Bailie, D A; Prodöhl, P A

    2011-01-01

    Reliable population DNA molecular markers are difficult to develop for molluscs, the reasons for which are largely unknown. Identical protocols for microsatellite marker development were implemented in three gastropods. Success rates were lower for Gibbula cineraria compared to Littorina littorea and L. saxatilis. Comparative genomic analysis of 47.2 kb of microsatellite containing sequences (MCS) revealed a high incidence of cryptic repetitive DNA in their flanking regions. The majority of these were novel, and could be grouped into DNA families based upon sequence similarities. Significant inter-specific variation in abundance of cryptic repetitive DNA and DNA families was observed. Repbase scans show that a large proportion of cryptic repetitive DNA was identified as transposable elements (TEs). We argue that a large number of TEs and their transpositional activity may be linked to differential rates of DNA multiplication and recombination. This is likely to be an important factor explaining inter-specific variation in genome stability and hence microsatellite marker development success rates. Gastropods also differed significantly in the type of TEs classes (autonomous vs non-autonomous) observed. We propose that dissimilar transpositional mechanisms differentiate the TE classes in terms of their propensity for transposition, fixation and/or silencing. Consequently, the phylogenetic conservation of non-autonomous TEs, such as CvA, suggests that dispersal of these elements may have behaved as microsatellite-inducing elements. Results seem to indicate that, compared to autonomous, non-autonomous TEs maybe have a more active role in genome rearrangement processes. The implications of the findings for genomic rearrangement, stability and marker development are discussed. PMID:20424639

  1. Comparative genomic analysis reveals species-dependent complexities that explain difficulties with microsatellite marker development in molluscs.

    PubMed

    McInerney, C E; Allcock, A L; Johnson, M P; Bailie, D A; Prodöhl, P A

    2011-01-01

    Reliable population DNA molecular markers are difficult to develop for molluscs, the reasons for which are largely unknown. Identical protocols for microsatellite marker development were implemented in three gastropods. Success rates were lower for Gibbula cineraria compared to Littorina littorea and L. saxatilis. Comparative genomic analysis of 47.2 kb of microsatellite containing sequences (MCS) revealed a high incidence of cryptic repetitive DNA in their flanking regions. The majority of these were novel, and could be grouped into DNA families based upon sequence similarities. Significant inter-specific variation in abundance of cryptic repetitive DNA and DNA families was observed. Repbase scans show that a large proportion of cryptic repetitive DNA was identified as transposable elements (TEs). We argue that a large number of TEs and their transpositional activity may be linked to differential rates of DNA multiplication and recombination. This is likely to be an important factor explaining inter-specific variation in genome stability and hence microsatellite marker development success rates. Gastropods also differed significantly in the type of TEs classes (autonomous vs non-autonomous) observed. We propose that dissimilar transpositional mechanisms differentiate the TE classes in terms of their propensity for transposition, fixation and/or silencing. Consequently, the phylogenetic conservation of non-autonomous TEs, such as CvA, suggests that dispersal of these elements may have behaved as microsatellite-inducing elements. Results seem to indicate that, compared to autonomous, non-autonomous TEs maybe have a more active role in genome rearrangement processes. The implications of the findings for genomic rearrangement, stability and marker development are discussed. PMID:20424639

  2. Microsatellite analysis reveals strong but differential impact of a social parasite on its two host species.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Blass, Birgit; Heinze, Jürgen; Foitzik, Susanne

    2006-03-01

    The speed and the dynamics of the co-evolutionary process strongly depend on the relative strengths of reciprocal selection pressures exerted by the interacting species. Here, we investigate the influence of an obligate social parasite, the slave-making ant Harpagoxenus sublaevis, on populations of the two main host species Leptothorax acervorum and Leptothorax muscorum from a German ant community. A combination of genetic and demographic data allowed us to analyse the consequences of raiding pressure on the hosts' life history and possible host preferences of the parasite. We can demonstrate that slave raids during which the social parasite pillages brood from neighbouring host colonies are both frequent and extremely destructive for both host species. Microsatellite analysis showed that, on average, a single slave-maker colony conducts more than three raids per year and that host colonies mostly perish in the aftermath of these parasite attacks. Only in few cases, surviving nests of previously raided host colonies were found in the surroundings of slave-maker colonies. As a consequence of the high prevalence of parasites and their recurrent and devastating slave raids on host colonies, the life expectancy of host colonies was severely reduced. Combining our results on host-specific parasitic colony founding and raiding frequencies with the post-raid survival rate, we can demonstrate an overall higher mortality rate for the smaller host species L. muscorum. This might be caused by a preference of H. sublaevis for this secondary host species as demographic data on host species usage indicate. PMID:16499708

  3. Population genetic analysis and origin discrimination of snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Park, Jung-Youn; Kim, Eun-Mi; Ko, Hyun-Sook

    2013-10-01

    Major habitats for the snow crab Chionoecetes opilio are mostly found within the northwest Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. However, the East Sea populations of C. opilio, along with its relative the red snow crab (C. japonicas), are two of the most important commercial crustacean species for fisheries on the east coast of the Korean Peninsula. The East Sea populations of C. opilio are facing declining resources due to overfishing and global climate change. Thus, an analysis of population structure is necessary for future management. Five Korean and one Russian group of C. opilio were analyzed using nine microsatellite markers that were recently developed using next-generation sequencing. No linkage disequilibrium was found between any pair of loci, indicating that the markers were independent. The number of alleles per locus varied from 4 to 18 with a mean of 12, and allelic richness per locus ranged from 4.0 to 17.1 across all populations with a mean of 9.7. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test revealed significant deviation in three out of nine loci in some populations after sequential Bonferroni correction and all of them had higher expected heterozygosity than observed heterozygosity. Null alleles were presumed in four loci, which explained the homozygosity in three loci. The pairwise fixation index (F ST ) values among the five Korean snow crab populations did not differ significantly, but all of the pairwise F ST values between each of the Korean snow crab populations and the Russian snow crab population differed significantly. An UPGMA dendrogram revealed clear separation of the Russian snow crab population from the Korean snow crab populations. Assignment tests based on the allele distribution discriminated between Korean and Russian origins with 93 % accuracy. Therefore, the snow crab populations around the Korean Peninsula need to be managed separately from the populations in Bering Sea in global scale resource management. Also, this information can be used for identification of snow crab origin which is problematic in worldwide crab trade. PMID:24022521

  4. Multiple Mating, Paternity and Complex Fertilisation Patterns in the Chokka Squid Loligo reynaudii.

    PubMed

    Naud, Marie-Jose; Sauer, Warwick H H; McKeown, Niall J; Shaw, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Polyandry is widespread and influences patterns of sexual selection, with implications for sexual conflict over mating. Assessing sperm precedence patterns is a first step towards understanding sperm competition within a female and elucidating the roles of male- and female-controlled factors. In this study behavioural field data and genetic data were combined to investigate polyandry in the chokka squid Loligo reynaudii. Microsatellite DNA-based paternity analysis revealed multiple paternity to be the norm, with 79% of broods sired by at least two males. Genetic data also determined that the male who was guarding the female at the moment of sampling was a sire in 81% of the families tested, highlighting mate guarding as a successful male tactic with postcopulatory benefits linked to sperm deposition site giving privileged access to extruded egg strings. As females lay multiple eggs in capsules (egg strings) wherein their position is not altered during maturation it is possible to describe the spatial / temporal sequence of fertilisation / sperm precedence There were four different patterns of fertilisation found among the tested egg strings: 1) unique sire; 2) dominant sire, with one or more rare sires; 3) randomly mixed paternity (two or more sires); and 4) a distinct switch in paternity occurring along the egg string. The latter pattern cannot be explained by a random use of stored sperm, and suggests postcopulatory female sperm choice. Collectively the data indicate multiple levels of male- and female-controlled influences on sperm precedence, and highlights squid as interesting models to study the interplay between sexual and natural selection. PMID:26872354

  5. Multiple Mating, Paternity and Complex Fertilisation Patterns in the Chokka Squid Loligo reynaudii

    PubMed Central

    Naud, Marie-Jose; Sauer, Warwick H. H.; McKeown, Niall J.; Shaw, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Polyandry is widespread and influences patterns of sexual selection, with implications for sexual conflict over mating. Assessing sperm precedence patterns is a first step towards understanding sperm competition within a female and elucidating the roles of male- and female-controlled factors. In this study behavioural field data and genetic data were combined to investigate polyandry in the chokka squid Loligo reynaudii. Microsatellite DNA-based paternity analysis revealed multiple paternity to be the norm, with 79% of broods sired by at least two males. Genetic data also determined that the male who was guarding the female at the moment of sampling was a sire in 81% of the families tested, highlighting mate guarding as a successful male tactic with postcopulatory benefits linked to sperm deposition site giving privileged access to extruded egg strings. As females lay multiple eggs in capsules (egg strings) wherein their position is not altered during maturation it is possible to describe the spatial / temporal sequence of fertilisation / sperm precedence There were four different patterns of fertilisation found among the tested egg strings: 1) unique sire; 2) dominant sire, with one or more rare sires; 3) randomly mixed paternity (two or more sires); and 4) a distinct switch in paternity occurring along the egg string. The latter pattern cannot be explained by a random use of stored sperm, and suggests postcopulatory female sperm choice. Collectively the data indicate multiple levels of male- and female-controlled influences on sperm precedence, and highlights squid as interesting models to study the interplay between sexual and natural selection. PMID:26872354

  6. Characterization of 14 microsatellite markers for genetic analysis and cultivar identification of walnut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One hundred and forty-seven primer pairs originally designed to amplify microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR), in black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) were screened for utility in persian walnut (J. regia L.). Based on scorability and number of informative polymorphisms, the best 1...

  7. New carrot microsatellites – linkage mapping, diversity analysis and transferability to other apiaceae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nearly 300 new microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed from genomic sequences of carrot. Efforts to map these markers and evaluate their usefulness in diversity studies are underway. In one F2 carrot population, a total of 51 polymorphic markers, including 37 codominan...

  8. Analysis of genetic diversity of flowering dogwood natural stands using microsatellites the effects of dogwood anthracnose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) populations recently have experienced severe declines caused by dogwood anthracnose. Mortality ranged from 48-98%, raising the concern that genetic diversity has been reduced significantly. Microsatellite data was used to evaluate the level and distribution of ge...

  9. Paternal and Maternal Genetic Analysis of a Desert Keriyan Population: Keriyans Are Not the Descendants of Guge Tibetans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kaixu; Ablimit, Abdurahman; Ling, Fengjun; Wu, Weiwei; Shan, Wenjuan; Qin, Wenbei; Keweier, Tuerhong; Zuo, Hongli; Zhang, Fuchun; Ma, Zhenghai; Zheng, Xiufen

    2014-01-01

    The Keriyan people live in an isolated village in the Taklimakan Desert in Xinjiang, Western China. The origin and migration of the Keriyans remains unclear. We studied paternal and maternal genetic variance through typing Y-STR loci and sequencing the complete control region of the mtDNA and compared them with other adjacent populations. Data show that the Keriyan have relatively low genetic diversity on both the paternal and maternal lineages and possess both European and Asian specific haplogroups, indicating Keriyan is an admixture population of West and East. There is a gender-bias in the extent of contribution from Europe vs. Asia to the Keriyan gene pool. Keriyans have more genetic affinity to Uyghurs than to Tibetans. The Keriyan are not the descendants of the Guge Tibetans. PMID:24968299

  10. Inheritance and diversity of simple sequence repeat (SSR) microsatellite markers in various families of Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Reza; Scotti, Ivan; Jansson, Gunnar; Plomion, Christophe; Mathur, Gaurav

    2003-01-01

    A large number of sequence-specific SSRs were screened by using electrophoresis on metaphore agarose gels with the bands visualized by ethidium bromide staining. Many SSRs appeared as codominant and many as dominant markers, with presence or absence of bands. A simple Mendelian inheritance pattern for most codominant and dominant SSR loci was found. For many codominant SSR markers, null alleles were detected. The proportion of dominant microsatellites detected in this study (close to 50 %) was much higher than that commonly reported in many other studies. A high proportion of dominant markers together with a high frequency of codominant markers with null alleles may represent two important limitations for the use of microsatellites in different studies. On the other hand, many polymorphic codominant SSR microsatellite markers were found to be highly repeatable, and can be used for population studies, seed certification, quality control of controlled crosses, paternity analysis, pollen contamination, and mapping of QTL in related families. In this paper, we report on the inheritance pattern and diversity of codominant and dominant SSR microsatellites in seven families of Picea abies sharing a common mother. PMID:14641487

  11. Microsatellites provide insight into contrasting mating patterns in arribada vs. non-arribada olive ridley sea turtle rookeries.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M P; Abreu-Grobois, F A; Frydenberg, J; Loeschcke, V

    2006-08-01

    Molecular studies of sea turtles have shown that the frequency of multiple paternity (MP) varies between species, and between rookeries of the same species. This study uses nuclear microsatellite markers to compare the incidence of MP in two neighbouring olive ridley rookeries on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, with contrasting nesting behaviours -- the 'arribada' population nesting at Ostional and the solitary nesters of Playa Hermosa. Using two highly polymorphic microsatellite markers, we tested 13 nests from each location and found a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the level of MP of the arribada rookery (92%- the highest found for marine turtles) and that of the solitary nesting rookery (30%). Additional analyses based on six microsatellite loci revealed no genetic differentiation between nesting females from the two locations, or between nesting females and attendant males from the Ostional breeding area. Sixty-nine per cent of the nests with MP were fathered by a minimum of three different males, and three nests showed evidence of at least four fathers. The results suggest that the differences observed in levels of MP between arribada and solitary rookeries are due to an effect of abundance of individuals on the mating system. This is supported by a regression analysis combining other paternity studies on sea turtles which shows that levels of MP increase with increasing abundance of nesting females. PMID:16842427

  12. Whole-genome association analysis to identify markers associated with recombination rates using single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Nianjun; Chen, Liang; Oh, Cheongeun; Zhao, Hongyu

    2005-01-01

    Recombination during meiosis is one of the most important biological processes, and the level of recombination rates for a given individual is under genetic control. In this study, we conducted genome-wide association studies to identify chromosomal regions associated with recombination rates. We analyzed genotype data collected on the pedigrees in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics on Alcoholism data provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 14. A total of 315 microsatellites and 10,081 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from Affymetrix on 22 autosomal chromosomes were used in our association analysis. Genome-wide gender-specific recombination counts for family founders were inferred first and association analysis was performed using multiple linear regressions. We used the positive false discovery rate (pFDR) to account for multiple comparisons in the two genome-wide scans. Eight regions showed some evidence of association with recombination counts based on the single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis after adjusting for multiple comparisons. However, no region was found to be significant using microsatellites. PMID:16451663

  13. Microsatellite analysis of the spectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatus) across its range distribution.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-García, Manuel; Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; Castellanos, Armando; Arias, Leonardo

    2005-02-01

    DNA samples of the spectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatus) from five Andean countries, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci. Seven of them were polymorphic, which led us to investigate several population-genetic parameters. Private alleles and significant differences in gene frequencies were found among the populations studied, which demonstrated the extent of genetic differentiation among the spectacled bear populations. The levels of gene diversity measured with these microsatellites were rather modest in this species. Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium was especially found for the overall and the Ecuadorian samples, and might be due to the Wahl-und effect or consanguinity. Significant genetic heterogeneity was mainly observed among the Colombian and the Ecuadorian populations. Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations clearly showed that two different gene pools were present, one present in the Venezuelan-Colombian bears and other in the Ecuadorian ones. PMID:15824457

  14. Taxonomy of the Rhizopogon vinicolor species complex based on analysis of ITS sequences and microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, Annette M; Luoma, Daniel L; Molina, Randy; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2003-01-01

    We are re-addressing species concepts in the Rhizopogon vinicolor species complex (Boletales, Basidiomycota) using sequence data from the internal-transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal repeat, as well as genotypic data from five microsatellite loci. The R. vinicolor species complex by our definition includes, but is not limited to, collections referred to as R. vinicolor Smith, R. diabolicus Smith, R. ochraceisporus Smith, R. parvulus Smith or R. vesiculosus Smith. Holo- and/or paratype material for the named species is included. Analyses of both ITS sequences and microsatellite loci separate collections of the R. vinicolor species complex into two distinct clades or clusters, suggestive of two biological species that subsequently are referred to as R. vinicolor sensu Kretzer et al and R. vesiculosus sensu Kretzer et al. Choice of the latter names, as well as morphological characters, are discussed. PMID:21156637

  15. Genetic diversity analysis in the section Caulorrhizae (genus Arachis) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Darío A; Bechara, Marcelo D; Curi, Rogério A; Monteiro, Jomar P; Valente, Sérgio E S; Gimenes, Marcos A; Lopes, Catalina R

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in 26 microsatellite loci from section Caulorrhizae germplasm was evaluated by using 33 accessions of A. pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Gregory and ten accessions of Arachis repens Handro. Twenty loci proved to be polymorphic and a total of 196 alleles were detected with an average of 9.8 alleles per locus. The variability found in those loci was greater than the variability found using morphological characters, seed storage proteins and RAPD markers previously used in this germplasm. The high potential of these markers to detect species-specific alleles and discriminate among accessions was demonstrated. The set of microsatellite primer pairs developed by our group for A. pintoi are useful molecular tools for evaluating Section Caulorrhizae germplasm, as well as that of species belonging to other Arachis sections. PMID:21637613

  16. Analysis of conservation priorities of Iberoamerican cattle based on autosomal microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining the value of livestock breeds is essential to define conservation priorities, manage genetic diversity and allocate funds. Within- and between-breed genetic diversity need to be assessed to preserve the highest intra-specific variability. Information on genetic diversity and risk status is still lacking for many Creole cattle breeds from the Americas, despite their distinct evolutionary trajectories and adaptation to extreme environmental conditions. Methods A comprehensive genetic analysis of 67 Iberoamerican cattle breeds was carried out with 19 FAO-recommended microsatellites to assess conservation priorities. Contributions to global diversity were investigated using alternative methods, with different weights given to the within- and between-breed components of genetic diversity. Information on Iberoamerican plus 15 worldwide cattle breeds was used to investigate the contribution of geographical breed groups to global genetic diversity. Results Overall, Creole cattle breeds showed a high level of genetic diversity with the highest level found in breeds admixed with zebu cattle, which were clearly differentiated from all other breeds. Within-breed kinships revealed seven highly inbred Creole breeds for which measures are needed to avoid further genetic erosion. However, if contribution to heterozygosity was the only criterion considered, some of these breeds had the lowest priority for conservation decisions. The Weitzman approach prioritized highly differentiated breeds, such as Guabalá, Romosinuano, Cr. Patagonico, Siboney and Caracú, while kinship-based methods prioritized mainly zebu-related breeds. With the combined approaches, breed ranking depended on the weights given to the within- and between-breed components of diversity. Overall, the Creole groups of breeds were generally assigned a higher priority for conservation than the European groups of breeds. Conclusions Conservation priorities differed significantly according to the weight given to within- and between-breed genetic diversity. Thus, when establishing conservation programs, it is necessary to also take into account other features. Creole cattle and local isolated breeds retain a high level of genetic diversity. The development of sustainable breeding and crossbreeding programs for Creole breeds, and the added value resulting from their products should be taken into consideration to ensure their long-term survival. PMID:24079454

  17. Genome-Wide Survey and Analysis of Microsatellite Sequences in Bovid Species

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wen-Hua; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Du, Lian-Ming; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Yue, Bi-Song; Quan, Qiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have become the most popular source of genetic markers, which are ubiquitously distributed in many eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes. This is the first study examining and comparing SSRs in completely sequenced genomes of the Bovidae. We analyzed and compared the number of SSRs, relative abundance, relative density, guanine-cytosine (GC) content and proportion of SSRs in six taxonomically different bovid species: Bos taurus, Bubalus bubalis, Bos mutus, Ovis aries, Capra hircus, and Pantholops hodgsonii. Our analysis revealed that, based on our search criteria, the total number of perfect SSRs found ranged from 663,079 to 806,907 and covered from 0.44% to 0.48% of the bovid genomes. Relative abundance and density of SSRs in these Bovinae genomes were non-significantly correlated with genome size (Pearson, r < 0.420, p > 0.05). Perfect mononucleotide SSRs were the most abundant, followed by the pattern: perfect di- > tri- > penta- > tetra- > hexanucleotide SSRs. Generally, the number of SSRs, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs decreased as the motif repeat length increased in each species of Bovidae. The most GC-content was in trinucleotide SSRs and the least was in the mononucleotide SSRs in the six bovid genomes. The GC-contents of tri- and pentanucleotide SSRs showed a great deal of similarity among different chromosomes of B. taurus, O. aries, and C. hircus. SSR number of all chromosomes in the B. taurus, O.aries, and C. hircus is closely positively correlated with chromosome sequence size (Pearson, r > 0.980, p < 0.01) and significantly negatively correlated with GC-content (Pearson, r < -0.638, p < 0.01). Relative abundance and density of SSRs in all chromosomes of the three species were significantly negatively correlated with GC-content (Pearson, r < -0.333, P < 0.05) but not significantly correlated with chromosome sequence size (Pearson, r < -0.185, P > 0.05). Relative abundances of the same nucleotide SSR type showed great similarity among different chromosomes of B. taurus, O. aries, and C. hircus. PMID:26196922

  18. Genome-Wide Survey and Analysis of Microsatellite Sequences in Bovid Species.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Hua; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Du, Lian-Ming; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Yue, Bi-Song; Quan, Qiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have become the most popular source of genetic markers, which are ubiquitously distributed in many eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes. This is the first study examining and comparing SSRs in completely sequenced genomes of the Bovidae. We analyzed and compared the number of SSRs, relative abundance, relative density, guanine-cytosine (GC) content and proportion of SSRs in six taxonomically different bovid species: Bos taurus, Bubalus bubalis, Bos mutus, Ovis aries, Capra hircus, and Pantholops hodgsonii. Our analysis revealed that, based on our search criteria, the total number of perfect SSRs found ranged from 663,079 to 806,907 and covered from 0.44% to 0.48% of the bovid genomes. Relative abundance and density of SSRs in these Bovinae genomes were non-significantly correlated with genome size (Pearson, r < 0.420, p > 0.05). Perfect mononucleotide SSRs were the most abundant, followed by the pattern: perfect di- > tri- > penta- > tetra- > hexanucleotide SSRs. Generally, the number of SSRs, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs decreased as the motif repeat length increased in each species of Bovidae. The most GC-content was in trinucleotide SSRs and the least was in the mononucleotide SSRs in the six bovid genomes. The GC-contents of tri- and pentanucleotide SSRs showed a great deal of similarity among different chromosomes of B. taurus, O. aries, and C. hircus. SSR number of all chromosomes in the B. taurus, O.aries, and C. hircus is closely positively correlated with chromosome sequence size (Pearson, r > 0.980, p < 0.01) and significantly negatively correlated with GC-content (Pearson, r < -0.638, p < 0.01). Relative abundance and density of SSRs in all chromosomes of the three species were significantly negatively correlated with GC-content (Pearson, r < -0.333, P < 0.05) but not significantly correlated with chromosome sequence size (Pearson, r < -0.185, P > 0.05). Relative abundances of the same nucleotide SSR type showed great similarity among different chromosomes of B. taurus, O. aries, and C. hircus. PMID:26196922

  19. Genetic diversity and structure in Leishmania infantum populations from southeastern Europe revealed by microsatellite analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The dynamic re-emergence of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in south Europe and the northward shift to Leishmania-free European countries are well-documented. However, the epidemiology of VL due to Leishmania infantum in southeastern (SE) Europe and the Balkans is inadequately examined. Herein, we aim to re-evaluate and compare the population structure of L. infantum in SE and southwestern (SW) Europe. Methods Leishmania strains collected from humans and canines in Turkey, Cyprus, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania and Croatia, were characterized by the K26-PCR assay and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Genetic diversity was assessed by multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) and MLM Types were analyzed by model- and distance- based algorithms to infer the population structure of 128 L. infantum strains. Results L. infantum MON-1 was found predominant in SE Europe, whilst 16.8% of strains were MON-98. Distinct genetic populations revealed clear differentiation between SE and SW European strains. Interestingly, Cypriot canine isolates were genetically isolated and formed a monophyletic group, suggesting the constitution of a clonal MON-1 population circulating among dogs. In contrast, two highly heterogeneous populations enclosed all MON-1 and MON-98 strains from the other SE European countries. Structure sub-clustering, phylogenetic and Splitstree analysis also revealed two distinct Croatian subpopulations. A mosaic of evolutionary effects resulted in consecutive sub-structuring, which indicated substantial differentiation and gene flow among strains of both zymodemes. Conclusions This is the first population genetic study of L. infantum in SE Europe and the Balkans. Our findings demonstrate the differentiation between SE and SW European strains; revealing the partition of Croatian strains between these populations and the genetic isolation of Cypriot strains. This mirrors the geographic position of Croatia located in central Europe and the natural isolation of the island of Cyprus. We have analysed the largest number of MON-98 strains so far. Our results indicate extensive gene flow, recombination and no differentiation between MON-1 and MON-98 zymodemes. No correlation either to host specificity or place and year of strain isolation was identified. Our findings may be associated with intensive host migration and common eco-epidemiological characteristics in these countries and give valuable insight into the dynamics of VL. PMID:24308691

  20. Development of novel DNA markers for genetic analysis of grey hamsters by cross-species amplification of microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Zhang, S J; Du, X Y; Xu, Y M; Huo, X Y; Liao, L F; Chen, Z W

    2015-01-01

    The grey hamster has been used in biomedical research for decades. However, effective molecular methods for evaluating the genetic structure of this species are lacking, which hinders its wider usage. In this study, we employed cross-amplification of microsatellite loci of species within the same genus by polymerase chain reaction. Loci screened included 107 from the Mongolian gerbil (MG) and 60 from the Chinese hamster (CH); of these, 15 polymorphic loci were identified for the grey hamster. Of the 167 loci screened, 95 (56.9%) with clear bands on agarose gel were initially identified. After sequencing, 74 (77.9%) of these matched the criteria for microsatellite characteristics, including 41 from MG and 33 from CH. Lastly, 15 (20.3%) loci with more than two alleles for each locus were identified through capillary electrophoresis scanning. To justify the applicability of the 15 grey hamster loci, genetic indexes of grey hamsters were evaluated using 46 generations of outbred stock, established 20 years ago, from Xinjiang, China. Mean effective allele numbers and expected heterozygosity of stock were as low as, respectively, 1.2 and 0.14; these were 2.8 and 4.0 times inferior, respectively, to wild grey hamsters. This finding suggests that the genetic structure of the stock-bred population is too weak to resist artificial and natural selection, mutation and genetic drifting. In conclusion, we have developed de novo microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of the grey hamster, providing data and methodology for the enrichment of a genetic library for this species. PMID:26600493

  1. Microsatellite analysis of chloroquine resistance associated alleles and neutral loci reveal genetic structure of Indian Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Prashant K.; Sutton, Patrick L.; Singh, Ruchi; Singh, Om P.; Dash, Aditya P.; Singh, Ashok K.; Carlton, Jane M.; Bhasin, Virendra K.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to control malignant malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum are hampered by the parasite’s acquisition of resistance to antimalarial drugs, e.g., chloroquine. This necessitates evaluating the spread of chloroquine resistance in any malaria-endemic area. India displays highly variable malaria epidemiology and also shares porous international borders with malaria-endemic Southeast Asian countries having multi-drug resistant malaria. Malaria epidemiology in India is believed to be affected by two major factors: high genetic diversity and evolving drug resistance in P. falciparum. How transmission intensity of malaria can influence the genetic structure of chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum population in India is unknown. Here, genetic diversity within and among P. falciparum populations is analyzed with respect to their prevalence and chloroquine resistance observed in 13 different locations in India. Microsatellites developed for P. falciparum, including three putatively neutral and seven microsatellites thought to be under a hitchhiking effect due to chloroquine selection were used. Genetic hitchhiking is observed in five of seven microsatellites flanking the gene responsible for chloroquine resistance. Genetic admixture analysis and F-statistics detected genetically distinct groups in accordance with transmission intensity of different locations and the probable use of chloroquine. A large genetic break between the chloroquine-resistant parasite of the Northeast-East-Island group and Southwest group (FST = 0.253, P<0.001) suggests a long period of isolation or a possibility of different origin between them. A pattern of significant isolation by distance was observed in low transmission areas (r = 0.49, P=0.003, N = 83, Mantel test). An unanticipated pattern of spread of hitchhiking suggests genetic structure for Indian P. falciparum population. Overall, the study suggests that transmission intensity can be an efficient driver for genetic differentiation at both neutral and adaptive loci across India. PMID:23871774

  2. Intracommunity relationships, dispersal pattern and paternity success in a wild living community of Bonobos (Pan paniscus) determined from DNA analysis of faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Gerloff, U; Hartung, B; Fruth, B; Hohmann, G; Tautz, D

    1999-06-01

    Differences in social relationships among community members are often explained by differences in genetic relationships. The current techniques of DNA analysis allow explicit testing of such a hypothesis. Here, we have analysed the genetic relationships for a community of wild bonobos (Pan paniscus) using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers extracted from faecal samples. Bonobos show an opportunistic and promiscuous mating behaviour, even with mates from outside the community. Nonetheless, we find that most infants were sired by resident males and that two dominant males together attained the highest paternity success. Intriguingly, the latter males are the sons of high-ranking females, suggesting an important influence of mothers on the paternity success of their sons. The molecular data support previous inferences on female dispersal and male philopatry. We find a total of five different mitochondrial haplotypes among 15 adult females, suggesting a frequent migration of females. Moreover, for most adult and subadult males in the group we find a matching mother, while this is not the case for most females, indicating that these leave the community during adolescence. Our study demonstrates that faecal samples can be a useful source for the determination of kinship in a whole community. PMID:10406131

  3. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis between Indian red jungle fowl and domestic chicken using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Shukla, Sanjeev K; Mathew, Jose; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity, population structure, and relatedness in Indian red jungle fowl (RJF, Gallus gallus murgi) from northern India and three domestic chicken populations (gallus gallus domesticus), maintained at the institute farms, namely White Leghorn (WL), Aseel (AS) and Red Cornish (RC) using 25 microsatellite markers. All the markers were polymorphic, the number of alleles at each locus ranged from five (MCW0111) to forty-three (LEI0212) with an average number of 19 alleles per locus. Across all loci, the mean expected heterozygosity and polymorphic information content were 0.883 and 0.872, respectively. Population-specific alleles were found in each population. A UPGMA dendrogram based on shared allele distances clearly revealed two major clusters among the four populations; cluster I had genotypes from RJF and WL whereas cluster II had AS and RC genotypes. Furthermore, the estimation of population structure was performed to understand how genetic variation is partitioned within and among populations. The maximum ▵K value was observed for K = 4 with four identified clusters. Furthermore, factorial analysis clearly showed four clustering; each cluster represented the four types of population used in the study. These results clearly, demonstrate the potential of microsatellite markers in elucidating the genetic diversity, relationships, and population structure analysis in RJF and domestic chicken populations. PMID:25831041

  4. Microsatellite-based analysis of the genetic structure and diversity of Aleurocanthus spiniferus (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) from tea plants in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Tian; Tao, Huan-Huan; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2015-04-10

    Although Aleurocanthus spiniferus (Quaintance) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a well known insect pest of tea plants, little information is available about its genetic structure and diversity. The present study used microsatellite markers to assess the genetic structure and diversity of this species on tea plants in China. For this purpose, 193 individuals from ten natural populations were analyzed using ten microsatellite markers. Our results indicated that the average number of alleles (A) across populations was 35.6, and all observed heterozygosities (HO) were greater than 0.7, indicating an excess of heterozygosity and a relatively high level of genetic diversity among populations, and the number of private alleles per population ranged from 3 to 26. Pairwise FST analysis suggested that the number of genetic differentiation events was moderate (0.05analysis revealed that more than 95% of variation was attributed to among samples within populations. High levels of migration rate were detected among five groups and migration rate was generally symmetrical in group pairs. Bottleneck test indicated that most populations had experienced a population bottleneck. PMID:25662872

  5. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis for cystic fibrosis: detection of paternal mutations, exploration of patient preferences and cost analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Melissa; Twiss, Philip; Verhoef, Talitha I; Drury, Suzanne; McKay, Fiona; Mason, Sarah; Jenkins, Lucy; Morris, Stephen; Chitty, Lyn S

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives We aim to develop non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) for cystic fibrosis (CF) and determine costs and implications for implementation. Methods A next-generation sequencing assay was developed to detect ten common CF mutations for exclusion of the paternal mutation in maternal plasma. Using uptake data from a study exploring views on NIPD for CF, total test-related costs were estimated for the current care pathway and compared with those incorporating NIPD. Results The assay reliably predicted mutation status in all control and maternal plasma samples. Of carrier or affected adults with CF (n = 142) surveyed, only 43.5% reported willingness to have invasive testing for CF with 94.4% saying they would have NIPD. Using these potential uptake data, the incremental costs of NIPD over invasive testing per 100 pregnancies at risk of CF are £9025 for paternal mutation exclusion, and £26 510 for direct diagnosis. Conclusions We have developed NIPD for risk stratification in around a third of CF families. There are economic implications due to potential increased test demand to inform postnatal management rather than to inform decisions around termination of an affected pregnancy. © 2015 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25708280

  6. Microsatellite Analysis of the Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Dairy Goats in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Seilsuth, Somkiat; Seo, Joo Hee; Kong, Hong Sik; Jeon, Gwang Joo

    2016-03-01

    The genetic relationships between different populations and breeds of exotic dairy goats in Thailand were studied using 12 microsatellite markers. Blood samples were obtained from 211 goats from Department of Livestock Development breeding and research farms: 29 Anglonubian (AN), 21 Alpine (AP), 23 Jamunapari (JAM), 50 Saanen (SN), and 88 Toggenburg (TG). Five of the 12 microsatellite markers were found to be polymorphic. A mean of 7.40 alleles per locus was found, with a range from 5 (SPS115 and ETH225) to 11 (TGLA122). We found 24, 27, 19, 32, and 24 alleles in the AN, AP, JAM, SN, and TG breeds, respectively; 37 alleles were present in all breeds. The mean number of alleles in each population ranged from 3.2 (ETH225 locus) to 7.6 (TGLA122 locus). Genetic variability within the breeds was moderate as evidenced by the mean expected heterozygosity of 0.539. The average observed heterozygosity across the 5 markers in all breeds was 0.529 with the maximum observed at the BM1818 locus (0.772) and the minimum at the ETH225 locus (0.248). The observed and expected heterozygosity for all breeds for the 5 microsatellite markers ranged from 0.419 to 0.772 and 0.227 to 0.792, respectively. On the basis of their means, the TGLA122 and BM1818 loci were the most suitable markers for distinguishing genetic diversity among the goats. The estimated average F is value for the breeds ranged from -0.044 (ETH225) to 0.180 (SPS115), while the estimated average F st value ranged from 0.021 (SPS115) to 0.104 (ETH10). These results indicated that TGLA122 and BM1818 markers are suitable to be used for aiding conservation and breeding improvement strategies of dairy. PMID:26950862

  7. Genome-wide analysis of microsatellite sequence in seven filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Yun; Liu, Lin; Yang, Jing; Li, Jin-Bin; Su, Yuan; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yun-Yue; Zhu, You-Yong

    2009-06-01

    Abundance of microsatellites with repeated unit lengths of 1-6 base pairs in seven fungi: Aspergillus nidulans, Coprinus cinereus, Cryptococcus neoformans (serotype A), Fusarium graminearum, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa and Ustilago maydis were investigated on genomic scale. The results showed that each species has its specific profile for different types and different motifs of SSR loci. Ascomycetes fungi M. grisea, N. crassa and basidiomycete fungus U. maydis adopt much more microsatellites than other fungi examined. Total amount of 15,751, 14,788 and 6,854 SSR loci were observed respectively, average density is 406, 389 and 347 per Mbp sequence; overall length of SSR sequence was 0.82%, 0.95% and 0.79% of genomic sequence respectively. While ascomycetes fungus F. graminearum and A. nidulans contains the least SSRs in the genomic DNA, only 4,679 and 4,837 tracts were observed in 36 Mb and 30 Mb genomic sequence respectively. Microsatellite repeats in protein coding regions are investigated in Aspergillus nidulans, Magnaporthe grisea, and Neurospora crassa also, the results show that the difference of different types and motifs among three fungi is very little than that in whole genomic sequence. For trinucleotide repeats, overrepresent (comparing to the total base pair of protein coding region) of AGC, GGC, AGG, ACG and ACC was observed in coding region, frequencies of AAC and AAG were not difference between coding and non-coding region, AAT, AGT and ATG were underrepresent in coding region excepted for A. nidulans, in which ATG was overrepresentative. PMID:20640828

  8. Microsatellite Analysis of the Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Dairy Goats in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Seilsuth, Somkiat; Seo, Joo Hee; Kong, Hong Sik; Jeon, Gwang Joo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic relationships between different populations and breeds of exotic dairy goats in Thailand were studied using 12 microsatellite markers. Blood samples were obtained from 211 goats from Department of Livestock Development breeding and research farms: 29 Anglonubian (AN), 21 Alpine (AP), 23 Jamunapari (JAM), 50 Saanen (SN), and 88 Toggenburg (TG). Five of the 12 microsatellite markers were found to be polymorphic. A mean of 7.40 alleles per locus was found, with a range from 5 (SPS115 and ETH225) to 11 (TGLA122). We found 24, 27, 19, 32, and 24 alleles in the AN, AP, JAM, SN, and TG breeds, respectively; 37 alleles were present in all breeds. The mean number of alleles in each population ranged from 3.2 (ETH225 locus) to 7.6 (TGLA122 locus). Genetic variability within the breeds was moderate as evidenced by the mean expected heterozygosity of 0.539. The average observed heterozygosity across the 5 markers in all breeds was 0.529 with the maximum observed at the BM1818 locus (0.772) and the minimum at the ETH225 locus (0.248). The observed and expected heterozygosity for all breeds for the 5 microsatellite markers ranged from 0.419 to 0.772 and 0.227 to 0.792, respectively. On the basis of their means, the TGLA122 and BM1818 loci were the most suitable markers for distinguishing genetic diversity among the goats. The estimated average Fis value for the breeds ranged from −0.044 (ETH225) to 0.180 (SPS115), while the estimated average Fst value ranged from 0.021 (SPS115) to 0.104 (ETH10). These results indicated that TGLA122 and BM1818 markers are suitable to be used for aiding conservation and breeding improvement strategies of dairy. PMID:26950862

  9. [HLA-DRB1 typing by PCR-sequence specific primers for paternity determination].

    PubMed

    Liu, L M; Liang, J; Wang, B J; Ding, M; Li, J P; Li, C M; Xiao, Y Z; Jia, J T

    1999-11-01

    HLA-DRB1 typing by PCR-SSP technique was first used for paternity testing. The analysis of 42 paternity cases shows that this identification method is simple, fast and reliable and has high exclusion probability of paternity (66.3%). This method can also be applied to the study of transplantation, HLA associated disease and anthropogenesis. PMID:12536433

  10. Paternally inherited markers in bovine hybrid populations.

    PubMed

    Verkaar, E L C; Vervaecke, H; Roden, C; Romero Mendoza, L; Barwegen, M W; Susilawati, T; Nijman, I J; Lenstra, J A

    2003-12-01

    The genetic integrity of crossfertile bovine- or cattle-like species may be endangered by species hybridization. Previously, amplified fragment length polymorphism, satellite fragment length polymorphism and microsatellite assays have been used to analyze the species composition of nuclear DNA in taurine cattle, zebu, banteng and bison populations, while mitochondrial DNA reveals the origin of the maternal lineages. Here, we describe species-specific markers of the paternally transmitted Y-chromosome for the direct detection of male-mediated introgression. Convenient PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and competitive PCR assays are shown to differentiate the Y-chromosomes of taurine cattle, American bison and European bison, and to detect the banteng origin of Indonesian Madura and Bali cattle bulls. PMID:14508501

  11. Microsatellite analysis to estimate genetic relationships among five bulgarian sheep breeds

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Herein, genetic relationships among five breeds of Bulgarian sheep were estimated using microsatellite markers. The total number of alleles identified was 226 at the 16 loci examined. DA distance values were used for phylogenetic tree construction with the UPGMA algorithm. The two Tsigai and two Maritza populations were found to be geneticallvery closely related to each other y (0.198, and 0.258 respectively). The Pleven Black Head population was distinct from the other four. These results could be useful for preserving genes in these breeds, thereby ensuring their preservation in Bulgaria. PMID:21637604

  12. An intelligent maintenance system for earth-based failure analysis and self-repairing of microsatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, Enrique A.; Quiroga, Juan J.; Fernández, Roberto; Monte, Gustavo E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a recently developed maintenance system for a microsatellite, which is being constructed and it is expected to be launched shortly. The autonomous maintenance system is going to be installed on a personal computer located in an earth-based control room. As this place will most likely be staffed 24 h a day, 7 days a week, there is a good deal of interest in the use of increased automation in maintenance tasks in order to improve the efficiency with which personnel are used and as a way to reduce costs. The system described here is a good example of emerging automation technology that is intended to replace human operators responsible for system maintenance. The structure of the automation system is based upon an architecture of collaborative intelligent agents designed to detect failure in any of the microsatellites components. The multiagent system consists of a set of different agents devoted to failure detection, prevention and correction. Regarding correction, specific agents for each constitutive part of the microsatellite have been developed that take over the necessary actions to solve any given problem in its operation. The detection agent decides which correction agent control should be transferred, based upon inference obtained from its knowledge base made up of rules for testing and diagnosis. Actions for correction may imply the use of redundant systems, which can reconfigure themselves to avoid defective circuits, among other repairing strategies. The prevention agent uses predictive models that have been developed for each significant failure mode. Statistical models are also used by this agent to determine the shape of the distribution of times to failure. The prevention agent selects the corresponding correction agent to which control is going to be transferred and this agent carries out the necessary actions to prevent the system failure. The overall intelligent system employs a blackboard architecture for communication and collaboration among agents. Several simulations with specially designed test cases used to evaluate the system performance suggest that in order for maintenance automation to be effective, it must be designed in close relationship with human operators who will occasionally troubleshoot, maintain and repair the microsatellite from earth. This human-centered approach of the design implies assigning particular importance to the effectiveness achieved in the process of knowledge acquisition when the intelligent agents are being designed.

  13. Inferred Paternity and Male Reproductive Success in a Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Population.

    PubMed

    Ford, Michael J; Hanson, M Bradley; Hempelmann, Jennifer A; Ayres, Katherine L; Emmons, Candice K; Schorr, Gregory S; Baird, Robin W; Balcomb, Kenneth C; Wasser, Samuel K; Parsons, Kim M; Balcomb-Bartok, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    We used data from 78 individuals at 26 microsatellite loci to infer parental and sibling relationships within a community of fish-eating ("resident") eastern North Pacific killer whales (Orcinus orca). Paternity analysis involving 15 mother/calf pairs and 8 potential fathers and whole-pedigree analysis of the entire sample produced consistent results. The variance in male reproductive success was greater than expected by chance and similar to that of other aquatic mammals. Although the number of confirmed paternities was small, reproductive success appeared to increase with male age and size. We found no evidence that males from outside this small population sired any of the sampled individuals. In contrast to previous results in a different population, many offspring were the result of matings within the same "pod" (long-term social group). Despite this pattern of breeding within social groups, we found no evidence of offspring produced by matings between close relatives, and the average internal relatedness of individuals was significantly less than expected if mating were random. The population's estimated effective size was <30 or about 1/3 of the current census size. Patterns of allele frequency variation were consistent with a population bottleneck. PMID:21757487

  14. Novel microsatellite repeats (MSRs) and linkage disequilibrium analysis in the SMA region of 5q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Yaraghi, Z.; Roy, N.; MacKenzie, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    The spinal muscular atrophies (SMA) are characterized by degeneration of the anterior horn cells of the spinal cord, leading to muscular atrophy associated with progressive paralysis. The gene involved in SMA has been mapped by linkage analysis to a region of 5q13.1 flanked centromerically by D5S435 and telomerically by D5S557. We are in the process of identifying new microsatellite repeats to further define the genetic map of the SMA region. A contiguous array of YAC clones covering the SMA containing D5S435-D56S112 interval of 5q13.1 was established. From this contig, a 700 kb clone 76C1, which contains the 200 kb CMS-1/CATT-1 critical region, was used to generate a partial Sau3A1 phage library. We have previously shown that 2 CATT-1 subloci are in linkage disequilibrium with type I SMA. The 76C1 subloci are in linkage disequilibrium with type I SMA. The 76C1 phage library has been screened for human MSRs. To date we have identified two novel polymorphic microsatellites and four further candidates are being characterized. Results of linkage disequilibrium studies currently underway will be presented. The identification of a linkage disequilibrium maximum will be helpful in the further narrowing of the SMA region.

  15. Population structure of the predatory mite Neoseiulus womersleyi in a tea field based on an analysis of microsatellite DNA markers

    PubMed Central

    Todokoro, Yasuhiro; Higaki, Tomomi

    2010-01-01

    The predatory mite Neoseiulus womersleyi (Schicha) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is an important natural enemy of the Kanzawa spider mite, Tetranychus kanzawaki Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), in tea fields. Attraction and preservation of natural enemies by habitat management to reduce the need for acaricide sprays is thought to enhance the activity of N. womersleyi. To better conserve N. womersleyi in the field, however, it is essential to elucidate the population genetic structure of this species. To this end, we developed ten microsatellite DNA markers for N. womersleyi. We then evaluated population structure of N. womersleyi collected from a tea field, where Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia (Mill.), was planted to preserve N. womersleyi. Seventy-seven adult females were collected from four sites within 200 m. The fixation indexes FST among subpopulations were not significantly different. The kinship coefficients between individuals did not differ significantly within a site as a function of the sampling dates, but the coefficients gradually decreased with increasing distance. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed that the population consisted of three genetic clusters, and that subpopulations within 100 m, including those collected on T. rotundifolia, were genetically similar to each other. Given the previously observed population dynamics of N. womersleyi, it appears that the area inhabited by a given cluster of the mite did not exceed 100 m. The estimation of population structure using microsatellite markers will provide valuable information in conservation biological control. PMID:20625919

  16. Use of microsatellite markers in molecular analysis of segregating populations of papaya (Carica papaya L.) derived from backcrossing.

    PubMed

    Pinto, F O; Pereira, M G; Luz, L N; Cardozo, D L; Ramos, H C C; Macedo, C M P

    2013-01-01

    Brazil is the world leader in papaya production. However, only a small number of cultivars are registered for commercial planting, mainly owing to delays in obtaining cultivars and the high costs of the field phase of breeding programs. These costs can be reduced when molecular tools are combined with conventional breeding methods. In the present study, we conducted a molecular analysis of a self-fertilized population of a first backcrossing generation of BC1S1 papaya plants via microsatellite markers both to monitor the level of homozygosity and the gene/allele transfer that confers the Golden trait (fruit color) and to assess the parental genomic proportion in the genotypes studied. Based on the analysis of 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci, 19 genotypes with the Golden trait belonging to BC1S1 were evaluated in addition to the parental genotypes. Genetic distance was estimated through weighted index. The genotypes were then grouped using the hierarchical nearest neighbor method, and the analysis of principal coordinates was used to measure the proportion of parental genomes in the segregating genotypes. The mean value of the inbreeding coefficient was 0.36. The analysis of the principal coordinates revealed that on average, 64% of the recurrent parent genome was present in the population. Together, the analyses allowed the selection of 3 individuals for the next backcross cycle (33BC1S1-18, 34BC1S1-16, and 37BC1S1-10). These individuals had a higher proportion of the recurrent parent and were grouped close to the recurrent parent in the cluster analysis. PMID:23884768

  17. Fluorescent microsatellite analysis reveals duplication of specific chromosomal regions in papillary renal cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Palmedo, G; Fischer, J; Kovacs, G

    1997-12-01

    Trisomies of chromosomes 3q, 7, 8, 12, 16, 17q, and 20 and the loss of the Y chromosome are specific genetic changes in papillary renal cell tumors. Many papillary renal cell tumors show marker chromosomes by karyotyping, which may contain duplicated chromosomal sequences. To uncover such alterations, we have analyzed 35 papillary renal cell tumors for each chromosome arm mentioned above and also for the X and Y chromosomes by employing a fluorescent microsatellite assay. We detected allelic duplications at the following chromosomal regions: 7q31-33 (64%), 17q12-22 (70%), 16q24-qter (55%), 12q12-14 (42%), 8p21 (25%), 3q22-24 (24%), and 20q13 (48%). The Y chromosome was missing in 74% of tumors obtained from male patients. No deletion at chromosome 3p was detected. The microsatellite assay revealed several allelic duplications at the specific chromosomal regions in papillary renal cell tumors, which either showed rearranged chromosomes of unknown origin or did not show specific alterations by previous karyotyping. PMID:9426401

  18. A new source of polymorphic DNA markers for sperm typing: analysis of microsatellite repeats in single cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, R; Weber, J L; Schmitt, K; Zhang, L; Arnheim, N

    1992-01-01

    We show that dinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeat polymorphisms can be analyzed in single cells without using radioactivity or denaturing gels. This provides a rich new source of DNA polymorphisms for genetic mapping by sperm typing. The recombination fraction between two CA repeat polymorphisms was determined after whole genome amplification of single sperm, followed by typing of two different aliquots, one aliquot for each polymorphic locus. Single-cell analysis of microsatellites may also be valuable both for preimplantation genetic disease diagnosis based on single-blastomere or polar-body analysis and for the typing of forensic or ancient DNA samples containing very small amounts of nucleic acid. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1415267

  19. Generation and analysis of ESTs from the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica Gmelin and identification of microsatellite and SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    Quilang, Jonas; Wang, Shaolin; Li, Ping; Abernathy, Jason; Peatman, Eric; Wang, Yongping; Wang, Lingling; Shi, Yaohua; Wallace, Richard; Guo, Ximing; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2007-01-01

    Background The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin 1791), is an economically important species cultured in many areas in North America. It is also ecologically important because of the impact of its filter feeding behaviour on water quality. Populations of C. virginica have been threatened by overfishing, habitat degradation, and diseases. Through genome research, strategies are being developed to reverse its population decline. However, large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) resources have been lacking for this species. Efficient generation of EST resources from this species has been hindered by a high redundancy of transcripts. The objectives of this study were to construct a normalized cDNA library for efficient EST analysis, to generate thousands of ESTs, and to analyze the ESTs for microsatellites and potential single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Results A normalized and subtracted C. virginica cDNA library was constructed from pooled RNA isolated from hemocytes, mantle, gill, gonad and digestive tract, muscle, and a whole juvenile oyster. A total of 6,528 clones were sequenced from this library generating 5,542 high-quality EST sequences. Cluster analysis indicated the presence of 635 contigs and 4,053 singletons, generating a total of 4,688 unique sequences. About 46% (2,174) of the unique ESTs had significant hits (E-value ≤ 1e-05) to the non-redundant protein database; 1,104 of which were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO) terms. A total of 35 microsatellites were identified from the ESTs, with 18 having sufficient flanking sequences for primer design. A total of 6,533 putative SNPs were also identified using all existing and the newly generated EST resources of the eastern oysters. Conclusion A high quality normalized cDNA library was constructed. A total of 5,542 ESTs were generated representing 4,688 unique sequences. Putative microsatellite and SNP markers were identified. These genome resources provide the material basis for future microarray development, marker validation, and genetic linkage and QTL analysis. PMID:17559679

  20. Paternal programming in sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Laura R.; Bell, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    In a wide range of organisms, including humans, mothers can influence offspring via the care they provide. Comparatively little is known about the effects of fathering on offspring. Here, we test the hypothesis that fathers are capable of programming their offspring for the type of environment they are likely to encounter. Male threespine sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, were either exposed to predation risk while fathering or not. Fathers altered their paternal behaviour when exposed to predation risk, and consequently produced adult offspring with phenotypes associated with strong predation pressure (smaller size, reduced body condition, reduced behavioural activity). Moreover, more attentive fathers produced offspring that showed stronger antipredator responses. These results are consistent with behaviourally mediated paternal programming: fathers can alter offspring phenotypes to match their future environment and influence offspring traits well into adulthood.

  1. Molecular and genomic characterisation of cryptic chromosomal alterations leading to paternal duplication of the 11p15.5 Beckwith‐Wiedemann region

    PubMed Central

    Russo, S; Finelli, P; Recalcati, M P; Ferraiuolo, S; Cogliati, F; Bernardina, B Dalla; Tibiletti, M G; Agosti, M; Sala, M; Bonati, M T; Larizza, L

    2006-01-01

    Background Beckwith‐Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth disorder with increased risk of paediatric tumours. The aetiology involves epigenetic and genetic alterations affecting the 11p15 region, methylation of the differentially methylated DMR2 region being the most common defect, while less frequent aetiologies include mosaic paternal 11p uniparental disomy (11patUPD), maternally inherited mutations of the CDKN1C gene, and hypermethylation of DMR1. A few patients have cytogenetic abnormalities involving 11p15.5. Methods Screening of 70 trios of BWS probands for 11p mosaic paternal UPD and for cryptic cytogenetic rearrangements using microsatellite segregation analysis identified a profile compatible with paternal 11p15 duplication in two patients. Results Fluorescence in situ hybridisation analysis revealed in one case the unbalanced translocation der(21)t(11;21)(p15.4;q22.3) originated from missegregation of a cryptic paternal balanced translocation. The second patient, trisomic for D11S1318, carried a small de novo dup(11)(p15.5p15.5), resulting from unequal recombination at paternal meiosis I. The duplicated region involves only IC1 and spares IC2/LIT1, as shown by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) mapping of the proximal duplication breakpoint within the amino‐terminal part of KvLQT1. Conclusions An additional patient with Wolf‐Hirschorn syndrome was shown by FISH studies to carry a der(4)t(4;11)(p16.3;p15.4), contributed by a balanced translocation father. Interestingly, refined breakpoint mapping on 11p and the critical regions on the partner 21q and 4p chromosomal regions suggested that both translocations affecting 11p15.4 are mediated by segmental duplications. These findings of chromosomal rearrangements affecting 11p15.5–15.4 provide a tool to further dissect the genomics of the BWS region and the pathogenesis of this imprinting disorder. PMID:16882733

  2. ANALYSIS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND POPULATION STRUCTURE WITHIN FLORIDA COCONUT (COCOS NUCIFERA L.) GERMPLASM USING MICROSATELLITE DNA, WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON THE FIJI DWARF CULTIVAR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using fifteen simple sequence repeat (SSR) microsatellite DNA loci, we analyzed genetic variation within Cocos nucifera germplasm collections at two locations in south Florida, representing eight cultivars. The loci were also used in a parentage analysis of progeny of the 'Fiji Dwarf' variety at bo...

  3. Development of 304 new microsatellite markers for carrot. Analysis of their potential for linkage mapping, assessment of genetic diversity and cross-taxa utilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two different approaches were used to isolate carrot SSRs: 1) Construction and analysis of a genomic DNA library enriched for SSR loci (GSSRs) and 2) Bioinformatic mining for SSR motifs in a 1.7 Mb BAC-end sequence database (BSSR). The SSR-enriched library yielded microsatellites with more repeats b...

  4. Paternal age bioethics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin R

    2015-09-01

    Modern genetic sequencing studies have confirmed that the sperm of older men contain a greater number of de novo germline mutations than the sperm of younger men. Although most of these mutations are neutral or of minimal phenotypic impact, a minority of them present a risk to the health of future children. If demographic trends towards later fatherhood continue, this will likely lead to a more children suffering from genetic disorders. A trend of later fatherhood will accelerate the accumulation of paternal-origin de novo mutations in the gene pool, gradually reducing human fitness in the long term. These risks suggest that paternal age is of ethical importance. Children affected by de novo mutations arising from delayed fatherhood can be said to be harmed, in the sense of 'impersonal' harm or 'non-comparative' harm. Various strategies are open at societal and individual levels towards reducing deleterious paternal age effects. Options include health education to promote earlier fatherhood, incentives for young sperm donors and state-supported universal sperm banking. The latter approach would likely be of the greatest benefit and could in principle be implemented immediately. More futuristically, human germline genetic modification offers the potential to repair heritable mutational damage. PMID:26037282

  5. Development of microsatellite markers for Manilkara maxima T.D. Penn. (Sapotaceae) and their use in conservation genetics.

    PubMed

    Silva-Junior, José Audenor; de Souza França, Daniele; Moraes, Ramiris César Souza; Gaiotto, Fernanda Amato

    2016-06-01

    Manilkara maxima is an endemic tree species of the Atlantic Forest in southern Bahia, Brazil. It is considered important for forest conservation due to its mutualistic interactions with endemic and endangered animals. Our aim was to develop microsatellite markers to estimate genetic diversity in order to provide information for effectiveness of future conservation programs. We used next generation sequencing technology to develop the first specific microsatellite markers for M. maxima. Seventeen new microsatellite loci were applied in 72 individuals sampled in three natural populations. On average, the number of alleles per loci was 8.8. The expected heterozygosity varied between 0.72 and 0.77, indicating that the developed set of molecular markers is useful for genetic diversity studies. Additionally, the estimated value for the combined probability of exclusion (Q) was greater than 0.999, which indicates the powerful of these molecular tools for paternity and kinship analysis. Our results demonstrate that the set of microsatellites developed in this work is a powerful tool for population genetics, molecular ecology and conservation biology purposes. PMID:27061192

  6. Are clownfish groups composed of close relatives? An analysis of microsatellite DNA variation in Amphiprion percula.

    PubMed

    Buston, Peter M; Bogdanowicz, Steven M; Wong, Alex; Harrison, Richard G

    2007-09-01

    A central question of evolutionary ecology is: why do animals live in groups? Answering this question requires that the costs and benefits of group living are measured from the perspective of each individual in the group. This, in turn, requires that the group's genetic structure is elucidated, because genetic relatedness can modulate the individuals' costs and benefits. The clown anemonefish, Amphiprion percula, lives in groups composed of a breeding pair and zero to four nonbreeders. Both breeders and nonbreeders stand to gain by associating with relatives: breeders might prefer to tolerate nonbreeders that are relatives because there is little chance that relatives will survive to breed elsewhere; nonbreeders might prefer to associate with breeders that are relatives because of the potential to accrue indirect genetic benefits by enhancing anemone and, consequently, breeder fitness. Given the potential benefits of associating with relatives, we use microsatellite loci to investigate whether or not individuals within groups of A. percula are related. We develop seven polymorphic microsatellite loci, with a number of alleles (range 2-24) and an observed level of heterozygosity (mean = 0.5936) sufficient to assess fine-scale genetic structure. The mean coefficient of relatedness among group members is 0.00 +/- 0.10 (n = 9 groups), and there are no surprising patterns in the distribution of pairwise relatedness. We conclude that A. percula live in groups of unrelated individuals. This study lays the foundation for further investigations of behavioural, population and community ecology of anemonefishes which are emerging as model systems for evolutionary ecology in the marine environment. PMID:17845439

  7. Population genetic structure of Myzus persicae nicotianae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in China by microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Yang, X M; Tang, S H; Xu, P J; Bian, W J; Wang, X F; Wang, X W; Ren, G W

    2015-01-01

    The tobacco aphid, Myzus persicae nicotianae (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is an important agricultural pest that feeds on host plants and transmits plant viruses in China. To effectively control this pest, we investigated the genetic variation and genetic structure of 54 populations of tobacco aphids collected in China, using five microsatellite loci. An average of 7 alleles with effective number ranging from 1.5 to 6.6 was detected using these five loci, and the average polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.652, suggesting that the five selected microsatellite loci were polymorphic and suitable for the study of population genetics. The expected heterozygosities in the populations studied ranged from 0.128 and 0.653, with an average value of 0.464. However, the observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.250 and 0.942 (average = 0.735), revealing a high genetic variability and heterozygosity excess in the Chinese tobacco aphid populations. The global fixation index (F(ST)) and mean gene flow (N(m)) were 0.34 (P < 0.0001) and 0.50, respectively, suggesting the high genetic differentiation among Chinese populations. The 54 populations of tobacco aphids were classified into two groups. The populations did not cluster geographically, as populations from the same provinces were usually present in different clusters. This was also confirmed by the Mantel test, which showed no significant correlation between the genetic distance and geographical distance or altitude. Long distance migration might be responsible for the lack of distance-related isolation. PMID:26681063

  8. Patterns of differentiation and hybridization in North American wolflike canids, revealed by analysis of microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Roy, M S; Geffen, E; Smith, D; Ostrander, E A; Wayne, R K

    1994-07-01

    Genetic divergence and gene flow among closely related populations are difficult to measure because mutation rates of most nuclear loci are so low that new mutations have not had sufficient time to appear and become fixed. Microsatellite loci are repeat arrays of simple sequences that have high mutation rates and are abundant in the eukaryotic genome. Large population samples can be screened for variation by using the polymerase chain reaction and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to separate alleles. We analyzed 10 microsatellite loci to quantify genetic differentiation and hybridization in three species of North American wolflike canids. We expected to find a pattern of genetic differentiation by distance to exist among wolflike canid populations, because of the finite dispersal distances of individuals. Moreover, we predicted that, because wolflike canids are highly mobile, hybrid zones may be more extensive and show substantial changes in allele frequency, relative to nonhybridizing populations. We demonstrate that wolves and coyotes do not show a pattern of genetic differentiation by distance. Genetic subdivision in coyotes, as measured by theta and Gst, is not significantly different from zero, reflecting persistent gene flow among newly established populations. However, gray wolves show significant subdivision that may be either due to drift in past Ice Age refugia populations or a result of other causes. Finally, in areas where gray wolves and coyotes hybridize, allele frequencies of gray wolves are affected, but those of coyotes are not. Past hybridization between the two species in the south-central United States may account for the origin of the red wolf. PMID:8078397

  9. Microsatellite and Mini-Exon Analysis of Mexican Human DTU I Trypanosoma cruzi Strains and Their Susceptibility to Nifurtimox and Benznidazole

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Ignacio; Nogueda, Benjamín; Martínez-Hernández, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, and it affects as many as 10 million people in North and South America, where it represents a major public health problem. T. cruzi is a parasite with high genetic diversity, and it has been grouped into 6 discrete typing units (DTUs), designated as T. cruzi I (TcI) to T. cruzi VI (TcVI). Mexican isolates from humans and from vector insects have been primarily found to be TcI, and these isolates are likely to be the strains that cause the clinical manifestations observed in Mexico. However, genetic characterization and drug susceptibility assays are limited in Mexican TcI strains. In this work, 24 Mexican T. cruzi strains, obtained primarily from humans, were studied with 7 locus microsatellites and mini-exon gene by PCR. Also, drug susceptibility was evaluated by growth and mobility assays. All of the human strains belonged to TcI, and they could be further grouped through microsatellite analysis into 2 subgroups (microsatellite genotypes 1 and 2), which were not related to the host clinical status or biological origin of the strain. Two strains, both from wild mammals, belonged to the TcII–TcVI groups; these strains and the CL Brener strain constituted microsatellite genotype 3. The number of alleles in each locus was lower than reported for South American strains, and a departure from the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was observed. The susceptibility of these strains to nifurtimox and benznidazole was heterogeneous. T. cruzi strains characterized as microsatellite genotypes 2 and 3 were significantly more susceptible to benznidazole than strains of microsatellite genotype 1. Only 1 Mexican strain resistant to both drugs was found in this study. PMID:23421890

  10. Genetic components of grey cattle in Estonia as revealed by microsatellite analysis using two Bayesian clustering methods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It was recently postulated that a few individual grey cattle still found in Estonia might be a relict of the old native cattle stock. Genotypes at 17 microsatellite loci from a total of 243 cattle from North European breeds and 11 grey cattle in Estonia were used in an attempt to clarify the genetic composition of the grey cattle. Findings We characterize the genetic components of 11 examples of the grey cattle in Estonia at the population and individual levels. Our results show that the grey cattle in Estonia are most genetically similar to the Holstein-Friesian breed and secondarily to the Estonian Red cattle. Conclusions Both Bayesian approaches gave similar results in terms of the identification of numbers of clusters and the estimation of proportions of genetic components. This study suggested that the Estonian grey cattle included in the analysis are a genetic composite resulting from cross-breeding of European dairy breeds. PMID:21314923

  11. Molecular analysis of dinucleotide microsatellite in growth hormone gene of Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) from Mumbal, India.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Raj Naresh; Singh, S D; Kumari, Vibha; Pandey, A K

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, out of four alleles amplified from seabass (Lates calcarifer) genome inhabiting Mumbai water by PCR using growth hormone (GH) gene-specific primers, two DNA fragments (SGMS1, 233 bp and SGMS2, 239 bp) were eluted from gel, cloned using pTZ57R (2.886 kb) vector into E. coli DH5α, characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis and sequenced by automated DNA sequencer. After blasting and multiple alignment of the above sequences, SGMS1 showed 97% and SGMS2 93.3% homology with promoter region of GH gene containing microsatellite of Australian seabass and 94.6% homology between both the fragments. These sequences SGMS1 and SGMS2 were submitted to NCBI GenBank. On blasting, these sequences with gene databases, SGMS1 and SGMS2 showed partial homologies with Seriola quinqueradiata (26.9%, 12.9%), flounder (15.8%, 15.8%), Oreochromis nilotica (23%, 7.9%), Oreochromis mossambicus (23%, 7.9%) and Danio rerio (8.2%, 7.5%). Critical analysis showed the presence of microsatellite (CA)16 and (CA)19 repeats in fragments SGMS1 and SGMS2, respectively in seabass from Mumbai water in comparison to (CA)14 repeats from the Australian seabass. Further, on sequence comparison, single nucleotide mismatches detected at their several positions in relation to seabass GH gene of Australia. These nucleotide variations detected in SGMS1 and SGMS2 in comparison to those of the Australian seabass may be due to mutations owing to environmental or habitat changes that seem to have definite potentials for development of genetic markers, which would be useful for identification and selection of superior germplasm with desirable commercial traits such as high growth rate. PMID:26536806

  12. Comparative analysis of the within-population genetic structure in wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) at the self-incompatibility locus and nuclear microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Silvio; Tusch, Alexandra; Scholz, Florian

    2006-10-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) systems in plants exhibit high polymorphism at the SI controlling S-locus because individuals with rare alleles have a higher probability to successfully pollinate other plants than individuals with more frequent alleles. This process, referred to as frequency-dependent selection, is expected to shape number, frequency distribution, and spatial distribution of self-incompatibility alleles in natural populations. We investigated the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure within a Prunus avium population at two contrasting gene loci: nuclear microsatellites and the S-locus. The S-locus revealed a higher diversity (15 alleles) than the eight microsatellites (4-12 alleles). Although the frequency distribution of S-alleles differed significantly from the expected equal distribution, the S-locus showed a higher evenness than the microsatellites (Shannon's evenness index for the S-locus: E = 0.91; for the microsatellites: E = 0.48-0.83). Also, highly significant deviations from neutrality were found for the S-locus whereas only minor deviations were found for two of eight microsatellites. A comparison of the frequency distribution of S-alleles in three age-cohorts revealed no significant differences, suggesting that different levels of selection acting on the S-locus or on S-linked sites might also affect the distribution and dynamics of S-alleles. Autocorrelation analysis revealed a weak but significant spatial genetic structure for the multilocus average of the microsatellites and for the S-locus, but could not ascertain differences in the extent of spatial genetic structure between these locus types. An indirect estimate of gene dispersal, which was obtained to explain this spatial genetic pattern, indicated high levels of gene dispersal within our population (sigma(g) = 106 m). This high gene dispersal, which may be partly due to the self-incompatibility system itself, aids the effective gene flow of the microsatellites, thereby decreasing the contrast between the neutral microsatellites and the S-locus. PMID:16968267

  13. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite loci for Lusitanian toadfish, Halobatrachus didactylus

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo J.; Amorim, Maria Clara P.

    2015-01-01

    The Lusitanian toadfish Halobatrachus didactylus is an eastern Atlantic polygynous species showing male paternal care. In this paper we describe 5 novel microsatellite loci obtained by 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of a microsatellite-enriched library. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus varied between 2 and 4, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.082 to 0.600. No significant deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was found and there was no evidence for linkage disequilibrium. These markers will be of great value for paternity studies and population genetics of this species. PMID:25653909

  14. Analysis of the frequency of microsatellite instability and p53 gene mutation in splenic marginal zone and MALT lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Sol Mateo, M; Mollejo, M; Villuendas, R; Algara, P; Sánchez-Beato, M; Martinez-Delgado, B; Martínez, P; Piris, M A

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: Studies of the genetic characteristics of splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) have failed to identify genetic changes specific to this tumour. Microsatellite instability is a type of genomic instability associated with different types of human cancer. Although microsatellite instability is rare in B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, it has been found in some specific subsets, such as marginal zone lymphomas arising in mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), where an association with p53 mutation has been described. Because it has been proposed that SMZL and MALT are close in histogenetic terms, this study investigated the comparative frequency of microsatellite instability and p53 mutation in patients with SMZL and MALT lymphomas. METHODS: Microsatellite instability was investigated using seven microsatellite marker loci in 14 patients with SMZL and 20 patients with MALT lymphomas. In an attempt to clarify the role of p53 gene mutation in the pathogenesis of SMZL, exons 5-8 were also investigated by polymerase chain reaction single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and direct sequencing in a total of 20 patients with SMZL and 22 patients with MALT lymphomas. RESULTS: Microsatellite instability was not detected in patients with SMZL, although five of 20 patients with MALT lymphomas had microsatellite instability. The frequency of p53 mutation was low in both series (two of 20 patients with SMZL and one of 22 patients with MALT lymphomas). No significant association was found between p53 mutation and microsatellite instability. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that microsatellite instability is not associated with the molecular pathogenesis of SMZL, confirming the relatively increased frequency of microsatellite instability in MALT lymphomas, and perhaps suggesting that MALT and SMZL have different mechanisms of tumorigenesis. PMID:10193520

  15. Microsatellite DNA analysis of genetic effects of harvesting in old-growth eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rajora, O P; Rahman, M H; Buchert, G P; Dancik, B P

    2000-03-01

    Microsatellite DNA markers from 13 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were used to compare genetic diversity between preharvest pristine and postharvest residual gene pools of two adjacent virgin, old-growth ( approximately 250 years) stands of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) in Ontario. There was concurrence in genetic diversity changes in the postharvest gene pools of the two stands. The total and mean numbers of alleles detected in each stand were reduced by approximately 26% after tree density reductions of approximately 75%. Approximately 18 and 21% of the low-frequency (0. 25 > P > or = 0.01) alleles and 76 and 92% of the rare (P < 0.01) alleles were lost from residual stands A and B, respectively, after harvesting. Multilocus gametic diversity was reduced by 38 and 85% and genotype additivity by approximately 50% in the residual stands after harvesting. Latent genetic potential of each stand was reduced by approximately 40%. Although heterozygosity was reduced (1-5%) in the postharvest residual stands, the reductions were not substantial and not comparable to those using other genetic diversity measures. The reductions in genetic diversity measures were slightly higher than those theoretically expected in postbottleneck populations according to drift theory. In the absence of substantial gene migration that could ameliorate the genetic losses, the ability of the postharvest white pine gene pools to adapt to changing environmental and disease conditions may have been compromised. The microsatellite DNA results for genetic effects of harvesting in old-growth eastern white pine stands were similar to those that we reported earlier from allozyme analysis (Buchert et al. 1997). The results indicate that silvicultural practices should ensure that the gene pools of remaining pristine old-growth stands are reconstituted in the regenerating stands. PMID:10736031

  16. Genetic status of Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) reintroduced into South Korea based on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite loci analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yung-Kun; Hong, Yoon-Jee; Min, Mi-Sook; Kim, Kyung Seok; Kim, Young-Jun; Voloshina, Inna; Myslenkov, Alexander; Smith, Gavin J D; Cuong, Nguyen Dinh; Tho, Huynh Huu; Han, Sang-Hoon; Yang, Doo-Ha; Kim, Chang-Bae; Lee, Hang

    2011-01-01

    The Asiatic black bear is one of the most endangered mammals in South Korea owing to population declines resulting from human exploitation and habitat fragmentation. To restore the black bear population in South Korea, 27 bear cubs from North Korea and Russian Far East (Primorsky Krai) were imported and released into Jirisan National Park, a reservoir of the largest wild population in South Korea, in 2004. To monitor the success of this reintroduction, the genetic diversity and population structure of the reintroduced black bears were measured using both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers. Mitochondrial D-loop region DNA sequences (615 bp) of 43 Japanese black bears from previous study and 14 Southeast Asian black bears in this study were employed to obtain phylogenetic inference of the reintroduced black bears. The mitochondrial phylogeny indicated Asiatic black bear populations from Russian Far East and North Korea form a single evolutionary unit distinct from populations from Japan and Southeast Asia. Mean expected heterozygosity (H(E)) across 16 microsatellite loci was 0.648 for Russian and 0.676 for North Korean populations. There was a moderate but significant level of microsatellite differentiation (F(ST) = 0.063) between black bears from the 2 source areas. In addition, genetic evidences revealed that 2 populations are represented as diverging groups, with lingering genetic admixture among individuals of 2 source populations. Relatedness analysis based on genetic markers indicated several discrepancies with the pedigree records. Implication of the phylogenetic and genetic evidences on long-term management of Asiatic black bears in South Korea is discussed. PMID:21325020

  17. Genetic diversity and admixture analysis of Sanfratellano and three other Italian horse breeds assessed by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Zuccaro, A; Bordonaro, S; Criscione, A; Guastella, A M; Perrotta, G; Blasi, M; D'Urso, G; Marletta, D

    2008-07-01

    Sanfratellano is a native Sicilian horse breed, mainly reared in the north east of the Island, developed in the 19th century from local dams and sires with a restricted introgression of Oriental, African and, more recently, Maremmano stallions. In this study, the genetic relationships and admixture among Sanfratellano, the other two Sicilian autochthonous breeds and Maremmano breed were assessed using a set of microsatellites. The main goals were to infer the impact of Maremmano breed in the current Sanfratellano horse and to provide genetic information useful to improve the selection strategies of the Sanfratellano horse. The whole sample included 384 horses (238 Sanfratellano, 50 Sicilian Oriental Purebred, 30 Sicilian Indigenous and 66 Maremmano), chosen avoiding closely related animals. A total of 111 alleles from 11 microsatellite loci were detected, from four at HTG7 to 15 at ASB2 locus. The mean number of alleles was the lowest in Oriental Purebred (6.7), the highest in Sanfratellano (8.3). All the breeds showed a high level of gene diversity (He) ranging from 0.71 0.04 in Sicilian Oriental Purebred to 0.81 0.02 in Sicilian Indigenous. The genetic differentiation index was low; only about 6% of the diversity was found among breeds. Nei's standards (DS) and Reynolds' (DR) genetic distances reproduced the same population ranking. Individual genetic distances and admixture analysis revealed that: (a) nowadays Maremmano breed does not significantly influence the current Sanfratellano breed; (b) within Sanfratellano breed, it is possible to distinguish two well-defined groups with different proportions of Indigenous blood. PMID:22443698

  18. Multiyear multiple paternity and mate fidelity in the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Lance, S L; Tuberville, T D; Dueck, L; Holz-Schietinger, C; Trosclair, P L; Elsey, R M; Glenn, T C

    2009-11-01

    We examined multiple paternity during eight breeding events within a 10-year period (1995-2005) for a total of 114 wild American alligator nests in Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge in south-west Louisiana. Our goals included examining (i) within population variation in multiple paternity among years, (ii) variation in multiple paternity in individual females and (iii) the potential for mate fidelity. To accomplish this, in the current study, eggs were sampled from 92 nests over 6 years and analysed along with 22 nests from a previous 2-year study. Genotypes at five microsatellite loci were generated for 1802 alligator hatchlings. Multiple paternity was found in 51% of clutches and paternal contributions to these clutches were highly skewed. Rates of multiple paternity varied widely among years and were consistently higher in the current study than previously reported for the same population. Larger females have larger clutches, but are not more likely to have multiply sired nests. However, small females are unlikely to have clutches with more than two sires. For 10 females, nests from multiple years were examined. Seven (70%) of these females exhibited long-term mate fidelity, with one female mating with the same male in 1997, 2002 and 2005. Five females exhibiting partial mate fidelity (71%) had at least one multiple paternity nest and thus mated with the same male, but not exclusively. These patterns of mate fidelity suggest a potential role for mate choice in alligators. PMID:19804377

  19. Paternalism and partial autonomy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, O

    1984-01-01

    A contrast is often drawn between standard adult capacities for autonomy, which allow informed consent to be given or withheld, and patients' reduced capacities, which demand paternalistic treatment. But patients may not be radically different from the rest of us, in that all human capacities for autonomous action are limited. An adequate account of paternalism and the role that consent and respect for persons can play in medical and other practice has to be developed within an ethical theory that does not impose an idealised picture of unlimited autonomy but allows for the variable and partial character of actual human autonomy. PMID:6520849

  20. Genetic structure and gene flow among Komodo dragon populations inferred by microsatellite loci analysis.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, C; Bruford, M W

    1999-12-01

    A general concern for the conservation of endangered species is the maintenance of genetic variation within populations, particularly when they become isolated and reduced in size. Estimates of gene flow and effective population size are therefore important for any conservation initiative directed to the long-term persistence of a species in its natural habitat. In the present study, 10 microsatellite loci were used to assess the level of genetic variability among populations of the Komodo dragon Varanus komodoensis. Effective population size was calculated and gene flow estimates were compared with palaeogeographic data in order to assess the degree of vulnerability of four island populations. Rinca and Flores, currently separated by an isthmus of about 200 m, retained a high level of genetic diversity and showed a high degree of genetic similarity, with gene flow values close to one migrant per generation. The island of Komodo showed by far the highest levels of genetic divergence, and its allelic distinctiveness was considered of great importance in the maintenance of genetic variability within the species. A lack of distinct alleles and low levels of gene flow and genetic variability were found for the small population of Gili Motang island, which was identified as vulnerable to stochastic threats. Our results are potentially important for both the short- and long-term management of the Komodo dragon, and are critical in view of future re-introduction or augmentation in areas where the species is now extinct or depleted. PMID:10703549

  1. A microsatellite analysis of five Colonial Spanish horse populations of the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Conant, E K; Juras, R; Cothran, E G

    2012-02-01

    The domestic horse (Equus caballus) was re-introduced to the Americas by Spanish explorers. Although horses from other parts of Europe were subsequently introduced, some New World populations maintain characteristics ascribed to their Spanish heritage. The southeastern United States has a history of Spanish invasion and settlement, and this influence on local feral horse populations includes two feral-recaptured breeds: the Florida Cracker and the Marsh Tacky, both of which are classified as Colonial Spanish horses. The feral Banker horses found on islands off the coast of North Carolina, which include, among others, the Shackleford Banks, the Corolla and the Ocracoke, are also Colonial Spanish horses. Herein we analyse 15 microsatellite loci from 532 feral and 2583 domestic horses in order to compare the genetic variation of these five Colonial Spanish Horse populations to 40 modern horse breeds. We find that the Corolla horse has very low heterozygosity and that both the Corolla and Ocracoke populations have a low mean number of alleles. We also find that the Florida Cracker population has a heterozygosity deficit. In addition, we find evidence of similarity of the Shackleford Banks, Marsh Tacky and Florida Cracker populations to New World Iberian horse breeds, while the origins of the other two populations are less clear. PMID:22221025

  2. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in five different antagonistic Trichoderma species for diversity assessment.

    PubMed

    Rai, Shalini; Kashyap, Prem Lal; Kumar, Sudheer; Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites provide an ideal molecular markers system to screen, characterize and evaluate genetic diversity of several fungal species. Currently, there is very limited information on the genetic diversity of antagonistic Trichoderma species as determined using a range of molecular markers. In this study, expressed and whole genome sequences available in public database were used to investigate the occurrence, relative abundance and relative density of SSRs in five different antagonistic Trichoderma species: Trichoderma atroviride, T. harzianum, T. reesei, T. virens and T. asperellum. Fifteen SSRs loci were used to evaluate genetic diversity of twenty isolates of Trichoderma spp. from different geographical regions of India. Results indicated that relative abundance and relative density of SSRs were higher in T. asperellum followed by T. reesei and T. atroviride. Tri-nucleotide repeats (80.2%) were invariably the most abundant in all species. The abundance and relative density of SSRs were not influenced by the genome sizes and GC content. Out of eighteen primer sets, only 15 primer pairs showed successful amplification in all the test species. A total of 24 alleles were detected and five loci were highly informative with polymorphism information content values greater than 0.40, these markers provide useful information on genetic diversity and population genetic structure, which, in turn, can exploit for establishing conservation strategy for antagonistic Trichoderma isolates. PMID:26712623

  3. Short communication: development and characterization of novel transcriptome-derived microsatellites for genetic analysis of persimmon.

    PubMed

    Luo, C; Zhang, Q L; Luo, Z R

    2014-01-01

    Oriental persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) (2n = 6x = 90) is a major commercial and deciduous fruit tree that is believed to have originated in China. However, rare transcriptomic and genomic information on persimmon is available. Using Roche 454 sequencing technology, the transcriptome from RNA of the flowers of D. kaki was analyzed. A total of 1,250,893 reads were generated and 83,898 unigenes were assembled. A total of 42,711 SSR loci were identified from 23,494 unigenes and 289 polymerase chain reaction primer pairs were designed. Of these 289 primers, 155 (53.6%) showed robust PCR amplification and 98 revealed polymorphism between 15 persimmon genotypes, indicating a polymorphic rate of 63.23% of the productive primers for characterization and genotyping of the genus Diospyros. Transcriptome sequence data generated from next-generation sequencing technology to identify microsatellite loci appears to be rapid and cost-efficient, particularly for species with no genomic sequence information available. PMID:24782136

  4. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity of the Vietnamese sika deer (Cervus nippon pseudaxis).

    PubMed

    Thvenon, S; Thuy, L T; Ly, L V; Maudet, F; Bonnet, A; Jarne, P; Maillard, J-C

    2004-01-01

    The Vietnamese sika deer (Cervus nippon pseudaxis) is an endangered subspecies of economic and traditional value in Vietnam. Most living individuals are held in traditional farms in central Vietnam, others being found in zoos around the world. Here we study the neutral genetic diversity and population structure of this subspecies using nine microsatellite loci in order to evaluate the consequences of the limited number of individuals from which this population was initiated and of the breeding practices (i.e., possible inbreeding). Two hundred individuals were sampled from several villages. Our data show both evidence for limited local inbreeding and isolation by distance with a mean F(ST) value of 0.02 between villages. This suggests that exchange of animals occurs at a local scale, at a rate such that highly inbred mating is avoided. However, the genetic diversity, with an expected heterozygosity (H(e)) of 0.60 and mean number of alleles (k) of 5.7, was not significantly larger than that estimated from zoo populations of much smaller census size (17 animals sampled; H(e) = 0.65, k = 4.11). Our results also suggest that the Vietnamese population might have experienced a slight bottleneck. However, this population is sufficiently variable to constitute a source of individuals for reintroduction in the wild in Vietnam. PMID:14757725

  5. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of freshwater mussel (Lamprotula leai).

    PubMed

    Min, Jin-Jin; Ye, Rong-Hui; Zhang, Gen-Fang; Zheng, Rong-Quan

    2015-01-18

    Lamprotula leai is one of the most commercially important freshwater pearl mussels in China, but there is limited data on its genetic diversity and population structure. In the present study, 119 individuals from four major geographical populations were investigated using 15 microsatellite loci identified via cross-species amplification. A total of 114 alleles were detected, with an average of 7.6 alleles per locus (range: 2 to 21). Among the four stocks, those from Hung-tse Lake and Poyang Lake had the lowest (0.412) and highest (0.455) observed heterozygosity respectively. The polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.374 to 0.927 (mean: 0.907). AMOVA showed that 12.56% and 44.68% genetic variances were among populations and within individuals, respectively. Pairwise Fst ranged from 0.073 to 0.146, indicating medium genetic differentiation among the populations. In aggregate, our results suggest that inbreeding is a crucial factor accounting for deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at 12 loci. Moreover, the genetic distance among four stocks ranged from 0.192 to 0.890. Poyang Lake and Hung-tse Lake were clustered together, joined with Dongting Lake and Anqing Lake. Given that specimens from Hung-tse Lake showed the highest average allele richness, expected heterozygosity and PIC, this location may be the source of the highest quality germplasm resources and the stock from this area may be the best for future breeding efforts. PMID:25730459

  6. Mating behaviour of Rhytidoponera sp. 12 ants inferred from microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Tay, W T; Crozier, R H

    2001-01-01

    In the queenless ponerine ant Rhytidoponera sp. 12, all workers have a spermatheca and functional ovaries and are potentially able to mate and reproduce. Within a colony gamergates may either be full sisters to each other (Type 1 colony), or they may not be full sisters but still be significantly related to each other (Type 2 colony) due to daughter gamergates reproducing in their natal colonies after mating. Despite many studies the mating behaviour of R. sp. 12 has been poorly understood. In this study, we used microsatellite markers to investigate intracolony relatednesses of male mates to the gamergates (bmq) and between male mates (bmm), and mating frequencies and mating patterns, using gamergate DNA and sperm DNA isolated from the spermathecae of gamergates from five colonies. Average bmm and bmq estimates for all five colonies studied were not significantly different from zero, suggesting that on average, within colonies, mating males were unrelated both to each other and to the gamergates. A low frequency (3%) of multiple mating by gamergates was detected. Multiple mating by individual males with sister gamergates within Type 1 colonies was also detected at 3% and could give rise to half-sister nestmate workers. Polygamy in R. sp. 12 might indicate local female-biased operational sex ratios despite the expectation of overall male biases. Our results concur with previous reports that gamergates mate within the colony or nearby, but indicate more diversity in mating patterns than previously indicated for this polygynous ponerine ant species. PMID:11251795

  7. Microsatellite marker analysis shows differentiation among Trypanosoma cruzi populations of peripheral blood and dejections of Triatoma infestans fed on the same chronic chagasic patients : microsatellite marker analysis and T. cruzi.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Juan; Miranda, Sandra; Coñoepan, William; Pîchuantes, Sergio; Jercic, María Isabel; González, Christian; Gajardo, Marta; Apt, Werner; Arribada, Arturo; Sánchez, Gittith

    2010-09-01

    To investigate whether Trypanosoma cruzi populations found in chagasic cardiopathic and non-cardiopathic patients are genetically differentiated, three molecular microsatellite markers were analysed. This analysis was also applied to compare T. cruzi samples from peripheral blood or dejections of Triatoma infestans fed on the blood of the same patients. In order to obtain the first objective, analyses of predominant T. cruzi genotypes were conducted using three approaches: a locus-by-locus analysis; a Fisher method across three loci; and analysis of molecular variance by Genepop and Arlequin programs. Only with one locus and on the blood samples was a significant differentiation detected among non-cardiopathic and cardiopathic groups, which was not confirmed by the other two methods. On the contrary, with the three approaches, it was found that T. cruzi clones present in the blood of patients are genetically differentiated from those detected in dejections of T. infestans fed on the same patients. Our results showed that the most frequent lineage both in blood as well as in triatomine dejection samples was TcI. No significant difference in T. cruzi lineage distribution was observed among chagasic cardiopathic and non-cardiopathic patients. The majority of the samples (50-60%) had only one T. cruzi clone (uniclonal) either in blood or dejection samples. PMID:20585804

  8. Development of a multiplex PCR assay for fine-scale population genetic analysis of the Komodo monitor Varanus komodoensis based on 18 polymorphic microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, Claudio; Tzika, Athanasia C; Natali, Chiara; Watts, Phillip C; Sulandari, Sri; Zein, Moch S A; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2011-05-01

    Multiplex PCR assays for the coamplification of microsatellite loci allow rapid and cost-effective genetic analyses and the production of efficient screening protocols for international breeding programs. We constructed a partial genomic library enriched for di-nucleotide repeats and characterized 14 new microsatellite loci for the Komodo monitor (or Komodo dragon, Varanus komodoensis). Using these novel microsatellites and four previously described loci, we developed multiplex PCR assays that may be loaded on a genetic analyser in three separate panels. We tested the novel set of microsatellites for polymorphism using 69 individuals from three island populations and evaluated the resolving power of the entire panel of 18 loci by conducting (i) a preliminary assignment test to determine population(s) of origin and (ii) a parentage analysis for 43 captive Komodo monitors. This panel of polymorphic loci proved useful for both purposes and thus can be exploited for fine-scale population genetic analyses and as part of international captive breeding programs directed at maintaining genetically viable ex situ populations and reintroductions. PMID:21481213

  9. Validation of microsatellite multiplexes for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two hybridizing species of coral reef fish (Plectropomus spp., Serranidae)

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Hugo B; Feldheim, Kevin A; Jones, Geoffrey P; Ma, Kayan; Mansour, Hicham; Perumal, Sadhasivam; Williamson, David H; Berumen, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are often considered ideal markers to investigate ecological processes in animal populations. They are regularly used as genetic barcodes to identify species, individuals, and infer familial relationships. However, such applications are highly sensitive the number and diversity of microsatellite markers, which are also prone to error. Here, we propose a novel framework to assess the suitability of microsatellite datasets for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two closely related species of coral reef fish, Plectropomus leopardus and P. maculatus (Serranidae). Coral trout are important fisheries species throughout the Indo-Pacific region and have been shown to hybridize in parts of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. We first describe the development of 25 microsatellite loci and their integration to three multiplex PCRs that co-amplify in both species. Using simulations, we demonstrate that the complete suite of markers provides appropriate power to discriminate between species, detect hybrid individuals, and resolve parent–offspring relationships in natural populations, with over 99.6% accuracy in parent–offspring assignments. The markers were also tested on seven additional species within the Plectropomus genus with polymorphism in 28–96% of loci. The multiplex PCRs developed here provide a reliable and cost-effective strategy to investigate evolutionary and ecological dynamics and will be broadly applicable in studies of wild populations and aquaculture brood stocks for these closely related fish species. PMID:25360247

  10. Global population genetic structure and male-mediated gene flow in the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas): analysis of microsatellite loci.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mark A; Schwartz, Tonia S; Karl, Stephen A

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the degree of population subdivision among global populations of green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, using four microsatellite loci. Previously, a single-copy nuclear DNA study indicated significant male-mediated gene flow among populations alternately fixed for different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and that genetic divergence between populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans was more common than subdivisions among populations within ocean basins. Even so, overall levels of variation at single-copy loci were low and inferences were limited. Here, the markedly more variable microsatellite loci confirm the presence of male-mediated gene flow among populations within ocean basins. This analysis generally confirms the genetic divergence between the Atlantic and Pacific. As with the previous study, phylogenetic analyses of genetic distances based on the microsatellite loci indicate a close genetic relationship among eastern Atlantic and Indian Ocean populations. Unlike the single-copy study, however, the results here cannot be attributed to an artifact of general low variability and likely represent recent or ongoing migration between ocean basins. Sequence analyses of regions flanking the microsatellite repeat reveal considerable amounts of cryptic variation and homoplasy and significantly aid in our understanding of population connectivity. Assessment of the allele frequency distributions indicates that at least some of the loci may not be evolving by the stepwise mutation model. PMID:15126404

  11. Clear-cell and papillary carcinoma of the kidney: an analysis of chromosome 3, 7, and 17 abnormalities by microsatellite amplification, cytogenetics, and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hughson, M D; Dickman, K; Bigler, S A; Meloni, A M; Sandberg, A A

    1998-10-15

    Clear-cell and papillary renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) have specific genetic changes that allow them to be classified on the basis of histopathology and on the basis of cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings. Clear-cell carcinomas are characterized by a deletion of gene sequences on the short arm of chromosome 3 (3p). Papillary RCCs do not have 3p deletions but have an increase in chromosomal number that usually includes trisomies of chromosomes 7 and 17. This study was undertaken to determine whether PCR-amplified DNA microsatellites can be used to detect numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 7 and 17 and whether the numerical abnormalities and 3p deletions that are detected by microsatellite analysis can be correlated with histopathologic tumor types. A series of histologically unambiguous RCCs consisting of three papillary and ten clear-cell RCCs were studied by cytogenetics and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome 7 and 17 centromeric probes. Microsatellites on the long and short arms of chromosomes 3, 7, and 17 were amplified in paired normal tissue and tumor samples, and the reaction products were analyzed for differences between the normal and the tumor allele ratios. Clear-cell carcinomas showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 3p but not 3q alleles in eight of ten cases. LOH of 3p and 3q was seen in one case of papillary RCC that cytogenetically had two normal chromosomes 3. This indicated a nondisjunction duplication that could be confused with monosomy 3 if only microsatellite studies were performed. Differences in microsatellite allele ratios between normal tissue and tumor correlated with the presence of trisomy 7 that was identified in clear-cell and papillary RCCs by cytogenetics and by FISH. Microsatellite analysis did not detect numerical chromosome 17 abnormalities in the papillary RCCs but did show an abnormality in one clear-cell carcinoma that was markedly aneusomic for chromosomes 7 and 17 by FISH. In this collection of cases, microsatellite amplification genetically distinguished only clear-cell RCCs showing 3p but not 3q LOH as a separate class of tumors. The method detected abnormalities in chromosome number that were found in both clear-cell and papillary RCCs. PMID:9797772

  12. Microsatellite and flow cytometry analysis to help understand the origin of Dioscorea alata polyploids

    PubMed Central

    Nemorin, A.; David, J.; Maledon, E.; Nudol, E.; Dalon, J.; Arnau, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Dioscorea alata is a polyploid species with a ploidy level ranging from diploid (2n = 2x = 40) to tetraploid (2n = 4x = 80). Ploidy increase is correlated with better agronomic performance. The lack of knowledge about the origin of D. alata spontaneous polyploids (triploids and tetraploids) limits the efficiency of polyploid breeding. The objective of the present study was to use flow cytometry and microsatellite markers to understand the origin of D. alata polyploids. Methods Different progeny generated by intracytotype crosses (2x × 2x) and intercytotype crosses (2x × 4x and 3x × 2x) were analysed in order to understand endosperm incompatibility phenomena and gamete origins via the heterozygosity rate transmitted to progeny. Results This work shows that in a 2x × 2x cross, triploids with viable seeds are obtained only via a phenomenon of diploid female non-gametic reduction. The study of the transmission of heterozygosity made it possible to exclude polyspermy and polyembryony as the mechanisms at the origin of triploids. The fact that no seedlings were obtained by a 3x × 2x cross made it possible to confirm the sterility of triploid females. Flow cytometry analyses carried out on the endosperm of seeds resulting from 2x × 4x crosses revealed endosperm incompatibility phenomena. Conclusions The major conclusion is that the polyploids of D. alata would have appeared through the formation of unreduced gametes. The triploid pool would have been built and diversified through the formation of 2n gametes in diploid females as the result of the non-viability of seeds resulting from the formation of 2n sperm and of the non-viability of intercytotype crosses. The tetraploids would have appeared through bilateral sexual polyploidization via the union of two unreduced gametes due to the sterility of triploids. PMID:23912697

  13. Microsatellite Marker Analysis Reveals the Complex Phylogeographic History of Rhododendron ferrugineum (Ericaceae) in the Pyrenees

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Olivia; Dupont, Pierre; Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation within plant species is determined by a number of factors such as reproductive mode, breeding system, life history traits and climatic events. In alpine regions, plants experience heterogenic abiotic conditions that influence the population's genetic structure. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of the subalpine shrub Rhododendron ferrugineum across the Pyrenees and the links between the populations in the Pyrenees, the Alps and Jura Mountains. We used 27 microsatellite markers to genotype 645 samples from 29 Pyrenean populations, three from the Alps and one from the Jura Mountains. These data were used to estimate population genetics statistics such as allelic richness, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, fixation index, inbreeding coefficient and number of migrants. Genetic diversity was found to be higher in the Alps than in the Pyrenees suggesting colonization waves from the Alps to the Pyrenees. Two separate genetic lineages were found in both the Alps and Pyrenees, with a substructure of five genetic clusters in the Pyrenees where a loss of genetic diversity was noted. The strong differentiation among clusters is maintained by low gene flow across populations. Moreover, some populations showed higher genetic diversity than others and presented rare alleles that may indicate the presence of alpine refugia. Two lineages of R. ferrugineum have colonized the Pyrenees from the Alps. Then, during glaciation events R. ferrugineum survived in the Pyrenees in different refugia such as lowland refugia at the eastern part of the chain and nunataks at high elevations leading to a clustered genetic pattern. PMID:24667824

  14. Mining functional microsatellites in legume unigenes.

    PubMed

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Sharma, Prakash Chand

    2011-01-01

    Highly polymorphic and transferable microsatellites (SSRs) are important for comparative genomics, genome analysis and phylogenetic studies. Development of novel species-specific microsatellite markers remains a costly and labor-intensive project. Therefore, interest has been shifted from genomic to genic markers owing to their high inter-species transferability as they are developed from conserved coding regions of the genome. This study concentrates on comparative analysis of genic microsatellites in nine important legume (Arachis hypogaea, Cajanus cajan, Cicer arietinum, Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, Phaseolus vulgaris, Pisum sativum and Vigna unguiculata) and two model plant species (Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana). Screening of a total of 228090 putative unique sequences spanning 219610522 bp using a microsatellite search tool, MISA, identified 12.18% of the unigenes containing 36248 microsatellite motifs excluding mononucleotide repeats. Frequency of legume unigene-derived SSRs was one SSR in every 6.0 kb of analyzed sequences. The trinucleotide repeats were predominant in all the unigenes with the exception of C. cajan, which showed prevalence of dinucleotide repeats over trinucleotide repeats. Dinucleotide repeats along with trinucleotides counted for more than 90% of the total microsatellites. Among dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats, AG and AAG motifs, respectively, were the most frequent. Microsatellite positive chickpea unigenes were assigned Gene Ontology (GO) terms to identify the possible role of unigenes in various molecular and biological functions. These unigene based microsatellite markers will prove valuable for recording allelic variance across germplasm collections, gene tagging and searching for putative candidate genes. PMID:22125396

  15. Obesity, paternalism and fairness.

    PubMed

    Kniess, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Many liberal theories are committed to the promotion of population health, and the principle of non-interference in individual life plans. Public health interventions often bring out a tension between these two values. In this paper, I examine this tension by assessing the justifiability of liberty-restricting policies in the field of obesity prevention. As I want to show, a 'soft' form of paternalism, which interferes with people's choices to safeguard their true interests, goes some way in justifying such policies, but it leaves unaddressed the problem of limiting the liberty of those whose true interest is in pursuing an unhealthy lifestyle. I argue that in this latter case, the key to reconcile the promotion of population health with the respect for individual liberty is distributive justice: when we cannot help those who care about their health without doing the same for those who do not, fairness will often require us to do so. PMID:26282279

  16. Mitogenomic analysis of a 50-generation chicken pedigree reveals a rapid rate of mitochondrial evolution and evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Michelle; Ho, Simon Y W; Molak, Martyna; Barnett, Ross; Carlborg, Örjan; Dorshorst, Ben; Honaker, Christa; Besnier, Francois; Wahlberg, Per; Dobney, Keith; Siegel, Paul; Andersson, Leif; Larson, Greger

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial genomes represent a valuable source of data for evolutionary research, but studies of their short-term evolution have typically been limited to invertebrates, humans and laboratory organisms. Here we present a detailed study of 12 mitochondrial genomes that span a total of 385 transmissions in a well-documented 50-generation pedigree in which two lineages of chickens were selected for low and high juvenile body weight. These data allowed us to test the hypothesis of time-dependent evolutionary rates and the assumption of strict maternal mitochondrial transmission, and to investigate the role of mitochondrial mutations in determining phenotype. The identification of a non-synonymous mutation in ND4L and a synonymous mutation in CYTB, both novel mutations in Gallus, allowed us to estimate a molecular rate of 3.13 × 10(-7) mutations/site/year (95% confidence interval 3.75 × 10(-8)-1.12 × 10(-6)). This is substantially higher than avian rate estimates based upon fossil calibrations. Ascertaining which of the two novel mutations was present in an additional 49 individuals also revealed an instance of paternal inheritance of mtDNA. Lastly, an association analysis demonstrated that neither of the point mutations was strongly associated with the phenotypic differences between the two selection lines. Together, these observations reveal the highly dynamic nature of mitochondrial evolution over short time periods. PMID:26510672

  17. Mitogenomic analysis of a 50-generation chicken pedigree reveals a rapid rate of mitochondrial evolution and evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Michelle; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Molak, Martyna; Barnett, Ross; Carlborg, Örjan; Dorshorst, Ben; Honaker, Christa; Besnier, Francois; Wahlberg, Per; Dobney, Keith; Siegel, Paul; Andersson, Leif; Larson, Greger

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes represent a valuable source of data for evolutionary research, but studies of their short-term evolution have typically been limited to invertebrates, humans and laboratory organisms. Here we present a detailed study of 12 mitochondrial genomes that span a total of 385 transmissions in a well-documented 50-generation pedigree in which two lineages of chickens were selected for low and high juvenile body weight. These data allowed us to test the hypothesis of time-dependent evolutionary rates and the assumption of strict maternal mitochondrial transmission, and to investigate the role of mitochondrial mutations in determining phenotype. The identification of a non-synonymous mutation in ND4L and a synonymous mutation in CYTB, both novel mutations in Gallus, allowed us to estimate a molecular rate of 3.13 × 10−7 mutations/site/year (95% confidence interval 3.75 × 10−8–1.12 × 10−6). This is substantially higher than avian rate estimates based upon fossil calibrations. Ascertaining which of the two novel mutations was present in an additional 49 individuals also revealed an instance of paternal inheritance of mtDNA. Lastly, an association analysis demonstrated that neither of the point mutations was strongly associated with the phenotypic differences between the two selection lines. Together, these observations reveal the highly dynamic nature of mitochondrial evolution over short time periods. PMID:26510672

  18. Postfertilization autophagy of sperm organelles prevents paternal mitochondrial DNA transmission.

    PubMed

    Al Rawi, Sara; Louvet-Vallée, Sophie; Djeddi, Abderazak; Sachse, Martin; Culetto, Emmanuel; Hajjar, Connie; Boyd, Lynn; Legouis, Renaud; Galy, Vincent

    2011-11-25

    In sexual reproduction of most animals, the spermatozoon provides DNA and centrioles, together with some cytoplasm and organelles, to the oocyte that is being fertilized. Paternal mitochondria and their genomes are generally eliminated in the embryo by an unknown degradation mechanism. We show that, upon fertilization, a Caenorhabditis elegans spermatozoon triggers the recruitment of autophagosomes within minutes and subsequent paternal mitochondria degradation. Whereas the nematode-specific sperm membranous organelles are ubiquitinated before autophagosome formation, the mitochondria are not. The degradation of both paternal structures and mitochondrial DNA requires an LC3-dependent autophagy. Analysis of fertilized mouse embryos shows the localization of autophagy markers, which suggests that this autophagy event is evolutionarily conserved to prevent both the transmission of paternal mitochondrial DNA to the offspring and the establishment of heteroplasmy. PMID:22033522

  19. High genetic diversity in gametophyte clones of Undaria pinnatifida from Vladivostok, Dalian and Qingdao revealed using microsatellite analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Tifeng; Pang, Shaojun; Liu, Feng; Xu, Na; Zhao, Xiaobo; Gao, Suqin

    2012-03-01

    Breeding practice for Undaria pinnatifida (Harvey) Suringar requires the screening of a large number of offspring from gametophyte crossings to obtain an elite variety for large-scale cultivation. To better understand the genetic relationships of different gametophyte cultures isolated from different sources, 20 microsatellite loci were screened and 53 gametophyte clone cultures analyzed for U. pinnatifida isolated from wild sporophytes in Vladivostok, Russia and from cultivated sporophytes from Dalian and Qingdao, China. One locus was abandoned because of poor amplification. At the sex-linked locus of Up-AC-2A8, 3 alleles were detected in 25 female gametophyte clones, with sizes ranging from 307 to 316 bp. At other loci, 3 to 7 alleles were detected with an average of 4.5 alleles per locus. The average number of alleles at each locus was 1.3 and 3.7 for Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones, respectively. The average gene diversity for Russian, Chinese, and for the combined total of gametophyte clones was 0.1, 0.4, and 0.5, respectively. Russian gametophyte clones had unique alleles at 7 out of the 19 loci. In cluster analysis, Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones were separated into two different groups according to genetic distance. Overall, high genetic diversity was detected in gametophyte clones isolated from the two countries. These gametophyte cultures were believed to be appropriate parental materials for conducting breeding programs in the future.

  20. Higher Levels of Multiple Paternities Increase Seedling Survival in the Long-Lived Tree Eucalyptus gracilis

    PubMed Central

    Breed, Martin F.; Christmas, Matthew J.; Lowe, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Studying associations between mating system parameters and fitness in natural populations of trees advances our understanding of how local environments affect seed quality, and thereby helps to predict when inbreeding or multiple paternities should impact on fitness. Indeed, for species that demonstrate inbreeding avoidance, multiple paternities (i.e. the number of male parents per half-sib family) should still vary and regulate fitness more than inbreeding – named here as the ‘constrained inbreeding hypothesis’. We test this hypothesis in Eucalyptus gracilis, a predominantly insect-pollinated tree. Fifty-eight open-pollinated progeny arrays were collected from trees in three populations. Progeny were planted in a reciprocal transplant trial. Fitness was measured by family establishment rates. We genotyped all trees and their progeny at eight microsatellite loci. Planting site had a strong effect on fitness, but seed provenance and seed provenance × planting site did not. Populations had comparable mating system parameters and were generally outcrossed, experienced low biparental inbreeding and high levels of multiple paternity. As predicted, seed families that had more multiple paternities also had higher fitness, and no fitness-inbreeding correlations were detected. Demonstrating that fitness was most affected by multiple paternities rather than inbreeding, we provide evidence supporting the constrained inbreeding hypothesis; i.e. that multiple paternity may impact on fitness over and above that of inbreeding, particularly for preferentially outcrossing trees at life stages beyond seed development. PMID:24587373

  1. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  2. Male-Biased Sexual Size Dimorphism, Resource Defense Polygyny, and Multiple Paternity in the Emei Moustache Toad (Leptobrachium boringii)

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Cameron M.; Fu, Jinzhong

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that the Emei moustache toad (Leptobrachium boringii) exhibits resource defense polygyny and that combat led to the evolution of male-biased sexual size dimorphism. Between February and March of 2011 and 2012, 26 female and 55 male L. boringii from Mount Emei UNESCO World Heritage Site, Sichuan, China, were observed throughout the breeding season. Prior to the breeding season, males grow 1016 keratinized maxillary nuptial spines, which fall off once the season has ended. Throughout this time, males construct and defend aquatic nests where they produce advertisement calls to attract females. In a natural setting, we documented 14 cases involving a total of 22 males where males used their moustaches for aggressive interaction, and nest takeover was observed on seven occasions. Males were also observed to possess injuries resulting from combat. Genetic analysis using microsatellite DNA markers revealed several cases of multiple paternity, both within nest and within clutch. This observation indicated that some alternative male reproductive strategy, such as satellite behaviour, is occurring, which may have led to the multiple paternity. Larger males were observed to mate more frequently, and in multiple nests, suggesting that females are selecting for larger males, or that larger males are more capable of defending high quality territories. PMID:23840725

  3. A comparison of single nucleotide polymorphism and microsatellite markers for analysis of parentage and kinship in a cooperatively breeding bird.

    PubMed

    Weinman, Lucia R; Solomon, Joseph W; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2015-05-01

    The development of genetic markers has revolutionized molecular studies within and among populations. Although poly-allelic microsatellites are the most commonly used genetic marker for within-population studies of free-living animals, biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, have also emerged as a viable option for use in nonmodel systems. We describe a robust method of SNP discovery from the transcriptome of a nonmodel organism that resulted in more than 99% of the markers working successfully during genotyping. We then compare the use of 102 novel SNPs with 15 previously developed microsatellites for studies of parentage and kinship in cooperatively breeding superb starlings (Lamprotornis superbus) that live in highly kin-structured groups. For 95% of the offspring surveyed, SNPs and microsatellites identified the same genetic father, but only when behavioural information about the likely parents at a nest was included to aid in assignment. Moreover, when such behavioural information was available, the number of SNPs necessary for successful parentage assignment was reduced by half. However, in a few cases where candidate fathers were highly related, SNPs did a better job at assigning fathers than microsatellites. Despite high variation between individual pairwise relatedness values, microsatellites and SNPs performed equally well in kinship analyses. This study is the first to compare SNPs and microsatellites for analyses of parentage and relatedness in a species that lives in groups with a complex social and kin structure. It should also prove informative for those interested in developing SNP loci from transcriptome data when published genomes are unavailable. PMID:25224810

  4. Development of Genomic Microsatellite Markers in Carthamus tinctorius L. (Safflower) Using Next Generation Sequencing and Assessment of Their Cross-Species Transferability and Utility for Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Variath, Murali Tottekkad; Joshi, Gopal; Bali, Sapinder; Agarwal, Manu; Kumar, Amar; Jagannath, Arun; Goel, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), an Asteraceae member, yields high quality edible oil rich in unsaturated fatty acids and is resilient to dry conditions. The crop holds tremendous potential for improvement through concerted molecular breeding programs due to the availability of significant genetic and phenotypic diversity. Genomic resources that could facilitate such breeding programs remain largely underdeveloped in the crop. The present study was initiated to develop a large set of novel microsatellite markers for safflower using next generation sequencing. Principal Findings Low throughput genome sequencing of safflower was performed using Illumina paired end technology providing ~3.5X coverage of the genome. Analysis of sequencing data allowed identification of 23,067 regions harboring perfect microsatellite loci. The safflower genome was found to be rich in dinucleotide repeats followed by tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotides. Primer pairs were designed for 5,716 novel microsatellite sequences with repeat length ≥ 20 bases and optimal flanking regions. A subset of 325 microsatellite loci was tested for amplification, of which 294 loci produced robust amplification. The validated primers were used for assessment of 23 safflower accessions belonging to diverse agro-climatic zones of the world leading to identification of 93 polymorphic primers (31.6%). The numbers of observed alleles at each locus ranged from two to four and mean polymorphism information content was found to be 0.3075. The polymorphic primers were tested for cross-species transferability on nine wild relatives of cultivated safflower. All primers except one showed amplification in at least two wild species while 25 primers amplified across all the nine species. The UPGMA dendrogram clustered C. tinctorius accessions and wild species separately into two major groups. The proposed progenitor species of safflower, C. oxyacantha and C. palaestinus were genetically closer to cultivated safflower and formed a distinct cluster. The cluster analysis also distinguished diploid and tetraploid wild species of safflower. Conclusion Next generation sequencing of safflower genome generated a large set of microsatellite markers. The novel markers developed in this study will add to the existing repertoire of markers and can be used for diversity analysis, synteny studies, construction of linkage maps and marker-assisted selection. PMID:26287743

  5. Early-onset obesity and paternal 2pter deletion encompassing the ACP1, TMEM18, and MYT1L genes.

    PubMed

    Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Leroy, Camille; Schneider, Anouck; Petit, Florence; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Andrieux, Joris; Perrin-Sabourin, Laurence; Landais, Emilie; Aboura, Azzedine; Puechberty, Jacques; Girard, Manon; Tournaire, Magali; Sanchez, Elodie; Rooryck, Caroline; Ameil, Agnès; Goossens, Michel; Jonveaux, Philippe; Lefort, Geneviève; Taine, Laurence; Cailley, Dorothée; Gaillard, Dominique; Leheup, Bruno; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-04-01

    Obesity is a common but highly, clinically, and genetically heterogeneous disease. Deletion of the terminal region of the short arm of chromosome 2 is rare and has been reported in about 13 patients in the literature often associated with a Prader-Willi-like phenotype. We report on five unrelated patients with 2p25 deletion of paternal origin presenting with early-onset obesity, hyperphagia, intellectual deficiency, and behavioural difficulties. Among these patients, three had de novo pure 2pter deletions, one presented with a paternal derivative der(2)t(2;15)(p25.3;q26) with deletion in the 2pter region and the last patient presented with an interstitial 2p25 deletion. The size of the deletions was characterized by SNP array or array-CGH and was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Four patients shared a 2p25.3 deletion with a minimal critical region estimated at 1.97 Mb and encompassing seven genes, namely SH3HYL1, ACP1, TMEMI8, SNTG2, TPO, PXDN, and MYT1L genes. The fifth patient had a smaller interstitial deletion encompassing the TPO, PXDN, and MYT1L genes. Paternal origin of the deletion was determined by genotyping using microsatellite markers. Analysis of the genes encompassed in the deleted region led us to speculate that the ACP1, TMEM18, and/or MYT1L genes might be involved in early-onset obesity. In addition, intellectual deficiency and behavioural troubles can be explained by the heterozygous loss of the SNTG2 and MYT1L genes. Finally, we discuss the parent-of-origin of the deletion. PMID:24129437

  6. Early-onset obesity and paternal 2pter deletion encompassing the ACP1, TMEM18, and MYT1L genes

    PubMed Central

    Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Leroy, Camille; Schneider, Anouck; Petit, Florence; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Andrieux, Joris; Perrin-Sabourin, Laurence; Landais, Emilie; Aboura, Azzedine; Puechberty, Jacques; Girard, Manon; Tournaire, Magali; Sanchez, Elodie; Rooryck, Caroline; Ameil, Agnès; Goossens, Michel; Jonveaux, Philippe; Lefort, Geneviève; Taine, Laurence; Cailley, Dorothée; Gaillard, Dominique; Leheup, Bruno; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a common but highly, clinically, and genetically heterogeneous disease. Deletion of the terminal region of the short arm of chromosome 2 is rare and has been reported in about 13 patients in the literature often associated with a Prader–Willi-like phenotype. We report on five unrelated patients with 2p25 deletion of paternal origin presenting with early-onset obesity, hyperphagia, intellectual deficiency, and behavioural difficulties. Among these patients, three had de novo pure 2pter deletions, one presented with a paternal derivative der(2)t(2;15)(p25.3;q26) with deletion in the 2pter region and the last patient presented with an interstitial 2p25 deletion. The size of the deletions was characterized by SNP array or array-CGH and was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Four patients shared a 2p25.3 deletion with a minimal critical region estimated at 1.97 Mb and encompassing seven genes, namely SH3HYL1, ACP1, TMEMI8, SNTG2, TPO, PXDN, and MYT1L genes. The fifth patient had a smaller interstitial deletion encompassing the TPO, PXDN, and MYT1L genes. Paternal origin of the deletion was determined by genotyping using microsatellite markers. Analysis of the genes encompassed in the deleted region led us to speculate that the ACP1, TMEM18, and/or MYT1L genes might be involved in early-onset obesity. In addition, intellectual deficiency and behavioural troubles can be explained by the heterozygous loss of the SNTG2 and MYT1L genes. Finally, we discuss the parent-of-origin of the deletion. PMID:24129437

  7. Facilitating co-existence by tracking gene dispersal in conventional potato systems with microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Petti, Carloalberto; Meade, Conor; Downes, Martin; Mullins, Ewen

    2007-01-01

    Based on international findings, Irish co-existence guidelines for the cultivation of GM potato stipulate that an isolation distance of 20 m is required to minimize the spread of transgenic pollen in accordance with required labeling thresholds. As potato tolerant to Phytophthora infestans is the most applicable GM crop from an Irish context, we tested the efficacy of this isolation distance under Irish environmental conditions using the conventional variety Dsire as a pollen donor and the male-sterile variety British Queen as a pollen receptor. Gene flow was determined by scoring for berry presence on receptor plants and confirmed using a microsatellite marker system designed to assess paternity in F(1) seedlings. 99.1% of seedlings recovered were identified as having Dsire paternity. Whereas 19.9% (140/708) of total berries formed on receptor plants occurred at a distance of 21 m from the pollen source, only 4 of these berries bore viable true potato seed (TPS), from which 23 TPS germinated. TPS-bearing berry formation was negatively correlated with distance from the pollen source, and although overall distribution of berries and seeds was non-random across the plot, no significant correlation was evident with respect to wind direction. Microsatellite markers were also used to confirm that the foraging beetle Meligethes aeneus is a vector for the transmission of potato pollen, but a more detailed statistical analysis of this dataset was limited by inclement weather during the trial. To conclude, we recommend that a two-tiered system be established in regard to establishing isolation distances for the experimental trial and commercial cultivation of GM potato in Ireland, and that responsible crop management be adopted to minimize the establishment of TPS-derived volunteers, which we have noted will emerge through a rotation as a result of pollen-mediated gene flow. PMID:18289498

  8. Analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici genome and the development of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Feng, Yanxia; Sun, Haiyan; Deng, Yuanyu; Yu, Hanshou; Chen, Huaigu

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici is essential for the establishment of efficient disease control strategies. It is becoming clear that microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), play an important role in genome organization and phenotypic diversity, and are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. In this study, we examined the G. graminis var. tritici genome (1) to analyze its pattern of SSRs, (2) to compare it with other plant pathogenic filamentous fungi, such as Magnaporthe oryzae and M. poae, and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for genetic diversity. The G. graminis var. tritici genome was rich in SSRs; a total 13,650 SSRs have been identified with mononucleotides being the most common motifs. In coding regions, the densities of tri- and hexanucleotides were significantly higher than in noncoding regions. The di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotide repeats in the G. graminis var. tritici genome were more abundant than the same repeats in M. oryzae and M. poae. From 115 devised primers, 39 SSRs are polymorphic with G. graminis var. tritici isolates, and 8 primers were randomly selected to analyze 116 isolates from China. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 7 and the expected heterozygosity (He) from 0.499 to 0.837. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic, and our analysis indicated that G. graminis var. tritici is a species with high genetic diversity. The results provide a pioneering report for several applications, such as the assessment of population structure and genetic diversity of G. graminis var. tritici. PMID:24789608

  9. Microsatellite typing and avidity analysis suggest a common source of infection in herds with epidemic Neospora caninum-associated bovine abortion.

    PubMed

    Basso, W; Schares, S; Minke, L; Bärwald, A; Maksimov, A; Peters, M; Schulze, C; Müller, M; Conraths, F J; Schares, G

    2010-10-11

    Neosporosis is an important cause of reproductive failure in cattle worldwide. Two different abortion patterns associated with Neospora caninum infection have been observed in cattle herds: endemic and epidemic abortion outbreaks. The endemic pattern is characterized by an abortion problem in a herd persisting for several months or years, and is assumed to be caused by reactivation of a chronic infection. In epidemic outbreaks, abortions concentrate within a short period of time, most likely due to a recent point source exposure of naïve animals to N. caninum. The aim of the study was to characterize five N. caninum-associated epidemic abortion outbreaks in Germany by serological and molecular techniques, including a p38-avidity-ELISA and typing of N. caninum in clinical samples by multilocus-microsatellite analysis. DNA extracts from the brain of 18 N. caninum infected fetuses from epidemic abortion outbreaks were characterized using 10 N. caninum-microsatellite markers. Nested-PCR protocols were developed to amplify the marker regions MS1B, MS3, MS5, MS6A, MS6B, MS7, MS12 and MS21 from clinical samples for subsequent analysis by capillary electrophoresis. Microsatellites MS2 and MS10 were analyzed by previously reported sequencing techniques. Most dams which had aborted showed a low-avidity IgG response to the N. caninum p38-antigen, and in three of the five studied herds, the majority of the dams at risk, which had not aborted, had also low-avidity responses suggesting that infection with N. caninum had recently occurred in most animals. A common microsatellite pattern prevailed in all fetuses from each individual epidemic outbreak. This pattern was unique for each herd. Although the number of epidemic abortion outbreaks analyzed was limited, the observation of a common microsatellite pattern, accompanied by a low-avidity IgG response against N. caninum in the dams, supports the hypothesis of a recent infection from a common point source. The genetic diversity of N. caninum observed among these outbreaks may indicate that not a particular N. caninum genotype but the horizontal infection route determines the occurrence of epidemic abortions. PMID:20609521

  10. Strong male-biased operational sex ratio in a breeding population of loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) inferred by paternal genotype reconstruction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lasala, Jacob A; Harrison, J Scott; Williams, Kris L; Rostal, David C

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of a species mating systems is fundamental for understanding the natural history and evolution of that species. Polyandry can result in the multiple paternity of progeny arrays. The only previous study of the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) in the USA showed that within the large peninsular Florida subpopulation, multiple paternity occurs in approximately 30% of clutches. Our study tested clutches from the smaller northern subpopulation for the presence of multiple paternal contributions. We examined mothers and up to 20 offspring from 19.5% of clutches laid across three nesting seasons (2008–2010) on the small nesting beach on Wassaw Island, Georgia, USA. We found that 75% of clutches sampled had multiple fathers with an average of 2.65 fathers per nest (1–7 fathers found). The average number of fathers per clutch varied among years and increased with female size. There was no relationship between number of fathers and hatching success. Finally, we found 195 individual paternal genotypes and determined that each male contributed to no more than a single clutch over the 3-year sampling period. Together these results suggest that the operational sex ratio is male-biased at this site. PMID:24363901

  11. Strong male-biased operational sex ratio in a breeding population of loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) inferred by paternal genotype reconstruction analysis.

    PubMed

    Lasala, Jacob A; Harrison, J Scott; Williams, Kris L; Rostal, David C

    2013-11-01

    Characterization of a species mating systems is fundamental for understanding the natural history and evolution of that species. Polyandry can result in the multiple paternity of progeny arrays. The only previous study of the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) in the USA showed that within the large peninsular Florida subpopulation, multiple paternity occurs in approximately 30% of clutches. Our study tested clutches from the smaller northern subpopulation for the presence of multiple paternal contributions. We examined mothers and up to 20 offspring from 19.5% of clutches laid across three nesting seasons (2008-2010) on the small nesting beach on Wassaw Island, Georgia, USA. We found that 75% of clutches sampled had multiple fathers with an average of 2.65 fathers per nest (1-7 fathers found). The average number of fathers per clutch varied among years and increased with female size. There was no relationship between number of fathers and hatching success. Finally, we found 195 individual paternal genotypes and determined that each male contributed to no more than a single clutch over the 3-year sampling period. Together these results suggest that the operational sex ratio is male-biased at this site. PMID:24363901

  12. Inheritance pattern of microsatellite loci and their use for kinship analysis in the Japanese scallop Patinopecten yessoensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kefeng; Li, Qi

    2009-06-01

    The inheritance mode of seven microsatellite markers was investigated in Patinopecten yessoensis larvae from four controlled crosses, and the feasibility of using these markers for kinship estimation was also examined. All the seven microsatellite loci were compatible with Mendelian inheritance. Neither sex-linked barriers to transmission nor major barriers to fertilization between gametes from the parents were evident. Two of the seven loci showed the presence of null alleles in two families, suggesting the need to conduct comprehensive species-specific inheritance studies for microsatellite loci used in population genetic studies. However, even if the null allele heterozygotes were considered as homozygotes in the calculation of genetic distance, offspring from four families were all unambiguously discriminated in the neighbor-joining dendrogram. This result indicates that the microsatellite markers used may be capable of discriminating between related and unrelated scallop larvae in the absence of pedigree information, and of investigating the effective number of parents contributing to the hatchery population of the Japanese scallop.

  13. Inheritance mode of microsatellite loci and their use for kinship analysis in the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ruihai

    2008-08-01

    Five full-sib families of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) larvae were used to study the mode of inheritance at eight microsatellite loci, and the feasibility of these markers for kinship estimate was also examined. All eight microsatellite loci were compatible with Mendelian inheritance. Neither evidence of sex-linked barriers to transmission nor evidence of major barriers to fertilization between gametes from the parents was shown. Three of the eight loci showed the presence of null alleles in four families, demonstrating the need to conduct comprehensive species-specific inheritance studies for microsatellite loci used in population genetic studies. Although the null allele heterozygotes were considered as homozygotes in the calculation of genetic distance, offspring from five full-sib families were unambiguously discriminated in the neighbor-joining dendrogram. This result indicates that the microsatellite markers may be capable of discriminating between related and unrelated oyster larvae in the absence of pedigree information, and is applicable to the investigation of the effective number of parents contributing to the hatchery population of the Pacific oyster.

  14. Microsatellite markers from the 'South American fruit fly' Anastrepha fraterculus: a valuable tool for population genetic analysis and SIT applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anastrepha fraterculus Wiedemann is a horticultural pest which causes significant economic losses in the fruit-producing areas of the American continent and limits the access of products to international markets. The use of environmentally friendly control strategies against this pest is constrained due to the limited knowledge of its population structure. Results We developed microsatellite markers for A. fraterculus from four genomic libraries, which were enriched in CA, CAA, GA and CAT microsatellite motifs. Fifty microsatellite regions were evaluated and 14 loci were selected for population genetics studies. Genotypes of 122 individuals sampled from four A. fraterculus populations were analyzed. The level of polymorphism ranged from three to 13 alleles per locus and the mean expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.60 to 0.64. Comparison between allelic and genotypic frequencies showed significant differences among all pairs of populations. Conclusions This novel set of microsatellite markers provides valuable information for the description of genetic variability and population structure of wild populations and laboratory strains of A. fraterculus. This information will be used to identify and characterize candidate strains suitable to implement effective pest control strategies and might represent a first step towards having a more comprehensive knowledge about the genetics of this pest. PMID:25471285

  15. Microsatellites: evolution and contribution.

    PubMed

    Madesis, Panagiotis; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites are codominant molecular genetic markers, which are universally dispersed within genomes. These markers are highly popular because of their high level of polymorphism, relatively small size, and rapid detection protocols. They are widely used in a variety of fundamental and applied fields of biological sciences for plants and animal studies. Microsatellites are also extensively used in the field of agriculture, where they are used in characterizing genetic materials, plant selection, constructing dense linkage maps, mapping economically important quantitative traits, identifying genes responsible for these traits. In addition microsatellites are used for marker-assisted selection in breeding programs, thus speeding up the process. In this chapter, genomic distribution, evolution, and practical applications of microsatellites are considered, with special emphasis on plant breeding and agriculture. Moreover, novel advances in microsatellite technologies are also discussed. PMID:23546780

  16. An induced mass spawn of the hermaphroditic lion-paw scallop, Nodipecten subnodosus: genetic assignment of maternal and paternal parentage.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jessica L; Ibarra, Ana M; Ramirez, José L; May, Bernie

    2008-01-01

    The Pacific lion-paw scallop is commonly propagated for aquaculture by induced mass spawns of few individuals. Parentage of a mass spawn of this species has not been evaluated nor has the maternal and paternal contribution of each of these functional hermaphrodites to the progeny. Genotypes of 6 spawners and 374 resulting progeny at 6 microsatellite loci were coupled with mitochondrial DNA sequencing to assign maternal and paternal parentage. After the identification of a high proportion of null alleles (9.7%), microsatellite data revealed that 51.7% of the progenies were full siblings, with a significant, unequal contribution of the 6 spawners to the progeny. Three progenies were the result of self-fertilization. All spawners contributed paternally (though unequally); however, 2 spawners were the maternal parents of all but 7 progenies resulting in a variance effective population size of 3.52. DNA sequencing confirmed 4 microsatellite mutations within 4476 alleles scored, all in the paternal germ line. With minor exception, the loci conformed to Mendelian rules of segregation when null alleles were accounted for, and 2 loci were found to be linked. These results lend insight to the genetic composition of induced mass spawns and provide a basis for the development of more effective spawning techniques. PMID:18334505

  17. Increasing paternal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Cutright, P

    1985-01-01

    Increasing numbers of fathers of children born out of wedlock are not contributing to these children's economic support. In 1981, a tiny minority (14%) of the 1.7 million never-married mothers living with a child with an absent father had a child-support award, and of these, just 112,000 actually received some payment in 1981. The high rates of noncompliance, and the low level of legal efforts to enforce child support, are the result of attempts to collect payments through inefficient traditional methods, not the inability of fathers to pay, a Wisconsin study has shown. A basic problem with collecting child support under the present system is that it relies on fathers to control their expenditures and voluntarily to send the payment on a weekly, biweekly or monthly basis, year after year. As a Wisconsin study shows, full compliance with court-ordered payments dropped from 38% in the 1st year to below 20% by the 5th year among 163 ex-husbands tracked. A proposal by researchers at the University of Wisconsin's Institute for Research on Poverty calls for an "absent-parent tax." The Wisconsin Plan, as it is known, is simply a withholding tax based on the father's gross income and the number of his absent children. If his income falls below a certain level, payments will stop automatically, but will resume if and when it rises above the cutoff point. The Wisconsin plan removes all judicial discretion and lawyer's skill as factors in child-support awards, thus eliminating erratic awards. It also insures that support payments will be maintained during periods of conflict between the father and mother. However, before the Wisconsin Plan can effectively protect children both out of wedlock, a feature needs to be added that will establish paternity at birth. Imposing a real child-support obligation on fathers of children born outside of marriage will introduce a potentially powerful economic incentive for responsible male reproductive and parental behavior. PMID:3842810

  18. [Development of microsatellites and genetic diversity analysis of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi using genomic-SSR markers].

    PubMed

    Qi, Lin-jie; Long, Ping; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-qi

    2015-04-01

    A total of 12 775 SSRs were identified from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi genomic database, accounting for 2.56% of the total genomic sequences. The result showed that S. baicalensis SSRs were based on 68.32% dinucleotide and 18.63% trinucleotide repeats; CT/GA and TTC/GAA were predominant in the dinucleotide motifs and the trinucleotide motifs respectively. Nine primers were selected to produce highly reproducible SSR bands and were used in studying the genetic diversity of S. baicalensis, 50 individuals from ten populations. 68 SSR polymorphic loci were detected, these loci were polymorphic and displayed 4 to 12 alleles per locus with a mean number of 7; the effect number of alleles was 3. Expected heterozygosities were 0.6 and were far more greater than the average in dicotyledonous plants. PIC (polymorphism information content) was 0.72, Shannon's information index was 1.32, these all proved that S. baicalensis had a high genetic diversity in general. Genetic differentiation among population Gst was 0.131, genetic variation among population accounted for 13.1% and genetic variation within population accounted for 86.9%. The cluster analysis showed that 10 populations S. Baicalensis were classified into 2 groups, but it was not associated with geographical distribution. PMID:26223135

  19. The frequency of multiple paternity suggests that sperm competition is common in house mice (Mus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    DEAN, M. D.; ARDLIE, K. G.; NACHMAN, M . W .

    2010-01-01

    Sexual selection is an important force driving the evolution of morphological and genetic traits. To determine the importance of male–male, postcopulatory sexual selection in natural populations of house mice, we estimated the frequency of multiple paternity, defined as the frequency with which a pregnant female carried a litter fertilized by more than one male. By genotyping eight microsatellite markers from 1095 mice, we found evidence of multiple paternity from 33 of 143. Evidence for multiple paternity was especially strong for 29 of these litters. Multiple paternity was significantly more common in higher-density vs. lower-density populations. Any estimate of multiple paternity will be an underestimate of the frequency of multiple mating, defined as the frequency with which a female mates with more than a single male during a single oestrus cycle. We used computer simulations to estimate the frequency of multiple mating, incorporating observed reductions in heterozygosity and levels of allele sharing among mother and father. These simulations indicated that multiple mating is common, occurring in at least 20% of all oestrus cycles. The exact estimate depends on the competitive skew among males, a parameter for which we currently have no data from natural populations. This study suggests that sperm competition is an important aspect of postcopulatory sexual selection in house mice. PMID:17054508

  20. [Genetic variation analysis of two silver carp populations in the middle and upper Yangtze River by microsatellite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Zhong; Liang, Hong-Wei; Zou, Gui-Wei; Luo, Xiang-Zhong; Li, Zhong; Tian, Hua1; Hu, Guang-Fu

    2008-10-01

    Thirty nine microsatellite markers were applied to analyze the genetic diversity of two silver carp populations in the middle and upper reaches of the Yangtze River. The following parameters were calculated: average observed number of alleles, average effective number of alleles, genetic heterozygosity, polymorphism information content (PIC), genetic similarity coefficient, genetic distance, Hardy-Weinberg balance deflection index. These results indicated that the average observed number of alleles in each microsatellite locus of the Wanzhou population and Jianli populations is 6.128 and 4.974, respectively; the average effective number of alleles is 4.107 and 3.395, respectively; and the number of total alleles of these 39 microsatellite loci is 259. The PIC of polymorphic loci varies between 0.077-0.865, and the average PIC is 0.617. The average observed heterozygosity (Ho) of two populations is 0.834 and 0.775, respectively, and the average expective heterzygosity (He) is 0.713 and 0.623, respectively. The genetic similarity coefficient of two populations is 0.618 and the genetic distance of these populations is 0.482. These results indicated that the two populations belong to different popula-tions for the obvious genetic differentiation. PMID:18930896

  1. Landscape genetic patterns of the rainbow darter Etheostoma caeruleum: a catchment analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences and nuclear microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Haponski, A E; Bollin, T L; Jedlicka, M A; Stepien, C A

    2009-12-01

    Catchment population structure and divergence patterns of the rainbow darter Etheostoma caeruleum (Percidae: Teleostei), an eastern North American benthic fish, are tested using a landscape genetics approach. Allelic variation at eight nuclear DNA microsatellite loci and two mitochondrial DNA regions [cytochrome (cyt) b gene and control region; 2056 aligned base pairs (bp)] is analysed from 89 individuals and six sites in the Lake Erie catchment (Blanchard, Chagrin, Cuyahoga and Grand Rivers) v. the Ohio River catchment (Big Darby Creek and Little Miami River). Genetic and geographic patterning is assessed using phylogenetic trees, pair-wise F(ST) analogues, AMOVA partitioning, Mantel regression, Bayesian assignment, 3D factorial correspondence and barrier analyses. Results identify 34 cyt b haplotypes, 22 control region haplotypes and 137 microsatellite alleles whose distributions demonstrate marked genetic divergence between populations from the Lake Erie and Ohio River catchments. Etheostoma caeruleum populations in the Lake Erie and Ohio River catchments diverged c. 1.6 mya during the Pleistocene glaciations. Greater genetic separations characterize the Ohio River populations, reflecting their older habitat age and less recent connectivity. Divergence levels within the Lake Erie catchment denote more recent post-glacial origins. Notably, the western Lake Erie Blanchard River population markedly differs from the three central basin tributary samples, which are each genetically distinguishable using microsatellites. Overall relationships among the Lake Erie sites refute a genetic isolation by geographic distance hypothesis. Etheostoma caeruleum populations thus exchange few genes and have low migration among tributaries and catchments. PMID:20738685

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of Microsatellite Markers Based on Sequenced Database in Chinese Spring Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhaohui; Ren, Yongkang; Li, Yali; Zhang, Dayong; Dong, Yanhui; Zhao, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are distributed across both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and have been widely used for genetic studies and molecular marker-assisted breeding in crops. Though an ordered draft sequence of hexaploid bread wheat have been announced, the researches about systemic analysis of SSRs for wheat still have not been reported so far. In the present study, we identified 364,347 SSRs from among 10,603,760 sequences of the Chinese spring wheat (CSW) genome, which were present at a density of 36.68 SSR/Mb. In total, we detected 488 types of motifs ranging from di- to hexanucleotides, among which dinucleotide repeats dominated, accounting for approximately 42.52% of the genome. The density of tri- to hexanucleotide repeats was 24.97%, 4.62%, 3.25% and 24.65%, respectively. AG/CT, AAG/CTT, AGAT/ATCT, AAAAG/CTTTT and AAAATT/AATTTT were the most frequent repeats among di- to hexanucleotide repeats. Among the 21 chromosomes of CSW, the density of repeats was highest on chromosome 2D and lowest on chromosome 3A. The proportions of di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats on each chromosome, and even on the whole genome, were almost identical. In addition, 295,267 SSR markers were successfully developed from the 21 chromosomes of CSW, which cover the entire genome at a density of 29.73 per Mb. All of the SSR markers were validated by reverse electronic-Polymerase Chain Reaction (re-PCR); 70,564 (23.9%) were found to be monomorphic and 224,703 (76.1%) were found to be polymorphic. A total of 45 monomorphic markers were selected randomly for validation purposes; 24 (53.3%) amplified one locus, 8 (17.8%) amplified multiple identical loci, and 13 (28.9%) did not amplify any fragments from the genomic DNA of CSW. Then a dendrogram was generated based on the 24 monomorphic SSR markers among 20 wheat cultivars and three species of its diploid ancestors showing that monomorphic SSR markers represented a promising source to increase the number of genetic markers available for the wheat genome. The results of this study will be useful for investigating the genetic diversity and evolution among wheat and related species. At the same time, the results will facilitate comparative genomic studies and marker-assisted breeding (MAS) in plants. PMID:26536014

  3. Characterization of microsatellites in wild and sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.)--markers for individual identification and reproductive processes.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Silvio; Tusch, Alexandra; Schuster, Mirko; Ziegenhagen, Birgit

    2003-02-01

    Nuclear microsatellites were characterized in Prunus avium and validated as markers for individual and cultivar identification, as well as for studies of pollen- and seed-mediated gene flow. We used 20 primer pairs from a simple sequence repeat (SSR) library of Prunus persica and identified 7 loci harboring polymorphic microsatellite sequences in P. avium. In a natural population of 75 wild cherry trees, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 9 and expected heterozygosity from 0.39 to 0.77. The variability of the SSR markers allowed an unambiguous identification of individual trees and potential root suckers. Additionally, we analyzed 13 sweet cherry cultivars and differentiated 12 of them. An exclusion probability of 0.984 was calculated, which indicates that the seven loci are suitable markers for paternity analysis. The woody endocarp was successfully used for resolution of all microsatellite loci and exhibited the same multilocus genotype as the mother tree, as shown in a single seed progeny. Hence, SSR fingerprinting of the purely maternal endocarp was also successful in this Prunus species, allowing the identification of the mother tree of the dispersed seeds. The linkage of microsatellite loci with PCR-amplified alleles of the self-incompatibility locus was tested in two full-sib families of sweet cherry cultivars. From low recombination frequencies, we inferred that two loci are linked with the S locus. The present study provides markers that will significantly facilitate studies of spatial genetic variation and gene flow in wild cherry, as well as breeding programs in sweet cherry. PMID:12669801

  4. Quantification of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations in the retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, J.F.; Rapaport, J.M.; Dryia, T.P.

    1994-09-01

    New germline mutations in the human retinoblastoma gene preferentially arise on a paternally derived allele. In nonhereditary retinoblastoma, the initial somatic mutation seems to have no such bias. The few previous reports of these phenomena included relatively few cases (less than a dozen new germline or initial somatic mutations), so that the magnitude of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations is not known. Knowledge of the magnitude of the bias is valuable for genetic counseling, since, for example, patients with new germline mutations who reproduce transmit risk for retinoblastoma according to the risk that the transmitted allele has a germline mutation. We sought to quantitate the paternal allele bias and to determine whether paternal age is a factor possibly accounting for it. We studied 311 families with retinoblastoma (261 simplex, 50 multiplex) that underwent clinical genetic testing and 5 informative families recruited from earlier research. Using RFLPs and polymorphic microsatellites in the retinoblastoma gene, we could determine the parental origin of 45 new germline mutations and 44 probable initial somatic mutations. Thirty-seven of the 45 new germline mutations, or 82%, arose on a paternal allele while only 24 of the 44 initial somatic mutations (55%) did so. Increased paternal age does not appear to account for the excess of new paternal germline mutations, since the average age of fathers of children with new germline mutations (29.4 years, n=26, incomplete records on 11) was not significantly different from the average age of fathers of children with maternal germline mutations or somatic initial mutations (29.8 years, n=35, incomplete records on 17).

  5. Can paternal leakage maintain sexually antagonistic polymorphism in the cytoplasm?

    PubMed

    Kuijper, B; Lane, N; Pomiankowski, A

    2015-02-01

    A growing number of studies in multicellular organisms highlight low or moderate frequencies of paternal transmission of cytoplasmic organelles, including both mitochondria and chloroplasts. It is well established that strict maternal inheritance is selectively blind to cytoplasmic elements that are deleterious to males - 'mother's curse'. But it is not known how sensitive this conclusion is to slight levels of paternal cytoplasmic leakage. We assess the scope for polymorphism when individuals bear multiple cytoplasmic alleles in the presence of paternal leakage, bottlenecks and recurrent mutation. When fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements within an individual are additive, we find that sexually antagonistic polymorphism is restricted to cases of strong selection on males. However, when fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements are nonlinear, much more extensive polymorphism can be supported in the cytoplasm. In particular, mitochondrial mutants that have strong beneficial fitness effects in males and weak deleterious fitness effects in females when rare (i.e. 'reverse dominance') are strongly favoured under paternal leakage. We discuss how such epistasis could arise through preferential segregation of mitochondria in sex-specific somatic tissues. Our analysis shows how paternal leakage can dampen the evolution of deleterious male effects associated with predominant maternal inheritance of cytoplasm, potentially explaining why 'mother's curse' is less pervasive than predicted by earlier work. PMID:25653025

  6. Can paternal leakage maintain sexually antagonistic polymorphism in the cytoplasm?

    PubMed Central

    Kuijper, B; Lane, N; Pomiankowski, A

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of studies in multicellular organisms highlight low or moderate frequencies of paternal transmission of cytoplasmic organelles, including both mitochondria and chloroplasts. It is well established that strict maternal inheritance is selectively blind to cytoplasmic elements that are deleterious to males – ’mother's curse’. But it is not known how sensitive this conclusion is to slight levels of paternal cytoplasmic leakage. We assess the scope for polymorphism when individuals bear multiple cytoplasmic alleles in the presence of paternal leakage, bottlenecks and recurrent mutation. When fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements within an individual are additive, we find that sexually antagonistic polymorphism is restricted to cases of strong selection on males. However, when fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements are nonlinear, much more extensive polymorphism can be supported in the cytoplasm. In particular, mitochondrial mutants that have strong beneficial fitness effects in males and weak deleterious fitness effects in females when rare (i.e. ’reverse dominance’) are strongly favoured under paternal leakage. We discuss how such epistasis could arise through preferential segregation of mitochondria in sex-specific somatic tissues. Our analysis shows how paternal leakage can dampen the evolution of deleterious male effects associated with predominant maternal inheritance of cytoplasm, potentially explaining why ’mother's curse’ is less pervasive than predicted by earlier work. PMID:25653025

  7. Genetic diversity and differentiation of the Korean starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) between and within cultured stocks and wild populations inferred from microsatellite DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    An, Hye Suck; Nam, Myung Mo; Myeong, Jeong In; An, Chul Min

    2014-11-01

    The Korean starry flounder, Platichthys stellatus, is economically valuable coastal resident fish species. However, the annual catch of this fish has fluctuated and suffered major declines in Korea. We examined the genetic diversity and population structure for four wild populations and three hatchery stocks of Korean starry flounder to protect its genetic integrity using nine microsatellites. A group of 339 genotypes belonging to seven populations were screened. High degrees of polymorphism at the microsatellite loci were observed within both the wild and hatchery populations. Compared to the wild populations, genetic changes, including reduced genetic diversity and highly significant differentiation, have occurred in cultured stocks. Significant population differentiation was also observed in wild starry flounder populations. Similar degrees of inbreeding and significant Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium deviations were detected in both the wild and the hatchery populations. The genetic connectivity pattern identified four distinct metapopulations of starry flounder in Korea by clustering in the phylogenetic tree, Bayesian analyses, molecular variance analysis, PCA and multidimensional scaling analysis. A pattern of isolation-by-distance was not significant. This genetic differentiation may be the result of the co-effects of various factors, such as historic dispersal, local environment or anthropogenic activities. These results provide useful information for the genetic monitoring of P. stellatus hatchery stocks, for the genetic improvement of this species by selective breeding and for designing suitable management guidelines for the conservation of this species. PMID:25064574

  8. Genetic Diversity and Differentiation of the Orange-Spotted Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Between and Within Cultured Stocks and Wild Populations Inferred from Microsatellite DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le; Meng, Zining; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we employed microsatellite DNA markers to analyze the genetic diversity and differentiation between and within cultured stocks and wild populations of the orange-spotted grouper originating from the South China Sea and Southeast Asia. Compared to wild populations, genetic changes including reduced genetic diversity and significant differentiation have taken place in cultured grouper stocks, as shown by allele richness and heterozygosity studies, pairwise Fst, structure, molecular variance analysis, as well as multidimensional scaling analysis. Although two geographically adjacent orange-spotted grouper populations in China showed negligible genetic divergence, significant population differentiation was observed in wild grouper populations distributed in a wide geographical area from China, through Malaysia to Indonesia. However, the Mantel test rejected the isolation-by-distance model of genetic structure, which indicated the genetic differentiation among the populations could result from the co-effects of various factors, such as historical dispersal, local environment, ocean currents, river flows and island blocks. Our results demonstrated that microsatellite markers could be suitable not only for genetic monitoring cultured stocks but also for revealing the population structuring of wild orange-spotted grouper populations. Meanwhile, our study provided important information for breeding programs, management of cultured stocks and conservation of wild populations of the orange-spotted grouper. PMID:21845084

  9. Detection of Sequence Polymorphism in Rubus Occidentalis L. Monomorphic Microsatellite Markers by High Resolution Melting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. Development of microsatellite primers through the identification of appropriate repeate...

  10. Comparison of SNPs and microsatellites in identifying offtypes of cacao clones from Cameroon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers are increasingly being used in crop breeding programs, slowly replacing microsatellites and other markers. SNPs provide many benefits over microsatellites, including ease of analysis and unambiguous results across various platforms. We compare SNPs to m...

  11. Rapid and inexpensive analysis of genetic variability in Arapaima gigas by PCR multiplex panel of eight microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Hamoy, I G; Santos, E J M; Santos, S E B

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the development of a multiplex genotyping panel of eight microsatellite markers of Arapaima gigas, previously described. Specific primer pairs were developed, each one of them marked with either FAM-6, HEX or NED. The amplification conditions using the new primers were standardized for a single reaction. The results obtained demonstrate high heterozygosity (average of 0.69) in a Lower Amazon population. The multiplex system described can thus be considered a fast, efficient and inexpensive method for the investigation of genetic variability in Arapaima populations. PMID:18273816

  12. Application of Microsatellite Loci for Molecular Identification of Elite Genotypes, Analysis of Clonality, and Genetic Diversity in Aspen Populus tremula L. (Salicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Politov, Dmitry V.; Belokon, Maryana M.; Belokon, Yuri S.; Polyakova, Tatyana A.; Shatokhina, Anna V.; Mudrik, Elena A.; Azarova, Anna B.; Filippov, Mikhail V.; Shestibratov, Konstantin A.

    2015-01-01

    Testing systems for molecular identification of micropropagated elite aspen (Populus tremula L.) genotypes were developed on the base on microsatellite (SSR) loci. Out of 33 tested microsatellite loci, 14 were selected due to sustainable PCR amplification and substantial variability in elite clones of aspen aimed for establishment of fast-rotated forest plantations. All eight tested clones had different multilocus genotypes. Among 114 trees from three reference native stands located near the established plantations, 80 haplotypes were identified while some repeated genotypes were attributed to natural clones which appeared as a result of sprouting. The selected set of SSR markers showed reliable individual identification with low probability of appearance of identical aspen genotypes (a minimum of 4.8 · 10−10 and 1 × 10−4 for unrelated and related individuals, resp.). Case studies demonstrating practical applications of the test system are described including analysis of clonal structure and levels of genetic diversity in three natural aspen stands growing in the regions where plantations made of elite clones were established. PMID:26823661

  13. Analysis of four microsatellite markers on the long arm of chromosome 9 by meiotic recombination in flow-sorted single sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, R.A.; Goudie, D.R.; Carter, N.P.; Lyall, J.E.W.; Affara, N.A.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Meiotic recombination in flow-sorted single sperm was used to analyze four highly polymorphic microsatellite markers on the long arm of chromosome 9. The microsatellites comprised three tightly linked markers: 9CMP1 (D9S109), 9CMP2 (D9S127), and D9S53, which map to 9q31, and a reference marker, ASS, which is located in 9q34.1. Haplotypes of single sperm were assessed by using PCR in a single-step multiplex reaction to amplify each locus. Recombinant haplotypes were identified by their relative infrequency and were analyzed using THREELOC, a maximum-likelihood-analysis program, and an adaptation of CRI-MAP. The most likely order of these markers was cen-D9S109-D9S127-D9S53-ASS-tel with D9S109, D9S127, and D9S53 being separated by a genetic distance of approximately 3%. The order of the latter three markers did not however achieve statistical significance using the THREELOC program. 21 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Development of microsatellite markers for Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae).

    PubMed

    Gondim, S G C A; Resende, L V; Brondani, R P V; Collevatti, R G; Silva-Júnior, N J; Pereira, R R; Telles, M P C

    2010-01-01

    We identified 14 microsatellite loci for the wolf fish, Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae), from a genomic shotgun library. Twenty-five primers were designed, and 48 individuals of H. malabaricus from four localities of northwest Goiás, in central Brazil, were genotyped to characterize the polymorphism at each locus. Fourteen primers amplified clearly interpretable products using a single PCR protocol; six loci were polymorphic, but with a low number of alleles per locus (2 or 3). Expected heterozygosities for polymorphic loci ranged from 0.136 to 0.505. Combined paternity exclusion probability (0.638) was low and combined genetic identity (0.056) was high in studies of parentage. The low polymorphism may be due to the small microsatellite size and the large size of the motifs. PMID:20690083

  15. Fine-Scale Genetic Structure and Gene Dispersal in Centaurea corymbosa (Asteraceae). II. Correlated Paternity Within and Among Sibships

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Olivier J.; González-Martínez, Santiago C.; Colas, Bruno; Fréville, Hélène; Mignot, Agnès; Olivieri, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    The fine-scale pattern of correlated paternity was characterized within a population of the narrow-endemic model plant species, Centaurea corymbosa, using microsatellites and natural progeny arrays. We used classical approaches to assess correlated mating within sibships and developed a new method based on pairwise kinship coefficients to assess correlated paternity within and among sibships in a spatio-temporal perspective. We also performed numerical simulations to assess the relative significance of different mechanisms promoting correlated paternity and to compare the statistical properties of different estimators of correlated paternity. Our new approach proved very informative to assess which factors contributed most to correlated paternity and presented good statistical properties. Within progeny arrays, we found that about one-fifth of offspring pairs were full-sibs. This level of correlated mating did not result from correlated pollen dispersal events (i.e., pollen codispersion) but rather from limited mate availability, the latter being due to limited pollen dispersal distances, the heterogeneity of pollen production among plants, phenological heterogeneity and, according to simulations, the self-incompatibility system. We point out the close connection between correlated paternity and the “TwoGener” approach recently developed to infer pollen dispersal and discuss the conditions to be met when applying the latter. PMID:15579710

  16. Integrative Omics Analysis Reveals Post-Transcriptionally Enhanced Protective Host Response in Colorectal Cancers with Microsatellite Instability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Bing

    2016-03-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a frequent and clinically relevant molecular phenotype in colorectal cancer. MSI cancers have favorable survival compared with microsatellite stable cancers (MSS), possibly due to the pronounced tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes observed in MSI cancers. Consistent with the strong immune response that MSI cancers trigger in the host, previous transcriptome expression studies have identified mRNA signatures characteristic of immune response in MSI cancers. However, proteomics features of MSI cancers and the extent to which the mRNA signatures are reflected at the protein level remain largely unknown. Here, we performed a comprehensive comparison of global proteomics profiles between MSI and MSS colorectal cancers in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We found that protein signatures of MSI are also associated with increased immunogenicity. To reliably quantify post-transcription regulation in MSI cancers, we developed a resampling-based regression method by integrative modeling of transcriptomics and proteomics data sets. Compared with the popular simple method, which detects post-transcriptional regulation by either identifying genes differentially expressed at the mRNA level but not at the protein level or vice versa, our method provided a quantitative, more sensitive, and accurate way to identify genes subject to differential post-transcriptional regulation. With this method, we demonstrated that post-transcriptional regulation, coordinating protein expression with key players, initiates de novo and enhances protective host response in MSI cancers. PMID:26680540

  17. Integrative Omics Analysis Reveals Post-Transcriptionally Enhanced Protective Host Response in Colorectal Cancers with Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a frequent and clinically relevant molecular phenotype in colorectal cancer. MSI cancers have favorable survival compared with microsatellite stable cancers (MSS), possibly due to the pronounced tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes observed in MSI cancers. Consistent with the strong immune response that MSI cancers trigger in the host, previous transcriptome expression studies have identified mRNA signatures characteristic of immune response in MSI cancers. However, proteomics features of MSI cancers and the extent to which the mRNA signatures are reflected at the protein level remain largely unknown. Here, we performed a comprehensive comparison of global proteomics profiles between MSI and MSS colorectal cancers in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We found that protein signatures of MSI are also associated with increased immunogenicity. To reliably quantify post-transcription regulation in MSI cancers, we developed a resampling-based regression method by integrative modeling of transcriptomics and proteomics data sets. Compared with the popular simple method, which detects post-transcriptional regulation by either identifying genes differentially expressed at the mRNA level but not at the protein level or vice versa, our method provided a quantitative, more sensitive, and accurate way to identify genes subject to differential post-transcriptional regulation. With this method, we demonstrated that post-transcriptional regulation, coordinating protein expression with key players, initiates de novo and enhances protective host response in MSI cancers. PMID:26680540

  18. Paternity testing in an autotetraploid alfalfa breeding polycross

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining unknown parentage in autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) (2n = 4x = 32) can improve breeding gains. Exclusion analysis based paternity testing SAS code is presented, amenable to genotyping errors, for autotetraploid species utilizing co-dominant molecular markers with ambiguous d...

  19. Characterization of microsatellite loci and repeat density in the gooseneck barnacle, Pollicipes elegans, using next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Plough, Louis V; Marko, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    Pollicipes elegans is a commercially important and biogeographically significant rocky-shore gooseneck barnacle found along the eastern Pacific coasts of Peru, El Salvador, and Mexico. Little is known about its reproductive biology, and no genetic resources exist despite its growing importance as a fisheries species in the region. Next generation sequencing methods can provide rapid and cost-effective development of molecular markers such as microsatellites, which can be applied to studies of paternity, parentage, and population structure in this understudied species. Here, we used Roche 454 pyrosequencing to develop microsatellite markers in P. elegans and made genomic comparisons of repeat density and repeat class frequency with other arthropods and more distantly related taxa. We identified 13 809 repeats of 1-6 bp, or a density of 9744 bp of repeat per megabase queried, which was intermediate in the range of taxonomic groups compared. Comparison of repeat class frequency distributions revealed that P. elegans was most similar to Drosophila melanogaster rather than the more closely related crustacean Daphnia pulex. We successfully isolated 15 polymorphic markers with an average of 9.4 alleles per locus and average observed and expected heterozygosities of 0.501 and 0.597, respectively. Four loci were found to be out of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, likely due to the presence of null alleles. A preliminary population genetic analysis revealed low but significant differentiation between a Peruvian (n = 47) and Mexican (n = 48) population (F(ST) = 0.039) and markedly reduced genetic diversity in Peru. These markers should facilitate future studies of paternity, parentage, and population structure in this species. PMID:24115106

  20. Polygynandry, extra-group paternity and multiple-paternity litters in European badger (Meles meles) social groups.

    PubMed

    Dugdale, Hannah L; Macdonald, David W; Pope, Lisa C; Burke, Terry

    2007-12-01

    The costs and benefits of natal philopatry are central to the formation and maintenance of social groups. Badger groups, thought to form passively according to the resource dispersion hypothesis (RDH), are maintained through natal philopatry and delayed dispersal; however, there is minimal evidence for the functional benefits of such grouping. We assigned parentage to 630 badger cubs from a high-density population in Wytham Woods, Oxford, born between 1988 and 2005. Our methodological approach was different to previous studies; we used 22 microsatellite loci to assign parent pairs, which in combination with sibship inference provided a high parentage assignment rate. We assigned both parents to 331 cubs at > or = 95% confidence, revealing a polygynandrous mating system with up to five mothers and five fathers within a social group. We estimated that only 27% of adult males and 31% of adult females bred each year, suggesting a cost to group living for both sexes. Any strong motivation or selection to disperse, however, may be reduced because just under half of the paternities were gained by extra-group males, mainly from neighbouring groups, with males displaying a mixture of paternity strategies. We provide the strongest evidence to date for multiple-paternity litters, and for the first time show that within-group and extra-group males can sire cubs in the same litter. We investigate the factors that may play a role in determining the degree of delayed dispersal and conclude that the ecological constraints hypothesis, benefits of philopatry hypothesis, and life history hypothesis may all play a part, as proposed by the broad constraints hypothesis. PMID:17971085

  1. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jennings, T N; Knaus, B J; Mullins, T D; Haig, S M; Cronn, R C

    2011-11-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356,958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5 M (USD). PMID:21676207

  2. Multiple paternity and variance in male fertilization success within Atlantic salmon Salmo salar redds in a naturally spawning population.

    PubMed

    Weir, L K; Breau, C; Hutchings, J A; Cunjak, R A

    2010-08-01

    The incidence and magnitude of multiple paternity were estimated for a natural, unmanipulated spawning population of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Egg nests were surveyed in the autumn and sub-samples were excavated the following spring. Parentage data derived from microsatellite DNA revealed an unexpectedly high level of multiple paternity. Within a single redd, females may mate with as many as 16 different males, including small mature male parr and large anadromous males. Multiple paternity was most pronounced in areas of highest redd density, corresponding with increased abundances of mature male parr. In addition, there was considerable variation in success among males, although this variability did not depend upon the number of males participating in spawning. This work underscores the value of undertaking genetic studies on the mating systems of fishes in unmanipulated, natural environments. PMID:20701635

  3. Microsatellite isolation and marker development in carrot - genomic distribution, linkage mapping, genetic diversity analysis and marker transferability across Apiaceae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Apiaceae family includes several vegetable and spice crop species among which carrot is the most economically important member, with ~21 million tons produced yearly worldwide. Despite its importance, molecular resources in this species are relatively underdeveloped. The availability of informative, polymorphic, and robust PCR-based markers, such as microsatellites (or SSRs), will facilitate genetics and breeding of carrot and other Apiaceae, including integration of linkage maps, tagging of phenotypic traits and assisting positional gene cloning. Thus, with the purpose of isolating carrot microsatellites, two different strategies were used; a hybridization-based library enrichment for SSRs, and bioinformatic mining of SSRs in BAC-end sequence and EST sequence databases. This work reports on the development of 300 carrot SSR markers and their characterization at various levels. Results Evaluation of microsatellites isolated from both DNA sources in subsets of 7 carrot F2 mapping populations revealed that SSRs from the hybridization-based method were longer, had more repeat units and were more polymorphic than SSRs isolated by sequence search. Overall, 196 SSRs (65.1%) were polymorphic in at least one mapping population, and the percentage of polymophic SSRs across F2 populations ranged from 17.8 to 24.7. Polymorphic markers in one family were evaluated in the entire F2, allowing the genetic mapping of 55 SSRs (38 codominant) onto the carrot reference map. The SSR loci were distributed throughout all 9 carrot linkage groups (LGs), with 2 to 9 SSRs/LG. In addition, SSR evaluations in carrot-related taxa indicated that a significant fraction of the carrot SSRs transfer successfully across Apiaceae, with heterologous amplification success rate decreasing with the target-species evolutionary distance from carrot. SSR diversity evaluated in a collection of 65 D. carota accessions revealed a high level of polymorphism for these selected loci, with an average of 19 alleles/locus and 0.84 expected heterozygosity. Conclusions The addition of 55 SSRs to the carrot map, together with marker characterizations in six other mapping populations, will facilitate future comparative mapping studies and integration of carrot maps. The markers developed herein will be a valuable resource for assisting breeding, genetic, diversity, and genomic studies of carrot and other Apiaceae. PMID:21806822

  4. Density drives polyandry and relatedness influences paternal success in the Pacific gooseneck barnacle, Pollicipes elegans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyandry is a common mating strategy in animals, increasing female fitness through direct (material) and indirect (genetic) benefits. Most theories about the benefits of polyandry come from studies of terrestrial animals, which have relatively complex mating systems and behaviors; less is known about the potential benefits of polyandry in sessile marine animals, for which potential mates may be scarce and females have less control over pre-copulatory mate choice. Here, we used microsatellite markers to examine multiple paternity in natural aggregations of the Pacific gooseneck barnacle Pollicipes elegans, testing the effect of density on paternity and mate relatedness on male reproductive success. Results We found that multiple paternity was very common (79% of broods), with up to five fathers contributing to a brood, though power was relatively low to detect more than four fathers. Density had a significant and positive linear effect on the number of fathers siring a brood, though this relationship leveled off at high numbers of fathers, which may reflect a lack of power and/or an upper limit to polyandry in this species. Significant skew in male reproductive contribution in multiply-sired broods was observed and we found a positive and significant relationship between the proportion of offspring sired and the genetic similarity between mates, suggesting that genetic compatibility may influence reproductive success in this species. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to show high levels of multiple paternity in a barnacle, and overall, patterns of paternity in P. elegans appear to be driven primarily by mate availability. Evidence of paternity bias for males with higher relatedness suggests some form of post-copulatory sexual selection is taking place, but more work is needed to determine whether it operates during or post-fertilization. Overall, our results suggest that while polyandry in P. elegans is driven by mate availability, it may also provide a mechanism for females to ensure fertilization by compatible gametes and increase reproductive success in this sessile species. PMID:24739102

  5. Decrease in the CGG{sub n} trinucleotide repeat mutation of the fragile X syndrome to normal size range during paternal transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Vaeisaenen, M.L.; Haataja, R.; Leisti, J.

    1996-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of mental retardation, is caused by the expansion of a CGG{sub n} trinucleotide repeat in the FMR-1 gene. Although the repeat number usually increases during transmission, few cases with reduction of an expanded CGG{sub n} repeat back to the normal size range have been reported. We describe for the first time a family in which such reduction has occurred in the paternal transmission. The paternal premutation ({Delta} = 300 hp) was not detected in one of the five daughters or in the son of this daughter, although he had the grandpaternal RFLP haplotype. Instead, fragments indicating the normal CGG{sub n} repeat size were seen on a Southern blot probed with StB12.3. PCR analysis of the CGG{sub n} repeat confirmed this; in addition to a maternal allele of 30 repeats, an allele of 34 repeats was detected in the daughter and, further, in her son. Sequencing of this new allele revealed a pure CGG{sub n} repeat configuration without AGG interruptions. No evidence for a somatic mosaicism of a premutation allele in the daughter or a normal allele in her father was detected when investigating DNA derived from blood lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts. Another unusual finding in this family was lack of the PCR product of the microsatellite marker RS46 (DXS548) in one of the grandmaternal X chromosomes, detected as incompatible inheritance of RS46 alleles. The results suggest an intergenerational reduction in the CGG{sub n} repeat from premutation size to the normal size range and stable transmission of the contracted repeat to the next generation. However, paternal germ-line mosaicism could not be excluded as an alternative explanation for the reverse mutation. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Analysis of microsatellite polymorphisms within the GLC1F locus in Japanese patients with normal tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kaori; Ota, Masao; Shiota, Tomoko; Nomura, Naoko; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Mabuchi, Fumihiko; Iijima, Hiroyuki; Kawase, Kazuhide; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Makoto; Negi, Akira; Sagara, Takeshi; Nishida, Teruo; Inatani, Masaru; Tanihara, Hidenobu; Aihara, Makoto; Araie, Makoto; Fukuchi, Takeo; Abe, Haruki; Higashide, Tomomi; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Kanamoto, Takashi; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Iwase, Aiko; Ohno, Shigeaki; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether the GLC1F locus is associated with normal tension glaucoma (NTG) in Japanese patients. Methods We recruited 242 unrelated Japanese subjects, including, 141 NTG patients and 101 healthy controls. The patients exhibiting a comparatively early onset were selected as they suggest that genetic factors may show stronger involvement. Genotyping and assessment of allelic diversity was performed on 11 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers in and around the GLC1F locus. Results Individuals carrying the 163 allele of D7S1277i had a statistically significant increased risk of NTG (p=0.0013, pc=0.016, OR=2.47, 95%CI=1.42–4.30). None of the other markers identified significant loci (pc>0.05) after Bonferroni’s correction. Conclusions These findings suggested that the genes in the GLC1F locus may be associated with the pathogenesis of NTG. PMID:20309402

  7. Identification of visual paternity cues in humans.

    PubMed

    Alvergne, Alexandra; Perreau, Fanny; Mazur, Allan; Mueller, Ulrich; Raymond, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how individuals identify their relatives has implications for the evolution of social behaviour. Kinship cues might be based on familiarity, but in the face of paternity uncertainty and costly paternal investment, other mechanisms such as phenotypic matching may have evolved. In humans, paternal recognition of offspring and subsequent discriminative paternal investment have been linked to father-offspring facial phenotypic similarities. However, the extent to which paternity detection is impaired by environmentally induced facial information is unclear. We used 27 portraits of fathers and their adult sons to quantify the level of paternity detection according to experimental treatments that manipulate the location, type and quantity of visible facial information. We found that (i) the lower part of the face, that changes most with development, does not contain paternity cues, (ii) paternity can be detected even if relational information within the face is disrupted and (iii) the signal depends on the presence of specific information rather than their number. Taken together, the results support the view that environmental effects have little influence on the detection of paternity using facial similarities. This suggests that the cognitive dispositions enabling the facial detection of kinship relationships ignore genetic irrelevant facial information. PMID:24759368

  8. High fidelity--no evidence for extra-pair paternity in Siberian jays (Perisoreus infaustus).

    PubMed

    Gienapp, Phillip; Merilä, Juha

    2010-01-01

    Extra-pair paternity (EPP) in birds is related to a number of ecological and social factors. For example, it has been found to be positively related with breeding density, negatively with the amount of paternal care and especially high rates have been observed in group-living species. Siberian jays (Perisoreous infaustus) breed at low densities and have extended parental care, which leads to the expectation of low rates of EPP. On the other hand, Siberian jays live in groups which can include also unrelated individuals, and provide opportunities for extra-pair matings. To assess the potential occurrence of EPP in Siberian jays, we analysed a large data pool (n=1029 offspring) covering ca. 30 years of samples from a Finnish Siberian jay population. Paternities were assigned based on up to 21 polymorphic microsatellite markers with the additional information from field observations. We were unable to find any evidence for occurrence of EPP in this species. Our findings are in line with earlier studies and confirm the generally low rates of EPP in related Corvid species. These results suggest that ecological factors may be more important than social factors (group living) in determining costs and benefits of extra-pair paternity. PMID:20711255

  9. Efficient human paternity testing with a panel of 40 short insertion-deletion polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, J R; Pena, S D J

    2010-01-01

    We developed a panel of 40 multiplexed short insertion-deletion (indel) polymorphic loci with widespread chromosomal locations and allele frequencies close to 0.50 in the European population. We genotyped these markers in 360 unrelated self-classified White Brazilians and 50 mother-child-probable father trios with proven paternity. The average heterozygosity (gene diversity) per locus was 0.48, and the combined probability of identity (matching probability) for the 40-locus set was 3.48 x 10(-17). The combined power of exclusion of the indel panel was 0.9997. The efficiency of the 40 indel set in the exclusion of falsely accused individuals in paternity casework was equivalent to the CODIS set of 13 microsatellites. The geometric mean of the paternity indices of the 50 mother-child-probable father trios was 17,607. This panel of 40 short indels was found to have excellent performance. Thus, especially because of its simplicity and low cost, and the fact that it is composed of genomic markers that have very low mutation rates, it represents a useful new tool for human paternity testing. PMID:20391344

  10. Multiple paternity in the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, María José; Chaskelson, Saskia; Gompper, Matthew E; Eggert, Lori S

    2012-06-01

    The reproductive strategies and variation in reproductive success of ticks are poorly understood. We determined variation in multiple paternity in the American dog tick Dermancentor variabilis . In total, 48 blood-engorged female ticks and 22 male companion ticks were collected from 13 raccoon ( Procyon lotor ) hosts. In the laboratory, 56.3% of blood-engorged females laid eggs, of which 37.0% hatched or showed signs of development. We examined the presence of multiple paternity in the ensuing clutches by genotyping groups of eggs and larvae at 5 microsatellite loci and subtracting the known maternal alleles, thereby identifying male-contributed alleles. Seventy-five percent of the clutches presented multiple paternity, with a mode of 2 fathers siring the clutch. Males associated with the females on the host always sired some offspring. In 1 case, a male was the sire of clutches derived from 2 females, indicating both polygyny and polyandry may occur for this species. These results, combined with those of several other recent studies, suggest that multiple paternity might be frequent for ixodid ticks. PMID:22257158

  11. A measure of population subdivision based on microsatellite allele frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, M.

    1995-01-01

    Microsatellite loci, loci that vary in the number of repeats of a simple DNA sequence, are becoming commonly used in the analysis of natural populations. Microsatellite loci are often highly polymorphic and relatively easy to survey and hence offer the hope of greater understanding of population structure. The question is how to make the best use of allele frequencies at microsatellite loci. This paper, like the accompanying paper by Goldstein et al. (1995), discusses how information about the mutation process at microsatellite loci can suggest statistics that are more appropriate for the analysis of microsatellite loci than are existing statistics. In this paper, I will introduce a new statistic analogous to Wright`s (1951) F{sub ST} that can be used to estimate effective migration rates or times since population divergence. This statistic is closely related to the distance measures introduced by Goldstein et al. (1995). 15 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS IN HESSIAN FLY (MAYETIOLA DESTRUCTOR) AND ANALYSIS OF HESSIAN FLY BIOTYPES. INDICATIONS FOR CONTROL OF PEST IN THE FIELD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microsatellite library was prepared from size-selected genomic DNA of the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor). Over 52,000 microsatellite containing clones were recovered and several candidate loci were subsequently characterized and used to determine amounts of gene flow within and between biotyp...

  13. A New Electrophoresis Technique to Seperate Microsatellite Alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been used commonly for microsatellite (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) analysis, but they are labor- intensive and not always able to provide accurate sizes for different alleles. Capillary sequencers provide automated analysis and accur...

  14. Survey and analysis of microsatellites in the silkworm, Bombyx mori: frequency, distribution, mutations, marker potential and their conservation in heterologous species.

    PubMed

    Prasad, M Dharma; Muthulakshmi, M; Madhu, M; Archak, Sunil; Mita, K; Nagaraju, J

    2005-01-01

    We studied microsatellite frequency and distribution in 21.76-Mb random genomic sequences, 0.67-Mb BAC sequences from the Z chromosome, and 6.3-Mb EST sequences of Bombyx mori. We mined microsatellites of >/=15 bases of mononucleotide repeats and >/=5 repeat units of other classes of repeats. We estimated that microsatellites account for 0.31% of the genome of B. mori. Microsatellite tracts of A, AT, and ATT were the most abundant whereas their number drastically decreased as the length of the repeat motif increased. In general, tri- and hexanucleotide repeats were overrepresented in the transcribed sequences except TAA, GTA, and TGA, which were in excess in genomic sequences. The Z chromosome sequences contained shorter repeat types than the rest of the chromosomes in addition to a higher abundance of AT-rich repeats. Our results showed that base composition of the flanking sequence has an influence on the origin and evolution of microsatellites. Transitions/transversions were high in microsatellites of ESTs, whereas the genomic sequence had an equal number of substitutions and indels. The average heterozygosity value for 23 polymorphic microsatellite loci surveyed in 13 diverse silkmoth strains having 2-14 alleles was 0.54. Only 36 (18.2%) of 198 microsatellite loci were polymorphic between the two divergent silkworm populations and 10 (5%) loci revealed null alleles. The microsatellite map generated using these polymorphic markers resulted in 8 linkage groups. B. mori microsatellite loci were the most conserved in its immediate ancestor, B. mandarina, followed by the wild saturniid silkmoth, Antheraea assama. PMID:15371363

  15. Novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    The authors are developing extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for smaller-faster-cheaper spacecraft attitude and control systems. They will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses the novel control system to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source.

  16. Paternal inheritance of the primary sex ratio in a copepod.

    PubMed

    Voordouw, M J; Robinson, H E; Anholt, B R

    2005-09-01

    Uniparentally inherited genetic elements are under strong selection to manipulate sex determination in their host and shift the host sex ratio towards the transmitting sex. For any sex-ratio trait, lineage analysis and quantitative genetics are important tools for characterizing the mode of inheritance (biparental vs. maternal vs. paternal) thereby narrowing the field of possible sex-determining mechanisms (e.g. polygenic, sex chromosomes with meiotic drive, cytoplasmic microorganisms). The primary sex ratio of the harpacticoid copepod, Tigriopus californicus is often male-biased and is highly variable among full sib families. We found that this extra-binomial variation for the primary sex ratio is paternally but not maternally transmitted in T. californicus. Paternal transmission of the primary sex ratio has been well documented in the haplo-diploid hymenoptera but is relatively rare in diplo-diploid organisms. If the sex-ratio trait is paternally transmitted in other closely related harpacticoid copepods it would explain why male biased primary sex ratios are so common in this group. PMID:16135125

  17. Measuring Microsatellite Conservation in Mammalian Evolution with a Phylogenetic Birth–Death Model

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, Sterling M.; Lennon, Dustin; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Gemmell, Neil; Minin, Vladimir N.

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellites make up ∼3% of the human genome, and there is increasing evidence that some microsatellites can have important functions and can be conserved by selection. To investigate this conservation, we performed a genome-wide analysis of human microsatellites and measured their conservation using a binary character birth--death model on a mammalian phylogeny. Using a maximum likelihood method to estimate birth and death rates for different types of microsatellites, we show that the rates at which microsatellites are gained and lost in mammals depend on their sequence composition, length, and position in the genome. Additionally, we use a mixture model to account for unequal death rates among microsatellites across the human genome. We use this model to assign a probability-based conservation score to each microsatellite. We found that microsatellites near the transcription start sites of genes are often highly conserved, and that distance from a microsatellite to the nearest transcription start site is a good predictor of the microsatellite conservation score. An analysis of gene ontology terms for genes that contain microsatellites near their transcription start site reveals that regulatory genes involved in growth and development are highly enriched with conserved microsatellites. PMID:22593552

  18. Epigenetics and the Origins of Paternal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Curley, James P.; Mashoodh, Rahia; Champagne, Frances A.

    2010-01-01

    Though there are multiple routes through which parents can influence their offspring, recent studies of environmentally induced epigenetic variation have highlighted the role of non-genomic pathways. In addition to the experience-dependent modification of DNA methylation that can be achieved via mother-infant interactions, there has been increasing interest in the epigenetic mechanisms through which paternal influences on offspring development can be achieved. Epidemiological and laboratory studies suggest that paternal nutritional and toxicological exposures as well as paternal age and phenotypic variation can lead to variations in offspring and, in some cases, grand-offspring development. These findings suggest a potential epigenetic germline inheritance of paternal effects. However, it may be important to consider the interplay between maternal and paternal influences as well as the experimental dissociation between experience-dependent and germline transmission when exploring the role of epigenetic variation within the germline as a mediator of these effects. In this review, we will explore these issues, with a particular focus on the potential role of paternally-induced maternal investment, highlight the literature illustrating the transgenerational impact of paternal experiences, and discuss the evidence supporting the role of epigenetic mechanisms in maintaining paternal effects both within and across generations. PMID:20620140

  19. Paternal inheritance in mealybugs (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kol-Maimon, Hofit; Mendel, Zvi; Franco, José Carlos; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-10-01

    Mealybugs have a haplodiploid reproduction system, with paternal genome elimination (PGE); the males are diploid soon after fertilization, but during embryogenesis, the male paternal set of chromosomes becomes heterochromatic (HC) and therefore inactive. Previous studies have suggested that paternal genes can be passed on from mealybug males to their sons, but not necessarily by any son, to the next generation. We employed crosses between two mealybug species— Planococcus ficus (Signoret) and Planococcus citri (Risso)—and between two populations of P. ficus, which differ in their mode of pheromone attraction, in order to demonstrate paternal inheritance from males to F2 through F1 male hybrids. Two traits were monitored through three generations: mode of male pheromone attraction (pherotype) and sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) gene segment (genotype). Our results demonstrate that paternal inheritance in mealybugs can occur from males to their F2 offspring, through F1 males (paternal line). F2 backcrossed hybrid males expressed paternal pherotypes and ITS2 genotypes although their mother originated through a maternal population. Further results revealed other, hitherto unknown, aspects of inheritance in mealybugs, such as that hybridization between the two species caused absence of paternal traits in F2 hybrid females produced by F1 hybrid females. Furthermore, hybridization between the two species raised the question of whether unattracted males have any role in the interactions between P. ficus and P. citri.

  20. Risk Factors for Paternal Physical Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shawna J.; Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Yookyong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study uses the developmental-ecological framework to examine a comprehensive set of paternal factors hypothesized to be linked to risk for paternal child abuse (PCA) among a diverse sample of fathers. Attention was given to fathers' marital status and their race/ethnicity (White, African American, and Hispanic). Methods: Interviews…

  1. The Effect of Paternal Age on Relapse in First-Episode Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Christy L M; Chiu, Cindy P Y; Li, Yuet-Keung; Law, Chi-Wing; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry K W; Lee, Edwin H M; Sham, Pak; Chen, Eric Y H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Multiple etiological and prognostic factors have been implied in schizophrenia and its outcome. Advanced paternal age has been reported as a risk factor in schizophrenia. Whether this may affect schizophrenia outcome was not previously studied. We hypothesized that advanced paternal age may have a negative effect on the outcome of relapse in schizophrenia. Method: We interviewed 191 patients with first-episode schizophrenia and their relatives for parental ages, sociodemographic factors at birth, birth rank, family history of psychotic disorders, and obstetric complications. The outcome measure was the presence of relapse at the end of the first year of treatment. Results: In the 1-year follow-up period, 42 (22%) patients experienced 1 or more relapses. The mean paternal age was 34.62 years (SD 7.69). Patients who relapsed had significantly higher paternal age, poorer medication adherence, were female, and were hospitalized at onset, compared with patients who did not relapse. A multivariate regression analysis showed that advanced paternal age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.10), medication nonadherence (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.12 to 4.99), and female sex (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.14 to 5.24) independently contributed to a higher risk of relapse. Analysis between different paternal age groups found a significantly higher relapse rate with paternal age over 40. Conclusions: Advanced paternal age is found to be modestly but significantly related to more relapses, and such an effect is the strongest at a cut-off of paternal age of 40 years or older. The effect is less likely to be mediated through less effective parental supervision or nonadherence to medication. Other possible biological mechanisms need further explorations. PMID:26454556

  2. Microsatellite Analysis of Museum Specimens Reveals Historical Differences in Genetic Diversity between Declining and More Stable Bombus Species

    PubMed Central

    Maebe, Kevin; Meeus, Ivan; Ganne, Maarten; De Meulemeester, Thibaut; Biesmeijer, Koos; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide most pollinators, e.g. bumblebees, are undergoing global declines. Loss of genetic diversity can play an essential role in these observed declines. In this paper, we investigated the level of genetic diversity of seven declining Bombus species and four more stable species with the use of microsatellite loci. Hereto we genotyped a unique collection of museum specimens. Specimens were collected between 1918 and 1926, in 6 provinces of the Netherlands which allowed us to make interspecific comparisons of genetic diversity. For the stable species B. pascuorum, we also selected populations from two additional time periods: 1949–1955 and 1975–1990. The genetic diversity and population structure in B. pascuorum remained constant over the three time periods. However, populations of declining bumblebee species showed a significantly lower genetic diversity than co-occurring stable species before their major declines. This historical difference indicates that the repeatedly observed reduced genetic diversity in recent populations of declining bumblebee species is not caused solely by the decline itself. The historically low genetic diversity in the declined species may be due to the fact that these species were already rare, making them more vulnerable to the major drivers of bumblebee decline. PMID:26061732

  3. Admixture analysis of stocked brown trout populations using mapped microsatellite DNA markers: indigenous trout persist in introgressed populations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael M; Mensberg, Karen-Lise D

    2009-10-23

    Admixture between wild and captive populations is an increasing concern in conservation biology. Understanding the extent of admixture and the processes involved requires identification of admixed and non-admixed individuals. This can be achieved by statistical methods employing Bayesian clustering, but resolution is low if genetic differentiation is weak. Here, we analyse stocked brown trout populations represented by historical (1943-1956) and contemporary (2000s) samples, where genetic differentiation between wild populations and stocked trout is weak (pairwise F(ST) of 0.047 and 0.053). By analysing a high number of microsatellite DNA markers (50) and making use of linkage map information, we achieve clear identification of admixed and non-admixed trout. Moreover, despite strong population-level admixture by hatchery strain trout in one of the populations (70.8%), non-admixed individuals nevertheless persist (7 out of 53 individuals). These remnants of the indigenous population are characterized by later spawning time than the majority of the admixed individuals. We hypothesize that isolation by time mediated by spawning time differences between wild and hatchery strain trout is a major factor rescuing a part of the indigenous population from introgression. PMID:19515653

  4. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and genetic structure in five consecutive breeding generations of mandarin fish Siniperca chuatsi (Basilewsky).

    PubMed

    Yi, T L; Guo, W J; Liang, X F; Yang, M; Lv, L Y; Tian, C X; Song, Y; Zhao, C; Sun, J

    2015-01-01

    In this report, 10 polymorphic microsatellites were applied to assess the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of 5 consecutive breeding generations of mandarin fish, Siniperca chuatsi (Basilewsky). The results from total number of alleles, average polymorphism information content, and average homozygosity and heterozygosity showed that the genetic diversity of the breeding population was decreasing. The genetic identity between F1 and its descendant generations (F2, F3, F4, F5) decreased (from 0.9248 to 0.8803), while the genetic distance (from 0.0782 to 0.1275) and fixation index (from 0.03796 to 0.07393) increased. The allele frequency of SS181-235 and SS211-246 changed regularly in the 5 breeding generations, and they may be negatively associated with the selected trait, which needs to be confirmed by further research. Our study indicated that selective breeding was an efficient strategy for mandarin fish. In the process of breeding, some deleterious genes were phased out, and the genetic structure of the breeding populations became stable. PMID:25867407

  5. Genetic evidence for polygynandry in the black-striped pipefish Syngnathus abaster: a microsatellite-based parentage analysis.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Kerstin; Gonzalez-Wanguemert, Mercedes; Diekmann, Onno E; Serrão, Ester A

    2013-01-01

    Sexual selection theory predicts that, in organisms with reversed sex roles, more polyandrous species exhibit higher levels of sexual dimorphism. In the family Syngnathidae (pipefish, seahorses, and seadragons), males provide all parental care by carrying developing embryos on their ventral surfaces, and females develop secondary sex characters. Syngnathids exhibit a variety of genetic mating patterns, making them an ideal group to test predictions of sexual selection theory. Here, we describe the mating system of the black-striped pipefish Syngnathus abaster, using 4 highly variable microsatellites to analyze parentage of 102 embryos. Results revealed that 1) both sexes mate multiple times over the course of a pregnancy (polygynandrous mating system), 2) eggs are spatially segregated by maternity within each brood pouch, and 3) larger females have higher mating success (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test; P < 0.05). Together with similar studies of other syngnathid species, our results support the hypothesis that the mating system is related to the intensity of sexual dimorphism. PMID:23975836

  6. Multiplex PCR panel of microsatellite markers for the tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, developed as a tool for use in conservation and broodstock management.

    PubMed

    Hamoy, I G; Santos, S

    2012-01-01

    The tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, native to Brazil, is widely used in aquaculture systems. We developed a multiplex PCR panel for this species, comprising 12 microsatellite loci. This panel was used to genotype 73 specimens collected from Juruti, a city in the Brazilian Amazon. The mean number of alleles per locus was 8.8, the mean observed heterozygosity was 0.76, and the combined power of discrimination and the combined power of exclusion were 0.99999999999999993 and 0.999991762, respectively. We observed no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in this population. All amplified alleles were clearly typed, and easily interpretable results were obtained. This method will be useful for paternity analysis, population genetics and conservation studies, as well as for selective breeding programs for C. macropomum. PMID:22370880

  7. Paternal isodisomy for chromosome 7 and normal growth and development in a patient with congenital chloride diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeglund, P.; de la Chapelle, A.; Kere, J.

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) has been reported in an increasing number of patients, occasionally ascertained because of concomitant autosomal recessive disorders. In some cases, additional signs such as growth alteration, mental retardation or minor anomalies are present, suggesting an imprinting effect. For maternal chromosome 7, UPD has been described in three patients with recessive disorders. Severe growth retardation diagnosed in all these patients has been explained by the effect of imprinting of growth related genes on maternal chromosome 7. No cases of paternally derived disomy from chromosome 7 were previously known. Here we report paternal isodisomy for chromosome 7 and normal growth in a patient with a recessive disorder, congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD; MIM 214700). Ten informative microsatellite markers on chromosome 7 demonstrated that the proband did not have any maternal contribution to her genotype for that chromosome. Maternal and paternal alleles could not be distinguished for another 10 markers tested for chromosome 7, but the proband was always homozygous. As most uniparental paternal disomies appear to have a postzygotic origin, the primary event might have been a maternal meiotic nondisjunction. A thorough clinical evaluation with a view to additional signs of imprinted genes localized in chromosome 7 was performed. The physical status and laboratory tests were normal except for a mild high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. As the patient has normal stature, it is likely that the paternal chromosome 7 lacks the suggested maternal imprinting effect on growth. The origin of the hearing loss remains speculative.

  8. Non-Density Dependent Pollen Dispersal of Shorea maxwelliana (Dipterocarpaceae) Revealed by a Bayesian Mating Model Based on Paternity Analysis in Two Synchronized Flowering Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shinsuke; Tani, Naoki; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Lee, Soon Leong; Muhammad, Norwati; Kondo, Toshiaki; Numata, Shinya; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Pollinator syndrome is one of the most important determinants regulating pollen dispersal in tropical tree species. It has been widely accepted that the reproduction of tropical forest species, especially dipterocarps that rely on insects with weak flight for their pollination, is positively density-dependent. However differences in pollinator syndrome should affect pollen dispersal patterns and, consequently, influence genetic diversity via the mating process. We examined the pollen dispersal pattern and mating system of Shorea maxwelliana, the flowers of which are larger than those of Shorea species belonging to section Mutica which are thought to be pollinated by thrips (weak flyers). A Bayesian mating model based on the paternity of seeds collected from mother trees during sporadic and mass flowering events revealed that the estimated pollen dispersal kernel and average pollen dispersal distance were similar for both flowering events. This evidence suggests that the putative pollinators – small beetles and weevils – effectively contribute to pollen dispersal and help to maintain a high outcrossing rate even during sporadic flowering events. However, the reduction in pollen donors during a sporadic event results in a reduction in effective pollen donors, which should lead to lower genetic diversity in the next generation derived from seeds produced during such an event. Although sporadic flowering has been considered less effective for outcrossing in Shorea species that depend on thrips for their pollination, effective pollen dispersal by the small beetles and weevils ensures outcrossing during periods of low flowering tree density, as occurs in a sporadic flowering event. PMID:24391712

  9. Monosomy 1p36.31-33{yields}pter due to a paternal reciprocal translocation: Prognostic significance of FISH analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Bui, The-Hung; Wallin, A.

    1996-10-02

    A rare monosomy 1p36.31-33{r_arrow}pter was found in a child with physical anomalies, psycho-motor retardation, and seizures. Cytogenetic investigation suggested an unbalanced translocation between 1p and an acrocentric chromosome, but the rearrangement was difficult to assess accurately using conventional chromosome banding techniques. The half-cryptic translocation was further characterized using fluorescence in situ hybridization, and the aberrant chromosome 1 was shown to be a derivate of a paternal reciprocal translocation t(1;15)(p36.31-33;p11.2-12). The breakpoints on chromosome 1 and 15 were defined in detail using locus specific probes. The rearrangement did not include the region on chromosome 1p which previously has been suggested to predispose to the development of neuroblastoma in a case with a constitutional translocation. At 3 6/12 years, the patient has no clinical signs of this disease, which illustrates the prognostic significance of this investigation. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Molecular phylogenetics and microsatellite analysis reveal cryptic species of speckled dace (Cyprinidae: Rhinichthys osculus) in Oregon's Great Basin.

    PubMed

    Hoekzema, Kendra; Sidlauskas, Brian L

    2014-08-01

    Speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus) is a small cyprinid that occurs throughout western North America and is the most commonly occurring fish in Oregon. Because of the high genetic and morphological variation in this species across its range, it has been referred to as a species complex; however, no revision to its taxonomy has occurred since 1984. Here, the phylogenetics and population genetics of speckled dace are examined throughout Oregon's Great Basin to describe genetic variation and infer the geographic boundaries between distinct taxonomic entities and populations. We tested the validity of a putative subspecies, Foskett Spring speckled dace, that occurs in a single spring within Warner Valley in Southeast Oregon and is listed Federally as threatened. Dace were collected from Foskett Spring and all surrounding basins containing speckled dace (Warner, Goose Lake, Lake Abert, Silver Lake, and Malheur), as well as Stinking Lake Spring (located within Malheur), created phylogenetic trees from mitochondrial ND2 and nuclear S7 sequence data, and genotyped eight microsatellite loci for population-level analyses. Three highly divergent clades warrant species-level status: Malheur stream dace, Stinking Lake Spring dace, and dace from the other four basins combined. Although Foskett Spring dace were not monophyletic, substantial population structure occurs at the basin-level and separates Foskett Spring dace from other dace in the surrounding Warner Valley. Thus, we recommend ESU status for the isolated population of speckled dace in Foskett Spring. The high, previously unrecognized, taxonomic diversity within this region indicates a need for a range-wide phylogeographic study of speckled dace and an investigation of the morphological distinctiveness of the putative new species. PMID:24795214

  11. Analysis of the population structure of Macrolophus pygmaeus (Rambur) (Hemiptera: Miridae) in the Palaearctic region using microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Juan Antonio; Spina, Michelangelo La; Perera, Omaththage P

    2012-01-01

    Macrolophus pygmaeus (Rambur) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is widely distributed throughout the Palaearctic region. The aim was to explain the current geographic distribution of the species by investigating its genetic population structure. Samples of M. pygmaeus were collected in 15 localities through its range of distribution. A sample from a commercial producer was also analyzed. A total of 367 M. pygmaeus were genotyped for nine microsatellite loci. Isolation by distance was tested by Mantel's test. The molecular structure of M. pygmaeus populations was inferred by UPGMA, AMOVA, Principal component and Bayesian analyses. The average number of alleles per locus per population was 5.5 (range: 3.1–7.8). Istanbul (Turkey) and Nimes (France) had the lowest (0.291) and the highest (0.626) expected heterozygosity (He), respectively. There was an increase in He from the Canary Islands to Nimes, and a progressive decrease thereafter. A significant negative correlation was found between allelic richness and He, and the distance of each population to the easternmost locality (Canary Islands). Significant linkage disequilibrium was observed in the populations from Turkey. FST (0.004–0.334) indicated a high population differentiation, with isolation by distance supported by a high correlation. Bayesian analyses, PCA, and UPGMA pointed to three main clusters: (1) Greece and Turkey, (2) Italy and France, and (3) southern Iberia and the Canary Islands. The recent evolutionary history of M. pygmaeus is inferred from the data as follows: (1) the reduction in the geographic distribution of the species to the Iberian, Italian, and Balkan peninsulas, and possibly southern France, during glaciations and re-colonization of northern Europe from its southern refuges; (2) the maintenance of high diversity in Iberia and Italy (and possibly southern France) during contraction periods, and bottlenecks in the Balkans; (3) introgression of the Italian–French lineage in northern Spain, naturally or through trade. PMID:23301179

  12. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Laccaria bicolor genome, with development of microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Labbe, Jessy L; Murat, Claude; Morin, Emmanuelle; Le Tacon, F; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play a significant role in fungal genome organization, and they are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. We identified SSRs in the Laccaria bicolor genome by in silico survey and analyzed their distribution in the different genomic regions. We also compared the abundance and distribution of SSRs in L. bicolor with those of the following fungal genomes: Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Coprinopsis cinerea, Ustilago maydis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the MISA computer program, we detected 277,062 SSRs in the L. bicolor genome representing 8% of the assembled genomic sequence. Among the analyzed basidiomycetes, L. bicolor exhibited the highest SSR density although no correlation between relative abundance and the genome sizes was observed. In most genomes the short motifs (mono- to trinucleotides) were more abundant than the longer repeated SSRs. Generally, in each organism, the occurrence, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs decreased as the repeat unit increased. Furthermore, each organism had its own common and longest SSRs. In the L. bicolor genome, most of the SSRs were located in intergenic regions (73.3%) and the highest SSR density was observed in transposable elements (TEs; 6,706 SSRs/Mb). However, 81% of the protein-coding genes contained SSRs in their exons, suggesting that SSR polymorphism may alter gene phenotypes. Within a L. bicolor offspring, sequence polymorphism of 78 SSRs was mainly detected in non-TE intergenic regions. Unlike previously developed microsatellite markers, these new ones are spread throughout the genome; these markers could have immediate applications in population genetics.

  13. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS FOR PERSEA AMERICANA (AVOCADO).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of their relative abundance, distribution across the genome, hypervariability and co-dominance, microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats are considered to be cost effective and efficient molecular genetic markers for parentage analysis, linkage mapping, association studies, and genetic fi...

  14. The Taranis microsatellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Elisabeth; Lefeuvre, Francois; Pincon, Jean-Louis

    TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiations from lightNIngs and Sprites) is a microsatellite project of the CNES Myriade program. TARANIS is dedicated to the investigation of impulsive transfers of energy between the neutral atmosphere and the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas. The main objective is the determination of the mechanisms at the origin of such transitory processes with a multi-instrument payload dedicated to the measurements of all expected wave and particle emissions. The science objectives include: characterization of TLEs (Transient Luminous Events including sprites, jets elves and halos) and TGFs (Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes), global mapping and occurrence rates, relation of TLEs, TGFs, associated electromagnetic emissions and high energy electrons in order to determine the source mechanisms, determination of triggering factors and formation conditions, characterization of the parent lightning that cause TLEs and TGFs and precipitate electrons, investigation of Wave Plasma Interactions leading to precipitated (LEP) and accelerated (runaway) electrons, effects on the radiationbelt of low altitude sources, tracking of the variability of the radiation belts from electron and wave measurements, effects on thermospheric parameters (ionisation rate, NOx, O3). The satellite observations will be correlated with observations at ground and by balloon. The project is multidisciplinary, based on different kind of sensors including: two micro cameras and three photometers (NIR to UV) looking at the nadir, X and gamma detectors (20 keV - 10 MeV), energetic electrons detectors (70 keV - 4 MeV) and electric and magnetic sensors in a wide frequency range (1 Hz - 30 MHz for the electric sensors). The orbit will be polar sun-synchronous at 650 km altitude, with a slow drift of the order of 2 local hours per year. The scientific payload weight is 30 kg, the power used by the scientific instrumentation is about 35 W, data of 'event' and 'survey' modes will be stored on a mass memory of 16 Gbits and transmitted by X link, to the CNES control station at Toulouse (F). TARANIS, presently in phase B, could be launched in 2011.

  15. Clustered microsatellite mutations in the pipefish Syngnathus typhle.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A G; Rosenqvist, G; Berglund, A; Avise, J C

    1999-01-01

    Clustered mutations are copies of a mutant allele that enter a population's gene pool together due to replication from a premeiotic germline mutation and distribution to multiple successful gametes of an individual. Although the phenomenon has been studied in Drosophila and noted in a few other species, the topic has received scant attention despite claims of being of major importance to population genetics theory. Here we capitalize upon the reproductive biology of male-pregnant pipefishes to document the occurrence of clustered microsatellite mutations and to estimate their rates and patterns from family data. Among a total of 3195 embryos genetically screened from 110 families, 40% of the 35 detected de novo mutant alleles resided in documented mutational clusters. Most of the microsatellite mutations appeared to involve small-integer changes in repeat copy number, and they arose in approximately equal frequency in paternal and maternal germlines. These findings extend observations on clustered mutations to another organismal group and motivate a broader critique of the mutation cluster phenomenon. They also carry implications for the evolution of microsatellites with respect to mutational models and homoplasy among alleles. PMID:10388824

  16. Causes of size homoplasy among chloroplast microsatellites in closely related Clusia species.

    PubMed

    Hale, Marie L; Borland, Anne M; Gustafsson, Mats H G; Wolff, Kirsten

    2004-02-01

    Chloroplast DNA sequences and microsatellites are useful tools for phylogenetic as well as population genetic analyses of plants. Chloroplast microsatellites tend to be less variable than nuclear microsatellites and therefore they may not be as powerful as nuclear microsatellites for within-species population analysis. However, chloroplast microsatellites may be useful for phylogenetic analysis between closely related taxa when more conventional loci, such as ITS or chloroplast sequence data, are not variable enough to resolve phylogenetic relationships in all clades. To determine the limits of chloroplast microsatellites as tools in phylogenetic analyses, we need to understand their evolution. Thus, we examined and compared phylogenetic relationships of species within the genus Clusia, using both chloroplast sequence data and variation at seven chloroplast microsatellite loci. Neither ITS nor chloroplast sequences were variable enough to resolve relationships within some sections of the genus, yet chloroplast microsatellite loci were too variable to provide any useful phylogenetic information. Size homoplasy was apparent, caused by base substitutions within the microsatellite, base substitutions in the flanking regions, indels in the flanking regions, multiple microsatellites within a fragment, and forward/reverse mutations of repeat length resulting in microsatellites of identical base composition that were not identical by descent. PMID:15042338

  17. Strong male/male competition allows for nonchoosy females: high levels of polygynandry in a territorial frog with paternal care.

    PubMed

    Ursprung, Eva; Ringler, Max; Jehle, Robert; Hödl, Walter

    2011-04-01

    Our knowledge about genetic mating systems and the underlying causes for and consequences of variation in reproductive success has substantially improved in recent years. When linked to longitudinal population studies, cross-generational pedigrees across wild populations can help answer a wide suite of questions in ecology and evolutionary biology. We used microsatellite markers and exhaustive sampling of two successive adult generations to obtain population-wide estimates of individual reproductive output of males and females in a natural population of the Neotropical frog Allobates femoralis (Aromobatidae), a pan-Amazonian species that features prolonged iteroparous breeding, male territoriality and male parental care. Parentage analysis revealed a polygynandrous mating system in which high proportions of males (35.5%) and females (56.0%) produced progeny that survived until adulthood. Despite contrasting reproductive strategies, successfully reproducing males and females had similar numbers of mating partners that sired the adult progeny (both sexes: median 2; range 1-6); the numbers of their offspring that reached adulthood were also similar (both sexes: median 2; range 1-8). Measures of reproductive skew indicate selection on males only for their opportunity to breed. Reproductive success was significantly higher in territorial than in nonterritorial males, but unrelated to territory size in males or to body size in both sexes. We hypothesize that female polyandry in this species has evolved because of enhanced offspring survival when paternal care is allocated to multiple partners. PMID:21410576

  18. Transcriptome analysis and microsatellite discovery in the blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) after challenge with Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tuan; Gao, Ze-Xia; Zhao, Hong-Hao; Yi, Shao-Kui; Chen, Bo-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Hua; Lin, Li; Liu, Xue-Qin; Wang, Wei-Min

    2015-07-01

    The blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala, is a herbivorous freshwater fish species native to China and a major aquaculture species in Chinese freshwater polyculture systems. In recent years, the bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila has been reported to be its pathogen causing great losses of farmed fish. To understand the immune response of the blunt snout bream to A. hydrophila infection, we used the Solexa/Illumina technology to analyze the transcriptomic profile after artificial bacterial infection. Two nonnormalized cDNA libraries were synthesized from tissues collected from control blunt snout bream or those injected with A. hydrophila. After assembly, 155,052 unigenes (average length 692.8 bp) were isolated. All unigenes were annotated using BLASTX relative to several public databases: the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonreduntant (Nr) database, SwissProt, Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups of proteins (KOG), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and Gene Ontology (GO). The sequence similarity (86%) of the assembled unigenes was to zebrafish based on the Nr database. A number of unigenes (n = 30,482) were assigned to three GO categories: biological processes (25,242 unigenes), molecular functions (26,096 unigenes), and cellular components (22,778 unigenes). 20,909 unigenes were classified into 25 KOG categories and 28,744 unigenes were assigned into 315 specific signaling pathways. In total, 238 significantly differentially expressed unigenes (mapped to 125 genes) were identified: 101 upregulated genes and 24 downregulated genes. Another 303 unigenes were mapped to unknown or novel genes. Among the known expressed genes identified, 53 were immune-related genes and were distributed in 71 signaling pathways. The expression patterns of selected up- and downregulated genes from the control and injected groups were determined with reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Microsatellites (n = 10,877), including di-to pentanucleotide repeat motifs, were also identified in the blunt snout bream transcriptome profiles. This study extends our understanding of the immune defense mechanisms of the blunt snout bream against A. hydrophila and provides useful data for further studies of the immunogenetics of this species. PMID:25681750

  19. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging at Low Altitudes from the Swedish Microsatellite Astrid: Images and Spectral Analysis. Paper 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Pontus C:son; Barabash, Stas; Norberg, Olle; Lundin, Rickard; Roelof, Rdmond C.; Chase, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in the energy range 26- 52 keV are reported from four occasions during geomagnetically disturbed periods. The data were acquired by the ENA imager flown on the Swedish microsatellite Astrid in a 1000 km circular orbit with 83 deg inclination. The ENA imager separates charged particles from neutrals through an electrostatic deflection system in the energy range between 0.1 and 114 keV. ENA images obtained from vantage points in the polar cap and in the afternoon magnetic local time (MLT) hours looking into the antisunward hemisphere show intense ENA fluxes (approx. 10(exp 4)/sq cm sr s over 26-37 keV) coming from the dusk region and low altitudes (approx. 300 km). The morphology shows no relation to local magnetic field excluding the possibility of charged particle detection. It is concluded that the source of these ENAs are precipitating/mirroring ions from the ring current/trapped radiation interacting with the exobase on auroral L-shells and in the dusk region. The observed ENA fluxes show a relation with Kp and Dst geomagnetic indices. The observed ENA spectrum from a geomagnetic storm on February 8, 1995, is investigated in more detail and compared to the parent ion spectrum obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Project (DMSP) satellite, Fl2, during the same period on L = 6 +/- 2 around dusk. The observed ENA spectral slope is used to derive the parent ion spectral temperature. The derived ion temperatures range is 3.0 - 6.0 keV for H and 4.5 - 8.5 keV for O. The higher of these ion temperatures comes closest in agreement to the extrapolated DMSP spectrum leading us to favor O over H as the species of the detected ENAS. It is shown that the detected ENAs must have been produced at L greater than or equal to 6 to reach the detector without atmospheric attenuation and that the main energy dependence of the ENA spectrum, apart from the parent ion spectrum, is governed by the energy dependence of the charge exchange cross section between ions and exospheric oxygen.

  20. Paternity analysis reveals significant isolation and near neighbor pollen dispersal in small Cariniana legalis Mart. Kuntze populations in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Tambarussi, Evandro V; Boshier, David; Vencovsky, Roland; Freitas, Miguel L M; Sebbenn, Alexandre M

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the world, large trees are increasingly rare. Cariniana legalis is the tallest tree species of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, reaching up to 60 m in height. Due to extensive deforestation of the Atlantic Forest, remnant C. legalis populations are small and spatially isolated, requiring the development of strategies for their conservation. For in situ and ex situ genetic conservation to be effective, it is important to understand the levels and patterns of spatial genetic structure (SGS), and gene flow. We investigated SGS and pollen flow in three small, physically isolated C. legalis stands using microsatellite loci. We measured, mapped, and sampled all C. legalis trees in the three stands: 65 trees from Ibicatu population, 22 trees from MGI, and 4 trees from MGII. We also collected and genotyped 600 seeds from Ibicatu, 250 seeds from MGI, and 200 seeds from MGII. Significant SGS was detected in Ibicatu up to 150 m, but substantial levels of external pollen flow were also detected in Ibicatu (8%), although not in MGI (0.4%) or MGII (0%). Selfing was highest in MGII (18%), the smallest group of trees, compared to MGI (6.4%) and Ibicatu (6%). In MGI and MGII, there was a strong pattern of mating among near-neighbors. Seed collection strategies for breeding, in situ and ex situ conservation and ecological restoration, must ensure collection from seed trees located at distances greater than 350 m and from several forest fragments. PMID:27069608

  1. Contribution of Lidia cattle breed historical castes to the paternal genetic stock of Spain.

    PubMed

    Pelayo, R; Valera, M; Molina, A; Royo, L J

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this work was to determine whether the five founding castes defined in the Lidia cattle breed actually have an important contribution to the Spanish paternal genetic stock as well as to the paternal genetic origin support. A total of 1300 Bos taurus male individuals were genotyped for five microsatellites (INRA189, UMN0103, UMN0307, BM861 and BYM1) and one indel (ZFY10). Microsatellite and indel alleles were combined into haplotypes, identifying a total of 38 haplotypes, 11 of them belonging to haplogroup Y1 and 27 to haplogroup Y2. Ten different haplotypes were found in the Lidia cattle breed, with five being exclusive to this breed. Our results agree with different male genetic stocks in the Lidia breed: one hypothetically representing the ancient Iberian bovine genetic stock (Gallardo, Navarra and Cabrera castes and some encastes from Vistahermosa) and a second one that is the result of the more recent breeding strategy of choosing the most aggressive individuals from traditional herds (including some Vistahermosa encastes and the Vazqueña caste). In terms of conservation, it would be better to not consider this breed as a unit but to consider the caste, or even better the encaste, as the target of putative conservation efforts. PMID:25728408

  2. A Consensus Microsatellite-Based Linkage Map for the Hermaphroditic Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians) and Its Application in Size-Related QTL Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjun; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Guofan

    2012-01-01

    Bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) is one of the most economically important aquaculture species in China. In this study, we constructed a consensus microsatellite-based genetic linkage map with a mapping panel containing two hybrid backcross-like families involving two subspecies of bay scallop, A. i. irradians and A. i. concentricus. One hundred sixty-one microsatellite and one phenotypic (shell color) markers were mapped to 16 linkage groups (LGs), which corresponds to the haploid chromosome number of bay scallop. The sex-specific map was 779.2 cM and 781.6 cM long in female and male, respectively, whereas the sex-averaged map spanned 849.3 cM. The average resolution of integrated map was 5.9 cM/locus and the estimated coverage was 81.3%. The proportion of distorted markers occurred more in the hybrid parents, suggesting that the segregation distortion was possibly resulted from heterospecific interaction between genomes of two subspecies of bay scallop. The overall female-to-male recombination rate was 1.13∶1 across all linked markers in common to both parents, and considerable differences in recombination also existed among different parents in both families. Four size-related traits, including shell length (SL), shell height (SH), shell width (SW) and total weight (TW) were measured for quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Three significant and six suggestive QTL were detected on five LGs. Among the three significant QTL, two (qSW-10 and qTW-10, controlling SW and TW, respectively) were mapped on the same region near marker AiAD121 on LG10 and explained 20.5% and 27.7% of the phenotypic variance, while the third (qSH-7, controlling SH) was located on LG7 and accounted for 15.8% of the phenotypic variance. Six suggestive QTL were detected on four different LGs. The linkage map and size-related QTL obtained in this study may facilitate marker-assisted selection (MAS) in bay scallop. PMID:23077533

  3. Effect of Paternal Age on Reproductive Outcomes of In Vitro Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Haiyan; Liu, Haiying; Liu, Jianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Although the adverse effects of maternal aging on reproductive outcomes have been investigated widely, there is no consensus on the impact of paternal age. Therefore, we investigated the effect of paternal age on reproductive outcomes in a retrospective analysis of 9,991 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles performed at the Reproductive Medicine Center of the Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (China) between January 2007 and October 2013. Samples were grouped according to maternal age [<30 (3,327 cycles), 30–34 (4,587 cycles), and 35–38 (2,077 cycles)] and then subgrouped according to paternal age (<30, 30–32, 33–35, 36–38, 39–41, and ≥42). The groups did not differ in terms of fertilization rate, numbers of viable and high-quality embryos and miscarriage rate when controlling maternal age (P >0.05). Chi-squared analysis revealed that there were no differences in implantation and pregnancy rates among the different paternal age groups when maternal age was <30 and 35–38 years (P >0.05). However, implantation and pregnancy rates decreased with paternal age in the 31–34 y maternal age group (P <0.05). Our study indicates that paternal age has no impact on fertilization rate, embryo quality at the cleavage stage and miscarriage rate. For the 30–34 y maternal age group, the implantation rate decreased with increased paternal age, with the pregnancy rate in this group being significantly higher in the paternal <30 y and 30–32 y age groups, compared with those in the 36–38 y and 39–41 y groups. PMID:26352861

  4. 32 CFR 584.3 - Paternity claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... advise soldiers of their moral and legal obligations in the matter. Soldiers admitting paternity will be... questioning, advise the soldier of his right to remain silent under article, 31, UCMJ, and his right...

  5. Paternal age and mental health of offspring.

    PubMed

    Malaspina, Dolores; Gilman, Caitlin; Kranz, Thorsten Manfred

    2015-06-01

    The influence of paternal age on the risk for sporadic forms of Mendelian disorders is well known, but a burgeoning recent literature demonstrates, in addition, a paternal age effect for complex neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, and even for learning potential, expressed as intelligence. Mental illness is costly to patients, their family, and the public health system, accounting for the largest portion of disability costs in our economy. The delayed onset of neuropsychiatric conditions and lack of physical manifestations at birth are common frequencies in the population that have obscured the recognition that a portion of the risks for mental conditions is associated with paternal age. Identification of these risk pathways may be leveraged for knowledge about mental function and for future screening tests. However, only a small minority of at-risk offspring are likely to have such a psychiatric or learning disorder attributable to paternal age, including the children of older fathers. PMID:25956369

  6. Microsatellite DNA in peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) and its use in fingerprinting and testing the genetic origin of cultivars.

    PubMed

    Testolin, R; Marrazzo, T; Cipriani, G; Quarta, R; Verde, I; Dettori, M T; Pancaldi, M; Sansavini, S

    2000-06-01

    We isolated and sequenced 26 microsatellites from two genomic libraries of peach cultivar 'Redhaven', enriched for AC/GT and AG/CT repeats, respectively. For 17 of these microsatellites, it was possible to demonstrate Mendelian inheritance. Microsatellite polymorphism was assayed in 50 peach and nectarine cultivars. Of the 1300 PCRs carried out, all but two produced amplified products of the expected size. All microsatellites were polymorphic, showing 2-8 alleles per locus. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.04-0.74 (mean 0.47); the discrimination power (PD) ranged from 0.04-0.84 (mean 0.60). Cultivar heterozygosity varied greatly, with one cultivar ('Independence') being homozygous at all loci. The set of microsatellites discriminated all cultivars investigated, except several sport mutations, i.e., 'Dixitime' vs. 'Springcrest', 'Compact Redhaven' vs. 'Redhaven', and two pairs of cultivars, 'Venus' vs. 'Orion' and 'Elegant Lady' vs. 'Rome Star', whose pedigrees are controversial. We were able to analyze the paternity of several cultivars. In most cases, the parenthood was confirmed. The comparison of three long-living 'Redhaven' accessions supplied by different repositories did not provide any evidence of somatic instability of microsatellites. Hence, microsatellites, ranked according to their information content, are recommended as markers of choice for peach fingerprinting and suggestions are provided for interpreting band profiles and the correct sizing of alleles. PMID:10902716

  7. Student's Microsatellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelentsov, Victor; Kopik, Anatoliy; Karpenko, Stanislav; Mayorova, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays BMSTU Youth space center carries on development of the microsatellite project. The project is based on principles of students direct involvement on all stages of development and maintenance of the satellite. The group of students was organized within the university with purpose of coordination of work at the program. Project current condition The work on creation of an experimental model of the micro satellite is performed. The aim is to define the structure and parameters of on-board devices (mass-overall dimensions characteristics, energy consumption and so on). developed. According to the simplified model an active stabilization system (three orthogonal electro-magnetic coils) and orientation characterization system (sunlight detector and magnitometer) are included in OCS structure. most suitable battery storage, power-supply controlling system. Student micro-satellite program goals 1.Scientific Information gaining in the field of Earth study- using perspective research methods. Studying of new devices behavior in space conditions. 2. Educative a. Students derive real experience of projecting, building of a spacecraft from the point of view of an experimenter, a constructor and a researcher. b. Organization of student's cooperation with key men of aerospace industry and other branches. c. Brainpower and material base preparation for micro-satellite systems' development. d. Attraction of youth interest to the topic, by: - Students' and pupils' groups attraction and involvement in experiments conduction and results processing. - Seminars and lections devoted to Earth study from the space organization - Specific scientific data distribution over World Wide Web. 3. International With purpose of program expansion, the developers' group looks to start of an international project. Within the project new experiments conduction and scientific information exchange are expected. 4. Status Bauman Moscow State Technical University's status improvement in the field of satellite system development.

  8. Paternity testing using the poisonous sting in captive white-spotted eagle rays Aetobatus narinari: a non-invasive tool for captive sustainability programmes.

    PubMed

    Janse, M; Kappe, A L; Van Kuijk, B L M

    2013-03-01

    A group of captive white-spotted eagle rays Aetobatus narinari produced 20 offspring, with an unknown father. Part of the poisonous sting was removed from each fish and DNA was extracted from the epidermis for paternity research using eight microsatellite markers of which four were from another species Aetobatus flagellum. This non-invasive sampling technique can be applied on all members of Myliobatiformes. PMID:23464564

  9. Combined Microsatellite Instability, MLH1 Methylation Analysis, and Immunohistochemistry for Lynch Syndrome Screening in Endometrial Cancers From GOG210: An NRG Oncology and Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Paul J.; Billingsley, Caroline C.; Lankes, Heather A.; Ali, Shamshad; Cohn, David E.; Broaddus, Russell J.; Ramirez, Nilsa; Pritchard, Colin C.; Hampel, Heather; Chassen, Alexis S.; Simmons, Luke V.; Schmidt, Amy P.; Gao, Feng; Brinton, Louise A.; Backes, Floor; Landrum, Lisa M.; Geller, Melissa A.; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; Pearl, Michael L.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Powell, Matthew A.; Zaino, Richard J.; Mutch, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The best screening practice for Lynch syndrome (LS) in endometrial cancer (EC) remains unknown. We sought to determine whether tumor microsatellite instability (MSI) typing along with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and MLH1 methylation analysis can help identify women with LS. Patients and Methods ECs from GOG210 patients were assessed for MSI, MLH1 methylation, and mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression. Each tumor was classified as having normal MMR, defective MMR associated with MLH1 methylation, or probable MMR mutation (ie, defective MMR but no methylation). Cancer family history and demographic and clinical features were compared for the three groups. Lynch mutation testing was performed for a subset of women. Results Analysis of 1,002 ECs suggested possible MMR mutation in 11.8% of tumors. The number of patients with a family history suggestive of LS was highest among women whose tumors were classified as probable MMR mutation (P = .001). Lynch mutations were identified in 41% of patient cases classified as probable mutation (21 of 51 tested). One of the MSH6 Lynch mutations was identified in a patient whose tumor had intact MSH6 expression. Age at diagnosis was younger for mutation carriers than noncarriers (54.3 v 62.3 years; P < .01), with five carriers diagnosed at age > 60 years. Conclusion Combined MSI, methylation, and IHC analysis may prove useful in Lynch screening in EC. Twenty-four percent of mutation carriers presented with ECs at age > 60 years, and one carrier had an MSI-positive tumor with no IHC defect. Restricting Lynch testing to women diagnosed at age < 60 years or to women with IHC defects could result in missing a substantial fraction of genetic disease. PMID:26552419

  10. Epistemic paternalism in public health.

    PubMed

    Grill, K; Hansson, S O

    2005-11-01

    Receiving information about threats to one's health can contribute to anxiety and depression. In contemporary medical ethics there is considerable consensus that patient autonomy, or the patient's right to know, in most cases outweighs these negative effects of information. Worry about the detrimental effects of information has, however, been voiced in relation to public health more generally. In particular, information about uncertain threats to public health, from-for example, chemicals-are said to entail social costs that have not been given due consideration. This criticism implies a consequentialist argument for withholding such information from the public in their own best interest. In evaluating the argument for this kind of epistemic paternalism, the consequences of making information available must be compared to the consequences of withholding it. Consequences that should be considered include epistemic effects, psychological effects, effects on private decisions, and effects on political decisions. After giving due consideration to the possible uses of uncertain information and rebutting the claims that uncertainties imply small risks and that they are especially prone to entail misunderstandings and anxiety, it is concluded that there is a strong case against withholding of information about uncertain threats to public health. PMID:16269563

  11. Paternity and inheritance of wealth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, John

    1981-06-01

    One of the oldest conjectures in anthropology is that men transfer wealth to their sister's son when the biological paternity of their `own' children is in doubt1-12. Because maternity is certain, a man is necessarily related to his sister's son and his brother (see Fig. 1). It is argued here that relatedness to male heirs can be assured by passing wealth to sister's sons or down a line of brothers, whether the prevailing kinship system reckons those brothers matrilineally or patrilineally. It is also argued that when several transfers of wealth are considered, a man's likelihood of being cuckolded need not be unrealistically high13 for his successive matrilineal heirs to be more related to him than his successive patrilineal heirs (see Fig. 2). Cross-cultural data on sister's son/brother inheritance14 and frequency of extramarital sex for females15 support the hypothesis that men tend to transmit wealth to their sister's son and/or brother when the probability that their putative children are their genetic children is relatively low.

  12. High paternal diversity in the self-incompatible herb Arabidopsis halleri despite clonal reproduction and spatially restricted pollen dispersal.

    PubMed

    Llaurens, V; Castric, V; Austerlitz, F; Vekemans, X

    2008-03-01

    The number of sires fertilizing a given dam is a key parameter of the mating system in species with spatially restricted offspring dispersal, since genetic relatedness among maternal sibs determines the intensity of sib competition. In flowering plants, the extent of multiple paternity is determined by factors such as floral biology, properties of the pollen vector, selfing rate, spatial organization of the population, and genetic compatibility between neighbours. To assess the extent of multiple paternity and identify ecological factors involved, we performed a detailed study of mating patterns in a small population of a self-incompatible clonal herb, Arabidopsis halleri. We mapped and genotyped 364 individuals and 256 of their offspring at 12 microsatellite loci and jointly analysed the level of multiple paternity, pollen and seed dispersal, and spatial genetic structure. We found very low levels of correlated paternity among sibs (P(full-sib) = 3.8%) indicating high multiple paternity. Our estimate of the outcrossing rate was 98.7%, suggesting functional self-incompatibility. The pollen dispersal distribution was significantly restricted (mean effective pollen dispersal distance: 4.42 m) but long-distance successful pollination occurred and immigrating pollen was at most 10% of all pollination events. Patterns of genetic structure indicated little extent of clonal reproduction, and a low but significant spatial genetic structure typical for a self-incompatible species. Overall, in spite of restricted pollen dispersal, the multiple paternity in this self-incompatible species was very high, a result that we interpret as a consequence of high plant density and high pollinator service in this population. PMID:18266621

  13. Paternal Psychiatric Symptoms and Maladaptive Paternal Behavior in the Home during the Child Rearing Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Patricia; Kasen, Stephanie; Brook, Judith S.

    2004-01-01

    Data from the Children in the Community Study, a community-based longitudinal study were used to investigate associations between paternal psychiatric disorders and child-rearing behaviors. Paternal psychiatric symptoms and behavior in the home were assessed among 782 families during the childhood and adolescence of the offspring. Paternal…

  14. The unexpected but understandable dynamics of mating, paternity and paternal care in the ocellated wrasse

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Suzanne H.; Heckman, Kellie L.

    2010-01-01

    Although theory generally predicts that males should reduce paternal care in response to cues that predict increased sperm competition and decreased paternity, empirical patterns are equivocal. Some studies have found the predicted decrease in male care with increased sperm competition, while even more studies report no effect of paternity or sperm competition on male care. Here, we report the first example, to our knowledge, of paternal care increasing with the risk and intensity of sperm competition, in the ocellated wrasse (Symphodus ocellatus). Theory also predicts that if paternal care varies and is important to female fitness, female choice among males and male indicators traits of expected paternal care should evolve. Despite a non-random distribution of mating success among nests, we found no evidence for female choice among parental males. Finally, we document the highest published levels of extra-pair paternity for a species with exclusive and obligate male care: genetic paternity analyses revealed cuckoldry at 100 per cent of nests and 28 per cent of all offspring were not sired by the male caring for them. While not predicted by any existing theory, these unexpected reproductive patterns become understandable if we consider how male and female mating and parental care interact simultaneously in this and probably many other species. PMID:19812085

  15. Microsatellite analysis supports clonal propagation and reduced divergence of Trypanosoma vivax from asymptomatic to fatally infected livestock in South America compared to West Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical transmission of the major livestock pathogen Trypanosoma vivax by other biting flies than tsetse allows its spread from Africa to the New World. Genetic studies are restricted to a small number of isolates and based on molecular markers that evolve too slowly to resolve the relationships between American and West African populations and, thus, unable us to uncover the recent history of T. vivax in the New World. Methods T. vivax genetic diversity, population structure and the source of outbreaks was investigated through the microsatellite multiloci (7 loci) genotype (MLGs) analysis in South America (47isolates from Brazil, Venezuela and French Guiana) and West Africa (12 isolates from The Gambia, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin and Nigeria). Relationships among MLGs were explored using phylogenetic, principal component and STRUCTURE analyses. Results Although closely phylogenetically related, for the first time, genetic differences were detected between T. vivax isolates from South America (11 genotypes/47 isolates) and West Africa (12 genotypes/12 isolates) with no MLGs in common. Diversity was far greater across West Africa than in South America, where genotypes from Brazil (MLG1-6), Venezuela (MLG7-10) and French Guiana (MLG11) shared similar but not identical allele composition. No MLG was exclusive to asymptomatic (endemic areas) or sick (outbreaks in non-endemic areas) animals, but only MLGs1, 2 and 3 were responsible for severe haematological and neurological disorders. Conclusions Our results revealed closely related genotypes of T. vivax in Brazil and Venezuela, regardless of endemicity and clinical conditions of the infected livestock. The MLGs analysis from T. vivax across SA and WA support clonal propagation, and is consistent with the hypothesis that the SA populations examined here derived from common ancestors recently introduced from West Africa. The molecular markers defined here are valuable to assess the genetic diversity, to track the source and dispersion of outbreaks, and to explore the epidemiological and pathological significance of T. vivax genotypes. PMID:24885708

  16. Reconstructing paternal genotypes to infer patterns of sperm storage and sexual selection in the hawksbill turtle.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Karl P; Jorgensen, Tove H; Jolliffe, Kevin G; Jolliffe, San-Marie; Henwood, Jock; Richardson, David S

    2013-04-01

    Postcopulatory sperm storage can serve a range of functions, including ensuring fertility, allowing delayed fertilization and facilitating sexual selection. Sperm storage is likely to be particularly important in wide-ranging animals with low population densities, but its prevalence and importance in such taxa, and its role in promoting sexual selection, are poorly known. Here, we use a powerful microsatellite array and paternal genotype reconstruction to assess the prevalence of sperm storage and test sexual selection hypotheses of genetic biases to paternity in one such species, the critically endangered hawksbill turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata. In the majority of females (90.7%, N = 43), all offspring were sired by a single male. In the few cases of multiple paternity (9.3%), two males fertilized each female. Importantly, the identity and proportional fertilization success of males were consistent across all sequential nests laid by individual females over the breeding season (up to five nests over 75 days). No males were identified as having fertilized more than one female, suggesting that a large number of males are available to females. No evidence for biases to paternity based on heterozygosity or relatedness was found. These results indicate that female hawksbill turtles are predominantly monogamous within a season, store sperm for the duration of the nesting season and do not re-mate between nests. Furthermore, females do not appear to be using sperm storage to facilitate sexual selection. Consequently, the primary value of storing sperm in marine turtles may be to uncouple mating and fertilization in time and avoid costly re-mating. PMID:23379838

  17. Low paternity skew and the influence of maternal kin in an egalitarian, patrilocal primate

    PubMed Central

    Strier, Karen B.; Chaves, Paulo B.; Mendes, Sérgio L.; Fagundes, Valéria; Di Fiore, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Levels of reproductive skew vary in wild primates living in multimale groups depending on the degree to which high-ranking males monopolize access to females. Still, the factors affecting paternity in egalitarian societies remain unexplored. We combine unique behavioral, life history, and genetic data to evaluate the distribution of paternity in the northern muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus), a species known for its affiliative, nonhierarchical relationships. We genotyped 67 individuals (22 infants born over a 3-y period, their 21 mothers, and all 24 possible sires) at 17 microsatellite marker loci and assigned paternity to all infants. None of the 13 fathers were close maternal relatives of females with which they sired infants, and the most successful male sired a much lower percentage of infants (18%) than reported for the most successful males in other species. Our findings of inbreeding avoidance and low male reproductive skew are consistent with the muriqui's observed social and sexual behavior, but the long delay (≥2.08 y) between the onset of male sexual behavior and the age at which males first sire young is unexpected. The allocation of paternity implicates individual male life histories and access to maternal kin as key factors influencing variation in paternal—and grandmaternal—fitness. The apparent importance of lifelong maternal investment in coresident sons resonates with other recent examinations of maternal influences on offspring reproduction. This importance also extends the implications of the “grandmother hypothesis” in human evolution to include the possible influence of mothers and other maternal kin on male reproductive success in patrilocal societies. PMID:22065786

  18. Deciphering diversity in populations of various linguistic and ethnic affiliations of different geographical regions of India: analysis based on 15 microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, V K; Ashma, Richa; Gaikwad, Sonali; Sarkar, B N; Trivedi, R

    2004-04-01

    The extent of genetic polymorphism at fifteen autosomal microsatellite markers in 54 ethnically, linguistically and geographically diverse human populations of India was studied to decipher intrapopulation diversity. The parameters used to quantify intrapopulation diversity were average allele diversity, average heterozygosity, allele range (base pairs), and number of alleles. Multilocus genotype frequencies calculated for selected populations were utilized for testing conformity with the assumption of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The exact test values, after Bonferroni correction, showed significant deviation amongst Gowda (vWA, Penta E); Dhangar, Satnami and Gounder (D8S1179); Hmar (FGA); Kuki and Balti (vWA) groups. Relatively low number of alleles and allelic diversity (base-pairs size) had been observed in populations of central India as compared with southern and northern regions of the country. The communities of Indo-Caucasoid ethnic origin and Indo-European linguistic family (Kshatriya of Uttar Pradesh) showed highest allelic diversity, as well as rare alleles, not reported in any other Indian populations. Analysis based on average heterozygosity was also found to be lowest among the populations of central India (0.729) and highest among the populations from north (0.777) and west (0.784) regions of the country, having Indo-Caucasoid ethnic origin and Austro-Asiatic linguistic affiliation. The maximum power of discrimination (85%-89%) had been observed at loci FGA, Penta E, D18S51 and D21S11, suggested high intrapopulation diversity in India. Genetic diversity revealed by STR markers was consistent with the known demographic histories of populations. Thus, the present study clearly demonstrated that the intrapopulation diversity is not only present at the national level, but also within smaller geographical regions of the country. This is the first attempt to understand the extent of diversity within populations of India at such a large scale at genomic level. PMID:15240909

  19. Neonatal neosporosis in a 2-week-old Bernese mountain dog infected with multiple Neospora caninum strains based on MS10 microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Prandini da Costa Reis, Rodrigo; Crisman, Robin; Roser, Margie; Malik, Richard; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-05-15

    Neonatal neosporosis is a challenging disease to diagnose in neonatal and young puppies because the first signs of this condition may not be strongly suggestive of an infectious aetiology. Within two weeks of birth, three of four pups died with a subacute clinical course, some with dyspnea, some with diarrhoea and some with neurologic signs. Neosporosis was diagnosed post-mortem, but only after microscopic examination of tissues collected at necropsy. Histological findings consisted of (i) necrotizing, diffuse interstitial pneumonia associated with intralesional protozoa and (ii) necrotizing multifocal myocarditis with mineralization and intralesional protozoa. No significant alterations were found in the cerebrum or cerebellum (spinal cord was not examined). Immunohistochemistry confirmed protozoal stages and cysts were Neospora caninum. Immunohistochemistry for Toxoplasma gondii was negative. Lung and heart were the most severely affected tissues with large numbers of free zoites, BAG5 positive bradyzoites and tissue cysts of N. caninum further confirmed by N. caninum-specific quantitative real-time PCR. One affected pup which displayed knuckling, ataxia and diarrhoea were treated with trimethoprim sulfadiazine and clindamycin, and made a complete recovery. This surviving pup (at 8 weeks-of-age) and dam were both positive for N. caninum antibody (reciprocal titres 4096 and 256, respectively). Three other intact bitches on the same property were seropositive for N. caninum, suggesting horizontal transmission and a common source of infection, possibly due to consumption of infected meat. Analysis using microsatellite-10 (MS10) demonstrated that multiple strains of N. caninum were present. It was likely that all MS10 N. caninum strains were transplacentally transmitted from dam to pups. This is the first time that multiple N. caninum strains have been demonstrated to be vertically transmitted in dogs. N. caninum should be considered in the differential diagnosis for acute to subacute death in neonatal pups even when neurological signs suggestive of neosporosis are absent. PMID:27084485

  20. A microsatellite-based genome-wide analysis of genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars from major cotton-growing countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the genetic diversity of the cultivated Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and its structure at the molecular level, 193 Upland cotton cultivars collected from 26 countries were genotyped using 448 microsatellite markers. These markers were selected based on their mapping po...

  1. Microsatellite Instability Assay — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Microsatellite analysis (MSA) is a promising new technique for the surveillance of bladder cancer. The technology, which permits the separation by electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified sequences from non-malignant and malignant sources, has been applied to the diagnosis of solid tumors arising in colon, lung, oropharynx, kidney and bladder. MSA can detect genetic changes indicative of carcinoma from urothelial cells obtained in voided urine specimens. The genetic profile of DNA purified from urine is compared to that of DNA purified from peripheral lymphocytes that are considered normal. Once the DNA from uroepithelial cells has been obtained, PCR is performed with specific oligonucleotide primers for each chromosomal locus. The PCR products are then examined for evidence of microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), which are genetic characteristics of epithelial tumors. Preliminary work shows that MSA detects 95% of cancers.

  2. Development of polymorphic microsatellite markers in Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say).

    PubMed

    Schemerhorn, Brandon J; Crane, Yan M; Morton, Philip K

    2008-11-01

    A microsatellite library was prepared from size-selected genomic DNA of Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor). Approximately 81% of recovered clones hybridized with microsatellite motif-specific probes. Subsequently, 2350 clones were sequenced. Sixty-two individual flies from laboratory strains were used to test for reliability and polymorphism in 50 of the microsatellites by gel electrophoresis; 18 were further tested with capillary electrophoresis. Of these, 17 behaved as a polymorphic single locus appropriate for population analysis. PMID:21586046

  3. W-SPECIFIC MICROSATELLITE LOCI DETECTED BY IN SILICO ANALYSIS, MAP TO CHROMOSOME Z OF THE CHICKEN GENOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike mammals, avian females are the heterogametic gender (ZW) and males are the homogametic (ZZ). The non-recombining, female-specific regions are maternally inherited. As such, they have a special value for matrilineal phylogenetic analysis of chicken populations and possibly for avian species in...

  4. PCR and microsatellite analysis of diminazene aceturate resistance of bovine trypanosomes correlated to knowledge, attitude and practice of livestock keepers in South-Western Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Moti, Y; De Deken, R; Thys, E; Van Den Abbeele, J; Duchateau, L; Delespaux, V

    2015-06-01

    African Animal Trypanosomosis is threatening the agricultural production and cattle breeding more severely than any other livestock disease in the continent, even more since the advent of drug resistance. A longitudinal study was conducted from November 2012 to May 2013 in the Ghibe valley to evaluate diminazene aceturate (DA) resistance and assess livestock owner's perception of trypanocidal drug use. Four Peasant Associations (PAs) were purposively selected and the cattle randomly sampled in each PAs. At the beginning of the study (t0), 106 bovines positive for trypanosomes by the haematocrit centrifugation technique (HCT) and 119 negative control animals were recruited for six months follow-up using HCT, 18S-PCR-RFLP, DpnII-PCR-RFLP and microsatellite analysis. Prevalence of trypanosomosis was 18.1% based on the HCT technique and the mean PCV value was 23.6±5.1% for the 587 sampled cattle. Out of the 106 HCT positive, 64 (60.4%) were positive for the presence of trypanosomes using the 18S-PCR-RFLP. Species detection showed 38 (59.4%) Trypanosoma congolense savannah, 18 (28.1%) Trypanosoma vivax, 5 (7.8%) Trypanosoma theileri and 3 (4.7%) T. congolense Kilifi. Among the T. congolense savannah samples, 31 (81.6%) showed a DA resistant RFLP profile, 2 (5.3%) a mixed profile and 5 did not amplify using the DpnII-PCR-RFLP. A positive HCT had a significant effect on PCV (p<0.001) with the mean PCV value equal to 24.4±0.2% in the absence of trypanosomes and to 20.9±0.3% in the presence of trypanosomes. PCV increased significantly (p<0.001) with 4.4±0.5% one month after treatment. All T. congolense savannah type were analyzed using microsatellite markers TCM1, TCM3 and TCM4. The main events were new infections (40.0%) and relapses (37.5%) with cures lagging at 22.5%. In 10 purposively selected PAs a semi-structured questionnaire was used. The average herd size was the highest in Abelti PA (6.7±1.8 TLU) and the mean herd size was statistically different (p=0.01) in the 10 PAs. Trypanosomosis was designated as the main disease affecting cattle by 97% of the respondents. DA was used by 95.5% of the farmers though more than half of them (51.9%) were not familiar with isometamidium (ISM). There was a trend to overdose young small animals and to underdose large ones. Oxen were treated very frequently (nearly 20 times/year) and calves almost never. To improve the situation in the Ghibe valley, extension messages should be delivered to promote a rational drug use, improved livestock management and the application of strategic vector control methods. PMID:25738729

  5. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... agency or applying for services under § 302.33 of this chapter in which paternity has not been... paternity in any case involving incest or forcible rape, or in any case in which legal proceedings...

  6. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... agency or applying for services under § 302.33 of this chapter in which paternity has not been... paternity in any case involving incest or forcible rape, or in any case in which legal proceedings...

  7. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... agency or applying for services under § 302.33 of this chapter in which paternity has not been... paternity in any case involving incest or forcible rape, or in any case in which legal proceedings...

  8. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... agency or applying for services under § 302.33 of this chapter in which paternity has not been... paternity in any case involving incest or forcible rape, or in any case in which legal proceedings...

  9. 45 CFR 303.5 - Establishment of paternity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... agency or applying for services under § 302.33 of this chapter in which paternity has not been... paternity in any case involving incest or forcible rape, or in any case in which legal proceedings...

  10. Identification of the skeletal remains of Josef Mengele by DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeffreys, A J; Allen, M J; Hagelberg, E; Sonnberg, A

    1992-09-01

    There has been considerable controversy over the identity of the skeletal remains exhumed in Brazil in 1985 and believed to be those of Dr Josef Mengele, the Auschwitz 'Angel of Death'. Bone DNA analysis was therefore conducted in an attempt to provide independent evidence of identity. Trace amounts of highly degraded human DNA were successfully extracted from the shaft of the femur. Despite the presence of a potent inhibitor of DNA amplification, microsatellite alleles could be reproducibly amplified from the femur DNA. Comparison of the femur DNA with DNA from Josef Mengele's son and wife revealed a bone genotype across 10 different loci fully compatible with paternity of Mengele's son. Less than 1 in 1800 Caucasian individuals unrelated to Mengele's son would by chance show full paternal inclusion. DNA analysis therefore provides very strong independent evidence that the remains exhumed from Brazil are indeed those of Josef Mengele. PMID:1398379

  11. Nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite analysis of Abies sachalinensis regeneration on fallen logs in a subboreal forest in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Lian, Chunlan; Goto, Susumu; Kubo, Takuya; Takahashi, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Masahiko; Hogetsu, Taizo

    2008-06-01

    Fallen logs are the main regeneration sites for Abies sachalinensis (Sachalin fir) in subboreal forests in Japan. We surveyed the spatial genetic structure of different demographic stages in a 4.29-ha natural population of A. sachalinensis. Genetic structure was significant at short distances throughout all stages in this wind-dispersed conifer. To evaluate the effects of fallen-log-dependent recruitment on demography and spatial genetic structure, we conducted parentage analysis of offspring with highly polymorphic nuclear simple sequence repeat and chloroplast simple sequence repeat markers, and developed a new hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate the effects of mother trees and fallen logs on seed dispersal and offspring recruitment. Combined application of nuclear and chloroplast simple sequence repeat markers allowed us to unambiguously identify mother trees of most offspring (> 90%). Female reproductive success was extremely skewed; a few adults produced most of the offspring on fallen logs. Limited distance of effective dispersal and recruitment was seen in the parentage analysis and modelling estimation. These recruitment characters of A. sachalinensis, with a fallen-log-dependent recruitment process, may result in significant genetic structure in early demographic stages. PMID:18489547

  12. Relationships of maternal and paternal anthropometry with neonatal body size, proportions and adiposity in an Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Emma; Wells, Jonathan C K; Cole, Tim J; O'Callaghan, Michael; Stock, Jay T

    2015-04-01

    The patterns of association between maternal or paternal and neonatal phenotype may offer insight into how neonatal characteristics are shaped by evolutionary processes, such as conflicting parental interests in fetal investment and obstetric constraints. Paternal interests are theoretically served by maximizing fetal growth, and maternal interests by managing investment in current and future offspring, but whether paternal and maternal influences act on different components of overall size is unknown. We tested whether parents' prepregnancy height and body mass index (BMI) were related to neonatal anthropometry (birthweight, head circumference, absolute and proportional limb segment and trunk lengths, subcutaneous fat) among 1,041 Australian neonates using stepwise linear regression. Maternal and paternal height and maternal BMI were associated with birthweight. Paternal height related to offspring forearm and lower leg lengths, maternal height and BMI to neonatal head circumference, and maternal BMI to offspring adiposity. Principal components analysis identified three components of variability reflecting neonatal "head and trunk skeletal size," "adiposity," and "limb lengths." Regression analyses of the component scores supported the associations of head and trunk size or adiposity with maternal anthropometry, and limb lengths with paternal anthropometry. Our results suggest that while neonatal fatness reflects environmental conditions (maternal physiology), head circumference and limb and trunk lengths show differing associations with parental anthropometry. These patterns may reflect genetics, parental imprinting and environmental influences in a manner consistent with parental conflicts of interest. Paternal height may relate to neonatal limb length as a means of increasing fetal growth without exacerbating the risk of obstetric complications. PMID:25502164

  13. Relationship of Paternity Status, Welfare Reform Period, and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Infant Mortality.

    PubMed

    Ngui, Emmanuel M; Cortright, Alicia L; Michalski, Karen

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of paternity status, welfare reform period, and racial/ethnic disparities in infant mortality. The study used retrospective analysis of birth outcomes data from singleton birth/infant death data in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from 1993 to 2009. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between paternity status, welfare reform period, and infant mortality, adjusting for maternal and infant characteristics. Data consisted of almost 185,000 singleton live births and 1,739 infant deaths. Although unmarried women with no father on record made up about 32% of the live births, they accounted for over two thirds of the infant deaths compared with married women with established paternity who made up 39% of live births but had about a quarter of infant deaths. After adjustments, any form of paternity establishment was protective against infant mortality across all racial/ethnic groups. Unmarried women with no father on record had twice to triple the odds of infant mortality among all racial/ethnic groups. The likelihood of infant mortality was only significantly greater for African American women in the postwelfare (1999-2004; odds ratio = 1.27; 95% confidence interval = 1.10-1.46) period compared with the 1993 to 1998 period. Study findings suggest that any form of paternity establishment may have protective effect against infant mortality. Welfare reform changes may have reduced some of the protection against infant mortality among unmarried African American women that was present before the welfare legislation. Policies and programs that promote or support increased paternal involvement and establishment of paternity may improve birth outcomes and help reduce infant mortality. PMID:25061086

  14. Genomic characterization of EmsB microsatellite loci in Echinococcus multilocularis.

    PubMed

    Valot, Benoît; Knapp, Jenny; Umhang, Gérald; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Millon, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    EmsB is a molecular marker applied to Echinococcus multilocularis genotyping studies. This marker has largely been used to investigate the epidemiology of the parasite in different endemic foci. The present study has lifted the veil on the genetic structure of this microsatellite. By in silico analysis on the E. multilocularis genome the microsatellite was described in about 40 copies on the chromosome 5 of the parasite. Similar structure was found in the relative parasite Echinococcus granulosus, where the microsatellite was firstly described. The present study completes the first investigations made on the EmsB microsatellite origins and confirms the reliability of this highly discriminant molecular marker. PMID:25847697

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of the Trachinotus ovatus: Identification of Reproduction, Growth and Immune-Related Genes and Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Fang; Qiongyu, Liu; Zihao, Li; Xiaochun, Liu; Yong, Zhang; Shuisheng, Li; Haoran, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background The Trachinotus ovatus (Teleostei, Carangidae) is an economically important marine fish species in the world. However, the lack of genomic information regarding this species limits our understanding of the genetics and biological mechanisms in Trachinotus ovatus. In this study, high throughput transcriptome sequencing was used to obtain comprehensive genomic information in Trachinotus ovatus. Principal Findings Transcriptome sequencing was performed by using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. The 98,534,862 high quality reads were yielded, and were de novo assembled into 156,094 unigenes with an average sequence length of 1179 bp. Transcriptome annotation revealed that 75,586 and 67,923 unigenes were functionally annotated in the NCBI non-redundant database and Swiss-Prot protein database, respectively. Functional analysis demonstrated that 67,923 unigenes were grouped into 25 Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional categories, 37,976 unigenes were clustered into 61 Gene Ontology (GO) terms, and 38,172 unigenes were assigned to 275 different Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Based on the transcriptome dataset, a large number of unigenes associated with reproduction, growth and immunity were identified. Furthermore, a total number of 38,794 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were discovered and 16 polymorphic loci were characterized in Trachinotus ovatus. Conclusion/Significance The present study is the first transcriptome analysis of a fish species belonging to the genus Trachinotus and provides a valuable genomic resource for novel gene discovery, gene expression and regulation studies, and the identification of genetic markers in Trachinotus ovatus and the other fish of the genus Trachinotus. PMID:25303650

  16. First Microsatellite Markers Developed from Cupuassu ESTs: Application in Diversity Analysis and Cross-Species Transferability to Cacao.

    PubMed

    Ferraz Dos Santos, Lucas; Moreira Fregapani, Roberta; Falcão, Loeni Ludke; Togawa, Roberto Coiti; Costa, Marcos Mota do Carmo; Lopes, Uilson Vanderlei; Peres Gramacho, Karina; Alves, Rafael Moyses; Micheli, Fabienne; Marcellino, Lucilia Helena

    2016-01-01

    The cupuassu tree (Theobroma grandiflorum) (Willd. ex Spreng.) Schum. is a fruitful species from the Amazon with great economical potential, due to the multiple uses of its fruit´s pulp and seeds in the food and cosmetic industries, including the production of cupulate, an alternative to chocolate. In order to support the cupuassu breeding program and to select plants presenting both pulp/seed quality and fungal disease resistance, SSRs from Next Generation Sequencing ESTs were obtained and used in diversity analysis. From 8,330 ESTs, 1,517 contained one or more SSRs (1,899 SSRs identified). The most abundant motifs identified in the EST-SSRs were hepta- and trinucleotides, and they were found with a minimum and maximum of 2 and 19 repeats, respectively. From the 1,517 ESTs containing SSRs, 70 ESTs were selected based on their functional annotation, focusing on pulp and seed quality, as well as resistance to pathogens. The 70 ESTs selected contained 77 SSRs, and among which, 11 were polymorphic in cupuassu genotypes. These EST-SSRs were able to discriminate the cupuassu genotype in relation to resistance/susceptibility to witches' broom disease, as well as to pulp quality (SST/ATT values). Finally, we showed that these markers were transferable to cacao genotypes, and that genome availability might be used as a predictive tool for polymorphism detection and primer design useful for both Theobroma species. To our knowledge, this is the first report involving EST-SSRs from cupuassu and is also a pioneer in the analysis of marker transferability from cupuassu to cacao. Moreover, these markers might contribute to develop or saturate the cupuassu and cacao genetic maps, respectively. PMID:26949967

  17. First Microsatellite Markers Developed from Cupuassu ESTs: Application in Diversity Analysis and Cross-Species Transferability to Cacao

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz dos Santos, Lucas; Moreira Fregapani, Roberta; Falcão, Loeni Ludke; Togawa, Roberto Coiti; Costa, Marcos Mota do Carmo; Lopes, Uilson Vanderlei; Peres Gramacho, Karina; Alves, Rafael Moyses

    2016-01-01

    The cupuassu tree (Theobroma grandiflorum) (Willd. ex Spreng.) Schum. is a fruitful species from the Amazon with great economical potential, due to the multiple uses of its fruit´s pulp and seeds in the food and cosmetic industries, including the production of cupulate, an alternative to chocolate. In order to support the cupuassu breeding program and to select plants presenting both pulp/seed quality and fungal disease resistance, SSRs from Next Generation Sequencing ESTs were obtained and used in diversity analysis. From 8,330 ESTs, 1,517 contained one or more SSRs (1,899 SSRs identified). The most abundant motifs identified in the EST-SSRs were hepta- and trinucleotides, and they were found with a minimum and maximum of 2 and 19 repeats, respectively. From the 1,517 ESTs containing SSRs, 70 ESTs were selected based on their functional annotation, focusing on pulp and seed quality, as well as resistance to pathogens. The 70 ESTs selected contained 77 SSRs, and among which, 11 were polymorphic in cupuassu genotypes. These EST-SSRs were able to discriminate the cupuassu genotype in relation to resistance/susceptibility to witches’ broom disease, as well as to pulp quality (SST/ATT values). Finally, we showed that these markers were transferable to cacao genotypes, and that genome availability might be used as a predictive tool for polymorphism detection and primer design useful for both Theobroma species. To our knowledge, this is the first report involving EST-SSRs from cupuassu and is also a pioneer in the analysis of marker transferability from cupuassu to cacao. Moreover, these markers might contribute to develop or saturate the cupuassu and cacao genetic maps, respectively. PMID:26949967

  18. Microsatellite DNA instability and COPD exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Makris, D; Tzanakis, N; Damianaki, A; Ntaoukakis, E; Neofytou, E; Zervou, M; Siafakas, N M; Tzortzaki, E G

    2008-09-01

    Increased frequency of microsatellite DNA instability (MSI) has been detected in the sputum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between MSI in sputum cells and exacerbation frequency, which is an important parameter in the clinical course of the disease. Induced sputum samples and peripheral blood obtained from 36 patients with COPD at stable state were analysed. The control group consisted of 30 nonsmoking healthy subjects. DNA was extracted and analysed for MSI using the following microsatellite markers: RH70958, D5S207, D6S2223, D6S344, D6S263, G29802, D13S71, D14S588, D14S292 and D17S250. Following MSI analysis, exacerbations were recorded for 3 yrs in total. No MSI was detected in healthy nonsmokers. A total of 18 (50%) out of 36 patients exhibited MSI in their sputum cells. Patients who exhibited MSI showed significantly increased frequency of exacerbations compared with patients that did not. In addition, a significantly increased frequency of purulent and of severe type exacerbations was found in patients exhibiting MSI. Patients positive for marker G29802, D13S71 or D14S588 presented increased exacerbation frequency. The significant association between microsatellite DNA instability and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations indicates that somatic mutations could be involved in the pathogenesis and natural history of the disease. PMID:18508815

  19. XSS-10 microsatellite flight demonstration program results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Thomas M.; Melanson, David

    2004-08-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory"s space experiment XSS-10 was flown on the Air Force Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) mission IIR-8 launched on January 29, 2003. The mission objectives of XSS-10 were to demonstrate autonomous navigation, proximity operations, and inspection of a Resident Space Object (RSO). XSS-10 was a 28-kilogram micro-satellite was launched as a secondary mission on a Delta II expendable launch vehicle carrying a GPS satellite. XSS-10 was equipped with a visible camera, a star sensor, and mini SGLS system, all specially built for this program. In addition, a visible camera was attached to the second stage to observe the release of the micro-satellite and observe its maneuvers. Following the release of the GPS satellite, the Delta II initiated three depletion burns to reorient into an 800 KM circular orbit. The XSS-II was ejected from the Delta II second stage approximately 18 hours after launch. Operating autonomously on a preplanned course, XSS-10 performed its mission of navigating around the Delta II second stage at preplanned positions; the micro-satellite took images of the second stage and send them back to earth in real time. During these demonstrations the XSS-10 mission operations team accomplished responsive checkout of the micro-satellite and all of its subsystems, autonomous navigation on a preplanned course and a variety of algorithms and mission operations that pave the way for more ambitious missions in the future. This paper will discuss the results of the mission and post mission analysis of the XSS-10 space flight.

  20. A second generation framework for the analysis of microsatellites in expressed sequence tags and the development of EST-SSR markers for a conifer, Cryptomeria japonica

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are useful resources for genome analysis because of their abundance, functionality and polymorphism. The advent of commercial second generation sequencing machines has lead to new strategies for developing EST-SSR markers, necessitating the development of bioinformatic framework that can keep pace with the increasing quality and quantity of sequence data produced. We describe an open scheme for analyzing ESTs and developing EST-SSR markers from reads collected by Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica). Results We collected 141,097 sequence reads by Sanger sequencing and 1,333,444 by pyrosequencing. After trimming contaminant and low quality sequences, 118,319 Sanger and 1,201,150 pyrosequencing reads were passed to the MIRA assembler, generating 81,284 contigs that were analysed for SSRs. 4,059 SSRs were found in 3,694 (4.54%) contigs, giving an SSR frequency lower than that in seven other plant species with gene indices (5.4–21.9%). The average GC content of the SSR-containing contigs was 41.55%, compared to 40.23% for all contigs. Tri-SSRs were the most common SSRs; the most common motif was AT, which was found in 655 (46.3%) di-SSRs, followed by the AAG motif, found in 342 (25.9%) tri-SSRs. Most (72.8%) tri-SSRs were in coding regions, but 55.6% of the di-SSRs were in non-coding regions; the AT motif was most abundant in 3′ untranslated regions. Gene ontology (GO) annotations showed that six GO terms were significantly overrepresented within SSR-containing contigs. Forty–four EST-SSR markers were developed from 192 primer pairs using two pipelines: read2Marker and the newly-developed CMiB, which combines several open tools. Markers resulting from both pipelines showed no differences in PCR success rate and polymorphisms, but PCR success and polymorphism were significantly affected by the expected PCR product size and number of SSR repeats, respectively. EST-SSR markers exhibited less polymorphism than genomic SSRs. Conclusions We have created a new open pipeline for developing EST-SSR markers and applied it in a comprehensive analysis of EST-SSRs and EST-SSR markers in C. japonica. The results will be useful in genomic analyses of conifers and other non-model species. PMID:22507374

  1. Development of Microsatellite Markers Derived from Expressed Sequence Tags of Polyporales for Genetic Diversity Analysis of Endangered Polyporus umbellatus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuejin; Chen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ruihong; Zeng, Ailin; Deyholos, Michael K.; Shu, Jia; Guo, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    A large scale of EST sequences of Polyporales was screened in this investigation in order to identify EST-SSR markers for various applications. The distribution of EST sequences and SSRs in five families of Polyporales was analyzed, respectively. Mononucleotide was the most abundant type, followed by trinucleotide. Among five families, Ganodermataceae occupied the most SSR markers, followed by Coriolaceae. Functional prediction of SSR marker-containing EST sequences in Ganoderma lucidum obtained three main groups, namely, cellular component, biological process, and molecular function. Thirty EST-SSR primers were designed to evaluate the genetic diversity of 13 natural Polyporus umbellatus accessions. Twenty one EST-SSRs were polymorphic with average PIC value of 0.33 and transferability rate of 71%. These 13 P. umbellatus accessions showed relatively high genetic diversity. The expected heterozygosity, Nei's gene diversity, and Shannon information index were 0.41, 0.39, and 0.57, respectively. Both UPGMA dendrogram and principal coordinate analysis (PCA) showed the same cluster result that divided the 13 accessions into three or four groups. PMID:26146636

  2. Transferability of cucumber microsatellite markers used for phylogenetic analysis and population structure study in bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl.).

    PubMed

    Bhawna; Abdin, M Z; Arya, L; Verma, M

    2015-02-01

    Improved breeding for developing fruit quality in bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl.) necessitates knowledge regarding its genetic diversity. To achieve this, a set of 108 locus-specific SSR markers has been developed in bottle gourd by cross-species transferability from 995 mapped Cucumis sativus SSR markers. During screening, 280 primer pairs amplified in the bottle gourd germplasm, which were further evaluated in a diverse set of 42 lines, resulting in 19 polymorphic, 89 monomorphic, 15 with multiple bands, and the rest 157 showed no or very non-specific amplification. The 19 polymorphic primer pairs produced a total of 54 alleles. Gene diversity, Shannon's information index, and Nei's coefficient of differentiation were calculated suggesting a moderate genetic variation at the species level. A model-based population structure analysis divided these germplasm into two subpopulations. This marker set will be applicable for evaluating the genetic structure for association mapping, DNA fingerprinting, and mounting linkage maps and will be a practical tool set for further genetics. This study provides one of the first quantitative views of population genetic variation in bottle gourd. PMID:25471016

  3. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellites from the critically endangered hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata).

    PubMed

    Miro-Herrans, Aida T; Velez-Zuazo, Ximena; Acevedo, Jenny P; McMillan, W Owen

    2008-09-01

    We isolated and characterized 12 microsatellite loci from the hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata). The loci exhibited a variable number of alleles that ranged from three to 14 with an average observed heterozygosity of 0.70 (SD 0.18) across 40 hawksbill turtles from the Caribbean. The polymorphism exhibited individually and in combination makes them suitable for fine-scale genetic studies. In particular, the low probability of identity and high paternity exclusion of these markers makes them highly useful for parentage and relatedness studies. These new markers greatly increase the power of genetic studies directed towards the conservation of this endangered species. PMID:21585983

  4. Development and characterization of 11 microsatellite loci for the Mona Island iguana (Cyclura cornuta stejnegeri).

    PubMed

    Rosas, K G; Pérez-Buitrago, N; Acevedo, J P; Martínez, N; Funk, S M; McMillan, W O

    2008-07-01

    We isolated and characterized 11 microsatellite loci in the Mona Island iguana (Cyclura cornuta stejnegeri). Eleven loci exhibit moderate to high allelic diversity (two to 12 alleles, mean = 4.5) and polymorphism (mean observed heterozygosity, 0.56; range, 0.26 to 0.78) in 41 adults. This marker set has low probability of identity and high parentage exclusion power and will be suitable for studies of paternity, social organization and relatedness in this species. PMID:21585903

  5. Low paternal dietary folate alters the mouse sperm epigenome and is associated with negative pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lambrot, R.; Xu, C.; Saint-Phar, S.; Chountalos, G.; Cohen, T.; Paquet, M.; Suderman, M.; Hallett, M.; Kimmins, S.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that a fathers diet can influence offspring health. A proposed mechanism for paternal transmission of environmental information is via the sperm epigenome. The epigenome includes heritable information such as DNA methylation. We hypothesize that the dietary supply of methyl donors will alter epigenetic reprogramming in sperm. Here we feed male mice either a folate-deficient or folate-sufficient diet throughout life. Paternal folate deficiency is associated with increased birth defects in the offspring, which include craniofacial and musculoskeletal malformations. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis and the subsequent functional analysis identify differential methylation in sperm of genes implicated in development, chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, autism and schizophrenia. While >300 genes are differentially expressed in offspring placenta, only two correspond to genes with differential methylation in sperm. This model suggests epigenetic transmission may involve sperm histone H3 methylation or DNA methylation and that adequate paternal dietary folate is essential for offspring health. PMID:24326934

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Genetic Diversity in Chinese Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huabo; Tang, Yan; Wu, Liping; Wang, Zhe; Li, Yingyue; Wu, Rongling; Pang, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill, 2n = 2× = 24, Rhamnaceae) is an economically important Chinese native species. It has high nutritional value, and its medicinal properties have led to extensive use in traditional oriental medicine. The characterization of genotypes using molecular markers is important for genetic studies and plant breeding. However, few simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are available for this species. In this study, 1,488 unique SSR clones were isolated from Z. jujuba ‘Dongzao’ using enriched genomic libraries coupled with a three-primer colony PCR screening strategy, yielding a high enrichment rate of 73.3%. Finally, 1,188 (80.87%) primer pairs were amplified successfully in the size expected for ‘Dongzao’. A total of 350 primer pairs were further selected and evaluated for their ability to detect polymorphisms across a panel of six diverse cultivars; among these, 301 primer pairs detected polymorphisms, and the polymorphism information content (PIC) value across all loci ranged from 0.15 to 0.82, with an average of 0.52. An analysis of 76 major cultivars employed in Chinese jujube production using 31 primer pairs revealed comparatively high genetic diversity among these cultivars. Within-population differences among individuals accounted for 98.2% of the observed genetic variation. Neighbor-joining clustering divided the cultivars into three main groups, none of which correspond to major geographic regions, suggesting that the genetics and geographical origin of modern Chinese jujube cultivars might not be linked. The current work firstly reports the large-scale development of Chinese jujube SSR markers. The development of these markers and their polymorphic information represent a significant improvement in the available Chinese jujube genomic resources and will facilitate both genetic and breeding applications, further accelerating the development of new cultivars. PMID:24932973

  7. Microsatellites for Carpotroche brasiliensis (Flacourtiaceae), a useful species for agroforestry and ecosystem conservation1

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Flora; Alves, Jackeline S.; Gaiotto, Fernanda A.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: We developed microsatellite markers for Carpotroche brasiliensis (Flacourtiaceae), a dioecious tree that is used as a food resource by midsize animals of the Brazilian fauna. Methods and Results: We designed 30 primer pairs using next-generation sequencing and classified 25 pairs as polymorphic. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.5 to 1.0, and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.418 to 0.907. The combined probability of exclusion was greater than 0.999 and the combined probability of identity was less than 0.001, indicating that these microsatellites are appropriate for investigations of genetic structure, individual identification, and paternity testing. Conclusions: The developed molecular tools may contribute to future studies of population genetics, answering ecological and evolutionary questions regarding efficient conservation strategies for C. brasiliensis. PMID:26697275

  8. Genetic characterization of 12 heterologous microsatellite markers for the giant tropical tree Cariniana legalis (Lecythidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Twelve microsatellite loci previously developed in the tropical tree Cariniana estrellensis were genetically characterized in Cariniana legalis. Polymorphisms were assessed in 28 C. legalis individuals found between the Pardo and Mogi-Guaçu River basins in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Of the 12 loci, 10 were polymorphic and exhibited Mendelian inheritance. The allelic richness at each locus ranged from 2-11, with an average of 7 alleles per locus, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.07-0.88. These loci showed a high probability of paternity exclusion. The characteristics of these heterologous microsatellite markers indicate that they are suitable tools for investigating questions concerning population genetics in C. legalis. PMID:21637616

  9. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in the armored catfish Hypostomus gymnorhynchus (Loricariidae).

    PubMed

    Telles, M P C; Resende, L V; Brondani, R P V; Collevatti, R G; Costa, M C; Silva Júnior, N J

    2010-01-01

    We isolated and characterized 10 microsatellite loci in the armored catfish (Hypostomus gymnorhynchus, Loricariidae), using a genomic shotgun library to obtain the repetitive sequences. Twenty-four primers were designed and 14 individuals of H. gymnorhynchus from the Caiapó River, in central Brazil, were genotyped using these primers to analyze the polymorphism at each locus. All loci showed low polymorphism, with a low number of alleles per locus (1 or 2), except locus Hg_E19, which had 11 alleles. Expected heterozygosities for polymorphic loci ranged from 0.182 to 0.901. Combined paternity exclusion probability (0.857) was low and combined genetic identity (0.0026) was high, when we examined parentage. The low degree of polymorphism that we detected may be due to the small sample size and the small microsatellite size, despite the large motif size. PMID:20830668

  10. Genetic variability among Polish Red, Hereford and Holstein-Friesian cattle raised in Poland based on analysis of microsatellite DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Radko, Anna; Zyga, Agata; Zabek, Tomasz; Słota, Ewa

    2005-01-01

    Polymorphism of 11 microsatellite DNA loci was analysed in Polish Red (PR), Hereford and Holstein-Friesian (HF) cattle raised in Poland and genetic distance among these breeds was determined. At the 11 loci (TGLA227, BM2113, TGLA53, ETH10, SPS115, TGLA126, TGLA122, INRA23, ETH3, ETH225 and BM1824) analysed with automated DNA sizing technology, a total of 213 alleles were identified: 76 in PR, 76 in HF, and 61 in Hereford. All the microsatellite DNA markers showed high polymorphism. Polymorphism information content (PIC) calculated for each marker exceeded 0.5, except for the ETH3 locus in Hereford cattle (PIC=0.475), and heterozygosity (H) ranged from 54.1% to as much as 85.2%. The coefficient of genetic distance was 0.354 between PR and Hereford, 0.414 between HF and Hereford, and 0.416 between PR and HF cattle. PMID:15741669

  11. Paternal Attachment, Parenting Beliefs and Children's Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between fathers' romantic attachment style, parenting beliefs and father-child attachment security and dependence were examined in a diverse sample of 72 fathers of young children. Paternal romantic attachment style was coded based on fathers' endorsement of a particular style represented in the Hazan and Shaver Three-Category

  12. Advancing Paternal Age and Simplex Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puleo, Connor Morrow; Schmeidler, James; Reichenberg, Abraham; Kolevzon, Alexander; Soorya, Latha V.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Silverman, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    De novo events appear more common in female and simplex autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cases and may underlie greater ASD risk in older fathers' offspring. This study examined whether advancing paternal age predicts an increase in simplex (n = 90) versus multiplex ASD cases (n = 587) in 677 participants (340 families). Whether or not controlling…

  13. Paternal occupational exposures and childhood cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Feychting, M; Plato, N; Nise, G; Ahlbom, A

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the study described here was to test the hypothesis that paternal occupational exposure near conception increases the risk of cancer in the offspring. We conducted a cohort study based on a population of 235,635 children born shortly after two different censuses in Sweden. The children were followed from birth to 14 years, and cases of cancer were identified in the Swedish Cancer Registry. Occupational hygienists assessed the probability of exposure to different agents in each combination of the father's industry and occupation as reported in the censuses. We also analyzed individual job titles. We compared the cancer incidence among children of exposed fathers to that among children of unexposed fathers using Cox proportional hazards modeling. The main findings were an increased risk of nervous system tumors related to paternal occupational exposure to pesticides [relative risk (RR) = 2.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.27-4.39] and work as a painter (RR = 3.65; 95% CI, 1.71-7.80), and an increased risk of leukemia related to wood work by fathers (RR = 2.18; 95% CI, 1.26-3.78). We found no associations between childhood leukemia and paternal exposure to pesticides or paint. Our results support previous findings of an increased risk of childhood brain tumors and leukemia associated with certain paternal occupational exposures. Some findings in previous studies were not confirmed in this study. PMID:11266332

  14. Paternal Attachment, Parenting Beliefs and Children's Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between fathers' romantic attachment style, parenting beliefs and father-child attachment security and dependence were examined in a diverse sample of 72 fathers of young children. Paternal romantic attachment style was coded based on fathers' endorsement of a particular style represented in the Hazan and Shaver Three-Category…

  15. Paternity Testing in a PBL Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casla, Alberto Vicario; Zubiaga, Isabel Smith

    2010-01-01

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) makes use of real-life scenarios to stimulate students' prior knowledge and to provide a meaningful context that is also related to the student's future professional work. In this article, Paternity testing is presented using a PBL approach that involves a combination of classroom, laboratory, and out-of-class…

  16. Paternally expressed genes predominate in the placenta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Miller, Donald C; Harman, Rebecca; Antczak, Douglas F; Clark, Andrew G

    2013-06-25

    The discovery of genomic imprinting through studies of manipulated mouse embryos indicated that the paternal genome has a major influence on placental development. However, previous research has not demonstrated paternal bias in imprinted genes. We applied RNA sequencing to trophoblast tissue from reciprocal hybrids of horse and donkey, where genotypic differences allowed parent-of-origin identification of most expressed genes. Using this approach, we identified a core group of 15 ancient imprinted genes, of which 10 were paternally expressed. An additional 78 candidate imprinted genes identified by RNA sequencing also showed paternal bias. Pyrosequencing was used to confirm the imprinting status of six of the genes, including the insulin receptor (INSR), which may play a role in growth regulation with its reciprocally imprinted ligand, histone acetyltransferase-1 (HAT1), a gene involved in chromatin modification, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus G6C, a newly identified imprinted gene in the major histocompatibility complex. The 78 candidate imprinted genes displayed parent-of-origin expression bias in placenta but not fetus, and most showed less than 100% silencing of the imprinted allele. Some displayed variability in imprinting status among individuals. This variability results in a unique epigenetic signature for each placenta that contributes to variation in the intrauterine environment and thus presents the opportunity for natural selection to operate on parent-of-origin differential regulation. Taken together, these features highlight the plasticity of imprinting in mammals and the central importance of the placenta as a target tissue for genomic imprinting. PMID:23754418

  17. Paternal inheritance of mitochondria in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Soichi

    2010-03-01

    To analyze mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)inheritance, differences in mtDNA between Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas smithii, respiration deficiency and antibiotic resistance were used to distinguish mtDNA origins. The analyses indicated paternal inheritance. However, these experiments raised questions regarding whether paternal inheritance occurred normally.Mitochondrial nucleoids were observed in living zygotes from mating until 3 days after mating and then until progeny formation. However, selective disappearance of nucleoids was not observed. Subsequently, experimental serial backcrosses between the two strains demonstrated strict paternal inheritance. The fate of mt+ and mt- mtDNA was followed using the differences in mtDNA between the two strains. The slow elimination of mt+ mtDNA through zygote maturation in darkness was observed, and later the disappearance of mt+ mtDNA was observed at the beginning of meiosis. To explain the different fates of mtDNA, methylation status was investigated; however, no methylation was detected. Variously constructed diploid cells showed biparental inheritance. Thus, when the mating process occurs normally, paternal inheritance occurs. Mutations disrupting mtDNA inheritance have not yet been isolated. Mutations that disrupt maternal inheritance of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) do not disrupt inheritance of mtDNA. The genes responsible for mtDNA inheritance are different from those of chloroplasts. PMID:20069335

  18. DNA content analysis of colorectal cancer defines a distinct microsatellite and chromosome stable group but does not predict response to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fadhil, Wakkas; Kindle, Karin; Jackson, Darryl; Zaitoun, Abed; Lane, Nina; Robins, Adrian; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRC) are thought to have genetic instability in the form of either microsatellite instability (MSI) or chromosomal instability (CIN). Recently, tumours have been described without either MSI or CIN, that is, microsatellite and chromosome stable (MACS) CRCs. We investigated the (i) frequency of the MACS-CRCs and (ii) whether this genotype predicted responsiveness to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. To examine the frequency of MACS-CRCs, DNA content (ploidy) was examined in 89 sporadic microsatellite-stable CRCs using flow cytometry. The tumours were also screened for mutations in KRAS/BRAF/TP53/PIK3CA by QMC-PCR. To examine the value of tumour ploidy in predicting response to chemoradiotherapy, DNA content was tested in a separate group of 62 rectal cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Fifty-one of 89 CRCs (57%) were aneuploid and 38 (43%) were diploid. There was no significant association between mutations in TP53/KRAS/BRAF/PIK3CA and ploidy. Testing of association between mutations revealed only mutual exclusivity of KRAS/BRAF mutation (P?microsatellite-stable CRCs with a mutation profile overlapping that of CRCs with CIN. A diploid genotype does not, however, predict the responsiveness to radiotherapy. PMID:24456329

  19. Genome-wide semiquantitative microsatellite analysis of human hepatocellular carcinoma: discrete mapping of smallest region of overlap of recurrent chromosomal gains and losses.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takafumi; Nishida, Naoshi; Komeda, Toshiki; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Ikai, Iwao; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2006-05-01

    Recurrent chromosomal gains at 1q, 6p, 8q, and 17q, or losses at 1p, 4q, 6q, 8p, 9p, 13q, 16q, and 17p are common features of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). For precise determination of the shortest region of overlap (SRO), 49 HCC obtained at the time of surgery or autopsy were subjected to comprehensive microsatellite analysis by using 400 markers distributed at almost equal distances throughout the 22 autosomes and X chromosomes. Each allele showing imbalance was subjected to comparative duplex polymerase chain reaction using a retained allele as an internal control to determine whether the imbalance was the result of chromosomal gain or loss. The following SRO of recurrent chromosomal gains and losses were determined: -1p36.22 approximately p36.33, D1S450-D1S2893, 5.0 mega-base pairs (Mbp); +1q23.3 approximately q25.3, D1S2878-D1S2619, 16.9 Mbp; -4q21.2 approximately q24, D4S2964-D4S1572, 23.0 Mbp; -6q23.3 approximately qter, D6S292-qter, 34.7 Mb; -8p22 approximately p23.1, D8S549-D8S550, 4.8 Mbp; +8q12.2 approximately q24.13, D8S260-D8S514, 61.8 Mbp; -13q13.3 approximately q22.1, D13S218-D13S156, 35.6 Mbp; -16q22.1 approximately qter, D16S503-qter, 26.7 Mbp; and -17p12 approximately pter, D17S921-pter, 14.2 Mbp. Contrary to our initial expectations, many HCC showed major deletions or additions of chromosome arms, so that a number of genes were included in the SRO. Although some putative oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes mapped in these SRO may be important, relative copy number changes of numerous other genes may affect pathogenesis of HCC. PMID:16682288

  20. The effect of paternal age on offspring intelligence and personality when controlling for paternal trait level.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Ruben C; Penke, Lars; Johnson, Wendy; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Paternal age at conception has been found to predict the number of new genetic mutations. We examined the effect of father's age at birth on offspring intelligence, head circumference and personality traits. Using the Minnesota Twin Family Study sample we tested paternal age effects while controlling for parents' trait levels measured with the same precision as offspring's. From evolutionary genetic considerations we predicted a negative effect of paternal age on offspring intelligence, but not on other traits. Controlling for parental intelligence (IQ) had the effect of turning an initially positive association non-significantly negative. We found paternal age effects on offspring IQ and Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire Absorption, but they were not robustly significant, nor replicable with additional covariates. No other noteworthy effects were found. Parents' intelligence and personality correlated with their ages at twin birth, which may have obscured a small negative effect of advanced paternal age (<1% of variance explained) on intelligence. We discuss future avenues for studies of paternal age effects and suggest that stronger research designs are needed to rule out confounding factors involving birth order and the Flynn effect. PMID:24587224

  1. Discovering misattributed paternity in genetic counselling: different ethical perspectives in two countries.

    PubMed

    Tozzo, Pamela; Caenazzo, Luciana; Parker, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Misattributed paternity or 'false' paternity is when a man is wrongly thought, by himself and possibly by others, to be the biological father of a child. Nowadays, because of the progression of genetics and genomics the possibility of finding misattributed paternity during familial genetic testing has increased. In contrast to other medical information, which pertains primarily to individuals, information obtained by genetic testing and/or pedigree analysis necessarily has implications for other biologically related members in the family. Disclosing or not a misattributed paternity has a number of different biological and social consequences for the people involved. Such an issue presents important ethical and deontological challenges. The debate centres on whether or not to inform the family and, particularly, whom in the family, about the possibility that misattributed paternity might be discovered incidentally, and whether or not it is the duty of the healthcare professional (HCP) to disclose the results and to whom. In this paper, we consider the different perspectives and reported problems, and analyse their cultural, ethical and legal dimensions. We compare the position of HCPs from an Italian and British point of view, particularly their role in genetic counselling. We discuss whether the Oviedo Convention of the Council of Europe (1997) can be seen as a basis for enriching the debate. PMID:23443210

  2. Influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on epigenetic regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene in Holocaust survivor offspring

    PubMed Central

    Desarnaud, Frank; Bader, Heather N.; Makotkine, Iouri; Flory, Janine D.; Bierer, Linda M.; Meaney, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Differential effects of maternal and paternal PTSD have been observed in adult offspring of Holocaust survivors in both glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and vulnerability to psychiatric disorder. The current study examined the relative influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on DNA methylation of the exon 1F promoter of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and its relationship to glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity, in Holocaust offspring. Method Adult offspring with at least one Holocaust survivor parent (n=80), and demographically similar participants without parental Holocaust exposure or PTSD (n=15) completed clinical interviews, self-report measures, and biological procedures. Blood samples were collected for analysis of glucocorticoid receptor gene exon 1F (GR-1F) promoter methylation and cortisol levels in response to low-dose dexamethasone, and two-way analysis of covariance was performed using maternal and paternal PTSD as main effects. Hierarchical-clustering analysis was used to permit visualization of maternal vs. paternal PTSD effects on clinical variables. Results A significant interaction demonstrated that in the absence of maternal PTSD, offspring with paternal PTSD showed higher GR-1F promoter methylation, whereas offspring with both maternal and paternal PTSD showed lower methylation. Lower GR-1F promoter methylation was significantly associated with greater post-dexamethasone cortisol suppression. The clustering analysis confirmed that maternal and paternal PTSD effects were differentially associated with clinical indicators. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate alterations of GR-1F promoter methylation in relation to parental PTSD and neuroendocrine outcomes. The moderation of paternal PTSD effects by maternal PTSD suggests different mechanisms for the intergenerational transmission of trauma-related vulnerabilities. PMID:24832930

  3. A microsatellite-based analysis for the detection of selection on BTA1 and BTA20 in northern Eurasian cattle (Bos taurus) populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microsatellites surrounding functionally important candidate genes or quantitative trait loci have received attention as proxy measures of polymorphism level at the candidate loci themselves. In cattle, selection for economically important traits is a long-term strategy and it has been reported that microsatellites are linked to these important loci. Methods We have investigated the variation of seven microsatellites on BTA1 (Bos taurus autosome 1) and 16 on BTA20, using bovine populations of typical production types and horn status in northern Eurasia. Genetic variability of these loci and linkage disequilibrium among these loci were compared with those of 28 microsatellites on other bovine chromosomes. Four different tests were applied to detect molecular signatures of selection. Results No marked difference in locus variability was found between microsatellites on BTA1, BTA20 and the other chromosomes in terms of different diversity indices. Average D' values of pairwise syntenic markers (0.32 and 0.28 across BTA 1 and BTA20 respectively) were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than for non-syntenic markers (0.15). The Ewens-Watterson test, the Beaumont and Nichol's modified frequentist test and the Bayesian FST-test indicated elevated or decreased genetic differentiation, at SOD1 and AGLA17 markers respectively, deviating significantly (P < 0.05) from neutral expectations. Furthermore, lnRV, lnRH and lnRθ' statistics were used for the pairwise population comparison tests and were significantly less variable in one population relative to the other, providing additional evidence of selection signatures for two of the 51 loci. Moreover, the three Finnish native populations showed evidence of subpopulation divergence at SOD1 and AGLA17. Our data also indicate significant intergenic linkage disequilibrium around the candidate loci and suggest that hitchhiking selection has played a role in shaping the pattern of observed linkage disequilibrium. Conclusion Hitchhiking due to tight linkage with alleles at candidate genes, e.g. the POLL gene, is a possible explanation for this pattern. The potential impact of selective breeding by man on cattle populations is discussed in the context of selection effects. Our results also suggest that a practical approach to detect loci under selection is to simultaneously apply multiple neutrality tests based on different assumptions and estimations. PMID:20691068

  4. G-IMEx: A comprehensive software tool for detection of microsatellites from genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Mudunuri, Suresh B; Kumar, Pankaj; Rao, Allam Appa; Pallamsetty, S; Nagarajaram, H A

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellites are ubiquitous short tandem repeats found in all known genomes and are known to play a very important role in various studies and fields including DNA fingerprinting, paternity studies, evolutionary studies, virulence and adaptation of certain bacteria and viruses etc. Due to the sequencing of several genomes and the availability of enormous amounts of sequence data during the past few years, computational studies of microsatellites are of interest for many researchers. In this context, we developed a software tool called Imperfect Microsatellite Extractor (IMEx), to extract perfect, imperfect and compound microsatellites from genome sequences along with their complete statistics. Recently we developed a user-friendly graphical-interface using JAVA for IMEx to be used as a stand-alone software named G-IMEx. G-IMEx takes a nucleotide sequence as an input and the results are produced in both html and text formats. The Linux version of G-IMEx can be downloaded for free from http://www.cdfd.org.in/imex. PMID:21364802

  5. Displays of paternal mouse pup retrieval following communicative interaction with maternal mates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lopatina, Olga; Higashida, Chiharu; Fujimoto, Hiroko; Akther, Shirin; Inzhutova, Alena; Liang, Mingkun; Zhong, Jing; Tsuji, Takahiro; Yoshihara, Toru; Sumi, Kohei; Ishiyama, Mizuho; Ma, Wen-Jie; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Yagitani, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Mukaida, Naofumi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Hori, Osamu; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Hirao, Atsushi; Kato, Yukio; Ishihara, Katsuhiko; Kato, Ichiro; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Cherepanov, Stanislav M.; Salmina, Alla B.; Hirai, Hirokazu; Asano, Masahide; Brown, David A.; Nagano, Isamu; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2013-01-01

    Compared with the knowledge of maternal care, much less is known about the factors required for paternal parental care. Here we report that new sires of laboratory mice, though not spontaneously parental, can be induced to show maternal-like parental care (pup retrieval) using signals from dams separated from their pups. During this interaction, the maternal mates emit 38-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations to their male partners, which are equivalent to vocalizations that occur following pheromone stimulation. Without these signals or in the absence of maternal mates, the sires do not retrieve their pups within 5?min. These results show that, in mice, the maternal parent communicates to the paternal parent to encourage pup care. This new paradigm may be useful in the analysis of the parental brain during paternal care induced by interactive communication. PMID:23299896

  6. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of human chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, R.E.; Speer, M.C.; Luo, Ying; Ott, J.; Gilliam, T.C. ); Rojas, K.; Overhauser, J. )

    1993-01-01

    We isolated nine new microsatellite markers from chromosome 18 and further characterized and mapped eight microsatellites developed in other laboratories. We have constructed a framework linkage map of chromosome 18 that includes 14 microsatellite markers (12 dinucleotide and 2 tetranucleotide) and 2 RFLP markers. Cytogenetic localization for the microsatellites was performed by PCR amplification of IS somatic cell hybrids containing different deletions of chromosome 18. Twelve of the microsatellites and one of the RFLPs have heterozygosities greater than 70%. The average heterozygosity of the markers included in the map is 72%. In addition, we have made provisional placements of 3 more microsatellite markers and 2 more RFLP markers. The map lengths (in Kosambi centimorgans) are as follows: sex-averaged, 109.3 cM; male, 72.4 cM; female, 161.2 cM. The average distance between markers in the sex-averaged map is 7.3 cM, and the largest gap between markers is 16.7 cM. Analysis of the data for differences in the female:male map distance ratio revealed significant evidence for a constant difference in the ratio (X[sup 2]=32.25; df = 1; P < 0.001; ratio = 2.5:1). Furthermore, there was significant evidence in favor of a variable female:male map distance ratio across the chromosome compared to a constant distance ratio (X[sup 2] = 27.78; df = 14; P = 0.015). To facilitate their use in genomic screening for disease genes, all of the microsatellite markers used here can be amplified under standard PCR conditions, and most can be used in duplex PCR reactions. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Indentification of 700 new microsatellite loci from cotton (G. hirsutum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite markers, also known as SSRs, comprise a keystone technology for genetic linkage analysis, QTL mapping, marker-assisted breeding, and genome analysis. In order to contribute to a growing body of molecular marker resources for cotton research and improvement, we developed primers to am...

  8. Transpecific microsatellites for hard pines.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, M.; Cross, M.; Maguire, L.; Dieters, J.; Williams, G.; Henry, J.

    2002-04-01

    Microsatellites are difficult to recover from large plant genomes so cross-specific utilisation is an important source of markers. Fifty microsatellites were tested for cross-specific amplification and polymorphism to two New World hard pine species, slash pine ( Pinus elliottii var. elliottii) and Caribbean pine ( P. caribaea var. hondurensis). Twenty-nine (58%) markers amplified in both hard pine species, and 23 of these 29 were polymorphic. Soft pine (subgenus Strobus) microsatellite markers did amplify, but none were polymorphic. Pinus elliottii var. elliottii and P. caribaea var. hondurensis showed mutational changes in the flanking regions and the repeat motif that were informative for Pinus spp. phylogenetic relationships. Most allele length variation could be attributed to variability in repeat unit number. There was no evidence for ascertainment bias. PMID:12582642

  9. Managing misaligned paternity findings in research including sickle cell disease screening in Kenya: ‘Consulting communities’ to inform policy☆

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Vicki; Kombe, Francis; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Molyneux, Sassy; Parker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The management of misaligned paternity findings raises important controversy worldwide. It has mainly, however, been discussed in the context of high-income countries. Genetic and genomics research, with the potential to show misaligned paternity, are becoming increasingly common in Africa. During a genomics study in Kenya, a dilemma arose over testing and sharing information on paternal sickle cell disease status. This dilemma may be paradigmatic of challenges in sharing misaligned paternity findings in many research and health care settings. Using a deliberative approach to community consultation to inform research practice, we explored residents' views on paternal testing and sharing misaligned paternity information. Between December 2009 and November 2010, 63 residents in Kilifi County were engaged in informed deliberative small group discussions, structured to support normative reflection within the groups, with purposive selection to explore diversity. Analysis was based on a modified framework analysis approach, drawing on relevant social science and bioethics literature. The methods generated in-depth individual and group reflection on morally important issues and uncovered wide diversity in views and values. Fundamental and conflicting values emerged around the importance of family interests and openness, underpinned by disagreement on the moral implications of marital infidelity and withholding truth. Wider consideration of ethical issues emerging in these debates supports locally-held reasoning that paternal sickle cell testing should not be undertaken in this context, in contrast to views that testing should be done with or without the disclosure of misaligned paternity information. The findings highlight the importance of facilitating wider testing of family members of affected children, contingent on the development and implementation of national policies for the management of this inherited disorder. Their richness also illustrates the potential for the approach adopted in this study to strengthen community consultation. PMID:24034967

  10. Multiple Paternity in the Norway Rat, Rattus norvegicus, from Urban Slums in Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Federico; Richardson, Jonathan L; Dion, Kirstin; Mariani, Carol; Pertile, Arsinoe C; Burak, Mary K; Childs, James E; Ko, Albert I; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2016-03-01

    The Norway rat, Rattus norvegicus, is one of the most important pest species globally and the main reservoir of leptospires causing human leptospirosis in the urban slums of tropical regions. Rodent control is a frequent strategy in those settings to prevent the disease but rapid growth from residual populations and immigration limit the long-term effectiveness of interventions. To characterize the breeding ecology of R. norvegicus and provide needed information for the level of genetic mixing, which can help identify inter-connected eradication units, we estimated the occurrence of multiple paternity, distances between mothers and sires, and inbreeding in rats from urban slum habitat in Salvador, Brazil. We genotyped 9 pregnant females, their 66 offspring, and 371 males at 16 microsatellite loci. Multiple paternity was observed in 22% (2/9) of the study litters. Of the 12 sires that contributed to the 9 litters, we identified 5 (42%) of those sires among our genotyped males. Related males were captured in close proximity to pregnant females (the mean inter-parent trapping distance per litter was 70 m, ±58 m SD). Levels of relatedness between mother-sire pairs were higher than expected and significantly higher than relatedness between all females and non-sire males. Our findings indicate multiple paternity is common, inbreeding is apparent, and that mother-sire dyads occur in close proximity within the study area. This information is relevant to improve the spatial definition of the eradication units that may enhance the effectiveness of rodent management programs aimed at preventing human leptospirosis. High levels of inbreeding may also be a sign that eradication efforts are successful. PMID:26733693

  11. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers from tropical forage Stylosanthes species and analysis of genetic variability and cross-species transferability.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amaresh; Tiwari, K K; Nagaich, D; Dubey, N; Kumar, S; Roy, A K

    2011-12-01

    A limited number of functional molecular markers has slowed the desired genetic improvement of Stylosanthes species. Hence, in an attempt to develop simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, genomic libraries from Stylosanthes seabrana B.L. Maass & 't Mannetje (2n=2x=20) using 5' anchored degenerate microsatellite primers were constructed. Of the 76 new microsatellites, 21 functional primer pairs were designed. Because of the small number of primer pairs designed, 428 expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences from seven Stylosanthes species were also examined for SSR detection. Approximately 10% of sequences delivered functional primer pairs, and after redundancy elimination, 57 microsatellite repeats were selected. Tetranucleotides followed by trinucleotides were the major repeated sequences in Stylosanthes ESTs. In total, a robust set of 21 genomic-SSR (gSSR) and 20 EST-SSR (eSSR) markers were developed. These markers were analyzed for intraspecific diversity within 20 S. seabrana accessions and for their cross-species transferability. Mean expected (He) and observed (Ho) heterozygosity values with gSSR markers were 0.64 and 0.372, respectively, whereas with eSSR markers these were 0.297 and 0.214, respectively. Dendrograms having moderate bootstrap value (23%-94%) were able to distinguish all accessions of S. seabrana with gSSR markers, whereas eSSR markers showed 100% similarities between few accessions. The set of 21 gSSRs, from S. seabrana, and 20 eSSRs, from selected Stylosanthes species, with their high cross-species transferability (45% with gSSRs, 86% with eSSRs) will facilitate genetic improvement of Stylosanthes species globally. PMID:22088085

  12. Detecting Sex-Biased Gene Flow in African-Americans through the Analysis of Intra- and Inter-Population Variation at Mitochondrial DNA and Y- Chromosome Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Battaggia, C; Anagnostou, P; Bosch, I; Brisighelli, F; Destro-Bisol, G; Capocasa, M

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on variations at the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) and at seven Y-chromosome microsatellites in an African-American population sample from Chicago, IL, USA. Our results support the hypothesis that the population studied had undergone a European male-biased gene flow. We show that comparisons of intra-and inter-population diversity parameters between African-Americans, Europeans and Africans may help detect sex-biased gene flow, providing a complement to quantitative methods to estimate genetic admixture. PMID:24052726

  13. "I've Fixed Things Up": Paternal Identity of Substance-Dependent Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peled, Einat; Gavriel-Fried, Belle; Katz, Noam

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with how substance-dependent men perceive their paternal identity. Data were based on in-depth semi-structured interviews with 12 Israeli fathers who were enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment. Content analysis revealed that participants had undergone a process of parental identity formation composed of four distinct stages:…

  14. "I've Fixed Things Up": Paternal Identity of Substance-Dependent Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peled, Einat; Gavriel-Fried, Belle; Katz, Noam

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with how substance-dependent men perceive their paternal identity. Data were based on in-depth semi-structured interviews with 12 Israeli fathers who were enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment. Content analysis revealed that participants had undergone a process of parental identity formation composed of four distinct stages:

  15. An Examination of Paternal Influence on High-Achieving Gifted Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Thomas P.; Pagnani, Alexander R.; Hammond, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    The challenges facing contemporary boys are complex, highlighting the importance of positive paternal influence for young men to achieve success. This study examines the father-son relationships of 10 prominent gifted men of achievement to identify factors influencing talent development. Through biographical analysis, 6 significant themes were…

  16. Paternal Work Stress and Latent Profiles of Father-Infant Parenting Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, W. Benjamin; Crouter, Ann C.; Lanza, Stephanie T.; Cox, Martha J.; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    The current study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to examine the implications of fathers' experiences of work stress for paternal behaviors with infants across multiple dimensions of parenting in a sample of fathers living in nonmetropolitan communities (N = 492). LPA revealed five classes of fathers based on levels of social-affective…

  17. Paternal Age, Paternal Presence and Children’s Health: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Julian; Sutcliffe, Alastair G.; Melhuish, Edward; Barnes, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    In an observational study of 31,257 children we investigated the effects of paternal age at the time of the child’s birth, paternal absence and non-biological fathers on children’s health. Results are per 5 year change in paternal age. Older fathers were associated with lower rates of unintentional injuries, odds ratio (OR)=0.966, P=0.0027. There was a quadratic association between paternal age and risk of hospital admission, β=0.0121, P=0.0109, with minimum risk at paternal age 37.7. Absent fathers were associated with increased risk of hospital admission, OR=1.19, P<10−3, lower rates of complete immunizations to 9 months, OR=0.562, P<10−3, higher Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) difficulties scores: β=0.304, P=0.0024 (3 year olds), β=0.697, P<10−3 (5 year olds). Non-biological fathers were associated with increased risk of unintentional injury, OR=1.16, P=0.0319 and hospital admission, OR=1.26, P=0.0166; lower rates of complete immunizations to 9 months, OR=0.343, P=0.0309 and higher SDQ difficulties scores: β=0.908, P<10−3. PMID:25918623

  18. Certainty of paternity and paternal investment in eastern bluebirds and tree swallows.

    PubMed

    Kempenaers; Lanctot; Robertson

    1998-04-01

    Extra-pair paternity is common in many socially monogamous passerine birds with biparental care. Thus, males often invest in offspring to which they are not related. Models of optimal parental investment predict that, under certain assumptions, males should lower their investment in response to reduced certainty of paternity. We attempted to reduce certainty of paternity experimentally in two species, the eastern bluebird, Sialia sialis, and the tree swallow, Tachycineta bicolor, by temporarily removing fertile females on two mornings during egg laying. In both species, experimental males usually attempted to copulate with the female immediately after her reappearance, suggesting that they experienced the absence of their mate as a threat to their paternity. Experimental males copulated at a significantly higher rate than control males. However, contrary to the prediction of the model, experimental males did not invest less than control males in their offspring. There was no difference between experimental and control nests in the proportion of male feeds, male and female feeding rates, nestling growth and nestling condition and size at age 14 days. We argue that females might have restored the males' confidence in paternity after the experiment by soliciting or accepting copulations. Alternatively, males may not reduce their effort, because the fitness costs to their own offspring may outweigh the benefits for the males, at least in populations where females cannot fully compensate for reduced male investment. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9632472

  19. Religion as a means to assure paternity.

    PubMed

    Strassmann, Beverly I; Kurapati, Nikhil T; Hug, Brendan F; Burke, Erin E; Gillespie, Brenda W; Karafet, Tatiana M; Hammer, Michael F

    2012-06-19

    The sacred texts of five world religions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism) use similar belief systems to set limits on sexual behavior. We propose that this similarity is a shared cultural solution to a biological problem: namely male uncertainty over the paternity of offspring. Furthermore, we propose the hypothesis that religious practices that more strongly regulate female sexuality should be more successful at promoting paternity certainty. Using genetic data on 1,706 father-son pairs, we tested this hypothesis in a traditional African population in which multiple religions (Islam, Christianity, and indigenous) coexist in the same families and villages. We show that the indigenous religion enables males to achieve a significantly (P = 0.019) lower probability of cuckoldry (1.3% versus 2.9%) by enforcing the honest signaling of menstruation, but that all three religions share tenets aimed at the avoidance of extrapair copulation. Our findings provide evidence for high paternity certainty in a traditional African population, and they shed light on the reproductive agendas that underlie religious patriarchy. PMID:22665788

  20. Human mutagens: evidence from paternal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Douglas, G.R.; Nestmann, E.R.; Blakey, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    The importance of inherited mutations as a cause of human disease has been established clearly through examples of well-defined genetic anomalies, such as Down syndrome and retinoblastoma. Furthermore, it is suspected that environmental contaminants induce mutations resulting in increased risk for such defects in subsequent generations of persons exposed. The present lack of direct evidence for induced inherited genetic disorders in human beings hampers the development of risk estimation techniques for extrapolation from animal models. The most extensive prospective epidemiologic studies of inherited genetic effects have involved survivors of atomic bomb detonations and patients treated with cancer chemotherapy. In neither case has a significant elevation in inherited genetic effects or cancer been detected in the offspring of exposed individuals. Epidemiologic studies of subjects receiving chronic exposure may be confounded by the effect of maternal exposure during pregnancy. Consideration of only paternal exposure can minimize the confounding influence of teratogenicity, enhancing the resolving power of studies for inherited effects. Using this approach, retrospective (case-control) studies of childhood cancer patients have provided limited but suggestive evidence for inheritance of induced effects. Endpoints, such as congenital malformations and spontaneous abortion following paternal exposure, can also be considered as indicators of heritable mutagenic effects. For example, there is limited evidence suggesting that paternal exposure to anaesthetic gases may cause miscarriage and congenital abnormalities as a result of induced male germ cell mutations. 104 references.

  1. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for Japanese Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus niphonius).

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Zhu, L; Liu, S-F; Tang, Q-S; Su, Y-Q; Zhuang, Z-M

    2012-01-01

    We isolated and characterized 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci in Japanese Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus niphonius) using a (GT)(13)-enriched genomic library. Forty individuals were collected from Qingdao, China. We found 3 to 24 alleles per locus, with a mean of 8.8. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.263 to 0.975 and from 0.385 to 0.946, with means of 0.655 and 0.685, respectively. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg proportions was detected at three loci. Two loci showed evidence for null alleles. These microsatellite markers will be useful for population genetic analysis of Japanese Spanish mackerel. PMID:22614347

  2. A MOLECULAR EXAMINATION OF RELATEDNESS, MULTIPLE PATERNITY, AND COHABITATION OF THE SOUTHERN PLAINS WOODRAT (NEOTOMA MICROPUS)

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, B. Dnate’; Mendez-Harclerode, Francisca M.; Fulhorst, Charles F.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Two hundred twenty-two individuals of the southern plains woodrat (Neotoma micropus) were captured from 198 excavated middens at 10 discrete collecting sites from a single population in south-central Texas. Field data, mitochondrial D-loop haplotypes, and polymorphic microsatellite loci (5–7) were used to determine genetic patterns in parentage, relatedness, and mating strategy. Microsatellite loci were highly polymorphic (average observed heterozygosity = 0.859) and were used to construct genotypes that were unique for each individual (probability of identical genotypes: 1 in 2,104,567). Results indicated a high frequency of multiple paternity (6 of 9 litters), evidence of repeat mating between the same 2 individuals, and no indication of male dominance at any collection site. Examination of these data suggested a promiscuous mating system. Within a site, average relatedness between adult females was similar to that between adult males. A higher level of cohabitation from that previously documented was recorded and finer-scale analyses revealed high levels of relatedness between most cohabiting individuals. Taken with results from other studies of mating behaviors of N. micropus, our results suggest that mating and social behavior of this species are likely influenced by population density. PMID:20011670

  3. Paternal genetic history of the Basque population of Spain.

    PubMed

    Young, Kristin L; Sun, Guangyun; Deka, Ranjan; Crawford, Michael H

    2011-08-01

    This study examines the genetic variation in Basque Y chromosome lineages using data on 12 Y-short tandem repeat (STR) loci in a sample of 158 males from four Basque provinces of Spain (Alava, Vizcaya, Guipuzcoa, and Navarre). As reported in previous studies, the Basques are characterized by high frequencies of haplogroup R1b (83%). AMOVA analysis demonstrates genetic homogeneity, with a small but significant amount of genetic structure between provinces (Y-short tandem repeat loci STRs: 1.71%, p = 0.0369). Gene and haplotype diversity levels in the Basque population are on the low end of the European distribution (gene diversity: 0.4268; haplotype diversity: 0.9421). Post-Neolithic contribution to the paternal Basque gene pool was estimated by measuring the proportion of those haplogroups with a Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor (TMRCA) previously dated either prior (R1b, I2a2) or subsequent to (E1b1b, G2a, J2a) the Neolithic. Based on these estimates, the Basque provinces show varying degrees of post-Neolithic contribution in the paternal lineages (10.9% in the combined sample). PMID:21846204

  4. Paternal employment in solvent related occupations and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Daniell, W E; Vaughan, T L

    1988-03-01

    Washington State birth certificates were examined for associations between adverse pregnancy outcomes and paternal employment in solvent exposed occupations. Four cohorts defined by live, singleton births to fathers usually employed as auto body shop workers, painters (construction and maintenance), printers, or fibreglass workers were compared retrospectively with both a systematically selected control cohort and a low solvent exposed, occupationally defined control cohort (paternal electricians). The effects of maternal race and medical illness were controlled by sample restriction; maternal age and gravidity by stratified analysis. There was evidence of increased risk of low birth weight for infants born to fathers employed as body shop workers (relative risk = 1.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.1-2.4) or painters (RR = 1.4; CI = 0.9-2.1) when compared with the systematically selected controls but not with the electrician controls. The excess risk appeared stronger when only term infants were analysed suggesting a mechanism of growth retardation rather than prematurity. There was no evidence of increased risk among the other exposed cohorts or for other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Several design features limit the interpretation of the findings and confirmation by other studies is needed. PMID:3348995

  5. Microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, Matej; Stabuc, Borut

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. In 75% CRC develops sporadically, in 25% hereditary or as a consequence of inflammatory bowel disease. CRC carcinogenesis develops over many years. The cause of CRC in 85% is chromosomal instability (CIN) and in 15% microsatellite instability (MSI-H), where hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) represents 1020%. Microsatellite sequences (MS) are repeated sequences of short stretches of DNA all over the genome. Microsatellite stability (MSS) means MS are the same in each cell of an individual, whereas microsatellite instability (MSI-H) means MS differ in normal and cancer cells of an individual. The cause of MSI-H is a damaged mismatch repair mechanism (MMR), with the most important MMR proteins being MSH2, MLH1 and MSH6. Conclusions MSI-H seems to be an important prognostic factor in CRC and an important predictive factor of CRC chemotherapeutic treatment efficacy. Clinical trials conducted until now have shown contradictory findings in different chemotherapeutic settings, adjuvant and palliative; therefore MSI-H is going to be the object of the future research. The future of cancer treatment is in the individualized therapy based on molecular characteristics of the tumour, such as MSI-H in CRC. PMID:22933939

  6. A microsatellite map of wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Röder, M S; Korzun, V; Wendehake, K; Plaschke, J; Tixier, M H; Leroy, P; Ganal, M W

    1998-01-01

    Hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell) is one of the world's most important crop plants and displays a very low level of intraspecific polymorphism. We report the development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers using procedures optimized for the large wheat genome. The isolation of microsatellite-containing clones from hypomethylated regions of the wheat genome increased the proportion of useful markers almost twofold. The majority (80%) of primer sets developed are genome-specific and detect only a single locus in one of the three genomes of bread wheat (A, B, or D). Only 20% of the markers detect more than one locus. A total of 279 loci amplified by 230 primer sets were placed onto a genetic framework map composed of RFLPs previously mapped in the reference population of the International Triticeae Mapping Initiative (ITMI) Opata 85 x W7984. Sixty-five microsatellites were mapped at a LOD >2.5, and 214 microsatellites were assigned to the most likely intervals. Ninety-three loci were mapped to the A genome, 115 to the B genome, and 71 to the D genome. The markers are randomly distributed along the linkage map, with clustering in several centromeric regions. PMID:9691054

  7. Blueberry Microsatellite Markers Identify Cranberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty-six blueberry simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers or microsatellites were tested for the ability to amplify a polymorphic marker in eight American cranberry accessions. Sixteen SSRs resulted in informative and polymorphic SSR primer pairs and were used to fingerprint 16 economically important...

  8. Heterozygosity increases microsatellite mutation rate.

    PubMed

    Amos, William

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing of families of Arabidopsis has recently lent strong support to the heterozygote instability (HI) hypothesis that heterozygosity locally increases mutation rate. However, there is an important theoretical difference between the impact on base substitutions, where mutation rate increases in regions surrounding a heterozygous site, and the impact of HI on sequences such as microsatellites, where mutations are likely to occur at the heterozygous site itself. At microsatellite loci, HI should create a positive feedback loop, with heterozygosity and mutation rate mutually increasing each other. Direct support for HI acting on microsatellites is limited and contradictory. I therefore analysed AC microsatellites in 1163 genome sequences from the 1000 genomes project. I used the presence of rare alleles, which are likely to be very recent in origin, as a surrogate measure of mutation rate. I show that rare alleles are more likely to occur at locus-population combinations with higher heterozygosity even when all populations carry exactly the same number of alleles. PMID:26740567

  9. Microsatellites from Conyza canadensis (horseweed)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite loci were identified from Conyza canadensis (horseweed). Primer pairs for 64 loci were developed and of these eight were optimized and screened using genomic DNA from 22 accessions of horseweed from North America. Most loci were polymorphic and the number of alleles per locus ranged ...

  10. Genetic diversity in population of largemouth bronze gudgeon (Coreius guichenoti Sauvage et Dabry) from Yangtze River determined by microsatellite DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Futie; Tan, Deqing

    2010-01-01

    Largemouth bronze gudgeon (Coreius guichenoti Sauvage et Dabry 1874), one of the endemic fish species in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River in China, is a benthic and potamodromous fish that is typically found in rivers with torrential flow. Three dams in the Yangtze River, Ertan Dam, Three Gorges Dam and Gezhouba Dam, may have had vital impacts on the habitat and spawning behaviors of largemouth bronze gudgeon, and could ultimately threaten the survival of this fish. We studied the population genetic diversity of C. guichenoti samples collected at seven sites (JH, GLP, BX, HJ, MD, SDP and XB) within the Yangtze River and one of its tributaries, the Yalong River. Genetic diversity patterns were determined by analyzing genetic data from 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci. A high genetic diversity among these largemouth bronze gudgeon populations was indicated by the number of microsatellite alleles (A) and the expected heterozygosity (HE). No significant population variation occurred among GLP, BX, HJ and MD populations, but dramatic population differentiation was observed among JH and XB, two dam-blocked populations, versus other populations. Tests for bottlenecks did not indicate recent dramatic population declines and concurrent losses of genetic diversity in any largemouth bronze gudgeon populations. To the contrary, we found that dams accelerated the population differentiation of this fish. PMID:21317547

  11. Addressing policy barriers to paternal involvement during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alio, Amina P; Bond, M Jermane; Padilla, Yolanda C; Heidelbaugh, Joel J; Lu, Michael; Parker, Willie J

    2011-05-01

    Efforts to reduce infant mortality in the United States have failed to incorporate paternal involvement. Research suggests that paternal involvement, which has been recognized as contributing to child development and health for many decades, is likely to affect infant mortality through the mother's well-being, primarily her access to resources and support. In spite of that, systemic barriers facing the father and the influence on his involvement in the pregnancy have received little attention. The Commission on Paternal Involvement in Pregnancy Outcomes (CPIPO) has identified the most important social barriers to paternal involvement during pregnancy and outlined a set of key policy priorities aimed at fostering paternal involvement. This article summarizes the key recommendations, including equitable paternity leave, elimination of marriage as a tax and public assistance penalty, integration of fatherhood initiatives in MCH programs, support of low-income fathers through employment training, father inclusion in family planning services, and expansion of birth data collection to include father information. PMID:21472512

  12. Effect of Paternal Age on Reproductive Outcomes of Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Haiyan; Liu, Haiying; Huang, Qing; Liu, Jianqiao

    2016-01-01

    The impact of paternal age on reproduction, especially using assisted reproductive technologies, has not been well studied to date. To investigate the effect of paternal age on reproductive outcomes, here we performed a retrospective analysis of 2,627 intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles performed at the Reproductive Medicine Center of the Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (China) between January 2007 and May 2015. Effect of paternal age on embryo quality [number of fertilized oocytes, 2 pronucleus zygotes (2PNs), viable embryos, and high-quality embryos] was analyzed by multiple linear regression. Relationships between paternal age and pregnancy outcomes were analyzed by binary logistic regression. After adjusting for female age, no association between paternal age and the following parameters of embryo quality was observed: number of fertilized oocytes (B = -0.032; 95% CI -0.069–0.005; P = 0.088), number of 2PNs (B = -0.005; 95% CI -0.044–0.034; P = 0.806), and number of viable embryos (B = -0.025; 95% CI -0.052–0.001; P = 0.062). However, paternal age negatively influenced the number of high-quality embryos (B = -0.020; 95% CI -0.040–0.000; P = 0.045). Moreover, paternal age had no effect on pregnancy outcomes (OR for a 5-year interval), including the rates of clinical pregnancy (OR 0.919; 95% CI 0.839–1.006; P = 0.067), ongoing pregnancy (OR 0.914; 95% CI 0.833–1.003; P = 0.058), early pregnancy loss (OR 1.019; 95% CI 0.823–1.263; P = 0.861), live births (OR 0.916; 95% CI 0.833–1.007; P = 0.070), and preterm births (OR 1.061; 95% CI 0.898–1.254; P = 0.485). Therefore, increased paternal age negatively influences the number of high-quality embryos, but has no effect on pregnancy outcomes in couples undergoing ICSI cycles. However, more studies including men aged over 60 years with a longer-term follow-up are needed. PMID:26901529

  13. High frequency of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis detected by a combined approach of microsatellite segregation analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridisation.

    PubMed

    Jehee, F S; Krepischi-Santos, A C V; Rocha, K M; Cavalcanti, D P; Kim, C A; Bertola, D R; Alonso, L G; D'Angelo, C S; Mazzeu, J F; Froyen, G; Lugtenberg, D; Vianna-Morgante, A M; Rosenberg, C; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2008-07-01

    We present the first comprehensive study, to our knowledge, on genomic chromosomal analysis in syndromic craniosynostosis. In total, 45 patients with craniosynostotic disorders were screened with a variety of methods including conventional karyotype, microsatellite segregation analysis, subtelomeric multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) and whole-genome array-based comparative genome hybridisation. Causative abnormalities were present in 42.2% (19/45) of the samples, and 27.8% (10/36) of the patients with normal conventional karyotype carried submicroscopic imbalances. Our results include a wide variety of imbalances and point to novel chromosomal regions associated with craniosynostosis. The high incidence of pure duplications or trisomies suggests that these are important mechanisms in craniosynostosis, particularly in cases involving the metopic suture. PMID:18456720

  14. Microsatellite instability in adenocarcinoma of the prostrate

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, R.B.; Willie, A.H.; Cheville, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Instability of tandem repeat sequences (microsatellites) has been reported to play a major etiologic role in familial colon cancer, as well as a potential role in the carcinogenesis of other sporadic neoplasms. These replication errors are the result of faulty DNA excision/repair function controlled at the gene level. In order to examine this phenomenon in prostate cancer, we screened 40 tumors with di-, tri- and tetranucleotide markers spanning eleven chromosomal loci. Microsatellite instability was observed overall in 3 of the 40 cases (7.5%). All changes were identified solely in tetranucleotide sequences (3 of 11 total markers analyzed). One tumor demonstrated repeat length expansions at two loci, while the other tumors did so at a single locus. Both Type 1 (>4 base pairs) and Type II (4 base pairs) mutations were identified. One of these cases also included metastatic nodal disease. Analysis of the metastatic tumor tissue revealed allelic patterns identical to the normal tissue control. A secondary screening of the mutated tumors demonstrated no repeat length alterations in 16 additional markers. A CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) gene was also studied and demonstrated that 3 of 40 (7.5%) tumors contained mutations within this repeat. We concluded that microsatellite instability is uncommon in prostate adenocarcinoma appearing to occur more often in tetranucleotide repeat sequences and in an AR gene repeat. Additionally, these findings suggest that dysfunctional DNA excision/repair mechanisms, as evidenced by the low frequency of replication errors, are unlikely to play a major role in the natural history of prostate cancer.

  15. Heterologous nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite amplification and variation in tea, Camellia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Kaundun, Shiv Shankhar; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2002-12-01

    The advantage of the cross transferability of heterologous chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite primers was taken to detect polymorphism among 24 tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) genotypes, including both the assamica and the sinensis varieties. Primer information was obtained from the closely related Camellia japonica species for four nuclear microsatellites, and from Nicotiana tabaccum for seven universal chloroplast microsatellites. All of the nuclear microsatellite loci tested generated an expected DNA fragment in tea, revealing between three and five alleles per locus. Four out of the seven chloroplast microsatellites primers amplified positively, and of these only one was polymorphic with three alleles, which is in agreement with the conserved nature of chloroplast microsatellites at the intraspecific level. A factorial correspondence analysis carried out on all genotypes and nuclear microsatellite alleles separated the assamica and sinensis genotypes into two groups, thus demonstrating the value of these markers in establishing the genetic relationship between tea varieties. Genetic diversity measured with nuclear microsatellites was higher than that measured with other types of molecular markers, offering prospects for their use in fingerprinting, mapping, and population genetic studies, whereas polymorphisms detected at a cpSSR locus will allow the determination of plastid inheritance in the species. PMID:12502248

  16. Joint Inference of Microsatellite Mutation Models, Population History and Genealogies Using Transdimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Drummond, Alexei J.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a framework for Bayesian coalescent inference from microsatellite data that enables inference of population history parameters averaged over microsatellite mutation models. To achieve this we first implemented a rich family of microsatellite mutation models and related components in the software package BEAST. BEAST is a powerful tool that performs Bayesian MCMC analysis on molecular data to make coalescent and evolutionary inferences. Our implementation permits the application of existing nonparametric methods to microsatellite data. The implemented microsatellite models are based on the replication slippage mechanism and focus on three properties of microsatellite mutation: length dependency of mutation rate, mutational bias toward expansion or contraction, and number of repeat units changed in a single mutation event. We develop a new model that facilitates microsatellite model averaging and Bayesian model selection by transdimensional MCMC. With Bayesian model averaging, the posterior distributions of population history parameters are integrated across a set of microsatellite models and thus account for model uncertainty. Simulated data are used to evaluate our method in terms of accuracy and precision of θ estimation and also identification of the true mutation model. Finally we apply our method to a red colobus monkey data set as an example. PMID:21385725

  17. Transferability of Rubus Microsatellite Markers for use in Black Raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. To date, SSR marker development in Rubus has focused on red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L., subgenu...

  18. Targeted development of informative microsatellite (SSR) markers

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, M. J.; Sharp, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a novel approach, selectively amplified microsatellite (SAM) analysis, for the targeted development of informative simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A modified selectively amplified microsatellite polymorphic loci assay is used to generate multi-locus SSR fingerprints that provide a source of polymorphic DNA markers (SAMs) for use in genetic studies. These polymorphisms capture the repeat length variation associated with SSRs and allow their chromosomal location to be determined prior to the expense of isolating and characterising individual loci. SAMs can then be converted to locus-specific SSR markers with the design and synthesis of a single primer specific to the conserved region flanking the repeat. This approach offers a cost-efficient and rapid method for developing SSR markers for predetermined chromosomal locations and of potential informativeness. The high recovery rate of useful SSR markers makes this strategy a valuable tool for population and genetic mapping studies. The utility of SAM analysis was demonstrated by the development of SSR markers in bread wheat. PMID:11292858

  19. Reporting for duty: the paternal function and clinical formulations.

    PubMed

    Davies, Nick

    2015-02-01

    The author highlights some developments in the theory of the preoedipal paternal function and paternal functionary and incorporates these ideas in developing clinical formulations for four clinical cases that privilege the preoedipal paternal function. In particular, four aspects of the preoedipal paternal function are identified, and for each a clinical case is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the necessity of widening clinical formulations to ensure clinicians have the widest possible set of clinical ideas and hence interventions and techniques at their fingertips. PMID:25688683

  20. Renal cell carcinoma of end-stage renal disease: an analysis of chromosome 3, 7, and 17 abnormalities by microsatellite amplification.

    PubMed

    Hughson, M D; Bigler, S; Dickman, K; Kovacs, G

    1999-03-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients have an increased risk of carcinoma of the kidney, thought to result from development of a disproportionately high number of papillary renal cell carcinomas. This study was undertaken to discover whether these renal carcinomas have a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 3, which characterizes conventional (clear cell) carcinomas, or trisomies of chromosomes 7 and 17, which characterize the majority of sporadic papillary renal cell neoplasms. Archival specimens from 17 end-stage kidneys containing renal cell carcinomas were collected from 16 ESRD patients. DNA was extracted from paraffin blocks of tumor and nontumorous tissue. Microsatellites on the long and short arm of chromosomes 3, 7, and 17 were amplified in paired "normal" tumor samples. Heterozygous loci were analyzed for loss of heterozygosity, indicating a deletion, and for allele ratio differences, indicating a duplication. Successful microsatellite studies were obtained on 18 tumors (2 conventional carcinomas, 14 papillary carcinomas, 2 unclassified [solid, eosinophilic cell] carcinomas). Of the papillary carcinomas, none had a 3p deletion, five had trisomies of both chromosomes 7 and 17, six had no changes in chromosomes 7 and 17, and three had either trisomy 7 or trisomy 17 but not both. A 3p deletion was present in one of two conventional carcinomas. No chromosome 3, 7, or 17 changes were identified in the unclassified carcinomas. The genetic abnormalities in 6 of 18 ESRD tumors seemed to be the same as those found in sporadic papillary or conventional renal cell carcinomas. Nine of 14 papillary carcinomas did not show allelic duplications of chromosomes 7 and 17. This is uncharacteristic of the findings reported for most of the sporadic forms of the neoplasm and suggests that the genetic mechanism underlying the development of many papillary renal cell carcinomas in ESRD patients might be different than that of the general population. PMID:10102616

  1. Microsatellite marker diversity in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, M W; Giraldo, M C; Buendía, H F; Tovar, E; Duque, M C; Beebe, S E

    2006-06-01

    A diversity survey was used to estimate allelic diversity and heterozygosity of 129 microsatellite markers in a panel of 44 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes that have been used as parents of mapping populations. Two types of microsatellites were evaluated, based respectively on gene coding and genomic sequences. Genetic diversity was evaluated by estimating the polymorphism information content (PIC), as well as the distribution and range of alleles sizes. Gene-based microsatellites proved to be less polymorphic than genomic microsatellites in terms of both number of alleles (6.0 vs. 9.2) and PIC values (0.446 vs. 0.594) while greater size differences between the largest and the smallest allele were observed for the genomic microsatellites than for the gene-based microsatellites (31.4 vs. 19.1 bp). Markers that showed a high number of alleles were identified with a maximum of 28 alleles for the marker BMd1. The microsatellites were useful for distinguishing Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes, for uncovering the races within each genepool and for separating wild accessions from cultivars. Greater polymorphism and race structure was found within the Andean gene pool than within the Mesoamerican gene pool and polymorphism rate between genotypes was consistent with genepool and race identity. Comparisons between Andean genotypes had higher polymorphism (53.0%) on average than comparisons among Mesoamerican genotypes (33.4%). Within the Mesoamerican parental combinations, the intra-racial combinations between Mesoamerica and Durango or Jalisco race genotypes showed higher average rates of polymorphism (37.5%) than the within-race combinations between Mesoamerica race genotypes (31.7%). In multiple correspondance analysis we found two principal clusters of genotypes corresponding to the Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools and subgroups representing specific races especially for the Nueva Granada and Peru races of the Andean gene pool. Intra population diversity was higher within the Andean genepool than within the Mesoamerican genepool and this pattern was observed for both gene-based and genomic microsatellites. Furthermore, intra-population diversity within the Andean races (0.356 on average) was higher than within the Mesoamerican races (0.302). Within the Andean gene pool, race Peru had higher diversity compared to race Nueva Granada, while within the Mesoamerican gene pool, the races Durango, Guatemala and Jalisco had comparable levels of diversity which were below that of race Mesoamerica. PMID:16614831

  2. Moral Status and the Wrongness of Paternalism

    PubMed Central

    Birks, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I consider the view that paternalism is wrong when it demeans or diminishes the paternalizee’s moral status (the Moral Status Argument). I argue that we should reject the Moral Status Argument because it is both too narrow and too broad. It is too narrow because it cannot account for the wrongness of some of the most objectionable paternalistic interventions, namely strong paternalistic interventions. It is too broad because it is unable to distinguish between wrongful paternalistic acts that are plausibly considered more wrong than other wrongful paternalistic acts. PMID:25075133

  3. An Epigenetic Role for Disrupted Paternal Gene Expression in Postzygotic Seed Abortion in Arabidopsis Interspecific Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Kirkbride, Ryan C; Yu, Helen Hong; Nah, Gyoungju; Zhang, Changqing; Shi, Xiaoli; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Interspecific hybrids often increase the levels of heterozygosity and hybrid vigor, but some interspecific hybrid seeds are aborted shortly after fertilization. The mechanism behind this postzygotic seed abortion is poorly understood. Here, we report genome-wide analysis of allelic expression changes in developing siliques and seeds in three F1 interspecific crosses between Arabidopsis thaliana (Col, Ler, or C24) and Arabidopsis arenosa. The majority of maternally expressed genes (MEGs) were shared among all three F1 interspecific crosses, whereas ∼90% of 272 paternally expressed genes (PEGs) were found only in one or two F1 crosses, suggesting a role for disrupted paternal gene expression in seed abortion that varies in different crosses. Consistent with this notion, 12 PEGs in the infertile interspecific hybrids matched MEGs in fertile intraspecific hybrids. This disruption of PEGs in the interspecific hybrids was consistent with the upregulation of the genes in the paternal-excess interploidy cross (2X6) between a diploid mother and a hexaploid father, leading to the seed abortion. Moreover, a subset of PEGs in the interspecific crosses were also upregulated in the intraspecific hybrid met1XWT or meaXWT, in which the mutant of MET1 (DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE1) or MEDEA, a Polycomb Repressive Complex2 gene, was used as the maternal parent. These data suggest that maternal epigenetic factors and paternal gene expression play important roles in the postzygotic seed abortion in interspecific hybrids or neo-allopolyploids. PMID:26409189

  4. A novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1998-02-01

    The authors are researching extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for ``smaller-faster-cheaper`` spacecraft attitude and control systems. The will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses their novel control method to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source. Though still in design infancy, the ``Nervous Net`` controllers described could allow for space missions not currently possible given conventional satellite hardware. Result, prospects and details are presented.

  5. Modeling paternal attentiveness: distressed pups evoke differential neurobiological and behavioral responses in paternal and nonpaternal mice.

    PubMed

    Lambert, K G; Franssen, C L; Hampton, J E; Rzucidlo, A M; Hyer, M M; True, M; Kaufman, C; Bardi, M

    2013-03-27

    With the exception of parturition and lactation, male California deer mice (Peromyscus californicus) exhibit the same parental responses toward offspring as conspecific females. A closely related species, Peromyscus maniculatus, however, rarely exhibits paternal responses. In the current study, a comparative species approach was used to assess paternal responses in both Peromyscus species with varying levels of paternal experience (biological fathers, pup-exposed virgins, and pup-naïve virgins). Of special interest was the persistence of the males to direct their attention toward a distressed pup housed in a small enclosure (i.e., a barrier existed between males and pups). In addition to pup-directed responses, non-pup-directed responses such as grooming, resting and jumping were recorded. Subsequently, all animals' brains were assessed for fos-immunoreactivity (ir) in several areas previously associated with the paternal brain circuit. Overall, P. californicus exhibited more pup-directed responses as well as less fos-ir in brain areas involved in emotional integration and processing such as the insula and anterior cingulate. In addition to increased activation of emotional regulatory areas, P. maniculatus males, observed to direct their behavior away from the pup, exhibited higher fos-ir in the nucleus accumbens (involved in goal acquisition), perhaps due to a heightened motivation to avoid the pups. Interestingly, experience with pups altered the lateral septum and amygdala activation of P. maniculatus to levels similar to P. californicus biological fathers. Finally, fos-ir was increased in the medial preoptic area, involved in the maintenance of maternal behavior, in the biological fathers of both species. Thus, although biological predispositions toward pup-directed behaviors were observed in P. californicus males, evidence of a few shifts toward the paternal neural activation profile was apparent in P. maniculatus males. Specifically, modifications in fear responses and social processing may represent the cornerstones of the gradual shift from social tentativeness to social attentiveness in the presence of pups. PMID:23262236

  6. Hepatoblastoma in an infant with paternal uniparental disomy 14.

    PubMed

    Horii, Mariko; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Momoeda, Mikio; Nakagawa, Machiko; Hirata, Michio; Kusakawa, Isao; Yamanaka, Michiko

    2012-12-01

    A 29-year-old primigravida developed polyhydramnios at 24 weeks of gestation, requiring six serial amnioreductions. In addition, prenatal ultrasound examinations revealed a fetus with small stomach pouch, small thorax, slightly shortened limbs, and skin edema; paternal uniparental disomy 14(upd(14)pat) phenotype was suspected. At 37 weeks, the patient delivered a 2558 g female infant with characteristic facial features, webbed neck, thoracic deformity, abdominal wall defect, skin edema, overlapping fingers, placentomegaly, and small thorax with 'coat-hanger' appearance of the ribs on chest X-ray. A phenotype consistent with upd(14)pat was confirmed by DNA analysis. Although the infant's condition was initially stable, hepatoblastoma was subsequently detected and right hepatectomy was performed on day 224. On day 382, the infant was discharged with in-home respiratory management. PMID:23181499

  7. Parental Psychopathology and Paternal Child Neglect in Late Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Chris; Mezzich, Ada C.; Day, Bang-Shiuh

    2006-01-01

    We aimed at determining the association of both severity of paternal and maternal substance use disorder (SUD) and psychiatric disorders with paternal child neglect severity during late childhood. The sample comprised 146 intact SUD (n=71) and non SUD (n=75) families with a 10-12 year old female or male biological offspring. The average age of…

  8. Fathers and Families: Paternal Factors in Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biller, Henry B.

    Examining the implications of research findings concerning the impact of paternal involvement in child development, this book elaborates on how variations in paternal involvement affect many different dimensions of child and parent development. The 12 chapters discuss the role of fathers in regard to: (1) the advantages of two-parent families; (2)…

  9. Female reproductive synchrony predicts skewed paternity across primates

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Charles L.; Schülke, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered remarkable variation in paternity within primate groups. To date, however, we lack a general understanding of the factors that drive variation in paternity skew among primate groups and across species. Our study focused on hypotheses from reproductive skew theory involving limited control and the use of paternity “concessions” by investigating how paternity covaries with the number of males, female estrous synchrony, and rates of extragroup paternity. In multivariate and phylogenetically controlled analyses of data from 27 studies on 19 species, we found strong support for a limited control skew model, with reproductive skew within groups declining as female reproductive synchrony and the number of males per group increase. Of these 2 variables, female reproductive synchrony explained more of the variation in paternity distributions. To test whether dominant males provide incentives to subordinates to resist matings by extragroup males, that is, whether dominants make concessions of paternity, we derived a novel prediction that skew is lower within groups when threat from outside the group exists. This prediction was not supported as a primary factor underlying patterns of reproductive skew among primate species. However, our approach revealed that if concessions occur in primates, they are most likely when female synchrony is low, as these conditions provide alpha male control of paternity that is assumed by concessions models. Collectively, our analyses demonstrate that aspects of male reproductive competition are the primary drivers of reproductive skew in primates. PMID:19018288

  10. Low frequency paternal transmission of plastid genes in Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anja; Stelljes, Christian; Adams, Caroline; Kirchner, Stefan; Burkhard, Gabi; Jarzombski, Sabine; Broer, Inge; Horn, Patricia; Elsayed, Ashraf; Hagl, Peter; Leister, Dario; Koop, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Plastid-encoded genes are maternally inherited in most plant species. Transgenes located on the plastid genome are thus within a natural confinement system, preventing their distribution via pollen. However, a low-frequency leakage of plastids via pollen seems to be universal in plants. Here we report that a very low-level paternal inheritance in Arabidopsis thaliana occurs under field conditions. As pollen donor an Arabidopsis accession (Ler-Ely) was used, which carried a plastid-localized atrazine resistance due to a point mutation in the psbA gene. The frequency of pollen transmission into F1 plants, based on their ability to express the atrazine resistance was 1.9 × 10(-5). We extended our analysis to another cruciferous species, the world-wide cultivated crop Brassica napus. First, we isolated a fertile and stable plastid transformant (T36) in a commercial cultivar of B. napus (cv Drakkar). In T36 the aadA and the bar genes were integrated in the inverted repeat region of the B. napus plastid DNA following particle bombardment of hypocotyl segments. Southern blot analysis confirmed transgene integration and homoplasmy of plastid DNA. Line T36 expressed Basta resistance from the inserted bar gene and this trait was used to estimate the frequency of pollen transmission into F1 plants. A frequency of <2.6 × 10(-5) was determined in the greenhouse. Taken together, our data show a very low rate of paternal plastid transmission in Brassicacea. Moreover, the establishment of plastid transformation in B. napus facilitates a safe use of this important crop plant for plant biotechnology. PMID:25343875

  11. Paternal and sibling incest: a case report.

    PubMed

    Celbis, Osman; Ozcan, M Erkan; Ozdemir, Bora

    2006-01-01

    A case is reported of a female victim of paternal incest, who had also been raped repeatedly by her elder brother for two years. A survey of the literature showed no other report of such a case from Turkey. This does not necessarily mean that the incidence of paternal and sibling incest does not happen, but may indicate that incestuous abuse is not reported or handled without making it known to legal authorities. The victim was first raped by her 16 year-old brother when she was 9 years old. He raped her repeatedly over a period of two years, until he left home. Her father began raping the victim when she was 13 year-old, leaving her pregnant at age 15. He took her to a doctor for a termination of pregnancy. The father continued abuse after the termination. The victim left home to marry a man. The father filed a lawsuit against the man for taking the victim away from home. More openness and awareness of incest in Turkey may encourage the victims to seek help from medical and legal authorities. PMID:16310400

  12. Subtle Biobehavioral Effects Produced by Paternal Cocaine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Killinger, Catherine E.; Robinson, Stacey; Stanwood, Gregg D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increased prevalence of cocaine use and abuse in males as compared to females, possible effects of paternal cocaine exposure on biobehavioral development has received little attention. We therefore exposed male mice to cocaine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle for 10 weeks, and then used those mice as sires. We then behaviorally phenotyped the F1 offspring in order to assess the consequences of paternal cocaine exposure on brain function. We report the presence of a subtle but significant increase in immobility in the tail suspension test, a measure of behavioral depression, following paternal cocaine. Body weight was also significantly decreased in paternal cocaine-exposed offspring. Other aspects of neurobehavioral function, including locomotor activity, anxiety, and learning and memory, were not affected by paternal cocaine history. These data suggest alterations in brain systems and/or circuitry underlying mood regulation in the offspring of cocaine-using fathers. PMID:22807092

  13. Relationships of maternal and paternal anthropometry with neonatal body size, proportions and adiposity in an Australian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pomeroy, Emma; Wells, Jonathan CK; Cole, Tim J; O'Callaghan, Michael; Stock, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    The patterns of association between maternal or paternal and neonatal phenotype may offer insight into how neonatal characteristics are shaped by evolutionary processes, such as conflicting parental interests in fetal investment and obstetric constraints. Paternal interests are theoretically served by maximizing fetal growth, and maternal interests by managing investment in current and future offspring, but whether paternal and maternal influences act on different components of overall size is unknown. We tested whether parents' prepregnancy height and body mass index (BMI) were related to neonatal anthropometry (birthweight, head circumference, absolute and proportional limb segment and trunk lengths, subcutaneous fat) among 1,041 Australian neonates using stepwise linear regression. Maternal and paternal height and maternal BMI were associated with birthweight. Paternal height related to offspring forearm and lower leg lengths, maternal height and BMI to neonatal head circumference, and maternal BMI to offspring adiposity. Principal components analysis identified three components of variability reflecting neonatal “head and trunk skeletal size,” “adiposity,” and “limb lengths.” Regression analyses of the component scores supported the associations of head and trunk size or adiposity with maternal anthropometry, and limb lengths with paternal anthropometry. Our results suggest that while neonatal fatness reflects environmental conditions (maternal physiology), head circumference and limb and trunk lengths show differing associations with parental anthropometry. These patterns may reflect genetics, parental imprinting and environmental influences in a manner consistent with parental conflicts of interest. Paternal height may relate to neonatal limb length as a means of increasing fetal growth without exacerbating the risk of obstetric complications. Am J Phys Anthropol 156:625–636, 2015. PMID:25502164

  14. Microsatellite DNA instability in nasal cytology of COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Karatzanis, Alexander D; Samara, Katerina D; Tzortzaki, Eleni; Zervou, Maria; Helidonis, Emmanuel S; Velegrakis, George A; Siafakas, Nikolaos

    2007-03-01

    Genetic alterations in the microsatellite DNA level have been successfully detected in sputum samples of patients with COPD and have been shown to be disease specific. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that inflammation coexists in the nasal mucosa of patients with COPD. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of MSI in nasal cytological samples of patients with COPD comparing the results with sputum samples of the same individuals. Nasal brush samples, sputum samples obtained by induction, and peripheral blood from 20 patients with COPD were analyzed. DNA was extracted and analyzed for MSI using the following microsatellite markers: RH70958, D5S207, D6S344, D6S263, G29802, D13S71, D14S588, D14S292 and D17S250. Microsatellite analysis was also performed in 8 healthy non-smokers. MSI was detected in the sputum samples of 7 patients with COPD (35%). In contrast, no microsatellite DNA instability was noted in the nasal cytological samples of the same COPD patients. In addition, no genetic alteration was detected in the control group. These results suggest that MSI is a specific finding for the target organ of COPD, i.e. the lungs, despite the fact that inflammation coexists in the nasal mucosa of COPD patients. Our study supports the hypothesis that MSI could be an index of the somatic-acquired genetic alterations in the lungs of COPD patients. PMID:17273748

  15. Survey of microsatellite clustering in eight fully sequenced species sheds light on the origin of compound microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Robert; Schlötterer, Christian; Luschützky, Evita; Lelley, Tamas

    2008-01-01

    Background Compound microsatellites are a special variation of microsatellites in which two or more individual microsatellites are found directly adjacent to each other. Until now, such composite microsatellites have not been investigated in a comprehensive manner. Results Our in silico survey of microsatellite clustering in genomes of Homo sapiens, Maccaca mulatta, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, Gallus gallus, Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster revealed an unexpected high abundance of compound microsatellites. About 4 – 25% of all microsatellites could be categorized as compound microsatellites. Compound microsatellites are approximately 15 times more frequent than expected under the assumption of a random distribution of microsatellites. Interestingly, microsatellites do not only tend to cluster but the adjacent repeat types of compound microsatellites have very similar motifs: in most cases (>90%) these motifs differ only by a single mutation (base substitution or indel). We propose that the majority of the compound microsatellites originates by duplication of imperfections in a microsatellite tract. This process occurs mostly at the end of a microsatellite, leading to a new repeat type and a potential microsatellite repeat track. Conclusion Our findings suggest a more dynamic picture of microsatellite evolution than previously believed. Imperfections within microsatellites might not only cause the "death" of microsatellites they might also result in their "birth". PMID:19091106

  16. Linkage analysis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and microsatellite loci spanning 61 cM of human chromosome 6p in 19 nuclear pedigrees provides no evidence for a susceptibility locus in this region

    SciTech Connect

    Elmslie, F.V.; Williamson, M.P.; Rees, M.

    1996-09-01

    Linkage analysis in separately ascertained families of probands with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has previously provided evidence both for and against the existence of a locus (designated {open_quotes}EJM1{close_quotes}), on chromosome 6p, predisposing to a trait defined as either clinical JME, its associated electroencephalographic abnormality, or idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Linkage analysis was performed in 19 families in which a proband and at least one first- or two second-degree relatives have clinical JME. Family members were typed for seven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 6p: D6S260, D6S276, D6S291, D6S271, D6S465, D6S257, and D6S254. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out under the assumptions of autosomal dominant inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance and autosomal recessive inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage to the clinical trait of JME was obtained for any locus. The region formally excluded (LOD score <-2) by using multipoint analysis varies depending on the assumptions made concerning inheritance parameters and the proportion of linked families, {alpha} - that is, the degree of locus heterogeneity. Further analysis either classifying all unaffected individuals as unknown or excluding a subset of four families in which pyknoleptic absence seizures were present in one or more individuals did not alter these conclusions. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Microsatellite analysis of a population crash and bottleneck in the Mauna Kea silversword, Argyroxiphium sandwicense ssp. sandwicense (Asteraceae), and its implications for reintroduction.

    PubMed

    Friar, E A; Ladoux, T; Roalson, E H; Robichaux, R H

    2000-12-01

    The Mauna Kea silversword, Argyroxiphium sandwicense ssp. sandwicense, has experienced both a severe population crash associated with an increase in alien ungulate populations on Mauna Kea, and a population bottleneck associated with reintroduction. In this paper, we address the genetic consequences of both demographic events using eight microsatellite loci. The population crash was not accompanied by a significant reduction in number of alleles or heterozygosity. However, the population bottleneck was accompanied by significant reductions in observed number of alleles, effective number of alleles, and expected heterozygosity, though not in observed heterozygosity. The effective size of the population bottleneck was calculated using both observed heterozygosities and allele frequency variances. Both methods corroborated the historical census size of the population bottleneck of at most three individuals. The results suggest that: (i) small populations, even those that result from severe reductions in historical population size and extent, are not necessarily genetically depauperate; and (ii) species reintroduction plans need to be conceived and implemented carefully, with due consideration to the genetic impact of sampling for reintroduction. PMID:11123615

  18. Microsatellite and mtDNA analysis of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, from Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories: impacts of historical and contemporary evolutionary forces on Arctic ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Les N; Howland, Kimberly L; Kowalchuk, Matthew W; Bajno, Robert; Lindsay, Melissa M; Taylor, Eric B

    2013-01-01

    Resolving the genetic population structure of species inhabiting pristine, high latitude ecosystems can provide novel insights into the post-glacial, evolutionary processes shaping the distribution of contemporary genetic variation. In this study, we assayed genetic variation in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Great Bear Lake (GBL), NT and one population outside of this lake (Sandy Lake, NT) at 11 microsatellite loci and the mtDNA control region (d-loop). Overall, population subdivision was low, but significant (global FST θ = 0.025), and pairwise comparisons indicated that significance was heavily influenced by comparisons between GBL localities and Sandy Lake. Our data indicate that there is no obvious genetic structure among the various basins within GBL (global FST = 0.002) despite the large geographic distances between sampling areas. We found evidence of low levels of contemporary gene flow among arms within GBL, but not between Sandy Lake and GBL. Coalescent analyses suggested that some historical gene flow occurred among arms within GBL and between GBL and Sandy Lake. It appears, therefore, that contemporary (ongoing dispersal and gene flow) and historical (historical gene flow and large founding and present-day effective population sizes) factors contribute to the lack of neutral genetic structure in GBL. Overall, our results illustrate the importance of history (e.g., post-glacial colonization) and contemporary dispersal ecology in shaping genetic population structure of Arctic faunas and provide a better understanding of the evolutionary ecology of long-lived salmonids in pristine, interconnected habitats. PMID:23404390

  19. Genetic characterization of four native Italian shepherd dog breeds and analysis of their relationship to cosmopolitan dog breeds using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Bigi, D; Marelli, S P; Randi, E; Polli, M

    2015-12-01

    Very little research into genetic diversity of Italian native dog breeds has been carried out so far. In this study we aimed to estimate and compare the genetic diversity of four native Italian shepherd dog breeds: the Maremma, Bergamasco, Lupino del Gigante and Oropa shepherds. Therefore, some cosmopolitan dog breeds, which have been widely raised in Italy for a long time past, have also been considered to check possible influence of these dog populations on the Italian autochthonous breeds considered here. A total of 212 individuals, belonging to 10 different dog breeds, were sampled and genotyped using 18 autosomal microsatellite loci. We analyzed the genetic diversity of these breeds, within breed diversity, breed relationship and population structure. The 10 breeds considered in this study were clearly genetically differentiated from each other, regardless of current population sizes and the onset of separate breeding history. The level of genetic diversity explained 20% of the total genetic variation. The level of H E found here is in agreement with that found by other studies. The native Italian breeds showed generally higher genetic diversity compared with the long established, well-defined cosmopolitan dog breeds. As the Border Collie seems closer to the Italian breeds than the other cosmopolitan shepherd dogs considered here, a possible utilization of this breed to improve working performance in Italian traditional working shepherd dogs cannot be ignored. The data and information found here can be utilized in the organization of conservation programs planned to reduce inbreeding and to minimize loss of genetic variability. PMID:26245492

  20. Twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci from the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, the vector for citrus greening disease Huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed from microsatellite-enriched DNA libraries and mined from an EST library of Diaphorina citri, the vector of the devastating citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing). Analysis of 288 individuals from Florida, Texas, and Brazil showed allelic di...

  1. Identification of common, unique and polymorphic microsatellites among 73 cyanobacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Ritika; Kapil, Aditi; Attarwala, Kherunnisa; Rai, Piyush Kant; Shanker, Asheesh

    2016-04-01

    Microsatellites also known as Simple Sequence Repeats are short tandem repeats of 1-6 nucleotides. These repeats are found in coding as well as non-coding regions of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and play a significant role in the study of gene regulation, genetic mapping, DNA fingerprinting and evolutionary studies. The availability of 73 complete genome sequences of cyanobacteria enabled us to mine and statistically analyze microsatellites in these genomes. The cyanobacterial microsatellites identified through bioinformatics analysis were stored in a user-friendly database named CyanoSat, which is an efficient data representation and query system designed using ASP.net. The information in CyanoSat comprises of perfect, imperfect and compound microsatellites found in coding, non-coding and coding-non-coding regions. Moreover, it contains PCR primers with 200 nucleotides long flanking region. The mined cyanobacterial microsatellites can be freely accessed at www.compubio.in/CyanoSat/home.aspx . In addition to this 82 polymorphic, 13,866 unique and 2390 common microsatellites were also detected. These microsatellites will be useful in strain identification and genetic diversity studies of cyanobacteria. PMID:27030027

  2. The prognostic value of anti-paternal antibodies and leukocyte immunizations on the proportion of live births in couples with consecutive recurrent miscarriages.

    PubMed

    Orgad, S; Loewenthal, R; Gazit, E; Sadetzki, S; Novikov, I; Carp, H

    1999-12-01

    Anti-paternal antibodies directed towards paternal leukocytes have been used to predict the prognosis for the subsequent pregnancy in women with consecutive recurrent miscarriages (CRM) and also to determine if the patient has become immune after paternal leukocyte immunization. The predictive value is controversial, as these antibodies are not essential for pregnancy to develop, and only occur in a minority of parous women. This study tried to determine the predictive value of these antibodies when assessed separately for women with five or more abortions and compared to women with three or four abortions. The patients were assessed separately so that the higher live birth rate in the latter group would not obscure meaningful results in the former group with a poor prognosis. Antibody production, whether spontaneous, or induced by immunization, raised the live birth rate in primary and tertiary aborters with three, four, five or more abortions. Anti-paternal antibodies increased the proportion of live births from 18.5 to 53. 7% (P /= 5 CRM and 3-4 CRM respectively. Both immunization with paternal leukocytes per se and the ability to express anti-paternal antibodies were associated with an increased proportion of live births in the next pregnancy. Multivariate analysis showed that that the odds ratio for a live birth was approximately four times greater in women who were immunized and produced anti-paternal antibodies than in control patients. The lack of anti-paternal antibodies at initial testing could serve as a marker for the benefit of immunization with paternal leukocytes; the subsequent presence as a prognostic marker for the subsequent pregnancy. PMID:10601081

  3. Risk for childhood leukemia associated with maternal and paternal age.

    PubMed

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Gialamas, Spyros P; Karalexi, Maria A; Biniaris-Georgallis, Stylianos-Iason; Kontogeorgi, Evangelia; Papathoma, Paraskevi; Tsilimidos, Gerasimos; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Iliadou, Anastasia N; Petridou, Eleni T

    2015-12-01

    The role of reproductive factors, such as parental age, in the pathogenesis of childhood leukemias is being intensively examined; the results of individual studies are controversial. This meta-analysis aims to quantitatively synthesize the published data on the association between parental age and risk of two major distinct childhood leukemia types in the offspring. Eligible studies were identified and pooled relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated using random-effects models, separately for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Subgroup analyses were performed by study design, geographical region, adjustment factors; sensitivity analyses and meta-regression analyses were also undertaken. 77 studies (69 case-control and eight cohort) were deemed eligible. Older maternal and paternal age were associated with increased risk for childhood ALL (pooled RR = 1.05, 95 % CI 1.01-1.10; pooled RR = 1.04, 95 % CI 1.00-1.08, per 5 year increments, respectively). The association between maternal age and risk of childhood AML showed a U-shaped pattern, with symmetrically associated increased risk in the oldest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.06-1.43) and the youngest (pooled RR = 1.23, 95 % CI 1.07-1.40) extremes. Lastly, only younger fathers were at increased risk of having a child with AML (pooled RR = 1.28, 95 % CI 1.04-1.59). In conclusion, maternal and paternal age represents a meaningful risk factor for childhood leukemia, albeit of different effect size by leukemia subtype. Genetic and socio-economic factors may underlie the observed associations. Well-adjusted studies, scheduled by large consortia, are anticipated to satisfactorily address methodological issues, whereas the potential underlying genetic mechanisms should be elucidated by basic research studies. PMID:26537708

  4. Human paternal lineages, languages, and environment in the Caucasus.

    PubMed

    Tarkhnishvili, David; Gavashelishvili, Alexander; Murtskhvaladze, Marine; Gabelaia, Mariam; Tevzadze, Gigi

    2014-01-01

    Publications that describe the composition of the human Y-DNA haplogroup in diffferent ethnic or linguistic groups and geographic regions provide no explicit explanation of the distribution of human paternal lineages in relation to specific ecological conditions. Our research attempts to address this topic for the Caucasus, a geographic region that encompasses a relatively small area but harbors high linguistic, ethnic, and Y-DNA haplogroup diversity. We genotyped 224 men that identified themselves as ethnic Georgian for 23 Y-chromosome short tandem-repeat markers and assigned them to their geographic places of origin. The genotyped data were supplemented with published data on haplogroup composition and location of other ethnic groups of the Caucasus. We used multivariate statistical methods to see if linguistics, climate, and landscape accounted for geographical diffferences in frequencies of the Y-DNA haplogroups G2, R1a, R1b, J1, and J2. The analysis showed significant associations of (1) G2 with wellforested mountains, (2) J2 with warm areas or poorly forested mountains, and (3) J1 with poorly forested mountains. R1b showed no association with environment. Haplogroups J1 and R1a were significantly associated with Daghestanian and Kipchak speakers, respectively, but the other haplogroups showed no such simple associations with languages. Climate and landscape in the context of competition over productive areas among diffferent paternal lineages, arriving in the Caucasus in diffferent times, have played an important role in shaping the present-day spatial distribution of patrilineages in the Caucasus. This spatial pattern had formed before linguistic subdivisions were finally shaped, probably in the Neolithic to Bronze Age. Later historical turmoil had little influence on the patrilineage composition and spatial distribution. Based on our results, the scenario of postglacial expansions of humans and their languages to the Caucasus from the Middle East, western Eurasia, and the East European Plain is plausible. PMID:25397702

  5. Microsatellite spreading in the human genome: evolutionary mechanisms and structural implications.

    PubMed Central

    Nadir, E; Margalit, H; Gallily, T; Ben-Sasson, S A

    1996-01-01

    Microsatellites are tandem repeat sequences abundant in the genomes of higher eukaryotes and hitherto considered as "junk DNA." Analysis of a human genome representative data base (2.84 Mb) reveals a distinct juxtaposition of A-rich microsatellites and retroposons and suggests their coevolution. The analysis implies that most microsatellites were generated by a 3'-extension of retrotranscripts, similar to mRNA polyadenylylation, and that they serve in turn as "retroposition navigators," directing the retroposons via homology-driven integration into defined sites. Thus, they became instrumental in the preservation and extension of primordial genomic patterns. A role is assigned to these reiterating A-rich loci in the higher-order organization of the chromatin. The disease-associated triplet repeats are mostly found in coding regions and do not show an association with retroposons, constituting a unique set within the family of microsatellite sequences. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8692839

  6. The impact of paternity on male-infant association in a primate with low paternity certainty

    PubMed Central

    Langos, Doreen; Kulik, Lars; Mundry, Roger; Widdig, Anja

    2013-01-01

    In multi-male groups where females mate promiscuously, male-infant associations have rarely been studied. However, recent studies have shown that males selectively support their offspring during agonistic conflicts with other juveniles and that father’s presence accelerates offspring maturation. Furthermore, it was shown that males invest in unrelated infants to enhance future mating success with the infant’s mother. Hence, infant care might provide fitness gain for males. Here we investigate male-infant associations in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), a primate with low paternity certainty as females mate with multiple partners and males ensure paternity less efficiently through mate-guarding. We combined behavioral data with genetic paternity analyses of one cohort of the semifree-ranging population of Cayo Santiago (Puerto Rico) and recorded affiliative and aggressive interactions between focal subjects and adult males from birth to sexual maturation (0–4 years) of focal subjects. Our results revealed, that 9.6% of all interactions of focal subjects involved an adult male and 94% of all male-infant interactions were affiliative, indicating the rareness of male-infant aggression. Second and most interestingly, sires were more likely to affiliate with their offspring than non-sires with unrelated infants. This preference was independent of mother’s proximity and emphasized during early infancy. Male-infant affiliation rose with infant age and was pronounced between adult males and male rather than female focal subjects. Overall our results suggest that male-infant affiliation are also an important component in structuring primate societies and affiliation directed towards own offspring presumably represent low cost paternal care. PMID:23682587

  7. Pathologic Predictors of Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenson, Joel K.; Huang, Shu-Chen; Herron, Casey; Moreno, Victor; Bonner, Joseph D.; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Ben-Izhak, Ofer; Cohen, Hector I.; Trougouboff, Phillip; Bejhar, Jacob; Sova, Yanina; Pinchev, Mila; Rennert, Gad; Gruber, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of microsatellite unstable (MSI-H) colorectal cancers (CRC) is important not only for the identification of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (HNPCC) but also because MSI-H CRCs have a better prognosis and may respond differently to 5 flourouracil based chemotherapy. We present two nearly equivalent logistic regression models for clinical use that predict microsatellite instability based on the review of 1649 CRCs from patients of all ages collected in a population-based case control study in northern Israel. 198 of these 1649 tumors demonstrated a high degree of microsatellite instability (12%). Multivariate analysis found that >2 TIL cells per high-power field, the lack of dirty necrosis, the presence of a Crohn’s-like reaction, right-sided location, any mucinous differentiation (mucinous or focally mucinous) and well or poor differentiation, and age less than 50 were all independent predictors of MSI-H. We developed two logistic regression models that differ only by the statistical approach used to analyze the number of TIL cells per high-powered field, where the slightly more accurate (and complex) model uses the log of the total number of TIL cells. The simpler clinical model uses a cutoff of 2>TIL cells per high-powered field. The accuracy of both models is high, with an 85.4% vs. 85.0% probability of correctly classifying tumors as MSI-H. By employing the simpler model, pathologists can predict the likelihood of microsatellite instability by compiling the MSI probability score (see Table 4 and figure 1) from simple histologic and clinical data available during sign-out. Our model shows that approximately 43% of CRCs have a MSI probability score of 1 or less and hence have little likelihood (<3%) of being MSI-H. While this model is not perfect in predicting microsatellite instability, its use could improve the efficiency of expensive diagnostic testing. PMID:18830122

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, H.M.; Kahkonen, T.M.; Leisti, J.

    1994-09-01

    Angelman (AS) and Prader-Willi (PWS) syndromes are caused by the loss of either maternal (AS) or paternal (PWS) contributions to chromosome 15q11-q13 region, which is subject to genomic imprinting. DNA methylation has been postulated to play a crucial role in genomic imprinting and the diagnostic test used is based on the differential parental methylation of 15q11-q13. We report here the DNA studies of 39 classical PWS and 12 AS patients. For DNA polymorphism and dosage studies we used nine genomic probes and five microsatellite markers specific for chromosome 15. To study the methylation patterns the probes DN34 (D15S9) and PW71 (D15S63), which show a parental-specific DNA methylation imprint, were used. Among the PWS patients, 29 (77%) cases with a deletion belonging to four different size classes and 9 (23%) with maternal uniparental disomy were found, respectively. Of the AS patients, 8 (67%) had a deletion, 1 (8%) paternal uniparental disomy and 3 (25%) biparental inheritance, respectively. Two sibs with biparental disomy showed a typical methylation pattern for AS, indicating that the maternal chromosome 15 carried a paternal methylation imprint. In the DNA methylation analysis the probe PW71 was useful: in our study it detected all deletions and uniparental disomy patients as well as potential imprinting mutations. The probe DN34 couldn`t identify patients which have a deletion outside the D15S9 locus. In the diagnosis of AS and PWS, the differential methylation of the parental 15q11-q13 offers a rapid diagnostic test but does not distinguish between a deletion and uniparental disomy. In our material the probe 4a.1, which detects DNA sequences from both the locus SNRPN (15q12) and SNRPNP1 (6pter-p21), proved to be reliable detecting all deletions. For detection of parental origin of deletion or uniparental disomy, microsatellite markers proved useful.

  9. Sequence determinants of human microsatellite variability

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Microsatellite loci are frequently used in genomic studies of DNA sequence repeats and in population studies of genetic variability. To investigate the effect of sequence properties of microsatellites on their level of variability we have analyzed genotypes at 627 microsatellite loci in 1,048 worldwide individuals from the HGDP-CEPH cell line panel together with the DNA sequences of these microsatellites in the human RefSeq database. Results Calibrating PCR fragment lengths in individual genotypes by using the RefSeq sequence enabled us to infer repeat number in the HGDP-CEPH dataset and to calculate the mean number of repeats (as opposed to the mean PCR fragment length), under the assumption that differences in PCR fragment length reflect differences in the numbers of repeats in the embedded repeat sequences. We find the mean and maximum numbers of repeats across individuals to be positively correlated with heterozygosity. The size and composition of the repeat unit of a microsatellite are also important factors in predicting heterozygosity, with tetra-nucleotide repeat units high in G/C content leading to higher heterozygosity. Finally, we find that microsatellites containing more separate sets of repeated motifs generally have higher heterozygosity. Conclusions These results suggest that sequence properties of microsatellites have a significant impact in determining the features of human microsatellite variability. PMID:20015383

  10. Microsatellite primers for red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this note, we document polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) primer pairs for 101, nuclear-encoded microsatellites designed and developed from a red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) genomic library. The 101 microsatellites (Genbank Accession Numbers EU015882-EU015982) were amplified successfully and used to...

  11. Paternal smoking and birthweight in Shanghai.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Ratcliffe, J M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Although maternal active smoking has been established to be associated with fetal growth retardation, evidence of an effect of environmental tobacco smoke exposure on birthweight is still limited and inconclusive. This study addressed the relationship between prenatal environmental tobacco smoke exposure and birthweight and fetal growth retardation in Shanghai, China. METHODS. Data on 1785 full-term live-born normal infants of nonsmoking mothers were used from the Shanghai Birth Defects and Perinatal Death Monitoring conducted between October 1986 and September 1987. Environmental tobacco smoke exposure was defined as exposure to paternal smoking. RESULTS. Infants with environmental tobacco smoking exposure were, on average, 30 g lower in birthweight than nonexposed infants, after adjustment for gestational age, parity, maternal age, and occupation. CONCLUSION. Consistent with previous research, this study suggests that environmental tobacco smoking exposure may have a modestly adverse effect on birthweight. PMID:8427324

  12. The inherent paternalism in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wulff, H R

    1995-06-01

    It is sometimes suggested that the physician should offer the patient "just the facts," preferably in a "value-free manner," explain the different options, and then leave it to the patient to make the choice. This paper explores the extent to which this adviser model is realistic. The clinical decision process and the various components of clinical reasoning are discussed, and a distinction is made between the biological, empirical, empathic/hermeneutic and ethical components. The discussion is based on the ethical norms of the public health services in the Nordic countries, and the problems are illustrated by a clinical example. It is concluded that the adviser model is unrealistic. Patient information is important, but the complexity of clinical reasoning makes it impossible to separate facts and value judgments. It is claimed that there is an inherent element of paternalism in clinical decision-making and that clinical practice presupposes a mutual trust between physician and patient. PMID:7658175

  13. Impact of a chromosome X STR Decaplex in deficiency paternity cases

    PubMed Central

    Trindade-Filho, Aluisio; Ferreira, Samuel; Oliveira, Silviene F.

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency paternity cases, characterized by the absence of the alleged father, are a challenge for forensic genetics. Here we present four cases with a female child and a deceased alleged father in which the analysis of a set of 21 or 22 autosomal STRs (AS STRs) produced results within a range of doubt when genotyping relatives of the alleged father. Aiming to increase the Paternity Index (PI) and obtain more reliable results, a set of 10 X-linked STR markers, developed by the Spanish and Portuguese Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG), was then added. Statistical analysis substantially shifted the results towards the alleged fatherhood in all four cases, with more dramatic changes when the supposed half-sister and respective mother were the relatives tested. PMID:24385853

  14. Impact of a chromosome X STR Decaplex in deficiency paternity cases.

    PubMed

    Trindade-Filho, Aluisio; Ferreira, Samuel; Oliveira, Silviene F

    2013-12-01

    Deficiency paternity cases, characterized by the absence of the alleged father, are a challenge for forensic genetics. Here we present four cases with a female child and a deceased alleged father in which the analysis of a set of 21 or 22 autosomal STRs (AS STRs) produced results within a range of doubt when genotyping relatives of the alleged father. Aiming to increase the Paternity Index (PI) and obtain more reliable results, a set of 10 X-linked STR markers, developed by the Spanish and Portuguese Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG), was then added. Statistical analysis substantially shifted the results towards the alleged fatherhood in all four cases, with more dramatic changes when the supposed half-sister and respective mother were the relatives tested. PMID:24385853

  15. Genetic evidence of extra-pair paternity and intraspecific brood parasitism in the monk parakeet

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) is a widespread invasive species native to southern South America that has become established in many regions of the world. Monk parakeets breed in a large, fully enclosed structure built from twigs, which consist of one to many individual brooding chambers. The species has been considered to be socially and genetically monogamous. However, genetic relatedness of adults to juveniles in the native area was found to be lower than expected for monogamy. To assess the significance of this discrepancy, we examined individual and population genetic patterns of microsatellite loci at two sites in Córdoba province, Argentina. Results We sampled 154 nestlings and 42 adults in Córdoba, Argentina. Mean value of pairwise relatedness of nestlings within chambers was about 0.40. Contrarily, relatedness of nestlings between chambers was close to zero. We found a considerable degree of variation in nestling pairwise relatedness and parentage within chambers, including chambers with combinations of unrelated, half-sib, and full-sib nestlings. The proportion of sibling relatedness indicated monogamy in 47% and extra pair-paternity in 40% of the chambers. We also found intra-brood parasitism in 3% of the chambers. Conclusions Our results indicate that the monk parakeet is sexually polygamous in its native range in Argentina, which is consistent with the observed mean value of relatedness of adults to juveniles of about 0.4. We also confirm the existence of intra-brood parasitism. High density of monk parakeets may favor occurrence of extra-pair paternity and intra-brood parasitism in the native sites. PMID:24209709

  16. Paternal uniparental disomy 14 and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kagami, Masayo; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Nagai, Toshiro; Yamanaka, Michiko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Sekita, Yoichi; Miyado, Mami; Matsubara, Keiko; Fuke, Tomoko; Kato, Fumiko; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Although recent studies in patients with paternal uniparental disomy 14 [upd(14)pat] and other conditions affecting the chromosome 14q32.2 imprinted region have successfully identified underlying epigenetic factors involved in the development of upd(14)pat phenotype, several matters, including regulatory mechanism(s) for RTL1 expression, imprinting status of DIO3 and placental histological characteristics, remain to be elucidated. We therefore performed molecular studies using fresh placental samples from two patients with upd(14)pat. We observed that RTL1 expression level was about five times higher in the placental samples of the two patients than in control placental samples, whereas DIO3 expression level was similar between the placental samples of the two patients and the control placental samples. We next performed histological studies using the above fresh placental samples and formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded placental samples obtained from a patient with a maternally derived microdeletion involving DLK1, the-IG-DMR, the MEG3-DMR and MEG3. Terminal villi were associated with swollen vascular endothelial cells and hypertrophic pericytes, together with narrowed capillary lumens. DLK1, RTL1 and DIO3 proteins were specifically identified in vascular endothelial cells and pericytes, and the degree of protein staining was well correlated with the expression dosage of corresponding genes. These results suggest that RTL1as-encoded microRNA functions as a repressor of RTL1 expression, and argue against DIO3 being a paternally expressed gene. Furthermore, it is inferred that DLK1, DIO3 and, specially, RTL1 proteins, play a pivotal role in the development of vascular endothelial cells and pericytes. PMID:22917972

  17. Genetic Differentiation and Genetic Diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), the Dominant Tree Species in Japanese Broadleaved Evergreen Forests, Revealed by Analysis of EST-Associated Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Kyoko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Kamijo, Takashi; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Makoto; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae) is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata). Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species) and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii) is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may imply the existence of eastern refugia. PMID:24498103

  18. Analysis of nrDNA sequences and microsatellite allele frequencies reveals a cryptic chanterelle species Cantharellus cascadensis sp. nov. from the American Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Susie M; O'Dell, Thomas E; Molina, Randy

    2003-10-01

    In the Pacific Northwest, yellow chanterelles have long been referred to as Cantharellus cibarius, synonymous with the European yellow chanterelle. Broad scale genetic surveys of North American chanterelles with C. cibarius-like morphology have demonstrated that the nrDNA internal transcribed spacer exhibits length variability, suggesting that this common morphology masks a species complex. Recently researchers have used morphological and genetic data to identify the yellow chanterelle most frequently harvested from American Pacific Northwest forests as C. formosus, a species once thought to be rare in the region. We present three genetic data sets and one morphological data set that characterize a previously undescribed, species of yellow chanterelle from the central Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Phylogenetic analyses of the nrDNA large subunit and ITS regions show that C. cascadensis sp. nov., along with two other yellow chanterelle taxa (C. cibarius var. roseocanus and European C. cibarius), are more closely related to white chanterelles (C. subalbidus) than they are to C. formosus. Data from five microsatellite loci provide evidence that C. formosus, C. subalbidus, and C. cascadensis sp. nov. do not interbreed when they co-occur spatially and temporally in Douglas fir-western hemlock forests. This demonstrates that these three sympatric chanterelles are biological species with boundaries congruent with those delineated by nrDNA phylogenetic clades. Morphological data indicate that the colour of the pileus and shape of the stipe can be used to separate fresh collections of the two yellow species now known to co-occur in Douglas fir-western hemlock forests in Oregon. PMID:14635765

  19. The development of 10 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers through next generation sequencing and a preliminary population genetic analysis for the endangered Glenelg spiny crayfish, Euastacus bispinosus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam D; Van Rooyen, Anthony; Sweeney, Oisn F; Whiterod, Nick S; Weeks, Andrew R

    2013-07-01

    The Glenelg spiny crayfish, Euastacus bispinosus, is an iconic freshwater invertebrate of south eastern Australia and listed as 'endangered' under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, and 'vulnerable' under the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List. The species has suffered major population declines as a result of over-fishing, low environmental flows, the introduction of invasive fish species and habitat degradation. In order to develop an effective conservation strategy, patterns of gene flow, genetic structure and genetic diversity across the species distribution need to be clearly understood. In this study we develop a suite of polymorphic microsatellite markers by next generation sequencing. A total of 15 polymorphic loci were identified and 10 characterized using 22 individuals from the lower Glenelg River. We observed low to moderate genetic variation across most loci (mean number of alleles per locus = 2.80; mean expected heterozygosity = 0.36) with no evidence of individual loci deviating significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Marker independence was confirmed with tests for linkage disequilibrium, and analyses indicated no evidence of null alleles across loci. Individuals from two additional sites (Crawford River, Victoria; Ewens Ponds Conservation Park, South Australia) were genotyped at all 10 loci and a preliminary investigation of genetic diversity and population structure was undertaken. Analyses indicate high levels of genetic differentiation among sample locations (F ST = 0.49), while the Ewens Ponds population is genetically homogeneous, indicating a likely small founder group and ongoing inbreeding. Management actions will be needed to restore genetic diversity in this and possibly other at risk populations. These markers will provide a valuable resource for future population genetic assessments so that an effective framework can be developed for implementing conservation strategies for E. bispinosus. PMID:23644985

  20. Development of Chloroplast Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Chloroplast Diversity in Chinese Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) and Wild Jujube (Ziziphus acidojujuba Mill.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoting; Zhang, Chunmei; Yin, Xiao; Liu, Shipeng; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Ziziphus is an important genus within the family Rhamnaceae. This genus includes several important fruit tree species that are widely planted in China and India, such as the Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.), the wild jujube (Z. acidojujuba), and the Indian jujube (Z. mauritiana). However, information about their domestication based on the chlorotype diversity of Chinese jujube population is lacking. In this study, chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) markers were developed and used to investigate the genetic relationships between and domestication of jujube cultivars and wild jujube populations. Primer sets flanking each of the 46 cpSSR loci in non-coding regions of the chloroplast genome sequence of Z. jujuba Mill. cv. 'Junzao' were designed. In total, 10 markers showed polymorphisms from 15 samples (9 jujube cultivars and 6 wild jujube individuals), of which 8 loci were due to variations in the number of mononucleotide (A/T) repeats and 2 were due to indels. Six cpSSR markers were used in further analyses of 81 additional samples (63 jujube cultivars, 17 wild jujube samples, and 1 Indian jujube). Using these cpSSR markers, the number of alleles per locus ranged from two to four. In general, the Shannon Index (I) for each cpSSR ranged from 0.159 to 0.1747, and the diversity indices (h) and uh were 0.061 to 0.435 and 0.062 to 0.439, respectively. Seven chlorotypes were found; the Indian jujube showed distinct chlorotypes, and both the Chinese and wild jujube had four chlorotypes and shared two chlorotypes. A dominant chlorotype (G) accounted for 53 of 72 jujube cultivars and 13 of 23 wild jujube individuals. All chlorotypes were highly localized along the Yellow River, from the mid- to the lower reaches, suggesting a wide origin of jujube. These cpSSR markers can be applied to population and evolution studies of Chinese jujube and wild jujube. PMID:26406601

  1. Microsatellite and mtDNA analysis of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, from Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories: impacts of historical and contemporary evolutionary forces on Arctic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Harris, Les N; Howland, Kimberly L; Kowalchuk, Matthew W; Bajno, Robert; Lindsay, Melissa M; Taylor, Eric B

    2012-01-01

    Resolving the genetic population structure of species inhabiting pristine, high latitude ecosystems can provide novel insights into the post-glacial, evolutionary processes shaping the distribution of contemporary genetic variation. In this study, we assayed genetic variation in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from Great Bear Lake (GBL), NT and one population outside of this lake (Sandy Lake, NT) at 11 microsatellite loci and the mtDNA control region (d-loop). Overall, population subdivision was low, but significant (global F(ST) θ = 0.025), and pairwise comparisons indicated that significance was heavily influenced by comparisons between GBL localities and Sandy Lake. Our data indicate that there is no obvious genetic structure among the various basins within GBL (global F(ST) = 0.002) despite the large geographic distances between sampling areas. We found evidence of low levels of contemporary gene flow among arms within GBL, but not between Sandy Lake and GBL. Coalescent analyses suggested that some historical gene flow occurred among arms within GBL and between GBL and Sandy Lake. It appears, therefore, that contemporary (ongoing dispersal and gene flow) and historical (historical gene flow and large founding and present-day effective population sizes) factors contribute to the lack of neutral genetic structure in GBL. Overall, our results illustrate the importance of history (e.g., post-glacial colonization) and contemporary dispersal ecology in shaping genetic population structure of Arctic faunas and provide a better understanding of the evolutionary ecology of long-lived salmonids in pristine, interconnected habitats. PMID:23404390

  2. Development of Chloroplast Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Chloroplast Diversity in Chinese Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) and Wild Jujube (Ziziphus acidojujuba Mill.)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoting; Zhang, Chunmei; Yin, Xiao; Liu, Shipeng; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Ziziphus is an important genus within the family Rhamnaceae. This genus includes several important fruit tree species that are widely planted in China and India, such as the Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.), the wild jujube (Z. acidojujuba), and the Indian jujube (Z. mauritiana). However, information about their domestication based on the chlorotype diversity of Chinese jujube population is lacking. In this study, chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) markers were developed and used to investigate the genetic relationships between and domestication of jujube cultivars and wild jujube populations. Primer sets flanking each of the 46 cpSSR loci in non-coding regions of the chloroplast genome sequence of Z. jujuba Mill. cv. ‘Junzao’ were designed. In total, 10 markers showed polymorphisms from 15 samples (9 jujube cultivars and 6 wild jujube individuals), of which 8 loci were due to variations in the number of mononucleotide (A/T) repeats and 2 were due to indels. Six cpSSR markers were used in further analyses of 81 additional samples (63 jujube cultivars, 17 wild jujube samples, and 1 Indian jujube). Using these cpSSR markers, the number of alleles per locus ranged from two to four. In general, the Shannon Index (I) for each cpSSR ranged from 0.159 to 0.1747, and the diversity indices (h) and uh were 0.061 to 0.435 and 0.062 to 0.439, respectively. Seven chlorotypes were found; the Indian jujube showed distinct chlorotypes, and both the Chinese and wild jujube had four chlorotypes and shared two chlorotypes. A dominant chlorotype (G) accounted for 53 of 72 jujube cultivars and 13 of 23 wild jujube individuals. All chlorotypes were highly localized along the Yellow River, from the mid- to the lower reaches, suggesting a wide origin of jujube. These cpSSR markers can be applied to population and evolution studies of Chinese jujube and wild jujube. PMID:26406601

  3. Genetic differentiation and genetic diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), the dominant tree species in Japanese broadleaved evergreen forests, revealed by analysis of EST-associated microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kyoko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Kamijo, Takashi; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Makoto; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae) is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata). Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species) and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii) is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may imply the existence of eastern refugia. PMID:24498103

  4. Identification and DUS Testing of Rice Varieties through Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Pourabed, Ehsan; Jazayeri Noushabadi, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Seyed Hossein; Moheb Alipour, Naser; Zareyan, Abbas; Sadeghi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Identification and registration of new rice varieties are very important to be free from environmental effects and using molecular markers that are more reliable. The objectives of this study were, first, the identification and distinction of 40 rice varieties consisting of local varieties of Iran, improved varieties, and IRRI varieties using PIC, and discriminating power, second, cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficient and UPGMA algorithm, and, third, determining the ability of microsatellite markers to separate varieties utilizing the best combination of markers. For this research, 12 microsatellite markers were used. In total, 83 polymorphic alleles (6.91 alleles per locus) were found. In addition, the variation of PIC was calculated from 0.52 to 0.9. The results of cluster analysis showed the complete discrimination of varieties from each other except for IR58025A and IR58025B. Moreover, cluster analysis could detect the most of the improved varieties from local varieties. Based on the best combination of markers analysis, five pair primers together have shown the same results of all markers for detection among all varieties. Considering the results of this research, we can propose that microsatellite markers can be used as a complementary tool for morphological characteristics in DUS tests. PMID:25755666

  5. Identification and DUS Testing of Rice Varieties through Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Pourabed, Ehsan; Jazayeri Noushabadi, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Seyed Hossein; Moheb Alipour, Naser; Zareyan, Abbas; Sadeghi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Identification and registration of new rice varieties are very important to be free from environmental effects and using molecular markers that are more reliable. The objectives of this study were, first, the identification and distinction of 40 rice varieties consisting of local varieties of Iran, improved varieties, and IRRI varieties using PIC, and discriminating power, second, cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficient and UPGMA algorithm, and, third, determining the ability of microsatellite markers to separate varieties utilizing the best combination of markers. For this research, 12 microsatellite markers were used. In total, 83 polymorphic alleles (6.91 alleles per locus) were found. In addition, the variation of PIC was calculated from 0.52 to 0.9. The results of cluster analysis showed the complete discrimination of varieties from each other except for IR58025A and IR58025B. Moreover, cluster analysis could detect the most of the improved varieties from local varieties. Based on the best combination of markers analysis, five pair primers together have shown the same results of all markers for detection among all varieties. Considering the results of this research, we can propose that microsatellite markers can be used as a complementary tool for morphological characteristics in DUS tests. PMID:25755666

  6. Differential decay of parent-of-origin-specific genomic sharing in cystic fibrosis-affected sib pairs maps a paternally imprinted locus to 7q34

    PubMed Central

    Stanke, Frauke; Davenport, Colin; Hedtfeld, Silke; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease characterized by a high variability of disease severity and outcome that points to the role of environmental factors and modulating genes that shape the course of this multiorgan disease. We genotyped families of cystic fibrosis sib pairs homozygous for F508del-CFTR who represent extreme clinical phenotypes at informative microsatellite markers spanning a 38 Mb region between CFTR and 7qtel. Recombination events on both parental chromosomes were compared between siblings with concordant clinical phenotypes and siblings with discordant clinical phenotypes. Monitoring parent-of-origin-specific decay of genomic sharing delineated a 2.9-Mb segment on 7q34 in which excess of recombination on paternal chromosomes in discordant pairs was observed compared with phenotypically concordant sibs. This 2.9-Mb core candidate region was enriched in imprinting-related elements such as predicted CCCTC-binding factor consensus sites and CpG islands dense in repetitive elements. Moreover, allele frequencies at a microsatellite marker within the core candidate region differed significantly comparing mildly and severely affected cystic fibrosis sib pairs. The identification of this paternally imprinted locus on 7q34 as a modulator of cystic fibrosis disease severity shows that imprinted elements can be identified by straightforward fine mapping of break points in sib pairs with informative contrasting phenotypes. PMID:20051989

  7. Genetic variation, multiple paternity, and measures of reproductive success in the critically endangered hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata).

    PubMed

    González-Garza, Blanca Idalia; Stow, Adam; Sánchez-Teyer, Lorenzo Felipe; Zapata-Pérez, Omar

    2015-12-01

    The Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico contains some of the largest breeding groups of the globally distributed and critically endangered hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata). An improved understanding of the breeding system of this species and how its genetic variation is structured among nesting areas is required before the threats to its survival can be properly evaluated. Here, we genotype 1195 hatchlings and 41 nesting females at 12 microsatellite loci to assess levels of multiple paternity, genetic variation and whether individual levels of homozygosity are associated with reproductive success. Of the 50 clutches analyzed, only 6% have multiple paternity. The distribution of pairwise relatedness among nesting localities (rookeries) was not random with elevated within-rookery relatedness, and declining relatedness with geographic distance indicating some natal philopatry. Although there was no strong evidence that particular rookeries had lost allelic variation via drift, younger turtles had significantly lower levels of genetic variation than older turtles, suggesting some loss of genetic variation. At present there is no indication that levels of genetic variation are associated with measures of reproductive success such as clutch size, hatching success, and frequency of infertile eggs. PMID:26811751

  8. A likelihood-based approach for assessment of extra-pair paternity and conspecific brood parasitism in natural populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemons, Patrick R.; Marshall, T.C.; McCloskey, Sarah E.; Sethi, S.A.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Sedinger, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Genotypes are frequently used to assess alternative reproductive strategies such as extra-pair paternity and conspecific brood parasitism in wild populations. However, such analyses are vulnerable to genotyping error or molecular artifacts that can bias results. For example, when using multilocus microsatellite data, a mismatch at a single locus, suggesting the offspring was not directly related to its putative parents, can occur quite commonly even when the offspring is truly related. Some recent studies have advocated an ad-hoc rule that offspring must differ at more than one locus in order to conclude that they are not directly related. While this reduces the frequency with which true offspring are identified as not directly related young, it also introduces bias in the opposite direction, wherein not directly related young are categorized as true offspring. More importantly, it ignores the additional information on allele frequencies which would reduce overall bias. In this study, we present a novel technique for assessing extra-pair paternity and conspecific brood parasitism using a likelihood-based approach in a new version of program cervus. We test the suitability of the technique by applying it to a simulated data set and then present an example to demonstrate its influence on the estimation of alternative reproductive strategies.

  9. Paternal RNA contributions in the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckius, Marlon; Grün, Dominic; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of the early embryo is thought to be mainly driven by maternal gene products and post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here, we used metabolic labeling to show that RNA can be transferred by sperm into the oocyte upon fertilization. To identify genes with paternal expression in the embryo, we performed crosses of males and females from divergent Caenorhabditis elegans strains. RNA sequencing of mRNAs and small RNAs in the 1-cell hybrid embryo revealed that about one hundred sixty paternal mRNAs are reproducibly expressed in the embryo and that about half of all assayed endogenous siRNAs and piRNAs are also of paternal origin. Together, our results suggest an unexplored paternal contribution to early development. PMID:24894551

  10. Canine Paternity Testing--Using Personal Experiences To Teach Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rascati, Ralph J.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines how an example from the field of animal husbandry is used in a DNA Technology course to motivate students to take a deeper interest in the material. Focuses on paternity testing in dogs. (DDR)

  11. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for the Brazil nut tree Bertholletia excelsa Humb. & Bonpl. (Lecythidaceae).

    PubMed

    Reis, Alessandra M M; Braga, Aline C; Lemes, Maristerra R; Gribel, Rogério; Collevatti, Rosane G

    2009-05-01

    Twelve polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa), one of the most valuable non-timber forest products from the Amazon, based on enrichment protocol. Six to 18 (mean 10.4) alleles per locus were identified and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.663 to 0.923 based on a screen of 40 individuals from one population of B. excelsa. The combined probabilities of genetic identity (8.39 × 10(-17) ) and paternity exclusion (0.999999) indicated that multilocus genotypes are likely to be unique allowing precise analyses of genetic structure, gene flow, and mating system of this economically important species. PMID:21564791

  12. A genome-wide microsatellite polymorphism database for the indica and japonica rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Deng, Yajun; Tan, Jun; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun; Xue, Qingzhong

    2007-02-28

    Microsatellite (MS) polymorphism is an important source of genetic diversity, providing support for map-based cloning and molecular breeding. We have developed a new database that contains 52 845 polymorphic MS loci between indica and japonica, composed of ample Class II MS markers, and integrated 18 828 MS loci from IRGSP and genetic markers from RGP. Based on genetic marker positions on the rice genome (http://rise.genomics.org.cn/rice2/index.jsp ), we determined the approximate genetic distances of these MS loci and validated 100 randomly selected markers experimentally with 90% success rate. In addition, we recorded polymorphic MS positions in indica cv. 9311 that is the most important paternal parent of the two-line hybrid rice in China. Our database will undoubtedly facilitate the application of MS markers in genetic researches and marker-assisted breeding. The data set is freely available from www.wigs.zju.edu.cn/achievment/polySSR. PMID:17452422

  13. Comparison of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites in inference of population structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nianjun; Chen, Liang; Wang, Shuang; Oh, Cheongeun; Zhao, Hongyu

    2005-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are a class of attractive genetic markers for population genetic studies and for identifying genetic variations underlying complex traits. However, the usefulness and efficiency of SNPs in comparison to microsatellites in different scientific contexts, e.g., population structure inference or association analysis, still must be systematically evaluated through large empirical studies. In this article, we use the Collaborative Studies on Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) data from Genetic Analysis Workshop 14 (GAW14) to compare the performance of microsatellites and SNPs in the whole human genome in the context of population structure inference. A total of 328 microsatellites and 15,840 SNPs are used to infer population structure in 236 unrelated individuals. We find that, on average, the informativeness of random microsatellites is four to twelve times that of random SNPs for various population comparisons, which is consistent with previous studies. Our results also indicate that for the combined set of microsatellites and SNPs, SNPs constitute the majority among the most informative markers and the use of these SNPs leads to better inference of population structure than the use of microsatellites. We also find that the inclusion of less informative markers may add noise and worsen the results. PMID:16451635

  14. DETERMINATION OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND PATERNITY IN THE GRAY-TAILED VOLE (MICROTUS CANICAUDUS) BY RAPD-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic relatedness of gray-tailed voles (Microtus canicaudus) was determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). This work is the first reported use of the RAPD method for pedigree analysis of M. canicaudus and demonstrates the feasibility of RAPD for assessing paternity...

  15. Same school, different conduct: rates of multiple paternity vary within a mixed-species breeding school of semi-pelagic cichlid fish (Cyprichromis spp.).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Caleb; Werdenig, Alexandra; Koblmller, Stephan; Sefc, Kristina M

    2016-01-01

    Mating system variability is known to exist between and within species, often due to environmental influences. An open question is whether, vice versa, similar environmental conditions entail congruent mating behavior, for example in terms of multiple paternity, in species or populations sharing largely comparable breeding modes. This study employed microsatellite markers to investigate the incidence of multiple paternity in Cyprichromis coloratus and Cyprichromis leptosoma, two sympatric, closely related, mouthbrooding Lake Tanganyika cichlids with similar ecological and behavioral characteristics including the formation of open-water schools. Mouthbrooding females of both species were collected from the same mixed-species breeding school at the same time, minimizing environmental variation during courtship and mating. In C.coloratus, four of 12 broods had more than one sire, with a mean of 1.33 reconstructed sires per brood. C.leptosoma exhibited multiple paternity in 18 of 22 broods, with a mean of 2.59 or 2.86 reconstructed sires per brood according to the programs gerud and colony, respectively. In addition, two broods were found to contain offspring transplanted from another brood. There was no significant difference in brood size between species, but mean sire number did differ significantly. Hence, substantial similarity in reproductive behavior along with shared environmental conditions during courtship and spawning did not lead to equal rates of polyandry or sneaking in the two species. PMID:26811772

  16. Genetic origins of the Ainu inferred from combined DNA analyses of maternal and paternal lineages.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Atsushi; Hayami, Masanori; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Juji, Takeo; Matsuo, Masafumi; Marzuki, Sangkot; Omoto, Keiichi; Horai, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    The Ainu, a minority ethnic group from the northernmost island of Japan, was investigated for DNA polymorphisms both from maternal (mitochondrial DNA) and paternal (Y chromosome) lineages extensively. Other Asian populations inhabiting North, East, and Southeast Asia were also examined for detailed phylogeographic analyses at the mtDNA sequence type as well as Y-haplogroup levels. The maternal and paternal gene pools of the Ainu contained 25 mtDNA sequence types and three Y-haplogroups, respectively. Eleven of the 25 mtDNA sequence types were unique to the Ainu and accounted for over 50% of the population, whereas 14 were widely distributed among other Asian populations. Of the 14 shared types, the most frequently shared type was found in common among the Ainu, Nivkhi in northern Sakhalin, and Koryaks in the Kamchatka Peninsula. Moreover, analysis of genetic distances calculated from the mtDNA data revealed that the Ainu seemed to be related to both the Nivkhi and other Japanese populations (such as mainland Japanese and Okinawans) at the population level. On the paternal side, the vast majority (87.5%) of the Ainu exhibited the Asian-specific YAP+ lineages (Y-haplogroups D-M55* and D-M125), which were distributed only in the Japanese Archipelago in this analysis. On the other hand, the Ainu exhibited no other Y-haplogroups (C-M8, O-M175*, and O-M122*) common in mainland Japanese and Okinawans. It is noteworthy that the rest of the Ainu gene pool was occupied by the paternal lineage (Y-haplogroup C-M217*) from North Asia including Sakhalin. Thus, the present findings suggest that the Ainu retain a certain degree of their own genetic uniqueness, while having higher genetic affinities with other regional populations in Japan and the Nivkhi among Asian populations. PMID:14997363

  17. Survey of compound microsatellites in multiple Lactobacillus genomes.

    PubMed

    Basharat, Zarrin; Yasmin, Azra

    2015-12-01

    Distinct simple sequence repeats with 2 or more individual microsatellites joined together or lying adjacent to each other are identified as compound microsatellites. Investigation of such composite microsatellites in the genomes of genus Lactobacillus was the aim of this study. In silico inspection of microsatellite clustering in genomes of 14 Lactobacillus species revealed a wealth of compound microsatellites. All of the mined compound microsatellites were imperfect, were composed of variant motifs, and increased in all genomes, with maximum distance (dMAX) increments of 10 to 50. The majority of these repeats were present in the coding regions. A correlation of microsatellite to compound microsatellite density was detected. The difference established in compound microsatellite division among eukaryotes, Escherichia coli, and lactobacilli is suggestive of diverse genomic features and elementary distinction between creation and fixation methods of compound microsatellites among these organisms. PMID:26445296

  18. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, A.L.; Wick, M.J.; Persons, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.

  19. Characterization of 14 microsatellite markers for Silene acaulis (Caryophyllaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Eike; Hlaváčková, Iva; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Alsos, Inger Greve; Eidesen, Pernille Bronken

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Fifty candidate microsatellite markers, generated using 454 shotgun sequencing, were tested for the widespread arctic/alpine herb Silene acaulis (Caryophyllaceae). Methods and Results: Fourteen out of 50 markers resulted in polymorphic products with profiles that enabled interpretation. The numbers of alleles per locus ranged from two to six, and the expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.06 to 0.68. Analysis of F0 and F1 samples proved that one allele was always inherited maternally. Four multiplex mixes have been developed. Conclusions: Microsatellite markers for this species will be a valuable tool to study detailed small-scale genetic patterns in an arctic/alpine herb and to relate them to demographic parameters. PMID:26421249

  20. Cues of Paternal Uncertainty and Father to Child Physical Abuse as Reported by Mothers in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandre, Gisele Caldas; Nadanovsky, Paulo; Wilson, Margo; Daly, Martin; Moraes, Claudia Leite; Reichenheim, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Paternity is uncertain, so if paternal feelings evolved to promote fitness, we might expect them to vary in response to variables indicative of paternity probability. We therefore hypothesized that the risk of lapses of paternal affection, including abusive assaults on children, will be exacerbated by cues of non-paternity. Methods:…

  1. Cues of Paternal Uncertainty and Father to Child Physical Abuse as Reported by Mothers in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexandre, Gisele Caldas; Nadanovsky, Paulo; Wilson, Margo; Daly, Martin; Moraes, Claudia Leite; Reichenheim, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Paternity is uncertain, so if paternal feelings evolved to promote fitness, we might expect them to vary in response to variables indicative of paternity probability. We therefore hypothesized that the risk of lapses of paternal affection, including abusive assaults on children, will be exacerbated by cues of non-paternity. Methods:

  2. Adolescents' paternal attachment and Internet use.

    PubMed

    Lei, Li; Wu, Yana

    2007-10-01

    As children approach middle childhood and adolescence, the influence of fathers on children's behavior and development becomes more equivalent to that of mothers. The quality of father-child attachment operates as a stronger predictor of adolescents' cognitive and emotional development. During adolescence, symbolic communication by means of the Internet becomes increasingly more important than physical approximate-seeking behavior in infancy and childhood. Adolescents might regard the Internet as their new attachment figure or may seek new attachment figures through the Internet. This study was designed to address the impacts of father-adolescent attachment on adolescents' Internet use. Seven hundred twelve adolescent participants completed questionnaires to assess the associations among their paternal attachment, intensity of Internet use, and Internet services preference. The result revealed that alienation positively predicted pathological Internet use (PIU) directly and also indirectly mediated by leisure services preference. Trust predicted PIU negatively. These results help to provide parents and educators with guidance in adolescents' more appropriate Internet use. PMID:17927530

  3. FishMicrosat: a microsatellite database of commercially important fishes and shellfishes of the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microsatellite DNA is one of many powerful genetic markers used for the construction of genetic linkage maps and the study of population genetics. The biological databases in public domain hold vast numbers of microsatellite sequences for many organisms including fishes. The microsatellite data available in these data sources were extracted and managed into a database that facilitates sequences analysis and browsing relevant information. The system also helps to design primer sequences for flanking regions of repeat loci for PCR identification of polymorphism within populations. Description FishMicrosat is a database of microsatellite sequences of fishes and shellfishes that includes important aquaculture species such as Lates calcarifer, Ctenopharyngodon idella, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, Penaeus monodon, Labeo rohita, Oreochromis niloticus, Fenneropenaeus indicus and Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The database contains 4398 microsatellite sequences of 41 species belonging to 15 families from the Indian subcontinent. GenBank of NCBI was used as a prime data source for developing the database. The database presents information about simple and compound microsatellites, their clusters and locus orientation within sequences. The database has been integrated with different tools in a web interface such as primer designing, locus finding, mapping repeats, detecting similarities among sequences across species, and searching using motifs and keywords. In addition, the database has the ability to browse information on the top 10 families and the top 10 species, through record overview. Conclusions FishMicrosat database is a useful resource for fish and shellfish microsatellite analyses and locus identification across species, which has important applications in population genetics, evolutionary studies and genetic relatedness among species. The database can be expanded further to include the microsatellite data of fishes and shellfishes from other regions and available information on genome sequencing project of species of aquaculture importance. PMID:24047532

  4. Origin and genome evolution of polyploid green toads in Central Asia: evidence from microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Betto-Colliard, C; Sermier, R; Litvinchuk, S; Perrin, N; Stöck, M

    2015-03-01

    Polyploidization, which is expected to trigger major genomic reorganizations, occurs much less commonly in animals than in plants, possibly because of constraints imposed by sex-determination systems. We investigated the origins and consequences of allopolyploidization in Palearctic green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup) from Central Asia, with three ploidy levels and different modes of genome transmission (sexual versus clonal), to (i) establish a topology for the reticulate phylogeny in a species-rich radiation involving several closely related lineages and (ii) explore processes of genomic reorganization that may follow polyploidization. Sibship analyses based on 30 cross-amplifying microsatellite markers substantiated the maternal origins and revealed the paternal origins and relationships of subgenomes in allopolyploids. Analyses of the synteny of linkage groups identified three markers affected by translocation events, which occurred only within the paternally inherited subgenomes of allopolyploid toads and exclusively affected the linkage group that determines sex in several diploid species of the green toad radiation. Recombination rates did not differ between diploid and polyploid toad species, and were overall much reduced in males, independent of linkage group and ploidy levels. Clonally transmitted subgenomes in allotriploid toads provided support for strong genetic drift, presumably resulting from recombination arrest. The Palearctic green toad radiation seems to offer unique opportunities to investigate the consequences of polyploidization and clonal transmission on the dynamics of genomes in vertebrates. PMID:25370211

  5. Origin and genome evolution of polyploid green toads in Central Asia: evidence from microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Betto-Colliard, C; Sermier, R; Litvinchuk, S; Perrin, N; Stöck, M

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidization, which is expected to trigger major genomic reorganizations, occurs much less commonly in animals than in plants, possibly because of constraints imposed by sex-determination systems. We investigated the origins and consequences of allopolyploidization in Palearctic green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup) from Central Asia, with three ploidy levels and different modes of genome transmission (sexual versus clonal), to (i) establish a topology for the reticulate phylogeny in a species-rich radiation involving several closely related lineages and (ii) explore processes of genomic reorganization that may follow polyploidization. Sibship analyses based on 30 cross-amplifying microsatellite markers substantiated the maternal origins and revealed the paternal origins and relationships of subgenomes in allopolyploids. Analyses of the synteny of linkage groups identified three markers affected by translocation events, which occurred only within the paternally inherited subgenomes of allopolyploid toads and exclusively affected the linkage group that determines sex in several diploid species of the green toad radiation. Recombination rates did not differ between diploid and polyploid toad species, and were overall much reduced in males, independent of linkage group and ploidy levels. Clonally transmitted subgenomes in allotriploid toads provided support for strong genetic drift, presumably resulting from recombination arrest. The Palearctic green toad radiation seems to offer unique opportunities to investigate the consequences of polyploidization and clonal transmission on the dynamics of genomes in vertebrates. PMID:25370211

  6. Uniparental isodisomy for paternal 7p and maternal 7q in a child with growth retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Eggerding, F.A.; Schonberg, S.A.; Cox, V.A.; Epstein, C.J. Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA ); Chehab, F.F.; Norton, M.E. )

    1994-08-01

    Uniparental isodisomy resulting from the simultaneous presence of isochromosomes of the p and q arms of a chromosome and absence of a normal homologue is an exceptionally rare event. The authors have observed a growth-retarded female infant in whom the normal chromosome 7 homologues were replaced by what appeared cytogenetically to be isochromosomes of 7p and 7q. Polymorphic microsatellite loci spanning the length of 7p and 7q were analyzed in the proband and her parents to ascertain the parental origin and extent of heterozygosity of the proband's rearranged chromosomes. These studies demonstrated that the 7p alleles of the proband were derived only from the father, the 7q alleles were derived only from the mother, and there was homozygosity for all chromosome 7 loci analyzed. The mechanisms leading to the formation of the proband's isochromosomes could reflect abnormalities of cell division occurring at meiosis, postfertilization mitosis, or both. The authors believe that the present case may result from incomplete mitotic interchange in the pericentromeric regions of chromosome 7 homologues, with resolution by sister-chromatid reunion in an early, if not first, zygotic division. Phenotypically, the proband resembled three previously reported cases of maternal isodisomy for chromosome 7, suggesting that lack of paternal genes from 7q may result in a phenotype of short stature and growth retardation. 76 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Uniparental isodisomy for paternal 7p and maternal 7q in a child with growth retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Eggerding, F. A.; Schonberg, S. A.; Chehab, F. F.; Norton, M. E.; Cox, V. A.; Epstein, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Uniparental isodisomy resulting from the simultaneous presence of isochromosomes of the p and q arms of a chromosome and absence of a normal homologue is an exceptionally rare event. We have observed a growth-retarded female infant in whom the normal chromosome 7 homologues were replaced by what appeared cytogenetically to be isochromosomes of 7p and 7q. Polymorphic microsatellite loci spanning the length of 7p and 7q were analyzed in the proband and her parents to ascertain the parental origin and extent of heterozygosity of the proband's rearranged chromosomes. These studies demonstrated that the 7p alleles of the proband were derived only from the father, the 7q alleles were derived only from the mother, and there was homozygosity for all chromosome 7 loci analyzed. The mechanisms leading to the formation of the proband's isochromosomes could reflect abnormalities of cell division occurring at meiosis, postfertilization mitosis, or both. We believe that the present case may result from incomplete mitotic interchange in the pericentromeric regions of chromosome 7 homologues, with resolution by sister-chromatid reunion in an early, if not first, zygotic division. Phenotypically, our proband resembled three previously reported cases of maternal isodisomy for chromosome 7, suggesting that lack of paternal genes from 7q may result in a phenotype of short stature and growth retardation. Images Figure 1 PMID:7913578

  8. Paternal obesity in a rodent model affects placental gene expression in a sex-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Binder, Natalie K; Beard, Sally A; Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha J; Tong, Stephen; Hannan, Natalie J; Gardner, David K

    2015-05-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a major obstetric complication stemming from poor placental development. We have previously demonstrated that paternal obesity in mice is associated with impaired embryo development and significantly reduced fetal and placental weights. We hypothesised that the FGR observed in our rodent model of paternal diet-induced obesity is associated with alterations in metabolic, cell signalling and stress pathways. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed either a normal or high-fat diet for 10 weeks before sperm collection for IVF and subsequent embryo transfer. On embryonic day 14, placentas were collected and RNA extracted from both male and female placentas to assess mRNA expression of 24 target genes using custom RT-qPCR arrays. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (Ppara) and caspase-12 (Casp12) expression were significantly altered in male placentas from obese fathers compared with normal (P<0.05), but not female placentas. PPARA and CASP12 proteins were localised within the placenta to trophoblast giant cells by immunohistochemistry, and relative protein abundance was determined by western blot analysis. DNA was also extracted from the same placentas to determine methylation status. Global DNA methylation was significantly increased in female placentas from obese fathers compared with normal (P<0.05), but not male placentas. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that paternal obesity is associated with changes in gene expression and methylation status of extraembryonic tissue in a sex-specific manner. These findings reinforce the negative consequences of paternal obesity before conception, and emphasise the need for more lifestyle advice for prospective fathers. PMID:25725082

  9. Gene expression profiling of white adipose tissue reveals paternal transmission of proneness to obesity.

    PubMed

    Morita, Sumiyo; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Tomoko; Hayashi, Keiko; Horii, Takuro; Kimura, Mika; Kamei, Yasutomi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hata, Kenichiro; Hatada, Izuho

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that C57BL/6J (B6) mice are more prone to develop obesity than PWK mice. In addition, we analyzed reciprocal crosses between these mice and found that (PWK × B6) F1 mice, which have B6 fathers, are more likely to develop dietary obesity than (B6 × PWK) F1 mice, which have B6 mothers. These results suggested that diet-induced obesity is paternally transmitted. In this study, we performed transcriptome analysis of adipose tissues of B6, PWK, (PWK × B6) F1, and (B6 × PWK) F1 mice using next-generation sequencing. We found that paternal transmission of diet-induced obesity was correlated with genes involved in adipose tissue inflammation, metal ion transport, and cilia. Furthermore, we analyzed the imprinted genes expressed in white adipose tissue (WAT) and obesity. Expression of paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs) was negatively correlated with body weight, whereas expression of maternally expressed imprinted genes (MEGs) was positively correlated. In the obesity-prone B6 mice, expression of PEGs was down-regulated by a high-fat diet, suggesting that abnormally low expression of PEGs contributes to high-fat diet-induced obesity in B6 mice. In addition, using single-nucleotide polymorphisms that differ between B6 and PWK, we identified candidate imprinted genes in WAT. PMID:26868178

  10. Gene expression profiling of white adipose tissue reveals paternal transmission of proneness to obesity

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Sumiyo; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Tomoko; Hayashi, Keiko; Horii, Takuro; Kimura, Mika; Kamei, Yasutomi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hata, Kenichiro; Hatada, Izuho

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that C57BL/6J (B6) mice are more prone to develop obesity than PWK mice. In addition, we analyzed reciprocal crosses between these mice and found that (PWK × B6) F1 mice, which have B6 fathers, are more likely to develop dietary obesity than (B6 × PWK) F1 mice, which have B6 mothers. These results suggested that diet-induced obesity is paternally transmitted. In this study, we performed transcriptome analysis of adipose tissues of B6, PWK, (PWK × B6) F1, and (B6 × PWK) F1 mice using next-generation sequencing. We found that paternal transmission of diet-induced obesity was correlated with genes involved in adipose tissue inflammation, metal ion transport, and cilia. Furthermore, we analyzed the imprinted genes expressed in white adipose tissue (WAT) and obesity. Expression of paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs) was negatively correlated with body weight, whereas expression of maternally expressed imprinted genes (MEGs) was positively correlated. In the obesity-prone B6 mice, expression of PEGs was down-regulated by a high-fat diet, suggesting that abnormally low expression of PEGs contributes to high-fat diet-induced obesity in B6 mice. In addition, using single-nucleotide polymorphisms that differ between B6 and PWK, we identified candidate imprinted genes in WAT. PMID:26868178

  11. Paternal psychosocial work conditions and mental health outcomes: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Stefania; Ostry, Aleck; Tansey, James; Dunn, James; Hershler, Ruth; Chen, Lisa; Hertzman, Clyde

    2008-01-01

    Background The role of social and family environments in the development of mental health problems among children and youth has been widely investigated. However, the degree to which parental working conditions may impact on developmental psychopathology has not been thoroughly studied. Methods We conducted a case-control study of several mental health outcomes of 19,833 children of sawmill workers and their association with parental work stress, parental socio-demographic characteristics, and paternal mental health. Results Multivariate analysis conducted with four distinct age groups (children, adolescents, young adults, and adults) revealed that anxiety based and depressive disorders were associated with paternal work stress in all age groups and that work stress was more strongly associated with alcohol and drug related disorders in adulthood than it was in adolescence and young adulthood. Conclusion This study provides support to the tenet that being exposed to paternal work stress during childhood can have long lasting effects on the mental health of individuals. PMID:18377651

  12. Survey of microsatellite DNA in pine.

    PubMed

    Echt, C S; May-Marquardt, P

    1997-02-01

    A large insert genomic library from eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) was probed for the microsatellite motifs (AC)n and (AG)n, all 10 trinucleotide motifs, and 22 of the 33 possible tetranucleotide motifs. For comparison with a species from a different subgenus, a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) genomic library was also probed with the same set of di- and tri-nucleotide repeats and 11 of the tetranucleotide repeats. The four most abundant microsatellite motifs in both species were (AC)n, (AG)n, (AAT)n, and (ATC)n, which as a group accounted for over half the microsatellite sites investigated. The two dinucleotide repeats were the most abundant microsatellite motifs tested in both species, each at 2-4.5 sites/megabase pair (Mbp), but the two trinucleotide motifs were nearly as abundant and are considered good candidates for pine microsatellite marker development efforts. Eastern white pine had more than twice as many (AC)n as (AG)n loci, in contrast with loblolly pine and most other plant species in which (AG)n is more abundant. In both pine species the minimum estimated genome density for all microsatellites, excluding (AT)n repeats, was 16 sites/Mbp. PMID:9061909

  13. Microsatellite characterization of Cimarron Uruguayo dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Rosa; Llambí, Silvia; García, Cristina; Arruga, María Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Various genetic markers, including microsatellites, have been used to analyze the genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in canine breeds. In this work, we used nine microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic variability in Cimarron Uruguayo dogs, the only officially recognized native canine breed in Uruguay. DNA from 30 Cimarron Uruguayo dogs from northeastern and southern Uruguay was analyzed. The allelic frequencies for each microsatellite, the genetic variability and the consanguinity were calculated, as were the polymorphic information content (PIC) and the probability of exclusion (PE). All of the microsatellites studied were polymorphic. FH 2361, FH 2305 and PEZ 03 were the most informative, with PIC values > 0.7, in agreement with results for other canine breeds. The PE values for the markers were within the ranges previously described and were generally greater for microsatellites with higher PIC values. The heterozygosity value (0.649) was considered high since only nine microsatellites were analyzed. Compared with data for other breeds, the results obtained here indicate that Cimarron Uruguayo dogs have high genetic diversity. PMID:21637561

  14. Transgenerational inheritance of enhanced susceptibility to radiation-induced medulloblastoma in newborn Ptch1+/− mice after paternal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanno, Barbara; Meschini, Roberta; Cordelli, Eugenia; Benassi, Barbara; Longobardi, Maria Grazia; Izzotti, Alberto; Pulliero, Alessandra; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pacchierotti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of transgenerational induction of increased cancer susceptibility after paternal radiation exposure has long been controversial because of inconsistent results and the lack of a mechanistic interpretation. Here, exploiting Ptch1 heterozygous knockout mice, susceptible to spontaneous and radiation-induced medulloblastoma, we show that exposure of paternal germ cells to 1 Gy X-rays, at the spermatogonial stage, increased by a considerable 1.4-fold the offspring susceptibility to medulloblastoma induced by neonatal irradiation. This effect gained further biological significance thanks to a number of supporting data on the immunohistochemical characterization of the target tissue and preneoplastic lesions (PNLs). These results altogether pointed to increased proliferation of cerebellar granule cell precursors and PNLs cells, which favoured the development of frank tumours. The LOH analysis of tumor DNA showed Ptch1 biallelic loss in all tumor samples, suggesting that mechanisms other than interstitial deletions, typical of radiation-induced medulloblastoma, did not account for the observed increased cancer risk. This data was supported by comet analysis showing no differences in DNA damage induction and repair in cerebellar cells as a function of paternal irradiation. Finally, we provide biological plausibility to our results offering evidence of a possible epigenetic mechanism of inheritance based on radiation-induced changes of the microRNA profile of paternal sperm. PMID:26452034

  15. Microsatellite mutations and inferences about human demography.

    PubMed Central

    Gonser, R; Donnelly, P; Nicholson, G; Di Rienzo, A

    2000-01-01

    Microsatellites have been widely used as tools for population studies. However, inference about population processes relies on the specification of mutation parameters that are largely unknown and likely to differ across loci. Here, we use data on somatic mutations to investigate the mutation process at 14 tetranucleotide repeats and carry out an advanced multilocus analysis of different demographic scenarios on worldwide population samples. We use a method based on less restrictive assumptions about the mutation process, which is more powerful to detect departures from the null hypothesis of constant population size than other methods previously applied to similar data sets. We detect a signal of population expansion in all samples examined, except for one African sample. As part of this analysis, we identify an "anomalous" locus whose extreme pattern of variation cannot be explained by variability in mutation size. Exaggerated mutation rate is proposed as a possible cause for its unusual variation pattern. We evaluate the effect of using it to infer population histories and show that inferences about demographic histories are markedly affected by its inclusion. In fact, exclusion of the anomalous locus reduces interlocus variability of statistics summarizing population variation and strengthens the evidence in favor of demographic growth. PMID:10747070

  16. Microsatellite DNA instability and loss of heterozygosity in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Paraskakis, E; Sourvinos, G; Passam, F; Tzanakis, N; Tzortzaki, E G; Zervou, M; Spandidos, D; Siafakas, N M

    2003-12-01

    Genetic alterations, such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) or microsatellite instability (MI), have been reported in both malignant and benign disorders. In order to identify loci of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation in asthma, MI and LOH were studied in sputum cells. DNA was extracted from cells in the sputum and blood cells of 22 patients with moderate asthma. Cells were analysed for MI and LOH using 18 polymorphic markers on chromosome 5q, 6p, 11q, 14q. Microsatellite analysis was also performed in six healthy subjects. None of the healthy individuals exhibited any genetic alteration. Genetic alterations were found in 16 of 22 asthmatic patients (73%). In total, 12 (54.5%) patients exhibited LOH only, one (4.5%) MI only, while three showed both MI and LOH. The highest incidence of LOH and MI was found on chromosome 14q. Mean immunoglobulin E and blood eosinophil levels were significantly higher in asthmatics with three or more genetic alterations. A high incidence of genetic alterations in the deoxyribonucleic acid of the sputum cells was found in asthmatic patients. Further studies are needed to identify the role of loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability in the investigation of genetic susceptibility of asthma and thus, in its pathogenesis. PMID:14680084

  17. Inbreeding, microsatellite heterozygosity, and morphological traits in Lipizzan horses.

    PubMed

    Curik, I; Zechner, P; Slkner, J; Achmann, R; Bodo, I; Dovc, P; Kavar, T; Marti, E; Brem, G

    2003-01-01

    While the negative effects of inbreeding and reduced heterozygosity on fecundity and survival are well established, only a few investigations have been carried out concerning their influence on morphological traits. This topic is of particular interest for a small and closed population such as the Lipizzan horse. Thus, 27 morphological traits were measured in 360 Lipizzan mares and were regressed on the individual inbreeding coefficients, as well as on the individual heterozygosity and mean squared distances (mean d(2)) between microsatellite alleles within an individual. Both individual heterozygosity and mean d(2) were based on 17 microsatellite loci dispersed over 14 chromosomes. The results obtained by multivariate analysis reveal significant effects of stud (P <.0001), age at measurement (P <.0001), and mean d(2) (P =.0143). In univariate analyses, significant associations were obtained between length of pastern-hindlimbs and inbreeding coefficient (P <.01), length of cannons-hindlimb and mean d(2) (P <.01), and length of neck and mean d(2) (P <.001). After adjustment of single-test P values for multiple tests (Hochberg's step-up Bonferroni method), only the association of the length of neck and mean d(2) remained significant (P =.0213). Thus, no overall large effects of inbreeding, microsatellite heterozygosity, and mean d(2) on morphological traits were observed in the Lipizzan horse. PMID:12721224

  18. Mitochondrial microsatellite instability in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Venderbosch, S; van Vliet, S; Craenmehr, M H C; Simmer, F; de Haan, A F J; Punt, C J A; Koopman, M; Nagtegaal, I D

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial microsatellite instability (mtMSI), a change in length in mtDNA microsatellite sequences between normal and tumor tissue, has been described as a frequent occurrence in colorectal cancer (CRC). We evaluated the prevalence and prognostic value of mtMSI and its relation to nuclear microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC). At six loci (D310, D514, D16184, ND1, ND5, and COX1), the mitochondrial DNA sequence was analyzed in normal and tumor tissue, and the mtMSI status was determined. We evaluated the prevalence and outcome in terms of overall survival (OS) in 83 CRC patients with a MSI tumor (including 39 patients with Lynch syndrome) and in 99 mCRC patients with a microsatellite stable (MSS) tumor. A meta-analysis was performed to compare our findings with existing data. mtMSI at the D-loop region was found in 54.4 % (99 out of 182) of all patients. Prevalence of mtMSI was most pronounced at the D310 locus (50.5 %). Prevalence of mtMSI at the D-loop region was not different among patients with MSI compared to MSS tumors. There was no effect of mtMSI on prognosis in patients with MSI or MSS tumors. Prevalence of mtMSI was high in mCRC patients with both MSI and MSS tumors, but there was no correlation with prognosis. mtMSI was particularly present at the D310 locus. PMID:25697538

  19. Identification of RNA editing sites in chloroplast transcripts from the maternal and paternal progenitors of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum): comparative analysis shows the involvement of distinct trans-factors for ndhB editing.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tadamasa; Yukawa, Yasushi; Miyamoto, Tetsuya; Obokata, Junichi; Sugiura, Masahiro

    2003-07-01

    RNA editing alters genomic nucleotide sequences at the transcript level. In higher plant chloroplasts, C-to-U conversion is known to occur at around 30 specific sites. The tobacco cultivar Nicotiana tabacum is an amphidiploid derived from ancestors of N. sylvestris (maternal) and N. tomentosiformis (paternal). The chloroplast genome of N. tabacum is believed to originate from an ancestor of N. sylvestris. To study the evolution of RNA editing in higher plant chloroplasts, editing sites in the two likely progenitors have first been identified based on those found in N. tabacum. Altogether 34, 33, and 32 editing sites have been found in the chloroplast transcripts from N. tabacum, N. sylvestris, and N. tomentosiformis, respectively. Thirty-one sites are conserved among the three species, whereas remarkable differences are observed in the editing of ndhB and ndhD transcripts. Sites 7 and 8 in ndhB mRNAs are separated only by five nt, and both are edited in N. tabacum and N. sylvestris. However, site 8 is not edited in N. tomentosiformis, indicating that distinct trans-factors are involved in the two editing events. The first site in ndhD mRNAs is edited to produce an AUG start codon in N. sylvestris as well as in N. tabacum but not in N. tomentosiformis, suggesting that a distinct mechanism operates for the translational initiation of N. tomentosiformis ndhD mRNAs. Four to six sites are edited partially in green leaves. Some of these sites may represent evolutionary intermediates in the process of losing editing events. PMID:12716996

  20. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

  1. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

  2. The paternal function in Winnicott: the psychoanalytical frame.

    PubMed

    Faimberg, Haydée

    2014-08-01

    My first aim has been to identify the implicit assumptions underlying Winnicott's detailed notes on a fragment of an analysis dating from 1955 and published after his death. The importance given by Winnicott to the father figure as early as 1955 is one of my discoveries; another is the deep Freudian roots of his thinking. In this essay I propose a new way of linking together the concepts of 'paternal function' and the 'psychoanalytical frame'. Developing my hypothesis, I compare my reading of Winnicott and my way of reading José Bleger's study on the frame. Like Winnicott, I explore in detail a process of discovery, focusing on what the analyst and the patient are nor fully aware of …'as yet'. I am not proposing to unify Winnicott's and Bleger's thinking. My aim is to avoid the pitfall of eclecticism and, in so doing, to recognize both the related depths they sound in their thinking and their otherness. I want to share with the readers their 'meeting' in my mind. PMID:25229543

  3. Paternal familial twinning: hypothesis and genetic/medical implications.

    PubMed

    Golubovsky, Michael

    2002-04-01

    The phenomenon of paternally dependent familial twinning has been known in human and animal genetics since the 1920s, but still remains without any theoretical explanation and is indeed a neglected field of inquiry. Over the last two decades investigations in reproduction biology have discovered the significant role of multiple paternally dependent errors in fertilization including androgenic triploidy and moles. We suggest the hypothesis that the fathers of twins in the relevant families carry gene variants that increase the probability of dispermy, diplospermy and male pronucleus heterochrony as well as involvement of two male pronuclei in the fertilization of two female meiotic products. Any resulting twins would be an exceptional intermediate between MZ and DZ twins - and might properly be described as "sesquizygotic" (SZ). Paternal familial twinning may also go together with infertility due to triploidy, moles and chimerism. The hypothesis: (i) places the curiosities of paternally derived twinning within the framework of current knowledge of reproductive genetics and verifiable phenomena; (ii) predicts the existence of families in which twinning is associated with reproductive abnormalities; (iii) predicts an occurrence in relevant families of the third and intermediate category of SZ twins. Families with paternal twinning may thus provide the natural selective system for the search of unusual cases of primary chimeras, the frequency of which is still unknown. PMID:11931685

  4. Maternal and paternal imprisonment in the stress process.

    PubMed

    Foster, Holly; Hagan, John

    2013-05-01

    Parental incarceration is now prevalent in community samples (e.g., with 11% of children reporting paternal imprisonment and 3% reporting maternal imprisonment in a national sample), pointing to a potentially important childhood trauma that should be included in work on contemporary childhood stressors in this era of mass incarceration. This paper investigates the influences of maternal and paternal imprisonment on changes in young adult mental health using a nationally representative sample. We assess four perspectives-gendered loss, same-sex role model, intergenerational stress, and maternal salience - on the joint influences of maternal and paternal incarceration within the broader stress process paradigm. The results generalize support for a gendered loss perspective developed in work on parental death and an early small study of parental incarceration. This pattern reveals maternal incarceration increases depressive symptoms while paternal incarceration increases substance role problems. Chronicity of parental imprisonment and its timing are also influential. Analyses further specify a vulnerability of male and minority young adults to high levels of mental health problems following maternal and paternal incarceration in adolescence. PMID:23521986

  5. Paternal care and litter size coevolution in mammals.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Paula; Hobson, Liane

    2016-04-27

    Biparental care of offspring occurs in diverse mammalian genera and is particularly common among species with socially monogamous mating systems. Despite numerous well-documented examples, however, the evolutionary causes and consequences of paternal care in mammals are not well understood. Here, we investigate the evolution of paternal care in relation to offspring production. Using comparative analyses to test for evidence of evolutionary associations between male care and life-history traits, we explore if biparental care is likely to have evolved because of the importance of male care to offspring survival, or if evolutionary increases in offspring production are likely to result from the evolution of biparental care. Overall, we find no evidence that paternal care has evolved in response to benefits of supporting females to rear particularly costly large offspring or litters. Rather, our findings suggest that increases in offspring production are more likely to follow the evolution of paternal care, specifically where males contribute depreciable investment such as provisioning young. Through coevolution with litter size, we conclude that paternal care in mammals is likely to play an important role in stabilizing monogamous mating systems and could ultimately promote the evolution of complex social behaviours. PMID:27097924

  6. An extrachromosomal factor causing loss of paternal chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Werren, J H; Nur, U; Eickbush, D

    Extrachromosomal inheritance is ubiquitous among plants and animals; however, most extrachromosomal factors are uniparentally inherited through females, but not through males. Examples include chloroplasts, mitochondria and a variety of intracellular symbionts. The only known exception to maternal extrachromosomal inheritance in an animal is a paternally transmitted sex ratio factor (psr) which causes all-male families in the parasitic wasp, Nasonia vitripennis. Normally in this wasp, male offspring are haploid and develop from unfertilized eggs whereas females are diploid and develop from fertilized eggs. The psr factor is either a venereally transmitted infection which prevents egg fertilization (and therefore causes all-male families), or a factor transmitted to eggs by the sperm of males carrying psr, which somehow prevents incorporation of the paternal chromosomes. Here we report that sperm from psr males fertilizes eggs, but that the paternal chromosomes are subsequently condensed into a chromatin mass before the first mitotic division of the egg and do not participate in further divisions. Resulting haploid offspring are male, but have inherited the paternal factor. This extrachromosomal factor promotes its own transmission at the expense of the paternal chromosomes, and therefore can be considered a 'selfish' genetic element. PMID:3574468

  7. Paternal leakage, heteroplasmy, and the evolution of plant mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    McCauley, David E

    2013-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes are usually transmitted to the progeny from the maternal parent. However, cases of paternal transmission are known and are perhaps more common than once thought. This review will consider recent evidence, both direct and indirect, of paternal transmission (leakage) of the mitochondrial genome of seed plants, especially in natural populations, and how this can result in offspring that carry a mixture of maternally and paternally derived copies of the genome; a type of heteroplasmy. It will further consider how this heteroplasmy facilitates recombination between genetically distinct partners; a process that can enhance mitochondrial genotypic diversity. This will then form the basis for a discussion of five evolutionary questions that arise from these observations. Questions include how plant mitochondrial genome evolution can be placed on a sexual to asexual continuum, whether cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) facilitates the evolution of paternal leakage, whether paternal leakage is more likely in populations undergoing admixture, how leakage influences patterns of gene flow, and whether heteroplasmy occurs in natural populations at a frequency greater than predicted by crossing experiments. It is proposed that each of these questions offers fertile ground for future research on a diversity of plant species. PMID:23952142

  8. Paternal care and litter size coevolution in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Liane

    2016-01-01

    Biparental care of offspring occurs in diverse mammalian genera and is particularly common among species with socially monogamous mating systems. Despite numerous well-documented examples, however, the evolutionary causes and consequences of paternal care in mammals are not well understood. Here, we investigate the evolution of paternal care in relation to offspring production. Using comparative analyses to test for evidence of evolutionary associations between male care and life-history traits, we explore if biparental care is likely to have evolved because of the importance of male care to offspring survival, or if evolutionary increases in offspring production are likely to result from the evolution of biparental care. Overall, we find no evidence that paternal care has evolved in response to benefits of supporting females to rear particularly costly large offspring or litters. Rather, our findings suggest that increases in offspring production are more likely to follow the evolution of paternal care, specifically where males contribute depreciable investment such as provisioning young. Through coevolution with litter size, we conclude that paternal care in mammals is likely to play an important role in stabilizing monogamous mating systems and could ultimately promote the evolution of complex social behaviours. PMID:27097924

  9. Promiscuity, paternity and personality in the great tit

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Samantha C.; Chapman, Joanne R.; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Quinn, John L.; Sheldon, Ben C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding causes of variation in promiscuity within populations remain a major challenge. While most studies have focused on quantifying fitness costs and benefits of promiscuous behaviour, an alternative possibility—that variation in promiscuity within populations is maintained because of linkage with other traits—has received little attention. Here, we examine whether promiscuity in male and female great tits (Parus major)—quantified as extra-pair paternity (EPP) within and between nests—is associated with variation in a well-documented personality trait: exploration behaviour in a novel environment. Exploration behaviour has been shown to correlate with activity levels, risk-taking and boldness, and these are behaviours that may plausibly influence EPP. Exploration behaviour correlated positively with paternity gained outside the social pair among males in our population, but there was also a negative correlation with paternity in the social nest. Hence, while variation in male personality predicted the relative importance of paternity gain within and outside the pair bond, total paternity gained was unrelated to exploration behaviour. We found evidence that males paired with bold females were more likely to sire extra-pair young. Our data thus demonstrate a link between personality and promiscuity, with no net effects on reproductive success, suggesting personality-dependent mating tactics, in contrast with traditional adaptive explanations for promiscuity. PMID:22130602

  10. Microsatellite data support subpopulation structuring among Basques.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Miranda, Ana M; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Kalantar, Arif; García-Obregón, Susana; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Peña, José A; Herrera, Rene J

    2005-01-01

    Genomic diversity based on 13 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (D3S1358, vWA, FGA, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, TH01, TPOX, and CSF1PO) is reported for the first time in Basques from the provinces of Guipúzcoa and Navarre (Spain). STR data from previous studies on Basques from Alava and Vizcaya provinces were also examined using hierarchal analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and genetic admixture estimations to ascertain whether the Basques are genetically heterogeneous. To assess the genetic position of Basques in a broader geographic context, we conducted phylogenetic analyses based on F(ST) genetic distances [neighbor-joining trees and multidimensional scaling (MDS)] using data compiled in previous publications. The genetic profile of the Basque groups revealed distinctive regional partitioning of short tandem repeat (STR) diversity. Consistent with the above, native Basques clearly segregated from other populations from Europe (including Spain), North Africa, and the Middle East. The main line of genetic discontinuity inferred from the spatial variability of the microsatellite diversity in Basques significantly overlapped the geographic distribution of the Basque language. The genetic heterogeneity among native Basque groups correlates with the peculiar geography of peopling and marital structure in rural Basque zones and with language boundaries resulting from the uneven impact of Romance languages in the different Basque territories. PMID:16133660

  11. Genetic analysis of hybridization and introgression between wild mongoose and brown lemurs

    PubMed Central

    Pastorini, Jennifer; Zaramody, Alphonse; Curtis, Deborah J; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2009-01-01

    Background Hybrid zones generally represent areas of secondary contact after speciation. The nature of the interaction between genes of individuals in a hybrid zone is of interest in the study of evolutionary processes. In this study, data from nuclear microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA sequences were used to genetically characterize hybridization between wild mongoose lemurs (Eulemur mongoz) and brown lemurs (E. fulvus) at Anjamena in west Madagascar. Results Two segments of mtDNA have been sequenced and 12 microsatellite loci screened in 162 brown lemurs and mongoose lemurs. Among the mongoose lemur population at Anjamena, we identified two F1 hybrids (one also having the mtDNA haplotype of E. fulvus) and six other individuals with putative introgressed alleles in their genotype. Principal component analysis groups both hybrids as intermediate between E. mongoz and E. fulvus and admixture analyses revealed an admixed genotype for both animals. Paternity testing proved one F1 hybrid to be fertile. Of the eight brown lemurs genotyped, all have either putative introgressed microsatellite alleles and/or the mtDNA haplotype of E. mongoz. Conclusion Introgression is bidirectional for the two species, with an indication that it is more frequent in brown lemurs than in mongoose lemurs. We conclude that this hybridization occurs because mongoose lemurs have expanded their range relatively recently. Introgressive hybridization may play an important role in the unique lemur radiation, as has already been shown in other rapidly evolving animals. PMID:19196458

  12. The effects of advanced paternal age on fertility

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Jason R; Addai, Josephine; Smith, Ryan P; Coward, Robert M; Lamb, Dolores J; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2013-01-01

    Modern societal pressures and expectations over the past several decades have resulted in the tendency for couples to delay conception. While women experience a notable decrease in oocyte production in their late thirties, the effect of age on spermatogenesis is less well described. While there are no known limits to the age at which men can father children, the effects of advanced paternal age are incompletely understood. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding advanced paternal age and its implications on semen quality, reproductive success and offspring health. This review will serve as a guide to physicians in counseling men about the decision to delay paternity and the risks involved with conception later in life. PMID:23912310

  13. The effects of walls, paternity and ageing on sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Gee, C C; Zimmer-Faust, R K

    1997-12-01

    The measurement of sperm motility is critical when studying fertilization kinetics and chemotaxis. Analysis of motility has traditionally been carried out on cells in small fluid volumes on microscope slides. Several theoretical treatments suggest that drag forces significantly affect flagellar motion within 10 sperm body lengths of the slide surface. Understanding how sperm move in the absence of surface drag is crucial when considering natural locomotory patterns. To examine the effects of solid surfaces, motile sperm from sea urchins (Arbacia punctulata) were placed in a Plexiglas chamber (69 mmx45 mmx15.5 mm; length x width x height). A system was constructed to minimize convective flow by limiting temperature differences within the chamber to less than 0.1 degrees C. The movement of sperm was video-recorded at two levels: (3/4)100 micron (3 body lengths) and 5 mm (150 body lengths) below the chamber lid. When swimming speeds were measured using a computerized video motion-analysis system, a highly significant difference (P<0. 0001) between cells at the two depths was found. Cells nearest the lid swam at 174.6+/-5.9 micron s-1 (mean +/- s.e.m.), whereas those farther away slowed to only 111.1+/-9.9 micron s-1 (mean +/- s.e.m.). Swimming speed was also found to be significantly (P<0.01) affected by paternity, but not by sperm age. We conclude that viscous wall effects must be carefully considered in studies of sperm motility and chemotaxis. The analysis of sperm on a microscope slide may substantially exaggerate swimming speed. PMID:9364024

  14. Allelic imbalance regions on chromosomes 8p, 17p and 19p related to metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison between matched primary and metastatic lesions in 22 patients by genome-wide microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-Hai; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Ma, Zeng-Chen; Ye, Sheng-Long; Liu, Yin-Kun; Ye, Qing-Hai; Wu, Xin; Huang, Wei; Tang, Zhao-You

    2003-05-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms of metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is necessary to identify the accumulating genetic alterations during its progression as well as those responsible for the acquisition of metastatic potential in cancer cells. In our previous study, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), we found that loss on chromosome 8p is more frequent in metastatic lesions than in matched primary tumors of HCC. Thus, 8p deletion might contribute to HCC metastasis. To narrow the location of metastasis-related alteration regions, we analyzed 22 primary and matched metastatic lesions of HCC by genome-wide microsatellite analysis. Common regions with high levels of allelic imbalance (AI) were identified on 17p, 8p11-cen, 8p21-23, 4q32-qter, 4q13-23, 16q, and 1p33. Regions with increased AI in metastatic lesions were 8p23.3, 8p11.2, 17p11.2-13.3, 4q21-22, 4q32-qter, 8q24.1, 9p11, 9q31, 11q23.1, 13q14.1-31, 13q32-qter, 16p13.3, 16q13, 16q22, and 19p13.1, and these were considered to be related to the metastasis phenotype. Among them, loss on 8p was again proved to be related to progression and metastasis of HCC, and 8p23.3 and 8p11.2 were two likely regions harboring metastasis-related genes. It was also shown for the first time in HCC that AI of 19p13.1 might also be related to metastatic potential. These results provide some candidate regions for further study to identify putative genes suppressing metastasis of HCC. PMID:12734753

  15. Paternal kin recognition and infant care in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus).

    PubMed

    Sargeant, Elizabeth J; Wikberg, Eva C; Kawamura, Shoji; Jack, Katharine M; Fedigan, Linda M

    2016-06-01

    Evidence for paternal kin recognition and paternally biased behaviors is mixed among primates. We investigate whether infant handling behaviors exhibit paternal kin biases in wild white-faced capuchins monkeys (Cebus capucinus) by comparing interactions between infants and genetic sires, potential sires, siblings (full sibling, maternal, and paternal half-siblings) and unrelated handlers. We used a linear mixed model approach to analyze data collected on 21 focal infants from six groups in Sector Santa Rosa, Costa Rica. Our analyses suggest that the best predictor of adult and subadult male interactions with an infant is the male's dominance status, not his paternity status. We found that maternal siblings but not paternal siblings handled infants more than did unrelated individuals. We conclude that maternal but not paternal kinship influence patterns of infant handling in white-faced capuchins, regardless of whether or not they can recognize paternal kin. Am. J. Primatol. 78:659-668, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26815856

  16. Combining US and Brazilian microsatellite data for a meta-analysis of sheep (Ovis aries) breed diversity: Facilitating the FAO Global Plan of Action for conserving animal genetic resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellites have been used to understand genetic diversity among livestock populations. Nevertheless, most studies have involved the processing of samples in one laboratory or with common standards across laboratories. Our objective was to identify an approach to facilitate the merger of microsa...

  17. Integrative Analyses of Colorectal Cancer Show Immunoscore Is a Stronger Predictor of Patient Survival Than Microsatellite Instability.

    PubMed

    Mlecnik, Bernhard; Bindea, Gabriela; Angell, Helen K; Maby, Pauline; Angelova, Mihaela; Tougeron, David; Church, Sarah E; Lafontaine, Lucie; Fischer, Maria; Fredriksen, Tessa; Sasso, Maristella; Bilocq, Amélie M; Kirilovsky, Amos; Obenauf, Anna C; Hamieh, Mohamad; Berger, Anne; Bruneval, Patrick; Tuech, Jean-Jacques; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Le Pessot, Florence; Mauillon, Jacques; Rafii, Arash; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Speicher, Michael R; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Michel, Pierre; Sesboüe, Richard; Frebourg, Thierry; Pagès, Franck; Valge-Archer, Viia; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Galon, Jérôme

    2016-03-15

    Microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer predicts favorable outcomes. However, the mechanistic relationship between microsatellite instability, tumor-infiltrating immune cells, Immunoscore, and their impact on patient survival remains to be elucidated. We found significant differences in mutational patterns, chromosomal instability, and gene expression that correlated with patient microsatellite instability status. A prominent immune gene expression was observed in microsatellite-instable (MSI) tumors, as well as in a subgroup of microsatellite-stable (MSS) tumors. MSI tumors had increased frameshift mutations, showed genetic evidence of immunoediting, had higher densities of Th1, effector-memory T cells, in situ proliferating T cells, and inhibitory PD1-PDL1 cells, had high Immunoscores, and were infiltrated with mutation-specific cytotoxic T cells. Multivariate analysis revealed that Immunoscore was superior to microsatellite instability in predicting patients' disease-specific recurrence and survival. These findings indicate that assessment of the immune status via Immunoscore provides a potent indicator of tumor recurrence beyond microsatellite-instability staging that could be an important guide for immunotherapy strategies. PMID:26982367

  18. Evidence for paternal imprinting in familial Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, D; Ramesar, R

    1992-01-01

    A previously unreported family in which seven members in two generations have Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is documented. Paternal imprinting of the gene responsible for BWS is involved as the mechanism responsible for the aberrant inheritance pattern in this kindred. A review of published reports showed 27 previously published pedigrees with two or more affected subjects with BWS. Paternal imprinting would explain the non-mendelian inheritance of BWS in all but four kindreds. The latter families are examined in more detail and in only one example is the evidence against imprinting totally unexplained. Images PMID:1583639

  19. Paternal age at childbearing and offspring psychiatric and academic morbidity

    PubMed Central

    DOnofrio, Brian M.; Rickert, Martin E.; Frans, Emma; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Almqvist, Catarina; Sjlander, Arvid; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Summary Importance Advancing paternal age is associated with increased genetic mutations during spermatogenesis, which research suggests may cause psychiatric morbidity in the offspring. The effects of advancing paternal age at childbearing on offspring morbidity remains unclear, however, because of inconsistent epidemiological findings and the inability of previous studies to rigorously rule out confounding factors. Objective Examine the associations between advancing paternal age at childbearing and numerous indices of offspring morbidity. Setting Population-based cohort study in Sweden. Participants All individuals born in Sweden 19732001 (N=2,615,081), with subsets of the data used to predict childhood/adolescent morbidity. Design We estimated the risk for psychiatric and academic morbidity associated with advancing paternal age using several quasi-experimental designs, including the comparison of differentially exposed siblings, cousins, and first-born cousins. Exposure Paternal age at childbearing Main outcomes Psychiatric (autism, ADHD, psychosis, bipolar disorder, suicide attempt, and substance use problem) and academic (failing grades and low educational attainment) morbidity. Results In the population, advancing paternal age was associated with increased risk for some psychiatric disorders (e.g. autism, psychosis, and bipolar disorders) but decreased risk for the other indices of morbidity. In contrast, the sibling-comparison analyses indicated that advancing paternal age had a dose-response relationship with every index of morbidity, with the magnitude of the associations being as large or larger than the estimates in the entire population. Compared to offspring born to fathers 2025 years old, offspring of fathers 45 years+ were at heightened risk for autism (Hazard Ratio [HR]=3.45, 95% Confidence Intervals [CI]=1.627.33), ADHD (HR=13.13, CI=6.8525.16), psychosis (HR=2.07, CI=1.353.20), bipolar disorder (HR=24.70, CI=12.1250.31), suicide attempts (HR=2.72, CI=2.083.56), substance use problems (HR=2.44, CI=1.982.99), failing a grade (Odds Ratio [OR]=1.59, CI=1.371.85), and low educational attainment (OR=1.70, CI=1.501.93) in within-sibling comparisons. Additional analyses using several quasi-experimental designs obtained commensurate results, further strengthening the internal and external validity of the findings. Conclusions and Relevance Advancing paternal age is associated with increased risk for psychiatric and academic morbidity, with the magnitude of the risks being as large or larger than prev