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Sample records for microstructured molding technique

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Components Fabricated by a New Powder Injection Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Miller, Megan R.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weil, K. Scott

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a powder injection molding (PIM) binder system for titanium that employs naphthalene as the primary constituent to facilitate easy binder removal and mitigate problems with carbon contamination. In the study presented here, we examined densification behavior, microstructure, and mechanical properties in specimens formed by this process. In general, we found that we could achieve tensile strengths comparable to wrought titanium in the PIM-formed specimens, but that maximum elongation was less than expected. Chemical and microstructural analyses suggest that use of higher purity powder and further process optimization will lead to significant improvements in ductility.

  2. Programmable and self-demolding microstructured molds fabricated from shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Tobias; Bur, Julia; Reinhard, Maximilian; Schneider, Marc; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-06-01

    We introduce shape memory polymers as materials to augment molds with programmable switching between different micro and nanostructures as functional features of the mold and self-demolding properties. These polymer molds can be used for hot embossing (or nanoimprinting) and casting. Furthermore, they enable the replication of nano- and microstructures on curved surfaces as well as embedded structures like on the inside walls of a microfluidic channel. The shape memory polymer molds can be replicated from master molds fabricated by conventional techniques. We tested their durability for microfabrication processes and demonstrated the advantages of shape memory molds for hot embossing and casting by replicating microstructures with high aspect ratios and optical grade surface quality.

  3. A fabrication method of microneedle molds with controlled microstructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi Lei; Zhu, Dan Dan; Chen, Yang; Guo, Xin Dong

    2016-08-01

    Microneedle (MN) offers an attractive, painless and minimally invasive approach for transdermal drug delivery. Polymer microneedles are normally fabricated by using the micromolding method employing a MN mold, which is suitable for mass production due to high production efficiency and repeat-using of the mold. Most of the MN molds are prepared by pouring sylgard polymer over a MN master to make an inverse one after curing, which is limited in optimizing or controlling the MN structures and failing to keep the sharpness of MNs. In this work we describe a fabrication method of MN mold with controlled microstructures, which is meaningful for the fabrication of polymer MNs with different geometries. Laser micro-machining method was employed to drill on the surface of PDMS sheets to obtain MN molds. In the fabrication process, the microstructures of MN molds are precisely controlled by changing laser parameters and imported patterns. The MNs prepared from these molds are sharp enough to penetrate the skin. This scalable MN mold fabrication method is helpful for future applications of MNs. PMID:27157736

  4. Incipient flocculation molding: A new ceramic-forming technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrasmith, Steven Reade

    Incipient Flocculation Molding (IFM) was conceived as a new near-net-shape forming technique for ceramic components. It was hypothesized that the development of a temperature-dependent deflocculant would result in a forming technique that is flexible, efficient, and capable of producing a superior microstructure with improved mechanical properties from highly reactive, submicron ceramic powders. IFM utilizes a concentrated, nonaqueous, sterically stabilized ceramic powder and/or colloidal suspension which is injected into a non-porous mold. The suspension is then flocculated by destabilizing the suspension by lowering the temperature. Flocculation is both rapid and reversible. Cooling to -20°C produces a green body with sufficient strength for removal from the mold. The solvent is removed from the green body by evaporation. The dried green body is subsequently sintered to form a dense ceramic monolith. This is the first ceramic forming method based upon the manipulation of a sterically-stabilized suspension. To demonstrate IFM, the process of grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG), with molecular weights from 600 to 8000, to alumina powders was investigated. The maximum grafted amounts were achieved by the technique of dispersing the alumina powders in molten polymer at 195°C. The ungrafted PEG was then removed by repeated centrifuging and redispersion in fresh distilled water. The rheological behavior of suspensions of the PEG-grafted powders in water, 2-propanol and 2-butanol were characterized. All of the aqueous suspensions were shear thinning. The PEG 4600-grafted alumina powder aqueous suspensions were the most fluid. Sample rods and bars were molded from 52 vol% PEG-grafted alumina suspensions in 2-butanol. The best results were obtained with a preheated aluminum mold lubricated with a fluorinated oil mold-release. The samples were dried, sintered, and their microstructure and density were compared with sintered samples dry pressed from the same alumina powder

  5. Surface micro-structuring of glassy carbon for precision glass molding of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Glassy carbon is used nowadays for a variety of applications because of its mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties. This makes it also a suitable candidate as mold material for precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature materials. To fabricate molds for diffractive optics a highresolution structuring technique is needed. We introduce a process that allows the micro-structuring of glassy carbon by reactive ion etching. Key parameters such as uniformity, surface roughness, edge definition and lateral resolution are discussed. They are the most relevant parameters for a stamp in optical applications. The use of titanium as a hard mask makes it possible to achieve a reasonable selectivity of 4:1, which has so far been one of the main problems in microstructuring of glassy carbon. We investigate the titanium surface structure with its 5-10 nm thick layer of TiO2 grains and its influence on the shape of the hard mask. In our fabrication procedure we were able to realize optically flat diffractive structures with slope angles of more than 80° at typical feature sizes of 5 μm and at 700 nm depth. The fabricated glassy carbon molds were applied to thermal imprinting onto different glasses. Glassy carbon molds with 1 mm thickness were tested with binary optical structures. Our experiments show the suitability of glassy carbon as molds for cost efficient mass production with a high quality.

  6. Injection molding of thermoplastic elastomers for microstructured substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkar, Smita

    Amorphous and semi-crystalline thermoplastic polymers have been widely investigated for injection molding of parts with microstructured surfaces. Microstructured surfaces injection molded from thermoplastic elastomers have emerging applications as superhydrobic surfaces and patterned adhesives, but there is a limited understanding of the factors affecting replication with these materials. This research was a continued investigation of block copolymer thermoplastic elastomers as well as the first in-depth examination of thermoplastic vulcanizates for injection molding microfeatures. The first focus of this research was the interactions between tooling aspect ratio and feature orientation (negative and positive tooling) and thermoplastic elastomer hard segment content on microfeature replication. Electroformed nickel tooling having positive and negative features with different geometries and aspect ratios of 0.02:1 to 2:1 were molded from three copolyester thermoplastic elastomers with similar chemistry and different hardness values. The tooling and part features were characterized for feature depth and height as well as feature definition using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. Results were correlated with elastomer properties. In the second parts of this research, the effects of microfeature spacing on the replication of thermoplastic elastomer features was investigated using micropillars with two diameters (10 and 20 mum) and three spacing ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, and 2:1). The tooling and part features were characterized for feature depth and height as well as feature definition using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. Feature spacing significantly affected the replication of micropillars using a thermoplastic elastomer. This replication was competition between cooling and pressurization of the melt. Wider spacing between smaller features allowed cooling in the tooling lands to dominate the feature filling. Higher pressures did

  7. A micro powder injection molding apparatus for high aspect ratio metal micro-structure production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Gang; Tor, Shubeng; Loh, Ngiaphiang; Tay, Beeyen; Hardt, David E.

    2007-09-01

    A new variotherm molding apparatus is presented in this paper for the fabrication of high aspect ratio 316L stainless steel micro-structures using micro powder injection molding (μPIM) technology. The molding apparatus prototype includes an injection mold in which a silicon insert with an array of 24 × 24 (576) microcavities is mounted, a set of rapid tempering systems for the mold and a set of vacuum systems. The key advantage of this molding apparatus lies in the real-time monitoring and rapid adjustment of the mold cavity temperature during injection molding and part ejection, which makes molding and demolding of high aspect ratio green micro-structures possible. For example, incomplete filling occurs while injection molding micro-structures of 60 µm × height 191 µm with an aspect ratio of 3.2 using a conventional mold. In comparison, smaller micro-structures with higher aspect ratio are produced successfully in the case of the new molding apparatus, e.g. micro-structures of 40 µm × height 174 µm with an aspect ratio of 4.35 and 20 µm × height 160 µm with an aspect ratio of 8 were molded successfully.

  8. Multilevel micro-structuring of glassy carbon molds for precision glass molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Replication techniques for diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in soft materials such as plastic injection molding are state of the art. For precision glass molding in glasses with high transition temperatures, molds with extreme thermal resistivity, low chemical reactivity and high mechanical strength are needed. Glassy Carbon can be operated up to 2000°C making it possible to mold almost all glasses including Fused Silica with a transition temperatures above 1060°C. For the structuring of Glassy Carbon wafers photolithography and a RIE process is used. We have developed a process using Si as a hard mask material. If the flow rates of the etching gases O2 and SF6 are chosen properly, high selectivity of GC to Si 19:1 can be achieved, which provides excellent conditions to realize high resolution elements with feature size down to 1 micron and fulfills requirements for optical applications. We fabricated several multilevel GC molds with 8 levels of structuring. Two different optical functionalities were implemented: 6x6 array beamsplitter and 1x4 linear beamsplitter. The molds were applied for precision glass molding of a low Tg glass L-BAL 42 (from Ohara) with a transition temperature of 565°C. Their optical performance was measured. A more detailed analysis of the impact of mold fabrication defects on optical performance is done. Rigorous coupled wave analysis simulations are performed, where we included fabrication constrains such as duty cycle, edge depth errors, wall verticality and misalignment errors. We will compare the results with the design specifications and discuss the influence of fabrication errors introduced during the different process steps.

  9. Fabrication of a seamless roller mold with wavy microstructures using mask-less curved surface beam pen lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Sung-Wen; Chen, Po-Yu; Lee, Yung-Chun

    2014-04-01

    Roller imprinting is one of the most commonly used methods for the fabrication of continuous functional structures over large areas. However, the fabrication of roller molds with seamless and complex patterns poses a significant challenge. This paper presents an innovative technique for fabricating a seamless roller mold with wavy microstructures using a novel mask-less curved surface beam pen lithography technique. The major steps in the proposed technique include spray coating a thin photo-resist (PR) layer on the roller, exposing the PR layer though a translating micro-lens array (MLA), etching the patterned PR layer, and electro-polishing the etched microstructures. The proposed method is used to pattern roller molds with different wavy microstructures by varying the rotation speed of the roller, the translation speed of the MLA holder, and the translation distance of the MLA holder. The patterned metal roller molds are then used to replicate wavy microstructures on a thin polyethylene terephthalate substrate by means of continuous UV-type roller imprinting methods. The line-width and height of the wavy microstructure are 84.5 µm and 25.5 µm, respectively.

  10. Fabrication, densification, and replica molding of 3D carbon nanotube microstructures.

    PubMed

    Copic, Davor; Park, Sei Jin; Tawfick, Sameh; De Volder, Michael; Hart, A John

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of new materials and processes to microfabrication has, in large part, enabled many important advances in microsystems, lab-on-a-chip devices, and their applications. In particular, capabilities for cost-effective fabrication of polymer microstructures were transformed by the advent of soft lithography and other micromolding techniques (1, 2), and this led a revolution in applications of microfabrication to biomedical engineering and biology. Nevertheless, it remains challenging to fabricate microstructures with well-defined nanoscale surface textures, and to fabricate arbitrary 3D shapes at the micro-scale. Robustness of master molds and maintenance of shape integrity is especially important to achieve high fidelity replication of complex structures and preserving their nanoscale surface texture. The combination of hierarchical textures, and heterogeneous shapes, is a profound challenge to existing microfabrication methods that largely rely upon top-down etching using fixed mask templates. On the other hand, the bottom-up synthesis of nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanowires can offer new capabilities to microfabrication, in particular by taking advantage of the collective self-organization of nanostructures, and local control of their growth behavior with respect to microfabricated patterns. Our goal is to introduce vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which we refer to as CNT "forests", as a new microfabrication material. We present details of a suite of related methods recently developed by our group: fabrication of CNT forest microstructures by thermal CVD from lithographically patterned catalyst thin films; self-directed elastocapillary densification of CNT microstructures; and replica molding of polymer microstructures using CNT composite master molds. In particular, our work shows that self-directed capillary densification ("capillary forming"), which is performed by condensation of a solvent onto the substrate with CNT

  11. Filling and Transcription Behavior of Molten Polymer Coating on Microstructures in Melt-Transcription-Molding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Satoh, Isao; Saito, Takushi; Yakemoto, Kazutoshi

    To clarify the fabrication mechanism of molten polymer coating on microstructures such as optical display parts and bio-tip in Melt-Transcription-Molding (MTM) process, the transcription experiments between a metal stamper engraved with microstructures and a molten polymer (PC: polycarbonate and COC: cyclo-olefin copolymer) were carried out under various molding conditions (mold temperature, polymer temperature, polymer pressure and coating speed) and transcript results were evaluated from the dimensional aspect. In this study the complete transcription of the microstructures was obtained at mold temperature of 170°C for COC and 175°C for PC, respectively. However, the rim height of the microstructure was increased and its center depth was decreased, when lower mold temperatures were applied. From these experimental results, it was suggested that the adhesion force between a molten polymer filled with the microstructure and the metal mold surface plays an important role in fixing the transcript shape of the microstructure against the elastic recovery force and/or shrinkage by cooling. Furthermore, a model to explain the filling and transcription behavior of molten polymers was proposed from viscoelastic properties of each polymer, and it was confirmed that predicted microstructure geometries deduced with the model are well fitted with the transcript results which were experimentally obtained under various mold temperatures.

  12. Molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions or asthma attacks in sensitive people. Molds can cause fungal infections. In addition, mold exposure may irritate your eyes, skin, nose, ...

  13. Research in manufacturing of micro-structured injection molded polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucyshyn, Thomas; Struklec, Tobias; Burgsteiner, Martin; Graninger, Georg; Holzer, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    An overview of current research results is given for the topic of injection molding of micro-structured polymer parts regarding filling behavior and demolding process of micro-structures as well as the production of micro-structures on curved surfaces. In order to better understand how micro-structures are formed during the filling stage of injection molding, a study was performed on a test part with micro-channels placed parallely and perpendicularly to flow direction. Short shots with a highly fluent Polypropylene grade were injection molded with the melt front stopping in the structure fields. The melt and mold temperature, the injection rate as well as the use of a variotherm heating system were varied in a systematic Design of Experiments. The shape of the flow front was investigated with the optical measurement system Alicona InfiniteFocus. The data gained was analyzed with Matlab scripts and provided the needed distance to completely fill the structures as a reference value. The next topic covers the demolding step, which is a crucial process step in injection molding of micro-structured parts as the successfully replicated structures often get destroyed in the following demolding step. In order to evaluate the influence of the four aspects polymer, mold surface (coatings), structure (geometry and placement) and process settings on the demolding behavior, an injection mold with integrated measurement system was built, which makes it possible to measure the demolding force respectively a demolding energy under process conditions. These values can be used to quantitatively compare the impact of the above mentioned influencing factors on demolding. Finally, a concept to produce micro-structures on curved surfaces with injection molding is shown: A flat metal premaster structure is used to produce an elastomeric polymer (dimethylsiloxane) master in a casting process. This master is fixed in a conventional injection mold and a thermoplastic polymer is replicated

  14. Numerical Simulation of and Experiment on Electroforming Microstructure Mold Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ming-Nan

    2008-09-01

    Microstructures are a vital component in various systems such as bionic chips, micro-fluidics sensor, optical communication systems, and micro-fuel cells. Micro-mold inserts should be produced by precise electroforming; however, interchanging the plating solution in an extremely small tunnel has been a main problem, where flow field and mass transfer are the major variances. In this paper we will concentrate on single- and three-micro hole array mode insert electroform flow fields and the mass transfer effect. Single-hole results show that the interchange of the plating fluid is more efficient at a lower aspect ratio of similar apertures with different aspect ratios. A lower coefficient of viscosities results in a weaker microelectroforming effect. The electroforming effect is better at an entry flow field speed of 0.01 m/s than at that of 0.001 m/s. The three-hole array results show that the first hole proved the best among the three holes, followed by the second hole; the third hole showed the worst results. The 10:1 ratio of distance to diameter of the hole produces better electroforming results than the 1:1 ratio. Lastly, this paper will contribute to the development of microelectro-mechanical manufacturing technologies.

  15. A Combined Experimental and Computational Approach for the Design of Mold Topography that Leads to Desired Ingot Surface and Microstructure in Aluminum Casting.

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Zabaras, N.J.; Samanta, D.; Tan, L.

    2005-10-30

    A design methodology will be developed with which casting mold surface topographies can be tuned to produce required surface features and micro-structural properties of Aluminum ingots. Both static and continuous casting processes will be examined with instrumented molds. Mold surface topographies, which consist of unidirectional and bi-directional groove textures, will be generated using contact and non-contact techniques to elicit a radiator-like effect at the mold-casting interface. The rate of heat extraction, the evolution of near-surface cast microstructure, and shell macro-morphology can be controlled once the proper balance between mold surface area extension and the degree of imperfect wetting at the instant solidification starts is determined. Once this control is achieved, it will be possible to minimize or even eliminate costly post-casting surface milling or scalping which is currently a major barrier to the development of new Aluminum casting processes.

  16. Molds

    MedlinePlus

    Molds are fungi that can be found both outdoors and indoors. They grow best in warm, damp and humid conditions. If ... spots in your house, you will probably get mold. Molds can cause health problems. Inhaling or touching ...

  17. The demolding of powder injection molded micro-structures: analysis, simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, G.; Tor, S. B.; Loh, N. H.; Tay, B. Y.; Hardt, D. E.

    2008-07-01

    This paper studies the demolding of an array of powder injection molded micro-structures based on a variotherm mold. The demolding of the micro-structures array was analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Finite element method (FEM) software ABAQUS was used to analyze and simulate the demolding of an array of 24 × 24 (total of 576) micro-structures. It was found that there exists a 'critical temperature' at which the demolding force for the micro-structures array is a minimum. The stress distribution of the micro-structures and demolding force for the micro-structures during the course of demolding were analyzed for both demolding temperatures higher and lower than the critical temperature. Packing pressure and demolding temperature have an apparent impact on the demolding force. A series of demolding force measuring experiments at different packing pressures and demolding temperatures were conducted to verify the theoretical results.

  18. Characterization of Ni-Cr alloys using different casting techniques and molds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Teng, Fu-Yuan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    This study differentiated the mechanical properties of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys under various casting techniques (different casting molds and casting atmospheres). These techniques were sampled by a sand mold using a centrifugal machine in ambient air (group I) and electromagnetic induction in an automatic argon castimatic casting machine (group II). The specimen casting used a graphite mold by a castimatic casting machine (group III). The characteristics of the Ni-Cr alloys, yield and ultimate tensile strength, bending modulus, microhardness, diffraction phase, grindability, ability to spring back, as well as ground microstructure and pattern under different casting conditions were evaluated. The group III specimens exhibited the highest values in terms of strength, modulus, hardness, and grindability at a grind rate of 500 rpm. Moreover, group III alloys exhibited smaller grain sizes, higher ability to spring back, and greater ductility than those casted by sand investment (groups I and II). The main factor, "casting mold," significantly influenced all mechanical properties. The graphite mold casting of the Ni-Cr dental alloys in a controlled atmosphere argon casting system provided an excellent combination of high mechanical properties and good ability to spring back, and preserved the ductile properties for application in Ni-Cr porcelain-fused system. The results can offer recommendations to assist a prosthetic technician in selecting the appropriate casting techniques to obtain the desired alloy properties. PMID:24411373

  19. Microminiature molding techniques for cochlear electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Loeb, G E; Peck, R A; Smith, D W

    1995-12-01

    We provide a general method for producing a variety of small, complex electrode arrays based on injection molds produced using computer-aided drafting and machining (CAD-CAM) procedures and a novel method for connecting to the very fine electrical leads associated with the individual contacts of such arrays. Cat-sized cochlear electrode arrays with up to eight contacts were built according to these methods and their electrical contacts were characterized in vitro by impedance spectroscopy and in vivo by monitoring impedance for over 1 year of intermittent stimulation in chronically instrumented animals. PMID:8788052

  20. Effect of mold temperature on the microstructure and corrosion properties of a 14-karat gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Koiso, Kazuo; Saito, Takahiro; Kawashima, Isao

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of mold temperature on grain interior and grain boundary reactions in a14-karat gold alloy. The alloy (Au-15%Ag-3%Pd-24 mass%Cu) was cast into an investment with different mold temperatures (22, 250,400, and 700°C) and then analyzed using SEM, X-ray diffraction, and potentiodynamic polarization tests. Lower mold temperatures(22 and 250°C) retarded a grain boundary reaction evidently present when using higher mold temperatures (400 and 700°C). Phase separation, which was manifested as a dual phase grain boundary nodular formation, was observed at a higher degree at 400°C mold temperature than at 700°C. The corrosion potentials of alloys cast at lower mold temperatures were more noble than those cast at higher mold temperatures, suggesting improved corrosion properties. Results of this study showed that the microstructure, crystalline phases present, and corrosion properties of 14-karat gold alloy were keenly influenced by the mold temperature, which controls and influences the cooling rate. PMID:22864223

  1. Implications of diamond-turned versus diamond-ground mold fabrication techniques on precision-molded optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertus, Lou; Symmons, Alan

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the trend within the molded optics community has been an overall advancement in the capability to diamond grind molds using a variety of grinding techniques. Improvements in grinding equipment, materials and tooling have enabled higher quality ceramic and carbide molds and thereby lenses. Diamond turned molds from ductile metals are still used prevalently throughout the molding industry. Each technology presents a unique set of advantages and disadvantages whether used for precision injection molding of plastic optics or precision glass molding. This paper reviews the manufacturing techniques for each approach and applicable molding process. The advantages and disadvantages of each are compared and analyzed. The subtle differences that exist in optics molded from each technique and the impact they have on the performance in various applications is reviewed. Differences stemming from tooling material properties, material-specific minor defects, as well as cutting and grinding process-induced artifacts are described in detail as well as their influence on the roughness, waviness, and form errors present on the molded surface. A comparison with results between similar surfaces for both diamond grinding and diamond turning is presented.

  2. Comparison of injection molding and injection/compression molding for the replication of microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokkwan; Hwang, Jeongho; Kang, Jeongjin; Yoon, Kyunghwan

    2015-11-01

    Because of increasing interest in the functional surfaces including micro- or nano-patterns, the mass production of such surfaces has been actively researched. Both conventional injection molding (CIM) and injection/compression molding (ICM) of micro-patterns were investigated in the present study. The molding subject is a multi-scale structure that consists of a macro-scale thin plate and micro-scale patterns formed regularly on its surface. The transcription ratios of micro pattern made by CIM and ICM for different flow length were experimentally measured, and the origin of the obtained results was identified through numerical analysis. It was found that the cavity pressure and polymer temperature are the most important factors for micro-pattern filling; in particular, the polymer temperature is the key factor determining the transcription ratio. It was also found that the difference in CIM and ICM micro-pattern transcription ratios originates from the differences in the cavity pressure history if other molding conditions are the same.

  3. Multilevel micro-structuring of glassy carbon for precision glass molding of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    A consumer market for diffractive optical elements in glass can only be created if high efficient elements are available at affordable prices. In diffractive optics the efficiency and optical properties increases with the number of levels used, but in the same way the costs are multiplied by the number if fabrication steps. Replication of multilevel diffractive optical elements in glass would allow cost efficient fabrication but a suitable mold material is needed. Glassy carbon shows a high mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties, which makes it an excellent candidate as mold material for precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature materials. We introduce an 8 level micro structuring process for glassy carbon molds with standard photolithography and a Ti layer as hard mask for reactive ion etching. The molds were applied to thermal imprinting onto low and high transition temperature glass. Optical performance was tested for the molded samples with different designs for laser beamsplitters. The results show a good agreement to the design specification. Our result allow us to show limitations of our fabrication technique and we discussed the suitability of precision glass molding for cost efficient mass production with a high quality.

  4. High-Fidelity Replica Molding of Glassy Liquid Crystalline Polymer Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hangbo; Wie, Jeong Jae; Copic, Davor; Oliver, C Ryan; Orbaek White, Alvin; Kim, Sanha; Hart, A John

    2016-03-01

    Liquid crystalline polymers have recently been engineered to exhibit complex macroscopic shape adaptivity, including optically- and thermally driven bending, self-sustaining oscillation, torsional motion, and three-dimensional folding. Miniaturization of these novel materials is of great interest for both fundamental study of processing conditions and for the development of shape-changing microdevices. Here, we present a scalable method for high-fidelity replica molding of glassy liquid crystalline polymer networks (LCNs), by vacuum-assisted replica molding, along with magnetic field-induced control of the molecular alignment. We find that an oxygen-free environment is essential to establish high-fidelity molding with low surface roughness. Identical arrays of homeotropic and polydomain LCN microstructures are fabricated to assess the influence of molecular alignment on the elastic modulus (E = 1.48 GPa compared to E = 0.54 GPa), and side-view imaging is used to quantify the reversible thermal actuation of individual LCN micropillars by high-resolution tracking of edge motion. The methods and results from this study will be synergistic with future advances in liquid crystalline polymer chemistry, and could enable the scalable manufacturing of stimuli-responsive surfaces for applications including microfluidics, tunable optics, and surfaces with switchable wetting and adhesion. PMID:26943057

  5. Development of processes and techniques for molding thermally stable, fire-retardant, low-smoke-emitting polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, B.

    1979-01-01

    All available newly developed nonmetallic thermally stable polymers were examined for the development of processes and techniques by compression molding, injection molding, or thermoforming cabin interior parts. Efforts were directed toward developing molding techniques of new polymers to economically produce usable nonmetallic molded parts. Data on the flame resistant characteristics of the materials were generated from pilot plant batches. Preliminary information on the molding characteristics of the various thermoplastic materials was obtained by producing actual parts.

  6. Effect of Fe3P addition on magnetic properties and microstructure of injection molded iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jidong; Qin, Mingli; Tian, Lusha; Zhang, Lin; Khan, Dil Faraz; Ding, Xiangying; Qu, Xuanhui; Zhang, Houan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus powder was used to improve the performance of iron based alloy products fabricated by metal injection molding. Seven kinds of Fe-xP soft magnetic alloys were formed using carbonyl iron powder and Phosphorus powder as raw materials where x=0-1.2 wt% with 0.2 wt% increment. Samples were sintered in hydrogen atmosphere at the temperature range of 1100-1450 °C for varied times. The effects of sintering temperature and time on the density, microstructure and magnetic properties like magnetic induction, maximum permeability and coercive force of the alloys were examined. The results demonstrated that better magnetic performances of the injection molded Fe-xP alloy is due to increased density of the sintered compacts because of formation of liquid phase at low temperature. For Fe-0.8%P alloy, optimum density 7.84 g/cm3 (relative density 99%) and magnetic induction (B6000) 1.77 T, maximum permeability 17,100 were obtained at sintering temperature 1420 °C while the coercive force was 21 A/m respectively.

  7. (The control of microstructures during consolidation and injection molding of colloidal dispersions)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The existing three-year grant pertaining to The control of micro-structures during consolidation and injection molding of colloidal dispersions'' began July 1, 1988 as a continuation of a previous grant. The overall effort seeks to answer fundamental questions relevant to the colloidal processing of submicron particles leading to ceramic materials for strutural, electronic, or optical applications. At the outset two distinct projects were envisioned, an exploration of the ultrasonic enhancement of disorder-order transitions and a detailed study of injection molding of very dense dispersion, with each weighted toward experiments but with theoretical components. As the effort evolved the focus shifted in response to the interests of the students attracted to the project, the identification of interesting related problems through technical meetings, and different insights gained during participation in a DOE sponsored workshop. The scope that has emerged encompasses: completion of research begun during the first grant period on disorder-order transitions occurring during sedimentation, the consolidation of flocculated dispersions via filtration and the assembly of nanometer-sized particle into dense packings.

  8. Preparation of Microstructure Molds of Montmorillonite/Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate and Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Polyethylene Glycol Diacrylate Nanocomposites for Miniaturized Device Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ho; Sohn, Jeong-Woo; Woo, Youngjae; Hong, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Gyu Man; Kang, Bong Keun; Park, Juyoung

    2015-10-01

    Environmentally friendly microstructure molds with montmorillonite (MMT) or multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) nanocomposites have been prepared for miniaturized device applications. The micropatterning of MMT/PEGDA and MWCNT/PEGDA with 0.5 to 2.0 wt% of MMTs and MWCNTs was achieved through a UV curing process with micro-patterned masks. Hexagonal dot arrays and complex patterns for microstructures of the nanocomposites were produced and characterized with an optical microscope; their thermal properties were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The TGA results showed that these nanocomposites were thermally stable up to 350 °C. Polydimethylsiloxane thin replicas with different microstructures were prepared by a casting method using the microstructured nanocomposites as molds. It is considered that these microstructure molds of the nanocomposites can be used as microchip molds to fabricate nanobio-chips and medical diagnostic chip devices. PMID:26726429

  9. Application of Anisotropic Conductive Film to Fabrication of Molybdenum Field Emitter Arrays Using Transfer Mold Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eou Sik; Ahn, Min Hyung; Kwon, Sang Jik

    2008-08-01

    In the fabrication of molybdenum field emitter arrays (Mo FEA) by the transfer mold technique, anisotropic conductive film (ACF) was applied to the bond between the inverted mold structure and the transferred glass substrate. Without any electrical treatment of electrostatic bonding, the inverted mold was successfully bonded to an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate under optimized thermal and pressure conditions. No additional conductive layers were used in the bonding process, and the bonded ACF was not chemically affected in the wet-etch process of the silicon inverted mold structure. The fabricated Mo FEA was structurally and electrically investigated and an anode current of 10 nA per emitter was obtained at a gate bias of 94 V. The results demonstrate the possibility of selective conduction in the fabrication of transfer mold FEA using ACF bonding.

  10. Metallographic techniques and microstructures: uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Romig, A.D. Jr.

    1982-08-01

    The techniques used for the metallographic analysis of uranium and its alloys are discussed. Sample preparation and characterization procedures are described for: optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. A brief overview of electron optics, electron/sample interactions, signal detectors, and x-ray microanalysis is presented. Typical uranium alloy microstructures observed by these techniques are presented and discussed. The microstructures examined include those produced by the diffusional decomposition of ..gamma..:U-0.75Ti and ..gamma..:U-6Nb, the martensitic decomposition of U-2Mo, U-6Nb, U-0.75Ti and Mulberry, and the aging of quenched U-2Mo.

  11. Dimensional Changes of Acrylic Resin Denture Bases: Conventional Versus Injection-Molding Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gharechahi, Jafar; Asadzadeh, Nafiseh; Shahabian, Foad; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Acrylic resin denture bases undergo dimensional changes during polymerization. Injection molding techniques are reported to reduce these changes and thereby improve physical properties of denture bases. The aim of this study was to compare dimensional changes of specimens processed by conventional and injection-molding techniques. Materials and Methods: SR-Ivocap Triplex Hot resin was used for conventional pressure-packed and SR-Ivocap High Impact was used for injection-molding techniques. After processing, all the specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature until measured. For dimensional accuracy evaluation, measurements were recorded at 24-hour, 48-hour and 12-day intervals using a digital caliper with an accuracy of 0.01 mm. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using t-test and repeated-measures ANOVA. Statistical significance was defined at P<0.05. Results: After each water storage period, the acrylic specimens produced by injection exhibited less dimensional changes compared to those produced by the conventional technique. Curing shrinkage was compensated by water sorption with an increase in water storage time decreasing dimensional changes. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, dimensional changes of acrylic resin specimens were influenced by the molding technique used and SR-Ivocap injection procedure exhibited higher dimensional accuracy compared to conventional molding. PMID:25584050

  12. Microforging technique for rapid, low-cost fabrication of lens array molds.

    PubMed

    Forest, Craig R; Saez, Miguel A; Hunter, Ian W

    2007-12-20

    Interest in micro-optical components for applications ranging from telecommunications to life sciences has driven the need for accessible, low-cost fabrication techniques. Many microlens fabrication processes are unsuitable for applications requiring 100% fill factor, apertures approximately 1000 microm with high numerical aperture, and scalability to large areas (e.g., tens of centimeters to meters) with millions of lenses. We report on a flexible, low-cost mold fabrication technique that utilizes a combination of milling and microforging. The technique involves first performing a rough cut with a ball-end mill. Final shape and sag height are then achieved by pressing a sphere of equal diameter into the milled divot. Using this process, we have fabricated molds for rectangular arrays of 1-10,000 lenses with apertures of 25-1600 microm, sag heights of 3-130 microm, interlens spacings of 250-2000 microm, and fill factors up to 100%. Mold profiles have a roughness and figure error of 68 nm and 354 nm, respectively, for 100% fill factor, 1000 microm aperture lenses. The required forging force was modeled as a modified open-die forging process and experimentally verified to increase nearly linearly with surface area. The optical performance of lens arrays injection molded from microforged molds was characterized by imaging the point spread function and was found to be in the range of theoretical values. The process can be easily adapted to lenticular arrays as well. Limitations include milling machine range and accuracy. PMID:18091978

  13. An Integrated Approach Linking Process to Structural Modeling With Microstructural Characterization for Injections-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin

    2008-09-01

    The objective of our work is to enable the optimum design of lightweight automotive structural components using injection-molded long fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). To this end, an integrated approach that links process modeling to structural analysis with experimental microstructural characterization and validation is developed. First, process models for LFTs are developed and implemented into processing codes (e.g. ORIENT, Moldflow) to predict the microstructure of the as-formed composite (i.e. fiber length and orientation distributions). In parallel, characterization and testing methods are developed to obtain necessary microstructural data to validate process modeling predictions. Second, the predicted LFT composite microstructure is imported into a structural finite element analysis by ABAQUS to determine the response of the as-formed composite to given boundary conditions. At this stage, constitutive models accounting for the composite microstructure are developed to predict various types of behaviors (i.e. thermoelastic, viscoelastic, elastic-plastic, damage, fatigue, and impact) of LFTs. Experimental methods are also developed to determine material parameters and to validate constitutive models. Such a process-linked-structural modeling approach allows an LFT composite structure to be designed with confidence through numerical simulations. Some recent results of our collaborative research will be illustrated to show the usefulness and applications of this integrated approach.

  14. Improved wax mold technique forms complex passages in solid structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellbaum, R. F.; Page, A. D.; Phillips, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Low-cost fabricating technique produces minute, complex air passages in fluidic devices. Air jet interactions in these function as electronic and electromechanical control systems. Wax cores are fabricated without distortion by two-wax process using nonsoluble pattern-wax and water-soluble wax. Significant steps in fabrication process are discussed.

  15. A study of chemical decapsulation techniques for new generation plastic molded IC packages

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, R.; Adams, O.; Bartlett, J.; Todd, C.; Huynh, T.

    1995-12-31

    IC decapsulation is a crucial step for failure analysis. An improper decapsulation may lead to corrosion of bond pad metallizations and/or etching of the lead filters, effectively precluding further functional analysis. New generation plastic mold compounds and packages have rendered the traditional manual decapsulation techniques all but obsolete. This paper compares the advantages of automated decapsulation equipment and techniques over the conventional manual techniques. To encompass a majority of the decapsulation problems, the authors used a variety of plastic mold compounds and package types in this study. One fiberglass layered BGA package was especially vulnerable to manual chemical decapsulation, which attacked not only bond pad metallizations, but also the PCB materials. The authors will show that available spray etch systems provide reliable results with a substantial reduction in decapsulation time.

  16. Fabrication of sinterable silicon nitride by injection molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, C. L.; French, K.; Neil, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Transformation of structural ceramics from the laboratory to production requires development of near net shape fabrication techniques which minimize finish grinding. One potential technique for producing large quantities of complex-shaped parts at a low cost, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material. Binder selection methodology, compounding of ceramic and binder components, injection molding techniques, and problems in binder removal are discussed. Strength, oxidation resistance, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material.

  17. The Influence of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Machinability of a Prehardened Mold Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseiny, Hamed; Caballero, Francisca G.; M'Saoubi, Rachid; Högman, Berne; Weidow, Jonathan; Andrén, Hans-Olof

    2015-05-01

    The machinability performance of a modified AISI P20 steel, heat treated to have the same hardness but three different microstructures, lower bainite, tempered martensite, and primary spheroidized carbides in a tempered martensite matrix, was studied. The microstructures were characterized using light optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, and mechanical properties were compared by means of tensile and Charpy V-notch impact tests. The influence of microstructure and the resultant mechanical properties on machinability was studied in the context of single tooth end milling operation. The results showed that the material containing primary spheroidized carbides exhibited a superior machinability at the expense of a marginal loss of tensile strength and impact toughness, with comparable yield strength to that of the material containing tempered martensite. By contrast, the material with bainitic microstructure showed the lowest yield strength and the poorest machinability performance while having the highest uniform elongation.

  18. Comparative evaluation of border molding, using two different techniques in maxillary edentulous arches - An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Yarapatineni, Rameshbabu; Vilekar, Abhishek; Kumar, J Phani; Kumar, G Ajay; Aravind, Prasad; Kumar, P Anil

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to compare the retention between sectional border molding using low fusing greenstick compound and single step border molding using condensation silicone (putty) impression material in three stages- A. Immediately following border molding, B. After final impression and C. With the finished permanent denture base. Materials & Methods: In this study evaluation of retentive values of sectional border molding (Group I) (custom impression trays border molded with green stick compound ) and single step border molding (Group II) ( border molding with condensation silicone (putty) impression material ). In both techniques definitive wash impression were made with light body condensation silicone and permanent denture base with heat cure polymerization resin. Results: Group II was significantly higher (mean=8011.43) than Group I (mean=5777.43) in test-A. The t-value (1.5883) infers that there was significant difference between Group I and Group II (p =0.15). Group I was significantly higher (mean=6718.57) than Group II (mean=5224.29) in test -B. The t-value (1.6909) infers that there was significant difference between Group I and Group II (p=0.17). Group II was higher (mean=4025.14) than Group I (mean=3835.07) in test -C. The t-value was 0.1239. But it was found to be statistically insignificant (p=0.005). Conclusion: Within the limitation of this clinical study border molding custom tray with low fusing green stick compound provided similar retention as compared to custom impression tray with condensation silicone in permanent denture base. How to cite this article: Yarapatineni R, Vilekar A, Kumar JP, Kumar GA, Aravind P, Kumar PA. Comparative evaluation of border molding, using two different techniques in maxillary edentulous arches - An in vivo study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):82-7 . PMID:24453450

  19. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metal injection molded Ti-Nb binary alloys as biomedical material.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dapeng; Chang, Keke; Ebel, Thomas; Qian, Ma; Willumeit, Regine; Yan, Ming; Pyczak, Florian

    2013-12-01

    The application of titanium (Ti) based biomedical materials which are widely used at present, such as commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V, are limited by the mismatch of Young's modulus between the implant and the bones, the high costs of products, and the difficulty of producing complex shapes of materials by conventional methods. Niobium (Nb) is a non-toxic element with strong β stabilizing effect in Ti alloys, which makes Ti-Nb based alloys attractive for implant application. Metal injection molding (MIM) is a cost-efficient near-net shape process. Thus, it attracts growing interest for the processing of Ti and Ti alloys as biomaterial. In this investigation, metal injection molding was applied to the fabrication of a series of Ti-Nb binary alloys with niobium content ranging from 10wt% to 22wt%, and CP-Ti for comparison. Specimens were characterized by melt extraction, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Titanium carbide formation was observed in all the as-sintered Ti-Nb binary alloys but not in the as-sintered CP-Ti. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns revealed that the carbides are Ti2C. It was found that with increasing niobium content from 0% to 22%, the porosity increased from about 1.6% to 5.8%, and the carbide area fraction increased from 0% to about 1.8% in the as-sintered samples. The effects of niobium content, porosity and titanium carbides on mechanical properties have been discussed. The as-sintered Ti-Nb specimens exhibited an excellent combination of high tensile strength and low Young's modulus, but relatively low ductility. PMID:23994942

  20. Fabrication of dual-pore scaffolds using SLUP (salt leaching using powder) and WNM (wire-network molding) techniques.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Sang; Hong, Myoung Wha; Kim, So-Youn; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Young Yul; Cho, Young-Sam

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a novel technique was proposed to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds combining both SLUP (salt leaching using powder) and WNM (wire-network molding) techniques. This technique has several advantages: solvent-free, no limit on the use of thermoplastic polymers as a raw material, and easiness of fabricating scaffolds with dual-scale pores that are interconnected randomized small pores. To fabricate dual-pore scaffolds, PCL and NaCl powders were mixed at a certain ratio. Subsequently, needles were inserted into a designed mold, and the mixture was filled into the mold thereafter. Subsequently, after the mold was pressurized, the mold was heated to melt the PCL powders. The PCL/NaCl structure and needles were separated from the mold. The structure was sonicated to leach-out the NaCl particles and was dried. Consequently, the remaining PCL structure became the dual-pore scaffold. To compare the characteristics of dual-pore scaffolds, control scaffolds, which are 3D plotter and SLUP scaffolds were fabricated. PMID:25491863

  1. Solid Dispersion Matrix Tablet Comprising Indomethacin-PEG-HPMC Fabricated with Fusion and Mold Technique.

    PubMed

    Mesnukul, A; Yodkhum, K; Phaechamud, T

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to fabricate the polyethylene glycol matrix tablet by mold technique. Indomethacin and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose were used as model drug and polymer, respectively, in PEG matrix system. The physical and drug release characteristics of developed matrix tablet were studied. This inert carrier system comprising 7:3 polyethylene glycol 4000: polyethylene glycol 400 could effectively enhance the solubility of indomethacin and an addition of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose could sustain the drug release. Scanning electron microscope photomicrograph indicated the drug diffusion outward through the porous network of this developed matrix tablet into the dissolution fluid. Least square fitting the experimental dissolution data to the mathematical expressions (power law, first-order, Higuchi's and zero-order) indicated the drug release kinetics primarily as Fickian diffusion. Both the enhancement of drug dissolution and the prolongation of the drug release could be achieved for aqueous insoluble drug such as, indomethacin, by using polyethylene glycol-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose matrix system prepared with melting and mold technique. PMID:20502547

  2. Solid Dispersion Matrix Tablet Comprising Indomethacin-PEG-HPMC Fabricated with Fusion and Mold Technique

    PubMed Central

    Mesnukul, A.; Yodkhum, K.; Phaechamud, T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to fabricate the polyethylene glycol matrix tablet by mold technique. Indomethacin and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose were used as model drug and polymer, respectively, in PEG matrix system. The physical and drug release characteristics of developed matrix tablet were studied. This inert carrier system comprising 7:3 polyethylene glycol 4000: polyethylene glycol 400 could effectively enhance the solubility of indomethacin and an addition of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose could sustain the drug release. Scanning electron microscope photomicrograph indicated the drug diffusion outward through the porous network of this developed matrix tablet into the dissolution fluid. Least square fitting the experimental dissolution data to the mathematical expressions (power law, first-order, Higuchi's and zero-order) indicated the drug release kinetics primarily as Fickian diffusion. Both the enhancement of drug dissolution and the prolongation of the drug release could be achieved for aqueous insoluble drug such as, indomethacin, by using polyethylene glycol-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose matrix system prepared with melting and mold technique. PMID:20502547

  3. Mold Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... navigation Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Allergies ▸ Mold Allergy Share | Mold Allergy Overview Symptoms & Diagnosis Treatment & Management Mold Allergy Overview Molds are tiny fungi whose spores ...

  4. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jerome Sutherland

    2001-05-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  5. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    PubMed

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-08-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses. PMID:26737367

  6. Effect of microstructure on the impact toughness of a bainitic steel bloom for large plastic molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Xiao-chun; Zhou, Quan; Duan, Li-li

    2015-08-01

    The correlation between the impact toughness and microstructural characteristics of a large bainitic steel bloom has been investigated. The study focuses on microcrack nucleation and propagation in the basic cleavage plane. To analyze the phase transformation during the wind-cooling process, the temperature field of the bloom was acquired by computer simulation, and a continuous cooling transformation experiment was conducted. The results show that compared with the surface of the bloom, the toughness of the bloom's core is decreased by the increase in proeutectoid ferrite and the coarsening of tempered martensite-austenite constituents. The proeutectoid ferrite decreases the toughness via its effects on carbide precipitation, the formation of martensite-austenite constituents, and the bainite transformation. The relatively large tempered martensite-austenite constituents are conducive to microcrack nucleation and propagation.

  7. Single Stage Silicone Border Molded Closed Mouth Impression Technique-Part II.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E G R

    2011-09-01

    Functioning of a complete denture depends to a great extent on the impression technique. Several impression techniques have been described in the literature since the turn of this century when Greene [Clinical courses in dental prothesis, 1916] brothers introduced the first scientific system of recording dental impression. Advocates of each technique have their own claim of superiority over the other. The introduction of elastomeric impression materials [Skinner and Cooper, J Am Dent Assoc 51:523-536, 1955] has made possible new techniques of recording impression for complete denture construction. These rubber like materials are of two types; one has a polysulfide base and is popularily known as polysulfide rubber (Thiokol and Mercaptan). The other variety has a silicone base known as silicone rubber or silicone elastomer. Silicone elastomers are available in four different consistencies; a thin easy flowing light bodied material,a creamy medium bodied material, a highly viscous heavy bodied material and a kneadable putty material. This paper describes an active closed mouth impression technique with one stage border molding using putty silicone material as a substitute for low fusing compound. PMID:22942578

  8. EVALUATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNIQUES TO REDUCE STYRENE EMISIONS FROM OPEN CONTACT MOLDING PROCESSES - VOLUME 1. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to evaluate several pollution prevention techniques that could be used to reduce styrene emissions from open molding processes in the fiberglass-reinforced
    plastics/composites (FRP/C) and fiberglass boat building industries. Styrene emission...

  9. EVALUATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNIQUES TO REDUCE STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM OPEN CONTACT MOLDING PROCESSES - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to evaluate several pollution prevention techniques that could be used to reduce styrene emissions from open molding processes in the fiberglass-reinforced plastics/composites (FRP/C) and fiberglass boat building industries. Styrene emissions u...

  10. Characterization of microstructure with low frequency electromagnetic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, Matthew R.; Sathish, Shamachary; Pilchak, Adam L.; Blodgett, Mark P.; Cherry, Aaron J.

    2014-02-18

    A new computational method for characterizing the relationship between surface crystallography and electrical conductivity in anisotropic materials with low frequency electromagnetic techniques is presented. The method is discussed from the standpoint of characterizing the orientation of a single grain, as well as characterizing statistical information about grain ensembles in the microstructure. Large-area electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data was obtained and used in conjunction with a synthetic aperture approach to simulate the eddy current response of beta annealed Ti-6Al-4V. Experimental eddy current results are compared to the computed eddy current approximations based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data, demonstrating good agreement. The detectability of notches in the presence of noise from microstructure is analyzed with the described simulation method and advantages and limitations of this method are discussed relative to other NDE techniques for such analysis.

  11. Development of a reliable inoculation technique to assess resistance in pearl millet to Fusarium grain mold

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pearl millet is an alternative grain for the drought-prone southeast region of the United States. High humidity in this region can frequently promote the development of diverse fungi associated with grain mold complex. This study was conducted to develop a reliable method for grain mold inoculations...

  12. Surface 3D Micro Free Forms: Multifunctional Microstructured Mesoporous α-Alumina by in Situ Slip Casting Using Excimer Laser Ablated Polycarbonate Molds.

    PubMed

    Rowthu, Sriharitha; Böhlen, Karl; Bowen, Paul; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2015-11-11

    Ceramic surface microstructuring is a rapidly growing field with a variety of applications in tribology, wetting, biology, and so on. However, there are limitations to large-area microstructuring and fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) micro free forms. Here, we present a route to obtain intricate surface structures through in situ slip casting using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) negative molds which are replicated from excimer laser ablated polycarbonate (PC) master molds. PC sheets are ablated with a nanosecond KrF (λ = 248 nm) excimer laser mask projection system to obtain micron-scale 3D surface features over a large area of up to 3 m(2). Complex surface structures that include 3D free forms such as 3D topography of Switzerland, shallow structures such as diffractive optical elements (60 nm step) and conical micropillars have been obtained. The samples are defect-free produced with thicknesses of up to 10 mm and 120 mm diameter. The drying process of the slip cast alumina slurry takes place as a one-dimensional process, through surface evaporation and water permeation through the PDMS membrane. This allows homogeneous one-dimensional shrinkage during the drying process, independent of the sample's lateral dimensions. A linear mass diffusion model has been proposed to predict and explain the drying process of these ceramic colloidal suspensions. The calculated drying time is linearly proportional to the height of the slurry and the thickness of the negatively structured PDMS and is validated by the experimental results. An experimentally observed optimum Sylgard PDMS thickness range of ∼400 μm to 1 mm has achieved the best quality microstructured green compacts. Further, the model predicts that the drying time is independent of the microstructured areas and was validated using experimental observations carried out with microstructured areas of 300 mm(2), 1200 mm(2), and 120 cm(2). Therefore, in principle, the structures can be further replicated in areas up

  13. Mold Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Allergist Health Professionals Partners Media Donate Allergies Mold Allergy What Is a Mold Allergy? If you have an allergy that occurs ... or basement. What Are the Symptoms of a Mold Allergy? The symptoms of mold allergy are very ...

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of BFe10 cupronickel alloy tubes fabricated by a horizontal continuous casting with heating-cooling combined mold technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jun; Liu, Xin-hua; Xie, Jian-xin

    2012-04-01

    A new horizontal continuous casting method with heating-cooling combined mold (HCCM) technology was explored for fabricating high-quality thin-wall cupronickel alloy tubes used for heat exchange pipes. The microstructure and mechanical properties of BFe10 cupronickel alloy tubes fabricated by HCCM and traditional continuous casting (cooling mold casting) were comparatively investigated. The results show that the tube fabricated by HCCM has smooth internal and external surfaces without any defects, and its internal and external surface roughnesses are 0.64 μm and 0.85 μm, respectively. The tube could be used for subsequent cold processing without other treatments such as surface planning, milling and acid-washing. This indicates that HCCM can effectively reduce the process flow and improve the production efficiency of a BFe10 cupronickel alloy tube. The tube has columnar grains along its axial direction with a major casting texture of left\\{ {012} right\\}left< {6bar 21} rightrangle. Compared with cooling mold casting ( δ = 36.5%), HCCM can improve elongation ( δ = 46.3%) by 10% with a slight loss of strength, which indicates that HCCM remarkably improves the cold extension performance of a BFe10 cupronickel alloy tube.

  15. High resolution PFPE-based molding High resolution PFPE-based molding High resolution PFPE-based molding techniques for nanofabrication of high pattern density sub-20 nm features: A fundamental materials approach

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Stuart S; Samulski, Edward; Lopez, Renee; Ruiz, Ricardo; DeSimone, Joseph; Retterer, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Described herein is the development and investigation of PFPE-based elastomers for high resolution replica molding applications. The modulus of the elastomeric materials was increased through synthetic and additive approaches while maintaining relatively low surface energies (<25 mN/m). Using practically relevant large area master templates, we show that the resolution of the molds is strongly dependant upon the elastomeric mold modulus. A composite mold approach was used to form flexible molds out of stiff, high modulus materials that allow for replication of sub-20 nm post structures. Sub-100 nm line grating master templates, formed using e-beam lithography, were used to determine the experimental stability of the molding materials. It was observed that as the feature spacing decreased, high modulus composite molds were able to effectively replicate the nano-grating structures without cracking or tear-out defects that typically occur with high modulus elastomers.

  16. Characterizing TPS Microstructure: A Review of Some techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Stackpole, Mairead; Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcie, Jose

    2011-01-01

    I. When seeking to understand ablator microstructure and morphology there are several useful techniques A. SEM 1) Visual characteriza3on at various length scales. 2) Chemical mapping by backscatter or x-ray highlights areas of interest. 3) Combined with other techniques (density, weight change, chemical analysis) SEM is a powerful tool to aid in explaining thermo/structural data. B. ASAP. 1) Chemical characteriza3on at various length scales. 2) Chemical mapping of pore structure by gas adsorption. 3) Provides a map of pore size vs. pore volume. 4) Provided surface area of exposed TPS. II. Both methods help characterize and understand how ablators react with other chemical species and provides insight into how they oxidize.

  17. A novel 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique for linear nanochannels over a 4 inch diameter substrate

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhifu; Qi, Liping; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A novel low-cost 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique was developed based on Cu inclined-deposition and Ar+ (argon ion) etching. With this technique, sub-100 nm 2D (two dimensional) nano-channels can be etched economically over the whole area of a 4 inch n-type <100> silicon wafer. The fabricating process consists of only 4 steps, UV (Ultraviolet) lithography, inclined Cu deposition, Ar+ sputter etching, and photoresist & Cu removing. During this nano-mold fabrication process, we investigated the influence of the deposition angle on the width of the nano-channels and the effect of Ar+ etching time on their depth. Post-etching measurements showed the accuracy of the nanochannels over the whole area: the variation in width is 10%, in depth it is 11%. However, post-etching measurements also showed the accuracy of the nanochannels between chips: the variation in width is 2%, in depth it is 5%. With this newly developed technology, low-cost and large scale 2D nano-molds can be fabricated, which allows commercial manufacturing of nano-components over large areas. PMID:26752559

  18. A novel 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique for linear nanochannels over a 4 inch diameter substrate.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhifu; Qi, Liping; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A novel low-cost 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique was developed based on Cu inclined-deposition and Ar(+) (argon ion) etching. With this technique, sub-100 nm 2D (two dimensional) nano-channels can be etched economically over the whole area of a 4 inch n-type <100> silicon wafer. The fabricating process consists of only 4 steps, UV (Ultraviolet) lithography, inclined Cu deposition, Ar(+) sputter etching, and photoresist &Cu removing. During this nano-mold fabrication process, we investigated the influence of the deposition angle on the width of the nano-channels and the effect of Ar(+) etching time on their depth. Post-etching measurements showed the accuracy of the nanochannels over the whole area: the variation in width is 10%, in depth it is 11%. However, post-etching measurements also showed the accuracy of the nanochannels between chips: the variation in width is 2%, in depth it is 5%. With this newly developed technology, low-cost and large scale 2D nano-molds can be fabricated, which allows commercial manufacturing of nano-components over large areas. PMID:26752559

  19. A novel 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique for linear nanochannels over a 4 inch diameter substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhifu; Qi, Liping; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A novel low-cost 2D silicon nano-mold fabrication technique was developed based on Cu inclined-deposition and Ar+ (argon ion) etching. With this technique, sub-100 nm 2D (two dimensional) nano-channels can be etched economically over the whole area of a 4 inch n-type <100> silicon wafer. The fabricating process consists of only 4 steps, UV (Ultraviolet) lithography, inclined Cu deposition, Ar+ sputter etching, and photoresist & Cu removing. During this nano-mold fabrication process, we investigated the influence of the deposition angle on the width of the nano-channels and the effect of Ar+ etching time on their depth. Post-etching measurements showed the accuracy of the nanochannels over the whole area: the variation in width is 10%, in depth it is 11%. However, post-etching measurements also showed the accuracy of the nanochannels between chips: the variation in width is 2%, in depth it is 5%. With this newly developed technology, low-cost and large scale 2D nano-molds can be fabricated, which allows commercial manufacturing of nano-components over large areas.

  20. CW laser generated ultrasound techniques for microstructure material properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian; Pierce, Gareth; Cleary, Alison; McKee, Campbell; Veres, Istvan

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical properties of materials may be obtained from the inversion of ultrasonic Lamb wave dispersion curves. In order to do this broadband excitation and detection of ultrasound is required. As sample size and, in particular, thickness, are reduced to those of microstructures, ultrasound frequencies in the range of the gigahertz region will be required. We look at two possible cw laser excitation techniques which, having far lower peak powers than the more frequently used Q-switched lasers, therefore give a negligible risk of damaging the sample through ablation. In the first method the modulation frequency of a sinusoidally modulated laser is swept over the required range. In the second, the laser is modulated with a series of square pulses whose timing is given by a PRBS (pseudo random binary sequence) in the form of a modified m-sequence.

  1. Microstructure and properties of nano-TiN modified Ti(C,N)-based cermets fabricated by powder injection molding and die pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shan-jie; Yin, Hai-qing; Chen, Ke; Khan, Dil-Faraz; Zheng, Qing-jun; Qu, Xuan-hui

    2013-11-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) and die pressing were employed to fabricate nano-TiN modified Ti(C,N)-based cermets. The shrinkage behavior, microstructure, porosity, and mechanical properties of the samples with and without nano-TiN addition fabricated by PIM and die pressing were analyzed. It is demonstrated that for either PIM or die pressing, the porosities are obviously reduced, the mechanical properties are significantly improved after adding nano-TiN, and the hard particles are refined; the rim phase thickness obviously becomes thinner, and the number of dimples in fracture also increases. Compared the samples fabricated by die pressing, it is difficult for PIM to obtain dense Ti(C,N)-based cermets. Due to the too much existence of pores and isolated carbon, the mechanical properties of the sintered samples by PIM are inferior to those of the sintered ones by die pressing.

  2. MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, P.G.

    1963-10-01

    Molding apparatus capable of coating multiple elements each molding cycle is described. The apparatus comprises a centrally disposed reservoir penetrated by a plurality of circumferentially arranged and radially extending passageways. These passageways, in turn, communicate with passages in a separable annular member that retains selectively configured molds and mold seating arrangements. Each mold, which is readily removable from its respective seat, is adapted to retain an element therein in spaced relation to the interior of the mold by utilizing element positioning means within the mold seat and the mold so that coating material may flow about the entire outer surface of the element. (AEC)

  3. Development of improved asbestos reinforced phenolic insulating composites (optimization of physical properties as a function of molding technique and post cure conditions)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedges, L. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Detailed data are presented on phenolic-glass and phenolic-asbestos compounds which compare the effect of compression molding without degas to the effects of four variations of compression molding. These variations were designed to improve elimination of entrapped volatiles and the volatile products of the condensate reaction associated with the cure of phenolic resins. The utilization of conventional methods of degas plus degas by vacuum and directional heat flow methods are involved. Detailed data are also presented on these same compounds, comparing the effect of changes in post-bake time, and post-bake temperature for the five molding techniques.

  4. Pressure molding of powdered materials improved by rubber mold insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Pressure molding tungsten microspheres is accomplished by applying hydraulic pressure to a silicone rubber mold insert with several barrel shaped chambers which is placed in a steel die cavity. This technique eliminates castings containing shear fractures.

  5. Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Winter, Michael R.; Domeier, Linda A.; Allan, Shawn M.; Skala, Dawn M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

  6. Make it clear: molds, transparent casts and lightning techniques for stereomicroscopic analysis of taphonomic modifications on bone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Camarós, Edgard; Sánchez-Hernández, Carlos; Rivals, Florent

    2016-06-20

    This paper provides detailed description of a non-destructive, low-cost, and low-time consuming technique for producing high-resolution casts for the observation of taphonomic modifications on bone surfaces. The aim of the whole process is to obtain molds that accurately replicate the original bone surface at both the macro- and microscopic levels. The high quality transparent epoxy casts produced are analyzed by light microscopy and used to produce detailed microphotographs of bone surfaces. After describing each step of the process, we present some examples of its application in the case of anthropic activity, carnivores, or other post-depositional modifications. PMID:26829573

  7. Evaluating Local Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing Characterization Techniques Using Synthetic Directionally Solidified Dendritic Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Miller, Jonathan D.; Oppedal, Andrew L.; Solanki, Kiran N.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure characterization continues to play an important bridge to understanding why particular processing routes or parameters affect the properties of materials. This statement certainly holds true in the case of directionally solidified dendritic microstructures, where characterizing the primary dendrite arm spacing is vital to developing the process-structure-property relationships that can lead to the design and optimization of processing routes for defined properties. In this work, four series of simulations were used to examine the capability of a few Voronoi-based techniques to capture local microstructure statistics (primary dendrite arm spacing and coordination number) in controlled (synthetically generated) microstructures. These simulations used both cubic and hexagonal microstructures with varying degrees of disorder (noise) to study the effects of length scale, base microstructure, microstructure variability, and technique parameters on the local PDAS distribution, local coordination number distribution, bulk PDAS, and bulk coordination number. The Voronoi tesselation technique with a polygon-side-length criterion correctly characterized the known synthetic microstructures. By systematically studying the different techniques for quantifying local primary dendrite arm spacings, we have evaluated their capability to capture this important microstructure feature in different dendritic microstructures, which can be an important step for experimentally correlating with both processing and properties in single crystal nickel-based superalloys.

  8. Vacuum isostatic micro molding of diffractive structures into PTFE materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Ohar, Orest

    2007-09-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is an ideal material for use in industrial, automotive and consumer electronics. Specifically, PTFE has outstanding physical properties; such as chemical inertness and resistance to chemical corrosion, even when exposed to a strong acid, alkali and oxidants. Its properties provide for superior electrical insulation and thermal stability, which is not affected by wide ranges in temperature and frequency. Its non-absorption of moisture makes it a perfect material for consideration in micro optical, retro-reflector or diffuser type devices used in handheld displays, flat panel displays as well as automotive, industrial and home lighting. This paper presents an overview of a unique fabrication method that incorporates a variety of elements to establish a processing technique that can form micro diffractive, holographic and reflective structures into PTFE materials. By means of modifying an existing known molding process, this new technique incorporates the addition of a vacuum to assist in the reliable molding and densification of the PTFE as well the use of a micro-structured electroformed shim to form small microstructures into the surface of the PTFE material. The combination of the vacuum and the electroformed shim within the molding process noticeably increases the precision, reproducibility and resolution of micro-structures that can be realized. The paper will describe the molding hardware involved, process parameters and the resulting structures formed. Optical function testing and metrology of the micro-structure geometry formed on each sample will be compared to the original design mandrel geometry [1].

  9. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jerome Sutherland

    2001-06-27

    Over the last ten years, photonic band gap (PBG) theory and technology have become an important area of research because of the numerous possible applications ranging from high-efficiency laser diodes to optical circuitry. This research concentrates on reducing the length scale in the fabrication of layered photonic band gap structures and developing procedures to improve processing consistency. Various procedures and materials have been used in the fabrication of layered PBG structures. This research focused on an economical micro transfer molding approach to create the final PBG structure. A poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber mold was created from a silicon substrate. It was filled with epoxy and built layer-by-layer to create a 3-D epoxy structure. This structure was infiltrated with nanoparticle titania or a titania sol-gel, then fired to remove the polymer mold, leaving a monolithic ceramic inverse of the epoxy structure. The final result was a lattice of titania rolds that resembles a face-centered tetragonal structure. The original intent of this research was to miniaturize this process to a bar size small enough to create a photonic band gap for wavelengths of visible electro-magnetic radiation. The factor limiting progress was the absence of a silicon master mold of small enough dimensions. The Iowa State Microelectronics Research Center fabricated samples with periodicities of 2.5 and 1.0 microns with the existing technology, but a sample was needed on the order of 0.3 microns or less. A 0.4 micron sample was received from Sandia National Laboratory, which was made through an electron beam lithography process, but it contained several defects. The results of the work are primarily from the 2.5 and 1.0 micron samples. Most of the work focused on changing processing variables in order to optimize the infiltration procedure for the best results. Several critical parameters were identified, ranging from the ambient conditions to the specifics of the

  10. Fiber Length and Orientation in Long-Fiber Injection-Molded Thermoplastics. Part I: Modeling of Microstructure and Elastic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Holbery, James D.; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2008-05-01

    This paper investigates the effects of fiber length and orientation distributions on the elastic properties of long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). The corrected experimental fiber length distribution and the predicted and experimental orientation distributions were used in modeling to compute the elastic properties of the composite. First, from the fiber length distribution (FLD) data in terms of number of fibers versus fiber length, the probability density functions were built and used in the computation. Also, it has been shown that the two-parameter Weibull’s distribution can be used to represent the actual FLD. Next, the Mori-Tanaka model that employs the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method was applied to calculate the stiffness matrix of the aligned fiber composite containing the established FLD. The stiffness of the actual as-formed composite was then determined from the stiffness of the computed aligned fiber composite that was averaged over all possible orientations using the orientation averaging method. The methodology to predict the elastic properties of LFTs was validated via experimental verification of the longitudinal and transverse moduli determined for long glass fiber injection-molded polypropylene specimens. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effect of a variation of FLD on the composite elastic properties.

  11. Novel technique for high-quality microstructuring with excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Stephan; Geiger, Manfred

    2000-06-01

    Laser micromachining has become increasingly established in many microsystem applications during the past years. These new fields occasion higher demands on the quality of micromachiend devices combined with high resolution and working velocity. Due to the disadvantages of conventional excimer laser processing, a novel technique is required to meet these demands. The main problems of conventional excimer laser machining are the redeposition of ablated material on the irradiated work piece and the formation of a strong melting phase especially for metals. These difficulties greatly reduce the applicability of excimer laser material processing for manufacturing microsystems technology components. By applying a thin water film to the substrate surface, the redeposition of ablated material can be completely avoided, which results in a better quality of the microstructures. Usage of a water film, however, has proved to lead to a marked reduction of the ablation rate for the examined materials - ceramics and stainless steel. Therefore, one of the objectives of future research will be to raise the ablation rate in order to render excimer laser processing more interesting economically. Adding alcoholic additives, among others, has improved the wetting of the liquid films on the surface. The effect of the modified chemical composition of the liquid on ablation rate and structure quality for various materials is presented here.

  12. Single and Dual Drug Release Patterns from Shellac Wax-Lutrol Matrix Tablets Fabricated with Fusion and Molding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Phaechamud, T.; Choncheewa, C.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to prepare the shellac wax matrix tablets by fusion and molding technique incorporated with Lutrol in different ratios to modify the hydrophobicity of matrix tablet. The matrix tablets with single drug were loaded either with propranolol hydrochloride or hydrochlorothiazide as hydrophilic and hydrophobic model drugs, and a dual drug formula was also prepared. The single and dual drug release patterns were studied in a dissolution apparatus using distilled water as medium. Propranolol hydrochloride released from matrix was easier than hydrochlorothiazide. Drug release from shellac wax matrix could be enhanced by incorporation of Lutrol. However retardation of drug release from some matrix tablets was evident for the systems that could form dispersion in the dissolution medium. The gel network from high content of Lutrol was hexagonal which was a dense and more compact structure than the other structures found when low amounts of Lutrol were present in the formula. Therefore, the formulae with high content of Lutrol could prolong drug release more efficiently than those containing low content of Lutrol. Hence shellac wax matrix could modulate the drug release with the addition of Lutrol. Sustainable dual drug release was also obtained from these developed matrix tablets. Thus shellac wax-Lutrol component could be used as a potential matrix tablet prepared with fusion and molding technique with excellent controlled drug release. PMID:25767320

  13. Three-dimensional microstructural characterization of bulk plutonium and uranium metals using focused ion beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Brandon W.; Erler, Robert G.; Teslich, Nick E.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear forensics requires accurate quantification of discriminating microstructural characteristics of the bulk nuclear material to identify its process history and provenance. Conventional metallographic preparation techniques for bulk plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) metals are limited to providing information in two-dimension (2D) and do not allow for obtaining depth profile of the material. In this contribution, use of dual-beam focused ion-beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) to investigate the internal microstructure of bulk Pu and U metals is demonstrated. Our results demonstrate that the dual-beam methodology optimally elucidate microstructural features without preparation artifacts, and the three-dimensional (3D) characterization of inner microstructures can reveal salient microstructural features that cannot be observed from conventional metallographic techniques. Examples are shown to demonstrate the benefit of FIB-SEM in improving microstructural characterization of microscopic inclusions, particularly with respect to nuclear forensics.

  14. Effects of Processing and Medical Sterilization Techniques on 3D-Printed and Molded Polylactic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geritano, Mariah Nicole

    Manufacturing industries have evolved tremendously in the past decade with the introduction of Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing. The medical device industry has been a leader in adapting this new technology into research and development. 3D printing enables medical devices and implants to become more customizable, patient specific, and allows for low production numbers. This study compares the mechanical and thermal properties of traditionally manufactured parts versus parts manufactured through 3D printing before and after sterilization, and the ability of an FDM printer to produce reliable, identical samples. It was found that molded samples and 100% infill high-resolution samples have almost identical changes in properties when exposed to different sterilization methods, and similar cooling rates. The data shown throughout this investigation confirms that manipulation of printing parameters can result in an object with comparable material properties to that created through traditional manufacturing methods.

  15. Rapid mold replication

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, G.M.; Beeler, R.G. Jr.; Brown, D.L.

    1995-06-01

    The desire to reduce tooling costs have driven manufacturers to investigate new manufacturing methods and materials. In the plastics injection molding industry replicating molds to meet production needs is time consuming (up to 6 months) and costly in terms of lost business. We have recently completed a feasibility study demonstrating the capability of high rate Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) in producing mold inserts in days, not months. In the current practice a graphite mandrel, in the shape of the insert`s negative image, was exposed to a jet of metal vapor atoms emanating from an electron beam heated source of an aluminum-bronze alloy. The condensation rate of the metal atoms on the mandrel was sufficient to allow the deposit to grow at over 30 {mu}m/min or 1.2 mils per minute. The vaporization process continued for approximately 14 hours after which the mandrel and deposit were removed from the EBPVD vacuum chamber. The mandrel and condensate were easily separated resulting in a fully dense aluminum-bronze mold insert about 2.5 cm or one inch thick. This mold was subsequently cleaned and drilled for water cooling passages and mounted on a fixture for operation in an actual injection molding machine. Results of the mold`s operation were extremely successful showing great promise for this technique. This paper describes the EBPVD feasibility demonstration in more detail and discusses future development work needed to bring this technique into practice.

  16. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  17. Characterization of indomethacin release from polyethylene glycol tablet fabricated with mold technique.

    PubMed

    Mesnukul, A; Yodkhum, K; Mahadlek, J; Phaechamud, T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use polyethylene glycol as a carrier to improve the solubility of an aqueous insoluble drug by melting and molding method. The release of dissolved drug was designed to be subsequently sustained with an addition of xanthan gum. The release of indomethacin from the developed system into phosphate buffer pH 6.2 was conducted using the dissolution apparatus. This carrier system could effectively enhance the solubility of indomethacin and an addition of xanthan gum could sustain the drug release. Eudragit L100 film coating could protect the carrier not to be disturbed with HCl buffer pH 1.2 and could dissolve in phosphate buffer pH 6.2, therefore, the drug release from coated tablet was initially very low but subsequently gradually released and prolonged in phosphate buffer pH 6.2. Differential scanning calorimetry study indicated the amorphous state of drug in polyethylene glycol carrier. Scanning electron microscopy photomicrograph indicated the drug diffusion outward through the porous network of matrix tablets into the dissolution fluid and curve fitting signified that the drug release kinetic was Fickian diffusion. PMID:20582196

  18. Processing study of injection molding of silicon nitride for engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorabaugh, M. E.; Yeh, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    The high hardness of silicon nitride, which is currently under consideration as a structural material for such hot engine components as turbine blades, renders machining of the material prohibitively costly; the near net shape forming technique of injection molding is accordingly favored as a means for component fabrication. Attention is presently given to the relationships between injection molding processing parameters and the resulting microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting engine parts. An experimental program has been conducted under NASA sponsorship which tests the quality of injection molded bars of silicon nitride at various stages of processing.

  19. Silicone plesiotherapy molds

    SciTech Connect

    Karolis, C.; Reay-Young, P.S.; Walsh, W.; Velautham, G.

    1983-04-01

    Plesiotherapy, the treatment of superficial lesions by radioactive molds has largely been replaced by teletherapy techniques involving high energy photon and electron beams. There are, however, situations for which a short distance type treatment, in one form or another, is superior to any other presently available. Traditionally, molds have taken the form of rigid devices incorporating clamps to attach them to the patient. This ensures a reproducible geometry about a localized region since the molds are applied on a daily basis. To make such devices requires considerable skill and patience. This article describes an alternative method that eliminates the use of cumbersome devices in many situations. Silicone molds made from a plaster cast model have been found suitable for the treatment of surface lesions and especially for lesions in the oral and nasal cavities. With the use of radioactive gold seeds the molds may be left in place for a few days without fear of them moving.

  20. A Combined Experimental and Computational Approach for the Design of Mold Topography that Leads to Desired Ingot Surface and Microstructure in Aluminum Casting.

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Zabaras, N.; Tan, L.

    2005-07-12

    A thermomechanical study of the effects of mold topography on the solidification of Aluminum alloys at early times is provided. The various coupling mechanisms between the solid-shell and mold deformation and heat transfer at the mold/solid-shell interface during the early stages of Aluminum solidification on molds with uneven topographies are investigated. The air-gap nucleation time, the stress evolution and the solid-shell growth pattern are examined for different mold topographies to illustrate the potential control of Aluminum cast surface morphologies during the early stages of solidification using proper design of mold topographies. The unstable shell growth pattern in the early solidification stages results mainly from the unevenness of the heat flux between the solid-shell and the mold surface. This heat flux is determined by the size of the air-gaps formed between the solidifying shell and mold surface or from the value of the contact pressure. Simulation results show that a sinusoidal mold surface with a smaller wavelength leads to nucleation of air-gaps at earlier times. In addition, the unevenness in the solid-shell growth pattern decreases faster for a smaller wavelength. Such studies can be used to tune mold surfaces for the control of cast surface morphologies.

  1. Bulk microstructure and local elastic properties of carbon nanocomposites studied by impulse acoustic microscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V.; Petronyuk, Yu.; Morokov, E.; Chernozatonskii, L.; Kuzhir, P.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.; Bellucci, S.; Bistarelli, S.; Mastrucci, M.; Tabacchioni, I.

    2016-05-01

    Bulk microstructure and elastic properties of epoxy-nanocarbon nanocomposites for diverse types and different content of carbon nanofiller has been studied by using impulse acoustic microscopy technique. It has been shown occurrence of various types of mesoscopic structure formed by nanoparticles inside the bulk of nanocomposite materials, including nanoparticle conglomerates and nanoparticle aerogel systems. In spite of the bulk microstructure, nanocarbon composites demonstrate elastic uniformity and negligible influence of nanofiller on elastic properties of carbon nanocomposite materials.

  2. Mechanical Performance and Failure Mechanism of Thick-walled Composite Connecting Rods Fabricated by Resin Transfer Molding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Luo, Chuyang; Zhang, Daijun; Li, Xueqin; Qu, Peng; Sun, Xiaochen; Jia, Yuxi; Yi, Xiaosu

    2015-08-01

    A resin transfer molding technique was used to fabricate thick-walled composite connecting rods, and then the mechanical performance of the connecting rod was studied experimentally, at the same time the stress and failure index distributions were simulated numerically. The experimental results show that under a tensile load, the connecting rod first cracks near the vertex of the triangle areas at the two ends, and then the damage propagates along the interface between the main bearing beam and the triangle area as well as along the round angle of the triangle area. Whereas under a compressive load, the delamination primarily occurs at the corner of the U-shaped flange, and the final destruction is caused by the fracture of fibers in the main bearing beam. The simulated results reveal that the tensile failure is originated from the delamination at the round angle transition areas of the T-joints, and the failure strength is determined by the interlaminar strength. Whereas the compressive failure is caused by the fracture of fibers in the main bearing beam, and the failure strength of the structure is determined by the longitudinal compressive strength of the composite material. The simulated results are basically consistent with the experimental results. Hence the mechanical performance and failure mechanism of the complicated composite structure are revealed in great detail through the coupling of the two kinds of research methods, which is helpful for the optimal design of composite structures.

  3. Strong, easy-to-mold, spiral buttress thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Buttress thread with steep taper connects two molded plastic cylinders without changing wall thickness or sacrificing longitudinal strength at the juncture. Technique lends itself to conventional molding methods.

  4. Mold Charlatans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Offers a primer on toxic mold and its removal, warning against ignorant or unethical mold remediation companies and offering five considerations (checking references, considering the big picture, sampling more than the air, considering release, and considering the source) when hiring such services. (EV)

  5. MOLD POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mold pollution is the growth of molds in a building resulting in a negative impact on the use of that structure. The negative impacts generally fall into two categories: destruction of the structure itself and adverse health impacts on the building's occupants. It is estimated...

  6. Use of acrylic sheet molds for elastomeric products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Koerner, A. E.; Messineo, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Molds constructed of acrylic sheet are more easily machined than metal, are transparent to ensure complete filling during injection, and have smooth surfaces free of contamination. Technique eliminates flashing on molded parts and mold release agents.

  7. MCFET - A MICROSTRUCTURAL LATTICE MODEL FOR STRAIN ORIENTED PROBLEMS: A COMBINED MONTE CARLO FINITE ELEMENT TECHNIQUE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.

    1994-01-01

    A specialized, microstructural lattice model, termed MCFET for combined Monte Carlo Finite Element Technique, has been developed to simulate microstructural evolution in material systems where modulated phases occur and the directionality of the modulation is influenced by internal and external stresses. Since many of the physical properties of materials are determined by microstructure, it is important to be able to predict and control microstructural development. MCFET uses a microstructural lattice model that can incorporate all relevant driving forces and kinetic considerations. Unlike molecular dynamics, this approach was developed specifically to predict macroscopic behavior, not atomistic behavior. In this approach, the microstructure is discretized into a fine lattice. Each element in the lattice is labeled in accordance with its microstructural identity. Diffusion of material at elevated temperatures is simulated by allowing exchanges of neighboring elements if the exchange lowers the total energy of the system. A Monte Carlo approach is used to select the exchange site while the change in energy associated with stress fields is computed using a finite element technique. The MCFET analysis has been validated by comparing this approach with a closed-form, analytical method for stress-assisted, shape changes of a single particle in an infinite matrix. Sample MCFET analyses for multiparticle problems have also been run and, in general, the resulting microstructural changes associated with the application of an external stress are similar to that observed in Ni-Al-Cr alloys at elevated temperatures. This program is written in FORTRAN for use on a 370 series IBM mainframe. It has been implemented on an IBM 370 running VM/SP and an IBM 3084 running MVS. It requires the IMSL math library and 220K of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in EBCDIC format.

  8. Bag molding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodzinsky, A.

    Features, materials, and techniques of vacuum, pressure, and autoclave FRP bag molding processes are described. The bags are used in sealed environments, inflated to flexibly force a curing FRP laminate to conform to a stiff mold form which defines the shape of the finished product. Densification is achieved as the bag presses out the voids and excess resin from the laminate, and consolidation occurs as the plies and adherends are bonded by the bag pressure. Curing techniques nominally involved room temperature or high temperature, and investigations of alternative techniques, such as induction, dielectric, microwave, xenon flash, UV, electron beam, and gamma radiation heating are proceeding. Polysulfone is the most common thermoplastic. Details are given of mold preparations, peel plies or release films and fabrics, bagging techniques, and reusable venting blankets and silicone rubber bags.

  9. Supersoft lithography: candy-based fabrication of soft silicone microstructures.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Christopher; Labuz, Joseph M; Shao, Yue; Fu, Jianping; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    We designed a fabrication technique able to replicate microstructures in soft silicone materials (E < 1 kPa). Sugar-based 'hard candy' recipes from the confectionery industry were modified to be compatible with silicone processing conditions, and used as templates for replica molding. Microstructures fabricated in soft silicones can then be easily released by dissolving the template in water. We anticipate that this technique will be of particular importance in replicating physiologically soft, microstructured environments for cell culture, and demonstrate a first application in which intrinsically soft microstructures are used to measure forces generated by fibroblast-laden contractile tissues. PMID:26245893

  10. A technique for quantitatively measuring microstructurally induced ultrasonic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetan, F. J.; Gray, T. A.; Thompson, R. B.

    A method for quantifying backscattered grain noise amplitudes in pulse/echo inspections is presented. The technique employs positional averaging to extract the rms grain noise as a function of time, or equivalently, as a function of depth in the specimen. This technique has been demonstrated for focussed transducer inspections of titanium alloys. A simple grain noise model that assumes incoherent single scattering by the individual metal grains is presented as a first step toward the development of a comprehensive theory.

  11. Impact of advanced microstructural characterization techniques on modeling and analysis of radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Odette, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The evolution of radiation-induced alterations of dimensional and mechanical properties has been shown to be a direct and often predictable consequence of radiation-induced microstructural changes. Recent advances in understanding of the nature and role of each microstructural component in determining the property of interest has led to a reappraisal of the type and priority of data needed for further model development. This paper presents an overview of the types of modeling and analysis activities in progress, the insights that prompted these activities, and specific examples of successful and ongoing efforts. A review is presented of some problem areas that in the authors' opinion are not yet receiving sufficient attention and which may benefit from the application of advanced techniques of microstructural characterization. Guidelines based on experience gained in previous studies are also provided for acquisition of data in a form most applicable to modeling needs.

  12. Low-pressure injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Mangels, J.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Ceramic injection molding experienced a revival in the 1970s and 1980s with the application of ceramics for gas turbine components. Concurrently, techniques were being developed for the injection molding of powdered metal compositions into complex shaped articles. The impetus for the development of injection molding as a ceramic fabrication process lay in the potential to produce complex-shaped components to near-net shape. In the ceramic injection molding process, ceramic powders are processed to obtain the desired particle size, distribution and morphology and blended to obtain a homogeneous distribution. These powders are then mixed with the organic binders, generally in a heated, highshear mixer at temperatures above the melting point of the organic binders. The injection molding mix is pelletized, cooled and fed into an injection molding machine. The molding mix is reheated to a fluid state and injected under high pressure (7--70 MPa) into a die cavity. The molded part is removed from the tooling after the molding mix has solidified in the die. The organic binders are then removed from the component at temperatures up to 400 C, generally by some combination of wicking and thermal decomposition. Finally, the component is sintered to obtain its final ceramic properties, using conventional ceramic processes.

  13. Machine vision photogrammetry: a technique for measurement of microstructural strain in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Nicolella, D P; Nicholls, A E; Lankford, J; Davy, D T

    2001-01-01

    Understanding local microstructural deformations and strains in cortical bone may lead to a better understanding of cortical bone damage development, fracture, and remodeling. Traditional experimental techniques for measuring deformation and strain do not allow characterization of these quantities at the microstructural level in cortical bone. This study describes a technique based on digital stereoimaging used to measure the microstructural strain fields in cortical bone. The technique allows the measurement of material surface displacements and strains by comparing images acquired from a specimen at two distinct stress states. The accuracy of the system is investigated by analyzing an undeformed image set; the test image is identical to the reference image but translated by a known pixel amount. An increase in the correlation sub-image train parameter results in an increase in displacement measurement accuracy from 0.049 to 0.012 pixels. Errors in strain calculated from the measured displacement field were between 39 and 564 microstrain depending upon the sub-image train size and applied image displacement. The presence of a microcrack in cortical bone results in local strain at the crack tip reaching 0.030 (30,000 microstrain) and 0.010 (10,000 microstrain) near osteocyte lacunae. It is expected that the use of this technique will allow a greater understanding of bone strength and fracture as well as bone mechanotransduction. PMID:11425075

  14. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic rhinitis - mold ... make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are said to have a mold allergy. ...

  15. INGOT MOLD

    DOEpatents

    Mangold, A.J. Jr.; MaHaffey, J.W.; Reese, S.L.

    1958-04-29

    An improved ingot-mold assembly is described, consisting of a body having a cavity and a recess extending through to the bottom of the body from the cavity, and the bottom of the cavity having an internal shoulder extending downward and a plug having an external shoulder. The plug extends above the shoulders and below the bottom of the body.

  16. Microstructure refinement of commercial 7xxx aluminium alloys solidified by the electromagnetic vibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Tamura, T.; Omura, N.; Murakami, Y.; Tada, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines the microstructure refinement of commercial 7xxx aluminium alloys solidified by the electromagnetic vibration technique (EMV) as a function of vibration frequency, f. The microstructure evolution reveals that at the low frequency of f = 62.5 Hz, the solidified microstructure is coarse and with the increase of vibration frequency to f = 500 Hz, the grain size becomes the finest and further increase of frequency to f = 2000 Hz results in coarsening of microstructures. The refinement mechanism is clarified when considering the significant difference in electrical resistivities of the solid and the liquid in mushy zone, in which both phases coexist and subject to vibration. The frequency-dependent refinement behaviour is revealed when the displacement of the mobile solid and sluggish liquid is taken into account during solidification. In contrast to 3xxx aluminium alloys, no giant compounds have been discerned in the present 7xxx alloy regardless of the solidification condition. The formation of crystalline twin is briefly discussed when considering the vibration condition.

  17. Microstructure analysis of Al-Si-Cu alloys prepared by gradient solidification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, Hemant; Seifeddine, Salem; Jarfors, Anders E. W.

    2015-03-01

    Al-Si-Cu alloys were cast with the unique gradient solidification technique to produce alloys with two cooling rates corresponding to secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) of 9 and 27 μm covering the microstructural fineness of common die cast components. The microstructure was studied with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The alloy with higher cooling rate, lower SDAS, has a more homogeneous microstructure with well distributed network of eutectic and intermetallic phases. The results indicate the presence of Al-Fe-Si phases, Al-Cu phases and eutectic Si particles but their type, distribution and amount varies in the two alloys with different SDAS. EBSD analysis was also performed to study the crystallographic orientation relationships in the microstructure. One of the major highlights of this study is the understanding of the eutectic formation mechanism achieved by studying the orientation relationships of the aluminum in the eutectic to the surrounding primary aluminum dendrites.

  18. Micro-structural characterization of materials using synchrotron hard X-ray imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ashish Singh, Balwant; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2015-06-24

    X-ray imaging has been an important tool to study the materials microstructure with the laboratory based sources however the advent of third generation synchrotron sources has introduced new concepts in X-ray imaging such as phase contrast imaging, micro-tomography, fluorescence imaging and diffraction enhance imaging. These techniques are being used to provide information of materials about their density distribution, porosity, geometrical and morphological characteristics at sub-micron scalewith improved contrast. This paper discusses the development of various imaging techniques at synchrotron based imaging beamline Indus-2 and few recent experiments carried out at this facility.

  19. Directing neuronal cell growth on implant material surfaces by microstructuring.

    PubMed

    Reich, Uta; Fadeeva, Elena; Warnecke, Athanasia; Paasche, Gerrit; Müller, Peter; Chichkov, Boris; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2012-05-01

    For best hearing sensation, electrodes of auditory prosthesis must have an optimal electrical contact to the respective neuronal cells. To improve the electrode-nerve interface, microstructuring of implant surfaces could guide neuronal cells toward the electrode contact. To this end, femtosecond laser ablation was used to generate linear microgrooves on the two currently relevant cochlear implant materials, silicone elastomer and platinum. Silicone surfaces were structured by two different methods, either directly, by laser ablation or indirectly, by imprinting using laser-microstructured molds. The influence of surface structuring on neurite outgrowth was investigated utilizing a neuronal-like cell line and primary auditory neurons. The pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 and primary spiral ganglion cells were cultured on microstructured auditory implant materials. The orientation of neurite outgrowth relative to the microgrooves was determined. Both cell types showed a preferred orientation in parallel to the microstructures on both, platinum and on molded silicone elastomer. Interestingly, microstructures generated by direct laser ablation of silicone did not influence the orientation of either cell type. This shows that differences in the manufacturing procedures can affect the ability of microstructured implant surfaces to guide the growth of neurites. This is of particular importance for clinical applications, since the molding technique represents a reproducible, economic, and commercially feasible manufacturing procedure for the microstructured silicone surfaces of medical implants. PMID:22287482

  20. Microstructure and strain relaxation in thin nanocrystalline platinum films produced via different sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Wolfgang; Baehtz, Carsten; Horisberger, Michael; Ratschinski, Ingmar; Schmidt, Harald

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigated the correlation between microstructure and residual strain relaxation in nanocrystalline Pt films with a thickness of about 20 nm produced by different deposition techniques: magnetron sputtering and ion beam sputtering. X-ray diffractometry was carried out using synchrotron radiation. The out-of-plane interplanar distance was measured during isothermal in situ annealing at temperatures between 130 °C und 210 °C. The thermoelastic expansion coefficient is equal for both types of nanocrystalline Pt films and slightly lower than for coarse grained Pt. The relaxation of residual out-of-plain strain depends on temperature and is significantly stronger in the case of the magnetron sputtered films than for the ion beam sputtered films. Different relaxation of compressive stress is ascribed to the different microstructures which evolve during deposition via the corresponding deposition technique. Thickness fringes around the (1 1 1) Bragg peak deposited via magnetron sputtering reveal that these films are essentially composed of columnar (1 1 1) oriented grains which cover the whole film thickness. In contrast, no thickness fringes are observed around the (1 1 1) Bragg peak of films prepared by ion beam sputtering indicating a significantly different microstructure. This is confirmed by Electron Backscatter Diffraction which reveals a (1 1 1) texture for both types of films. The (1 1 1) texture, however, is significantly stronger in the case of the magnetron sputtered films. Grain growth at low homologous temperatures is considered to be an important contribution to relaxation of residual stress.

  1. Advanced manufacturing methods for chalcogenide molded optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogburn, Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    As Chalcogenide glass and Precision Molded Optics (PMO) have developed and matured to a point of being accepted as replacements for Germanium Single Point Diamond Turned (SPDT) optics; technological research is being dedicated to developing infrared PMO that can be used in a broader application base. These include laser arrays, large aperture molded chalcogenide optics, and molded in mount infrared optics. This paper presents applications for infrared laser arrays and the corresponding optics that must be closely mechanically mounted to avoid clipping the beams. Different molding and mounting techniques will be discussed to solve this issue which include; dicing chalcogenide optic lenses, molded in mount chalcogenide optics and stepped optic shape molding for mounting purposes. Accompanying the research and discussion of these techniques will be experiments and molded chalcogenide glass lenses showing the results and application for each lens type.

  2. Injection molding ceramics to high green densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangels, J. A.; Williams, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The injection molding behavior of a concentrated suspension of Si powder in wax was studied. It was found that the injection molding behavior was a function of the processing techniques used to generate the powder. Dry ball-milled powders had the best molding behavior, while air classified and impact-milled powders demonstrated poorer injection moldability. The relative viscosity of these molding batches was studied as a function of powder properties: distribution shape, surface area, packing density, and particle morphology. The experimental behavior, in all cases, followed existing theories. The relative viscosity of an injection molding composition composed of dry ball-milled powders could be expressed using Farris' relation.

  3. Experimental and numerical study of the effect of mold vibration on aluminum castings alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Dheir, Numan

    2005-07-01

    The recent advances in scientific and engineering tools have allowed researchers to integrate more science into manufacturing, leading to improved and new innovative processes. As a result, important accomplishments have been reached in the area of designing and engineering new materials for various industrial applications. This subject is of critical significance because of the impact it could have on the manufacturing industry. In the casting industry, obtaining the desired microstructure and properties during solidification may reduce or eliminate the need for costly thermo-mechanical processing prior to secondary manufacturing processes. Several techniques have been developed to alter and control the microstructure of castings during solidification including semi-solid processing, electromagnetic stirring, electromagnetic vibration, and mechanical vibration. Although it is established that mold vibration can significantly influence the structure and properties of castings, however, most of the studies are generally qualitative, limited to a small range of conditions and no attempts have been made to simulate the effect of vibration on casting microstructure. In this work, a detailed experimental and numerical investigation is carried out to advance the utilization of mold vibration as an effective tool for controlling and modifying the casting microstructure. The effects of a wide range of vibration amplitudes and frequencies on the solidification kinetics, microstructure formation and mechanical properties of Al-Si alloys are examined. Results show strong influence of mold vibration on the resulting casting. The presence of porosity was significantly reduced as a result of mold vibration. In addition, the changes in microstructure and mechanical properties can be successfully represented by the changes in solidification characteristics. Increasing the vibration amplitude tends to reduce the lamellar spacing and change the silicon morphology to become more

  4. Transfer of microstructure pattern of CNTs onto flexible substrate using hot press technique for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Prabhash; Harsh

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Successfully transfer of microstructure patterned CNTs on PET substrate. • Demonstrate as resistor-based NH{sub 3} gas sensor in the sub-ppm range. • Excellent photodetector having instantaneous response and recovery characteristics. • An effective technique to grow and produce flexible electronic device. - Abstract: In this work, we report the successful and efficient transfer process of two- dimensional (2-D) vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by hot pressing method with an aim to develop flexible sensor devices. Carbon nanotubes are synthesized by cold wall thermal chemical vapor deposition using patterned SiO{sub 2} substrate under low pressure. The height of the pattern of CNTs is controlled by reaction time. The entire growth and transfer process is carried out within 30 min. Strong adhesion between the nanotube and polyethylene terephthalate substrate was observed in the post-transferred case. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies are used to analyze the microstructure of carbon nanotube film before and after hot pressing. This technique shows great potential for the fabrication of flexible sensing devices. We report for the first time, the application of patterned microstructure developed by this technique in the development of gas sensor and optoelectronic device. Surface resistive mode is used for detection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas in the sub-ppm range. An impressive photoconducting response is also observed in the visible wavelength. The reproducibility of the sample was checked and the results indicate the possibility of use of carbon nanotube as gas sensor, photodetector, CCDs etc.

  5. Improved compression molding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1967-01-01

    Modified compression molding process produces plastic molding compounds that are strong, homogeneous, free of residual stresses, and have improved ablative characteristics. The conventional method is modified by applying a vacuum to the mold during the molding cycle, using a volatile sink, and exercising precise control of the mold closure limits.

  6. Benchtop fabrication of PDMS microstructures by an unconventional photolithographic method

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chang Mo; Sim, Woo Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Foudeh, Amir M; Bae, Hojae

    2010-01-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microstructures have been widely used in bio-microelectromechanical systems (bio-MEMS) for various types of analytical, diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, PDMS-based soft lithographic techniques still use conventional microfabrication processes to generate a master mold, which requires access to clean room facilities and costly equipment. With the increasing use of these systems in various fields, the development of benchtop systems for fabricating microdevices is emerging as an important challenge in their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a simple, low-cost and rapid method to fabricate PDMS microstructures by using micropatterned poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) master molds. In this method, PEGDA microstructures were patterned on a glass substrate by photolithography under ambient conditions and by using simple tools. The resulting PEGDA structures were subsequently used to generate PDMS microstructures by standard molding in a reproducible and repeatable manner. The thickness of the PEGDA microstructures was controllable from 15 to 300 μm by using commonly available spacer materials. We also demonstrate the use of this method to fabricate microfluidic channels capable of generating concentration gradients. In addition, we fabricated PEGDA microstructures by photolithography from the light generated from commonly available laminar cell culture hood. These data suggest that this approach could be beneficial for fabricating low-cost PDMS-based microdevices in resource limited settings. PMID:21076185

  7. High-resolution PFPE-based molding techniques for nanofabrication of high-pattern density, sub-20 nm features: a fundamental materials approach.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stuart S; Retterer, Scott; Lopez, Rene; Ruiz, Ricardo; Samulski, Edward T; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2010-04-14

    Several perfluoropolyether (PFPE)-based elastomers for high-resolution replica molding applications are explored. The modulus of the elastomeric materials was increased through synthetic and additive approaches while maintaining relatively low surface tension values (<25 mN/m). Using large area (>4 in.(2)) master templates, we experimentally show the relationship between mold resolution and material properties such as modulus and surface tension for materials used in this study. A composite mold approach was used to form flexible molds out of stiff, high modulus materials that allow for replication of sub-20 nm post structures. Sub-100 nm line grating master templates, formed using e-beam lithography, were used to determine the experimental stability of the molding materials. It was observed that as the feature spacing decreased, high modulus PFPE tetramethacrylate (TMA) composite molds were able to effectively replicate the nanograting structures without cracking or tear-out defects that typically occur with high modulus elastomers. PMID:20178369

  8. Development and application of techniques for the microstructural characterization of hydrogen permeability in zirconium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavicic, Michael G.

    Equipment and techniques have been developed for the microstructural characterization of Zirconium Oxide films grown on Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes. A thin film texture apparatus was constructed and used to measure the texture and stress present in thin zirconium oxide films. The general techniques developed employ a grazing incidence geometry which allows the texture and stress present in thin films (<1mum) of any type to be examined. In addition, a technique for the quantitative phase analysis of textured ZrO2 films grown on zirconium alloys using pole figure data has also been developed. Moreover, equipment was constructed to determine the relative porosity of oxide films grown on a metal substrate using an electrochemical method that measures the effective non-porous oxide thickness. The described equipment and techniques were then used to characterize a test matrix of specimens whose relative hydrogen pick-up was measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The application of beat treatments to the substrates prior to oxide growth was found to have a pronounced effect upon the sharpness of the oxide texture. A correlation between the degree of sharpness of the oxide texture and hydrogen pick-up and corrosion rate of the substrate was also determined. In addition, based upon the new techniques developed it was determined that the tetragonal phase of the oxide is stress stabilized in a region close to the metal/oxide interface.

  9. Microstructure Evaluation of Fe-BASED Amorphous Alloys Investigated by Doppler Broadening Positron Annihilation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Huang, Ping; Wang, Yuxin; Yan, Biao

    2013-07-01

    Microstructure of Fe-based amorphous and nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation technique (PAT). Doppler broadening measurement reveals that amorphous alloys (Finemet, Type I) which can form a nanocrystalline phase have more defects (free volume) than alloys (Metglas, Type II) which cannot form this microstructure. XRD and TEM characterization indicates that the nanocrystallization of amorphous Finemet alloy occurs at 460°C, where nanocrystallites of α-Fe with an average grain size of a few nanometers are formed in an amorphous matrix. With increasing annealing temperature up to 500°C, the average grain size increases up to around 12 nm. During the annealing of Finemet alloy, it has been demonstrated that positron annihilates in quenched-in defect, crystalline nanophase and amorphous-nanocrystalline interfaces. The change of line shape parameter S with annealing temperature in Finemet alloy is mainly due to the structural relaxation, the pre-nucleation of Cu nucleus and the nanocrystallization of α-Fe(Si) phase during annealing. This study throws new insights into positron behavior in the nanocrystallization of metallic glasses, especially in the presence of single or multiple nanophases embedded in the amorphous matrix.

  10. Surface microstructuring of biocompatible bone analogue material HAPEX using LIGA technique and embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Andreas; Rea, Susan; Huq, Ejaz; Bonfield, William

    2003-04-01

    HAPEX is an artificial bone analogue composite based on hydroxyapatite and polyethylene, which can be applied for growth of bone cells. Due to its biocompatibility and favourable mechanical properties, HAPEX is used for orthopaedic implants like tympanic (middle ear) bones. The morphology of HAPEX surfaces is of high interest and it is believed that surface structuring on a micron scale might improve the growth conditions for bone cells. A new and simple approach for the microstructuring of HAPEX surfaces has been investigated using LIGA technique. LIGA is a combination of several processes, in particular lithography, electroplating and forming/moulding. For HAPEX surface structuring, arrays of dots, grids and lines with typical lateral dimension ranging from 5 μm to 50 μm were created on a chromium photomask and the patterns were transferred into thick SU-8 photoresist (structure height > 10 μm) by UV lithography. Subsequently, the SU-8 structures served as moulds for electroplating nickel on Si wafers and nickel substrates. The final nickel microstructures were used as embossing master for the HAPEX material. Embossing was carried out using a conventional press (> 500 hPa) with the facility to heat the master and the HAPEX. The temperature ranged from ambient to a few degrees above glass transition temperature (Tg) of HAPEX. The paper will include details of the fabrication process and process tolerances in lateral and vertical directions. Data obtained are correlated to the temperature used during embossing.

  11. Sloped irradiation techniques in deep x-ray lithography for 3D shaping of microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiertag, Gregor; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Lehr, Heinz; Schmidt, Martin

    1997-07-01

    Deep x-ray lithography (DXRL) makes use of synchrotron radiation (SR) to transfer an absorber pattern from a mask into a thick resist layer. For most applications the direction of the SR beam is perpendicular to the mask and the resist plane. Subsequent replication techniques, e.g. electroforming, moulding or hot embossing, convert the resist relief obtained after development into micromechanical, microfluidic or micro- optical elements made from metals, polymers or ceramic materials. This process sequence is well known as the LIGA technique. The normal shadow printing process is complemented and enhanced by advanced techniques, e.g. by tilting the mask and the resist with respect to the SR beam or aligned multiple exposures to produce step-like structures. In this paper a technology for the fabrication of multidirectional inclined microstructures applying multiple tilted DXRL will be presented. Instead of one exposure with the mask/substrate assembly perpendicular to the SR beam, irradiation is performed several times applying tilt and rotational angles of the mask/substrate assembly relative to the SR beam. A huge variety of 3-D structures can be obtained using this technique. Some possible applications will be discussed.

  12. Vacuum isostatic micro molding of microfluidic structures into polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2008-04-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is an ideal material for use in microfluidic applications, such as industrial inkjet and biomedical analysis devices. PTFE has outstanding physical properties; such as chemical inertness and resistance to chemical corrosion, even when exposed to a strong acid, alkali and oxidants. Its properties provide for superior electrical insulation and thermal stability, which is not affected by wide ranges in temperature and frequency. Its non-absorption of moisture makes it a perfect material for consideration in micro-fluidic devices used in chemical analysis, fluidic photonic sensors and biomedical diagnostics. This paper presents an overview of a unique fabrication method that incorporates a variety of elements to establish a processing technique that can form micro channels, complex filter arrays and reflective micro mirror structures into PTFE materials for such applications. Using a modified isostatic compression molding process, this new technique incorporates the addition of a vacuum to assist in the reliable molding of micron structures and further densification of the fused or semi-fused PTFE. Various micro-structured electroformed and micro-machined shims are demonstrated to form small microstructures into the surface of the PTFE material. The combination of the vacuum and the electroformed shim within the molding process noticeably increases the precision, reproducibility and resolution of microstructures that can be realized. The paper will describe the molding hardware involved, process parameters and the resulting microfluidic channels and complex filter and capillary structures formed. Function testing and metrology of the micro-structure geometry formed on each sample will be compared to the original design mandrel geometry.

  13. Study of microstructure and electrical properties of bulk YBCO prepared by melt textured growth technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gonal, M. R.; Krishnan, Madangopal; Tewari, R.; Tyagi, A. K.; Gyore, A.; Vajda, I.

    2015-06-24

    Bulk YBCO components were prepared using Melt Texture Growth (MTG) technique. Components were fabricated using MTG by addition of Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} (Y211) and Ag to YBCO, which leads to improved grain size without affecting superconducting properties. Green compacts prepared by cold isostatic pressing were pre-sintered at 930°C before subjecting melt texturing. Cooling rates lower than 1 °C.h{sup −1} was used, in between (peritectic) temperature of about 995 and 1025°C, to obtain large grained components. Microstructure studies in details were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA), Orientation Imaging Microscope (OIM) and TEM correlated with electrical properties like Critical current density (J{sub c})

  14. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  15. An Overview of Micromechanics-Based Techniques for the Analysis of Microstructural Randomness in Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrante, Fernando J.; Brady, Lori L. Graham; Acton, Katherine; Arwade, Sanjay R.

    2008-02-15

    A review of current research efforts to develop micromechanics-based techniques for the study of microstructural randomness of functionally graded materials is presented, along with a framework developed by the authors of this paper that includes stochastic simulation of statistically inhomogeneous samples and a windowing technique coupled with a micromechanical homogenization technique. The methodology is illustrated through the analysis of one sample coupled with finite element modeling.

  16. 21ST CENTURY MOLD ANALYSIS IN FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditionally, the indoor air community has relied on mold analysis performed by either microscopic observations or the culturing of molds on various media to assess indoor air quality. These techniques were developed in the 19th century and are very laborious and time consumin...

  17. Evaluation of material microstructure changes in high speed tool steel by the non-collinear wave mixing technique with MST(magnetostrictive transducer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeongseok; Lee, Dong Jin; Cho, Younho

    2015-03-01

    Evaluation of material microstructure changes plays an important role in predicting material failure. Both destructive and nondestructive testings can be used to evaluate the variation of material microstructure. Destructive methods are used to directly verify the changes of material via microstructure picture in a vigorous manner while nonlinear ultrasonic NDE can render a promising tool for the cases. In this study, the MST driven non-collinear wave mixing technique is implemented to evaluate the material microstructure changes in high speed tool steel. The resonant wave is used to analyze the acoustic nonlinearity which is influenced by microstructure changes with various austenitizing temperature effects. Correlation microstructure change between the acoustic nonlinearity and material microstructure is accomplished to explore the feasibility of the non-collinear mixing technique.

  18. Thermoset matched die molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. R.

    Reinforced molding compounds, mat molding, preform molding, cold press molding, and various other molding processes are discussed. Particular attention is given to the bulk molding compound (BMC) and the sheet molding compound (SMC) (both of which are reinforced molding compounds) as there is an increasing use of these compounds. SMC can employ a wider range of fiber lengths and fiber content than BMC, while preserving strength. The dimensional stability of BMC and SMC is unexcelled, and their corrosion resistance is generally excellent. Both compounds are composed of resins (10-2500 poises), reinforcements (BMC-glass, asbestos, sisal; SMC-soluble binder chopped strand mat), and fillers from four chemical groups (silica and silicates, carbonates, sulfates, and oxides). Molding press designs are included.

  19. Analysis and characterization of demolding of hot embossed polymer microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirckx, Matthew E.; Hardt, David E.

    2011-08-01

    Micro-molding techniques including injection molding and hot embossing have great potential for manufacturing microfluidic 'lab-on-a-chip' devices for point-of-care diagnostics and many other applications; however, separating the part from the mold (demolding) can pose problems. This paper presents a study of demolding of hot embossed polymer microstructures, including theoretical analysis and finite element simulations, along with demolding experiments using a newly developed test method. Using this method, the energy dissipated during demolding (the demolding toughness) can be determined for individual microstructures. It has been found that both adhesion and sidewall friction play a role in demolding, with adhesion being degraded by thermal stress and friction being exacerbated as the part cools. A minimum value of demolding toughness occurs at the temperature where adhesion is fully degraded. This temperature depends on the initial adhesion strength, the part's material properties and the geometry of mold features. The minimum toughness temperature has been identified for several simple mold patterns for parts made of poly-methyl-methacrylate and polycarbonate. The minimum toughness temperature is higher for sparser patterns of features and lower for denser ones. Below this temperature, the demolding toughness is related to feature height but is not related to feature width.

  20. Anti-Toxoplasma activity and impact evaluation of lyophilization, hot molding process, and gamma-irradiation techniques on CLH-PLGA intravitreal implants.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Cunha, Gabriella M; Rezende, Cíntia M F; Mussel, Wagner N; da Silva, Gisele R; de L Gomes, Elionai C; Yoshida, Maria I; Fialho, Sílvia L; Goes, Alfredo M; Gomes, Dawison A; de Almeida Vitor, Ricardo W; Silva-Cunha, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Intraocular delivery systems have been developed to treat many eye diseases, especially those affecting the posterior segment of the eye. However, ocular toxoplasmosis, the leading cause of infectious posterior uveitis in the world, still lacks an effective treatment. Therefore, our group developed an intravitreal polymeric implant to release clindamycin, a potent anti-Toxoplasma antibiotic. In this work, we used different techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate drug/polymer properties while manufacturing the delivery system. We showed that the lyophilization, hot molding process, and sterilization by gamma irradiation did not change drug/polymer physical-chemistry properties. The drug was found to be homogeneously dispersed into the poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) chains and the profile release was characterized by an initial burst followed by prolonged release. The drug profile release was not modified after gamma irradiation and non-covalent interaction was found between the drug and the PLGA. We also observed the preservation of the drug activity by showing the potent anti-Toxoplasma effect of the implant, after 24-72 h in contact with cells infected by the parasite, which highlights this system as an alternative to treat toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis. PMID:26676856

  1. Comparison of three‐dimensional analysis and stereological techniques for quantifying lithium‐ion battery electrode microstructures

    PubMed Central

    TAIWO, OLUWADAMILOLA O.; FINEGAN, DONAL P.; EASTWOOD, DAVID S.; FIFE, JULIE L.; BROWN, LEON D.; DARR, JAWWAD A.; LEE, PETER D.; BRETT, DANIEL J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Lithium‐ion battery performance is intrinsically linked to electrode microstructure. Quantitative measurement of key structural parameters of lithium‐ion battery electrode microstructures will enable optimization as well as motivate systematic numerical studies for the improvement of battery performance. With the rapid development of 3‐D imaging techniques, quantitative assessment of 3‐D microstructures from 2‐D image sections by stereological methods appears outmoded; however, in spite of the proliferation of tomographic imaging techniques, it remains significantly easier to obtain two‐dimensional (2‐D) data sets. In this study, stereological prediction and three‐dimensional (3‐D) analysis techniques for quantitative assessment of key geometric parameters for characterizing battery electrode microstructures are examined and compared. Lithium‐ion battery electrodes were imaged using synchrotron‐based X‐ray tomographic microscopy. For each electrode sample investigated, stereological analysis was performed on reconstructed 2‐D image sections generated from tomographic imaging, whereas direct 3‐D analysis was performed on reconstructed image volumes. The analysis showed that geometric parameter estimation using 2‐D image sections is bound to be associated with ambiguity and that volume‐based 3‐D characterization of nonconvex, irregular and interconnected particles can be used to more accurately quantify spatially‐dependent parameters, such as tortuosity and pore‐phase connectivity. PMID:26999804

  2. Comparison of three-dimensional analysis and stereological techniques for quantifying lithium-ion battery electrode microstructures.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, Oluwadamilola O; Finegan, Donal P; Eastwood, David S; Fife, Julie L; Brown, Leon D; Darr, Jawwad A; Lee, Peter D; Brett, Daniel J L; Shearing, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    Lithium-ion battery performance is intrinsically linked to electrode microstructure. Quantitative measurement of key structural parameters of lithium-ion battery electrode microstructures will enable optimization as well as motivate systematic numerical studies for the improvement of battery performance. With the rapid development of 3-D imaging techniques, quantitative assessment of 3-D microstructures from 2-D image sections by stereological methods appears outmoded; however, in spite of the proliferation of tomographic imaging techniques, it remains significantly easier to obtain two-dimensional (2-D) data sets. In this study, stereological prediction and three-dimensional (3-D) analysis techniques for quantitative assessment of key geometric parameters for characterizing battery electrode microstructures are examined and compared. Lithium-ion battery electrodes were imaged using synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy. For each electrode sample investigated, stereological analysis was performed on reconstructed 2-D image sections generated from tomographic imaging, whereas direct 3-D analysis was performed on reconstructed image volumes. The analysis showed that geometric parameter estimation using 2-D image sections is bound to be associated with ambiguity and that volume-based 3-D characterization of nonconvex, irregular and interconnected particles can be used to more accurately quantify spatially-dependent parameters, such as tortuosity and pore-phase connectivity. PMID:26999804

  3. Molds in the Environment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program in Brief Related Issues Resources Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New ... ng Việt [PDF - 273 KB] Quick Links Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Air Quality Asthma Mold What's New ...

  4. QUANTIFYING INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing awareness that indoor molds/fungi may be connected to such conditions as asthma, allergies, hemorrhaging, chronic rhinosinusitis, memory loss, and a symptom complex called sick-building-syndrome. In addition, molds cause frequently fatal nosocomical infections. ...

  5. Pyrotechnic filled molding powder

    DOEpatents

    Hartzel, Lawrence W.; Kettling, George E.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to thermosetting molding compounds and more particularly to a pyrotechnic filled thermosetting compound comprising a blend of unfilled diallyl phthalate molding powder and a pyrotechnic mixture.

  6. Mold-Resistant Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that one of the surest ways to prevent indoor air quality and mold issues is to use preventive construction materials, discussing typical resistance to dealing with mold problems (usually budget-related) and describing mold-resistant construction, which uses concrete masonry, brick, and stone and is intended to withstand inevitable…

  7. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... in damp places. Outdoors, mold lives in the soil, on compost, and on plants that are damp. Keeping your house and yard drier will help control mold growth. Central heating and air-conditioning systems can help control mold. Change furnace and ...

  8. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, L.D.

    1996-12-10

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. 5 figs.

  9. Molds for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1996-01-01

    Molds for use in making end moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of a cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made.

  10. Mold and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuscano, Antoinette

    1998-01-01

    Mold can seriously affect the health of children with asthma or allergies. Indoor air problems related to mold can be difficult to identify, but when several students who spend time in the same classroom area show allergic symptoms, it is important to consider mold and air quality. Failure to respond promptly can have serious consequences. (SM)

  11. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  12. Study on heat flux from resin to mold in injection molding process

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiwaki, Nobuhiko; Hori, Sankei

    1999-07-01

    Recently, an injection molding of thermoplastic is widely used in many industries, because this manufacturing method is very suitable for mass production. For injection molding processes, a number of software packages for simulating an injection molding process have been developed. It is assumed in these software packages that the heat transfer coefficient between the resin and the mold surface is constant at the filling or cooling stages. In general, when melted resin flows into the mold, heat is generated in the flowing resin because of the high viscosity at the filling stage. Moreover at the cooling stage, a separation of the molded part from the mold surface generally occurs because of shrinkage of the molded material. Therefore, the heat transfer coefficient has not been accurately obtained yet at these stages. In this paper, the temperature near the surface of the mold cavity has been experimentally measured, so the heat flux that flows from the resin to the mold has been able to be analytically estimated by an inverse conduction method. On the other hand, the separating behavior of the resin from the mold surface has been measured using an ultrasonic transducer attached to the outer surface of the stationary mold. The heat flux that flows from the resin to the mold has been analytically estimated. The apparent heat transfer coefficient can be obtained from the heat flux and the representative temperature difference, which is measured by an ultrasonic technique. It was discovered that the heat flux and the apparent heat transfer coefficient are hardly influenced by the separation.

  13. IC chip stress during plastic package molding

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Benson, D.A.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

    1998-02-01

    Approximately 95% of the world`s integrated chips are packaged using a hot, high pressure transfer molding process. The stress created by the flow of silica powder loaded epoxy can displace the fine bonding wires and can even distort the metalization patterns under the protective chip passivation layer. In this study the authors developed a technique to measure the mechanical stress over the surface of an integrated circuit during the molding process. A CMOS test chip with 25 diffused resistor stress sensors was applied to a commercial lead frame. Both compression and shear stresses were measured at all 25 locations on the surface of the chip every 50 milliseconds during molding. These measurements have a fine time and stress resolution which should allow comparison with computer simulation of the molding process, thus allowing optimization of both the manufacturing process and mold geometry.

  14. Development and evaluation of P/M processing techniques to improve and control the mechanical properties of metal injection molded parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sago, James Alan

    Metal Injection Molding (MIM) is one of the most rapidly growing areas of powder metallurgy (P/M) but the growth of MIM into new markets and more demanding applications is limited by two fundamental barriers, the availability of low cost metal powders and a lack of knowledge and understanding of how mechanical properties, especially toughness, are affected by the many parameters in the MIM process. The goals of this study were to investigate solutions to these challenges for MIM. Mechanical alloying (MA) is a technique which can produce a wide variety of powder compositions in a size range suited to MIM and in smaller batches. However MA typically suffers from low production volumes and long milling times. This study will show that a saucer mill can produce sizable volumes of MA powders in times typically less than an hour. The MA process was also used to produce powders of 17-4PH stainless steel and the NiTi shape memory alloy for a MIM feedstock. This study shows that the MA powder characteristics led to successful MIM processing of parts. Previous studies have shown that the toughness of individual MIM parts can vary widely within a single production run and from one producer to another. In the last part of the study a Design of Experiments (DOE) approach was used to evaluate the effects of MIM processing parameters on the mechanical properties. Analysis of Variance produced mathematical models for Charpy impact toughness, hardness, density, and carbon content. Tensile properties did not produce a good model due to processing problems. The models and recommendations for improving both toughness and reproducibility of toughness are presented.

  15. A Combined Experimental and Computational Approach for the Design of Mold Topography that Leads to Desired Ingot Surface and Microstructure in Aluminum Casting.

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Zabaras, N.; Tan, L.

    2005-07-12

    A method combining features of front-tracking methods and fixed-domain methods is presented to model dendritic solidification of pure materials. To explicitly track the interface growth and shape of the solidifying crystals, a fronttracking approach based on the level set method is implemented. To easily model the heat and momentum transport, a fixed-domain method is implemented assuming a diffused freezing front where the liquid fraction is defined in terms of the level set function. The fixed-domain approach, by avoiding the explicit application of essential boundary conditions on the freezing front, leads to an energy conserving methodology that is not sensitive to the mesh size. To compute the freezing front morphology, an extended Stefan condition is considered. Applications to several classical Stefan problems and two- and three-dimensional crystal growth of pure materials in an undercooled melt including the effects of melt flow are considered. The computed results agree very well with available analytical solutions as well as with results obtained using front-tracking techniques and the phase-field method.

  16. 53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  17. Mold Simulator Study of the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Mold: Part II. Effects of Mold Oscillation and Mold Level Fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-04-01

    The surface quality of the continuous casting strands is closely related to the initial solidification of liquid steel in the vicinity of the mold meniscus, and thus the clear understanding of the behavior of molten steel initial solidification would be of great importance for the control of the quality of final slab. With the development of the mold simulator techniques, the complex interrelationship between the solidified shell surface profile, heat flux, shell thickness, mold level fluctuation, and the infiltrated slag film was well illustrated in our previous study. As the second part, this article investigated the effect of the mold oscillation frequency, stroke, and mold level fluctuation on the initial solidification of the molten steel through the conduction of five different experiments. Results suggested that in the case of the stable mold level, the oscillation marks (OMs) exhibit equally spaced horizon depressions on the shell surface, where the heat flux at the meniscus area raises rapidly during negative strip time (NST) period and the presence of each OMs on the shell surface is corresponding to a peak value of the heat flux variation rate. Otherwise, the shell surface is poorly defined by the existence of wave-type defects, such as ripples or deep depressions, and the heat flux variation is irregular during NST period. The rising of the mold level leads to the longer-pitch and deeper OMs formation; conversely, the falling of mold level introduces shorter-pitch and shallower OMs. With the increase of the mold oscillation frequency, the average value of the low-frequency heat flux at the meniscus increases; however, it decreases when the mold oscillation stroke increases. Additionally, the variation amplitude of the high-frequency temperature and the high-frequency heat flux decreases with the increase of the oscillation frequency and the reduction of the oscillation stroke.

  18. Comparative sampling molds evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierrard, L.; Jarry, P.; Charbonnier, J.; Rigaut, C.

    1996-10-01

    The metallurgical industry needs to cast alloys with narrow tolerances in their chemical composition in order to reduce variability of their use properties. Therefore appropriate sampling practices and analytical methods are required. Both accuracy and precision of the analytical results are limited by the non-homogeneity of as-cast disk or cylinder samples, which results from macrosegregation phenomenon. This paper presents a comparison between six commonly used molds: four molds recommended by ASTM standards (center-pour molds type B and vacuum mold), mushroom shaped and cylinder molds. Two complementary approaches are exhibited for the different molds designs: (1) solidification modeling in order to predict macrosegregation localization using the Simulor software; (2) experimental characterization. Radial and axial segregation profiles are determined by Analytical Scanning Electron Microscopy in addition to analytical precision evaluation by spark optical emission and X-Ray fluorescence spectrometries for a given machining depth.

  19. Injection molded polymeric micropatterns for bone regeneration study.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, Erika; Guidi, Enrica; Della Giustina, Gioia; Sorgato, Marco; Krampera, Mauro; Bassi, Giulio; Di Liddo, Rosa; Lucchetta, Giovanni; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Brusatin, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    An industrially feasible process for the fast mass-production of molded polymeric micro-patterned substrates is here presented. Microstructured polystyrene (PS) surfaces were obtained through micro injection molding (μIM) technique on directly patterned stamps realized with a new zirconia-based hybrid spin-on system able to withstand 300 cycles at 90 °C. The use of directly patterned stamps entails a great advantage on the overall manufacturing process as it allows a fast, flexible, and simple one-step process with respect to the use of milling, laser machining, electroforming techniques, or conventional lithographic processes for stamp fabrication. Among the different obtainable geometries, we focused our attention on PS replicas reporting 2, 3, and 4 μm diameter pillars with 8, 9, 10 μm center-to-center distance, respectively. This enabled us to study the effect of the substrate topography on human mesenchymal stem cells behavior without any osteogenic growth factors. Our data show that microtopography affected cell behavior. In particular, calcium deposition and osteocalcin expression enhanced as diameter and interpillar distance size increases, and the 4-10 surface was the most effective to induce osteogenic differentiation. PMID:25756304

  20. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction and Microstructure Modeling of Porosity-Graded Cathode Using Focused Ion Beam and Homogenization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamedani, Amani; Baniassadi, Majid; Sheidaei, A.; Pourboghrat, F.; Remond, Y.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2013-12-20

    In this study, microstructure of a porosity-graded lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) has been characterized using focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscopy(SEM) combined with image processing. Two-point correlation functions of the two-dimensional (2D) images taken along the direction of porosity gradient are used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) microstructure. The effective elastic modulus of the two-phase porosity-graded cathode is predicted using strong contrast (SC) and composite inclusion (CI) homogenization techniques. The effectiveness of the two methods in predicting the effective elastic properties of the porositygraded LSM cathode is investigated in comparison with the results obtained from the finite element model (FEM).

  1. Molded Magnetic Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A molded magnetic article and fabrication method are provided. Particles of ferromagnetic material embedded in a polymer binder are molded under heat and pressure into a geometric shape. Each particle is an oblate spheroid having a radius-to-thickness aspect ratio approximately in the range of 15-30. Each oblate spheroid has flattened poles that are substantially in perpendicular alignment to a direction of the molding pressure throughout the geometric shape.

  2. Guide to Molds at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., Albany, NY.

    Asserting that molds growing in schools can be harmful to children's health and learning, this guide offers information about the issue. It provides an overview of the basics, then addresses testing, types of molds, molds and health, monitoring schools for mold, mold prevention and clean-up tips for schools, and what parents should do if they…

  3. BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, PBQ AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINE MAKES BOTH MOLD HALVES INDIVIDUALLY WHICH ARE LATER ROTATED, ASSEMBLED, AND LOWERED TO POURING CONVEYORS BY ASSISTING MACHINES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Powder Injection Molding of Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Nyberg, Eric A.; Weil, K. Scott; Miller, Megan R.

    2005-01-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) is a well-established, cost-effective method of fabricating small-to-moderate size metal components. Derived from plastic injection molding and employing a mixture of metal powder and plastic binder, the process has been used with great success in manufacturing a wide variety of metal products, including those made from stainless steel, nickel-based superalloys, and copper alloys. Less progress has been achieved with titanium and other refractory metal alloys because of problems with alloy impurities that are directly attributable to the injection molding process. Specifically, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are left behind during binder removal and become incorporated into the chemistry and microstructure of the material during densification. Even at low concentration, these impurities can cause severe degradation in the mechanical properties of titanium and its alloys. We have developed a unique blend of PIM constituents where only a small volume fraction of binder (~5 – 10 vol%) is required for injection molding; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and binder solvent. Because of the nature of decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder is eliminated almost completely from the pre-sintered component during the initial stage of a two-step heat treatment process. Results will be presented on the first phase of this research, in which the binder, injection molding, de-binding and sintering schedule were developed. Additional data on the mechanical and physical properties of the material produced will be discussed.

  5. In vivo quantification of white matter microstructure for use in aging: a focus on two emerging techniques.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Melissa; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Charlton, Rebecca A; Dean, Douglas; Little, Deborah; Deoni, Sean C

    2014-02-01

    Human brain imaging has seen many advances in the quantification of white matter in vivo. For example, these advances have revealed the association between white matter damage and vascular disease as well as their impact on risk for and development of dementia and depression in an aging population. Current neuroimaging methods to quantify white matter damage provide a foundation for understanding such age-related neuropathology; however, these methods are not as adept at determining the underlying microstructural abnormalities signaling at risk tissue or driving white matter damage in the aging brain. This review will begin with a brief overview of the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in understanding white matter alterations in aging before focusing in more detail on select advances in both diffusion-based methods and multi-component relaxometry techniques for imaging white matter microstructural integrity within myelin sheaths and the axons they encase. Although DTI greatly extended the field of white matter interrogation, these more recent technological advances will add clarity to the underlying microstructural mechanisms that contribute to white matter damage. More specifically, the methods highlighted in this review may prove more sensitive (and specific) for determining the contribution of myelin versus axonal integrity to the aging of white matter in brain. PMID:24080382

  6. in vivo quantification of white matter microstructure for use in aging: A focus on two emerging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lamar, Melissa; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Charlton, Rebecca A.; Dean, Douglas; Little, Deborah; Deoni, Sean C

    2013-01-01

    Human brain imaging has seen many advances in the quantification of white matter in vivo. For example, these advances have revealed the association between white matter damage and vascular disease as well as their impact on risk for and development of dementia and depression in an aging population. Current neuroimaging methods to quantify white matter damage provide a foundation for understanding such age-related neuropathology; however, these methods are not as adept at determining the underlying microstructural abnormalities signaling at risk tissue or driving white matter damage in the aging brain. This review will begin with a brief overview of the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in understanding white matter alterations in aging before focusing in more detail on select advances in both diffusion-based methods and multi-component relaxometry techniques for imaging white matter microstructural integrity within myelin sheaths and the axons they encase. While DTI greatly extended the field of white matter interrogation, these more recent technological advances will add clarity to the underlying microstructural mechanisms that contribute to white matter damage. More specifically, the methods highlighted in this review may prove more sensitive (and specific) for determining the contribution of myelin versus axonal integrity to the aging of white matter in brain. PMID:24080382

  7. New methods and materials for molding and casting ice formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Richter, G. Paul

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to find improved materials and techniques for molding and casting natural or simulated ice shapes that could replace the wax and plaster method. By utilizing modern molding and casting materials and techniques, a new methodology was developed that provides excellent reproduction, low-temperature capability, and reasonable turnaround time. The resulting casts are accurate and tough.

  8. Microstructure Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Al-12Si Coatings on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Produced by Cold Spray Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yi; Wang, Ji-qiang; Cui, Xin-yu; Wu, Jie; Li, Tie-fan; Xiong, Tian-ying

    2016-06-01

    The cold spray technique was to deposit Al-12Si coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The influence of gas pressure and gas temperature on the microstructure of coatings was investigated so as to optimize the process parameters. OM, SEM, and XRD were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings. Mechanical properties including Vickers microhardness and adhesion strength were measured in order to evaluate coating quality. Test results indicate that the Al-12Si coatings possess the same crystal structure with powders, sufficient thickness, low porosity, high hardness, and excellent adhesion strength under optimal cold spray process parameters.

  9. Effects of aluminum microstructure on electromigration using a new reactive ion etching and scanning electron microscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ken; Baerg, William; Jupiter, Peter

    1991-03-01

    The effects of microstructure on the electromigration of aluminum-1% silicon and titanium/aluminum-silicon films were studied using a new reactive ion etching/scanning electron microscopy technique. We found that the number of intersecting Al grain boundaries, called ``triple points,'' in the metal line plays an important role in determining the median-time-to-fail (MTTF) of the electromigration distribution. Our data shows that the electromigration MTTF increases by 6× or 8× when the number of triple points decreases by 3× or 5× on Al-Si or Ti/Al-Si metallization, respectively.

  10. Microstructure Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of Al-12Si Coatings on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Produced by Cold Spray Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yi; Wang, Ji-qiang; Cui, Xin-yu; Wu, Jie; Li, Tie-fan; Xiong, Tian-ying

    2016-04-01

    The cold spray technique was to deposit Al-12Si coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The influence of gas pressure and gas temperature on the microstructure of coatings was investigated so as to optimize the process parameters. OM, SEM, and XRD were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings. Mechanical properties including Vickers microhardness and adhesion strength were measured in order to evaluate coating quality. Test results indicate that the Al-12Si coatings possess the same crystal structure with powders, sufficient thickness, low porosity, high hardness, and excellent adhesion strength under optimal cold spray process parameters.

  11. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  12. Development effort of sheet molding compound (SMC) parabolic trough panels

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, P.A.; Champion, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives of the development effort are to: investigate the problems of molding parabolic trough solar reflector panels of sheet molding compound (SMC); develop molding techniques and processes by which silvered glass reflector sheets can be integrally molded into SMC trough panels; provide representative prototype panels for evaluation; and provide information regarding the technical feasibility of molding SMC panels in high volume production. The approach taken to meet the objectives was to design the parabolic panel, fabricate a prototype die, choose an SMC formulation and mold the glass and SMC together into a vertex to rim mirrored panel. The main thrust of the program was to successfully co-mold a mirrored glass sheet with the SMC. Results indicate that mirrored glass sheets, if properly strengthened to withstand the temperature and pressure of the molding process, can be successfully molded with SMC in a single press stroke using standard compression molding techniques. The finalized design of the trough panel is given. The SMC formulation chosen is a low shrink, low profile SMC using 40% by weight one inch chopped glass fibers in a uv stabilized polyester resin matrix. A program to test for the adhesion between mirrored glass sheets and the SMC is discussed briefly. (LEW)

  13. Experimental Determination of Heat Transfer Within the Metal/Mold Gap in a DC Casting Mold: Part II. Effect of Casting Metal, Mold Material, and Other Casting Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Arvind; Bainbridge, Ian F.

    2013-07-01

    Extensive experimental studies were conducted to quantify the effect of different parameters that can affect the heat transfer from the metal to the mold during the steady-state phase of DC casting. In the first part previously published, the experimental technique was established and results were reported for the effect of gas type (atmosphere within the mold) and the gap between the metal and the mold. The results showed the significant effect of gas thermal conductivity and the metal-mold gap on the mold wall heat transfer coefficient. In this second publication on heat transfer in the mold wall region of a DC casting mold, the results from the effect of casting temperature, gas flow rate, casting alloy, mold material, and the mold insert material on the mold wall heat transfer coefficient are described. The experiments reported in the current paper show that these additional factors tested do not affect the heat flux through the mold wall to the same extent as the gap size or the gas type. The heat transfer coefficient changes by less than 5 pct when casting temperature is changed by ±25 K, less than 15 pct when the gas flow rate within the metal-mold gap flows at up to 3 LPM, and approximately 30 pct when the mold material is changed from stainless steel to AA601 to copper. Similar results were obtained when different insert materials were used. These results are explained with the help of an electrical analogy of heat transfer and are consistent with the heat transfer theory.

  14. Glass molding process with mold lubrication

    DOEpatents

    Davey, Richard G.

    1978-06-27

    Improvements are provided in glass forming processes of the type wherein hot metal blank molds are employed by using the complementary action of a solid film lubricant layer, of graphite dispersed in a cured thermoset organopolysiloxane, along with an overspray of a lubricating oil.

  15. Microstructural characterization of solid oxide fuel cell electrodes by image analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzini, Andrea; Leone, Pierluigi; Asinari, Pietro

    The paper deals with the microstructural characterization of electrodes of solid oxide fuel cells based on processing of 2D images. The interest relies on finding the reliable description of the structures which determine the microscopic image, by means of parameters involving the morphology, the shape and the size of elementary structures, and the microscopic topology in terms of spatial connectivity functions. The use of detailed mathematical methods allowed one to reconstruct the 3D structure of both fuel and air electrodes having 2D images as input. The analysis was applied to an anode-supported cell with NiO based anode, 8YSZ electrolyte and LSM/YSZ cathode. The microscopic analysis was performed by means of both a SEM and an optical microscope before and after the electrical testing of the cell. The obtained images were processed and a quantitative analysis was performed for achieving information concerning the microstructure and including: phases' fraction, grain size, granulometry law, constituent shape factors, phase spatial organization and descriptive functions. The microstructure features were analyzed by means of one-point and two-point statistics. It was possible to build 3D structures of the electrodes: anode and the double-layer cathode. The work also points out some issues related to the proper use of the observed microscopic parameters and topology functions as inputs for electrodes' modelling. In the work, the results of the image analysis are used with a simple analytical model with the aim to estimate the optimal design of the cathode current functional layer (CFL). It is proved that the actual cell design with 15 μm thick CFL was optimized for a temperature as high as 850 °C, with a charge transfer and total ohmic resistance of around 0.2 Ω cm 2. More generally, results of image analysis can be used efficiently as input in the multi-scale modelling of SOFC electrodes considering macroscopic and mesoscopic models.

  16. Resin film infusion mold tooling and molding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Roger (Inventor); Grossheim, Brian (Inventor); Mouradian, Karbis (Inventor); Thrash, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A mold apparatus and method for resin film infusion molding including an outer mold tool having a facing sheet adapted to support a resin film and preform assembly. The facing sheet includes attachment features extending therefrom. An inner mold tool is positioned on the facing sheet to enclose the resin film and preform assembly for resin film infusion molding. The inner mold tool includes a plurality of mandrels positioned for engagement with the resin film and preform assembly. Each mandrel includes a slot formed therein. A plurality of locating bars cooperate with the slots and with the attachment features for locating the mandrels longitudinally on the outer mold tool.

  17. 92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-53. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  18. Magnetic MEMS-based microstructures and sensors using a new thick photolithography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakopoulos, Trifon M.

    2000-11-01

    The research objective of this dissertation is to design, implement, and characterize innovative magnetic microstructures, microinductors and magnetic sensors using a new UV-LIGA (UV-based, Lithography and Galvanoforming)-based magnetic MEMS (Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems) technology. Using a microinductor as a foundry magnetic component, the large demand for the realization of magnetic-based microsystems such as electrical signal conversion systems, microfluidic systems, magnetic field sensing systems, and on-chip DC/DC power converters, can be satisfied. The realization of efficient, 3-dimensional microinductors on a chip as confined magnetic flux generators has been considered essential and difficult task to be performed prior to the realization of a CMOS/MEMS integrated system. In order to achieve the objectives of this research, a new multi-layer thick photoresist process, called UV-LIGA, has been developed and characterized. The UV-LIGA process has shown excellent structural reliability, electrical properties, and planarization characteristics, which are essential in realizing a multileveled magnetic microstructure. With the developed UV-LIGA technology, new magnetic MEMS-based microstructures and components such as thick electroplated permanent magnetic arrays, microinductors, microtransformers, electromagnetic microactuators and on- chip magnetic fluxgate sensors, have been designed, fabricated, and characterized in this research. The microinductors and transformers developed in this research have shown low resistance, high inductance, and a high Q factor, which makes these magnetic components essential for the realization of microsensors, microactuators, and power converters. The first electroplated permanent magnet arrays have high magnetic energy density, which is comparable to a conventional permanent magnet, showing high potential for bi- directional microactuator applications. Finally, the on- chip fabricated magnetic fluxgate sensor has achieved

  19. Mold After a Disaster

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Disaster Mold Removal After a Disaster Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ...

  20. Breaking the Mold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckabee, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Using the example of a Texas elementary school, describes how to eliminate mold and mildew from school facilities, including discovering the problem, responding quickly, reconstructing the area, and crisis planning and prevention. (EV)

  1. Newborn head molding

    MedlinePlus

    ... molding. In: Graham JM, Sanchez-Lara PA, eds. Smiths' Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 35. Smith J. Initial evaluation. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar SU, ...

  2. Microstructure investigations of streak formation in 6063 aluminum extrusions by optical metallographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Vander Voort, George; Suárez-Peña, Beatriz; Asensio-Lozano, Juan

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the solidification strategy for AA 6063 alloy on the surface appearance of anodized extrusions. The microstructure of the samples was analyzed using both light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that if heavy segregation occurs from rapid solidification, coarse Mg2Si particles form, thus reducing the potential for precipitation strengthening by the finer β-Mg2Si developed in the solid state. Differentially-strained regions formed during hot extrusion induce differences in particle size for magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) precipitates. Anodizing generates surface roughness due to Mg2Si particle dissolution and AlFeSi decohesion, which is related to both particle size and deformation. During anodizing, an oxide layer forms on the surface of the extruded products, which can lead to streak formation, usually a subject of rejection due to unacceptable heterogeneous reflectivity. PMID:23481588

  3. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  4. Metallic glass mold insert for hot embossing of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-07-01

    Molding of micro components from thermoplastic polymers (TPs) has become a routinely used industrial production process. To find hard, ductile and durable material for mold insert and to fabricate the mold insert are two big challenges for the thermoplastic polymers fabrication techniques. We report that a Pd-based metallic glass (MG) mold insert was readily fabricated in its supercooled liquid region, and the atomic force microscope measurement and time-temperature-transformation analysis show that the metallic glass mold insert has very fine surface quality and long service life. We show that the metallic glasses, which have remarkable mechanical properties and excellent thermoplastic forming ability, are new ideal materials for hot embossing mold insert of thermoplastic polymers.

  5. Nanostructuring steel for injection molding tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azawi, A.; Smistrup, K.; Kristensen, A.

    2014-05-01

    The production of nanostructured plastic items by injection molding with ridges down to 400 nm in width, which is the smallest line width replicated from nanostructured steel shims, is presented. Here we detail a micro-fabrication method where electron beam lithography, nano-imprint lithography and ion beam etching are combined to nanostructure the planar surface of a steel wafer. Injection molded plastic parts with enhanced surface properties, like anti-reflective, superhydrophobic and structural colors can be achieved by micro- and nanostructuring the surface of the steel molds. We investigate the minimum line width that can be realized by our fabrication method and the influence of etching angle on the structure profile during the ion beam etching process. Trenches down to 400 nm in width have been successfully fabricated into a 316 type electro-polished steel wafer. Afterward a plastic replica has been produced by injection molding with good structure transfer fidelity. Thus we have demonstrated that by utilizing well-established fabrication techniques, nanostructured steel shims that are used in injection molding, a technique that allows low cost mass fabrication of plastic items, are produced.

  6. Microstructure and electrochemical properties of nitrogen-doped DLC films deposited by PECVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kai; Ke, Peiling; Li, Xiaowei; Zou, Yousheng; Wang, Aiying

    2015-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (N-DLC) films were synthesized by glow discharge plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using a hybrid ion beam system. The influence of nitrogen incorporation on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of N-DLC films was investigated by scanning probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and cycle voltammetry. Regardless of the deposition parameters, the surface of all the deposited films is very smooth. Raman spectra show that ID/IG increases from 0.6 to 1.04 with the substrate bias voltage increases. XPS results identify that carbon is bonded with nitrogen and the substrate bias makes no distinct contribution to the N content in the films, even the N-DLC film at bias of -550 V has the lowest N-O bonds concentration and the highest C-N bonds concentration. The film electrodes show the wide potential windows range over 4 V, lower background currents in strong acid media. At the bias of -550 V, the N-DLC film electrode not only exhibits the ΔEp at 209 mV and Ipox / Ipred at 0.8778 in K3Fe(CN)6 solution, respectively, but also illustrates a nearly reversible electrode reaction. The mechanism of electroproperties is discussed in terms of the atomic bond structures and diffusion process.

  7. Differences in time-dependent mechanical properties between extruded and molded hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ersumo, N; Witherel, C E; Spiller, K L

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of hydrogels used in biomaterials and tissue engineering applications are critical determinants of their functionality. Despite the recent rise of additive manufacturing, and specifically extrusion-based bioprinting, as a prominent biofabrication method, comprehensive studies investigating the mechanical behavior of extruded constructs remain lacking. To address this gap in knowledge, we compared the mechanical properties and swelling properties of crosslinked gelatin-based hydrogels prepared by conventional molding techniques or by 3D bioprinting using a BioBots Beta pneumatic extruder. A preliminary characterization of the impact of bioprinting parameters on construct properties revealed that both Young's modulus and optimal extruding pressure increased with polymer content, and that printing resolution increased with both printing speed and nozzle gauge. High viability (>95%) of encapsulated NIH 3T3 fibroblasts confirmed the cytocompatibility of the construct preparation process. Interestingly, the Young's moduli of extruded and molded constructs were not different, but extruded constructs did show increases in both the rate and extent of time-dependent mechanical behavior observed in creep. Despite similar polymer densities, extruded hydrogels showed greater swelling over time compared to molded hydrogels, suggesting that differences in creep behavior derived from differences in microstructure and fluid flow. Because of the crucial roles of time-dependent mechanical properties, fluid flow, and swelling properties on tissue and cell behavior, these findings highlight the need for greater consideration of the effects of the extrusion process on hydrogel properties. PMID:27550945

  8. An Elastic-Plastic and Strength Prediction Model for Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper applies a recently developed model to predict the elastic-plastic stress/strain response and strength of injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). The model combines a micro-macro constitutive modeling approach with experimental characterization and modeling of the composite microstructure to determine the composite stress/strain response and strength. Specifically, it accounts for elastic fibers embedded in a thermoplastic resin that exhibits the elastic-plastic behavior obeying the Ramberg-Osgood relation and J-2 deformation theory of plasticity. It also accounts for fiber length, orientation and volume fraction distributions in the composite formed by the injection-molding process. Injection-molded-long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens were prepared for mechanical characterization and testing. Fiber length, orientation, and volume fraction distributions were then measured at some selected locations for use in the computation. Fiber orientations in these specimens were also predicted using an anisotropic rotary diffusion model developed for LFTs. The stress-strain response of the as-formed composite was computed by an incremental procedure that uses the Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method, the Mori-Tanaka assumption and a fiber orientation averaging technique. The model has been validated against the experimental stress-strain results obtained for these long-glass-fiber/PP specimens.

  9. TENDING THE MOLD, DURING THE TRANSFER FROM TUNDISH TO MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TENDING THE MOLD, DURING THE TRANSFER FROM TUNDISH TO MOLD TO CONTAINMENT CHAMBER IS CONTINUOUS CASTING OPERATOR, CALVIN ANDERS. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  10. FILLING MOLDS MADE ON THE BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, AUTOMATIC COPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FILLING MOLDS MADE ON THE BRITISH MOLDING MACHINE, AUTOMATIC COPE AND DRAG (BMM) FROM MOBILE LADLE. EMPTY BULL LADLE IN FOREGROUND. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands. PMID:26771992

  12. The research of UV curing injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pengcheng; Chang, Le; Song, Le; Cai, Tianze; Ding, Yumei; Yang, Weimin

    2015-05-01

    The micro-injection molding technology and the UV (ultraviolet) curing technique are combined to bring about a new plastic forming method, UV curing injection molding. The mean weight of micro-product is an important process characteristic for UV curing injection molding as well as the surface quality of micro-features is another important process characteristic for this new plastic forming method. This research investigates three effects of processing factors on the mass-change rate of micro-product and the surface quality of micro-features. In every particular, the following two factors are considered: UV material system temperature and the packing pressure. The study revealed that as usual, the micro-products gain weight with the imported increasing UV material system temperature and the improved packing pressure. Meanwhile, the increasing packing pressure also improves the surface quality, yet, warming the UV system temperature up has no effect on the quality of the product.

  13. THE COMPARISON OF SEVERAL STANDARD MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES FOR THE WARREN-AVERBACH DETERMINATION OF MICRO-STRUCTURE CHARACTERISTICS OF CALCIUM HYDROXIDE SORBENT MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a comparison of several standard materials and techniques for the Warren-Averbach determination of microstructure characteristics of calcium hydroxide--Ca(OH)2--sorbent materials. The comparison is part of an investigation of the injection of dry Ca(OH)...

  14. Microstructural study and size control of iron oxide nanoparticles produced by microemulsion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutzarova, T.; Kolev, S.; Ghelev, Ch.; Paneva, D.; Nedkov, I.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we study the possibility to control the size of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles by the microemulsion technique. We used a water-in-oil reverse microemulsion system with n-hexadecil trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic surfactant, n-butanol as a co-surfactant, n-hexanol as a continuous oil phase, and aqueous phase. The magnetite nanopowders were synthesized by a single microemulsion technique in which the aqueous phase contains only metal ions (Fe2+ and Fe3+). The particle size of the powders varied in the range of 14-36 nm depending on the preparation conditions. We studied the influence of changing the water/surfactant ratio (W 0 = 5, 10, 15, 20) and the metallic ion (Fe2+ and Fe3+) concentration on the particle size distribution and crystallinity of Fe3O4.

  15. Physicochemical and Microstructural Characterization of Corn Starch Edible Films Obtained by a Combination of Extrusion Technology and Casting Technique.

    PubMed

    Fitch-Vargas, Perla Rosa; Aguilar-Palazuelos, Ernesto; de Jesús Zazueta-Morales, José; Vega-García, Misael Odín; Valdez-Morales, Jesús Enrique; Martínez-Bustos, Fernando; Jacobo-Valenzuela, Noelia

    2016-09-01

    Starch edible films (EFs) have been widely studied due to their potential in food preservation; however, their application is limited because of their poor mechanical and barrier properties. Because of that, the aim of this work was to use the extrusion technology (Ex T) as a pretreatment of casting technique to change the starch structure in order to obtain EFs with improved physicochemical properties. To this, corn starch and a mixture of plasticizers (sorbitol and glycerol, in different ratios) were processed in a twin screw extruder to generate the starch modification and subsequently casting technique was used for EFs formation. The best conditions of the Ex T and plasticizers concentration were obtained using response surface methodology. All the response variables evaluated, were affected significatively by the Plasticizers Ratio (Sorbitol:Glycerol) (PR (S:G)) and Extrusion Temperature (ET), while the Screw Speed (SS) did not show significant effect on any of these variables. The optimization study showed that the appropriate conditions to obtain EFs with the best mechanical and barrier properties were ET = 89 °C, SS = 66 rpm and PR (S:G) = 79.7:20.3. Once the best conditions were obtained, the optimal treatment was characterized according to its microstructural properties (X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy) to determine the damage caused in the starch during Ex T and casting technique. In conclusion, with the combination of Ex T and casting technique were obtained EFs with greater breaking strength and deformation, as well as lower water vapor permeability than those reported in the literature. PMID:27550869

  16. Scanning electron microscopy combined with image processing technique: Microstructure and texture analysis of legumes and vegetables for instant meal.

    PubMed

    Pieniazek, Facundo; Messina, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    Development and innovation of new technologies are necessary especially in food quality; due that most instrumental technique for measuring quality properties involves a considerable amount of manual work. Image analysis is a technique that allows to provide objective evaluations from digitalized images that can estimate quality parameters for consumer's acceptance. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of freeze drying on the microstructure and texture of legume and vegetables using scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications' combined with image analysis. Cooked and cooked freeze dried rehydrated legumes and vegetables were analyzed individually by scanning electron microscopy at different magnifications' (250, 500, and 1000×).Texture properties were analyzed by texture analyzer and image analysis. Significant differences (P < 0.05) were obtained for image and instrumental texture parameters. A linear trend with a linear correlation was applied for instrumental and image features. Results showed that image features calculated from Grey level co-occurrence matrix at 1,000× had high correlations with instrumental features. In rice, homogeneity and contrast can be applied to evaluate texture parameters gumminess and adhesiviness; Lentils: contrast, correlation, energy, homogeneity, and entropy for hardness, adhesiviness, gumminess, and chewiness; Potato and carrots: contrast, energy, homogeneity and entropy for adhesiviness, chewiness, hardness, cohesiviness, and resilence. Results revealed that combing scanning electron microscopy with image analysis can be a useful tool to analyze quality parameters in legumes and vegetables. PMID:26789426

  17. Microstructure and thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings processed by plasma spray and physical vapor deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, K.S.; An, K.; Dutton, R.E.; Semiatin, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Improvements in the efficiency of gas turbine require the highest operating temperatures possible. Because the Ni-base superalloys used as turbine materials rapidly lose strength and oxidize above 1,000 C, a reduction in service temperature is often accomplished by the use of thermal barrier coatings. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of multilayer coatings made by a plasma spray technique as well as some coatings made by physical vapor deposition (PVD) was investigated. The multilayer coatings consisted of a varying number of layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} stabilized by 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Plasma sprayed coatings exhibited a large reduction in thermal conductivity at all temperatures when compared to the bulk monolithic materials. This reduction was found to be due to porosity as well as thermal resistance brought about by interfaces in the coatings. A comparable reduction in thermal conductivity was achieved in monolithic ZrO{sub 2} as well as in a composite coating deposited by the PVD technique. Microstructural factors that may be responsible for this reduction are discussed.

  18. Grinding aspheric and freeform micro-optical molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Yazid E.

    2007-02-01

    Fueled by the need for better performing optics, glass optics are now replacing plastic optics in many industrial and consumer electronic devices. One of these devices is the mobile phone camera. The optical sub-assembly in a mobile phone includes several micro lenses that are spherical and/or aspherical in shape and require form tolerances in the submicron range. These micro glass lenses are mass produced by a replication process known as glass press molding. The process entails the compression of a glass gob between two precise optical quality molds at an elevated temperature, usually near the transition temperature of the glass material. The elevated forces and temperatures required in the glass molding process limits the materials of the molds to very tough materials such as tungsten carbide or silicon carbide. These materials can withstand large pressing forces at high temperatures without any significant deformation. These materials offer great mechanical properties for glass press molding but they are also a challenge to machine to submicron accuracy. The work in this paper discusses a deterministic micro grinding manufacturing process referred to as wheel normal grinding, which is utilized to produce these optical quality molds. Wheel normal grinding is more accurate and more deterministic than most other grinding techniques and can produce molds to the form and finish tolerances required for optical molding. This method relies on the ability to recognize and compensate for grinding wheel wear and machine repeatable errors. Results will be presented to illustrate the accuracy of this micro grinding technique.

  19. End moldings for cable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    2000-01-01

    End moldings for high-voltage cables are described wherein the dielectric insulator of the cable is heated and molded to conform to a desired shape. As a consequence, high quality substantially bubble-free cable connectors suitable for mating to premanufactured fittings are made. Disclosed is a method for making the cable connectors either in the field or in a factory, molds suitable for use with the method, and the molded cable connectors, themselves.

  20. Molding process for imidazopyrrolone polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described for producing shaped articles of imidazopyrrolone polymers comprising molding imidazopyrrolone polymer molding power under pressure and at a temperature greater than 475 C. Moderate pressures may be employed. Preferably, prior to molding, a preform is prepared by isostatic compression. The preform may be molded at a relatively low initial pressure and temperature; as the temperature is increased to a value greater than 475 C., the pressure is also increased.

  1. Effect of cross sectional geometry on PDMS micro peristaltic pump performance: comparison of SU-8 replica molding vs. micro injection molding.

    PubMed

    Graf, Neil J; Bowser, Michael T

    2013-10-01

    Two different fabrication methods were employed to fabricate micropumps with different cross-sectional channel geometries. The first was to fabricate rectangular cross-sectional microchannel geometries using the well known fabrication method of replica molding (REM). The second, and far less utilized fabrication technique, was to create microchannel molds using an in-house fabricated handheld micro injection molding apparatus. The injection mold apparatus was designed for use with elastomeric room temperature vulcanization (RTV) polymers, as opposed to most other injection molding machines, which are designed for use with thermoplastic polymers. The injection mold's bottom plate was used as a microchannel molding template. The molding template was created by threading a small-diameter wire (150 μm or less) through the injection mold's bottom plate, with subsequent adhesion and smoothing of a thin piece of aluminum foil over the wire-raised injection mold template. When molded against, the template produced a rounded/Gaussian-shaped PDMS microchannel. The design of the injection mold will be presented, along with a direct comparison for micropump performance metrics such as flow rate, valving characteristics, and maximum backpressures attainable for each of the respective micropump channel geometries. PMID:23917263

  2. Innovative molding technologies for the fabrication of components for microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotter, Volker; Benzler, Tobias; Hanemann, Thomas; Woellmer, Heinz; Ruprecht, Robert; Hausselt, Juergen H.

    1999-03-01

    Economic success of microsystems technology requires a wide range of materials as well as the related manufacturing processes. A suitable technology for medium/large scale production is micro injection molding which actually allows the manufacturing of plastic microstructures with 20 microns minimum thickness, structural details of approximately 0.2 microns or maximum aspect ratios of more than 20. These microstructures are, for example, applied as components in micro optics, micro fluidics or minimally invasive surgery. This is demonstrated by microparts that are currently available or will be available soon. For higher economic efficiency and cost reduction, fully electrical injection modeling machines of higher accuracy have been applied. Also, micro insert injection molding reduces mounting costs. Manufacturing of metal or ceramic microparts by powder injection modeling allows large-scale production of complex shaped microstructures with a wide range of materials. Typical examples are sintered structured like stepped LIGA- gear wheels with minimal dimensions of 50 microns in different metal and ceramic materials. Micro Precision Casting originating from conventional investment casting is a suitable process for small/medium-scale production. Examples are microturbine housings made of precious metal alloys. An approach similar to rapid prototyping applies photocurable reactive resins. Photoinduced molding of low viscous resins under ambient conditions leads to significantly reduced cycle times. Additionally, rapid testing of new composite materials can be performed easily. Microcomponents molded from polymers and different composites like dyes with nonlinear optical properties and nanosized ceramic powders will be presented.

  3. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  4. Interfacial-Force-Controlled Placing Technique of Microstructures of Sub- to One Hundred Micrometer Size Using Blade Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Tohru; Arase, Hidekazu

    2011-01-01

    The surface mounting technology of electronic devices using pick-and-place machines is commonly used to fabricate functional electronic appliances, such as motherboards, flat panel displays, and mobile phones. However, the pick-and-place method begins to encounter difficulties in mounting electronic devices when devices shrink to a few hundreds of micrometers or less. We propose a new blade-coating method of placing microstructures smaller than several hundreds of micrometers on a substrate. The method comprises three steps: (1) preparing a microstructure dispersion consisting of chemically modified microstructures and a water-insoluble organic solvent, (2) continuous blade-coating of water and the dispersion on a chemically patterned substrate on which hydrophilic areas are surrounded by a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer, and (3) spontaneous placing of the microstructures on the hydrophilic areas by a water/solvent interfacial force that acts on the microstructures. Using this method, we have been able to place microstructures ranging in length from submicrometer to one hundred micrometers, including silicon nanowires and SiO2 microstructures of various sizes. However, our blade-coating method for placing microstructures can be realized with successful combinations of chemical modifiers for the microstructures and water-insoluble solvents. We present a simple method of assessing dispersion using a chemically modified glass test tube filled with water and a solvent for the dispersion.

  5. MOLDED SEALING ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bradford, B.W.; Skinner, W.J.

    1959-03-24

    Molded sealing elements suitable for use under conditions involving exposure to uranium hexafluoride vapor are described. Such sealing elements are made by subjecting graphitic carbons to a preliminary treatment with uranium hexafluoride vapor, and then incorporating polytetrafluorethylene in them. The resulting composition has good wear resistant and frictional properties and is resistant to disintegration by uranium hexafluoride over long periods of exposure.

  6. White Mold of Chickpea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White mold of chickpea can occur at either seedling stage or at flowering and pod filling stages. At seedling stage, the disease occurs at the base of the stem causing symptoms like collar rot. Often white mycelial growth around the stem on soil surface is visible. Affected plants wilt and die. ...

  7. Process and mold for molding foamed plastic articles

    SciTech Connect

    Baumrucker, E.J.

    1984-10-30

    A method for forming foamed plastic articles which includes the steps of closing a mold; prepressurizing the mold cavity with gas to prevent premature diffusion of blowing gas from the material injected into the cavity; injecting a short shot of molten synthetic resin material containing a blowing agent into the cavity; venting a portion of the prepressurization gas during the injection step; and venting the remaining prepressurization gas from the mold cavity to a vacuum chamber means to allow expansion of the injected foamable resin material within the mold cavity, the vacuum drawing the resin material throughout the mold cavity. In addition, the vacuum chamber is coupled to the mold cavity through plural spaced passageways so that the vacuum is drawn at various locations throughout the cavity to thereby enhance the complete filling of the cavity with the injected material as it expands. The mold is vented following the injection step automatically at the expiration of a predetermined time following the closing of a nozzle of the injection apparatus. A mold for carrying out the process includes improved gas flow means for delivering gas to and venting gas from the mold cavity. The mold also includes improved sealing means for sealing the mold to maintain it in a pressurized state as desired.

  8. Increasing prototype airfoil fabrication efficiency through the use of sectional molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karges, Adam T.

    Airfoil development has always been important in the aeronautics industry. Current airfoil development techniques are being applied to design larger and more efficient wind turbine blades. To verify simulation results, a prototype blade must be built and tested. Current wing or blade structures are fabricated using traditional molding techniques. These large molds, particularly those used for wind turbine blades, can be fabricated from composite materials formed over a master shape. This process can be time and material intensive. This project develops techniques and methodology to build cavity molds using sectional pieces directly fabricated by computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling. A mold cavity was machined into tooling foam using CNC milling. This process allowed for mold creation without fabricating a master airfoil. Employment of several mold sections makes the machining process much easier and allows machine shops to produce larger, previously unfeasible, airfoil molds using limited machining length.

  9. Nonpost mold cure compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiro

    1997-08-01

    The recent low price trend of electronic products has made IC manufacturing efficiency a top priority in the semiconductor industry. Post mold cure (PMC) process, which generally involves heating the packages in the oven at 175 C for 4 to 8 hours, takes up much longer time than most other assembly processes. If this PMC process can be reduced or eliminated, semiconductor makers will be rewarded with a much higher cost merit. We define the purpose of Non-PMC as 'to get high reliability with suitable physical and electrical properties without PMC'. We compared carious properties of molding compound before and after PMC. We found that curing reaction has almost complete through DSC and C-NMR measurement, but several properties have not stabilized yet, and that not all properties after PMC were better than before PMC. We developed new grade of molding compound considering these facts. And we found that main factors to accomplish non-PMC compound are curability and flowability, and more, increasing of fundamental properties. To accomplish non-PMC, at first, molding compound need to have very high curability. Generally speaking, too high curability causes low flowability, and causes incomplete filing, wire sweep, pad shift, and weak adhesion to inner parts of IC packages. To prevent these failures, various compound properties were studied, and we achieved in adding good flowability to very high curable molding compound. Finally, anti-popcorn property was improved by adding low moisture, high adhesion, high Tg, and high flexural strengths at high temperature. Through this study, we developed new compound grade for various package, especially large QFP using standard ECN resin.

  10. High Cost/High Risk Components to Chalcogenide Molded Lens Model: Molding Preforms and Mold Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2012-10-05

    This brief report contains a critique of two key components of FiveFocal's cost model for glass compression molding of chalcogenide lenses for infrared applications. Molding preforms and mold technology have the greatest influence on the ultimate cost of the product and help determine the volumes needed to select glass molding over conventional single-point diamond turning or grinding and polishing. This brief report highlights key areas of both technologies with recommendations for further study.

  11. Curing rate and flowing properties of silicone rubber at injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, M.; Nakamura, T. )

    1992-04-01

    Generally, silicone rubbers are mold-cured after mixing the rubber and peroxide curing agent with a two-roll mill or a kneader. Typically this is done at pressures of 5 MPa to 10 MPa and at temperatures between 120 to 200 C. Compression molding, transfer molding and injection molding are common molding ways for silicone rubbers. Recently, injection molding techniques are developing rapidly that have the advantages of molding automatically with high cycle mechanisms. To reduce the molding time and to make a precision part, both the flowing and curing properties of a particular rubber compound will be important. In this article, correlations between the curing and the flowing properties of silicone rubber are investigated by using the Rheovulkameter device.

  12. Deterministic embedding of a single gold nanoparticle into polymeric microstructures by direct laser writing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dam Thuy Trang; Pelissier, Aurélien; Montes, Kevin; Tong, Quang Cong; Ngo, Hoang Minh; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-04-01

    We have precisely positioned and embedded a single gold nanoparticle (Au NP) into a desired polymeric photonic structure (PS) using a simple and low-cost technique called low one-photon absorption direct laser writing (LOPA DLW), with a two-step process: identification and fabrication. First, the position of the Au NP was identified with a precision of 20 nm by using DLW technique with ultralow excitation laser power (μW). This power did not induce the polymerization of the photoresist (SU8) due to its low absorption at the excitation wavelength (532 nm). Then, the structure containing the NP was fabricated by using the same DLW system with high excitation power (mW). Different 2D photonic structures have been fabricated, which contain a single Au NP at desired position. In particular, we obtained a microsphere instead of a micropillar at the position of the Au NP. The formation of such microsphere was explained by the thermal effect of the Au NP at the wavelength of 532 nm, which induced thermal polymerization of surrounding photoresist. The effect of the post-exposure bake on the quality of structures was taken into account, revealing a more efficient fabrication way by exploiting the local thermal effect of the laser. We studied further the influence of the NP size on the NP/PS coupling by investigating the fabrication and fluorescence measurement of Au NPs of different sizes: 10, 30, 50, 80, and 100 nm. The photon collection enhancements in each case were 12.9 +/- 2.5, 12.6 +/- 5.6, 3.9 +/- 2.7, 5.9 +/- 4.4, and 6.6 +/- 5.1 times, respectively. The gain in fluorescence could reach up to 36.6 times for 10-nm gold NPs.

  13. Microstructural evolution and dielectric properties of 1D AlN powders synthesized by microwave technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VasanthiPillay, V.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2012-06-01

    Low temperature synthesis of Aluminum nitride (AlN) powders through NH4Cl assisted nitridation have been studied by microwave technique. The effect of processing time on the synthesis of AlN powders has been investigated. The optimum processing time was determined to be 120 min at 630 W, 200 °C. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and Impedance analyzer. XRD results revealed that the product has wurtzite phase of AlN. SEM micrographs show a 1D nanorod of AlN with a granular morphology. FTIR spectra exhibit A1 (TO) and E1 (LO) modes of wurtzite AlN. Dielectric properties of the powders were investigated by means of C-V and C-f and ɛ'-f characteristics. The reported results indicate a reasonable quality of the obtained AlN powders with high dielectric constant, suitable for application in the fabrication of specific electronic devices.

  14. Surface Morphology and Microstructural Characterization of KCl Crystals Grown in Halite-Sylvite Brine Solutions by Electron Backscattered Diffraction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, Jiban; Basu, Ritwik; Evitts, Richard William; Besant, Robert William

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a study on the ternary NaCl-KCl-H2O system was carried out by an extractive metallurgy technique from mixed brine solutions of different compositions at room temperature (23°C). The surface morphology and microstructure were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The presence of Na{ }+ was found to reduce the stability of the solutions and increase the crystallization induction period, interfacial energy, energy of formation of the nucleus and greatly reduce the nucleation rate of KCl crystal. The surface morphology of KCl crystals is significantly changed due to presence of 5 to 10% (w/w) of NaCl as impurities in the binary solutions and shows the formation of co-crystals of different crystallographic orientation of NaCl on the KCl surface. In addition X-ray diffraction studies performed on KCl crystals grown in halite-sylvite binary solutions reveals that these crystals are cubic in nature and its lattice constant is 6.2952 Å when the NaCl concentration is small.

  15. Numerical recipes for mold filling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, D.; Juric, D.; Lam, K.; Lally, B.

    1998-07-01

    Has the ability to simulate the filling of a mold progressed to a point where an appropriate numerical recipe achieves the desired results? If results are defined to be topological robustness, computational efficiency, quantitative accuracy, and predictability, all within a computational domain that faithfully represents complex three-dimensional foundry molds, then the answer unfortunately remains no. Significant interfacial flow algorithm developments have occurred over the last decade, however, that could bring this answer closer to maybe. These developments have been both evolutionary and revolutionary, will continue to transpire for the near future. Might they become useful numerical recipes for mold filling simulations? Quite possibly. Recent progress in algorithms for interface kinematics and dynamics, linear solution methods, computer science issues such as parallelization and object-oriented programming, high resolution Navier-Stokes (NS) solution methods, and unstructured mesh techniques, must all be pursued as possible paths toward higher fidelity mold filling simulations. A detailed exposition of these algorithmic developments is beyond the scope of this paper, hence the authors choose to focus here exclusively on algorithms for interface kinematics. These interface tracking algorithms are designed to model the movement of interfaces relative to a reference frame such as a fixed mesh. Current interface tracking algorithm choices are numerous, so is any one best suited for mold filling simulation? Although a clear winner is not (yet) apparent, pros and cons are given in the following brief, critical review. Highlighted are those outstanding interface tracking algorithm issues the authors feel can hamper the reliable modeling of today`s foundry mold filling processes.

  16. Precision lens molding of asphero diffractive surfaces in chalcogenide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Scordato, M.; Schwertz, K.; Bagwell, J.

    2015-10-01

    Finished lens molding, and the similar process of precision lens molding, have long been practiced for high volume, accurate replication of optical surfaces on oxide glass. The physics surrounding these processes are well understood, and the processes are capable of producing high quality optics with great fidelity. However, several limitations exist due to properties inherent with oxide glasses. Tooling materials that can withstand the severe environmental conditions of oxide glass molding cannot easily be machined to produce complex geometries such as diffractive surfaces, lens arrays, and off axis features. Current machining technologies coupled with a limited selection of tool materials greatly limits the type of structures that can be molded into the finished optic. Tooling for chalcogenide glasses are not bound by these restrictions since the molding temperatures required are much lower than for oxide glasses. Innovations in tooling materials and manufacturing techniques have enabled the production of complex geometries to optical quality specifications and have demonstrated the viability of creating tools for molding diffractive surfaces, off axis features, datums, and arrays. Applications for optics having these features are found in automotive, defense, security, medical, and industrial domains. This paper will discuss results achieved in the study of various molding techniques for the formation of positive diffractive features on a concave spherical surface molded from As2Se3 chalcogenide glass. Examples and results of molding with tools having CTE match with the glass and non CTE match will be reviewed. The formation of stress within the glass during molding will be discussed, and methods of stress management will also be demonstrated and discussed. Results of process development methods and production of good diffractive surfaces will be shown.

  17. Injection molded polymer optics in the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beich, William S.

    2005-08-01

    Precision polymer optics, manufactured by injection molding techniques, has been a key enabling technology for several decades now. The technology, which can be thought of as a subset of the wider field of precision optics manufacturing, was pioneered in the United States by companies such as Eastman Kodak, US Precision Lens, and Polaroid. In addition to suppliers in the U.S. there are several companies worldwide that design and manufacture precision polymer optics, for example Philips High Tech Plastics in Europe and Fujinon in Japan. Designers who are considering using polymer optics need a fundamental understanding of exactly how the optics are created. This paper will survey the technology and processes that are employed in the successful implementation of a polymer optic solution from a manufacturer's perspective. Special emphasis will be paid to the unique relationship between the molds and the optics that they produce. We will discuss the key elements of production: molding resins, molds and molding equipment, and metrology. Finally we will offer a case study to illustrate just how the optics designer carries a design concept through to production. The underlying theme throughout the discussion of polymer optics is the need for the design team to work closely with an experienced polymer optics manufacturer with a solid track record of success in molded optics. As will be seen shortly, the complex interaction between thermoplastics, molds, and molding machines dictates the need for working closely with a supplier who has the critical knowledge needed to manage all aspects of the program.

  18. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of medical devices using 3D printed molds for liquid injection molding.

    PubMed

    Chung, Philip; Heller, J Alex; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Ottoson, Paige E; Liu, Jonathan A; Rand, Larry; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Biologically inert elastomers such as silicone are favorable materials for medical device fabrication, but forming and curing these elastomers using traditional liquid injection molding processes can be an expensive process due to tooling and equipment costs. As a result, it has traditionally been impractical to use liquid injection molding for low-cost, rapid prototyping applications. We have devised a method for rapid and low-cost production of liquid elastomer injection molded devices that utilizes fused deposition modeling 3D printers for mold design and a modified desiccator as an injection system. Low costs and rapid turnaround time in this technique lower the barrier to iteratively designing and prototyping complex elastomer devices. Furthermore, CAD models developed in this process can be later adapted for metal mold tooling design, enabling an easy transition to a traditional injection molding process. We have used this technique to manufacture intravaginal probes involving complex geometries, as well as overmolding over metal parts, using tools commonly available within an academic research laboratory. However, this technique can be easily adapted to create liquid injection molded devices for many other applications. PMID:24998993

  19. Rapid and Low-cost Prototyping of Medical Devices Using 3D Printed Molds for Liquid Injection Molding

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Philip; Heller, J. Alex; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Ottoson, Paige E.; Liu, Jonathan A.; Rand, Larry; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Biologically inert elastomers such as silicone are favorable materials for medical device fabrication, but forming and curing these elastomers using traditional liquid injection molding processes can be an expensive process due to tooling and equipment costs. As a result, it has traditionally been impractical to use liquid injection molding for low-cost, rapid prototyping applications. We have devised a method for rapid and low-cost production of liquid elastomer injection molded devices that utilizes fused deposition modeling 3D printers for mold design and a modified desiccator as an injection system. Low costs and rapid turnaround time in this technique lower the barrier to iteratively designing and prototyping complex elastomer devices. Furthermore, CAD models developed in this process can be later adapted for metal mold tooling design, enabling an easy transition to a traditional injection molding process. We have used this technique to manufacture intravaginal probes involving complex geometries, as well as overmolding over metal parts, using tools commonly available within an academic research laboratory. However, this technique can be easily adapted to create liquid injection molded devices for many other applications. PMID:24998993

  20. The fabrication of a flexible mold for high resolution soft ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Koo, Namil; Plachetka, Ulrich; Otto, Martin; Bolten, Jens; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Lee, Eung-Sug; Kurz, Heinrich

    2008-06-01

    One key issue for all nanoimprint techniques is an appropriate method for the fabrication of desirable molds. We report on a novel flexible mold fabrication process-pressure-assisted molding (PAM)-for high resolution soft ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (soft UV-NIL). In PAM, enhanced master filling is achieved by applying an external pressure during the mold fabrication process. Flexible molds, fabricated with PAM using different pressures in the range of 10-90 kPa, are compared to determine the role of pressures applied in the imprint performance. PMID:21825759

  1. Ultra-short Pulse Laser Structuring of Molding Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Daniel; Richter, Lars

    The machining of highly filled abrasive polymer plastics in injection molding processes determines high resistant tools in the industrial production. One of the most important points is a long durability of the molding tools to reduce the costs of production. Thus, the adhesion force and abrasion will be reduced with the help of defined surface properties. To achieve appropriate surface conditions, an ultra-short pulse laser is used for a micro structuring. Additional a laser polishing of the micro-structured surfaces to optimize the frictional properties is presented. This paper shows the research results of investigations on the laser modification of steel surfaces, to generate high-quality and wear-resistant surfaces for injection molding tools.

  2. Novel Techniques for Examining Detailed Microstructure of Two-phase Lower Mantle Mineral Analogs with SEM and EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, P. M.; Mariani, E.; Dawson, K.

    2015-12-01

    We examined deformation microstructures of an analog two-phase system of the lower mantle using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Halite (NaCl) and neighborite (NaMgF3) were used as analogs to lower mantle minerals ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O and bridgmanite MgSiO3, respectively, and deformed to 30% strain at 4 GPa in the D-DIA. We have adapted techniques previously used for EBSD preparation of halite (NaCl) (e.g. Pennock et al. 2002, Journal of Microscopy, v205; Staiger et al. 2010, Materials Characterization, v61) to prepare halite and neighborite for EBSD. Because halite is soft and hydrophilic, it is tricky to prepare for high quality EBSD. On the other hand, neighborite is much harder than halite (with a bulk modulus 5 times that of halite) and requires high quality polishing for longer and through various polishing-medium sizes. EBSD maps were obtained by polishing with very fine colloidal alumina, followed by etching or a final polish in a precision ion polishing system (PIPS). Distribution of phases, grain size and shape, and crystallographic preferred orientation were examined to determine which phase controls the deformation and which deformation mechanisms dominate. Preliminary results show the softer halite is likely interconnected at just 25 volume % or less and controls the deformation through a mechanism that does not promote development of crystallographic preferred orientation. This suggests that periclase may control deformation in the lower mantle resulting in a weaker, more viscous lower mantle and may help to explain why the bulk of the lower mantle is mostly isotropic.

  3. Fabrication of Molded Magnetic Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A molded magnetic article and fabrication method are provided. Particles of ferromagnetic material embedded in a polymer binder are molded under heat and pressure into a geometric shape. Each particle is an oblate spheroid having a radius-to-thickness aspect ratio approximately in the range of 15-30. Each oblate spheroid has flattened poles that are substantially in perpendicular alignment to a direction of the molding pressure throughout the geometric shape.

  4. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  5. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  6. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Composite Part Molds

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Springfield, Robert M.

    2015-02-01

    The ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) collaborated with Tru-Design to test the quality and durability of molds used for making fiber reinforced composites using additive manufacturing. The partners developed surface treatment techniques including epoxy coatings and machining to improve the quality of the surface finish. Test samples made using the printed and surface finished molds demonstrated life spans suitable for one-of-a-kind and low-volume applications, meeting the project objective.

  7. 8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF A MOLD FOR PRECISION CASTING. THE MOLD WAS USED IN FOUNDRY OPERATIONS THAT CAST PLUTONIUM EITHER AS INGOTS SUITABLE FOR ROLLING AND FURTHER WROUGHT PROCESSING OR INTO SHAPES AMENABLE TO DIRECT MACHINING OPERATIONS. (5/6/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  8. MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today I will talk about the use of quantitative or Real time PCR for the standardized identification and quantification of molds. There are probably at least 100,000 species of molds or fungi. But there are actually about 100 typically found indoors. Some pose a threat to human...

  9. Indoor Mold, Toxigenic Fungi, and Stachybotrys chartarum: Infectious Disease Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, D. M.; Ghannoum, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Damp buildings often have a moldy smell or obvious mold growth; some molds are human pathogens. This has caused concern regarding health effects of moldy indoor environments and has resulted in many studies of moisture- and mold-damaged buildings. Recently, there have been reports of severe illness as a result of indoor mold exposure, particularly due to Stachybotrys chartarum. While many authors describe a direct relationship between fungal contamination and illness, close examination of the literature reveals a confusing picture. Here, we review the evidence regarding indoor mold exposure and mycotoxicosis, with an emphasis on S. chartarum. We also examine possible end-organ effects, including pulmonary, immunologic, neurologic, and oncologic disorders. We discuss the Cleveland infant idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage reports in detail, since they provided important impetus for concerns about Stachybotrys. Some valid concerns exist regarding the relationship between indoor mold exposure and human disease. Review of the literature reveals certain fungus-disease associations in humans, including ergotism (Claviceps species), alimentary toxic aleukia (Fusarium), and liver disease (Aspergillys). While many papers suggest a similar relationship between Stachybotrys and human disease, the studies nearly uniformly suffer from significant methodological flaws, making their findings inconclusive. As a result, we have not found well-substantiated supportive evidence of serious illness due to Stachybotrys exposure in the contemporary environment. To address issues of indoor mold-related illness, there is an urgent need for studies using objective markers of illness, relevant animal models, proper epidemiologic techniques, and examination of confounding factors. PMID:12525430

  10. Microstructure and associated properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} superconductors prepared by melt-processing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Zhong, W.; Youngdahl, C.A.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1993-03-01

    From the standpoint of applications, melt-processed bulk YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (YBCO) superconductors are of considerable interest. We have studied the microstructure and levitation force of melt-processed YBCO, YBCO plus Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5}, and YBCO plus Pt samples. Large single crystalline samples, grown using a seeding technique, were also studied. The levitation force is highest in melt-processed samples made by the seeding technique. 6 figs, 24 refs.

  11. Microstructure and associated properties of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] superconductors prepared by melt-processing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Zhong, W.; Youngdahl, C.A.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1993-03-01

    From the standpoint of applications, melt-processed bulk YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] (YBCO) superconductors are of considerable interest. We have studied the microstructure and levitation force of melt-processed YBCO, YBCO plus Y[sub 2]BaCuO[sub 5], and YBCO plus Pt samples. Large single crystalline samples, grown using a seeding technique, were also studied. The levitation force is highest in melt-processed samples made by the seeding technique. 6 figs, 24 refs.

  12. Fabrication of large-area hydrophobic surfaces with femtosecond-laser-structured molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, P. H.; Cheng, C. W.; Chang, C. P.; Wu, T. M.; Wang, J. K.

    2011-11-01

    Fast replication of large-area femtosecond-laser-induced surface micro/nanostructures on plastic parts by injection molding is demonstrated. An STAVAX steel mold insert is irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses with linear or circular polarization to form periodic-like nanostructures or nanostructure-covered conical microstructures. It was then used for the process of thermal injection molding. The process provides high-volume manufacturing means to generate hydrophobic enhanced plastic parts, which is expected to be widely used in consumables and chemical/biomedical device industries.

  13. Mold Materials For Permanent Molding of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    John F Wallace; David Schwam; Wen Hong dxs11@po.cwru.edu

    2001-09-14

    A test that involves immersion of the potential mod materials for permanent molds has been developed that provides a thermal cycle that is similar to the experienced during casting of aluminum in permanent molds. This test has been employed to determine the relative thermal fatigue resistance of several different types of mold materials. Four commercial mold coatings have been evaluated for their insulating ability, wear resistance and roughness. The results indicate that composition and structure of the mold materials have considerable effect on their thermal fatigue cracking behavior. Irons with a gray iron structure are the most prone to thermal fatigue cracking followed by compacted graphite irons with the least thermal fatigue cracking of the cast irons experienced by ductile iron. The composition of these various irons affects their behavior.

  14. Annealing effects on the microstructure and magnetic domain structures of duplex stainless steel studied by in situ technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. Q.; Zhao, X. M.; Li, M.; Zhang, W. J.; Bai, Y.; Qiao, L. J.

    2012-10-01

    The effects of annealing temperature on the microstructure and the magnetic domain structures of duplex stainless steel 2507 were investigated by the magnetic force microscopy (MFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The MFM and XRD results indicated that the volume fraction of ferrite phase increased with increasing annealing temperature, but the lattice constants kept constant. Moreover, with the rise of annealing temperature, the magnetic domain structure in the ferrite phase varied gradually, where the magnetic domain became thinner and the distribution turned more homogeneous. These results gave a direct evidence for the changes of microstructure and magnetic domain structure induced by the annealing treatment. EBSD analysis showed that the orientation of ferrite grains changed after annealing treatments, which coincided with the changes of the microstructure and the magnetic domain structures.

  15. Permanent Mold Casting of JIS-AC4C Aluminum Alloy Using a Low-Temperature Mold

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagata, Hiroshi; Nikawa, Makoto

    2011-01-17

    Permanent mold casting using mold temperatures below 200 deg. C was conducted to obtain a high-strength, thin-walled casting. Al-7.36 mass% Si -0.18 Cu- 0.27Mg-0.34Fe alloy JIS-AC4C was cast using a bottom pouring cast plan. The product had a rectangular tube shape (70 mm W x 68 mm D x 180 mm H) with wall thicknesses of 1, 3 and 5 mm. The effect of heat insulation at the melt path was compared when using a sand runner insert and when using a steel runner insert as well as a powder mold release agent. Fine microstructures were observed in the casting. The smaller the thickness, the higher the hardness with smaller secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS). However, the hardness and the SDAS were unaffected by the mold temperature. It was proposed that the avoidance of the formation of primary {alpha} dendrite at the melt path generates a higher strength casting with adequate mold filling.

  16. Permanent Mold Casting of JIS-AC4C Aluminum Alloy Using a Low-Temperature Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi; Nikawa, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Permanent mold casting using mold temperatures below 200° C was conducted to obtain a high-strength, thin-walled casting. Al-7.36 mass% Si -0.18 Cu- 0.27Mg-0.34Fe alloy JIS-AC4C was cast using a bottom pouring cast plan. The product had a rectangular tube shape (70 mm W x 68 mm D x 180 mm H) with wall thicknesses of 1, 3 and 5 mm. The effect of heat insulation at the melt path was compared when using a sand runner insert and when using a steel runner insert as well as a powder mold release agent. Fine microstructures were observed in the casting. The smaller the thickness, the higher the hardness with smaller secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS). However, the hardness and the SDAS were unaffected by the mold temperature. It was proposed that the avoidance of the formation of primary α dendrite at the melt path generates a higher strength casting with adequate mold filling.

  17. Processing studies in sheet molding compound compression molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Lisa Marie

    Due to its high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and low cost. Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) production offers great potential for growth in the automotive and trucking industry. Much attention is now being given to improving the economy of SMC compression molding by reducing the cycle time required to produce acceptable parts in steady production. One of the fastest growing applications of Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) compression molding panels is the manufacture of truck body panels. Due to their large size, the molding forces developed are substantial and have a major influence in the molding cycle. The relevant process models for SMC flow are reviewed and a procedure is developed that can be used to obtain the closing force and calculate the needed material parameters. Experiments were done using commercially made SMC varying quantities of glass, filler, and thickener to verify the validity of this model and the compression force was predicted for commercially made automotive hoods. It was found that glass and filler had a significant impact on the material parameters. When the amount of glass was increased, both material parameters m/deltan and eta increased. Similar trends were seen when increasing the amount of filler. For the thickener used in this research (magnesium oxide), it was found that it had minimal effect on the material parameters. Molding conditions and initial SMC charge configurations were also varied to see their effects on molding force and material parameters. Initial charge dimensions and volume as well as mold closing speed showed no effect on material parameters, while molding temperature showed a minimal effect. Material parameters were calculated for each SMC composition. These parameters were used to predict the compression force for the Corvette hood and Fiero hood. These predictions were compared with actual Corvette and Fiero hoods manufactured in industry. They predicted the commercially made parts quite well.

  18. Effect of Cross Sectional Geometry on PDMS Micro Peristaltic Pump Performance: Comparison of SU-8 Replica Molding vs. Micro Injection Molding

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Neil J.

    2013-01-01

    Two different fabrication methods were employed to fabricate micropumps with different cross-sectional channel geometries. The first was to fabricate rectangular cross-sectional microchannel geometries using the well known fabrication method of replica molding (REM).1 The second, and far less utilized fabrication technique, was to create microchannel molds using an in-house fabricated handheld micro injection molding apparatus. The injection mold apparatus was designed for use with elastomeric room temperature vulcanization (RTV) polymers, as opposed to most other injection molding machines, which are designed for use with thermoplastic polymers. The injection mold’s bottom plate was used as a microchannel molding template. The molding template was created by threading a small-diameter wire (150 μm or less) through the injection mold’s bottom plate, with subsequent adhesion and smoothing of a thin piece of aluminum foil over the wire-raised injection mold template. When molded against, the template produced a rounded/Gaussian-shaped PDMS microchannel. The design of the injection mold will be presented, along with a direct comparison for micropump performance metrics such as flow rate, valving characteristics, and maximum backpressures attainable for each of the respective micropump channel geometries. PMID:23917263

  19. Thermophilic molds: Biology and applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijender; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J; Johri, B N; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2016-11-01

    Thermophilic molds thrive in a variety of natural habitats including soils, composts, wood chip piles, nesting materials of birds and other animals, municipal refuse and others, and ubiquitous in their distribution. These molds grow in simple media containing carbon and nitrogen sources and mineral salts. Polyamines are synthesized in these molds and the composition of lipids varies considerably, predominantly containing palmitic, oleic and linoleic acids with low levels of lauric, palmiotoleic and stearic acids. Thermophilic molds are capable of efficiently degrading organic materials by secreting thermostable enzymes, which are useful in the bioremediation of industrial wastes and effluents that are rich in oil, heavy metals, anti-nutritional factors such as phytic acid and polysaccharides. Thermophilic molds synthesize several antimicrobial substances and biotechnologically useful miscellaneous enzymes. The analysis of genomes of thermophilic molds reveals high G:C contents, shorter introns and intergenic regions with lesser repetitive sequences, and further confirms their ability to degrade agro-residues efficiently. Genetic engineering has aided in ameliorating the characteristics of the enzymes of thermophilic molds. This review is aimed at focusing on the biology of thermophilic molds with emphasis on recent developments in the analysis of genomes, genetic engineering and potential applications. PMID:26777293

  20. STANDARDIZED MOLD IDENTIFICATION AND ENUMERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are probably at least 100,000 species of molds or fungi. But there are actually about 100 typically found indoors. Some pose a threat to humans and animals and others don't. We need to know what molds are present indoors and their concentrations. The older methods of cult...

  1. Twistable mold for helicopter blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. S.; Kiely, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Design is described of mold for fabrication of blades composed of sets of aerodynamic shells having same airfoil section characteristics but different distributions. Mold consists of opposing stacks of thin templates held together by long bolts. When bolts are loosened, templates can be set at different positions with respect to each other and then locked in place.

  2. INDOOR MOLDS AND ALLERGIC POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold¿s role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. Recently, 5 molds were statistically associated with water-damaged asthmatic homes in the Cleveland area. The asthma exacerbation...

  3. Impregnation molding of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic-ceramic composites using preceramic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdal, Merve

    A ceramic-ceramic composite processing method based on resin transfer molding of particle-filled preceramic polymers was proposed and a numerical investigation of the resin impregnation was performed. The study is intended to provide a better understanding of the particle filtration occurring during impregnation and the nonlinear relations between various processing parameters, so that by a proper process design, the particle filtration and hence microstructure heterogeneity can be minimized. The proposed process is based on the need to counteract the high porosity and cracks forming in the composite as a result of mass loss and densification in the polymer during conversion to ceramic. A formulation of the problem was accomplished through combining anisotropic porous flow theory with particle filtration. Physical models were incorporated for filtration coefficient and domain permeability, to include the effect of resulting nonhomogeneous particle distributions. Compression resin transfer molding was proposed as an alternative to conventional resin transfer molding for processing high fiber volume ceramic composites at lower process pressures. Computational analysis showed that compression resin transfer molding offers the opportunity for homogenization of particle distributions within the composite through manipulation of the flow path by proper design of the impregnation and compression stages. The flow length rather than the flow velocity was observed to be the dominating factor on amount of filtration when the filtration mechanism is governed by geometric effects. Due to the geometrical complexity of the flow configurations and the existence of a moving boundary, the computational technique of boundary-fitted coordinate systems encompassing numerical grid generation was employed for numerical solution. Stability analysis indicated that the filtration solution accuracy is very sensitive to a nondimensional parameter derived from the current formulation. Through

  4. The effect of mold materials on the overlay accuracy of a roll-to-roll imprinting system using UV LED illumination within a transparent mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Kook, YunHo; Kim, ChulHo; Yoo, SoonSung; Park, Kwon-Shik; Kim, Seok-min; Kang, Shinill

    2016-06-01

    Although several studies on the roll-to-roll (R2R) imprinting process have reported achieving flexible electronics, improving the alignment accuracy in the overlay process of R2R imprinting is recognized as the biggest problem for the commercialization of this technology. For an overlay technique with high alignment accuracy, it is essential to develop a roll mold with high positional accuracy. In this study, a method for fabricating a roll mold with high positional accuracy is proposed by wrapping a thin glass substrate flexible mold around the transparent roll base, because it can provide higher mechanical strength and thermal stability than a conventional polymer substrate. To confirm the usability of the proposed process, the prepared roll mold was used to fabricate a test pattern of thin-film transistor backplane for a rollable display. The positional and overlay accuracy of the roll mold with the proposed thin glass substrate flexible mold were compared with the roll mold with a conventional polymer substrate flexible mold. Large-area transparent flexible molds with a size of 470  ×  370 mm were fabricated by an ultraviolet (UV) imprinting process on thin glass and polyethylene terephthalate substrates, and these flexible molds were wrapped around a roll base of 125 mm radius through a precision alignment process. After an anti-adhesion treatment and the wrapping process, the roll mold with the polymer substrate showed a ~180 μm positional error, whereas the thin glass substrate showed a ~30 μm positional error. After the overlay process using the R2R imprinting system with the alignment system, an average overlay error of ~3 μm was obtained when the thin glass flexible wrapped roll mold was used, whereas a ~22 μm overlay error was obtained when the polymer substrate flexible wrapped roll mold was used.

  5. Slope-deviation measurement of Fresnel-shaped mold surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kiefel, Peter; Hornung, Thorsten; Nitz, Peter; Reinecke, Holger

    2016-03-10

    Molds are used to dictate their shape to other materials in embossing or filling processes. In optics fabrication especially, the exact surface slope of the polymer replica is of high relevance. The quality control of molds is challenging: non-invasive, optical metrologies struggle with shiny surfaces that minimize the scattering of light. In addition, the inspection of complex shaped molds with a stepped optical surface can be difficult. In response, the authors show a backward ray-tracing approach combined with fringe-reflection technique to determine the slopes of a Fresnel-shaped mold surface with topography features in the magnitude order of a quarter millimeter. The error is kept small by stitching together several measurements with different sample rotations. PMID:26974807

  6. INJECTION-MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Lobell, G.M.

    1958-02-11

    This patent is drawn to an injection molding apparatus for producing a tube closed at one end wherein the normally unsupported end of the core located in the cavity during the injection of the molten material to fill the space between the core and cavity wall, which supporting means is automatically removed from operation during the forming of the closed end of the tube. This support means is a plug extending through the end of the core into a recess in the bottom of the cavity where the closed end of the tube is to be formed. The plug is spring pressed into said recess and is forced out of the recess by a slidable bushing at the top of the cavity which is moved against the force of the spring by the molten material when it fills the uppormost open end portion of the cavity, thereby permitting the closed end of the tube to be formed.

  7. FIBER LENGTH DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENT FOR LONG GLASS AND CARBON FIBER REINFORCED INJECTION MOLDED THERMOPLASTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J; Nguyen, Ba N.; TuckerIII, Charles L.; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio

    2007-01-01

    Procedures for fiber length distribution (FLD) measurement of long fiber reinforced injection molded thermoplastics were refined for glass and carbon fibers. Techniques for sample selection, fiber separation, digitization and length measurement for both fiber types are described in detail. Quantitative FLD results are provided for glass and carbon reinforced polypropylene samples molded with a nominal original fiber length of 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) using equipment optimized for molding short fiber reinforced thermoplastics.

  8. Current status of mold immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, M

    1991-05-01

    There is evidence to suggest that molds can cause IgE-mediated upper respiratory tract disorders and immunotherapy is efficacious in a select group. The environmental sampling studies show a remarkably small numbers of molds accounting for a majority of the mold load in various diverse locations. These are Cladosporium, Basidiospores, Aspergillus, and Alternaria-Penicillin families. Basidiospores have been underreported in the older studies because of difficulties in their identification. Whether the absolute mold level is the most important factor leading to IgE formation and induction of upper respiratory tract symptoms is uncertain. Certainly, the majority of the studies are based on the assumption that the absolute level of mold in the environment is the most important factor leading to the development of symptoms, but this is not based on strong evidence. A major problem in the majority of the studies is a lack of standardization of extracts which may lead to false negatives on skin testing and thus produce variable data in population evaluations comparing the prevalence of mold to its ability to induce IgE production and symptoms. The best current trials to document the efficacy of mold immunotherapy have been with the standardized Cladosporium extract. Unfortunately, these results cannot be extrapolated to the commercially available mold extracts available in the United States either for immunotherapy or for skin testing. These extracts are highly variable in their potency, prone to high false negative rates, and at best serve as poor skin testing reagents and possibly even worse immunotherapy reagents. Adequately standardized mold reagents are urgently needed to determine whether the Cladosporium data can be extrapolated to them in any meaningful way. PMID:2035901

  9. Luminescent microstructures in bulk and thin films of PMMA, PDMS, PVA, and PS fabricated using femtosecond direct writing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, K. L. N.; Kuladeep, R.; Venugopal Rao, S.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2011-02-01

    We present here the luminescent properties of microstructures obtained through femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing (LDW) in bulk, and thin films of polymers such as poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS), polystyrene (PS), and poly vinyl alcohol (PVA). We report the transmission, emission, excitation, laser confocal and ESR data from the modified regions acquired with the intention of understanding the fs irradiation effects in these polymers. Formation of different optical centers in the laser irradiated regions has been identified as the reason for emission characteristics which are dependent on the excitation source. Such emitting microstructures demonstrate their utility in memory based devices. ESR studies reveal the existence of peroxide type free radicals in PMMA, PDMS and PS after fs laser irradiation.

  10. Reduction of birefringence in a skin-layer of injection molded polymer strips using CO{sub 2} laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosaki, Yasuo; Satoh, Isao; Saito, Takushi

    1995-12-31

    Injection molding of polymers is currently utilized for numerous industrial applications. Because of high productivity and stable quality of molded products, the injection-molding process makes the production costs lower, and therefore, is expected to spread more widely in the future. This paper deals with a technique for improving the optical quality of injection molded polymer products using radiative heating. The birefringence frozen in a skin-layer of the molded part was reduced by CO{sub 2} laser heating, and the efficiency of this technique was investigated experimentally. Namely, a simple numerical calculation was performed to estimate the heating efficiency of CO{sub 2} laser in the polymer, effects of radiation heating on the skin-layer of the molded polymer were observed by using a mold with transparent windows, and the residual birefringence frozen in the final molded specimen was measured. The results clearly showed that the birefringence in the skin-layer of injection molded polymer strips was reduced with CO{sub 2} laser heating. The authors believe that the proposed method for reducing the birefringence frozen in injection-molded polymer products is suitable for practical molding, because process time required for the injection-molding is only slightly increased with this method.

  11. Stimuli-responsive topological change of microstructured surfaces and the resultant variations of wetting properties.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zi Liang; Wei, Renbo; Buguin, Axel; Taulemesse, Jean-Marie; Le Moigne, Nicolas; Bergeret, Anne; Wang, Xiaogong; Keller, Patrick

    2013-08-14

    It is now well established that topological microstructures play a key role in the physical properties of surfaces. Stimulus-induced variations of topological microstructure should therefore lead to a change in the physical properties of microstructured responsive surfaces. In this paper, we demonstrate that roughness changes alter the wetting properties of responsive organic surfaces. Oriented nematic liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) are used to construct the microstructured surfaces via a replica molding technique. The topological microstructure of the surfaces covered with micropillars changes with temperature, due to the reversible contraction of the LCE pillars along the long axis at the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition. This is directly observed for the first time under environmental scanning electron microscopy (E-SEM). A high boiling point liquid, glycerol, is used to continuously monitor the contact angle change with temperature. The glycerol contact angle of the microstructured surfaces covered with small pillars decreases from 118° at room temperature to 80° at 140 °C, corresponding to a transition from Cassie state to Wenzel state. PMID:23848054

  12. Precision grinding of tungsten carbide mold insert for molding of sub-millimeter glass aspheric lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Choung-Lii; Chang, Chia-Jung; Chen, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Wen-Chen; Ma, Kung-Jeng

    2013-06-01

    As the demand for precision optical components with sub-millimeter feature size steadily increasing, numerous efforts have been made in developing new techniques and in improving the existing approaches to efficiently and economically produce those components. Glass molding process (GMP) is one of these methods to enable mass production of precision glass optical components in recent years. One of the key issues in GMP is precision mold insert fabrication. Since the mould are normally made of hard and brittle materials such as tungsten carbide (WC) and silicon carbide (SiC), precision diamond grinding is by far the principal choice used to machine the GMP mould. As the feature size of optical component gets smaller, the size of mould and grinding wheel used to fabricate the mould gets smaller too. This makes the grinding process a very time consuming and expensive task. This research aimed to improve the small mold fabrication processes by developing an effective way of producing small diamond wheels and in-process monitoring wheel profile. Diamond wheels of around 0.2mm to 0.5mm in diameter after truing and WC aspheric mold insert of form accuracy around 0.47μm were successfully produced in this research.

  13. Ceramic injection molding material analysis, modeling and injection molding simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, D.; Messingschlager, S.

    2014-05-01

    In comparison to unfilled polymers, a ceramic feedstocks has a very high viscosity, a very high heat conductivity and a different pvT-behavior. So far standard simulation tools for plastic injection molding are capable of simulating unfilled or fiber filled compounds with their typical low viscosity and heat conductivity etc. but not for very high ceramic powder filled polymers. This article shows an approach of preparing and adding ceramic feedstocks to standard injection molding tools. Two different feedstocks are used.

  14. ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK OF SOME COMMON MOLDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANDLER, MARION N.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A PICTURE GUIDE FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF TEN COMMON MOLDS. IT IS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH THE ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT "MICROGARDENING" AND IS SUGGESTED FOR UPPER ELEMENTARY GRADES. INCLUDED FOR EACH MOLD ARE COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS AND PHOTOMICROGRAPHS OF THE INTACT MOLD MASS AND OF THE MOLD'S SPORE PRODUCING STRUCTURES. ALSO…

  15. Transfer molding of PMR-15 polyimide resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. P.; Moyer, D. W.; Nowak, B. E.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer molding is an economically viable method of producing small shapes of PMR-15 polyimide. It is shown that with regard to flexural, compressive, and tribological properties transfer-molded PMR-15 polyimide is essentially equivalent to PMR-15 polyimide produced by the more common method of compression molding. Minor variations in anisotropy are predictable effects of molding design and secondary finishing operations.

  16. Rapid control of mold temperature during injection molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liparoti, Sara; Hunag, Tsang Min; Sorrentino, Andrea; Titomanlio, Giuseppe; Cakmak, Mukerrem

    2015-05-01

    The control of mold surface temperature is an important factor that determines surface morphology and its dimension in thickness direction. It can also affect the frozen molecular orientation and the mold surface replicability in injection molded products. In this work, thin thermally active films were used to quickly control the mold surface temperature. In particular, an active high electrical conductivity carbon black loaded polyimide composites sandwiched between two insulating thin polymeric layers was used to condition the mold surface. By controlling the heating time, it was possible to control precisely the temporal variation of the mold temperature surface during the entire cycle. The surface heating rate was about 40°C/s and upon contact with the polymer the surface temperature decreased back to 40°C within about 5 s; the overall cycle time increased only slightly. The effect on cross section sample morphology of samples of iPP were analyzed and discussed on the basis of the recorded temperature evolution.

  17. Rapid control of mold temperature during injection molding process

    SciTech Connect

    Liparoti, Sara; Titomanlio, Giuseppe; Hunag, Tsang Min; Cakmak, Mukerrem; Sorrentino, Andrea

    2015-05-22

    The control of mold surface temperature is an important factor that determines surface morphology and its dimension in thickness direction. It can also affect the frozen molecular orientation and the mold surface replicability in injection molded products. In this work, thin thermally active films were used to quickly control the mold surface temperature. In particular, an active high electrical conductivity carbon black loaded polyimide composites sandwiched between two insulating thin polymeric layers was used to condition the mold surface. By controlling the heating time, it was possible to control precisely the temporal variation of the mold temperature surface during the entire cycle. The surface heating rate was about 40°C/s and upon contact with the polymer the surface temperature decreased back to 40°C within about 5 s; the overall cycle time increased only slightly. The effect on cross section sample morphology of samples of iPP were analyzed and discussed on the basis of the recorded temperature evolution.

  18. White mold of Jerusalem artichoke

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a Native American food plant closely related to the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Tubers of Jerusalem artichoke are increasingly available in retail grocery outlets. White mold (Sclerotinia stem rot), caused by the fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotioru...

  19. On the thickness uniformity of micropatterns of hyaluronic acid in a soft lithographic molding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Suh, Kahp Y.

    2005-06-01

    A soft lithographic molding is a simple and yet robust method for fabricating well-defined microstructures of a hydrophilic biopolymer such as polyethylene glycol and polysaccharide over a large area. The method consists of three steps: placing a polydimethylsiloxane mold with a bas-relief pattern onto a drop-dispensed polymer solution typically dissolved in water, letting the mold and the solution undisturbed in contact until solvent evaporates completely, and leaving behind a polymer replica after mold removal. In such a molding process, water can only evaporate from the edges of the mold due to impermeable nature of polydimethylsiloxane to water, resulting in a nonuniform distribution of film thickness or pattern height. Here we examine systematically how the evaporation rate affects the thickness distribution of the resulting microstructures by evaporating the solution of hyaluronic acid in various conditions. To compare with a theory, we also present a simple theoretical model based on one-dimensional conservation equation for a liquid film, which is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Molded polymer solar water heater

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  1. Characterization of transition carbides in quench and partitioned steel microstructures by Mössbauer spectroscopy and complementary techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pierce, D. T.; Coughlin, D. R.; Williamson, D. L.; Clarke, K. D.; Clarke, A. J.; Speer, J. G.; De Moor, E.

    2015-05-01

    Quenching and partitioning (Q&P) produces steel microstructures with martensite and austenite that exhibit promising property combinations for third generation advanced high strength steels. Understanding the kinetics of reactions that compete for available carbon, such as carbide formation, is critical for alloying and processing design and achieving austenite enrichment and retention during Q&P. Mössbauer effect spectroscopy (MES) was used to characterize Q&P microstructures in a 0.38C-1.54Mn-1.48Si wt.% steel after quenching to 225 °C and partitioning at 400 °C for 10 or 300 s, with an emphasis on transition carbides. The recoilless fraction for η-carbide was calculated and a correction for saturationmore » of the MES absorption spectrum was applied, making quantitative measurements of small amounts of η-carbide, including non-stoichiometric η-carbide, possible in Q&P microstructures. Complementary transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of η-carbides, and MES and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the austenite. The amount of η-carbide formed during Q&P ranged from 1.4 to 2.4 at.%, accounting for a substantial portion (~24% to 41%) of the bulk carbon content of the steel. The amount (5.0 at.%) of η-carbide that formed after quenching and tempering (Q&T) at 400 °C for 300 s was significantly greater than after partitioning at 400 °C for 300 s (2.4 at.%), suggesting that carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite occurs in conjunction with η-carbide formation during Q&P in these specimens.« less

  2. Characterization of transition carbides in quench and partitioned steel microstructures by Mössbauer spectroscopy and complementary techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D. T.; Coughlin, D. R.; Williamson, D. L.; Clarke, K. D.; Clarke, A. J.; Speer, J. G.; De Moor, E.

    2015-05-01

    Quenching and partitioning (Q&P) produces steel microstructures with martensite and austenite that exhibit promising property combinations for third generation advanced high strength steels. Understanding the kinetics of reactions that compete for available carbon, such as carbide formation, is critical for alloying and processing design and achieving austenite enrichment and retention during Q&P. Mössbauer effect spectroscopy (MES) was used to characterize Q&P microstructures in a 0.38C-1.54Mn-1.48Si wt.% steel after quenching to 225 °C and partitioning at 400 °C for 10 or 300 s, with an emphasis on transition carbides. The recoilless fraction for η-carbide was calculated and a correction for saturation of the MES absorption spectrum was applied, making quantitative measurements of small amounts of η-carbide, including non-stoichiometric η-carbide, possible in Q&P microstructures. Complementary transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of η-carbides, and MES and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the austenite. The amount of η-carbide formed during Q&P ranged from 1.4 to 2.4 at.%, accounting for a substantial portion (~24% to 41%) of the bulk carbon content of the steel. The amount (5.0 at.%) of η-carbide that formed after quenching and tempering (Q&T) at 400 °C for 300 s was significantly greater than after partitioning at 400 °C for 300 s (2.4 at.%), suggesting that carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite occurs in conjunction with η-carbide formation during Q&P in these specimens.

  3. Accurate measurement of the cutoff wavelength in a microstructured optical fiber by means of an azimuthal filtering technique.

    PubMed

    Labonte, Laurent; Pagnoux, Dominique; Roy, Philippe; Bahloul, Faouzi; Zghal, Mourad; Melin, Gilles; Burov, Ekaterina; Renversez, Gilles

    2006-06-15

    A simple self-referenced nondestructive method is proposed for measuring the cutoff wavelength of microstructured optical fibers (MOFs). It is based on the analysis of the time-dependent optical power transmitted through a bow-tie slit rotating in the far-field pattern of the fiber under test. As a first demonstration, the cutoff wavelength of a 2 m MOF sample is found to be close to that provided by numerical predictions (approximately 25 nm higher). Because of the high dynamics of the measurement, the uncertainty is limited to Dlambda= +/-10 nm. PMID:16729068

  4. Effect of sandblasting intensity on microstructures and properties of pure titanium micro-arc oxidation coatings in an optimized composite technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-Fu; Lu, Yu-Peng; Xiao, Gui-Yong; He, Kun; Yuan, Y. F.; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Li, Ying

    2014-02-01

    Sandblasting is one of the most effective methods to modify a metal surface and improve its properties for application. Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) could produce a ceramic coating on a dental implant, facilitating cellular differentiation and osseocomposite on it. This study aims to deposit bioceramic Ca- and P-containing coatings on sandblasted commercially pure titanium by an optimum composite technique to improve the bioactive performance. The effect of sandblasting intensity on microstructures and properties of the implant coatings is examined, and the modified surfaces are characterized in terms of their topography, phase, chemical composition, mechanical properties and hydroxyapatite (HA)-inducing ability. The results show that a moderate sandblasting micromachines the substrate in favorable combination of rough and residual stresses; its MAO coating deposits nano-hydroxyapatite after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 5 days exhibiting better bioactivity. The further improvement of the implant surface performance is attributed to an optimized composite technique.

  5. Designed microstructures in textured barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, David Brian

    It is a fundamental principle of materials science that the microstructure of a material defines its properties and ultimately its performance for a given application. A prime example of this can be found in the large conch shell Strombus gigas, which has an intricate microstructure extending across five distinct length scales. This microstructure gives extraordinary damage tolerance to the shell. The structure of Strombus gigas cannot be replicated in a modern engineering ceramic with any existing processing technique, so new processing techniques must be developed to apply this structure to a model material. Barium hexaferrite was chosen as a model material to create microstructures reminiscent of Strombus gigas and evaluate its structure-property relations. This work describes novel processing methods to produce textured barium hexaferrite with no coupling between the sample geometry and the texture direction. This technique, combining magnetic field-assisted gelcasting with templated grain growth, also allows multilayer samples to be fabricated with different texture directions in adjacent layers. The effects of adding either B2O3 or excess BaCO 3 on the densification and grain growth of barium hexaferrite was studied. The texture produced using this technique was assessed using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These measurements showed peak textures as high as 60 MRD and sharp interfaces between layers cast with different texture directions. The effect of oxygen on the quality of gelcasting is also discussed, and it is shown that with proper mold design, it is possible to gelcast multiple layers with differing texture directions without delamination. Monolithic and multilayer samples were produced and tested in four point bending to measure the strength and work of fracture. Modulus measurements, made with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, show clear signs of microcracking in both the isotropic and textured samples

  6. A Study on Laser Beam Welding (LBW) Technique: Effect of Heat Input on the Microstructural Evolution of Superalloy Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabaşı, Akın; Ünlü, Necip; Göller, Gültekin; Eruslu, Mehmet Niyazi

    2010-09-01

    The effect of heat input from laser beam welding (LBW) on the microstructural evolution of superalloy Inconel 718 was investigated. LBW was carried out on 1.6-mm-thick sheets with an average grain size of 13 μm (ASTM # 9.5), and four different heat inputs in the range of 74.5 mm-1 to 126.6 J mm-1 were used. Full penetration was achieved in all weld experiments. Microstructures of the welds were evaluated using an optical microscope and a field emission scanning electron microscope. Increasing the heat input changed the resulting weld shape from a wine glass shape to a stemless glass shape with wider surface bead widths, and the measured average dendrite arm spacing was increased from 1.06 μm to 2.30 μm, indicating the corresponding solidification rate in the range of 1.75 × 105 K s-1 (°C s-1) to 3.5 × 106 K s-1 (°C s-1). The welds also were free from microfissuring even at the lowest heat input trials. The Nb concentration of Laves phase for the current LBW samples was ≈20.0 wt pct. The coefficients of partition and distribution for Nb were determined to be approximately 3.40 and 0.50, respectively.

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Al356/SiCp Cast Composites Fabricated by a Novel Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Niroumand, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    In this study, SiCp containing composite powders were used as the reinforcement carrier media for manufacturing cast Al356/5 vol.% SiCp composites. Untreated SiCp, milled particulate Al-SiCp composite powder, and milled particulate Al-SiCp-Mg composite powder were injected into Al356 melt. The resultant composite slurries were then cast from either a fully liquid state (stir casting) or semisolid state (compocasting). The results revealed that by injection of composite powders, the uniformity of the SiCp in the Al356 matrix was greatly improved, the particle-free zones in the matrix were disappeared, the SiC particles became smaller, the porosity was decreased, and the matrix microstructure became finer. Compocasting changed the matrix dendritic microstructure to a finer non-dendritic one and also slightly improved the distribution of the SiCp. Simultaneous utilization of Al-SiCp-Mg composite powder and compocasting method increased the macro- and micro-hardness, impact energy, bending strength, and bending strain of Al356/SiCp composite by 35, 63, 20, 20, and 40%, respectively, as compared with those of the composite fabricated by injection of untreated SiCp and stir casting process.

  8. Investigation of Heat Transfer at the Mold/Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Light Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Pehlke; John T. Berry

    2005-12-16

    Accurate modeling of the metal casting process prior to creating a mold design demands reliable knowledge of the interfacial heat transfer coefficient at the mold metal interface as a function of both time and location. The phenomena concerned with the gap forming between the mold and the solidifying metal are complex but need to be understood before any modeling is attempted. The presence of mold coatings further complicates the situation. A commercial casting was chosen and studied in a gravity permanent mold casting process. The metal/mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) was the focus of the research. A simple, direct method has been used to evaluate the IHTC. Both the simulation and experiments have shown that a reasonably good estimate of the heat transfer coefficient could be made in the case studied. It has been found that there is a good agreement between experiments and simulations in the temperature profiles during the solidification process, given that the primary mechanism of heat transfer across the gap in permanent mold casting of light alloys is by conduction across the gap. The procedure utilized to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient can be applied to other casting processes. A recently completed project involving The University of Michigan and Mississippi State University, together with several industrial partners, which was supported by the USDOE through the Cast Metals Coalition, examined a number of cases of thermal contact. In an investigation which gave special consideration to the techniques of measurement, several mold coatings were employed and results presented as a function of time. Realistic conditions of coating thickness and type together with an appropriate combination of mold preheat and metal pouring temperature were strictly maintained throughout the investigation. Temperature sensors, in particular thermocouples, play an important part in validating the predictions of solidification models. Cooling

  9. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  10. Effects of process parameters on the molding quality of the micro-needle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Z. J.; Ma, Z.; Gao, S.

    2016-07-01

    Micro-needle array, which is used in medical applications, is a kind of typical injection molded products with microstructures. Due to its tiny micro-features size and high aspect ratios, it is more likely to produce short shots defects, leading to poor molding quality. The injection molding process of the micro-needle array was studied in this paper to find the effects of the process parameters on the molding quality of the micro-needle array and to provide theoretical guidance for practical production of high-quality products. With the shrinkage ratio and warpage of micro needles as the evaluation indices of the molding quality, the orthogonal experiment was conducted and the analysis of variance was carried out. According to the results, the contribution rates were calculated to determine the influence of various process parameters on molding quality. The single parameter method was used to analyse the main process parameter. It was found that the contribution rate of the holding pressure on shrinkage ratio and warpage reached 83.55% and 94.71% respectively, far higher than that of the other parameters. The study revealed that the holding pressure is the main factor which affects the molding quality of micro-needle array so that it should be focused on in order to obtain plastic parts with high quality in the practical production.