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Sample records for microtopography accelerated osseointegration

  1. Discrete deposition of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on a titanium implant with predisposing substrate microtopography accelerated osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Huang, Yuhong; Butz, Frank; Ogawa, Takahiro; Lin, Audrey; Wang, Chiachien Jake

    2007-06-01

    We report here a new versatile method to deposit discrete hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles on a titanium (Ti) implant with predisposing substrate microtopography, which exhibited an unexpectedly robust biological effect. Commercially pure Ti substrates were treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, on which HA nanoparticles (20 nm) were deposited and chemically bonded to TiO2. The HA deposition rate was linearly related to the treatment time and HA nanoparticles were deposited on up to 50% of the substrate surface. As a result, the discrete deposition of HA nanoparticles generated novel 20-40 nm nanotopography on the Ti substrate with microtopography that was smooth (turned) or roughened by double acid etching (DAE). The experimental implants with or without HA nanoparticles were surgically placed in rat femur and an implant push-in test was performed after two weeks of healing. The deposition of HA nanoparticles on the DAE surface increased the mechanical withstanding load by 129% and 782% as compared to the control DAE and turned implants, respectively. Micro-computed tomography-based 3D bone morphometry revealed equivalent bone volumes around the DAE implant with or without HA nanoparticles. These data suggest that the discrete deposition of HA nanoparticles accelerates the early osseointegration process, likely through increased shear bonding strengths.

  2. Low-magnitude high-frequency loading, by whole-body vibration, accelerates early implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YONG-QIANG; QI, MENG-CHUN; XU, JIANG; XU, JUAN; LIU, HUA-WEI; DONG, WEI; LI, JIN-YUAN; HU, MIN

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis deteriorates jaw bone quality and may compromise early implant osseointegration and early implant loading. The influence of low-magnitude, high-frequency (LMHF) vibration on peri-implant bone healing and implant integration in osteoporotic bones remains poorly understood. LMHF loading via whole-body vibration (WBV) for 8 weeks has previously been demonstrated to significantly enhance bone-to-implant contact, peri-implant bone fraction and implant mechanical properties in osteoporotic rats. In the present study, LMHF loading by WBV was performed in osteoporotic rats, with a loading duration of 4 weeks during the early stages of bone healing. The results indicated that 4-week LMHF loading by WBV partly reversed the negative effects of osteoporosis and accelerated early peri-implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats. PMID:25270245

  3. Genetic Networks in Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, I.

    2013-01-01

    Osseointegration-based dental implants have become a well-accepted treatment modality for complete and partial edentulism. The success of this treatment largely depends on the stable integration and maintenance of implant fixtures in alveolar bone; however, the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating this unique tissue reaction have not yet been fully uncovered. Radiographic and histologic observations suggest the sustained retention of peri-implant bone without an apparent susceptibility to catabolic bone remodeling; therefore, implant-induced bone formation continues to be intensively investigated. Increasing numbers of whole-genome transcriptome studies suggest complex molecular pathways that may play putative roles in osseointegration. This review highlights genetic networks related to bone quality, the transient chondrogenic phase, the vitamin D axis, and the peripheral circadian rhythm to elute the regulatory mechanisms underlying the establishment and maintenance of osseointegration. PMID:24158334

  4. Osseointegrated finger prostheses.

    PubMed

    Doppen, P; Solomons, M; Kritzinger, S

    2009-02-01

    Amputation of a digit can lead to functional and psychological problems and patients can benefit from digital prostheses. Unfortunately, standard prostheses are often unstable, particularly when fitted over short amputation stumps. Prosthesis fixation by osseointegration is widely used in oral and extraoral applications and may help avoid the problem of instability. This paper reports the results of four patients with five finger amputations who were treated with osseointegrated implants to attach finger prostheses. One implant failed to osseointegrate and the procedure was abandoned. Three patients were successfully treated to completion of three finger prostheses and are extremely satisfied with their outcomes, both cosmetically and functionally, with osseoperception reported by all three patients. PMID:19091736

  5. Vertisols with Gilgai Microtopography: Classification and Parameters of Microtopography and Morphological Types of Soils (a Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitrov, N. B.

    2016-02-01

    Data on clayey swelling soils with gilgai microtopography are systematized. Classifications of gilgai microtopography representing regularly alternating microhighs and microlows are discussed, and its geometric parameters under different landscape conditions are considered. Gilgai microtopography is developed within flat or slightly inclined elements of the mesorelief composed of swelling clays of different geneses. These materials are characterized by the high swelling-shrinking capacity upon wetting-drying cycles owing to the predominance of clay minerals of smectitic group. These processes are especially pronounced under conditions of the impeded surface drainage and contrasting of the wet seasons with strong soil moistening by atmospheric precipitation or surface water and the seasons with deep soil drying under the impact of physical evaporation and transpiration. The areas with gilgai microtopography have complex soil cover patterns composed of Vertisols and vertic soils. Their formation is related to lateral movements of solid material in the soil profiles and along the curved soil surface. The morphological types of soil complexes in such area are systematized.

  6. GRAZING EFFECTS ON MICROTOPOGRAPHY IN A DESERT GRASSLAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured the effects of short-term intense grazing by domestic cattle on the microtopography of a black-grama grass Bouteloua eriopoda dominated desert grasslands. Plots were grazed during winter or summer for 24-36 hours by 20-40 yearlings in 1995 and 1996. Soil microtopography was measured wi...

  7. Microtopography affecting critical transitions in drylands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Hoop, Myrna; Mayor, Angeles G.; Dekker, Stefan C.; Bogaart, Patrick W.; Rietkerk, Max

    2014-05-01

    Human and natural disturbances in drylands can suddenly induce a transition to a degraded ecosystem state that is difficult to reverse. Water availability for plants is essential for the resilience and stability of these water limited ecosystems. On hillslopes, the redistribution of surface water flow can be altered by microtopographic structures of mounds that develop under isolated plant patches, thereby affecting the vegetation. For low mounds, the flow velocity of surface water can reduce near the vegetation patches, thereby increasing run-on towards the vegetation. However, if mound height increases, it is expected that surface water circumvents the vegetation patch. Little is known yet about the influence of human pressures such as livestock grazing on these microtopographic structures. To investigate the effect of grazing on the microtopographic structures on hillslopes with patchy vegetation, a simple model has been developed and a field pilot study has been done. According to the model, grazing can alter the system in two ways. First, under low grazing pressure, trampling can increase the bare soil erodibility which amplifies the development of microtopographic structures. Second, under high grazing pressure, increased bare soil erodibility and reduced vegetation cover are operating simultaneously. Here, reduced protection of the soil by plants causes a relative decrease in the microtopographic structures compared to the low grazing pressure. Microtopographic field data were collected in SE Spain. The target species Stipa tennacissima is an unpalatable plant species, so only the effect of trampling was tested. These data suggest that mound development under the unpalatable plant only occurs at the highly grazed sites. This implies that the microtopography can significantly change due to trampling by grazers. Current research suggests that grazing changes the microtopography of hillslopes in drylands. However, further research is needed to understand how

  8. Mechanisms regulating osteoblast response to surface microtopography and vitamin D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Bryan Frederick, Jr.

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between orthopaedic and dental implant surfaces with the surrounding host tissue is essential in the design of advanced biomaterials that better promote bone growth and osseointegration of implants. Dental implants with roughened surfaces and high surface energy are well known to promote osteoblast differentiation in vitro and promote increased bone-to-implant contact in vivo. In addition, increased surface roughness increases osteoblasts response to the vitamin D metabolite 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. However, the exact mechanisms mediating cell response to surface properties and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 are still being elucidated. The central aim of the thesis is to investigate whether integrin signaling in response to rough surface microtopography enhances osteoblast differentiation and responsiveness to 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. The hypothesis is that the integrin alpha5beta1 plays a role in osteoblast response to surface microtopography and that 1alpha,25(OH) 2D3 acts through VDR-independent pathways involving caveolae to synergistically enhance osteoblast response to surface roughness and 1alpha,25(OH) 2D3. To test this hypothesis the objectives of the studies performed in this thesis were: (1) to determine if alpha5beta 1 signaling is required for osteoblast response to surface microstructure; (2) to determine if increased responsiveness to 1alpha,25(OH)2D 3 requires the vitamin D receptor, (3) to determine if rough titanium surfaces functionalized with the peptides targeting integrins (RGD) and transmembrane proteoglycans (KRSR) will enhance both osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, and (4) to determine whether caveolae, which are associated with integrin and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 signaling, are required for enhance osteogenic response to surface microstructure and 1alpha,25(OH)2D 3. The results demonstrate that integrins, VDR, and caveolae play important roles in mediating osteoblast response to surface properties and 1alpha,25

  9. Is osseointegration inflammation-triggered?

    PubMed

    Vitkov, Ljubomir; Hartl, Dominik; Hannig, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Bioinert endosteal implants cause a foreign body reaction, whereas bioactive ones cause osseointegration. However, the mechanisms responsible for the two modi of host response remain unclear. COX-2(-/-) animal models showed the dependence of osseointegration on prostaglandins. PGE2, a product of COX-2, augments Wnt signalling, a pathway that promotes the regeneration in many types of tissues. Recently, we demonstrated the ability of bioactive implants to recruit neutrophils and to trigger neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are a potent source of PGE2. In bioinert implants no PGE2 release has been ascertained. Collectively, these findings suggest that osseointegration might be the host response to bioactive implants, novel and quite different to the so-called foreign body reaction. PMID:27372846

  10. Upscaling microtopography in high-latitude peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresto Aleina, F.; Runkle, B. R.; Kleinen, T.; Kutzbach, L.; Boike, J.; Brovkin, V.

    2013-12-01

    A challenging problem in climate modeling is how to deal with interactions and feedbacks across a multiplicity of spatial scales, and how to improve our understanding of the role played by local soil heterogeneities in the climate system. This is of particular interest in northern peatlands, because of the large amount of carbon stored in the soil. Greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes, such as methane, carbon dioxide and water vapor, vary largely within the environment, as an effect of the small scale processes that characterize the landscape. It is then essential to consider the local heterogeneous behavior of the system components in order to properly estimate water and carbon balances. We propose a novel method to fill the scaling gap from local mechanistic models to large scale mean field approximations. We developed a surface model for peatlands working at the landscape scale, which is able to show the impact of surface microtopography in modeling greenhouse gas fluxes. We tuned our landscape-scale model with data from a peatland site in the Komi Republic of Russia. We simulate surface microtopography and hydrology, and we couple it to a process-based model for methane emissions from the soil (Walter and Heiman, 1996). By partitioning the space in smaller subunits and then analyzing the statistical properties of the tiling, we are able to resolve the small scale processes and investigate their effects at larger scales. We not only investigate the influence of the hummocky surface on GHG emissions, but we are also able to simulate how complex hydrological interactions happening within the system at a subgrid scale affect the landscape-scale land-atmosphere GHG fluxes. We force our model climatology with data from the CMIP5 experiments. Future projections use forcing from the RCP 8.5 scenario, in order to investigate the impact of microrelieves on the future carbon cycle. We also explore potential dynamical feedbacks with the atmospheric water cycle and energy balance by

  11. Effects of capillarity and microtopography on wetland specific yield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrologic models aid in describing water flows and levels in wetlands. Frequently, these models use a specific yield conceptualization to relate water flows to water level changes. Traditionally, a simple conceptualization of specific yield is used, composed of two constant values for above- and below-surface water levels and neglecting the effects of soil capillarity and land surface microtopography. The effects of capiltarity and microtopography on specific yield were evaluated at three wetland sites in the Florida Everglades. The effect of capillarity on specific yield was incorporated based on the fillable pore space within a soil moisture profile at hydrostatic equilibrium with the water table. The effect of microtopography was based on areal averaging of topographically varying values of specific yield. The results indicate that a more physically-based conceptualization of specific yield incorporating capillary and microtopographic considerations can be substantially different from the traditional two-part conceptualization, and from simpler conceptualizations incorporating only capillarity or only microtopography. For the sites considered, traditional estimates of specific yield could under- or overestimate the more physically based estimates by a factor of two or more. The results suggest that consideration of both capillarity and microtopography is important to the formulation of specific yield in physically based hydrologic models of wetlands. ?? 2007, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  12. Evaluation of Functional Dynamics during Osseointegration and Regeneration Associated with Oral Implants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Po-Chun; Lang, Niklaus P.; Giannobile, William V.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper is to review current investigations on functional assessments of osseointegration and assess correlations to the peri-implant structure. Material and methods The literature was electronically searched for studies of promoting dental implant osseointegration, functional assessments of implant stability, and finite element (FE) analyses in the field of implant dentistry, and any references regarding biological events during osseointegration were also cited as background information. Results Osseointegration involves a cascade of protein and cell apposition, vascular invasion, de novo bone formation and maturation to achieve the primary and secondary dental implant stability. This process may be accelerated by alteration of the implant surface roughness, developing a biomimetric interface, or local delivery of growth-promoting factors. The current available preclinical and clinical biomechanical assessments demonstrated a variety of correlations to the peri-implant structural parameters, and functionally integrated peri-implant structure through FE optimization can offer strong correlation to the interfacial biomechanics. Conclusions The progression of osseointegration may be accelerated by alteration of the implant interface as well as growth factor applications, and functional integration of peri-implant structure may be feasible to predict the implant function during osseointegration. More research in this field is still needed. PMID:20070743

  13. SOIL MICROTOPOGRAPHY ON GRAZING GRADIENTS IN CHIHUAHUAN DESERT GRASSLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We tested the hypothesis that one of the significant impacts of livestock in the creation of
    piospheres centered on water points is the loss of soil microtopography. The size, height, and spatial distribution of micromounds and surrounding depressions were measured by a modi...

  14. Evaluation of structure from motion for soil microtopography measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in low cost structure from motion (SFM) technologies offer new opportunities for geoscientists to acquire high resolution soil microtopography data at a fraction of the cost of conventional techniques. However, these new methodologies often lack easily accessible error metrics an...

  15. Modeling of surface microtopography and its impacts on hydrologic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habtezion, Noah Lebassi

    Understanding the impacts of surface microtopography on hydrologic processes is critical. The objectives of this thesis research are: (1) to evaluate the effects of DEM resolution on microtopographic characteristics, hydrologic connectivity, and modeling of hydrologic processes; and (2) to assess the influences of multiple rainfall events on surface and subsurface hydrologic processes with the use of a puddle-to-puddle (P2P) modeling system. The change in DEM resolution has a significant effect on how surface microtopography is depicted, which in turn alters the hydrologic response of a topographic surface. The smoothing of reduced DEM resolution tends to enhance hydrologic connectivity, reduce the depression storage and infiltration, and increase surface runoff. Temporal rainfall distribution results in spatio-temporal variations in soil water dynamics, depression storage, infiltration, hydrologic connectivity, and surface runoff. The reduction in ponding time and infiltration, and the enhancement of hydrologic connectivity further caused earlier and greater surface runoff generation.

  16. Engineering the Microstructure of Electrospun Fibrous Scaffolds by Microtopography

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qian; Lee, Benjamin L.-P.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Li, Song

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the structure and organization of electrospun fibers is desirable for fabricating scaffolds and materials with defined microstructures. However, the effects of microtopography on the deposition and, in turn, the organization of the electrospun fibers are not well understood. In this study, conductive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) templates with different micropatterns were fabricated by combining photolithography, silicon wet etching, and PDMS molding techniques. The fiber organization was varied by fine-tuning the microtopography of the electrospinning collector. Fiber conformity and alignment were influenced by the depth and the slope of microtopography features, resulting in scaffolds comprising either an array of microdomains with different porosity and fiber alignment or an array of microwells. Microtopography affected the fiber organization for hundreds of micrometers below the scaffold surface, resulting in scaffolds with distinct surface properties on each side. In addition, the fiber diameter was also affected by the fiber conformity. The effects of the fiber arrangement in the scaffolds on the morphology, migration, and infiltration of cells were examined by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Cell morphology and organization were guided by the fibers in the microdomains, and cell migration was enhanced by the aligned fibers and the three-dimensional scaffold structure. Cell infiltration was correlated with the microdomain porosity. Microscale control of the fiber organization and the porosity at the surface and through the thickness of the fibrous scaffolds, as demonstrated by the results of this study, provides a powerful means of engineering the three-dimensional structure of electrospun fibrous scaffolds for cell and tissue engineering. PMID:23534553

  17. Engineered antifouling microtopographies: surface pattern effects on cell distribution.

    PubMed

    Decker, Joseph T; Sheats, Julian T; Brennan, Anthony B

    2014-12-23

    Microtopography has been observed to lead to altered attachment behavior for marine fouling organisms; however, quantification of this phenomenon is lacking in the scientific literature. Here, we present quantitative measurement of the disruption of normal attachment behavior of the fouling algae Ulva linza by antifouling microtopographies. The distribution of the diatom Navicula incerta was shown to be unaffected by the presence of topography. The radial distribution function was calculated for both individual zoospores and cells as well as aggregates of zoospores from attachment data for a variety topographic configurations and at a number of different attachment densities. Additionally, the screening distance and maximum values were mapped according to the location of zoospore aggregates within a single unit cell. We found that engineered topographies decreased the distance between spore aggregates compared to that for a smooth control surface; however, the distributions for individual spores were unchanged. We also found that the local attachment site geometry affected the screening distance for aggregates of zoospores, with certain geometries decreasing screening distance and others having no measurable effect. The distribution mapping techniques developed and explored in this article have yielded important insight into the design parameters for antifouling microtopographies that can be implemented in the next generation of antifouling surfaces. PMID:25420235

  18. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    Harrison, in 1914, first recognized that cells respond to physicochemical cues such as substratum topography when he observed that fibroblasts elongated while cultured on spider silk. Recently, techniques developed in the micro-electronics industry have been used to create molds for producing microscaled topographies with various shapes and spatial arrangements. Although these patterning techniques are well-established, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying cell sensing and response to microtopographies. In this work cellular micro-environments with varying surface topographies and chemistries were evaluated with marine organisms and mammalian cells to investigate cellular sensing and response. Biofouling---the accumulation of micro-organisms, plants, and animals on submerged surfaces---is an environmental and economic concern. Engineered topographies, replicated in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer (PDMSe) and functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) hydrogels, were evaluated for inhibition of marine fouling organism attachment. Microtopographies replicated in PDMSe inhibited attachment of the marine bacterium, Cobetia marina up to 99% versus smooth. The average normalized attachment densities of cells of C. marina and zoospores of the green algae Ulva on PDMSe topographies scaled inversely with the Engineered Roughness Index (ERIII), a representation of surface energy. Attachment densities of Ulva from four assays and C. marina from two growth phases to PDMSe surfaces scaled inversely with one equation: ERI II multiplied by the Reynolds number of the organism (Re) (R 2 = 0.77). The same microtopographies created in PDMSe reduced the initial attachment density and attachment strength of cells of the diatoms Navicula incerta and Seminavis robusta compared to smooth PDMSe. The average normalized attachment density of Navicula after exposure to shear stress (48 Pa) was correlated with the contact area between the diatom and a

  19. The genesis of vertisols with gilgai microtopography: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitrov, N. B.

    2016-05-01

    Different hypotheses about the genesis of gilgai microtopography and corresponding soil complexes with clayey swelling soils are considered in this review. Their diversity is stipulated by specificities of the objects themselves and by the history of studies of the composition, properties, regimes, and landscape conditions of the areas with Vertisols in different countries. Most of the hypotheses about the genesis of Vertisols with the gilgai microtopography suggest that strong swelling-shrinking processes take place in these soils in the course of moistening-drying cycles; the origin of shear stress in the soils, its spatial patterns, and the particular ways of translocation of the soil material are discussed. At the early stage of Vertisol studies, a hypothesis about the leading role of the process of "self-swallowing" of the soils as a result of filling of open cracks with the material from the upper soil horizons was popular. However, numerous facts suggest that the intensity of this process is relatively low, so that it cannot play the major role in the gilgai formation and cyclic changes in the thickness and properties of the soil horizons in Vertisols. Another important mechanism is the uneven moistening and drying of the whole soil volume resulting in the irregular distribution of inner tensions in the soil with the development of shear stress and plastic deformation of the soil mass. The hypotheses suggested in the recent decades are based on the models of soil mechanics. A number of hypotheses consider possible alternation and duration of evolutionary stages of the development of Vertisols with the gilgai microtopography.

  20. Microtopography enhances nitrogen cycling and removal in created mitigation wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, K.L.; Ahn, C.; Noe, G.B.

    2011-01-01

    Natural wetlands often have a heterogeneous soil surface topography, or microtopography (MT), that creates microsites of variable hydrology, vegetation, and soil biogeochemistry. Created mitigation wetlands are designed to mimic natural wetlands in structure and function, and recent mitigation projects have incorporated MT as one way to attain this goal. Microtopography may influence nitrogen (N) cycling in wetlands by providing adjacent areas of aerobic and anaerobic conditions and by increasing carbon storage, which together facilitate N cycling and removal. This study investigated three created wetlands in the Virginia Piedmont that incorporated disking-induced MT during construction. One site had paired disked and undisked plots, allowing an evaluation of the effects of this design feature on N flux rates. Microtopography was measured using conventional survey equipment along a 1-m circular transect and was described using two indices: tortuosity (T), describing soil surface roughness and relief, and limiting elevation difference (LD), describing soil surface relief. Ammonification, nitrification, and net N mineralization were determined with in situ incubation of modified ion-exchange resin cores and denitrification potential was determined using denitrification enzyme assay (DEA). Results demonstrated that disked plots had significantly greater LD than undisked plots one year after construction. Autogenic sources of MT (e.g. tussock-forming vegetation) in concert with variable hydrology and sedimentation maintained and in some cases enhanced MT in study wetlands. Tortuosity and LD values remained the same in one wetland when compared over a two-year period, suggesting a dynamic equilibrium of MT-forming and -eroding processes at play. Microtopography values also increased when comparing the original induced MT of a one-year old wetland with MT of older created wetlands (five and eight years old) with disking-induced MT, indicating that MT can increase by

  1. Simulating effects of microtopography on wetland specific yield and hydroperiod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Summer, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Specific yield and hydroperiod have proven to be useful parameters in hydrologic analysis of wetlands. Specific yield is a critical parameter to quantitatively relate hydrologic fluxes (e.g., rainfall, evapotranspiration, and runoff) and water level changes. Hydroperiod measures the temporal variability and frequency of land-surface inundation. Conventionally, hydrologic analyses used these concepts without considering the effects of land surface microtopography and assumed a smoothly-varying land surface. However, these microtopographic effects could result in small-scale variations in land surface inundation and water depth above or below the land surface, which in turn affect ecologic and hydrologic processes of wetlands. The objective of this chapter is to develop a physically-based approach for estimating specific yield and hydroperiod that enables the consideration of microtopographic features of wetlands, and to illustrate the approach at sites in the Florida Everglades. The results indicate that the physically-based approach can better capture the variations of specific yield with water level, in particular when the water level falls between the minimum and maximum land surface elevations. The suggested approach for hydroperiod computation predicted that the wetlands might be completely dry or completely wet much less frequently than suggested by the conventional approach neglecting microtopography. One reasonable generalization may be that the hydroperiod approaches presented in this chapter can be a more accurate prediction tool for water resources management to meet the specific hydroperiod threshold as required by a species of plant or animal of interest.

  2. Longevity of treethrow microtopography: implications for mass wasting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaetzl, R.J.; Follmer, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines and compares methods of dating pit/mound microtopography formed by tree uprooting, and provides 14C evidence for the longevity of these landforms. Microtopography can often by dated by reference to known meteorological phenomena, or within certain age constraints, by dendrochronologic means. We used 14C analysis of buried wood and charcoal in treethrow mounds in Michigan and Wisconsin, U.S.A. to arrive at estimates of the geochronometric ages of treethrow mounds. Results indicate that mounds in these areas often persist for more than 1000 years, which are two to five times longer than published estimates by less reliable methods. The longevity of treethrow mounds in these regions is ascribed to (l) sandy, porous soils which minimize runoff, (2) a continuous mat of forest litter and vegetation cover, (3) surface concentrations of gravel which may act as an "armor", (4) large initial size of the features, and (5) soil freezing. Implications are that rates of mass movement due to uprooting may be substantially less than studies from other regions suggest. ?? 1990.

  3. Enhancing osseointegration using surface-modified titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Oh, N.; Liu, Y.; Chen, W.; Oh, S.; Appleford, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Bumgardner, J.; Haggard, W.; Ong, J.

    2006-07-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants are used to replace missing teeth. The success of implants is due to osseointegration or the direct contact of the implant surface and bone without a fibrous connective tissue interface. This review discusses the enhancement of osseointegration by means of anodized microporous titanium surfaces, functionally macroporous graded titanium coatings, nanoscale titanium surfaces, and different bioactive factors.

  4. Unusual Microtopography on an Apollo 12 Soil Grain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Keprta, N. T.; Clemett, S. J.; Berger, E. L.; Rahman, Z.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    We have observed the presence of a previously undescribed microtopography in several regions on the surface of a lunar grain from Apollo regolith sample 12070,29. This microtopography consists of flattened triangular prisms, henceforth referred to as denticles, set in an orderly arrangement. We propose three possible processes to describe the presence of these structures: (1) radiation; (2) aqueous activity; or (3) impact. Radiation—the surface of the Earth’s moon is subject to energetic ion and photon irradiation which can produce a multitude of morphological effects on grain surfaces including erosion/sputtering, vesicle formation, and amorphization of crystalline phases. Under certain conditions surface erosion can result in the formation of well-ordered nanostructures including mounds, dots, wave-shaped, rippled or corrugated features typically <10s nm in size and organized into pattered arrays. However larger pyramid-shaped features up to approx. 300 nm at the base, similar in shape to lunar denticles, were produced on Cu substrates ex-posed to ion beam sputtering.. Aqueous alteration—recent reports of purported water on the Moon imply the possibility of brief, limited exposure of surface materials to aqueous fluids. Aqueous corrosion of silicates can result in the formation of crystallographically controlled denticulated features, up to 10s of micron at the base, arranged in a patterned formation. Impact—the surface of the moon is impacted by meteorites, particularly by micron-size particles, resulting in the formation of a variety of crater types. While it is difficult to envision a scenario in which a patterned array could be formed by impact, fracturing along planes of crystallographic structural weakness due to external stress could explain these features.

  5. Fire and Microtopography in Peatlands: Feedbacks and Carbon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benscoter, B.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Fire is the dominant natural disturbance in peatland ecosystems. Over the past decade, peat fires have emerged as an important issue for global climate change, human health, and economic loss, largely due to the extreme peat fire events in Indonesia and Russia that severely impacted metropolitan areas and social infrastructure. However, the impact and importance of fire in peatland ecosystems are more far-reaching. Combustion of vegetation and soil organic matter releases an average of 2.2 kg C m-2 to the atmosphere, primarily as CO2, as well as a number of potentially harmful emissions such as fine particulate matter and mercury. Additionally, while peatlands are generally considered to be net sinks of atmospheric carbon, the removal of living vegetation by combustion halts primary production following fire resulting in a net loss of ecosystem carbon to the atmosphere for several years. The recovery of carbon sink function is linked to plant community succession and development, which can vary based on combustion severity and the resulting post-fire microhabitat conditions. Microtopography has a strong influence on fire behavior and combustion severity during peatland wildfires. In boreal continental peatlands, combustion severity is typically greatest in low-lying hollows while raised hummocks are often lightly burned or unburned. The cross-scale influence of microtopography on landscape fire behavior is due to differences in plant community composition between microforms. The physiological and ecohydrological differences among plant communities result in spatial patterns in fuel availability and condition, influencing the spread, severity, and type of combustion over local to landscape scales. In addition to heterogeneous combustion loss of soil carbon, this differential fire behavior creates variability in post-fire microhabitat conditions, resulting in differences in post-fire vegetation succession and carbon exchange trajectories. These immediate and legacy

  6. Nanostructured tantala as a template for enhanced osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruckh, Timothy; Porter, Joshua R.; Allam, Nageh K.; Feng, Xinjian; Grimes, Craig A.; Popat, Ketul C.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of current dental and orthopedic biomaterials research is to design implants that induce controlled and guided tissue growth, and rapid healing. In addition to acceleration of normal wound healing phenomena, these implants should result in the formation of a characteristic interfacial layer with adequate biomechanical properties. To achieve these goals, however, a better understanding of events at the bone-material interface is needed, as well as the development of new materials and approaches that promote osseointegration. Here we present novel nanostructured nanoarrays from tantala that can promote cell adhesion and differentiation. Our results suggest that tantala nanotube arrays enhance osteoblast cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. The routes of fabrication of tantala nanotube arrays are flexible and cost-effective, enabling realization of desired platform topologies on existing non-planar orthopedic implants.

  7. Spatial Variation in Carbon Release From Arctic Tundra Resulting From Microtopography Created by Permafrost Thawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Schuur, E. A.; Vogel, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    One of the biggest potential feedbacks to global climate change from high latitude ecosystems may come from thawing of permafrost, which stores 30% of the total global terrestrial soil organic carbon (SOC). Thawing of permafrost may accelerate decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and increase carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and such emissions from soil can lead to further warming in global scale. When permafrost thaws in ice-rich areas, it creates localized topographical surface subsidence called thermokarst, which can induce variations in soil abiotic properties. By altering multiple resources in soil, thermokarst can change C cycling in high latitude ecosystems beyond simple increases in temperature alone. The objective was to determine how thermokarst affects ecosystem C exchange. We hypothesized that there would be a positive relationship between the degree of ground subsidence and CO2 emissions from decomposition of SOM. This study was conducted in a tundra site near Denali National Park, Alaska. Three study sites were established according to the degree of surface depressions: Severe Thaw, Moderate Thaw, and Minimal Thaw. We established 50 equally spaced grid points each site and they were surveyed using GPS to measure the micro-elevation. Clear static chamber measurements were used to measure ecosystem C exchange, while soil properties such as temperature and volumetric water content (VWC) were measured simultaneously. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was measured as an indicator of primary productivity. We used forward stepwise regression analysis to quantify how much microtopography explained ecosystem C exchange. There was a negative correlation between ecosystem respiration and relative elevation at the Severe and Minimal site. The best predictor variable for ecosystem C exchange was VWC alone, which was better than temperature alone, or mixed effects of temperature and VWC. There was no relationship between NDVI and microtopography

  8. Osseointegrated implant fracture: causes and treatment.

    PubMed

    Gealh, Walter Cristiano; Mazzo, Valéria; Barbi, Francisco; Camarini, Edevaldo Tadeu

    2011-08-01

    Despite its high success rate, therapy with osseointegrated dental implants is not free of complications. Among the problems that may occur is fracture of implants, which, albeit a rare phenomenon, may lead to unpleasant clinical outcomes for the patient, as well as for the clinician. Thus, it is paramount to know the factors related to the biological processes involved in maintenance of osseointegration and biomechanics applied to dental implants to prevent such complications, as well as treatment options available to deal with the problem. Therefore, the objectives of this work were to investigate the literature to identify causative factors that may lead to fracture of dental implants and to discuss available procedures. PMID:20553152

  9. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  10. Incorporating Information on (micro)Topography when Modelling Soil Erosion at the Watershed Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdan, O.

    2015-12-01

    In the context of shallow flows, the spatial distribution of the flow is highly influenced by the micro-topography. For instance, local oriented depressions may exist in which the flow depth and velocity may exceed the threshold for soil erosion initiation. If a mean uniform flow shear stress is used to characterize the area, it would be smaller and therefore may not initiate erosion. However, management of water and sediment fluxes requires analysis and modeling at the watershed scale in order to integrate the relations between upstream and downstream areas. At this scale, high resolution information on the microtopography is usually not always available and would anyway require too extensive computation resources to be explicitly integrated in modelling attempt. Moreover, in agricultural context, this information is likely to change during the year depending on the agricultural practices. In this context, the objective of this study is to propose a parameterisation of the influence of microtopography on erosion into the framework of the shallow water equation. For each cell, the proportion of wetted area is used as a microtopography indicator. For the case of erosion, the system is coupled to the sediment transport equations. In such context, an additional equation describing the micro-topography evolution caused by erosion is introduced. Different case study will be presented to investigate the potential of the approach.

  11. How much surface water can gilgai microtopography capture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishné, A. Sz.; Morgan, C. L. S.; Neely, H. L.

    2014-05-01

    Gilgai microtopography is associated with landscapes of strongly shrinking-swelling soils (Vertisols) and affects spatial and temporal variability of runoff, and thus the generation of stream flow and plant-available water. However, no report is available on the amount of surface water that a landscape with gilgai depressions can retain. Our objective was to assess water capturing capacity of a typical Vertisol landscape with gilgai depressions in the Blackland Prairie Major Land Resource Area of Texas. The 45 by 40 m study site was located on a Vertisol with circular gilgai covered by improved pasture on a summit with slope of less than 3%. A digital elevation model (DEM) with 0.25 m2 cell size was created from elevation data acquired by using GPS. Water capturing capacity of gilgai depressions was estimated at 10 randomly selected local gilgai basins by analyzing spatial distribution of Topographic Wetness Index (TWI). Our findings indicate that the average circular gilgai depression can hold 0.78 m3 of water leading to an estimate of 0.024 m3 m-2 water capturing capacity in a circular gilgai landscape, assuming no infiltration. The gilgai could capture a maximum of 43.74 m3 of rain and runoff water at the 1800 m2 study site. Consequently, if the soil were saturated and not infiltrating any water, no runoff would be expected following a 24.3 mm m-2, 1 h precipitation, affecting estimates of streamflow (runoff) and plant available water (redistribution and infiltration) at the m to km scale.

  12. [Panorama of prosthetic options in osseointegrated implantology].

    PubMed

    Khayat, P; Missika, P; Hockers, T

    1990-12-01

    Today, several prosthetic options can be used with osseointegrated implants. Fixed bridges may be retained by screws or cemented. Detachable bridges may be screwed on cylindrical, conical, straight or angulated abutments. In certain cases, they will be placed directly in contact with the implants. Cemented bridges may be placed over screwed, cemented or transfixed copings. They also may be cemented over transfixed metallic structures already splinting the implants. Removable prosthesis may be stabilized with bars, stud attachments or magnets. All these different options are discussed, and their advantages and disadvantages presented. PMID:2268784

  13. Small is beautiful: why microtopography should be included in bog hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appels, Willemijn; van der Ploeg, Martine; Oosterwoud, Marieke; Cirkel, Gijsbert; van der Zee, Sjoerd; Witte, Jan-Philip

    2014-05-01

    Microtopography can have a large effect on flow processes at the soil surface and the composition of soil water. In peat areas, microtopography is shaped by differences in species, the growth rate and transpiration of the vegetation, and the amount of water flowing from higher areas. Microtopography is often represented by a roughness parameter in hillslope hydrological models. In areas without a strong topographical gradient however, microtopography may be underestimated when accumulated in a single parameter, especially in the presence of shallow groundwater systems. In this study, we review the intricate relationships between microtopography, surface runoff, and ecohydrology in systems featuring shallow water tables. In an analogy to surface runoff, the hydrology of a raised bog can be described as a combination of open water flow on a saturated medium, instead of the traditional acrotelm-catotelm concept that only acknowledges the saturated medium. We explored water flow through the microtopography of a raised bog with a simple conceptual model that accounts explicitly for microtopographic features and the changing flow directions these may cause. With this approach we were able to investigate the activation of fast flow paths on different areas of the bog as a function of their wetness level and bog-specific morphological features, such as hummocks and hollows. Our type of approach could be used to improve the understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall-runoff responses on raised bogs. In addition, similar approaches could be used to investigate how various runoff regimes affect the mixing of water with different chemical signatures, another driver of variations of the occurrence of plant species.

  14. Posıtıve effect of platelet rich fibrin on osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Burak; Kantarcı, Alpdoğan; Gülsever, Serap; Alaaddinoğlu, Emine-Elif

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukocyte-platelet rich fibrin (L-PRF) is a second generation platelet concentrate clinically used to accelerate tissue healing and bone regeneration. Achieving reduced implant osseointegration time could provide immediate or early loading of implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the L-PRF-induced osseointegration and bone-implant contact (BIC) in an experimental animal model. Material and Methods Twelve 4-month-old New Zealand white rabbits were used. Following general anesthesia, 3-5 mL of blood was obtained from the central artery in rabbit ear and L-PRF was prepared. Two implant cavities (5 mm long and 3 mm in diameter) were created in each tibia with a total of four cavities in each animal. Two of these cavities were selected and covered with PRF (test group). The remaining L-PRF was used to soak the implants placed into the L-PRF covered sockets. Other cavities were left as controls. In total, 48 implants were placed. Animals were sacrificed after two, three, or four weeks. Histological samples were obtained and peri-implant tissues were histomorphometrically evaluated for bone-to-implant contact and new bone formation. Results Histomorphometric analyses of the defects revealed that the L-PRF was detectable up to the second week. Application of L-PRF increased the rate and amount of new bone formation in the experimental group compared to the control group. Bone-to-implant contact was enhanced when the surface was pre-wetted with L-PRF (p<0.01). Conclusions The results of this study demonstrated that L-PRF application may increases amount and rate of new bone formation during the early healing period and provides a faster osseointegration around implants. Key words:Dental implants, platelet rich fibrin, osseointegration, bone regeneration, matrix for growth factors. PMID:27475686

  15. Surface Contaminants Inhibit Osseointegration in a Novel Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Colbrunn, Robb W.; Tatro, Joscelyn M.; Messerschmitt, Patrick J.; Hernandez, Christopher J.; Goldberg, Victor M.; Stewart, Matthew C.; Greenfield, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface contaminants, such as bacterial debris and manufacturing residues, may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and affect osseointegration. The goals of this study were to develop a murine model of osseointegration in order to determine whether removing surface contaminants enhances osseointegration. To develop the murine model, titanium alloy implants were implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur and osseointegration was measured over a five week time course. Histology, backscatter scanning electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy showed areas of bone in intimate physical contact with the implant, confirming osseointegration. Histomorphometric quantification of bone-to-implant contact and peri-implant bone and biomechanical pullout quantification of ultimate force, stiffness and work to failure increased significantly over time, also demonstrating successful osseointegration. We also found that a rigorous cleaning procedure significantly enhances bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures by two-fold compared with implants that were autoclaved, as recommended by the manufacturer. The most likely interpretation of these results is that surface contaminants inhibit osseointegration. The results of this study justify the need for the development of better detection and removal techniques for contaminants on orthopaedic implants and other medical devices. PMID:21801863

  16. Laminin coatings on implant surfaces promote osseointegration: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Javed, Fawad; Al Amri, Mohammad D; Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Al-Askar, Mansour; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Romanos, Georgios E

    2016-08-01

    To our knowledge from indexed literature, the role of laminins in the expression of osteogenic biomarkers and osseointegration enhancement has not been systematically reviewed. The aim of the present systematic review was to assess the role of laminin coatings on implant surfaces in promoting osseointegration. To address the focused question, "Do laminin coatings on implant surfaces influence osseointegration?", indexed databases were searched from 1965 up to and including November 2015 using various combination of the following keywords: "Bone to implant contact"; "implant"; "laminins"; and "osseointegration". Letters to the Editor, case-reports/case-series, historic reviews, and commentaries were excluded. The pattern of the present systematic review was customized to primarily summarize the pertinent data. Nine studies were included. Six studies were prospective and were performed in animals and 5 studies were in vitro. Results from 8 studies showed that laminin coatings enhanced new bone formation around implants and/or bone-to-implant contact. One study showed that laminin coated implants surfaces did not improve osseointegration. On experimental grounds, laminin coatings seem to enhance osteogenic biomarkers expression and/or osseointegration; however, from a clinical perspective, further randomized control trials are needed to assess the role of laminin coatings in promoting osseointegration around dental implants. PMID:27164563

  17. EFFECTS OF INTENSE, SHORT DURATION GRAZING ON MICROTOPOGRAPHY IN A CHIHUAHUAN DESERT GRASSLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microtopography describes variations in soil surface elevation (nim or cm) for a scale of a few meters of horizontal distance, Small-scale (few centimeters) changes in vegetation communities synchronized with the elevation differences were observed in drained marsh (Zedler & Zedl...

  18. MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND GRAZING IN DESERT RANGE LAND: A LESSON IN STATISTICS VERSUS REALITY IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes two experiments on the effects of grazing on soil microtopography in a Chihuahuan Desert rangeland. In the first experiment, we measured the effect of three consecutive years of short duration <48 hours per year) intense grazing (20--40 yearling cows ...

  19. EFFECTS OF INTENSE, SHORT-DURATION GRAZING ON MICROTOPOGRAPHY IN A CHIHUAHUAN DESERT GRASSLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured the effects of short-term intense grazing by domestic cattle on the microtopography of a black-grama grass (Bouteloua eriopoda) dominated desert grassland. Plots were grazed during winter or summer for 24-36 hours by 20-40 yearlings in 1995 and 1996. Soil microtopogra...

  20. Proposal for an Ultrasonic Tool to Monitor the Osseointegration of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Marina Storani; Maciel, Carlos Dias; Pereira, José Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The longevity of dental implants depends on osseointegration, which provides load-bearing capacity without putting the prosthesis at risk from micromotions at the implant-bone interface. This research involved an analysis of the viability of an ultrasonic evaluation tool to quantify osseointegration. Ultrasonic transmission is directly dependent on the difference between the acoustic impedance of materials in intimate contact with each other. The closer their acoustic impedances the more intense their transmission. Therefore, an analysis of the ultrasonic echoes would presumably allow for a quantitative evaluation of the bone tissue that has grown into the pores of the implant. In addition, the literature reports that bone fracture healing can be accelerated by the application of a controlled low-amplitude mechanical stimulus on the site of the lesion. In fact, acoustic pressure waves of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound are reportedly a secure technique for promoting mechanical stimulus without impairing the healing process. Many experimental and clinical trials have confirmed that daily transcutaneous ultrasound applications on the injured site are beneficial to the enhancement of fractured bone. This proposal aims to bring together the characteristics of ultrasound propagation and the positive effect of ultrasound on bone growth into a single tool that quantitatively monitors the evolution of the osseointegration process. The viability of a device with these features was investigated through simulations and experimentally. The initial simulations were conducted to explore the influence of waveguide shapes on the tool's sensitivity to changes in the implant supporting media. The waveguides were designed in two parts, one consisting of a screw-shaped part to attach to the implant and the other a conical or step-shaped part to which the ultrasonic source was fixed in the first simulations. The step-shaped waveguide proved to be the more sensitive; intermediate stages

  1. A pre-clinical murine model of oral implant osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Mouraret, S.; Hunter, D.J.; Bardet, C.; Brunski, J.B.; Bouchard, P.; Helms, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Many of our assumptions concerning oral implant osseointegration are extrapolated from experimental models studying skeletal tissue repair in long bones. This disconnect between clinical practice and experimental research hampers our understanding of bone formation around oral implants and how this process can be improved. We postulated that oral implant osseointegration would be fundamentally equivalent to implant osseointegration elsewhere in the body. Mice underwent implant placement in the edentulous ridge anterior to the first molar and peri-implant tissues were evaluated at various timepoints after surgery. Our hypothesis was disproven; oral implant osseointegration is substantially different from osseointegration in long bones. For example, in the maxilla peri-implant pre-osteoblasts are derived from cranial neural crest whereas in the tibia peri-implant osteoblasts are derived from mesoderm. In the maxilla, new osteoid arises from periostea of the maxillary bone but in the tibia the new osteoid arises from the marrow space. Cellular and molecular analyses indicate that osteoblast activity and mineralization proceeds from the surfaces of the native bone and osteoclastic activity is responsible for extensive remodeling of the new peri-implant bone. In addition to histologic features of implant osseointegration, molecular and cellular assays conducted in a murine model provide new insights into the sequelae of implant placement and the process by which bone is generated around implants. PMID:23886841

  2. Where bone meets implant: the characterization of nano-osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandfield, Kathryn; Gustafsson, Stefan; Palmquist, Anders

    2013-05-01

    The recent application of electron tomography to the study of biomaterial interfaces with bone has brought about an awareness of nano-osseointegration and, to a further extent, demanded increasingly advanced characterization methodologies. In this study, nanoscale osseointegration has been studied via laser-modified titanium implants. The micro- and nano-structured implants were placed in the proximal tibia of New Zealand white rabbits for six months. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), analytical microscopy, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM), as well as electron tomography studies were used to investigate the degree of nano-osseointegration in two- and three-dimensions. HRTEM indicated the laser-modified surface encouraged the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite in the immediate vicinity of the implant. Analytical studies suggested the presence of a functionally graded interface at the implant surface, characterized by the gradual intermixing of bone with oxide layer. Yet, the most compelling of techniques, which enabled straightforward visualization of nano-osseointegration, proved to be segmentation of electron tomographic reconstructions, where thresholding techniques identified bone penetrating into the nanoscale roughened surface features of laser-modified titanium. Combining high-resolution, analytical and three-dimensional electron microscopy techniques has proven to encourage identification and understanding of nano-osseointegration.The recent application of electron tomography to the study of biomaterial interfaces with bone has brought about an awareness of nano-osseointegration and, to a further extent, demanded increasingly advanced characterization methodologies. In this study, nanoscale osseointegration has been studied via laser-modified titanium implants. The micro- and nano-structured implants were placed in the proximal tibia of New Zealand white rabbits for six months

  3. Osseointegrated dental implants produced via microwave processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutty, Muralithran G.

    This research is a comprehensive effort to develop osseointegrated dental implants via microwave processing. A net-shape microwave sintering procedure was employed to fabricate dental implants. Commercial pure titanium powders (-100, -200 and -325 mesh sizes) were used in this work. This process eliminates the need for machining of implants and prevents contamination. The idea was to take advantage of the peculiar way microwave couple with metallic powders, i.e. generating heat in the interior of the sample and dissipating it away through the surface. The desired features for an implant, a dense core with surface pores, is not possible via conventional sintering. Coating with hydroxyapatite via electrodeposition and chemical combustion vapor deposition was also attempted to further enhance the bioactivity of this layer. Surface roughness and area were measured using a non-contact surface profilometer to further describe the unique surface. In-vitro studies, conducted using osteoblast cells extracted from neonatal rat calvarial, showed improved cell growth on all the uncoated porous samples. However, the highest cell growth was observed on the -200 mesh size samples. The higher surface area of the -200 mesh samples is attributed to this observation. This work was able to identify the processing parameters for titanium in microwave and establishes the importance of surface area as a key parameter for cell growth on porous surfaces as compared to surface roughness.

  4. Fabrication of Polymeric Coatings with Controlled Microtopographies Using an Electrospraying Technique.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiongyu; Mather, Jason P; Yang, Pine; Boden, Mark; Mather, Patrick T

    2015-01-01

    Surface topography of medical implants provides an important biophysical cue on guiding cellular functions at the cell-implant interface. However, few techniques are available to produce polymeric coatings with controlled microtopographies onto surgical implants, especially onto implant devices of small dimension and with complex structures such as drug-eluting stents. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to develop a new strategy to fabricate polymeric coatings using an electrospraying technique based on the uniqueness of this technique in that it can be used to produce a mist of charged droplets with a precise control of their shape and dimension. We hypothesized that this technique would allow facile manipulation of coating morphology by controlling the shape and dimension of electrosprayed droplets. More specifically, we employed the electrospraying technique to coat a layer of biodegradable polyurethane with tailored microtopographies onto commercial coronary stents. The topography of such stent coatings was modulated by controlling the ratio of round to stretched droplets or the ratio of round to crumped droplets under high electric field before deposition. The shape of electrosprayed droplets was governed by the stability of these charged droplets right after ejection or during their flight in the air. Using the electrospraying technique, we achieved conformal polymeric coatings with tailored microtopographies onto conductive surgical implants. The approach offers potential for controlling the surface topography of surgical implant devices to modulate their integration with surrounding tissues. PMID:26090663

  5. Asymmetric Nano/Microtopography Biases Cytoskeletal Dynamics and Promotes Unidirectional Cell Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Driscoll, Meghan; Guven, Can; Das, Satarupa; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John; Losert, Wolfgang

    Many biological and physiological processes depend upon directed migration of cells, which is typically mediated by chemical or physical gradients or by signal relay. Here we show that cells can be guided in a single preferred direction based solely on local asymmetries in nano/microtopography on subcellular scales. These asymmetries can be repeated, and thereby provide directional guidance, over arbitrarily large areas. The direction and strength of the guidance is sensitive to the details of the nano/microtopography, suggesting that this phenomenon plays a context-dependent role in vivo. We demonstrate that asymmetric nano/microtopography guides the direction of internal actin polymerization waves (esotaxis), and that cells move in the same direction as these waves (microthigmotaxis). This phenomenon is observed both for the pseudopod-dominated migration of the amoeboid Dictyostelium discoideum and for the lamellipod-driven migration of human neutrophils. The conservation of this mechanism across cell types and the asymmetric shape of many natural scaffolds suggests that actin-wave-based guidance is important in biology and physiology.

  6. A new modeling approach for simulating microtopography-dominated, discontinuous overland flow on infiltrating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Chu, Xuefeng

    2015-04-01

    Realistic modeling of discontinuous overland flow on irregular topographic surfaces has been proven to be a challenge. This study is aimed to develop a new modeling framework to simulate the discontinuous puddle-to-puddle (P2P) overland flow dynamics for infiltrating surfaces with various microtopographic characteristics. In the P2P model, puddles were integrated in a well-delineated, cascaded drainage system to facilitate explicit simulation of their dynamic behaviors and interactions. Overland flow and infiltration were respectively simulated by using the diffusion wave model and a modified Green-Ampt model for the DEM-derived flow drainage network that consisted of a series of puddle-based units (PBUs). The P2P model was tested by using a series of data from laboratory overland flow experiments for various microtopography, soil, and rainfall conditions. The modeling results indicated that the hierarchical relationships and microtopographic properties of puddles significantly affected their connectivity, filling-spilling dynamics, and the associated threshold flow. Surface microtopography and rainfall characteristics also exhibited strong influences on the spatio-temporal distributions of infiltration rates, runoff fluxes, and unsaturated flow. The model tests demonstrated its applicability in simulating microtopography-dominated overland flow on infiltrating surfaces.

  7. Predicting the roughness length of turbulent flows over landscapes with multi-scale microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.; Field, Jason P.

    2016-05-01

    The fully rough form of the law of the wall is commonly used to quantify velocity profiles and associated bed shear stresses in fluvial, aeolian, and coastal environments. A key parameter in this law is the roughness length, z0. Here we propose a predictive formula for z0 that uses the amplitude and slope of each wavelength of microtopography within a discrete-Fourier-transform-based approach. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is used to quantify the effective z0 value of sinusoidal microtopography as a function of the amplitude and slope. The effective z0 value of landscapes with multi-scale roughness is then given by the sum of contributions from each Fourier mode of the microtopography. Predictions of the equation are tested against z0 values measured in ˜ 105 wind-velocity profiles from southwestern US playa surfaces. Our equation is capable of predicting z0 values to 50 % accuracy, on average, across a 4 order of magnitude range. We also use our results to provide an alternative formula that, while somewhat less accurate than the one obtained from a full multi-scale analysis, has an advantage of being simpler and easier to apply.

  8. Fabrication of Polymeric Coatings with Controlled Microtopographies Using an Electrospraying Technique

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiongyu; Mather, Jason P.; Yang, Pine; Boden, Mark; Mather, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Surface topography of medical implants provides an important biophysical cue on guiding cellular functions at the cell-implant interface. However, few techniques are available to produce polymeric coatings with controlled microtopographies onto surgical implants, especially onto implant devices of small dimension and with complex structures such as drug-eluting stents. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to develop a new strategy to fabricate polymeric coatings using an electrospraying technique based on the uniqueness of this technique in that it can be used to produce a mist of charged droplets with a precise control of their shape and dimension. We hypothesized that this technique would allow facile manipulation of coating morphology by controlling the shape and dimension of electrosprayed droplets. More specifically, we employed the electrospraying technique to coat a layer of biodegradable polyurethane with tailored microtopographies onto commercial coronary stents. The topography of such stent coatings was modulated by controlling the ratio of round to stretched droplets or the ratio of round to crumped droplets under high electric field before deposition. The shape of electrosprayed droplets was governed by the stability of these charged droplets right after ejection or during their flight in the air. Using the electrospraying technique, we achieved conformal polymeric coatings with tailored microtopographies onto conductive surgical implants. The approach offers potential for controlling the surface topography of surgical implant devices to modulate their integration with surrounding tissues. PMID:26090663

  9. Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, Matteo; Fernandez-Yague, Marc; Lázaro, Pedro; Herrero-Climent, Mariano; Bullon, Pedro; Gil, Francisco-Javier

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite’s high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures. Key words:Dental implants, implants surfaces, osseointegration, biomimetics surfaces. PMID:25662555

  10. EFFECTS OF NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ON OSSEOINTEGRATION: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; Aragão, Maria Gerusa Brito; Pinto, Vicente de Paulo Teixeira; Gondim, Delane Viana; Barbosa, Francisco Cesar Barroso; Silva, Antonio Alfredo Rodrigues E; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos

    2013-10-31

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to review the effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on osseointegration and determine whether they cause failures in dental implants and whether patients who use them chronically can receive dental implants safely.A bibliographic electronic search was performed using the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Medline databases, selecting articles published between January 1982 and December 2012. The search included the following keywords, either alone or combined: "non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs," "dental implants," "bone healing," and "osteoprogenitor cells." The inclusion criteria were the following: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies, in vivo animal model studies of osseointegration, and in vitro studies of the effects of these agents on osteoprogenitor cells. The literature search revealed 360 references. A total of 31 articles met the inclusion criteria, including two clinical trials, 20 animal studies, and nine osteoprogenitor cell studies. The clinical trials revealed that cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitors did not impair osseointegration. The animal studies showed that any drug that is capable of inhibiting COX-2 may impair the osseointegration process. The in vitro studies showed that COX-2 inhibitors are the most potent depressors of osseointegration at the cellular level. Caution must be taken when selecting COX-2 nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs during the postoperative period. PMID:24175941

  11. Early osseointegration driven by the surface chemistry and wettability of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    SARTORETTO, Suelen Cristina; ALVES, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; RESENDE, Rodrigo Figueiredo Britto; CALASANS-MAIA, José; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; CALASANS-MAIA, Mônica Diuana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of two different commercially available dental implants on osseointegration. The surfaces were sandblasting and acid etching (Group 1) and sandblasting and acid etching, then maintained in an isotonic solution of 0.9% sodium chloride (Group 2). Material and Methods X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed for surface chemistry analysis. Surface morphology and topography was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy (CM), respectively. Contact angle analysis (CAA) was employed for wetting evaluation. Bone-implant-contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) analysis were performed on thin sections (30 μm) 14 and 28 days after the installation of 10 implants from each group (n=20) in rabbits’ tibias. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA at the 95% level of significance considering implantation time and implant surface as independent variables. Results Group 2 showed 3-fold less carbon on the surface and a markedly enhanced hydrophilicity compared to Group 1 but a similar surface roughness (p>0.05). BIC and BAFO levels in Group 2 at 14 days were similar to those in Group 1 at 28 days. After 28 days of installation, BIC and BAFO measurements of Group 2 were approximately 1.5-fold greater than in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion The surface chemistry and wettability implants of Group 2 accelerate osseointegration and increase the area of the bone-to-implant interface when compared to those of Group 1. PMID:26221922

  12. Relative significance of microtopography and vegetation as controls on surface water flow on a low-gradient floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, Jungyill; Harvey, Judson W.

    2014-01-01

    Surface water flow controls water velocities, water depths, and residence times, and influences sediment and nutrient transport and other ecological processes in shallow aquatic systems. Flow through wetlands is substantially influenced by drag on vegetation stems but is also affected by microtopography. Our goal was to use microtopography data directly in a widely used wetland model while retaining the advantages of the model’s one-dimensional structure. The base simulation with no explicit treatment of microtopography only performed well for a period of high water when vegetation dominated flow resistance. Extended simulations using microtopography can improve the fit to low-water conditions substantially. The best fit simulation had a flow conductance parameter that decreased in value by 70 % during dry season such that mcrotopographic features blocked 40 % of the cross sectional width for flow. Modeled surface water became ponded and flow ceased when 85 % of the cross sectional width became blocked by microtopographic features. We conclude that vegetation drag dominates wetland flow resistance at higher water levels and microtopography dominates at low water levels with the threshold delineated by the top of microtopographic features. Our results support the practicality of predicting flow on floodplains using relatively easily measured physical and biological variables.

  13. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  14. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems.

    PubMed

    Shah, Furqan A; Johansson, Martin L; Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks' implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30-50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding which

  15. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of titanium and improvement in osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chi-Jen; Su, Rein-Teng; Chu, Hou-Jen; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; He, Ju-Liang

    2013-08-01

    Reducing the osseointegration time for biomedical titanium implants in surgical patients is an important goal. However, a huge controversy exists over the effectiveness of osseointegration of the surface layer by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO), which is a widely favored surface modification for titanium-based implants. In this study, various surface coatings, including anatase-TiO2 (A-TiO2 ), rutile-TiO2 (R-TiO2 ), hydroxyapatite (HAp), strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (Sr-HAp), and dual-phase HAp-TiO2 were synthesized on titanium implants by PEO. A comparative study of osseointegration performance (both in vitro and in vivo) and bone/implant adhesion strength conducted using push-out thrust tests were demonstrated. The in vitro experimental test results agree strongly with the in vivo test results: the dual-phase HAp-TiO2 coating exhibits the superior cell adhesion and differentiation condition among all of the coatings in the in vitro tests and therefore has the highest push-out bonding strength of 5.37 MPa after 12 wk of implantation in the in vivo test. The HAp-containing coatings benefit from its bioactivity and therefore perform the others in terms of long-term osteocyte growth (from the in vitro results) and the extent of osseointegration (from the in vivo results). The dual-phase HAp-TiO2 coating provides the advantages of both the bioactive HAp and structural enhancement by the TiO2 , effectively promoting osseointegration. PMID:23529975

  16. Clinical evaluation of osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Satwalekar, Parth; Nalla, Sandeep; Reddy, Ramaswamy; Chowdary, Sheeba Glory

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the implant at the time of placement and during the development of the osseointegration process are the two major issues governing the implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon related to local factors such as bone quality, quantity, type of placement technique and type of implant used. The application of a user-friendly, clinically reliable, non-invasive method to assess implant stability and the osseointegration process is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one such method which shows almost perfect reproducibility and repeatability after statistical analysis. The aim of this paper is to review the various methods used to assess implant stability and on the currently used RFA method which is being highly accepted in the recent times. PMID:26929512

  17. Clinical evaluation of osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Satwalekar, Parth; Nalla, Sandeep; Reddy, Ramaswamy; Chowdary, Sheeba Glory

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the implant at the time of placement and during the development of the osseointegration process are the two major issues governing the implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon related to local factors such as bone quality, quantity, type of placement technique and type of implant used. The application of a user-friendly, clinically reliable, non-invasive method to assess implant stability and the osseointegration process is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one such method which shows almost perfect reproducibility and repeatability after statistical analysis. The aim of this paper is to review the various methods used to assess implant stability and on the currently used RFA method which is being highly accepted in the recent times. PMID:26929512

  18. Imaging of dental implant osseointegration using optical coherent tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, I.; Reisen, P.

    2009-02-01

    Investigation of initial implant stability with different dental implant designs is an important task to obtain good quality dental implants. Failure of a dental implant is often related to failure to osseointegrate correctly. Optical Coherent Tomography is a competitive non-invasive method of osseointegration investigation. FD-OCT with Swept Source was used to obtain 3-D image of the peri-implant tissue (soft and hard) in the case of mandible fixed screw. 1350 nm centered laser source give better images than 850 nm laser source for hard tissue imaging. Present work suggests that Optical Coherent Tomography is a proper technique to obtain the image of the contact tissue-metal screw. OCT images are useful to evaluate optical properties of bone tissues.

  19. Gene Expression Dynamics During Bone Healing and Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhao; Rios, Hector F.; Volk, Sarah L.; Sugai, James V.; Jin, Qiming; Giannobile, William V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the molecular features of bone repair and osseointegration may aid in the development of therapeutics to improve implant outcomes. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the gene expression dynamics during alveolar bone repair and implant osseointegration. Methods An implant osseointegration preclinical animal model was used whereby maxillary defects were created at the time of oral implant placement, while a tooth extraction socket healing model was established on the contralateral side of each animal. The surrounding tissues in the zone of the healing defects were harvested during regeneration for temporal evaluation using histology, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for the identification of a panel of 17 putative genes associated with wound repair. Results In both models, three distinct expression patterns were displayed: 1) genes that are slowly increased during the healing process, such as bone morphogenetic protein 4, runt-related transcription factor 2, and osteocalcin; 2) genes that are upregulated at the early stage of healing and then downregulated at later stages, such as interleukin and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligands 2 and 5; and 3) genes that are constitutively expressed over time, such as scleraxis. Although some similarities between osseointegration and tooth extraction socket were seen, distinct features developed and triggered a characteristic coordinated expression and orchestration of transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix molecules, and chemokines. Conclusions Characterization of these events contributes to a better understanding of cooperative molecular dynamics in alveolar bone healing, and highlights potential pathways that could be further explored for the enhancement of osseous regenerative strategies. PMID:21142982

  20. Osseointegration of biochemically modified implants in an osteoporosis rodent model.

    PubMed

    Stadlinger, B; Korn, P; Tödtmann, N; Eckelt, U; Range, U; Bürki, A; Ferguson, S J; Kramer, I; Kautz, A; Schnabelrauch, M; Kneissel, M; Schlottig, F

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of implant surface modifications on osseointegration in an osteoporotic rodent model. Sandblasted, acid-etched titanium implants were either used directly (control) or were further modified by surface conditioning with NaOH or by coating with one of the following active agents: collagen/chondroitin sulphate, simvastatin, or zoledronic acid. Control and modified implants were inserted into the proximal tibia of aged ovariectomised (OVX) osteoporotic rats (n = 32/group). In addition, aged oestrogen competent animals received either control or NaOH conditioned implants. Animals were sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks post-implantation. The excised tibiae were utilised for biomechanical and morphometric readouts (n = 8/group/readout). Biomechanical testing revealed at both time points dramatically reduced osseointegration in the tibia of oestrogen deprived osteoporotic animals compared to intact controls irrespective of NaOH exposure. Consistently, histomorphometric and microCT analyses demonstrated diminished bone-implant contact (BIC), peri-implant bone area (BA), bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) and bone-mineral density (BMD) in OVX animals. Surface coating with collagen/chondroitin sulphate had no detectable impact on osseointegration. Interestingly, statin coating resulted in a transient increase in BIC 2 weeks post-implantation; which, however, did not correspond to improvement of biomechanical readouts. Local exposure to zoledronic acid increased BIC, BA, BV/TV and BMD at 4 weeks. Yet this translated only into a non-significant improvement of biomechanical properties. In conclusion, this study presents a rodent model mimicking severely osteoporotic bone. Contrary to the other bioactive agents, locally released zoledronic acid had a positive impact on osseointegration albeit to a lesser extent than reported in less challenging models. PMID:23832686

  1. Osseointegrated implants in microvascular fibula free flap reconstructed mandibles.

    PubMed

    Huryn, J M; Zlotolow, I M; Piro, J D; Lenchewski, E

    1993-11-01

    In the past, prosthodontic rehabilitation of patients who underwent segmental mandibular resection relied on removable prostheses, which were less than ideal. The advent of the microvascular free flap has provided improved appearance and function through reconstruction of the skeletal integrity of the mandible. In select patients osseointegrated implants strategically placed in the reconstructed mandible can be used to restore masticatory function. Patient selection criteria and techniques are discussed. PMID:8254548

  2. Effects of selected factors on the osseointegration of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Koszuta, Piotr; Grafka, Agnieszka; Koszuta, Agnieszka; Łopucki, Maciej; Szymańska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osseointegration of dental implants with the maxillary and/or mandibular bone is the basis for implant prosthetic treatment. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of the patients’ gender, age, and in the case of women, their menopausal status (before menopause/after menopause/during hormone replacement therapy) on the osseointegration of dental implants. Material and methods The study evaluated the bone loss after implant loading and the success rate of the procedure in 71 women and 30 men. In the postmenopausal group, 20 (28.1%) women were receiving hormone replacement therapy. The implants used in the treatment of the studied patients were the two-phase dental implants. The extent of bone loss was estimated by comparing the post-implantation radiographs and the post-loading ones. Results The implantation procedure was entirely successful in 81 patients (80.2%). The patients’ age, gender and menopausal status did not significantly affect the implantation procedure success rate or bone loss (p > 0.05). A correlation between bone loss and hormone replacement therapy (p = 0.002) was found. Conclusions The hormone replacement therapy contributes to a greater peri-implant bone loss. The patients receiving hormone replacement therapy who consider replacement of missing teeth with implants should be informed about a greater risk of osseointegration failure, which may affect the success of implant therapy. PMID:26528107

  3. Natural frequency analysis of osseointegration for trans-femoral implant.

    PubMed

    Shao, F; Xu, W; Crocombe, A; Ewins, D

    2007-05-01

    Osseointegration trans-femoral implants are a new orthopaedic anchoring method to attach prosthetic limbs. The clinical success of this promising technique depends on the effectiveness of osseointegration achieved after implantation. The aim of this study is to use the resonant characteristics of the implant system to determine the changes in stability as a reflection of boundary condition of the implant. With a small mechanical excitation, Vibration responses of the trans-femoral implant to a small mechanical excitation were measured using an accelerometer and the vibration signal was analyzed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) software to obtain the fundamental natural frequency (NF) of the implant system. In-vitro study was conducted using different silicone rubbers to simulate the interface condition. The result showed that a high NF corresponded to a high elastic modulus of the interface material between the implant and bone. A preliminary in-vivo study with one osseointegration trans-femoral implant patient showed that there was a decrease of NF after initial weight bearing rehabilitation. After continued weight bearing, the NF gradually returned to the pre-loading level at around day 24 and the general trend of the NF reached a stable state 38 days after the first weight bearing exercise. PMID:17377843

  4. How microtopography and soil morphology can help decipher flow paths and processes in headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, J. P.; McGuire, K. J.; Bailey, S.

    2012-12-01

    Headwater catchments dominate the drainage basins of larger rivers and determine the water quality of downstream water bodies. In these catchments, hydrology strongly influences soil development and soil chemistry, thereby determining stream water quality. This study aims to explain spatial and temporal variations of flow paths and fine scale variations in hydrologic regimes at the headwater catchment scale utilizing a hydropedological approach. Hydropedologic units (HPUs), defined by differing soil morphological characteristics provide a framework for describing the function of different soil types in a catchment. Preliminary analysis and field observations also indicate that HPU locations will be predictable based on surface microtopography calculated from a 1-meter, LiDAR (Light Detection and Range) derived digital elevation model. We show that water table data from 50 wells distributed throughout the catchment confirms HPUs are indicative of specific hydrologic flow regimes, including threshold behavior, consistent with predictions based on soil morphology alone. This study focuses on three intensive study sites representative of typical soil morphological development in a small catchment. Furthering the water table analysis, measures of saturated and unsaturated hydrologic regimes, surface topographic characteristics, subsurface characteristics, and soil morphology were compared for the three intensive sites in an effort to quantify the effect of surface microtopography on the proposed hydropedologic system. Preliminary analysis shows matric potential gradients develop laterally down slope at site locations hypothesized to be indicative of lateral podsolization based on site topography and soil morphology. These results are in agreement with our findings describing threshold behavior in water table development at the same sites. The results of this study suggest a hydropedological approach may be a useful tool for describing catchment runoff response as well

  5. Microtopography for Ductile Fracture Process Characterization - Part 2: Application for CTOA Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Wilson Randolph; F. A. McClintock

    2003-02-01

    The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) is seeing increased use to characterize fracture in so-called "low constraint" geometries, such as thin sheet aerospace structures and thin-walled pipes. With this increase in application comes a need to more fully understand and measure actual CTOA behavior. CTOA is a measure of the material response during ductile fracture, a "crack tip response function". In some range of crack extension following growth initiation, a constant value of CTOA is often assumed. However, many questions concerning the use of CTOA as a material response-characterizing parameter remain. For example, when is CTOA truly constant? What three-dimensional effects may be involved (even in thin sheet material)? What are the effects of crack tunneling on general CTOA behavior? How do laboratory specimen measurements of CTOA compare to actual structural behavior? Measurements of CTOA on the outer surface of test specimens reveal little about threedimensional effects in the specimen interior, and the actual measurements themselves are frequently difficult. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) use their microtopography system to collect data from the actual fracture surfaces following a test. Analyses of these data provide full three-dimensional CTOA distributions, at any amount of crack extension. The analysis is accomplished using only a single specimen and is performed entirely after the completion of a test. The resultant CTOA distributions allow development of full and effective understanding of CTOA behaviors. This paper presents underlying principles, various sources of measurement error and their corrections, and experimental and analytical verification of CTOA analysis with the microtopography method.

  6. Osseointegration of short titan implants: A pilot study in pigs.

    PubMed

    Botzenhart, Ute; Kunert-Keil, Christiane; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Gredes, Tomasz; Seiler, Juliane; Berniczei-Roykó, Ádám; Gedrange, Tomasz

    2015-05-01

    Reduced vertical bone level in the implantation area is often considered one of the limiting factors before implant insertion. Inserting implants of reduced length might be useful in order to avoid vertical bone augmentation prior to implantation. To the present day, no official guidelines exist as to the optimal length for these implants. It is nevertheless well known that the stability of an implant depends primarily on its osseointegration, which could otherwise be influenced by modifying implant surface texture. The aim of our study was to evaluate osseointegration in correlation with implant length and surface texture. Three different variations of titan implants (n=5) were compared: two types, each with an acid-etched and ceramic blasted surface, were inserted in the upper jaw of adult female minipigs at different lengths (tioLogic ST Shorty, 5mm length; tioLogic ST, 9mm length) and were compared to a control group (tioLogic ST, 9mm length, ceramic blasted surface). Eight weeks after unloaded healing, bone tissue specimens containing the implants were processed, stained with Masson-Goldner-trichrome and analyzed histologically. Regardless of implant length and surface texture, new bone formation with no signs of inflammation could be detected in the area of the threads. Implants with a modified surface showed no statistically significant difference in bone-implant-contact (BIC) (tioLogic ST Shorty, 56.5%; tioLogic(©)ST; 77.2%), but a statistically significant difference could be found, when the 9mm implants were compared to the control group (BIC 48.9%). Surface modification could positively influence osseointegration as well as contribute to overcoming the adverse effects of length reduction. PMID:24780612

  7. Laser surface modification of Ti implants to improve osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marticorena, M.; Corti, G.; Olmedo, D.; Guglielmotti, M. B.; Duhalde, S.

    2007-04-01

    Commercially Pure Titanium foils, were irradiated using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser under ambient air, in order to produce and characterize a well controlled surface texture (roughness and waviness) that enhances osseointegration. To study the 'peri-implant' reparative process response, the laser treated Ti foils were implanted in the tibia of 10 male Wistar rats. At 14 days post-implantation, the histological analysis showed a tendency to more bone formation compared to the untreated control implants. The formation of a layer of TiN on the surface and the obtained roughness, have been demonstrated to improve bone response.

  8. Assessment of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment for Implant Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Danna, Natalie R.; Beutel, Bryan G.; Tovar, Nick; Witek, Lukasz; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the osseointegrative effects of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) surface treatment for implants in a canine model. Control surfaces were untreated textured titanium (Ti) and calcium phosphate (CaP). Experimental surfaces were their 80-second air-based APP-treated counterparts. Physicochemical characterization was performed to assess topography, surface energy, and chemical composition. One implant from each control and experimental group (four in total) was placed in one radius of each of the seven male beagles for three weeks, and one implant from each group was placed in the contralateral radius for six weeks. After sacrifice, bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) were assessed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed decreased surface levels of carbon and increased Ti and oxygen, and calcium and oxygen, posttreatment for Ti and CaP surfaces, respectively. There was a significant (P < 0.001) increase in BIC for APP-treated textured Ti surfaces at six weeks but not at three weeks or for CaP surfaces. There were no significant (P = 0.57) differences for BAFO between treated and untreated surfaces for either material at either time point. This suggests that air-based APP surface treatment may improve osseointegration of textured Ti surfaces but not CaP surfaces. Studies optimizing APP parameters and applications are warranted. PMID:26090443

  9. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Ebker, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  10. Titanium alloys (AoN) and their involvement in osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Danza, Matteo; Zollino, Ilaria; Candotto, Valentina; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osseointegration is essential for a long-term successful and inflammation-free dental implant. Such a result depends on osteoblastic cells growth and differentiation at the tissue-implant interface. The aim of this study was to compare two different AoN titanium layers (GR4 and GR5) to investigate which one had a greater osteoconductive power using human osteoblasts (HOb) culture at two different time-points. Materials and Methods: The expression levels of some bone-related (ALPL, COL1A1, COL3A1, SPP1, RUNX2, and SPARC) were analyzed using real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR). Results: Real-time RT-PCR data showed that after 3 days of treatment with TiA4GR, the genes up-regulated were COL3A1, ALPL, SPP1, and RUNX2. Moreover, no difference in gene expression was noticed 4 days later. On the other hand, the genes that overexpressed after 3 days of treatment with AoN5GR were ALPL, SPP1, and RUNX2. In both cases, the expression of COL1A1 and SPARC was negatively regulated. Conclusion: Our data showed that both titanium surfaces led to osteoblasts recruitment, maturation, and differentiation, thus promoting osseointegration at the tissue-implant interface. PMID:23814585

  11. Osseointegration of alumina bioceramic granules: A comparative experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerikh, V. V.; Avetisyan, A. R.; Zaydman, A. M.; Anikin, K. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Aronov, A. M.; Semantsova, E. S.

    2016-08-01

    To perform a comparative analysis of osseointegration of bioceramic alumina-based granules, hydroxyapatite-based granules, and deproteinized bone granules. The experiment was conducted on 52 adult male Kyoto-Wistar rats weighing 350 to 520 g. The animals were divided into five matched groups that differed only in the type of an implanted material. The granules were implanted in the lumbar vertebral bodies and in the distal right femur of each laboratory animal. Two months after surgery, the animals were euthanized, followed by tissue sampling for morphological studies. An examination of specimens from the groups with implanted alumina granules revealed the newly formed trabecular bone with remodeling signs. The bone tissue filled the intragranular space, tightly adhering to the granule surface. There was no connective tissue capsule on the border between bone tissue and alumina granules. Cylindrical bioceramic alumina-based granules with an open internal channel have a higher strength surpassing than that of analogs and the osseointegration ability close to that of hydroxyapatite and deproteinized bone granules.

  12. Electrical Implications of Corrosion for Osseointegration of Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Gittens, R.A.; Olivares-Navarrete, R.; Tannenbaum, R.; Boyan, B.D.; Schwartz, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The success rate of titanium implants for dental and orthopedic applications depends on the ability of surrounding bone tissue to integrate with the surface of the device, and it remains far from ideal in patients with bone compromised by physiological factors. The electrical properties and electrical stimulation of bone have been shown to control its growth and healing and can enhance osseointegration. Bone cells are also sensitive to the chemical products generated during corrosion events, but less is known about how the electrical signals associated with corrosion might affect osseointegration. The metallic nature of the materials used for implant applications and the corrosive environments found in the human body, in combination with the continuous and cyclic loads to which these implants are exposed, may lead to corrosion and its corresponding electrochemical products. The abnormal electrical currents produced during corrosion can convert any metallic implant into an electrode, and the negative impact on the surrounding tissue due to these extreme signals could be an additional cause of poor performance and rejection of implants. Here, we review basic aspects of the electrical properties and electrical stimulation of bone, as well as fundamental concepts of aqueous corrosion and its electrical and clinical implications. PMID:21555775

  13. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  14. Microtopography for Ductile Fracture Process Characterization - Part 1: Theory and Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Wilson Randolph

    2003-02-01

    The mechanics of ductile fracture is receiving increased focus as the importance of integrity of structures constructed from ductile materials is increasing. The non-linear, irreversible mechanical response of ductile materials makes generalized models of ductile cracking very difficult to develop. Therefore, research and testing of ductile fracture have taken a path leading to deformation-based parameters such as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) and crack tip opening angle (CTOA). Constrained by conventional test techniques and instrumentation, physical values (e.g. crack mouth opening displacement, CMOD, and CTOA angles) are measured on the test specimen exterior and a single through-thickness "average" interior value is inferred. Because of three-dimensional issues such as crack curvature, constraint variation, and material inhomogeneity, inference of average parameter values may introduce errors. The microtopography methodology described here measures and maps three-dimensional fracture surfaces. The analyses of these data provide direct extraction of the parameters of interest at any location within the specimen interior, and at any desired increment of crack opening or extension. A single test specimen can provide all necessary information for the analysis of a particular material and geometry combination.

  15. Adherent lipopolysaccharide inhibits the osseointegration of orthopedic implants by impairing osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A; Anderson, J Robert; Lee, Zhenghong; Goldberg, Victor M; Greenfield, Edward M

    2013-01-01

    Osseointegration is the process by which an orthopedic implant makes direct bone-to-implant contact and is crucial for the long-term function of the implant. Surface contaminants, such as bacterial debris and manufacturing residues, may remain on orthopedic implants after sterilization and impair osseointegration. For example, specific lots of implants that were associated with impaired osseointegration and high failure rates were discovered to have contaminants including bacterial debris. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine if bacterial debris exists on sterile orthopedic implants and if adherent bacterial debris inhibits the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. We found that debris containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria exists on both sterile craniofacial implants and wrist implants. Levels of bacterial debris vary not only between different lots of implants but within an individual lot. Using our murine model of osseointegration, we found that ultrapure LPS adherent to the implants inhibited bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures. Analysis of osseointegration in knock-out mice demonstrated that adherent LPS inhibited osseointegration by signaling through its primary receptor, Toll-like receptor 4, and not by signaling through Toll-like receptor 2. Ultrapure LPS adherent to titanium alloy discs had no detectable effect on early stages of MC3T3-E1 osteogenesis in vitro such as attachment, spreading or growth. However, later stages of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization were inhibited by adherent LPS. Thus, LPS may inhibit osseointegration in part through cell autonomous effects on osteoblasts. These results highlight bacterial debris as a type of surface contaminant that can impair the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. PMID:22995462

  16. Effects of alveolar ridge preservation on delayed implant osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan; Li, Bin; Xue, Hui-Min; Huang, Hai-Yun; Liu, Gang-Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of alveolar ridge preservation with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma) on delayed implant osseointegration. The 3rd and 4th left and right mandibular premolars were extracted from four adult healthy male and female dogs. For the experimental group, we randomly selected two extraction sockets in each dog to be filled with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma). The two remaining extraction sockets remained untreated and served as the control group. Three months after Bio-Oss placement, dental implants were inserted into the alveolar bone of the experimental group and the control group. The osteogenic activity of the bone around the implants was assessed by evaluating the histological morphology and by estimating histomorphometric parameters at 3 and 6 months after delayed implantation. At 3 months, Goldner’s trichrome staining analysis showed that the bone-implant contact rate and mineralised bone area around the implant were significantly higher in the experimental group (75.98% ± 8.97% and 69.52% ± 9.63%, respectively) than in the control group (56.13% ± 8.18% and 52.82% ± 7.25%, respectively; P < 0.05). However, at 6 months, the two groups showed no significant difference. Fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed that the average mineralisation apposition rate of the bone tissue around the dental implant in the experimental group at 3 and 6 months was 6.80 ± 0.43 μm and 8.38 ± 0.84 μm, respectively, which was significantly higher than the rate in the control group (P < 0.05). These data indicated that alveolar ridge preservation by using Bio-Oss placement can promote osseointegration of delayed implantation. This may be a promising option for clinical use. PMID:26379871

  17. Osseointegrated implants: a potential route of entry for squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Schache, Andrew; Thavaraj, Selvam; Kalavrezos, Nicholas

    2008-07-01

    Documented cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma in relation to osseointegrated implants are rare. We present the first case with evidence to suggest that implants provide a route of entry for squamous cell carcinoma to the mandible. PMID:18063453

  18. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-11-01

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to represent the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics in northern

  19. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Hanson, Paul J.; Mao, Jiafu; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Griffiths, Natalie A.; Bisht, Gautam

    2015-11-12

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to representmore » the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. Furthermore, the new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological

  20. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-02-01

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to represent the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts significant hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics

  1. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Hanson, Paul J.; Mao, Jiafu; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Griffiths, Natalie A.; Bisht, Gautam

    2015-11-12

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to represent the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. Furthermore, the new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics

  2. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-02-20

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to represent the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts significant hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics

  3. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-02-20

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to representmore » the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts significant hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological

  4. Osseointegration of KrF laser hydroxylapatite films on Ti6A14V alloy by mini-pigs: loaded osseointegration of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinek, Miroslav; Himmlova, Lucia; Grivas, Christos

    1999-05-01

    Aim of study was to evaluate osseointegration of the KrF laser hydroxyapatite coated titanium alloy Ti6Al4V dental implants. For deposition KrF excimer laser in stainless- steel deposition chamber was used. Thickness of HA films were round 1 μm . Mini-pigs were used in this investigation. Implants were placed vertically into the lower jaw. After 14 weeks unloaded osseointegration the metal ceramic crowns were inserted. the experimental animals were sacrificed (1 year post insertion). The vertical position of implants was controlled with a radiograph. Microscopical sections were cut and ground. Sections were viewed using microscope with CCD camera. 1 year osseointegration in lower jaw confirmed by all implants presence of newly formed bone around the all implants. Laser-deposited coating the layer of fibrous connective tissue was seen only seldom. In the control group (titamium implant without cover) the fibrous connective tissue was seen between implant and newly formed bone.

  5. Osseointegrative Properties of Electrospun Hydroxyapatite-Containing Nanofibrous Chitosan Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Frohbergh, Michael E.; Katsman, Anya; Mondrinos, Mark J.; Stabler, Collin T.; Hankenson, Kurt D.; Oristaglio, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to develop smart biomaterials that can facilitate regeneration of critical-size craniofacial lesions. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that biomimetic scaffolds electrospun from chitosan (CTS) will promote tissue repair and regeneration in a critical size calvarial defect. To test this hypothesis, we first compared in vitro ability of electrospun CTS scaffolds crosslinked with genipin (CTS-GP) to those of mineralized CTS-GP scaffolds containing hydroxyapatite (CTS-HA-GP), by assessing proliferation/metabolic activity and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels of murine mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs). The cells' metabolic activity exhibited a biphasic behavior, indicative of initial proliferation followed by subsequent differentiation for all scaffolds. ALP activity of mMSCs, a surrogate measure of osteogenic differentiation, increased over time in culture. After 3 weeks in maintenance medium, ALP activity of mMSCs seeded onto CTS-HA-GP scaffolds was approximately two times higher than that of cells cultured on CTS-GP scaffolds. The mineralized CTS-HA-GP scaffolds were also osseointegrative in vivo, as inferred from the enhanced bone regeneration in a murine model of critical size calvarial defects. Tissue regeneration was evaluated over a 3 month period by microCT and histology (Hematoxylin and Eosin and Masson's Trichrome). Treatment of the lesions with CTS-HA-GP scaffolds induced a 38% increase in the area of de novo generated mineralized tissue area after 3 months, whereas CTS-GP scaffolds only led to a 10% increase. Preseeding with mMSCs significantly enhanced the regenerative capacity of CTS-GP scaffolds (by ∼3-fold), to 35% increase in mineralized tissue area after 3 months. CTS-HA-GP scaffolds preseeded with mMSCs yielded 45% new mineralized tissue formation in the defects. We conclude that the presence of HA in the CTS-GP scaffolds significantly enhances their osseointegrative capacity and that mineralized chitosan-based scaffolds

  6. Surface micro-topography causes hot spots of biogeochemical activity in wetland systems: A virtual modeling experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, S.; Knorr, K. H.; Peiffer, S.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands provide important ecohydrological services by regulating fluxes of nutrients and pollutants to receiving waters, which can in turn mitigate adverse effects on water quality. Turnover of redox-sensitive solutes in wetlands has been shown to take place in distinct spatial and temporal patterns, commonly referred to as hot spots and hot moments. Despite the importance of such patterns for solute fluxes the mechanistic understanding of their formation is still weak and their existence is often explained by variations in soil properties and diffusive transport only. Here we show that surface micro-topography in wetlands can cause the formation of biogeochemical hot spots solely by the advective redistribution of infiltrating water as a result of complex subsurface flow patterns. Surface and subsurface flows are simulated for an idealized section of a riparian wetland using a fully integrated numerical code for coupled surface-subsurface systems. Biogeochemical processes and transport along advective subsurface flow paths are simulated kinetically using the biogeochemical code PHREEQC. Distinct patterns of biogeochemical activity (expressed as reaction rates) develop in response to micro-topography induced subsurface flow patterns. Simulated vertical pore water profiles for various redox-sensitive species resemble profiles observed in the field. This mechanistic explanation of hot spot formation complements the more static explanations that relate hot spots solely to spatial variability in soil characteristics and can account for spatial as well as temporal variability of biogeochemical activity, which is needed to assess future changes in the biogeochemical turnover of wetland systems.

  7. Weight-bearing-induced changes in the microtopography and structural stiffness of human skin in vivo following immobility periods.

    PubMed

    Dobos, Gabor; Gefen, Amit; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are injuries to the skin and underlying tissues, caused by sustained deformations and occur frequently in aged patients. Skin microtopography and stiffness affect the interaction of skin with contact surfaces contributing to PU development. We simulated immobility in 20 healthy females (mean age 69.9 years). Skin microtopography and stiffness were measured at the PU predilection sites before and after loading. Skin roughness decreased at the heels by 18.1% after 90 minutes (p = 0.022), but remained unchanged at the sacrum and the upper back. Structural elasticity and elastic deformations increased at all skin areas; changes over time were significant at the sacrum (p = 0.005) and the heel, (p = 0.002). The residual skin deformation increased at all skin areas after loading significantly at the sacrum (32.0%, p = 0.013) and upper back (20.6%, p = 0.007). The structural "biological" elasticity of the skin decreased significantly at the upper back after loading, but remained unchanged at the heels. All skin changes recovered after unloading. Results indicate that prolonged loading causes structural skin changes in humans in vivo in PU predilection sites. The pathogenesis of PUs is different at the heels, the sacral and upper back skin. PMID:25682694

  8. The extracellular matrix microtopography drives critical changes in cellular motility and Rho A activity in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We have shown that the microtopography (mT) underlying colon cancer changes as a tumor de-differentiates. We distinguish the well-differentiated mT based on the increasing number of "pits" and poorly differentiated mT on the basis of increasing number of "posts." We investigated Rho A as a mechanosensing protein using mT features derived from those observed in the ECM of colon cancer. We evaluated Rho A activity in less-tumorogenic (Caco-2 E) and more tumorigenic (SW620) colon cancer cell-lines on microfabricated pits and posts at 2.5 μm diameter and 200 nm depth/height. In Caco-2 E cells, we observed a decrease in Rho A activity as well as in the ratio of G/F actin on surfaces with either pits or posts but despite this low activity, knockdown of Rho A led to a significant decrease in confined motility suggesting that while Rho A activity is reduced on these surfaces it still plays an important role in controlling cellular response to barriers. In SW620 cells, we observed that Rho A activity was greatest in cells plated on a post microtopography which led to increased cell motility, and an increase in actin cytoskeletal turnover. PMID:20667086

  9. Current-controlled, abyssal microtopography and sedimentation in Mozambique Basin, southwest Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolla, V.; Eittreim, S.; Sullivan, L.; Kostecki, J.A.; Burckle, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    The Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) activity and the variations in the abundance and grain size of the terrigenous sediments, derived from Africa and Madagascar land masses, are reflected in different types of microtopography in the Mozambique Basin. In southerly areas, where the sediment supply is much less, the bottom-current activity has resulted in the presence of manganese nodules, a thin veneer of sediments, and the absence of sediment waves. Farther north, along the marginal areas of the basin where the fine-grained sediments from the Africa-Madagascar source have been supplied in abundance, wavy bedforms have been generated by AABW. Wavy bedforms do not exist even in the northerly areas if coarse-grained, turbidite sediments are present on the sea floor. The continuation of acoustic reflectors from the zone of turbidites in the central areas of the basin into the zone of sediment waves along the margins, and the lithology and structures in sediment cores from these zones suggest that the turbidity-current-fed, fine-grained sediments were deposited as wavy bedforms by AABW flow. Thus, sediment waves formed readily during Pleistocene times. The enrichment of quartz and displaced Antarctic diatoms, and the relatively low kaolinite/chlorite ratios in the sediments, the north-pointing current lineations on the sea floor, the lack of any perceptible sedimentary fill in the troughs of waves, and the dense nepheloid layer in the westerly areas of the Mozambique Basin, attest to the current-controlled sedimentation and generation of wavy bedforms during Holocene time also. The formation of sediment waves in the Mozambique Basin can be modeled after a fluvial antidune mechanism. This model envisages that internal waves, focussed on a benthic boundary layer cap, have been locked in phase with sediment waves in the presence of an 8-10 cm/sec current in the Mozambique Basin. A density contrast of 2??10-6 g/cm3 appears to exist at the tops of benthic boundary layers in the

  10. Osseointegration properties of titanium dental implants modified with a nanostructured coating based on ordered porous silica and bioactive glass nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covarrubias, Cristian; Mattmann, Matías; Von Marttens, Alfredo; Caviedes, Pablo; Arriagada, Cristián; Valenzuela, Francisco; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Corral, Camila

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of a nanoporous silica coating loaded with bioactive glass nanoparticles (nBG/NSC) on titanium dental implant surface and its in vitro and in vivo evaluation is presented. The coating was produced by a combined sol-gel and evaporation induced self-assembly process. In vitro bioactivity was assessed in simulated body fluid (SBF) and investigating the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). A rat tibial model was employed to analyze the bone response to nBG/NSC-modified titanium implant surface in vivo. The nBG/NSC coating was confirmed at nano level to be constituted by a highly ordered nanoporous silica structure. The coating nanotopography in conjunction with the bioactivity of the BG particles accelerate the in vitro apatite formation and promote the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in absence of osteogenic supplements. These properties accelerate the formation of bone tissue in the periphery of the implant after 3 weeks of implantation. Backscattered scanning electron microscopy images revealed the presence of gaps and soft tissue in the unmodified implant after 6 weeks, whereas the nBG/NSC-modified implant showed mature bone in intimate contact with the implant surface. The nBG/NSC coating appears promising for accelerating the osseointegration of dental implants.

  11. Machine oil inhibits the osseointegration of orthopaedic implants by impairing osteoblast attachment and spreading.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A; Goldberg, Victor M; Greenfield, Edward M

    2015-07-01

    The most important factor contributing to short-term and long-term success of cementless total joint arthroplasties is osseointegration. Osseointegration leads to a direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of an implant. Surface contaminants may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and impair osseointegration. For example, specific lots of hip replacement Sulzer Inter-OP(TM) acetabular shells that were associated with impaired osseointegration and early failure rates were found to be contaminated with both bacterial debris and machine oil residues. However, the effect of machine oil on implant integration is unknown. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if machine oil inhibits the osseointegration of orthopaedic implants. To test this hypothesis in vivo we used our murine model of osseointegration where titanium alloy implants are implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur. We found that machine oil inhibited bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures. Machine oil on titanium alloy discs inhibited early stages of MC3T3-E1 osteogenesis in vitro such as attachment and spreading. Inhibition of osteoblast attachment and spreading occurred in both areas with and without detectable oil. Osteoblast growth was in turn inhibited on discs with machine oil due to both a decrease in proliferation and an increase in cell death. Later stages of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization on titanium alloy discs were also inhibited. Thus, machine oil can inhibit osseointegration through cell autonomous effects on osteoblast cells. These results support routine testing by manufacturers of machine oil residues on orthopaedic implants. PMID:25676177

  12. Patient satisfaction after insertion of an osseointegrated implant bridge.

    PubMed

    Hoogstraten, J; Lamers, L M

    1987-09-01

    The general and specific satisfaction of patients treated with a jawbone-anchored bridge was compared with their pretreatment satisfaction with dentures (condition 1, n = 31). Patients who asked for information on the osseointegration method but did not apply for treatment (condition 2, n = 32), and a group of patients that did not ask for information (condition 3, n = 10) were also questioned on their satisfaction with dentures. The results indicated that condition 1 subjects were both socially and physically substantially more satisfied with their bridge than with their earlier dentures. On all satisfaction measures condition 3 subjects indicated more satisfaction with dentures than either condition 1 or condition 2 subjects. There were no significant differences between the three groups on several personality characteristics (neuroticism, test-taking attitudes, internal/external control). Condition 3 subjects were less extrovert (socially oriented) than the other subjects. Condition 1 subjects made several suggestions towards improvement of the pre- and post-operation phase, concerning the amount of pain involved and the cleaning of the bridge, etc. PMID:3478456

  13. Enhancement of biomechanical behavior on osseointegration of implant with SLAffinity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kuo-Tien; Cheng, Han-Yi; Pan, Yung-Ning; Chen, Shyuan-Yow; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate stresses resulting from different thicknesses of hydroxyapatite- and titanium dioxide (TiO(2))-treated layers at the interface between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implants and bones using three-dimensional finite element models. For ensuring osseointegration of implant treatment, one must examine the stresses of interface between implant and bone tissue. Treated layers on TMJ implants are a very important factor in clinical application. Several studies have investigated finite element models for TMJs, but few have examined a model for TMJ implants with treated layers. In this study, TMJ models were reconstructed using computer tomography data, and the effects of treated layer thickness on the stress field during jaw movement were investigated; this index has not yet been reported with respect to TMJ implant. The maximum stresses in the bone occurred at the position of the first screw. Data analysis indicated a greater decrease in this stress in the case of using TMJ implants with TiO(2)-treated layers, and the stresses decreased with increasing layer thicknesses. Results confirmed that the treated layers improve biomechanical properties of the TMJ implants and release abnormal stress concentration in them. The results of our study offer the potential clinical benefit of inducing superior biomechanical behavior in TMJ implants. PMID:23349074

  14. Sheep Hip Arthroplasty Model of Failed Implant Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Thomas; Kold, Søren; Baas, Jørgen; Søballe, Kjeld; Rahbek, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Early secure stability of an implant is important for long-term survival. We examined whether micromotion of implants consistently would induce bone resorption and formation of a fibrous membrane and thereby prevent osseointegration. One micromotion implant was inserted into one of the medial femoral condyles in ten sheep. The micromotion device consists of an anchor bearing a PMMA implant and a PE plug. During each gait cycle the PE plug will make the PMMA implant axially piston 0.5 mm. After 12 weeks of observation the bone specimens were harvested and a post-mortem control implant was inserted into the contra-lateral medial femoral condyle. Histomorphometrical evaluation showed that the surface on the implant observed for 12 weeks was covered by fibrous tissue. The control implants were covered by lamellar bone. No difference was found with respect to the volume fraction of lamellar bone in a 1 mm zone around the implants. This study indicates that implant micromotion is sufficient to induce bone resorption and formation of a fibrous membrane. PMID:26664497

  15. The Effect of Titanium Surface Modifications on Dental Implant Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Marco; Guida, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The use of titanium dental implants has consistently changed the way of rehabilitating patients in modern dentistry and can count on high long-term survival and success rates. With respect to its introduction in the late 1960s, clinical indications for implant therapy have been significantly extended and optimal results have been achieved, even in clinical conditions formerly considered as unfavourable. Such evolution owes a lot to the significant progress made in the field of titanium surfaces. The topographical and chemical modification of traditional titanium surfaces has led to a real epochal shift in implant dentistry. Depending on the type and characteristics of the surface treatment applied, a wide range of implants has been produced, which have contributed to the success but also increased the risk of confusion in implant selection criteria for the clinician. This chapter, which provides an updated analysis of the relevant literature, the characteristics of modern implant surfaces, the biological principles underlying their role in promoting osseointegration and the scientific evidence about their clinical use are analyzed and presented. PMID:26201277

  16. Assessing the performance of structure-from-motion photogrammetry and terrestrial lidar 1 at reconstructing soil surface microtopography of naturally vegetated plots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microtopography or soil roughness is a property of critical importance in many earth surface processes but is often difficult to measure. Advances in computer vision technologies have made image-based 3D depiction of the soil surface or Structure-from-Motion (SfM) available to many scientists ...

  17. Effects of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound on Dental Implant Osseointegration: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Yakup; Erdogan, Ozgur; Kurkcu, Mehmet; Akova, Tolga; Damlar, İbrahim

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPU) on dental implant osseointegration in a rabbit model using mechanical-histomorphometric methods and resonance-frequency analysis (RFA). Methods Twelve skeletally mature, male New Zealand rabbits (3.4 kg±0.5) were included in the study. A total number of 24 implants were placed bilaterally into the tibiae of the subjects. The right tibia of each rabbit received LIPU application (20 min/day) while the left side received sham treatment. The study was carried on for six weeks and the rabbits were sacrificed in 7 days intervals (two rabbits for each week). The rabbits were categorized in the early or late osseointegration period according to their sacrification date. Comparisons between the groups were made using statistical analysis of histomorphometric analysis, resonance frequency analysis and mechanical tests. Results The histomorphometry parameters showed that the bone area and the bone volume values have significantly increased in the early osseointegration period and the bone-implant contact values have significantly increased in the late osseointegration period in the LIPU treated subjects when compared to the control group. RFA scores had mild increase in the LIPU group. However the difference was not statistically significant. Mechanical test results suggest an increased mechanical stability in the LIPU group as well. Conclusions Results of this pilot study indicate that low intensity pulsed ultrasound may have positive effects on osseointegration and stability of dental implants. PMID:19212531

  18. Osseointegrated total knee replacement connected to a lower limb prosthesis: 4 cases

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Aditya; Frossard, Laurent; Lord, Sarah J; Bosley, Belinda; Al Muderis, Munjed

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — Osseointegrated implants are an alternative for prosthetic attachment in individuals with amputation who are unable to wear a socket. However, the load transmitted through the osseointegrated fixation to the residual tibia and knee joint can be unbearable for those with transtibial amputation and knee arthritis. We report on the feasibility of combining total knee replacement (TKR) with an osseointegrated implant for prosthetic attachment. Patients and methods — We retrospectively reviewed all 4 cases (aged 38–77 years) of transtibial amputations managed with osseointegration and TKR in 2012–2014. The below-the-knee prosthesis was connected to the tibial base plate of a TKR, enabling the tibial residuum and knee joint to act as weight-sharing structures. A 2-stage procedure involved connecting a standard hinged TKR to custom-made implants and creation of a skin-implant interface. Clinical outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 1–3 years of follow-up using standard measures of health-related quality of life, ambulation, and activity level including the questionnaire for transfemoral amputees (Q-TFA) and the 6-minute walk test. Results — There were no major complications, and there was 1 case of superficial infection. All patients showed improved clinical outcomes, with a Q-TFA improvement range of 29–52 and a 6-minute walk test improvement range of 37–84 meters. Interpretation — It is possible to combine TKR with osseointegrated implants. PMID:26145721

  19. Spine interbody implants: material selection and modification, functionalization and bioactivation of surfaces to improve osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Rao, Prashanth J; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2014-05-01

    The clinical outcome of lumbar spinal fusion is correlated with achievement of bony fusion. Improving interbody implant bone on-growth and in-growth may enhance fusion, limiting pseudoarthrosis, stress shielding, subsidence and implant failure. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and titanium (Ti) are commonly selected for interbody spacer construction. Although these materials have desirable biocompatibility and mechanical properties, they require further modification to support osseointegration. Reports of extensive research on this topic are available in biomaterial-centric published reports; however, there are few clinical studies concerning surface modification of interbody spinal implants. The current article focuses on surface modifications aimed at fostering osseointegration from a clinician's point of view. Surface modification of Ti by creating rougher surfaces, modifying its surface topography (macro and nano), physical and chemical treatment and creating a porous material with high interconnectivity can improve its osseointegrative potential and bioactivity. Coating the surface with osteoconductive materials like hydroxyapatite (HA) can improve osseointegration. Because PEEK spacers are relatively inert, creating a composite by adding Ti or osteoconductive materials like HA can improve osseointegration. In addition, PEEK may be coated with Ti, effectively bio-activating the coating. PMID:24890288

  20. Cancellous Bone Osseointegration Is Enhanced by In Vivo Loading

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu; Kelly, Natalie H.; Han, Jane; Nair, Turya; Wright, Timothy M.; van der Meulen, Marjolein C.H.; Bostrom, Mathias P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Biophysical stimuli may be an effective therapy to counteract age-related changes in bone structure that affect the primary stability of implants used in joint replacement or fracture fixation. The influence of controlled mechanical loading on osseointegration was investigated using an in vivo device implanted in the distal lateral femur of 12 male rabbits. Compressive loads (1 MPa, 1 Hz, 50 cycles/day, 4 weeks) were applied to a porous titanium foam implant and the underlying cancellous bone. The contralateral limbs served as nonloaded controls. Backscattered electron imaging indicated that the amount of bone ingrowth was significantly greater in the loaded limb than in the nonloaded control limb, whereas the amount of underlying cancellous periprosthetic bone was similar. No significant difference in the mineral apposition rate of the bone ingrowth or periprosthetic bone was measured in the loaded compared to the control limb. Histological analysis demonstrated newly formed woven bone in direct apposition to the implant coating, with a lack of fibrous tissue at the implant–periprosthetic bone interface in both loaded and nonloaded implants. The lack of fibrous tissue demonstrates that mechanical stimulation using this model significantly enhanced cancellous bone ingrowth without the detrimental effects of micromotion. These results suggest that biophysical therapy should be further investigated to augment current treatments to enhance long-term fixation of orthopedic devices. Additionally, this novel in vivo loading model can be used to further investigate the influence of biophysical stimulation on other tissue engineering approaches requiring bone ingrowth into both metallic and nonmetallic cell-seeded scaffolds. PMID:20367497

  1. The influence of thread geometry on implant osseointegration under immediate loading: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyo-Sook; Namgung, Cheol; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Implant success is achieved by the synergistic combination of numerous biomechanical factors. This report examines the mechanical aspect of implants. In particular, it is focused on macrodesign such as thread shape, pitch, width and depth, and crestal module of implants. This study reviews the literature regarding the effect of implant thread geometry on primary stability and osseointegration under immediate loading. The search strategy included both in vitro and in vivo studies published in the MEDLINE database from January 2000 to June 2014. Various geometrical parameters are analyzed to evaluate their significance for optimal stress distribution, implant surface area, and bone remodeling responses during the process of osseointegration. PMID:25551016

  2. Berberine in Combination with Insulin Has Additive Effects on Titanium Implants Osseointegration in Diabetes Mellitus Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li; Zhijian, Huang; Lei, Li; Wenchuan, Chen; Zhimin, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of berberine in combination with insulin on early osseointegration of implants in diabetic rats. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: healthy rats were used as control (HC), and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with insulin, berberine, berberine + insulin (IB), or no treatment. Each rat received one machined-surface cp-Ti implant into the right tibia and was given insulin injection and/or gavage feeding with berberine daily for 8 weeks until being sacrificed. Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein (BGP) were analyzed in each group. Peri-implant mineral apposition was marked by fluorochrome double-labeling and osseointegration was histomorphologically examined. The ALP and BGP levels decreased in diabetic rats but were successfully corrected by insulin and berberine combined treatment. Moreover, untreated diabetic rats had less labeled mineral apposition and impaired osseointegration. In contrast, Groups I, B, and IB were observed with increased peri-implant bone formation. The combination treatment of insulin and berberine was more effective than each administrated as a monotherapy. These results suggest that berberine combined with insulin could promote osseointegration in diabetic rats, thereby highlighting its potential application to patients, though further studies are needed. PMID:26783411

  3. Ti implants with nanostructured and HA-coated surfaces for improved osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Hasret Tolga; Vargel, Ibrahim; Kutsal, Tulin; Korkusuz, Petek; Piskin, Erhan

    2016-05-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the osseointegration of titanium (Ti)-based Küntscher nails (K-nails) and plates with modified nanostructured and hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces in a rat femur model. Material surfaces were first modified via a simple anodization protocol in which the materials were treated in hydrogen fluoride (1% w/w) at 20 V. This modification resulted in tubular titanium oxide nanostructures of 40-65 nm in diameter. Then, hydroxyapatite-deposited layers, formed of particles (1-5) μm, were produced via incubation in a simulated body fluid, followed by annealing at 500°C. Both surface modifications significantly improved cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as compared to the control (non-modified Ti implants). The controls and modified nails and plates were implanted in the femur of 21 male Sprague-Dawley rats. The implants, with surrounding tissues, were removed after 10 weeks, and then mechanical tests (torque and pull-out) were performed, which showed that the modified K-nails exhibited significantly better osseointegration than the controls. Histologic examinations of the explants containing plates showed similar results, and the modified plates exhibited significantly better osseointegration than the controls. Surface nanostructuring of commercially available titanium-based implants by a very simple method - anodization - seems to be a viable method for increasing osseointegration without the use of bioactive surface coatings such as hydroxyapatite. PMID:26496822

  4. Implant design and its effects on osseointegration over time within cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Bryan G; Danna, Natalie R; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Marin, Charles; Tovar, Nick; Suzuki, Marcelo; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-08-01

    Healing chambers present at the interface between implant and bone have become a target for improving osseointegration. The objective of the present study was to compare osseointegration of several implant healing chamber configurations at early time points and regions of interest within bone using an in vivo animal femur model. Six implants, each with a different healing chamber configuration, were surgically implanted into each femur of six skeletally mature beagle dogs (n = 12 implants per dog, total n = 72). The implants were harvested at 3 and 5 weeks post-implantation, non-decalcified processed to slides, and underwent histomorphometry with measurement of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) within healing chambers at both cortical and trabecular bone sites. Microscopy demonstrated predominantly woven bone at 3 weeks and initial replacement of woven bone by lamellar bone by 5 weeks. BIC and BAFO were both significantly increased by 5 weeks (p < 0.001), and significantly higher in cortical than trabecular bone (p < 0.001). The trapezoidal healing chamber design demonstrated a higher BIC than other configurations. Overall, a strong temporal and region-specific dependence of implant osseointegration in femurs was noted. Moreover, the findings suggest that a trapezoidal healing chamber configuration may facilitate the best osseointegration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1091-1097, 2016. PMID:26034012

  5. A strontium-incorporated nanoporous titanium implant surface for rapid osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Huiliang; Zhang, Xiaochen; Li, Guanglong; Chang, Qing; Zhao, Jun; Qiao, Yuqin; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-03-01

    Rapid osseointegration of dental implants will shorten the period of treatment and enhance the comfort of patients. Due to the vital role of angiogenesis played during bone development and regeneration, it might be feasible to promote rapid osseointegration by modifying the implant surface to gain a combined angiogenesis/osteogenesis inducing capacity. In this study, a novel coating (MAO-Sr) with strontium-incorporated nanoporous structures on titanium implants was generated via a new micro-arc oxidation, in an attempt to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis to enhance rapid osseointegration. In vitro, the nanoporous structure significantly enhanced the initial adhesion of canine BMSCs. More importantly, sustained release of strontium ions also displayed a stronger effect on the BMSCs in facilitating their osteogenic differentiation and promoting the angiogenic growth factor secretion to recruit endothelial cells and promote blood vessel formation. Advanced mechanism analyses indicated that MAPK/Erk and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways were involved in these effects of the MAO-Sr coating. Finally, in the canine dental implantation study, the MAO-Sr coating induced faster bone formation within the initial six weeks and the osseointegration effect was comparable to that of the commercially available ITI implants. These results suggest that the MAO-Sr coating has the potential for future use in dental implants. PMID:26881868

  6. Osseointegration and biocompatibility of different metal implants - a comparative experimental investigation in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the present study, 4 different metallic implant materials, either partly coated or polished, were tested for their osseointegration and biocompatibility in a pelvic implantation model in sheep. Methods Materials to be evaluated were: Cobalt-Chrome (CC), Cobalt-Chrome/Titanium coating (CCTC), Cobalt-Chrome/Zirconium/Titanium coating (CCZTC), Pure Titanium Standard (PTST), Steel, TAN Standard (TANST) and TAN new finish (TANNEW). Surgery was performed on 7 sheep, with 18 implants per sheep, for a total of 63 implants. After 8 weeks, the specimens were harvested and evaluated macroscopically, radiologically, biomechanically (removal torque), histomorphometrically and histologically. Results Cobalt-Chrome screws showed significantly (p = 0.031) lower removal torque values than pure titanium screws and also a tendency towards lower values compared to the other materials, except for steel. Steel screws showed no significant differences, in comparison to cobalt-chrome and TANST, however also a trend towards lower torque values than the remaining materials. The results of the fluorescence sections agreed with those of the biomechanical test. Histomorphometrically, there were no significant differences of bone area between the groups. The BIC (bone-to-implant-contact), used for the assessment of the osseointegration, was significantly lower for cobalt-chrome, compared to steel (p = 0.001). Steel again showed a lower ratio (p = 0.0001) compared to the other materials. Conclusion This study demonstrated that cobalt-chrome and steel show less osseointegration than the other metals and metal-alloys. However, osseointegration of cobalt-chrome was improved by zirconium and/or titanium based coatings (CCTC, TANST, TAN, TANNEW) being similar as pure titanium in their osseointegrative behavior. PMID:22400715

  7. Fast plasma sintering delivers functional graded materials components with macroporous structures and osseointegration properties.

    PubMed

    Godoy, R F; Coathup, M J; Blunn, G W; Alves, A L; Robotti, P; Goodship, A E

    2016-01-01

    We explored the osseointegration potential of two macroporous titanium surfaces obtained using fast plasma sintering (FPS): Ti macroporous structures with 400-600 µmØ pores (TiMac400) and 850-1000 µmØ pores (TiMac850). They were compared against two surfaces currently in clinical use: Ti-Growth® and air plasma spray (Ti-Y367). Each surface was tested, once placed over a Ti-alloy and once onto a CoCr bulk substrate. Implants were placed in medial femoral condyles in 24 sheep. Samples were explanted at four and eight weeks after surgery. Push-out loads were measured using a material-testing system. Bone contact and ingrowth were assessed by histomorphometry and SEM and EDX analyses. Histology showed early osseointegration for all the surfaces tested. At 8 weeks, TiMac400, TiMac850 and Ti-Growth® showed deep bone ingrowth and extended colonisation with newly formed bone. The mechanical push-out force was equal in all tested surfaces. Plasma spray surfaces showed greater bone-implant contact and higher level of pores colonisation with new bone than FPS produced surfaces. However, the void pore area in FPS specimens was significantly higher, yet the FPS porous surfaces allowed a deeper osseointegration of bone to implant. FPS manufactured specimens showed similar osseointegration potential to the plasma spray surfaces for orthopaedic implants. FPS is a useful technology for manufacturing macroporous titanium surfaces. Furthermore, its capability to combine two implantable materials, using bulk CoCr with macroporous titanium surfaces, could be of interest as it enables designers to conceive and manufacture innovative components. FPS delivers functional graded materials components with macroporous structures optimised for osseointegration. PMID:27071735

  8. Simulation of Runoff Hydrograph on Soil Surfaces with Different Microtopography Using a Travel Time Method at the Plot Scale.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Longshan; Wu, Faqi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple travel time-based runoff model was proposed to simulate a runoff hydrograph on soil surfaces with different microtopographies. Three main parameters, i.e., rainfall intensity (I), mean flow velocity (vm) and ponding time of depression (tp), were inputted into this model. The soil surface was divided into numerous grid cells, and the flow length of each grid cell (li) was then calculated from a digital elevation model (DEM). The flow velocity in each grid cell (vi) was derived from the upstream flow accumulation area using vm. The total flow travel time through each grid cell to the surface outlet was the sum of the sum of flow travel times along the flow path (i.e., the sum of li/vi) and tp. The runoff rate at the slope outlet for each respective travel time was estimated by finding the sum of the rain rate from all contributing cells for all time intervals. The results show positive agreement between the measured and predicted runoff hydrographs. PMID:26103635

  9. Simple application of fibronectin-mimetic coating enhances osseointegration of titanium implants

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Timothy A.; Reyes, Catherine D.; Burns, Kellie L.; García, Andrés J.

    2009-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion to biomolecules adsorbed onto biomedical devices regulates device integration and performance. Because of the central role of integrin-fibronectin (FN) interactions in osteoblastic function and bone formation, we evaluated the ability of fibronectin-inspired biomolecular coatings to promote osteoblastic differentiation and implant osseointegration. Notably, these biomolecular coatings relied on physical adsorption of FN-based ligands onto biomedical-grade titanium as a simple, clinically-translatable strategy to functionalize medical implants. Surfaces coated with a recombinant fragment of FN spanning the central cell binding domain enhanced osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization in bone marrow stromal cell cultures and increased implant osseointegration in a rat cortical bone model compared to passively adsorbed RGD peptides, serum proteins, and full-length FN. Differences in biological responses correlated with integrin binding specificity and signaling among surface coatings. This work validates a simple, clinically-translatable, surface biofunctionalization strategy to enhance biomedical device integration. PMID:18752639

  10. Primary oral squamous cell carcinoma arising around dental osseointegrated implants mimicking peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Eguia del Valle, Asier; Martínez-Conde Llamosas, Rafael; López Vicente, José; Uribarri Etxebarria, Agurne; Aguirre Urizar, José Manuel

    2008-08-01

    Prosthodontic rehabilitation using dental implants has become a common practice in dentistry at the present time. The number of complications related to dental osseointegrated implants has increased according to the generalization of its use along the last decade. Among the most common of these complications are chronic inflammatory conditions affecting both hard and soft tissues around dental implants. Although severe complications are uncommon, in recent years several cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma adjacent to dental implants have been published. In this paper we present a new unusual case of primary oral squamous cell carcinoma arising around a dental fixed prosthesis over osseointegrated implants in a 76 male patient with no previous history of malignance and no risk factors related to oral cancer. PMID:18667981

  11. Multifunctional coatings to simultaneously promote osseointegration and prevent infection of orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Raphel, Jordan; Holodniy, Mark; Goodman, Stuart B; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2016-04-01

    The two leading causes of failure for joint arthroplasty prostheses are aseptic loosening and periprosthetic joint infection. With the number of primary and revision joint replacement surgeries on the rise, strategies to mitigate these failure modes have become increasingly important. Much of the recent work in this field has focused on the design of coatings either to prevent infection while ignoring bone mineralization or vice versa, to promote osseointegration while ignoring microbial susceptibility. However, both coating functions are required to achieve long-term success of the implant; therefore, these two modalities must be evaluated in parallel during the development of new orthopaedic coating strategies. In this review, we discuss recent progress and future directions for the design of multifunctional orthopaedic coatings that can inhibit microbial cells while still promoting osseointegration. PMID:26851394

  12. Osseointegrated implants and functional prosthetic rehabilitation in microvascular fibula free flap reconstructed mandibles.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, I M; Huryn, J M; Piro, J D; Lenchewski, E; Hidalgo, D A

    1992-12-01

    The mandibulectomy deformity can be alleviated by immediate mandibular reconstruction using the microvascular fibula free flap. Before the advent of microvascular reconstruction, conventional and maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation offered limited success after surgery due to the failure to reestablish the bony foundation and soft tissues (tongue, floor of mouth, vestibule) anatomically and physiologically. With proper multidisciplinary pretreatment planning and postoperative treatment, osseointegrated implants can be strategically placed in patients with these reconstructed mandibles to restore occlusal and masticatory function. The records of seven patients who underwent reconstructive surgery and osseointegrated implants were reviewed, with an emphasis on the variety of prosthetic designs and principles used to maximize long-term efficiency and preservation of tissues. PMID:1463123

  13. A strontium-incorporated nanoporous titanium implant surface for rapid osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Huiliang; Zhang, Xiaochen; Li, Guanglong; Chang, Qing; Zhao, Jun; Qiao, Yuqin; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-02-01

    Rapid osseointegration of dental implants will shorten the period of treatment and enhance the comfort of patients. Due to the vital role of angiogenesis played during bone development and regeneration, it might be feasible to promote rapid osseointegration by modifying the implant surface to gain a combined angiogenesis/osteogenesis inducing capacity. In this study, a novel coating (MAO-Sr) with strontium-incorporated nanoporous structures on titanium implants was generated via a new micro-arc oxidation, in an attempt to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis to enhance rapid osseointegration. In vitro, the nanoporous structure significantly enhanced the initial adhesion of canine BMSCs. More importantly, sustained release of strontium ions also displayed a stronger effect on the BMSCs in facilitating their osteogenic differentiation and promoting the angiogenic growth factor secretion to recruit endothelial cells and promote blood vessel formation. Advanced mechanism analyses indicated that MAPK/Erk and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways were involved in these effects of the MAO-Sr coating. Finally, in the canine dental implantation study, the MAO-Sr coating induced faster bone formation within the initial six weeks and the osseointegration effect was comparable to that of the commercially available ITI implants. These results suggest that the MAO-Sr coating has the potential for future use in dental implants.Rapid osseointegration of dental implants will shorten the period of treatment and enhance the comfort of patients. Due to the vital role of angiogenesis played during bone development and regeneration, it might be feasible to promote rapid osseointegration by modifying the implant surface to gain a combined angiogenesis/osteogenesis inducing capacity. In this study, a novel coating (MAO-Sr) with strontium-incorporated nanoporous structures on titanium implants was generated via a new micro-arc oxidation, in an attempt to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis to

  14. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical

  15. The synergistic effect of hierarchical micro/nano-topography and bioactive ions for enhanced osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjie; Wang, Guocheng; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Xiaobing; Zou, Duohong; Zhu, Chao; Jin, Yuqin; Huang, Qingfeng; Sun, Jian; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan; Zreiqat, Hala

    2013-04-01

    Both surface chemistry and topography have significant influence on good and fast osseointegration of biomedical implants; the main goals in orthopeadic, dental and maxillofacial surgeries. A surface modification strategy encompassing the use of bioactive trace elements together with surface micron/nano-topographical modifications was employed in this study in an attempt to enhance the osseointegration of Ti alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), a commonly used implant. Briefly, we developed strontium-substituted hardystonite (Sr-HT) ceramic coating with a hierarchical topography where the nanosized grains were superimposed in the micron-rough coating structure. Its ability to induce new bone formation was evaluated by an in vivo animal model (beagle dogs). Hardystonite (HT), classic hydroxyapatite (HAp) coated and uncoated Ti-alloy implants were parallelly investigated for comparison. In addition, we investigated the effects of surface topography and the dissolution products from the coatings on the in vitro bioactivity using canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) cultured on the implant surface as well as using extracts of the coated implants. Micro-CT evaluation, histological observations, biomechanical test (push-out test) and sequential fluorescent labeling and histomorphometrical analysis consistently demonstrated that our developed Sr-HT-coated Ti-alloy implants have the highest osseointegration, while the uncoated implants had the lowest. The osseointegration ability of HAp-coated Ti alloy was inferior to that seen for HT- and Sr-HT-coated Ti alloy. We demonstrated that the dissolution products, particularly strontium (Sr) from the Sr-HT-coated implants, enhanced the ALP activity and in vitro mineralization ability, while the micro/nano-topography was more related to the promotion of cell adhesion. Those results suggest that our developed Sr-HT coatings have the potential for future use as coatings for orthopedic/dental and maxillofacial devices. PMID:23380352

  16. Percutaneous osseointegrated prostheses for amputees: Limb compensation in a 12-month ovine model.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Trevor J; Beck, J Peter; Bloebaum, Roy D; Bachus, Kent N

    2011-10-13

    Percutaneous osseointegrated prostheses are being investigated as an alternative strategy to attach prosthetic limbs to patients. Although the use of these implants has shown to be promising in clinical trials, the ability to maintain a skin seal around an osseointegrated implant interface is a major challenge to prevent superficial and deep periprosthetic infections. The specific aim of this study was to establish a translational load-bearing ovine model to assess postoperative limb compensation and gait symmetry following a percutaneous osseointegrated implant. We tested the following hypotheses: (1) the animals would return to pre-amputation limb loads within 12-months; (2) the animals would return to a symmetrical gait pattern (stride length and time in stance) within 12-months. The results demonstrated that one month following surgery, the sheep loaded their amputated limb to a mean value of nearly 80% of their pre-amputation loading condition; by 12-months, this mean had dropped to approximately 74%. There was no statistical differences between the symmetry of the amputated forelimb and the contralateral forelimb at any time point for the animals stride length or the time spent in the stance phase of their gait cycle. Thus, the data showed that while the animals maintained symmetric gait patterns, they did not return to full weight-bearing after 12-months. The results of this study showed that a large animal load-bearing model had a symmetric gait and was weight bearing for up to 12 months. While the current investigation utilizes an ovine model, the data show that osseointegrated implant technology with postoperative follow-up can help our human patients return to symmetric gait and maintain an active lifestyle, leading to an improvement in their quality of life following amputation. PMID:21920525

  17. In vivo osseointegration of Ti implants with a strontium-containing nanotubular coating.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yonggang; Zhang, Li; Song, Wen; Chang, Bei; Han, Tianxiao; Zhang, Yumei; Zhao, Lingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Novel biomedical titanium (Ti) implants with high osteogenic ability for fast and good osseointegration under normal as well as osteoporotic conditions are urgently needed. Expanding on our previous in vitro results, we hypothesized that nanotubular, strontium-loaded (NT-Sr) structures on Ti implants would have favorable osteogenic effects and evaluated the in vivo osseointegration of these implants in rats. The structures with nanotubes of different diameters were fabricated by electrochemical anodization at 10 and 40 V, and the amounts of Sr loaded were adjusted by using two hydrothermal treatment times of 1 and 3 hours. Qualitative microcomputed tomography in two and three dimensions showed that the NT-Sr formed with an anodization voltage of 10 V and hydrothermal treatment time of 3 hours best supported bone growth in vivo. Histomorphometric examination of osseointegration also showed that more newly formed bone was found at its surface. The bone-implant contact percentage was highest (92.48%±0.76%) at 12 weeks. In conclusion, the NT-Sr formed with an anodization voltage of 10 V and hydrothermal treatment time of 3 hours showed excellent osteogenic properties, making it an attractive option for Ti surface modification with considerable clinical potential. PMID:27042055

  18. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration. PMID:27546196

  19. Effect of TiO2 nanotubes arrays on osseointegration of orthodontic miniscrew.

    PubMed

    Jang, Insan; Shim, Seong-Cheol; Choi, Dong-Soon; Cha, Bong-Kuen; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Choe, Byung-Hak; Choi, Won-Youl

    2015-08-01

    To increase the stability of orthodontic miniscrews, TiO2 nanotube arrays were fabricated on the surface of Ti miniscrews and the effect of those arrays on the osseointegration of miniscrews was evaluated. Highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays were grown on the surface of orthodontic miniscrews. Ethylene glycol based electrolyte was used in the anodic oxidation process. Two-step anodic oxidation was conducted to obtain clean and open windows in TiO2 nanotube arrays. The diameter and length of the TiO2 nanotube arrays were ~ 70 nm and ~ 5 μm, respectively. The miniscrews with TiO2 nanotube arrays were implanted in the legs of New Zealand white rabbits for 8 weeks. Histological osseointegration was assessed by bone-to-implant contact ratio, and three-dimensional bone volume ratio was measured by micro-computed tomography analysis. The miniscrews with TiO2 nanotube arrays had a greater mean bone-to-implant contact ratio of 52.8 % than the control, 29.3 %. Mean bone volume ratio (BV/TV) was also higher in the miniscrews with TiO2 nanotube arrays, at 81.2 % than those in the control via micro-CT analysis. Our findings support that TiO2 nanotube arrays on the surface of miniscrews enhance osseointegration and improve the stability of the miniscrew. PMID:26149697

  20. Evaluating the osseointegration of nanostructured titanium implants in animal models: Current experimental methods and perspectives (Review).

    PubMed

    Babuska, Vaclav; Moztarzadeh, Omid; Kubikova, Tereza; Moztarzadeh, Amin; Hrusak, Daniel; Tonar, Zbynek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the experimental methods currently being used to evaluate the osseointegration of nanostructured titanium implants using animal models. The material modifications are linked to the biocompatibility of various types of oral implants, such as laser-treated, acid-etched, plasma-coated, and sand-blasted surface modifications. The types of implants are reviewed according to their implantation site (endoosseous, subperiosteal, and transosseous implants). The animal species and target bones used in experimental implantology are carefully compared in terms of the ratio of compact to spongy bone. The surgical technique in animal experiments is briefly described, and all phases of the histological evaluation of osseointegration are described in detail, including harvesting tissue samples, processing undemineralized ground sections, and qualitative and quantitative histological assessment of the bone-implant interface. The results of histological staining methods used in implantology are illustrated and compared. A standardized and reproducible technique for stereological quantification of bone-implant contact is proposed and demonstrated. In conclusion, histological evaluation of the experimental osseointegration of dental implants requires careful selection of the experimental animals, bones, and implantation sites. It is also advisable to use larger animal models and older animals with a slower growth rate rather than small or growing experimental animals. Bones with a similar ratio of compact to spongy bone, such as the human maxilla and mandible, are preferred. A number of practical recommendations for the experimental procedures, harvesting of samples, tissue processing, and quantitative histological evaluations are provided. PMID:27421518

  1. Plasma Surface Functionalized Polyetheretherketone for Enhanced Osseo-Integration at Bone-Implant Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Wong, Hoi Man; Lui, So Ching; Chong, Eva Y W; Wu, Guosong; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wang, Chong; Pan, Haobo; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Wu, Shuilin; Chu, Paul K; Yeung, Kelvin W K

    2016-02-17

    This study aims at improving osseo-integration at the bone-implant interface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) by water (H2O) and ammonia (NH3) plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The pertinent surface characteristics including surface energy, roughness, morphology, and chemical composition are investigated systematically and the in vitro biological performance is evaluated by cell adhesion and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, real-time RT-PCR evaluation, and mineralization tests. In vivo osseo-integration is examined via implanting samples into the distal femur of the rats. The hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, and proliferation, ALP activity, and osteogenic differentiation after H2O PIII or NH3 PIII are improved significantly. Furthermore, substantially enhanced osseo-integration is achieved in vivo. Nonline-of-sight plasma surface functionalization, which is particularly suitable for biomedical implants with an irregular geometry, does not alter the bulk compressive yield strength and elastic modulus of the materials. Consequently, the favorable bulk attributes of PEEK are preserved while the surface biological properties are enhanced thus boding well for wider orthopedic application of the biopolymer. PMID:26796319

  2. In vivo osseointegration of Ti implants with a strontium-containing nanotubular coating

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yonggang; Zhang, Li; Song, Wen; Chang, Bei; Han, Tianxiao; Zhang, Yumei; Zhao, Lingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Novel biomedical titanium (Ti) implants with high osteogenic ability for fast and good osseointegration under normal as well as osteoporotic conditions are urgently needed. Expanding on our previous in vitro results, we hypothesized that nanotubular, strontium-loaded (NT-Sr) structures on Ti implants would have favorable osteogenic effects and evaluated the in vivo osseointegration of these implants in rats. The structures with nanotubes of different diameters were fabricated by electrochemical anodization at 10 and 40 V, and the amounts of Sr loaded were adjusted by using two hydrothermal treatment times of 1 and 3 hours. Qualitative microcomputed tomography in two and three dimensions showed that the NT-Sr formed with an anodization voltage of 10 V and hydrothermal treatment time of 3 hours best supported bone growth in vivo. Histomorphometric examination of osseointegration also showed that more newly formed bone was found at its surface. The bone–implant contact percentage was highest (92.48%±0.76%) at 12 weeks. In conclusion, the NT-Sr formed with an anodization voltage of 10 V and hydrothermal treatment time of 3 hours showed excellent osteogenic properties, making it an attractive option for Ti surface modification with considerable clinical potential. PMID:27042055

  3. Effect of Poly-L-Lysine coating on titanium osseointegration: from characterization to in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Varoni, Elena; Canciani, Elena; Palazzo, Barbara; Varasano, Vincenzo; Chevallier, Pascale; Petrizzi, Lucio; Dellavia, Claudia; Mantovani, Diego; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-12-01

    Dental implant prostheses cannot preclude a correct and stable implant osseointegration, which is still a challenge and greatly depends on biomaterial-cell interface. Titanium (Ti) coating using polyelectrolyte poly-L-lysine (PLL) may represent an interesting and simple approach, to provide a charged surface net able to improve cell adherence. However, in vitro and in vivo effects of Ti coated with PLL have been poorly investigated. The aims of the present study are (1) to obtain and characterize, chemically and physically, Ti disks coated with PLL (TiPLL); (2) to perform in vitro studies on osteoblast cell lines' cytocompatibility and functionality (alkaline phosphatase [ALP] activity, calcium deposition, proinflammatory interleukin 6 production); (3) to obtain in vivo evidence of osseointegration, using a sheep animal model. XPS, AFM, and contact-angle analyses demonstrated that the Ti disk was successfully covered with PLL, providing higher hydrophilicity to the Ti disk. No cellular toxicity, enhanced calcium deposition, and a decreased tendency toward interleukin-6 production were observed in the osteoblast seeded onto TiPLL. In vivo experiments showed cortical bone microhardness at 3 months significantly improved in the presence of the PLL coating. PLL coating on Ti implants seemed to safely enhance calcium deposition and implant early osseointegration in animals, suggesting promising evidence to optimize the surface properties of dental implants. PMID:24001103

  4. Numerical investigations on the osseointegration of uncemented endoprostheses based on bio-active interface theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, André; Nackenhorst, Udo

    2012-09-01

    In order to simulate the osseointegration of bone implants, a bio-active interface theory is necessary. The thin bone-implant interface layer is described by the Drucker-Prager plasticity model. The formulation of bone mineral density depends on the local mechanical environment. For the simulation of the osseointegration of bone implants a bio-active interface theory is suggested. A thin bone-implant interface layer is described by a Drucker-Prager plasticity model. An evolution rule for the bone mineral density is formulated in dependency of the local mechanical environment. The time dependent ingrowth is modeled by a hardening rule which modifies the Drucker-Prager yield-surface cone in the principle stress state in dependency of the local bone mineral density. The osseointegration process is limited by the violation of a so called micromotion threshold. This relative motion in the implant-bone interface is computed by dynamic loads of daily motion activity. For parameter studies on detailed 3D models model reduction techniques are introduced. The applicability is demonstrated on a hip-joint prosthesis which is in clinical usage.

  5. Force and movement of non-osseointegrated implants: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis; Ilies, Horea; Lasko, Brian; Stack, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Dental implants have enabled a dramatic increase in the quality of life for many partially edentulous and edentulous patents. Immediate loading of newly placed dental implants is a recent advancement that attempts to meet patient demand. However, immediate loading of a just placed implant may induce implant failure to osseointegrate. Some patients can generate a biting force that can reach approximately 1300 Newtons (N) in the posterior jaws. The magnitude of bite force that would cause failure of osseointegration of newly placed implants is currently unknown. It has been proposed that osseointegration would fail if an implant is luxated in bone more than 50 to 150 microns. Fibrous tissue, not bone, would form. This study investigated the quantity of various off-axial forces required to move a nonosseointegrated 4.3 x 13 mm implant 50 microns. The previously published pilot study for this study found that the amount of horizontal force required to displace an implant 50 microns was approximately 150 N. This study found that the force needed to move the implants 100 microns at a horizontal approach, 0 degrees, averaged 50 N, with a range of 23-79 N; at 22 degrees, averaged 52 N, with a range of 27-70 N; and at 60 degrees averaged 87 N, with a range of 33-105 N. PMID:20017642

  6. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration. PMID:27546196

  7. Implant Osseointegration and the Role of Microroughness and Nanostructures: Lessons for Spine Implants

    PubMed Central

    Gittens, Rolando A.; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of spinal implants for spine fusion has been steadily increasing to avoid the risks of complications and donor site morbidity involved when using autologous bone. A variety of fusion cages are clinically available, with different shapes and chemical compositions. However, detailed information about their surface properties and the effects of such properties on osteogenesis is lacking in the literature. Here we evaluate the role of surface properties for spinal implant applications, covering some of the key biological processes that occur around an implant and focusing on the role of surface properties, specifically surface structure, on osseointegration, drawing examples from other implantology fields when required. Our findings revealed that surface properties such as micro-roughness and nanostructures can directly affect early cell behavior and long-term osseointegration. Micro-roughness has been well established in the literature to have a beneficial effect on osseointegration of implants. In the case of the role of nanostructures, the number of reports is increasing and most studies reveal a positive effect from the nanostructures alone and a synergistic effect when combined with micro-rough surfaces. Still, long-term clinical results are necessary to establish the full implications of surface nanomodifications. PMID:24721613

  8. Improving oral implant osseointegration in a murine model via Wnt signal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Mouraret, Sylvain; Hunter, Daniel J.; Bardet, Claire; Popelut, Antoine; Brunski, John B.; Chaussain, Catherine; Bouchard, Philippe; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine the key biological events occurring during implant failure and then we use this knowledge to develop new biology-based strategies that improve osseointegration. Materials and Methods Wild-type and Axin2LacZ/LacZ adult male mice underwent oral implant placement, with and without primary stability. Peri-implant tissues were evaluated using histology, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and TUNEL staining. In addition, mineralization sites, collagenous matrix organization and the expression of bone markers in the peri-implant tissues were assessed. Results Maxillary implants lacking primary stability show histological evidence of persistent fibrous encapsulation and mobility, which recapitulates the clinical problems of implant failure. Despite histological and molecular evidence of fibrous encapsulation, osteoblasts in the gap interface exhibit robust ALP activity. This mineralization activity is counteracted by osteoclast activity that resorbs any new bony matrix and consequently, the fibrous encapsulation remains. Using a genetic mouse model, we show that implants lacking primary stability undergo osseointegration, provided that Wnt signalling is amplified. Conclusions In a mouse model of oral implant failure caused by a lack of primary stability, we find evidence of active mineralization. This mineralization, however, is outpaced by robust bone resorption, which culminates in persistent fibrous encapsulation of the implant. Fibrous encapsulation can be prevented and osseointegration assured if Wnt signalling is elevated at the time of implant placement. PMID:24164629

  9. Chitosan/siCkip-1 biofunctionalized titanium implant for improved osseointegration in the osteoporotic condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Kaimin; Song, Wen; Xu, Haiyan; An, Ran; Zhao, Lingzhou; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    Biofunctionalization with siRNA targeting the key negative modulators of bone turnover involved in the molecular mechanism of osteoporosis, such as casein kinase-2 interacting protein-1 (Ckip-1), may lead to enhanced Ti osseointegration in the osteoporotic condition. In this study, even siRNA loading was accomplished by the thermal alkali (TA) treatment to make the Ti ultrahydrophilic and negatively charged to facilitate the physical adsorption of the positively charged CS/siR complex, designated as TA-CS/siR. The intracellular uptake of the CS/siR complex and the gene knockdown efficiency were assessed with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as well as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing H1299 cells. In vitro osteogenic activity of TA-CS/siCkip-1 targeting Ckip-1 was assessed with MSCs. In vivo osseointegration of TA-CS/siCkip-1 was assessed in the osteoporotic rat model. TA-CS/siR showed excellent siRNA delivery efficiency and gene silencing effect. TA-CS/siCkip-1 significantly improved the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in terms of the enhanced alkaline phosphatase and collagen product and extracellular matrix mineralization, and led to dramatically enhanced in vivo osseointegration in the osteoporostic rat model, showing promising clinical potential for the osteoporotic condition application. TA-CS/siR may constitute a general approach for developing the advanced Ti implants targeting specific molecular mechanism. PMID:26040545

  10. [MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF OSSEOINTEGRATION AFTERAPPLICATION OF TITANIUM IMPLANTS WITH BIOACTIVE COATING AND RECOMBINANT BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN].

    PubMed

    Gaifullin, N M; Karyagina, A S; Gromov, A V; Terpilovskiy, A A; Malanin, D A; Demeshchenko, M V; Novochadov, V V

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on 22 albino male Wistar rats to study the morphological peculiarities of osseointegration of titanium grafts with bioactive surface stimulated additionally with bone plastic material "Gamalant-paste-FORTE Plus" containing recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). In 9 rats the implants were placed into femoral bones after local treatment of bone canal with rhBMP-2-containing material. Another 9 animals were implanted but received no treatment, 4 rats formed the group of intact control. Zone of osseointegration was studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after graft placement using histological and morphometric methods as well as immune histochemistry to demonstrate osteonectin, CD68, MMP-9, and TIMP-1. The study showed that preliminary treatment of bone canal with rhBMP-2-containing material preceding implant placement was accompanied by an additional osteoinductive effect. More intense and outrunning bone formation in the area of osseointegration was observed, together with remodeling and compaction of the contiguous cancellous bone, thus providing the necessary balance between MMP-9 and TIMP-1 with a high level of each factor expression. PMID:27487669

  11. Effect of microtopography and species composition on small-scale variability of CO2 fluxes in a subalpine grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvagno, Marta; Filippa, Gianluca; Cremonese, Edoardo; Morra di Cella, Umberto; Isabellon, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Grassland ecosystems cover around 30% of the Earth's land surface and consequently play an important role in the terrestrial carbon balance. Climate and land use changes have a significant effect on the sink/source strength of grasslands, especially in mountain regions. For these reasons the carbon cycle of high-altitude grasslands has recently received higher attention, however little is know on the within-ecosystem variability in CO2 fluxes. In fact, alpine and subalpine grasslands are often characterized by complex topography which generates differences in snowmelt dynamics at site level and related different microhabitats. The deriving patchy distribution of vegetation leads to the coexistence of different plant functional traits and developmental strategies within the same ecosystem. In this study we evaluated the effect of microtopography and associated vegetation types on the CO2 flux components of an unamanaged subalpine grassland located at 2160 m asl, by means of automated clear and opaque chambers. In order to disentangle the contribution of different growth forms to the whole ecosystem carbon sequestration we compare chambers with eddy covariance CO2 flux data. Results show that: i) different growth forms are associated with concave o convex shapes of the terrain and, in detail, grass species dominate in convex areas while forbs are especially found in concave ones ii) two distinct CO2 flux trajectories associated to these shapes can be distinguished in this ecosystem: graminoids show a later beginning of the carbon uptake period but higher CO2 net uptake (NEE), while forbs develop just after snowmelt but show lower NEE. The observed small-scale patterns of carbon sequestration may reflect the distinct vegetation type responses to snowmelt and different adaptations to resource use efficiency (light, temperature, nutrients) specific of their own microhabitat. Further investigations will be carried on to better evaluate the role of microhabitat

  12. Effects of near-bed turbulence and micro-topography on macroinvertebrate movements across contrasting gravel-bed surfaces (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffin-Belanger, T. K.; Rice, S. P.; Reid, I.; Lancaster, J.

    2009-12-01

    Fluvial habitats can be described from a series of physical variables but to adequately address the habitat quality it becomes necessary to develop an understanding that combines the physical variables with the behaviour of the inhabitating organisms. The hypothesis of flow refugia provide a rational that can explain the persistence of macroinvertebrate communities in gravel-bed rivers when spates occur. The movement behaviour of macroinvertebrates is a key element to the flow refugia hypothesis, but little is known about how local near-bed turbulence and bed microtopography may affect macroinvertebrate movements. We reproduced natural gravel-bed substrates with contrasting gravel bed textures in a large flume where we were able to document the movement behaviour of the cased caddisfly Potamophylax latipennis for a specific discharge. The crawling paths and drift events of animals were analysed from video recordings. Characteristics of movements differ from one substrate to another. The crawling speed is higher for the small grain-size substrates but the mean travel distance remains approximately the same between substrates. For each substrate, the animals tended to follow consistent paths across the surface. The number of drift events and mean distance drifted is higher for the small grain-size substrate. ADV measurements close to the boundary allow detailed characterisation of near-bed hydraulic variables, including : skewness coefficients, TKE, UV correlation coefficients and integral time scales from autocorrelation analysis. For these variables, the vertical patterns of turbulence parameters are similar between the substrates but the amplitude of the average values and standard errors vary significantly. The spatial distribution of this variability is considered in relation to the crawling paths. It appears that the animals tend to crawl within areas of the substrate where low flow velocities and low turbulent kinetic energies are found, while sites that

  13. Enhancement of biodegradation and osseointegration of poly(ε-caprolactone)/calcium phosphate ceramic composite screws for osteofixation using calcium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Hsu, Li-Ho; Tsai, Yuh-Feng; Sumi, Shoichiro; Yang, Kai-Chiang

    2016-04-01

    Internal fixation devices, which can stabilize and realign fractured bone, are widely used in fracture management. In this paper, a biodegradable composite fixator, composed of poly(ε-caprolactone), calcium phosphate ceramic and calcium sulfate (PCL/CPC/CS), is developed. The composition of CS, which has a high dissolution rate, was expected to create a porous structure to improve osteofixation to the composite fixator. PCL, PCL/CPC, and PCL/CPC/CS samples were prepared and their physical properties were characterized in vitro. In vivo performance of the composite screws was verified in the distal femurs of rabbits. Results showed that the PCL/CPC/CS composite had a higher compressive strength (28.55 ± 3.32 MPa) in comparison with that of PCL (20.64 ± 1.81 MPa) (p < 0.05). A larger amount of apatite was formed on PCL/CPC/CS than on PCL/CPC, while no apatite was found on PCL after simulated body fluid immersion. In addition, PCL/CPC/CS composites also had a faster in vitro degradation rate (13.05 ± 3.42% in weight loss) relative to PCL (1.79 ± 0.23%) and PCL/CPC (4.32 ± 2.18%) (p < 0.001). In animal studies, PCL/CPC/CS screws showed a greater volume loss than that of PCL or PCL/CPC at 24 weeks post-implantation. Under micro-computerized tomography observation, animals with PCL/CPC/CS implants had better osseointegration in terms of the structural parameters of the distal metaphysis, including trabecular number, trabecular spacing, and connectivity density, than the PCL screw. This study reveals that the addition of CS accelerates the biodegradation and enhanced apatite formation of the PCL/CPC composite screw. This osteoconductive PCL/CPC/CS is a good candidate material for internal fixation devices. PMID:27041468

  14. Comparison of hearing thresholds obtained with Baha preoperative assessment tools and those obtained with the osseointegrated implant.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Rebecca L; Patel, Parag M; Jonathan, David A

    2011-05-01

    We conducted a study of the Baha bone-anchored hearing aid system to quantify the difference between (1) hearing thresholds obtained through preoperative testing methods with the Baha sound processor attached to three different bone-conduction testing devices and (2) thresholds obtained postoperatively with the sound processor attached to a surgically placed osseointegrated titanium implant. Twenty-three patients underwent free-field testing in four situations: with the Baha sound processor attached to (1) the Baha Testband (transcutaneous transmission), (2) the Baha Softband (transcutaneous transmission), (3) a test rod (bone conduction via the teeth), and (4) the osseointegrated implant (percutaneous transmission). The main outcome measure was the result of a comparison of the thresholds obtained with the three preoperative test methods and those obtained with the osseointegrated implant. We found that aided thresholds obtained with the osseointegrated implant were significantly better (p < 0.05) than those obtained with the three preoperative test methods. The degree of superiority increased with higher frequencies. We conclude that thresholds of 1 to 18 dB better than those obtained by preoperative test methods can be expected postoperatively with the osseointegrated implant. The damping effect of sound transmission via the teeth or transcutaneously must be accounted for in making predictions of postoperative outcome. PMID:21563076

  15. Enhancement of Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament Graft Osseointegration using a Periosteum Patch in a Goat Model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Z; Bao, W; Li, S; Li, H; Jiang, J; Chen, S

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a periosteum patch could enhance polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament graft osseointegration in a bone tunnel. 12 female goats underwent ACL reconstruction with a PET artificial ligament graft in the right knees. Right knees in 6 goats were reconstructed with periosteum patch-enveloped PET grafts (Periosteum group) in the tibia bone tunnel, whereas the other 6 goats had no periosteum patch and served as the Control group. All the goats were sacrificed at 12 months after surgery. 3 tibial-graft complex samples in each group were harvested consecutively for microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and histological evaluation. The other 3 tibial-graft complex samples in each group were harvested for biomechanical testing. The mean pull-out load of the Periosteum group (208±25 N) at 12 months was significantly higher than that of the Control group (107±13 N) (p=0.0044). According to the micro-CT scan, more new bone formation was observed at the graft-bone interface in the Periosteum group compared with the Control group. Furthermore, MRI showed that the Periosteum group appeared to have a better graft osseointegration within the bone tunnel compared with the Control group. Histologically, application of a periosteum patch induced more new bone and Sharpey's fiber formation between the graft and bone tunnel compared with the controls. The study has shown that periosteum enveloping of the PET artificial ligament has a positive effect in the induction of artificial ligament osseointegration within the bone tunnel. PMID:26990720

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the risk of osseointegrated implant failure: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Al-Abedalla, K; Rastikerdar, E; Abi Nader, S; Daniel, N G; Nicolau, B; Tamimi, F

    2014-11-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the most widely used drugs for the treatment of depression, have been reported to reduce bone formation and increase the risk of bone fracture. Since osseointegration is influenced by bone metabolism, this study aimed to investigate the association between SSRIs and the risk of failures in osseointegrated implants. This retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients treated with dental implants from January 2007 to January 2013. A total of 916 dental implants in 490 patients (94 implants on 51 patients using SSRIs) were used to estimate the risk of failure associated with the use of SSRIs. Data analysis involved Cox proportional hazards, generalized estimating equation models, multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analysis, and Kaplan-Meier analysis. After 3 to 67 mo of follow-up, 38 dental implants failed and 784 succeeded in the nonusers group, while 10 failed and 84 succeeded in the SSRI-users group. The main limitation of this retrospective study was that drug compliance dose and treatment period could not be acquired from the files of the patients. The primary outcome was that compared with nonusers of SSRIs, SSRI usage was associated with an increased risk of dental implants failure (hazard ratio, 6.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-31.61; p = .03). The failure rates were 4.6% for SSRI nonusers and 10.6% for SSRI users. The secondary outcomes were that small implant diameters (≤4 mm; p = .02) and smoking habits (p = .01) also seemed to be associated with higher risk of implant failure. Our findings indicate that treatment with SSRIs is associated with an increased failure risk of osseointegrated implants, which might suggest a careful surgical treatment planning for SSRI users. PMID:25186831

  17. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and the Risk of Osseointegrated Implant Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X.; Al-Abedalla, K.; Rastikerdar, E.; Abi Nader, S.; Daniel, N.G.; Nicolau, B.; Tamimi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the most widely used drugs for the treatment of depression, have been reported to reduce bone formation and increase the risk of bone fracture. Since osseointegration is influenced by bone metabolism, this study aimed to investigate the association between SSRIs and the risk of failures in osseointegrated implants. This retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients treated with dental implants from January 2007 to January 2013. A total of 916 dental implants in 490 patients (94 implants on 51 patients using SSRIs) were used to estimate the risk of failure associated with the use of SSRIs. Data analysis involved Cox proportional hazards, generalized estimating equation models, multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analysis, and Kaplan-Meier analysis. After 3 to 67 mo of follow-up, 38 dental implants failed and 784 succeeded in the nonusers group, while 10 failed and 84 succeeded in the SSRI-users group. The main limitation of this retrospective study was that drug compliance dose and treatment period could not be acquired from the files of the patients. The primary outcome was that compared with nonusers of SSRIs, SSRI usage was associated with an increased risk of dental implants failure (hazard ratio, 6.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-31.61; p = .03). The failure rates were 4.6% for SSRI nonusers and 10.6% for SSRI users. The secondary outcomes were that small implant diameters (≤4 mm; p = .02) and smoking habits (p = .01) also seemed to be associated with higher risk of implant failure. Our findings indicate that treatment with SSRIs is associated with an increased failure risk of osseointegrated implants, which might suggest a careful surgical treatment planning for SSRI users. PMID:25186831

  18. Percutaneous Osseointegrated Prostheses for Amputees: Limb Compensation in a 12-Month Ovine model

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Trevor J.; Beck, J. Peter; Bloebaum, Roy D.; Bachus, Kent N.

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous osseointegrated prostheses are being investigated as an alternative strategy to attach prosthetic limbs to patients. Although the use of these implants has shown to be promising in clinical trials; the ability to maintain a skin seal around an osseointegrated implant interface is a major challenge to prevent superficial and deep periprosthetic infections. The specific aim of this study was to establish a translational load-bearing ovine model to assess postoperative limb compensation and gait symmetry following a percutaneous integrated implant. We tested the following hypotheses: (1) the animals would return to pre-amputation limb loads within 12-months; (2) the animals would return to a symmetrical gait pattern (stride length and time in stance) within 12-months. The results demonstrated that one month following surgery, the sheep loaded their amputated limb to a mean value of nearly 80% of their pre-amputation loading condition; by 12-months, this mean had dropped to approximately 74%. There were no statistical differences between the symmetry of the amputated forelimb and the contralateral forelimb at any time point for the animals stride length or the time spent in the stance phase of their gait cycle. Thus, the data showed that while the animals maintained symmetric gait patterns, they did not return to full weight-bearing after 12-months. The results of this study showed that a large animal load-bearing model had a symmetric gait and was weight bearing for up to 12 months. While the current investigation utilizes an ovine model, there data show that osseointegrated implant technology with postoperative follow-up can help our human patients return to symmetric gait and maintain an active lifestyle, leading to an improvement in their quality of life following amputation. PMID:21920525

  19. Experimental study on the osseointegration of foam TiC/Ti composites.

    PubMed

    Jingyu, Wang; Lin, Wu; Yong, Gao; Jinsong, Zhang; Cuicui, Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Macroporous ceramics have demonstrated osteoconductive properties because of their biocompatibility and 3D macroporous structure, and these materials have recently been widely studied as bone replacement materials. The foam TiC/Ti composites discussed in this study have good mechanical properties, balancing out metallic toughness and ceramic strength. Furthermore, because of the high porosity and pore connectivity of these TiC/Ti composites, they have the potential to be a new bone replacement material. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the osseointegration of foam TiC/Ti composites, preliminarily discuss the TiC/Ti ossification mechanism, and to obtain reliable data on the use of foam TiC/Ti composites as bone replacement materials. The foam TiC/Ti composites were sited in 40 Japanese white rabbits for 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks. The foam TiC/Ti composites were compared to foam SiC. M-CT (micro-computed tomography) analysis, histological analysis, SEM (scanning electron microscopy) observation and EDS (energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer) analysis were conducted to estimate the osseointegration of the materials. The histological observations and quantitative analysis exhibited significantly more ossification area (volume), trabeculae maturity, and calcium and phosphorus content in the foam TiC/Ti composites compared to the foam SiC (p < 0.05). The results from this study suggest that the foam TiC/Ti composites possess good osseointegration capacity and have the potential to be a new bone replacement material. PMID:23715099

  20. Peri-implant bony overgrowth as a cause of revision surgery in auditory osseointegrated implantation.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Jared J; Petersen, Dana K; Sharbel, Daniel D; McKinnon, Brian J; MacDonald, C Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Implantation of auditory osseointegrated implants, also known as bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS), represents a surgical option for select pediatric patients aged 5 years or older with hearing loss. Functional indications in this patient population include conductive or mixed hearing loss. Common complications of implantation include skin infections, chronic skin irritation, hypertrophic skin overgrowth, and loose abutments. In a case series of 15 pediatric patients, we discovered an unexpectedly high skin-related complication rate requiring surgical revision of 53%. During revision surgery, we discovered 5 patients who exhibited significant bony overgrowth at the abutment site, a complication infrequently noted in past literature. PMID:27260587

  1. Functional reconstruction of a bilateral maxillectomy defect using a fibula osteocutaneous flap with osseointegrated implants.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, B; Matsuura, H; Ishihara, O; Hasegawa, H; Mataga, I; Torii, S

    1995-10-01

    We have achieved functional reconstruction for a bilateral upper alveolar bone, gingival, and palatal defect that has various problems originating from instability of the prosthesis using the fibula osteocutaneous flap with osseointegrated implants. The flap had three bone segments and two skin paddles. The combined bone segments created the upper alveolar arch, and the skin paddles closed the palatal defect. Nine months later, prosthodontic treatment was performed successfully. Our procedure restored the patient to masticatory function of the upper jaw, intelligible speech, and natural facial appearance. As a result, quality of life of the patient was extremely improved. PMID:7568500

  2. Attempts to obtain re-osseointegration following experimental peri-implantitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, A C; Vlassis, J; Caffesse, R G; Hämmerle, C H; Lang, N P

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the healing potential and re-osseointegration in peri-implant infection defects adjacent to various implant surfaces. In 7 female Beagle dogs, a total of 41 titanium oral implants (ITI, Straumann, Waldenburg; Switzerland) with a sink depth of 6 mm (diameter 2.8 mm) were placed transmucosally. Four different surface configurations (TPS: titanium plasma sprayed (10); SLA: sand blasted and acid-etched (13); M: machined and smooth (11); TPS furc.: titanium plasma sprayed with coronally placed perforation to mimic a furcation (7) were distributed among the animals and locations. Following a healing period of 3 months, silk ligatures were placed and oral cleaning procedures abolished for 4 months to induce a vertical bone loss of about 40%. Following mechanical and chemical cleansing (chlorhexidine and metronidazole) and disinfection, the lesions were either sham operated (11) or subjected to a GTR procedure using ePTFE (30). After 6 months of healing the animals were killed and the jaws histologically evaluated. Six membranes were lost TPS: (1); SLA: (2); M: (2); TPS furc: (1) and 3 membranes exposed TPS: (1); M: (2) and excluded from further evaluation. Owing to the loss of 1 implant and infection of the membranes in the TPS furc group, this implant configuration was discarded from further analysis. For TPS surfaces, bone fill was 2.6 mm (73% of the distance from the bottom of the defect to the shoulder of the implant) sites with (4 GTR) and 0.33 mm (14%) for sites without membrane (2 controls). Re-osseointegration was 0.5 mm (14%) in the test group and 0.3 mm (14%) in the control. For SLA surfaces bone fill was 2.3 mm (83%) for sites with (7 GTR) and 0.41 mm (15%) for sites without membranes (4 controls). Re-osseointegration was 0.6 mm (20%) and 0.3 mm (11%) respectively. Corresponding values for M surfaces were 2.2 mm (62%) with 4 GTR) and 0.82 mm (31%) without membranes. Re-osseointegration was 0.07 mm (2%) and 0.19 mm (7

  3. Custom stent fabrication for free gingival grafts around osseointegrated abutment fixtures.

    PubMed

    Brygider, R M; Bain, C A

    1989-09-01

    The Branemark system of osseointegrated dental implants offers a viable treatment alternative for patients whose conventional prostheses have not been successful. However, the unkeratinized, loosely attached nature of the oral mucosa through which the fixtures may pass often presents a region of easy trauma. A free gingival graft of keratinized tissue from the hard palate can be substituted for these tissues. The success of the graft is dependent upon early healing and protection of the recipient site. This protection can be accomplished by fabrication and use of a custom acrylic resin tissue stent extended beyond the borders of the surgical site. PMID:2681702

  4. Significant improvement of the osseointegration of zirconia dental implants by HS-LEIS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekmans, H.; Breitenstein, D.; Brongersma, H. H.; de Ridder, M.; Tromp, Th. J.

    2010-06-01

    The use of sintered yttria stabilized zirconia dental implants is a recent development. After initial successes with these new implants a pattern of erratic results emerged. Reliable osseointegration would not always occur. High-sensitivity low energy ion scattering (HS-LEIS) is used to investigate both virgin and rejected implants. The surfaces of the implant are found to be covered with both an organic and inorganic contamination layer. Sterilization does not remove this contamination. Using LEIS as analytic tool a new cleaning process has been developed. Since this cleaning process is in use, the failure rate has dropped to a very low value.

  5. Strontium coating by electrochemical deposition improves implant osseointegration in osteopenic models

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YONGQIANG; LI, HAOYAN; XU, JIANG; LI, XIN; LI, XINCHANG; YAN, YUTING; QI, MENGCHUN; HU, MIN

    2015-01-01

    Osteopenia, a preclinical state of osteoporosis, restricts the application of adult orthodontic implant anchorage and tooth implantation. Strontium (Sr) is able to promote bone formation and inhibit bone absorption. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new method for improving the success rate of dental implantation. In this study, an electrochemical deposition (ECD) method was used to prepare a Sr coating on a titanium implant. The coating composition was investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, and the surface morphology of the coating was studied using scanning electron microscopy. A total of 24 Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) and an additional 12 rats underwent a sham surgery. All rats were then implanted in the bilateral tibiae with titanium mini-implants with or without a Sr coating. The results of histological examination and a fluorescence double labeling assay showed strong new bone formation with a wider zone between the double labels, a higher rate of bone mineralization and better osseointegration in the OVX rats that received Sr-coated implants compared with the OVX rats that received uncoated implants. The study indicates that Sr coatings are easily applied by an ECD method, and that Sr coatings have a promoting effect on implant osseointegration in animals with osteopenia. PMID:25452797

  6. Strontium coating by electrochemical deposition improves implant osseointegration in osteopenic models.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yongqiang; Li, Haoyan; Xu, Jiang; Li, Xin; Li, Xinchang; Yan, Yuting; Qi, Mengchun; Hu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Osteopenia, a preclinical state of osteoporosis, restricts the application of adult orthodontic implant anchorage and tooth implantation. Strontium (Sr) is able to promote bone formation and inhibit bone absorption. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new method for improving the success rate of dental implantation. In this study, an electrochemical deposition (ECD) method was used to prepare a Sr coating on a titanium implant. The coating composition was investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, and the surface morphology of the coating was studied using scanning electron microscopy. A total of 24 Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) and an additional 12 rats underwent a sham surgery. All rats were then implanted in the bilateral tibiae with titanium mini-implants with or without a Sr coating. The results of histological examination and a fluorescence double labeling assay showed strong new bone formation with a wider zone between the double labels, a higher rate of bone mineralization and better osseointegration in the OVX rats that received Sr-coated implants compared with the OVX rats that received uncoated implants. The study indicates that Sr coatings are easily applied by an ECD method, and that Sr coatings have a promoting effect on implant osseointegration in animals with osteopenia. PMID:25452797

  7. Titanium dental implants surface-immobilized with gold nanoparticles as osteoinductive agents for rapid osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Lee, Hak Rae; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Donghyun; Um, Soong Ho; Lee, Jung Haeng; Woo, Yi-Hyung; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Lee, Deok-Won; Kwon, Il Keun

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are quite attractive materials for use as osteogenic agents due to their potential effects on the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation. In this study, an osseo-integrated titanium (Ti) implant surface coated with GNPs was used for promotion of bone regeneration. We prepared a silanized Ti surface by chemical treatment of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and immobilized the GNP layer (Ti-GNP) on their surfaces via Au-S bonding. The GNP layer is uniformly immobilized on the surface and the layer covers the titanium oxide surface well, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Ti-GNP was used to investigate the effectiveness of this system both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro results showed that the Ti-GNP significantly enhances the osteogenic differentiation with increased mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation specific genes in human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Furthermore, the in vivo results showed that Ti-GNP had a significant influence on the osseous interface formation. Through these in vitro and vivo tests, we found that Ti-GNP can be useful as osseo-integration inducing dental implants for formation of an osseous interface and maintenance of nascent bone formation. PMID:26874978

  8. Acid Etching and Plasma Sterilization Fail to Improve Osseointegration of Grit Blasted Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Saksø, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Stig S; Saksø, Henrik; Baas, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation was evaluated by implant osseointegration and biomechanical fixation. The study consisted of two paired animal sub-studies where 10 skeletally mature Labrador dogs were used. Grit blasted titanium alloy implants were inserted press fit in each proximal tibia. In the first study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time. Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner. PMID:22962567

  9. Effects of Osseointegration by Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 on Titanium Implants In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fu-Yuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Yin-Lai; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study designed a biomimetic implant for reducing healing time and achieving early osseointegration to create an active surface. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is a strong regulator protein in osteogenic pathways. Due to hardly maintaining BMP-2 biological function and specificity, BMP-2 efficient delivery on implant surfaces is the main challenge for the clinic application. In this study, a novel method for synthesizing functionalized silane film for superior modification with BMP-2 on titanium surfaces is proposed. Three groups were compared with and without BMP-2 on modified titanium surfaces in vitro and in vivo: mechanical grinding; electrochemical modification through potentiostatic anodization (ECH); and sandblasting, alkali heating, and etching (SMART). Cell tests indicated that the ECH and SMART groups with BMP-2 markedly promoted D1 cell activity and differentiation compared with the groups without BMP-2. Moreover, the SMART group with a BMP-2 surface markedly promoted early alkaline phosphatase expression in the D1 cells compared with the other surface groups. Compared with these groups in vivo, SMART silaning with BMP-2 showed superior bone quality and created contact areas between implant and surrounding bones. The SMART group with BMP-2 could promote cell mineralization in vitro and osseointegration in vivo, indicating potential clinical use. PMID:26977141

  10. The Effect of Simplifying Dental Implant Drilling Sequence on Osseointegration: An Experimental Study in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Giro, Gabriela; Tovar, Nick; Marin, Charles; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Suzuki, Marcelo; Janal, Malvin N.; Coelho, Paulo G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To test the hypothesis that there would be no differences in osseointegration by reducing the number of drills for site preparation relative to conventional drilling sequence. Methods. Seventy-two implants were bilaterally placed in the tibia of 18 beagle dogs and remained for 1, 3, and 5 weeks. Thirty-six implants were 3.75 mm in diameter and the other 36 were 4.2 mm. Half of the implants of each diameter were placed under a simplified technique (pilot drill + final diameter drill) and the other half were placed under conventional drilling where multiple drills of increasing diameter were utilized. After euthanisation, the bone-implant samples were processed and referred to histological analysis. Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone-area-fraction occupancy (BAFO) were assessed. Statistical analyses were performed by GLM ANOVA at 95% level of significance considering implant diameter, time in vivo, and drilling procedure as independent variables and BIC and BAFO as the dependent variables. Results. Both techniques led to implant integration. No differences in BIC and BAFO were observed between drilling procedures as time elapsed in vivo. Conclusions. The simplified drilling protocol presented comparable osseointegration outcomes to the conventional protocol, which proved the initial hypothesis. PMID:23431303

  11. Improved osseointegration of long-term stored SLA implant by hydrothermal sterilization.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xingling; Xu, Lingli; Violin, Kalan Bastos; Lu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The sandblasted, large-grit and acid-etched (SLA) surface is easy to be contaminated during storage and its surface chemical state is usually changed by different sterilization methods. This causes an undesirable increase in surface hydrophobicity and results in osseointegration degradation. To overcome this problem, a low temperature hydrothermal (HT) sterilization method was proposed in this study. Briefly, 4 weeks-stored pure titanium SLA specimens were sterilized using a sealed glass bottle with pure water in an autoclave set at 121 °C for 20 min. Results showed that, stored SLA specimens were superhydrophobic before and after conventional autoclaving, whereas, HT sterilization decontaminated and endowed stored SLA surface with superhydrophilicity. Osteoblast spreading was greatly enhanced, ALP expression was upgraded and bone nodule formation was obviously promoted on HT sterilized specimens compared with autoclaved ones. More bone formation around HT sterilized specimens was observed and HT sterilization increased bonding strength of implant to bone by 95% and 127% after 2 and 4 weeks of healing, respectively. The simple, feasible HT sterilization restored osseointegration of SLA implant while diminishing recontamination as much as possible. Therefore, it is proposed as a standard sterilization method for implant practitioners and researches. PMID:26382972

  12. Acid etching and plasma sterilization fail to improve osseointegration of grit blasted titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Saksø, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Stig S; Saksø, Henrik; Baas, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation was evaluated by implant osseointegration and biomechanical fixation.The study consisted of two paired animal sub-studies where 10 skeletally mature Labrador dogs were used. Grit blasted titanium alloy implants were inserted press fit in each proximal tibia. In the first study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time.Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner. PMID:22962567

  13. Three-dimensional finite element stress and strain analysis of a transfemoral osseointegration implant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xu, Dong Hao; Crocombe, A D

    2006-08-01

    The percutaneous transfemoral osseointegration implant is an alternative technique for direct prosthetic limb attachment. In order to investigate the stress and strain in the transfemoral osseointegration implant system, finite element (FE) analyses were carried out using three-dimensional femur-implant models and the commercial FE software ABAQUS. The three-dimensional femoral model was reconstructed from presurgery CT scans of an above-knee amputee. The implant was then inserted into the femoral model using Boolean operations in CAD software. Under a typical walking load, stress and strain from the femur-implant FE model were investigated. Stress concentrations were found near to the distal and proximal regions of the femur. To study the effect of different contact ratios between femur and implant, FE analyses were carried out using different implant diameters. The results showed that there were local stress variations near the contact discontinuity areas. A comparison was also made between the results of this study and a previous study using axisymmetric FE models. The results of the two studies revealed different stress levels, but good correlation was found in the overall stress distribution. PMID:16961185

  14. Impact of excessive occlusal load on successfully-osseointegrated dental implants: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michael; Chronopoulos, Vasileios; Mattheos, Nikos

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to review the available evidence on the response of the peri-implant bone when subjected to excessive occlusal forces. The search strategy included papers published in English in the Medline database and the Wiley Online Library from January 1991 to December 2011. Experimental or review papers reporting the conditions of the peri-implant bone of dental implants submitted to excessive occlusal loading in the presence of a controlled oral hygiene regime were eligible for inclusion. The knowledge regarding the response of the peri-implant bone when the dental implant is excessively loaded is limited, and the level of evidence is poor. With animal experimental studies showing conflicting results, it is unclear whether occlusal overload might cause marginal bone loss or total loss of osseointegration to already osseointegrated dental implants when the applied load exceeds the biologically-acceptable limit. This biological limit is also unknown. Furthermore, higher remodeling activity of the peri-implant bone is found around implants subjected to high loading forces. PMID:23918506

  15. Effects of Osseointegration by Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 on Titanium Implants In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fu-Yuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Yin-Lai; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Tseng, Chun-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    This study designed a biomimetic implant for reducing healing time and achieving early osseointegration to create an active surface. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is a strong regulator protein in osteogenic pathways. Due to hardly maintaining BMP-2 biological function and specificity, BMP-2 efficient delivery on implant surfaces is the main challenge for the clinic application. In this study, a novel method for synthesizing functionalized silane film for superior modification with BMP-2 on titanium surfaces is proposed. Three groups were compared with and without BMP-2 on modified titanium surfaces in vitro and in vivo: mechanical grinding; electrochemical modification through potentiostatic anodization (ECH); and sandblasting, alkali heating, and etching (SMART). Cell tests indicated that the ECH and SMART groups with BMP-2 markedly promoted D1 cell activity and differentiation compared with the groups without BMP-2. Moreover, the SMART group with a BMP-2 surface markedly promoted early alkaline phosphatase expression in the D1 cells compared with the other surface groups. Compared with these groups in vivo, SMART silaning with BMP-2 showed superior bone quality and created contact areas between implant and surrounding bones. The SMART group with BMP-2 could promote cell mineralization in vitro and osseointegration in vivo, indicating potential clinical use. PMID:26977141

  16. Relative contributions of chemistry and topography to the osseointegration of hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Tanzer, M; Harvey, E J; Krygier, J J; Bobyn, J D

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of the current study was to ascertain the relative contributions of surface chemistry and topography to the osseointegration of hydroxyapatite-coated implants. A canine femoral intramedullary implant model was used to compare the osseous response to commercially pure titanium implants that were either polished, grit-blasted, plasma-sprayed with hydroxyapatite, or plasma-sprayed with hydroxyapatite and masked with a very thin layer of titanium using physical vapor deposition (titanium mask). The titanium mask isolated the chemistry of the underlying hydroxyapatite layer without functionally changing its surface topography and morphologic features. At 12 weeks, the bone-implant specimens were prepared for undecalcified thin section histologic evaluation and serial transverse sections were quantified with backscattered scanning electron microscopy for the percentage of bone apposition to the implant surface. Bone apposition averaged 3% for the polished implants and 23% for the grit-blasted implants. Bone apposition to the hydroxyapatite-coated implants averaged 74% whereas bone apposition to the titanium mask implants averaged 59%. Although there was significantly greater osseointegration with the hydroxyapatite-coated implants, 80% of the maximum bone forming response to the implant surfaces developed with the titanium mask implants. This simple, controlled experiment revealed that topography is the dominant factor governing bone apposition to hydroxyapatite-coated implants. PMID:12461353

  17. Biological Strategies for Improved Osseointegration and Osteoinduction of Porous Metal Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Riester, Scott M.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Dudakovic, Amel; Kakar, Sanjeev; Cohen, Robert C.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    The biological interface between an orthopedic implant and the surrounding host tissue may have a dramatic effect upon clinical outcome. Desired effects include bony ingrowth (osseointegration), stimulation of osteogenesis (osteoinduction), increased vascularization, and improved mechanical stability. Implant loosening, fibrous encapsulation, corrosion, infection, and inflammation, as well as physical mismatch may have deleterious clinical effects. This is particularly true of implants used in the reconstruction of load-bearing synovial joints such as the knee, hip, and the shoulder. The surfaces of orthopedic implants have evolved from solid-smooth to roughened-coarse and most recently, to porous in an effort to create a three-dimensional architecture for bone apposition and osseointegration. Total joint surgeries are increasingly performed in younger individuals with a longer life expectancy, and therefore, the postimplantation lifespan of devices must increase commensurately. This review discusses advancements in biomaterials science and cell-based therapies that may further improve orthopedic success rates. We focus on material and biological properties of orthopedic implants fabricated from porous metal and highlight some relevant developments in stem-cell research. We posit that the ideal primary and revision orthopedic load-bearing metal implants are highly porous and may be chemically modified to induce stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation, while minimizing inflammation and infection. We conclude that integration of new biological, chemical, and mechanical methods is likely to yield more effective strategies to control and modify the implant–bone interface and thereby improve long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:25348836

  18. Suture materials affect peri-implant bone healing and implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Villa, Oscar; Lyngstadaas, Staale P; Monjo, Marta; Satué, Maria; Rønold, Hans J; Petzold, Christiane; Wohlfahrt, Johan C

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the remnants of two suture materials on osseointegration of titanium implants in a rabbit tibial model. Calibrated defects were prepared in the tibia of five Chinchilla rabbits. Filaments of nonresorbable (NR) nylon or resorbable (R) chitosan were placed at the bone to implant interface, whereas control sites had no suture material. After a healing period of 4 weeks, a pull-out test procedure was performed followed by enzymatic analyses of the wound fluid and relative quantification of mRNA levels for bone-related and cytokine markers from the peri-implant bone. A trend toward a reduced pull-out force was observed in the NR group (NR: 23.0 ± 12.8 N; R: 33.9 ± 11.3 N; control: 33.6 ± 24.0 N). Similarly, the bone resorption marker vacuolar type H+-ATPase was increased in the NR group compared with that in the control group (P = 0.041). The R group showed trends for lower alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin expression and higher total protein content and RNA compared with the control group. In this submerged healing model, peri-implant bone healing was marginally affected by the two suture materials tested. However, there was a tendency toward better osseointegration and lower expression of bone resorption markers in the R group compared with the control group. PMID:26369486

  19. Cell Adhesion and in Vivo Osseointegration of Sandblasted/Acid Etched/Anodized Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20% ± 10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58% ± 8.63%), SLA (58.47% ± 12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62% ± 18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  20. Cell adhesion and in vivo osseointegration of sandblasted/acid etched/anodized dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20%±10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58%±8.63%), SLA (58.47%±12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62%±18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  1. Enhanced osseointegration of titanium implants with nanostructured surfaces: an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Salou, Laëtitia; Hoornaert, Alain; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are commonly used for dental implants because of their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. The surface properties of titanium implants are key factors for rapid and stable bone tissue integration. Micro-rough surfaces are commonly prepared by grit-blasting and acid-etching. However, proteins and cells interact with implant surfaces in the nanometer range. The aim of this study was to compare the osseointegration of machined (MA), standard alumina grit-blasted and acid-etched (MICRO) and nanostructured (NANO) implants in rabbit femurs. The MICRO surface exhibited typical random cavities with an average roughness of 1.5 μm, while the NANO surface consisted of a regular array of titanium oxide nanotubes 37±11 nm in diameter and 160 nm thick. The MA and NANO surfaces had a similar average roughness of 0.5 μm. The three groups of implants were inserted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. After 4 weeks, the pull-out test gave higher values for the NANO than for the other groups. Histology corroborated a direct apposition of bone tissue on to the NANO surface. Both the bone-to-implant contact and bone growth values were higher for the NANO than for the other implant surfaces. Overall, this study shows that the nanostructured surface improved the osseointegration of titanium implants and may be an alternative to conventional grit-blasted and acid-etched surface treatments. PMID:25449926

  2. Osseointegration of Titanium Implants in Onlay of Cerament™, a New Ceramic Bone Substitute

    PubMed Central

    Truedsson, Anna; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Lindberg, Pia; Warfvinge, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate whether a new biphasic and injectable ceramic bone substitute Cerament™ that rapidly remodels to bone, may contribute to the retention of titanium implant screws during the healing period, and to analyze the pattern of bone formation around titanium implants.Titanium screws were implanted in rat tibiae and embedded with or without Cerament™ on the cortical surface. Torsional resistance was measured after 1 day, and after 6 and 12 weeks. Implant areas without bone substitute were analyzed histologically for comparison. The torsional resistance increased over time as the screws were osseointegrated. There was no difference in resistance between screws embedded in the bone substitute and control screws. The bone apposition was more pronounced on the proximal side of the screw than on the distal side. Cerament™ is capable of conducting bone growth from a cortical bone surface. The newly formed bone in this application does not significantly add to the osseointegrative strength of the implant screw, as measured by torque resistance, during the first 12 weeks. PMID:26751485

  3. Measurement of surface microtopography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Farr, T. G.; Muller, J.-P.; Lewis, P.; Leberl, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    Acquisition of ground truth data for use in microwave interaction modeling requires measurement of surface roughness sampled at intervals comparable to a fraction of the microwave wavelength and extensive enough to adequately represent the statistics of a surface unit. Sub-centimetric measurement accuracy is thus required over large areas, and existing techniques are usually inadequate. A technique is discussed for acquiring the necessary photogrammetric data using twin film cameras mounted on a helicopter. In an attempt to eliminate tedious data reduction, an automated technique was applied to the helicopter photographs, and results were compared to those produced by conventional stereogrammetry. Derived root-mean-square (RMS) roughness for the same stereo-pair was 7.5 cm for the automated technique versus 6.5 cm for the manual method. The principal source of error is probably due to vegetation in the scene, which affects the automated technique but is ignored by a human operator.

  4. Numerical evaluation of bone remodelling associated with trans-femoral osseointegration implant--A 68 month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Xu, D H; Crocombe, A D; Xu, W

    2016-02-01

    Osseointegrated trans-femoral implant is a relatively new orthopaedic anchoring method for connecting a stump with a prosthesis. Through a follow-up study of a patient over six years, significant bone remodelling has been observed. Finite element (FE) simulations were carried out to investigate the relationship between the bone remodelling and the strain re-distribution around the trans-femoral osseointegrated implant system. An initial FE model representing the original status of the femur-implant assembly was created from CT scans of the subject prior to osseointegration. Follow-up X-ray images were acquired at various stages post-surgery, which allowed the changes in bone wall thickness to be measured. By updating the bone thickness in the initial model, a series of follow-up FE models were created. Representative load associated with the subject's body weight was applied to the models, and the strain re-distributions were calculated. The results showed that in order to minimise the adverse effect of bone remodelling, an osseointegration implant made by functionally gradient materials are preferred over homogeneous materials. PMID:26776932

  5. Reconstruction of alveolar bone defect with autogenous bone particles and osseointegrated implants: Histologic analysis and 10 years monitoring

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; de Carvalho, Mariliza Comar Astolphi; Ponzoni, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the volume of the alveolar process after extraction can be achieved by immediate implant placement and guided bone regeneration, with or without the use of biomaterials. The authors present a case report with a 10 years follow-up, rehabilitation using osseointegrated implants in the extraction area and maintenance of the volume of the alveolar process with autogenous cortical bone shavings. PMID:26389054

  6. Installing multifunctionality on titanium with RGD-decorated polyurethane-polyurea roxithromycin loaded nanoparticles: toward new osseointegrative therapies.

    PubMed

    Rocas, Pau; Hoyos-Nogués, Mireia; Rocas, Josep; Manero, José M; Gil, Javier; Albericio, Fernando; Mas-Moruno, Carlos

    2015-09-16

    A novel class of polyurethane-polyurea nanoparticles (PUUa NPs) to install multifunctionality on biomaterials is presented. Biofunctionalization of titanium with roxithromycin loaded RGD-decorated PUUa NPs results in an outstanding improvement of osteoblast adhesion and strong suppression of bacterial attachment. This strategy represents a powerful approach to enhance the osseointegration of implant materials. PMID:26274361

  7. The effect of osteotomy dimension on osseointegration to resorbable media-treated implants: a study in the sheep.

    PubMed

    Galli, Silvia; Jimbo, Ryo; Tovar, Nick; Yoo, Daniel Y; Anchieta, Rodolfo B; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-03-01

    The drilling technique and the surface characteristics are known to influence the healing times of oral implants. The influence of osteotomy dimension on osseointegration of microroughned implant surfaces treated with resorbable blasting media was tested in an in vivo model. Ninety-six implants (ø4.5 mm, 8 mm in length) with resorbable blasting media-treated surfaces were placed in the ileum of six sheep. The final osteotomy diameters were 4.6 mm (reamer), 4.1 mm (loose), 3.7 mm (medium), and 3.2 mm (tight). After three and six weeks of healing, the implants were biomechanically tested and histologically evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Page L trend test for ordered and paired sample and linear regression, with significance level at p < 0.05. An overall increase in all dependent variables was observed with the reduction of osteotomy diameter. In addition, all osseointegration scores increased over time. At three weeks, the retention was significantly higher for smaller osteotomies. The histological sections depicted intimate contact of bone with all the implant surfaces and osteoblast lines were visible in all sections. The resorbable blasting media microroughed surfaces achieved successful osseointegration for all the instrumentation procedures tested, with higher osseointegration scores for the high insertion torque group. PMID:25281647

  8. A multifractal approach to characterize cumulative rainfall and tillage effects on soil surface micro-topography and to predict depression storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, E.; Miranda, J. G. V.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2010-10-01

    Most of the indices currently employed for assessing soil surface micro-topography, such as random roughness (RR), are merely descriptors of its vertical component. Recently, multifractal analysis provided a new insight for describing the spatial configuration of soil surface roughness. The main objective of this study was to test the ability of multifractal parameters to assess in field conditions the decay of initial surface roughness induced by natural rainfall under different soil tillage systems. In addition, we evaluated the potential of the joint use of multifractal indices plus RR to improve predictions of water storage in depressions of the soil surface (MDS). Field experiments were performed on an Oxisol at Campinas, São Paulo State (Brazil). Six tillage treatments, namely, disc harrow, disc plough, chisel plough, disc harrow + disc level, disc plough + disc level and chisel plough + disc level were tested. In each treatment soil surface micro-topography was measured four times, with increasing amounts of natural rainfall, using a pin meter. The sampling scheme was a square grid with 25 × 25 mm point spacing and the plot size was 1350 × 1350 mm (≈1.8 m2), so that each data set consisted of 3025 individual elevation points. Duplicated measurements were taken per treatment and date, yielding a total of 48 experimental data sets. MDS was estimated from grid elevation data with a depression-filling algorithm. Multifractal analysis was performed for experimental data sets as well as for oriented and random surface conditions obtained from the former by removing slope and slope plus tillage marks, respectively. All the investigated microplots exhibited multifractal behaviour, irrespective of surface condition, but the degree of multifractality showed wide differences between them. Multifractal parameters provided valuable information for characterizing the spatial features of soil micro-topography as they were able to discriminate data sets with similar

  9. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  10. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  11. Exploring LiDAR data for mapping the micro-topography and tidal hydro-dynamics of mangrove systems: An example from southeast Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Jon M.; Dale, Pat E. R.; Spencer, John; Griffin, Lachlan

    2009-12-01

    The aim was to explore the use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to map the micro-topography of an intertidal wetland in southeast Queensland Australia. The driver for this was the need to identify and map the habitats of the immature stages of an aedine disease vector mosquito ( Aedes vigilax (Skuse)). We derived a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data set at a vertical resolution of 0.05 m from LiDAR data. The relative accuracy of the DEM across the site was tested by comparing water depth predictions derived from the DEM against in-situ water depth readings from pressure sensors over a 10-day tidal cycle, which included high spring tides. We found that the field observations of micro-topographic units important for mosquito management matched those delineated from the DEM. The micro-topography included a low berm or central ridge that was more or less continuous across the site, a shallow back basin and fringing mangroves. The fringing mangroves had unimpeded connection to the tidal source, however the central ridge blocked tidal water from the back basin for all but the highest tides. Eggshell survey indicated that the back basin was the area suitable for immature mosquitoes. We conclude that LiDAR data has application for understanding and mapping the structure of mangrove wetlands. We have also demonstrated (in a small area) that LiDAR is useful for modelling the effect of sea level changes on the coastal fringe. LiDAR may be the only method to inform research on changes to land use and ecosystems caused by sea level change.

  12. Genome Wide assessment of Early Osseointegration in Implant-Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalji, Ghadeer N.

    Objectives: To determine the molecular processes involved in osseointegration. Materials and methods: A structured literature review concerning in vitro and in vivo molecular assessment of osseointegration was performed. A rat and a human model were then used to identify the early molecular processes involved in osseointegration associated with a micro roughened and nanosurface superimposed featured implants. In the rat model, 32 titanium implants with surface topographies exhibiting a micro roughened (AT-II) and nanosurface superimposed featured implants (AT-I) were placed in the tibiae of 8 rats and subsequently harvested at 2 and 4 days after placement. Whereas in the human model, four titanium mini-implants with either a moderately roughened surface (TiOblast) or super-imposed nanoscale topography (Osseospeed) were placed in edentulous sites of eleven systemically healthy subjects and subsequently removed after 3 and 7 days. Total RNA was isolated from cells adherent to retrieved implants. A whole genome microarray using the Affymetrix 1.1 ST Array platform was used to describe the gene expression profiles that were differentially regulated by the implant surfaces. Results: The literature review provided evidence that particular topographic cues can be specifically integrated among the many extracellular signals received by the cell in its signal transduction network. In the rat model, functionally relevant categories related to ossification, skeletal system development, osteoblast differentiation, bone development and biomineral tissue development were upregulated and more prominent at AT-I compared to AT-II. In the human model, there were no significant differences when comparing the two-implant surfaces at each time point. However, the microarray identified several genes that were differentially regulated at day 7 vs. day 3 for both implant surfaces. Functionally relevant categories related to the extracellular matrix, collagen fibril organization and

  13. Single-stage osseointegrated implants for nasal prosthodontic rehabilitation: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Bruna M D F; Freitas-Pontes, Karina M; de Negreiros, Wagner A; Verde, Marcus A R L

    2015-08-01

    Malignant tumors in the nasal region may be treated by means of invasive surgical procedures, with large facial losses. Nasal prostheses, retained by osseointegrated facial implants, instead of plastic surgery, will, in most patients, offer good biomechanical and cosmetic results. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with nasal cancer who had the entire nasal vestibule removed in a single-stage surgical procedure in order to shorten the rehabilitation time. The nasal prosthesis was built on a 3-magnet bar and was made of platinum silicone with intrinsic pigmentation, thereby restoring the patient's appearance and self-esteem. The authors concluded that single-stage implants may reduce the rehabilitation time to as little as 1 month, and the correct use of materials and techniques may significantly improve the nasal prosthesis. PMID:25976710

  14. Osseointegration of multiphase anodic spark deposition treated porous titanium implants in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Bertollo, Nicky; Sandrini, Enrico; Dalla Pria, Paolo; Walsh, William R

    2015-03-01

    Modification of titanium oxide by multiphase anodic spark deposition (ASD) has the potential to increase bioactivity and hasten osseointegration and biological fixation in uncemented arthroplasty. This study assessed the in vivo performance of control (Ti), plasma-sprayed HA-coated (TiHA) and ASD (Biospark) treated (TiAn) porous titanium implants with a solid core using a standard uncemented implant fixation sheep model. Cortical interfacial shear-strength and bone ingrowth in cortical and cancellous sites were quantified following 12 weeks in situ. Ultimate shear-strength for the Ti, TiHA and TiAn coatings was 33±9.5, 35.4±8.4 and 33.8±7.8 MPa, respectively, which was limited by coating delamination. ASD treatment was associated with significantly higher mean bone ingrowth at both sites. These results support the osteoconductive potential of the BioSpark treatment of porous titanium. PMID:25540993

  15. Evaluating the bending response of two osseointegrated transfemoral implant systems using 3D digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Melanie L; Backman, David; Branemark, Rickard; Mechefske, Chris K

    2011-05-01

    Osseointegrated transfemoral implants have been introduced as a prosthetic solution for above knee amputees. They have shown great promise, providing an alternative for individuals who could not be accommodated by conventional, socket-based prostheses; however, the occurrence of device failures is of concern. In an effort to improve the strength and longevity of the device, a new design has been proposed. This study investigates the mechanical behavior of the new taper-based assembly in comparison to the current hex-based connection for osseointegrated transfemoral implant systems. This was done to better understand the behavior of components under loading, in order to optimize the assembly specifications and improve the useful life of the system. Digital image correlation was used to measure surface strains on two assemblies during static loading in bending. This provided a means to measure deformation over the entire sample and identify critical locations as the assembly was subjected to a series of loading conditions. It provided a means to determine the effects of tightening specifications and connection geometry on the material response and mechanical behavior of the assemblies. Both osseoinegrated assemblies exhibited improved strength and mechanical performance when tightened to a level beyond the current specified tightening torque of 12 N m. This was shown by decreased strain concentration values and improved distribution of tensile strain. Increased tightening torque provides an improved connection between components regardless of design, leading to increased torque retention, decreased peak tensile strain values, and a more gradual, primarily compressive distribution of strains throughout the assembly. PMID:21599097

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Osseointegrated Prosthetic Auricular Reconstruction in Patients With a Compromised Ipsilateral Temporoparietal Fascial Flap.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Kevin J; Wilkes, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    Patients with major ear deformities and associated compromise of the superficial temporal artery are poor candidates for autogenous ear reconstruction because of a tenuous ipsilateral temporoparietal fascial flap (TPFF). Osseointegrated prosthetic auricular reconstruction (OPAR) is an alternative to contralateral free TPFF microsurgical and autogenous reconstruction, but data on clinical outcomes are limited. The records of patients with ear loss or major deformity and a compromised ipsilateral TPFF who underwent OPAR from 1989 to 2013 were reviewed. Satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire based on a 5 point Likert scale. Thirty-two patients (8 women, 24 men) with mean age 43.0 years (range, 10-70 years) underwent OPAR. The ipsilateral TPFF was compromised due to major trauma (13 patients), cancer extirpation (9), burn injury (4), previous harvest (4), arteriovenous malformation (1), or infection (1). All but 2 patients had an associated craniofacial defect, such as soft tissue deformity (87.5%), hearing loss (46.9%), or bony deformity (31.3%). The overall implant success rate was 88.6% at mean follow-up time of 7.6 years post-OPAR. Prosthesis wear averaged 12.2 hours/day and 6.6 days/week (80.5 hours/week). All 5 patients who experienced implant failures had received prior head and neck irradiation. With their prosthesis, 76.2% (16 patients) stated that their self-consciousness and self-esteem were "better" or "much better," whereas 85.7% (18 patients) stated that their self-image was "better" or "much better." All patients declared that they would undergo the treatment again. Osseointegrated prosthetic auricular reconstruction is a reliable option in this challenging population with high patient satisfaction. Patients with prior radiotherapy may have a higher chance of implant failure and would benefit from extended annual follow-up. PMID:26703031

  17. Heat and Radiofrequency Plasma Glow Discharge Pretreatment of a Titanium Alloy Promote Bone Formation and Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Daniel E.; Rapuano, Bruce E.; Vyas, Parth; Lane, Joseph M.; Meyers, Kathleen; Wright, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic and dental implants manifest increased failure rates when inserted into low density bone. We determined whether chemical pretreatments of a titanium alloy implant material stimulated new bone formation to increase osseointegration in vivo in trabecular bone using a rat model. Titanium alloy rods were untreated or pretreated with heat (600°C) or radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD). The rods were then coated with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (1 nM) or left uncoated and surgically implanted into the rat femoral medullary cavity. Animals were euthanized 3 or 6 weeks later, and femurs were removed for analysis. The number of trabeculae in contact with the implant surface, surface contact between trabeculae and the implant, and the length and area of bone attached to the implant were measured by histomorphometry. Implant shear strength was measured by a pull-out test. Both pretreatments and fibronectin enhanced the number of trabeculae bonding with the implant and trabeculae-to-implant surface contact, with greater effects of fibronectin observed with pretreated compared to untreated implants. RFGD pretreatment modestly increased implant shear strength, which was highly correlated (r2 = 0.87 – 0.99) with measures of trabecular bonding for untreated and RFGD-pretreated implants. In contrast, heat pretreatment increased shear strength 3 to 5-fold for both uncoated and fibronectin-coated implants at 3 and 6 weeks, suggesting a more rapid increase in implant-femur bonding compared to the other groups. In summary, our findings suggest that the heat and RFGD pretreatments can promote the osseointegration of a titanium alloy implant material. PMID:23649564

  18. Osseointegration improvement by plasma electrolytic oxidation of modified titanium alloys surfaces.

    PubMed

    Echeverry-Rendón, Mónica; Galvis, Oscar; Quintero Giraldo, David; Pavón, Juan; López-Lacomba, José Luis; Jiménez-Piqué, Emilio; Anglada, Marc; Robledo, Sara M; Castaño, Juan G; Echeverría, Félix

    2015-02-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a material frequently used in orthopedic applications, due to its good mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. However, formation of a non-adherent fibrous tissue between material and bone drastically could affect the osseointegration process and, therefore, the mechanical stability of the implant. Modifications of topography and configuration of the tissue/material interface is one of the mechanisms to improve that process by manipulating parameters such as morphology and roughness. There are different techniques that can be used to modify the titanium surface; plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is one of those alternatives, which consists of obtaining porous anodic coatings by controlling parameters such as voltage, current, anodizing solution and time of the reaction. From all of the above factors, and based on previous studies that demonstrated that bone cells sense substrates features to grow new tissue, in this work commercially pure Ti (c.p Ti) and Ti6Al4V alloy samples were modified at their surface by PEO in different anodizing solutions composed of H2SO4 and H3PO4 mixtures. Treated surfaces were characterized and used as platforms to grow osteoblasts; subsequently, cell behavior parameters like adhesion, proliferation and differentiation were also studied. Although the results showed no significant differences in proliferation, differentiation and cell biological activity, overall results showed an important influence of topography of the modified surfaces compared with polished untreated surfaces. Finally, this study offers an alternative protocol to modify surfaces of Ti and their alloys in a controlled and reproducible way in which biocompatibility of the material is not compromised and osseointegration would be improved. PMID:25631270

  19. A three-dimensional finite element analysis of the osseointegration progression in the human mandible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmail, Enas; Hassan, Noha; Kadah, Yasser

    2010-02-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis was used to model the effect of the peri-implant bone geometry and thickness on the biomechanical behavior of a dental implant/supporting bone system. The 3D finite element model of the jaw bone, cancellous and cortical, was developed based on computerized tomography (CT) scan technology while the dental implant model was created based on a commercially available implant design. Two models, cylindrical and threaded, representing the peri-implant bone region were simulated. In addition, various thicknesses (0.1 mm, 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm) of the peri-implant bone region were modeled to account for the misalingnment during the drilling process. Different biomechanical properties of the peri-implant bone region were used to simulate the progression of the osseointegration process with time. Four stages of osseointegration were modeled to mimic different phases of tissue healing of the peri- implant region starting with soft connective tissue and ending with complete bone maturation. For the realistic threaded model of the peri-implant bone region, the maximum von Mises stress and displacement in the dental implant and jaw bone were higher than those computed for the simple cylindrical peri-implant bone region model. The average von Mises stress and displacement in the dental implant and the jaw bone decreased as the oseeointegration progressed with time for all thicknesses of the peri-implant bone region. On the other hand, the maximum absolute vertical displacement of the dental implant increased as the drilled thickness of the peri-implant bone region increased.

  20. Bio-Oss(®) for delayed osseointegration of implants in dogs: a histological study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-ying; Zheng, Hui; Hou, Xi-peng; Zhong, Wei-jian; Ying, Xiao-xia; Chai, Song-ling; Ma, Guo-wu

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of Bio-Oss® (a natural bone substitute derived from the mineral portion of bovine bone) on delayed osseointegration of implants. The bilateral third and fourth mandibular premolars of 4 adult, healthy, male and female dogs were extracted. We randomly selected 2 extraction sockets in each dog to be filled with Bio-Oss® (the experimental group); the other 2 extraction sockets, which were not treated, served as controls. Dental implants were inserted into the alveolar bone of the experimental group and the control group 3 months after insertion of the Bio-Oss®. The osteogenic activity in the bone around the implants was assessed by evaluating the histological morphology and estimating histomorphometric variables at 3 and 6 months after delayed implantation. After 3 months, Goldner's trichrome staining analysis showed that the rate of content between the bone and the implant and the mineralised area of bone around the implant were significantly higher in the experimental group (76%(9%) and 69.5% (9.6%), respectively) than those in the control group (56.1% (8.2%) and 52.8% (7.3%), respectively, p=0.003 and 0.000). However, the 2 groups did not differ significantly at 6 months. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the mean rates of mineralisation of the bony tissue around the implant in the experimental group at months 3 and 6 were 6.8 (0.4) μm and 8.4 (0.8) μm, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control group (p=0.000 and 0.03). These data indicate that putting Bio-Oss® into the extraction sockets can promote osseointegration after delayed implantation, and may be a promising option for clinical use. PMID:25060973

  1. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  2. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  3. Finite element analysis of bone stress and strain around a distal osseointegrated implant for prosthetic limb attachment.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Crocombe, A D; Hughes, S C

    2000-01-01

    Direct skeletal attachment techniques have recently been identified as an alternative method for percutaneous attachment of prosthetic limbs. Osseointegrated implants for prosthetic attachments are subjected to a complex load condition. This finite element study investigates the effect of varying geometries of the implant on the stress and strain distribution in the area of the bone/implant interface. Simplified three-dimensional axisymmetric models of the femur and seven implants with different core diameters, external diameters, implant lengths and thread pitches were derived. The resulting stress and strain distributions were compared. The significance of each implant geometry was identified for improving implant design in the light of benefit to the bone/implant osseointegration and the bone remodelling of the femur. PMID:11201407

  4. Clinoenstatite coatings have high bonding strength, bioactive ion release, and osteoimmunomodulatory effects that enhance in vivo osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Zetao; Wu, Qianju; Yi, Deliang; Friis, Thor; Zheng, Xuebin; Chang, Jiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Xiao, Yin

    2015-12-01

    A number of coating materials have been developed over past two decades seeking to improve the osseointegration of orthopedic metal implants. Despite the many candidate materials trialed, their low rate of translation into clinical applications suggests there is room for improving the current strategies for their development. We therefore propose that the ideal coating material(s) should possess the following three properties: (i) high bonding strength, (ii) release of functional ions, and (iii) favourable osteoimmunomodulatory effects. To test this proposal, we developed clinoenstatite (CLT, MgSiO3), which as a coating material has high bonding strength, cytocompability and immunomodulatory effects that are favourable for in vivo osteogenesis. The bonding strength of CLT coatings was 50.1 ± 3.2 MPa, more than twice that of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings, at 23.5 ± 3.5 MPa. CLT coatings released Mg and Si ions, and compared to HA coatings, induced an immunomodulation more conducive for osseointegration, demonstrated by downregurelation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancement of osteogenesis, and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. In vivo studies demonstrated that CLT coatings improved osseointegration with host bone, as shown by the enhanced biomechanical strength and increased de novo bone formation, when compared with HA coatings. These results support the notion that coating materials with the proposed properties can induce an in vivo environment better suited for osseointegration. These properties could, therefore, be fundamental when developing high-performance coating materials. PMID:26318815

  5. Re-osseointegration after treatment of peri-implantitis at different implant surfaces. An experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Persson, L G; Berglundh, T; Lindhe, J; Sennerby, L

    2001-12-01

    Peri-implantitis is a condition that includes soft tissue inflammation and rapid loss of bone. Treatment of peri-implantitis includes both antimicrobial and bone augmenting methods. The question of whether true re-osseointegration may occur following treatment of peri-implantitis is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the character of the implant surface was of importance for the occurrence of re-osseointegration following treatment of peri-implantitis. Four beagle dogs were used. The mandibular premolars were extracted. After 12 months, 3 ITI(R) solid screw dental implants were placed in each side of the mandible. In the left side, implants with a turned surface (Turned sites) were used, while in the right side implants with a SLA surface (SLA sites) were placed. After 3 months of healing, peri-implantitis was induced by ligature placement and plaque accumulation. When about 50% of the initial bone support was lost, the ligatures were removed. Five weeks later, treatment was initiated. Each animal received tablets of Amoxicillin and Metronidazole for a period of 17 days. Three days after the start of the antibiotic regimen, one implant site (experimental site) in each quadrant was exposed to local therapy. Following flap elevation, the exposed titanium surface was cleaned with the use of cotton pellets soaked in saline. The implants were submerged. Six months later, biopsies were obtained. Treatment resulted in a 72% bone fill of the bone defects at Turned sites and 76% at SLA sites. The amount of re-osseointegration was 22% at Turned sites and 84% at SLA sites. A treatment regimen that included (i) systemic administration of antibiotics combined with (ii) granulation tissue removal and implant surface cleaning resulted in resolution of peri-implantitis and bone fill in adjacent bone defects. Further, while substantial "re-osseointegration" occurred to an implant with a rough surface (SLA), bone growth on a previously exposed smooth

  6. Effects of a micro/nano rough strontium-loaded surface on osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Qi, Yaping; Gao, Qi; Niu, Qiang; Shen, Mingming; Fu, Qian; Hu, Kaijin; Kong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    We developed a hierarchical hybrid micro/nanorough strontium-loaded Ti (MNT-Sr) surface fabricated through hydrofluoric acid etching followed by magnetron sputtering and evaluated the effects of this surface on osseointegration. Samples with a smooth Ti (ST) surface, micro Ti (MT) surface treated with hydrofluoric acid etching, and strontium-loaded nano Ti (NT-Sr) surface treated with SrTiO3 target deposited via magnetron sputtering technique were investigated in parallel for comparison. The results showed that MNT-Sr surfaces were prepared successfully and with high interface bonding strength. Moreover, slow Sr release could be detected when the MNT-Sr and NT-Sr samples were immersed in phosphate-buffered saline. In in vitro experiments, the MNT-Sr surface significantly improved the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts compared with the other three groups. Twelve weeks after the four different surface implants were inserted into the distal femurs of 40 rats, the bone-implant contact in the ST, MT, NT-Sr, and MNT-Sr groups were 39.70%±6.00%, 57.60%±7.79%, 46.10%±5.51%, and 70.38%±8.61%, respectively. In terms of the mineral apposition ratio, the MNT-Sr group increased by 129%, 58%, and 25% compared with the values of the ST, MT, and NT-Sr groups, respectively. Moreover, the maximal pullout force in the MNT-Sr group was 1.12-, 0.31-, and 0.69-fold higher than the values of the ST, MT, and NT-Sr groups, respectively. These results suggested that the MNT-Sr surface has a synergistic effect of hierarchical micro/nano-topography and strontium for enhanced osseointegration, and it may be a promising option for clinical use. Compared with the MT surface, the NT-Sr surface significantly improved the differentiation of osteoblasts in vitro. In the in vivo animal experiment, the MT surface significantly enhanced the bone-implant contact and maximal pullout force than the NT-Sr surface. PMID:26213468

  7. Effect of Osteotomy Preparation on Osseointegration of Immediately Loaded, Tapered Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, A; Cochran, D; Obrecht, M; Pippenger, B E; Dard, M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present preclinical in vivo study was to evaluate whether a modified "drill-only" protocol, involving slight underpreparation of the implant site, may have an effect on aspects of osseointegration of a novel bone-level tapered implant, compared with the "standard drilling" protocol involving taping and profiling of the marginal aspect of the implant socket. In each side of the edentulated and completely healed mandible of 11 minipigs, 2 tapered implants (8 mm long × 4.1 mm Ø, BLT; Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) were installed either with the drill-only or the standard drilling protocol. Significantly lower average insertion torque values were recorded for the standard drilling protocol group (52 ± 29 Ncm) compared with the drill-only group (70 ± 27 Ncm) (t test, P ≤ 0.05); no significant difference was observed between the 2 groups regarding implant stability, by means of resonance frequency analysis (75 ± 8 vs. 75 ± 6, respectively). Half of the implants were immediately loaded and the rest were submerged, providing observation times of 8 or 4 wk, respectively. Non-decalcified histological and histomorphometric analysis of the implants with surrounding tissues showed no significant differences between the 2 drilling protocols regarding the distance from the implant platform to the first coronal bone-to-implant contact (f-BIC), the total bone-to-implant contact (BIC) as a percentage of the total implant perimeter, and the bone density in an area extending 1 mm laterally from the implant (BATA) within 2 rectangular regions of interest (ROIs) 4 mm in height, representing the coronal (parallel-walled) and apical (tapered) aspect of the implant (ROI 1 and ROI 2, respectively) in non-submerged implants. In general, marginal peri-implant bone levels were at or slightly apical to the implant platform, and large amounts of bone-to-implant contact were observed. In contrast, immediately loaded implants placed with the drill-only protocol

  8. A new adaptive method to filter terrestrial laser scanner point clouds using morphological filters and spectral information to conserve surface micro-topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Caballero, E.; Afana, A.; Chamizo, S.; Solé-Benet, A.; Canton, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), widely known as light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology, is increasingly used to provide highly detailed digital terrain models (DTM) with millimetric precision and accuracy. In order to generate a DTM, TLS data has to be filtered from undesired spurious objects, such as vegetation, artificial structures, etc., Early filtering techniques, successfully applied to airborne laser scanning (ALS), fail when applied to TLS data, as they heavily smooth the terrain surface and do not retain their real morphology. In this article, we present a new methodology for filtering TLS data based on the geometric and radiometric properties of the scanned surfaces. This methodology was built on previous morphological filters that select the minimum point height within a sliding window as the real surface. However, contrary to those methods, which use a fixed window size, the new methodology operates under different spatial scales represented by different window sizes, and can be adapted to different types and sizes of plants. This methodology has been applied to two study areas of differing vegetation type and density. The accuracy of the final DTMs was improved by ∼30% under dense canopy plants and over ∼40% on the open spaces between plants, where other methodologies drastically underestimated the real surface heights. This resulted in more accurate representation of the soil surface and microtopography than up-to-date techniques, eventually having strong implications in hydrological and geomorphological studies.

  9. The impact of a modified cutting flute implant design on osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, R; Tovar, N; Marin, C; Teixeira, H S; Anchieta, R B; Silveira, L M; Janal, M N; Shibli, J A; Coelho, P G

    2014-07-01

    Information concerning the effects of the implant cutting flute design on initial stability and its influence on osseointegration in vivo is limited. This study evaluated the early effects of implants with a specific cutting flute design placed in the sheep mandible. Forty-eight dental implants with two different macro-geometries (24 with a specific cutting flute design - Blossom group; 24 with a self-tapping design - DT group) were inserted into the mandibular bodies of six sheep; the maximum insertion torque was recorded. Samples were retrieved and processed for histomorphometric analysis after 3 and 6 weeks. The mean insertion torque was lower for Blossom implants (P<0.001). No differences in histomorphometric results were observed between the groups. At 3 weeks, P=0.58 for bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and P=0.52 for bone area fraction occupied (BAFO); at 6 weeks, P=0.55 for BIC and P=0.45 for BAFO. While no histomorphometric differences were observed, ground sections showed different healing patterns between the implants, with better peri-implant bone organization around those with the specific cutting flute design (Blossom group). Implants with the modified cutting flute design had a significantly reduced insertion torque compared to the DT implants with a traditional cutting thread, and resulted in a different healing pattern. PMID:24583140

  10. Novel carbon fiber composite for hip replacement with improved in vitro and in vivo osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Dimitrievska, S; Whitfield, J; Hacking, S A; Bureau, M N

    2009-10-01

    A novel composite femoral stem has been developed to match cortical stiffness and achieve fixation by osseointegration with the primary goal to reduce cortical bone loss associated with stress shielding. The femoral stem consists of three distinct material layers: the first is a long carbon fiber (CF) in a polyamide 12 (PA12) polymer matrix (PA12/CF); the second is a PA12/HA (hydroxyapatite) interface; and the third is a plasma-sprayed coating of HA. In vitro studies with MG63 cells indicated that the HA surface supported improved proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells as determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production when compared with Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64). In vivo studies comparing the composite and Ti64 rods in the rabbit femur demonstrated significantly higher bone apposition to the composite than Ti64 rods. The results of this study indicate that the invasion of surrounding bone cells and thus osteointegration together with its bone-matching mechanical properties make the PA12/CF/HA stem a promising hip replacement candidate. PMID:18688795

  11. Engineered protein coatings to improve the osseointegration of dental and orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Raphel, Jordan; Karlsson, Johan; Galli, Silvia; Wennerberg, Ann; Lindsay, Christopher; Haugh, Matthew G; Pajarinen, Jukka; Goodman, Stuart B; Jimbo, Ryo; Andersson, Martin; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the design of an engineered, elastin-like protein (ELP) that is chemically modified to enable stable coatings on the surfaces of titanium-based dental and orthopaedic implants by novel photocrosslinking and solution processing steps. The ELP includes an extended RGD sequence to confer bio-signaling and an elastin-like sequence for mechanical stability. ELP thin films were fabricated on cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V surfaces using scalable spin and dip coating processes with photoactive covalent crosslinking through a carbene insertion mechanism. The coatings withstood procedures mimicking dental screw and hip replacement stem implantations, a key metric for clinical translation. They promoted rapid adhesion of MG63 osteoblast-like cells, with over 80% adhesion after 24 h, compared to 38% adhesion on uncoated Ti6Al4V. MG63 cells produced significantly more mineralization on ELP coatings compared to uncoated Ti6Al4V. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) had an earlier increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, indicating more rapid osteogenic differentiation and mineral deposition on adhesive ELP coatings. Rat tibia and femur in vivo studies demonstrated that cell-adhesive ELP-coated implants increased bone-implant contact area and interfacial strength after one week. These results suggest that ELP coatings withstand surgical implantation and promote rapid osseointegration, enabling earlier implant loading and potentially preventing micromotion that leads to aseptic loosening and premature implant failure. PMID:26790146

  12. Application of high resolution synchrotron micro-CT radiation in dental implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Neldam, Camilla Albeck; Lauridsen, Torsten; Rack, Alexander; Lefolii, Tore Tranberg; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a refined method using high-resolution synchrotron radiation microtomography (SRmicro-CT) to evaluate osseointegration and peri-implant bone volume fraction after titanium dental implant insertion. SRmicro-CT is considered gold standard evaluating bone microarchitecture. Its high resolution, high contrast, and excellent high signal-to-noise-ratio all contribute to the highest spatial resolutions achievable today. Using SRmicro-CT at a voxel size of 5 μm in an experimental goat mandible model, the peri-implant bone volume fraction was found to quickly increase to 50% as the radial distance from the implant surface increased, and levelled out to approximately 80% at a distance of 400 μm. This method has been successful in depicting the bone and cavities in three dimensions thereby enabling us to give a more precise answer to the fraction of the bone-to-implant contact compared to previous methods. PMID:25957106

  13. New cosurface capacitive stimulators for the development of active osseointegrative implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Soares Dos Santos, Marco P; Marote, Ana; Santos, T; Torrão, João; Ramos, A; Simões, José A O; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B; Furlani, Edward P; Vieira, Sandra I; Ferreira, Jorge A F

    2016-01-01

    Non-drug strategies based on biophysical stimulation have been emphasized for the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. However, to date, an effective stimulation system for intracorporeal therapies has not been proposed. This is particularly true for active intramedullary implants that aim to optimize osseointegration. The increasing demand for these implants, particularly for hip and knee replacements, has driven the design of innovative stimulation systems that are effective in bone-implant integration. In this paper, a new cosurface-based capacitive system concept is proposed for the design of implantable devices that deliver controllable and personalized electric field stimuli to target tissues. A prototype architecture of this system was constructed for in vitro tests, and its ability to deliver controllable stimuli was numerically analyzed. Successful results were obtained for osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation in the in vitro tests. This work provides, for the first time, a design of a stimulation system that can be embedded in active implantable devices for controllable bone-implant integration and regeneration. The proposed cosurface design holds potential for the implementation of novel and innovative personalized stimulatory therapies based on the delivery of electric fields to bone cells. PMID:27456818

  14. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation & deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations. PMID:27185196

  15. A method for the quality control of osseointegration in endosseous implants.

    PubMed

    Almagro, J C; Guglielmotti, M B; Cabrini, R L; Todarello, A

    1994-01-01

    Metallic dental and orthopedic implants are essential therapeutic tool. The biologic success of an implant involves intimate contact between the implant and vital bone tissue, an event which has been termed osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to study the biocompatibility and biomechanic properties of different implant materials. Zircalloy 4 metallic cones (1.8 mm base x 2 mm height) were implanted in the diaphysis of the tibiae of 6 Wistar rats (90 g body weight) under i.p. Ethyl Urethane anesthesia. The animals were killed 30 days postimplantation, the tibiae were resected, and radiographed. One side chosen at random was used for the biomechanical study; whereas the other implant of each animal was processed for embedding in methyl-methacrylate. The bond of the implanted material to bone tissue was monitored immediately after resecting the tibiae by applying an extraction force to the base of the cone via a device designed ad hoc connected to a testing machine. Histological and radiographic analyses revealed the presence of bone tissue in contact with the implant surface. A force of about 35 g was necessary to separate the implant from the bone tissue. The system proposed renders possible the study of biocompatibility in histologic terms and in terms capacity to bond to bone tissue and could be a valuable research tool and the basis for quality control of all types of material, metallic or otherwise, used in endosseous implants. PMID:11885235

  16. Laser induced nitrogen enhanced titanium surfaces for improved osseo-integration.

    PubMed

    Dahotre, Sanket N; Vora, Hitesh D; Rajamure, Ravi Shanker; Huang, Lu; Banerjee, Rajarshi; He, Wei; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2014-01-01

    The osseo-integration, corrosion resistance, and tribological properties of the commonly used bioimplant alloy Ti-6Al-4V were enhanced using a laser-based surface nitridation process. The biomedical properties of the laser nitrided Ti-6Al-4V were investigated using experimental and computational methodologies. Electrochemical analysis of laser nitrided titanium in simulated body fluid (SBF) was performed to assess the biomedical characteristics in near-human body conditions. Additionally, the corrosive wear performance of these laser nitrided samples was evaluated using pin-on-disk geometry with a zirconia pin counter surface in SBF to mimic the biological scenario. Osteoblast studies were conducted to evaluate cell affinity towards titanium nitrided bioimplant material. Cells adhered to all substrates, with high viability. Initial cell adhesion was revealed by focal adhesion formation on all substrates. Cells can proliferate on samples treated with 1.89 and 2.12 × 10(6) J/m(2) laser conditions, while those treated with 1.70 × 10(6) J/m(2) inhibited proliferation. Thus, microstructural and phase observations, electrochemical analyses, corrosive wear evaluation, and cell behavior analysis of laser nitrided surface of bioimplant material (Ti-6Al-4V) indicated that laser nitriding greatly improves the performance of bioimplant material. PMID:23963886

  17. Simple coating with fibronectin fragment enhances stainless steel screw osseointegration in healthy and osteoporotic rats.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rachit; González-García, Cristina; Torstrick, Brennan; Guldberg, Robert E; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel; García, Andrés J

    2015-09-01

    Metal implants are widely used to provide structural support and stability in current surgical treatments for bone fractures, spinal fusions, and joint arthroplasties as well as craniofacial and dental applications. Early implant-bone mechanical fixation is an important requirement for the successful performance of such implants. However, adequate osseointegration has been difficult to achieve especially in challenging disease states like osteoporosis due to reduced bone mass and strength. Here, we present a simple coating strategy based on passive adsorption of FN7-10, a recombinant fragment of human fibronectin encompassing the major cell adhesive, integrin-binding site, onto 316-grade stainless steel (SS). FN7-10 coating on SS surfaces promoted α5β1 integrin-dependent adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. FN7-10-coated SS screws increased bone-implant mechanical fixation compared to uncoated screws by 30% and 45% at 1 and 3 months, respectively, in healthy rats. Importantly, FN7-10 coating significantly enhanced bone-screw fixation by 57% and 32% at 1 and 3 months, respectively, and bone-implant ingrowth by 30% at 3 months compared to uncoated screws in osteoporotic rats. These coatings are easy to apply intra-operatively, even to implants with complex geometries and structures, facilitating the potential for rapid translation to clinical settings. PMID:26100343

  18. In-vitro development of a temporal abutment screw to protect osseointegration in immediate loaded implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE In this study, a temporal abutment fixation screw, designed to fracture in a controlled way upon application of an occlusal force sufficient to produce critical micromotion was developed. The purpose of the screw was to protect the osseointegration of immediate loaded single implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven different screw prototypes were examined by fixing titanium abutments to 112 Mozo-Grau external hexagon implants (MG Osseous®; Mozo-Grau, S.A., Valladolid, Spain). Fracture strength was tested at 30° in two subgroups per screw: one under dynamic loading and the other without prior dynamic loading. Dynamic loading was performed in a single-axis chewing simulator using 150,000 load cycles at 50 N. After normal distribution of obtained data was verified by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, fracture resistance between samples submitted and not submitted to dynamic loading was compared by the use of Student's t-test. Comparison of fracture resistance among different screw designs was performed by the use of one-way analysis of variance. Confidence interval was set at 95%. RESULTS Fractures occurred in all screws, allowing easy retrieval. Screw Prototypes 2, 5 and 6 failed during dynamic loading and exhibited statistically significant differences from the other prototypes. CONCLUSION Prototypes 2, 5 and 6 may offer a useful protective mechanism during occlusal overload in immediate loaded implants. PMID:25932315

  19. Time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic applied to mock osseointegration monitoring applying two experimental models.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Jacques; Haupert, Sylvain; Laugier, Pascal; Ulrich, T J; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Johnson, Paul A

    2012-03-01

    This study broadens vibration-like techniques developed for osseointegration monitoring to the nonlinear field. The time reversed elastic nonlinearity diagnostic is applied to two mock models. The first one consists of tightening a dental implant at different torques in a mock cortical bone; the second one allows one to follow glue curing at the interface between a dental implant and a mock jaw. Energy is focused near the implant interface using the time reversal technique. Two nonlinear procedures termed pulse inversion and the scaling subtraction method, already used successfully in other fields such as contrast agents and material characterization, are employed. These two procedures are compared for both models. The results suggest that nonlinear elasticity can provide new information regarding the interface, complementary to the linear wave velocity and attenuation. The curing experiment exhibits an overall low nonlinear level due to the fact that the glue significantly damps elastic nonlinearity at the interface. In contrast, the torque experiment shows strong nonlinearities at the focus time. Consequently, a parallel analysis of these models, both only partially reflecting a real case, enables one to envisage future in vivo experiments. PMID:22423689

  20. Shape-memory alloy overload protection device for osseointegrated transfemoral implant prosthetic limb attachment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Fei; Hughes, Steven

    2002-11-01

    The osseointegrated trans-femoral implant system provides a direct anchoring technique to attach prosthetic limb. This technique was first introduced PI Brenmark in Sweden. The UK had the first clinical trial in 1997 and currently has 6 active limb wearers. The success of this procedure has the potential for improved gait function and mobility, increased employability and significant long-term improvements in the quality of life for above knee amputees. However, the significant load involved in the trans-femoral implant system has caused permanent deformation and/or fractures of the implant abutment in several occasions. To protect the implant system, the implant abutment in particularly, an overloading protection device was introduced. The device uses mechanical mechanism to release torsion overload on the abutment. However, the bending overload protection remains unsolved. To solve the problem, a new overload protection device was developed. This device uses SMA component for bending overload protection. In this paper, the results of non-linear finite element modelling of the SMA and steel (AISI 1040) components were presented. Experiments were also carried out using steel components to assess the design which is based on the non-linear property of the materials.

  1. Surface roughness enhances the osseointegration of titanium headposts in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Boyraz, P; Powers, B M; Sen-Gupta, E; Kucharski, W; Brown, C A; Cook, E P

    2012-11-15

    It is well recognized that micrometer and nanometer sized surface features enhance the skeletal attachment of implants within bone. However, little is known regarding the integration of implants placed outside the bone but in contact with the surface. Loosening of chronic skull anchored headposts in non-human primate based experiments can be a factor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a simple and easily applied surface texture on bone apposition to titanium implants fixed to the periosteal surface of the skull. Implants possessed either a polished surface or a textured surface created by grit-basting followed by acid etching. The percent of bone in contact with the implant surface (bone apposition) to three polished and three textured implants was evaluated in one adult female monkey after 14 weeks. Upon harvest, implants were processed for undecalcified histology and regions of bone apposition were quantified using backscatter electron microscopy and digital image analysis. The bone apposition to textured implants was 62±20% and to polished implants was 42±21%. The application of a peak-and-pit like texture to the surface of titanium implants significantly increased bone apposition to titanium implants placed on the periosteal surface of the skull. This study demonstrates that titanium headposts can easily be modified to improve osseointegration using equipment and supplies available to most neurophysiological laboratories. In addition, implant texturing may have utility in areas including skeletal trauma and reconstruction where devices are placed in contact with the bone surface. PMID:22975472

  2. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation &deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations. PMID:27185196

  3. Porous material based on spongy titanium granules: structure, mechanical properties, and osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Rubshtein, A P; Trakhtenberg, I Sh; Makarova, E B; Triphonova, E B; Bliznets, D G; Yakovenkova, L I; Vladimirov, A B

    2014-02-01

    A porous material has been produced by pressing spongy titanium granules with subsequent vacuum sintering. The material with porosity of more than 30% has an open system of interconnecting pores. The Young's modulus and 0.2% proof strength have been measured for the samples having 20-55% porosity. If the porosity is between 30 and 45%, the mechanical properties are determined by irregular shape of pores, which is due to spongy titanium granules. The experiment in vivo was performed on adult rabbits. Before surgery the implants were saturated with adherent autologous bone marrow cells. The implants were introduced into the defects formed in the condyles of tibias and femurs. Investigations of osseointegration of implants having 40% porosity showed that the whole system of pores was filled with mature bone tissue in 16 weeks after surgery. Neogenic bone tissue has an uneven surface formed by lacunas and craters indicative of active resorption and subsequent rearrangement (SEM examination). The bone tissue is pierced by neoformed vessels. Irregular-shaped pores with tortuous walls and numerous lateral channels going through the granules provide necessary conditions for the formation of functional bone tissue in the implant volume and the periimplant region. PMID:24411389

  4. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-05-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation & deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations.

  5. The effect of controlled microrobotized blasting on implant surface texturing and early osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luiz F; Marin, Charles; Teixeira, Hellen; Marão, Heloisa F; Tovar, Nick; Khan, Rehan; Bonfante, Estevam A; Janal, Malvin; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-02-01

    Surface topography modifications have become a key strategy for hastening the host-to-implant response to implantable materials. The present study evaluated the effect of three different carefully controlled surface texture patterns achieved through microrobotized blasting (controlled to high, medium and low roughness) relative to a larger scale blasting procedure (control) in early osseointegration in a canine model. Four commercially pure grade 2 titanium alloy implants (one of each surface) were bilaterally placed in the radii of six beagle dogs and allowed end points of 1 and 6 weeks in vivo. Following sacrifice, implants in bone were non-decalcified processed for bone morphologic and histometric (bone-to-implant contact; bone area fraction occupancy) evaluation. Surface topography was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical interferometry. Results showed initial osteogenic tissue interaction at one week and new bone in intimate contact with all implant surfaces at 6 weeks. At 1 and 6 weeks in vivo, higher bone-to-implant and bone area fraction occupancy were observed for the high texture pattern microrobotized blasted surface relative to others. PMID:26508287

  6. Computational biomechanics of bone's responses to dental prostheses - osseointegration, remodeling and resorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Rungsiyakull, Chaiy; Field, Clarice; Lin, Daniel; Zhang, Leo; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Clinical and experimental studies showed that human bone has the ability to remodel itself to better adapt to its biomechanical environment by changing both its material properties and geometry. As a consequence of the rapid development and extensive applications of major dental restorations such as implantation and fixed partial denture (FPD), the effect of bone remodeling on the success of a dental restorative surgery is becoming critical for prosthetic design and pre-surgical assessment. This paper aims to provide a computational biomechanics framework to address dental bone's responses as a result of dental restoration. It explored three important issues of resorption, apposition and osseointegration in terms of remodeling simulation. The published remodeling data in long bones were regulated to drive the computational remodeling prediction for the dental bones by correlating the results to clinical data. It is anticipated that the study will provide a more predictive model of dental bone response and help develop a new design methodology for patient-specific dental prosthetic restoration.

  7. New cosurface capacitive stimulators for the development of active osseointegrative implantable devices

    PubMed Central

    Soares dos Santos, Marco P.; Marote, Ana; Santos, T.; Torrão, João; Ramos, A.; Simões, José A. O.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Furlani, Edward P.; Vieira, Sandra I.; Ferreira, Jorge A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-drug strategies based on biophysical stimulation have been emphasized for the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. However, to date, an effective stimulation system for intracorporeal therapies has not been proposed. This is particularly true for active intramedullary implants that aim to optimize osseointegration. The increasing demand for these implants, particularly for hip and knee replacements, has driven the design of innovative stimulation systems that are effective in bone-implant integration. In this paper, a new cosurface-based capacitive system concept is proposed for the design of implantable devices that deliver controllable and personalized electric field stimuli to target tissues. A prototype architecture of this system was constructed for in vitro tests, and its ability to deliver controllable stimuli was numerically analyzed. Successful results were obtained for osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation in the in vitro tests. This work provides, for the first time, a design of a stimulation system that can be embedded in active implantable devices for controllable bone-implant integration and regeneration. The proposed cosurface design holds potential for the implementation of novel and innovative personalized stimulatory therapies based on the delivery of electric fields to bone cells. PMID:27456818

  8. Drilling dimension effects in early stages of osseointegration and implant stability in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    Baires-Campos, Felipe-Eduardo; Jimbo, Ryo; Fonseca-Oliveira, Maiolino-Thomaz; Moura, Camila; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny; Coelho, Paulo-Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Background This study histologically evaluated two implant designs: a classic thread design versus another specifically designed for healing chamber formation placed with two drilling protocols. Material and Methods Forty dental implants (4.1 mm diameter) with two different macrogeometries were inserted in the tibia of 10 Beagle dogs, and maximum insertion torque was recorded. Drilling techniques were: until 3.75 mm (regular-group); and until 4.0 mm diameter (overdrilling-group) for both implant designs. At 2 and 4 weeks, samples were retrieved and processed for histomorphometric analysis. For torque and BIC (bone-to-implant contact) and BAFO (bone area fraction occupied), a general-linear model was employed including instrumentation technique and time in vivo as independent. Results The insertion torque recorded for each implant design and drilling group significantly decreased as a function of increasing drilling diameter for both implant designs (p<0.001). No significant differences were detected between implant designs for each drilling technique (p>0.18). A significant increase in BIC was observed from 2 to 4 weeks for both implants placed with the overdrilling technique (p<0.03) only, but not for those placed in the 3.75 mm drilling sites (p>0.32). Conclusions Despite the differences between implant designs and drilling technique an intramembranous-like healing mode with newly formed woven bone prevailed. Key words: Histomorphometry, biomechanical, in vivo, initial stability, insertion torque, osseointegration. PMID:25858087

  9. Osseointegration into a Novel Titanium Foam Implant in the Distal Femur of a Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Bettina M.; Yang, Xu; Kelly, Natalie H.; Merkow, Justin; Gagne, Shawn; Ware, Robin; Wright, Timothy M.; Bostrom, Mathias P.G.

    2010-01-01

    A novel porous titanium foam implant has recently been developed to enhance biological fixation of orthopaedic implants to bone. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanical and histological characteristics of bone apposition into two different pore sizes of this titanium foam (565 and 464 micron mean void intercept length) and to compare these characteristics to those obtained with a fully porous conventionally sintered titanium bead implant. Cylindrical implants were studied in a rabbit distal femoral intramedullary osseointegration model at time zero and at 3, 6, and 12 weeks. The amount of bone ingrowth, amount of periprosthetic bone, and mineral apposition rate of periprosthetic bone measured did not differ among the three implant designs at 3, 6, or 12 weeks. By 12 weeks, the interface stiffness and maximum load of the beaded implant was significantly greater than either foam implant. No significant difference was found in the interface stiffness or maximum load between the two foam implant designs at 3, 6, or 12 weeks. The lower compressive modulus of the foam compared to the more dense sintered beaded implants likely contributed to the difference in failure mode. However, the foam implants have a similar compressive modulus to other clinically successful coatings, suggesting they are nonetheless clinically adequate. Additional studies are required to confirm this in weight-bearing models. Histological data suggest that these novel titanium foam implants are a promising alternative to current porous coatings and should be further investigated for clinical application in cementless joint replacement. PMID:20024964

  10. Progressive plateau root form dental implant osseointegration: A human retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luiz F; Suzuki, Marcelo; Janal, Malvin N; Tovar, Nick; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Jimbo, Ryo; Gil, Jose N; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-08-01

    Although preclinical and sparse human histology retrieval studies have shown that the interface between implant and bone is constantly remodeling, no human retrieval database has been developed to determine the effect of functional loading time and other clinical/implant design variables on osseointegration. The present study tested the hypothesis that bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) increase over functional loading time around dental implants. Due to prosthetic retreatment reasons, 93 human implant retrievals from the same manufacturer (Bicon LLC, Boston, MA, USA) were obtained over a period of approximately 15 years. The retrieved implants were under functional loading from 120 days to ∼18 years and were histomorphologic/metrically evaluated. BIC/BAFO were assessed as a function of multiple independent variables: implant surface type, diameter, length, jaw (maxilla/mandible), region (anterior/posterior), and time of functional loading. The results showed that both BIC and BAFO increased over time independently of implant design/clinical variables, supporting the postulated hypothesis. PMID:25367155

  11. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  12. External Mechanical Microstimuli Modulate the Osseointegration of Titanium Implants in Rat Tibiae

    PubMed Central

    Zacchetti, Giovanna; Cugnoni, Joël; Botsis, John; Ammann, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the effect of external mechanical microstimuli of controlled magnitude on the microarchitecture of the peri-implant bone beds in rat tibiae. Materials and Methods. Tibiae of forty rats were fitted with two transcutaneous titanium cylinders. After healing, the implants were loaded to 1 to 3 N, five days/week for four weeks. These force levels translated into intraosseous strains of 700 ± 200 με, 1400 ± 400 με, and 2100 ± 600 με. After sacrifice, the implants' pullout strength was assessed. Second, the bone's microarchitecture was analyzed by microcomputed tomography (μCT) in three discrete regions of interest (ROIs). Third, the effect of loading on bone material properties was determined by nanoindentation. Results. The trabecular BV/TV significantly increased in an ROI of 0.98 mm away from the test implant in the 1 N versus the 3 N group with an opposite trend for cortical thickness. Pull-out strength significantly increased in the 2 N relatively to the nonstimulated group. Higher values of E-modulus and hardness were observed in the trabecular bone of the 2 N group. Conclusion. The in vivo mechanical loading of implants induces load-dependent modifications in bone microarchitecture and bone material properties in rat tibiae. In pull-out strength measurements, implant osseointegration was maximized at 2 N (1400 ± 400 με). PMID:24369009

  13. A comparative study of zinc, magnesium, strontium-incorporated hydroxyapatite-coated titanium implants for osseointegration of osteopenic rats.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhou-Shan; Zhou, Wan-Shu; He, Xing-Wen; Liu, Wei; Bai, Bing-Li; Zhou, Qiang; Huang, Zheng-Liang; Tu, Kai-kai; Li, Hang; Sun, Tao; Lv, Yang-Xun; Cui, Wei; Yang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Surface modification techniques have been applied to generate titanium implant surfaces that promote osseointegration for the implants in cementless arthroplasty. However, its effect is not sufficient for osteoporotic bone. Zinc (Zn), magnesium (Mg), and strontium (Sr) present a beneficial effect on bone growth, and positively affect bone regeneration. The aim of this study was to confirm the different effects of the fixation strength of Zn, Mg, Sr-substituted hydroxyapatite-coated (Zn-HA-coated, Mg-HA-coated, Sr-HA-coated) titanium implants via electrochemical deposition in the osteoporotic condition. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used for this study. Twelve weeks after bilateral ovariectomy, all animals were randomly divided into four groups: group HA; group Zn-HA; group Mg-HA and group Sr-HA. Afterwards, all rats from groups HA, Zn-HA, Mg-HA and Sr-HA received implants with hydroxyapatite containing 0%, 10% Zn ions, 10% Mg ions, and 10% Sr ions. Implants were inserted bilaterally in all animals until death at 12 weeks. The bilateral femurs of rats were harvested for evaluation. All treatment groups increased new bone formation around the surface of titanium rods and push-out force; group Sr-HA showed the strongest effects on new bone formation and biomechanical strength. Additionally, there are significant differences in bone formation and push-out force was observed between groups Zn-HA and Mg-HA. This finding suggests that Zn, Mg, Sr-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings can improve implant osseointegration, and the 10% Sr coating exhibited the best properties for implant osseointegration among the tested coatings in osteoporosis rats. PMID:26952418

  14. RhBMP-2 microspheres-loaded chitosan/collagen scaffold enhanced osseointegration: an experiment in dog.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shanshan; Cheng, Xiangrong; Wang, Jiawei; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Lin; Zhang, Yufeng

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a novel recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) sustained release scaffold for dental implant osseointegration, and to evaluate the effect of this scaffold on promoting bone formation. RhBMP-2 was encapsulated in the poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) biodegradable microspheres, which were subsequently dispersed in a chitosan/collagen composite scaffold. This rhBMP-2 microspheres-loaded scaffold (S-MB) was compared with a chitosan/collagen scaffold without microspheres that directly encapsulated rhBMP-2 (S-B) in vitro and in vivo. The microstructure of the new scaffold was examined with scanning electron microscopy. The release profile of rhBMP-2 in vitro was measured at interval periods. The effect of rhBMP-2 encapsulated scaffolds on enhancing bone formation through implantation in dogs' mandibles was identified by histological examination of the regenerated bone after 4 weeks of implantation. Due to PLGA microspheres being loaded, the S-MB exhibited lower values at porosity and swelling rate, as well as a higher effective release dose than that of the S-B. Bone density, bone-implant contact, and bone-fill values measured from dog experiments demonstrated that the S-MB induced bone regeneration more quickly and was timely substituted by new bone. It was concluded that this sustained carrier scaffold based on microspheres was more effective to induce implant osseointegration. PMID:18667455

  15. In Vivo Osseointegration Performance of Titanium Dioxide Coating Modified Polyetheretherketone Using Arc Ion Plating for Spinal Implant Application.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chi, Meng-Hui; Hung, Yi-Wen; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), which has biomechanical performance similar to that of human cancellous bone, is used widely as a spinal implant material. However, its bioinertness and hydrophobic surface properties result in poor osseointegration. This study applies a novel modification method, arc ion plating (AIP), that produces a highly osteoblast compatible titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings on a PEEK substrate. This PEEK with TiO2 coating (TiO2/PEEK) was implanted into the femurs of New Zealand white male rabbits to evaluate its in vivo performance by the push-out test and histological observation. Analytical results show that AIP can prepare TiO2 coatings on bullet-shaped PEEK substrates as implant materials. After prolonged implantation in rabbits, no signs of inflammation existed. Newly regenerated bone formed more prominently with the TiO2/PEEK implant by histological observation. The shear strength of the bone/implant interface increases as implantation period increases. Most importantly, bone bonding performance of the TiO2/PEEK implant was superior to that of bare PEEK. The rutile-TiO2 coatings achieved better osseointegration than the anatase-TiO2 coatings. Therefore, AIP-TiO2 can serve as a novel surface modification method on PEEK for spinal interbody fusion cages. PMID:26504800

  16. In Vivo Osseointegration Performance of Titanium Dioxide Coating Modified Polyetheretherketone Using Arc Ion Plating for Spinal Implant Application

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chi, Meng-Hui; Hung, Yi-Wen; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), which has biomechanical performance similar to that of human cancellous bone, is used widely as a spinal implant material. However, its bioinertness and hydrophobic surface properties result in poor osseointegration. This study applies a novel modification method, arc ion plating (AIP), that produces a highly osteoblast compatible titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings on a PEEK substrate. This PEEK with TiO2 coating (TiO2/PEEK) was implanted into the femurs of New Zealand white male rabbits to evaluate its in vivo performance by the push-out test and histological observation. Analytical results show that AIP can prepare TiO2 coatings on bullet-shaped PEEK substrates as implant materials. After prolonged implantation in rabbits, no signs of inflammation existed. Newly regenerated bone formed more prominently with the TiO2/PEEK implant by histological observation. The shear strength of the bone/implant interface increases as implantation period increases. Most importantly, bone bonding performance of the TiO2/PEEK implant was superior to that of bare PEEK. The rutile-TiO2 coatings achieved better osseointegration than the anatase-TiO2 coatings. Therefore, AIP-TiO2 can serve as a novel surface modification method on PEEK for spinal interbody fusion cages. PMID:26504800

  17. Success and failure rates of osseointegrated implants in function in regenerated bone for 6 to 51 months: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1997-01-01

    Six hundred twenty-six titanium plasma-sprayed cylindrical implants that had been functioning in regenerated bone for a period of up to 51 months were evaluated according to Albrektsson's criteria. These implants had been placed either with concomitant guided bone regeneration procedures or in bony ridges that had previously been augmented. According to Albrektsson's criteria, absolute success rates of 97.6% overall, 98.8% in the maxilla, and 98.2% in the mandible were recorded, as were cumulative success rates of 94.9% in the maxilla and 91.9% in the mandible. The overall cumulative success rate was 93.8%. One patient, who underwent protracted chemotherapy 14 months after implant function began, accounted for 33% (3 of 9) of the total implant loss in the study. If this patient is excluded from the study, the cumulative success rates are 94.9% (maxilla), 96.7% (mandible), and 95.8% (overall). These findings support the theory that regenerated bone will achieve osseointegration with titanium plasma-sprayed cylindrical implants, and that this osseointegration can be maintained under function over time. PMID:9048450

  18. Primary stability and osseointegration of dental implants in polylactide modified bone - A pilot study in Goettingen minipigs.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Krohn, Sebastian; Thiemann, Charlotte; Schulz, Xenia; Kauffmann, Philipp; Tröltzsch, Markus; Schlottig, Falko; Schliephake, Henning; Gruber, Rudolf Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate primary stability (PS) and osseointegration of dental implants in polylactide [70/30 poly(l-lactide-co-d, l-lactide); (PLDLA)] modified bone in 30 Goettingen minipigs. Each animal received three implants per jaw quadrant. In a split-mouth design, one side of the maxilla and mandible was randomly allocated to the experimental treatment (PLDLA applied into the drill hole before implantation), while the contralateral sides served as intraindividual controls (no PLDLA applied). The required insertion torque and the implant stability quotient (ISQ) were measured during implantation. ISQ, volume density (VD) of new bone formation (NBF), and the bone-implant contact (BIC) were evaluated at the end of the observation period (1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively) in six animals each. Across all study groups, the PLDLA treatment resulted in a) a comparable insertion torque, b) an equivalent ISQ, c) a reduced BIC, and d) a reduced VD of NBF, as opposed to the untreated controls. In conclusion, the PLDLA treatment did not affect the PS, but rather led to an impaired osseointegration, which was particularly strong in the compact mandibular bone, and decreased in the spongious maxillary bone. PLDLA induced anchoring in spongious bone should be evaluated in further investigations. PMID:27346283

  19. Femtosecond laser treatment of 316L improves its surface nanoroughness and carbon content and promotes osseointegration: An in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kenar, Halime; Akman, Erhan; Kacar, Elif; Demir, Arif; Park, Haiwoong; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Aktas, Cenk; Karaoz, Erdal

    2013-08-01

    Cell-material surface interaction plays a critical role in osseointegration of prosthetic implants used in orthopedic surgeries and dentistry. Different technical approaches exist to improve surface properties of such implants either by coating or by modification of their topography. Femtosecond laser treatment was used in this study to generate microspotted lines separated by 75, 125, or 175μm wide nanostructured interlines on stainless steel (316L) plates. The hydrophobicity and carbon content of the metallic surface were improved simultaneously through this method. In vitro testing of the laser treated plates revealed a significant improvement in adhesion of human endothelial cells and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM MSCs), the cells involved in microvessel and bone formation, respectively, and a significant decrease in fibroblast adhesion, which is implicated in osteolysis and aseptic loosening of prostheses. The hBM MSCs showed an increased bone formation rate on the laser treated plates under osteogenic conditions; the highest mineral deposition was obtained on the surface with 125μm interline distance (292±18mg/cm(2) vs. 228±43mg/cm(2) on untreated surface). Further in vivo testing of these laser treated surfaces in the native prosthetic implant niche would give a real insight into their effectiveness in improving osseointegration and their potential use in clinical applications. PMID:23563298

  20. Surface modifications to enhance the wear resistance and the osseo-integration properties of biomedical Ti-alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kami, Pavani

    The current study focuses on improving the wear resistance of femoral head component and enhancing the osseo-integration properties of femoral stem component of a hip implant made of a new generation low modulus alloy, Ti-35Nb-7Zr-5Ta or TNZT. Different techniques that were adopted to improve the wear resistance of low-modulus TNZT alloy included; (a) fabrication of graded TNZT-xB (x= 0, 1, 2 wt%) samples using LENS, (b) oxidation, and (c) LASER nitriding of TNZT. TNZT-1B and TNZT-O samples have shown improved wear resistance when tested against UHMWPE ball in SBF medium. A new class of bio-ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphate (CaP), was applied on the TNZT sample surface and was further laser processed with the objective of enhancing their osseointegration properties. With optimized LASER parameters, TNZT-CaP samples have shown improved corrosion resistance, surface wettability and cellular response when compared to the base TNZT sample.

  1. Osseointegration aspects of placed implant in bone reconstruction with newly developed block-type interconnected porous calcium hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    DOI, Kazuya; KUBO, Takayasu; MAKIHARA, Yusuke; OUE, Hiroshi; MORITA, Koji; OKI, Yoshifumi; KAJIHARA, Shiho; TSUGA, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Artificial bone has been employed to reconstruct bone defects. However, only few reports on implant placement after block bone grafting exist. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the osseointegration of dental implant in bone reconstructions with interconnected porous calcium hydroxyapatite (IP-CHA). Material and Methods The IP-CHA cylinders (D; 4.3 mm, H; 10.0 mm) were placed into bone sockets in each side of the femurs of four male dogs. The IP-CHA on the right side was a 24-week sample. Twelve weeks after placement, a titanium implant was placed into a socket that was prepared in half of the placed IP-CHA cylinder on the right side. On the left side, another IP-CHA cylinder was placed as a 12-week sample. After another 12 weeks, the samples were harvested, and the bone regeneration and bone-implant contact (BIC) ratios were measured. Results New bone formation area was superior in the 24-week IP-CHA compared with the 12-week IP-CHA. BIC was not significantly different between IP-CHA and the parent sites. Osseointegration was detected around the implant in IP-CHA-reconstructed bone. Conclusion Our preliminary results suggest that IP-CHA may be a suitable bone graft material for reconstructing bones that require implant placement. PMID:27556202

  2. Stiffness and ultimate load of osseointegrated prosthesis fixations in the upper and lower extremity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Techniques for the skeletal attachment of amputation-prostheses have been developed over recent decades. This type of attachment has only been performed on a small number of patients. It poses various potential advantages compared to conventional treatment with a socket, but is also associated with an increased risk of bone or implant-bone interface fracture in the case of a fall. We therefore investigated the bending stiffness and ultimate bending moment of such devices implanted in human and synthetic bones. Methods Eight human specimens and 16 synthetic models of the proximal femora were implanted with lower extremity prostheses and eight human specimens and six synthetic humeri were implanted with upper extremity prostheses. They were dissected according to typical amputation levels and underwent loading in a material testing machine in a four-point bending setup. Bending stiffness, ultimate bending moment and fracture modes were determined in a load to failure experiment. Additionally, axial pull-out was performed on eight synthetic specimens of the lower extremity. Results Maximum bending moment of the synthetic femora was 160.6±27.5 Nm, the flexural rigidity of the synthetic femora was 189.0±22.6 Nm2. Maximum bending moment of the human femora was 100.4±38.5 Nm, and the flexural rigidity was 137.8±29.4 Nm2. The maximum bending moment of the six synthetic humeri was 104.9±19.0 Nm, and the flexural rigidity was 63.7±3.6 Nm2. For the human humeri the maximum bending moment was 36.7±11.0 Nm, and the flexural rigidity at was 43.7±10.5 Nm2. The maximum pull-out force for the eight synthetic femora was 3571±919 N. Conclusion Significant differences were found between human and synthetic specimens of the lower and upper extremity regarding maximum bending moment, bending displacement and flexural rigidity. The results of this study are relevant with respect to previous finding regarding the load at the interfaces of osseointegrated prosthesis

  3. Histomorphometric and biomechanical analyses of osseointegration of four different orthodontic mini implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Sumit

    Objective: To evaluate the osseointegration potential of four different surfaces of mini-implants. We hypothesized that mini-implants surface roughness alters the intrinsic biomechanical properties of the bone integrated to titanium. Materials and Methods: Mini implants and circular discs were made from alloy Ti6Al4V grade 5. On the basis of surface treatment study was divided into 4 groups: Group 1: Machined: no surface treatment, Group 2: Acid etched: with hydrochloric acid, Group 3: Grit Blasted with alumina and Group 4: Grit blasted +Acid etched. Surface roughness parameters (mean surface roughness: Ra and Quadratic Average roughness: Rq) of the four discs from each group were measured by the optical profilometer. Contact angle measurement of 3 discs from each group was done with a Goniometer. Contact angle of liquids with different hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity were measured. 128 mini implants, differing in surface treatment, were placed into the tibias and femurs of 8 adult male New Zealand white rabbits. Biomechanical properties (Removal torque and hardness) measurements and histomorphometric observations were measured. Results: Ra and Rq of groups were: Machined (1.17+/-0.11, 2.59+/-0.09) Acid etched (1.82+/-0.04, 3.17+/-0.13), Grit blasted (4.83+/-0.23, 7.04+/-0.08), Grit blasted + Acid etched (3.64+/-0.03, 4.95+/-0.04) respectively. Group 4 had significantly (p=0.000) lower Ra and Rq than Group 3. The interaction between the groups and liquid was significant. Group 4 had significantly lower contact angle measurements (40.4°, 26.9°), both for blood and NaCl when compared to other three groups (p≤0.01). Group 4 had significantly higher torque than Group 3 (Tibia: 13.67>9.07N-cm; Femur: 18.21>14.12N-cm), Group 4 (Tibia: 13.67>9.78N-cm; Femur: 18.21>12.87N-cm), and machined (Tibia: 13.67>4.08N-cm; Femur: 18.21>6.49N-cm). SEM analysis reveals significantly more bone implant gap in machined implant surfaces than treated implant surfaces. Bone to implant

  4. Accelerated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Accelerated Reader, a system of computerized testing and record-keeping that supplements the regular classroom reading program. Accelerated Reader's primary goal is to increase literature-based reading practice. The program offers a computer-aided reading comprehension and management program intended to motivate…

  5. Zn/Ag micro-galvanic couples formed on titanium and osseointegration effects in the presence of S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guodong; Qin, Hui; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Zhao, Yaochao; Peng, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong; Chu, Paul K

    2015-10-01

    Titanium implants possessing simultaneous osseointegration and antibacterial ability are desirable. In this work, three types of Zn/Ag micro-galvanic couples are fabricated on titanium by plasma immersion ion implantation to investigate the osseointegration and antibacterial effects as well as the involved mechanisms. The in vitro findings disclose enhanced proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and gene expressions of the rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), as well as good antibacterial ability on all three micro-galvanic couples. Excellent antimicrobial ability is also observed in vivo and the micro-CT and histological results reveal notable osseointegration in vivo despite the presence of bacteria. The Zn/Ag micro-galvanic couple formed on Zn/Ag dual-ion co-implanted titanium shows the best osseointegration as well as good antibacterial properties in vivo obtained from a rabbit tibia model. The difference among the three Zn/Ag micro-galvanic couples can be ascribed to the contact between the Ag NPs and Zn film, which affects the corrosion process. Our results indicate that the biological behavior can be controlled by the corrosion process of the Zn/Ag micro-galvanic couples. PMID:26141835

  6. Effect of low-level mechanical vibration on osteogenesis and osseointegration of porous titanium implants in the repair of long bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Tong, Shichao; Zhai, Mingming; Li, Xiaokang; Cai, Jing; Wu, Yan; Shen, Guanghao; Zhang, Xuhui; Xu, Qiaoling; Guo, Zheng; Luo, Erping

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence substantiates the potential of porous titanium alloy (pTi) as an ideal bone-graft substitute because of its excellent biocompatibility and structural properties. However, it remains a major clinical concern for promoting high-efficiency and high-quality osseointegration of pTi, which is beneficial for securing long-term implant stability. Accumulating evidence demonstrates the capacity of low-amplitude whole-body vibration (WBV) in preventing osteopenia, whereas the effects and mechanisms of WBV on osteogenesis and osseointegration of pTi remain unclear. Our present study shows that WBV enhanced cellular attachment and proliferation, and induced well-organized cytoskeleton of primary osteoblasts in pTi. WBV upregulated osteogenesis-associated gene and protein expression in primary osteoblasts, including OCN, Runx2, Wnt3a, Lrp6 and β-catenin. In vivo findings demonstrate that 6-week and 12-week WBV stimulated osseointegration, bone ingrowth and bone formation rate of pTi in rabbit femoral bone defects via μCT, histological and histomorphometric analyses. WBV induced higher ALP, OCN, Runx2, BMP2, Wnt3a, Lrp6 and β-catenin, and lower Sost and RANKL/OPG gene expression in rabbit femora. Our findings demonstrate that WBV promotes osteogenesis and osseointegration of pTi via its anabolic effect and potential anti-catabolic activity, and imply the promising potential of WBV for enhancing the repair efficiency and quality of pTi in osseous defects. PMID:26601709

  7. Evaluation of the effect of ozonated plant oils on the quality of osseointegration of dental implants under the influence of Cyclosporin A an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    El Hadary, Amany A; Yassin, Hala H; Mekhemer, Sameh T; Holmes, Julian C; Grootveld, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Immunosuppressive agents have been recognized as factors that induce changes and modifications in bone metabolism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ozonated plant extracts (herein termed ozonated oil) under the influence of Cyclosporin A (CsA) on osseointegration. A total of 20 dental implants were placed in 20 rabbit tibiae assigned to Group A or B. CsA was injected at an immunosuppressive dose in Groups A and B as a single-dose treatment. At the day of surgery, Group A received a single topical ozonated oil treatment (0.55 mL) around dental implants; Group B, the control group, received no ozonated oil. Animals were sacrificed after 8 weeks. Radiographs were obtained at implant surgery and on the day of sacrifice. Bone quality was compared between the 2 groups. Radiographically, osseointegration was microscopically evaluated using scanning electron and light microscopies. In ozonated Group A specimens, light microscopic examination demonstrated evidence of more organized mature bone compared with Group B. Within the limits of this study, the results suggest that short-term administration of CsA, when administered with topical ozonated oil, may influence bone density and the quality of dental implant osseointegration. Therefore, topically applied ozonated oil may influence bone density and the quality of osseointegration around dental implants. PMID:20545531

  8. Effect of low-level mechanical vibration on osteogenesis and osseointegration of porous titanium implants in the repair of long bone defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Da; Tong, Shichao; Zhai, Mingming; Li, Xiaokang; Cai, Jing; Wu, Yan; Shen, Guanghao; Zhang, Xuhui; Xu, Qiaoling; Guo, Zheng; Luo, Erping

    2015-11-01

    Emerging evidence substantiates the potential of porous titanium alloy (pTi) as an ideal bone-graft substitute because of its excellent biocompatibility and structural properties. However, it remains a major clinical concern for promoting high-efficiency and high-quality osseointegration of pTi, which is beneficial for securing long-term implant stability. Accumulating evidence demonstrates the capacity of low-amplitude whole-body vibration (WBV) in preventing osteopenia, whereas the effects and mechanisms of WBV on osteogenesis and osseointegration of pTi remain unclear. Our present study shows that WBV enhanced cellular attachment and proliferation, and induced well-organized cytoskeleton of primary osteoblasts in pTi. WBV upregulated osteogenesis-associated gene and protein expression in primary osteoblasts, including OCN, Runx2, Wnt3a, Lrp6 and β-catenin. In vivo findings demonstrate that 6-week and 12-week WBV stimulated osseointegration, bone ingrowth and bone formation rate of pTi in rabbit femoral bone defects via μCT, histological and histomorphometric analyses. WBV induced higher ALP, OCN, Runx2, BMP2, Wnt3a, Lrp6 and β-catenin, and lower Sost and RANKL/OPG gene expression in rabbit femora. Our findings demonstrate that WBV promotes osteogenesis and osseointegration of pTi via its anabolic effect and potential anti-catabolic activity, and imply the promising potential of WBV for enhancing the repair efficiency and quality of pTi in osseous defects.

  9. The distribution of organic material and its contribution to the micro-topography of particles from wettable and water repellent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Rob; Cheng, Shuying; Doerr, Stefan H.; Wright, Chris J.; Bayer, Julia V.; Williams, Rhodri P.

    2010-05-01

    repellency of a soil is the result of not only of particle surface chemistry and soil pore space geometry, but also of the micro-topography generated by organic material adsorbed on particle surfaces.

  10. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  11. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  12. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  13. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  14. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  15. Synergistic effects of surface chemistry and topologic structure from modified microarc oxidation coatings on Ti implants for improving osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Wei, Daqing; Cao, Jianyun; Feng, Wei; Cheng, Su; Du, Qing; Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Yaming; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu

    2015-04-29

    Microarc oxidation (MAO) coating containing Ca, P, Si, and Na elements on a titanium (Ti) implant has been steam-hydrothermally treated and further mediated by post-heat treatment to overcome the compromised bone-implant integration. The bone regeneration, bone-implant contact, and biomechanical push-out force of the modified Ti implants are discussed thoroughly in this work. The best in vivo performances for the steam-hydrothermally treated one is attributed to the synergistic effects of surface chemistry and topologic structure. Through post-heat treatment, we can decouple the effects of surface chemistry and the nanoscale topologic structure easily. Attributed to the excellent in vivo performance of the surface-modified Ti implant, the steam-hydrothermal treatment could be a promising strategy to improve the osseointegration of the MAO coating covered Ti implant. PMID:25860058

  16. Low-level laser therapy affects osseointegration in titanium implants: resonance frequency, removal torque, and histomorphometric analysis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with a diode gallium-aluminum-arsenide (Ga-Al-As) low-level laser device on the healing and attachment of titanium implants in bone. Materials and Methods Thirteen New Zealand white male rabbits weighing 3.0±0.5 kg were used for this study. Dental titanium implants (3.75 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length, US II RBM plus fixture; Osstem, Seoul, Korea) were implanted into both femurs of each rabbit. The rabbits were randomly divided into a LLLT group and a control group. The LLLT was initiated immediately after surgery and then repeated daily for 7 consecutive days in the LLLT group. Six weeks and 12 weeks after implantation, we evaluated and compared the osseointegration of the LLLT group and control group, using histomorphometric analysis, removal torque testing, and resonance frequency analysis (RFA). The results were statistically significant when the level of probability was 0.05 or less based on a non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The implant survival rate was about 96%. Histologically and histomorphometrically, we observed that the titanium implants were more strongly attached in LLLT group than in control group. However, there was no significant difference between the LLLT group and control group in removal torque or RFA. Conclusion Histologically, LLLT might promote cell-level osseointegration of titanium implants, but there was no statistically significant effects. PMID:26904488

  17. The role of well-defined nanotopography of titanium implants on osseointegration: cellular and molecular events in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karazisis, Dimitrios; Ballo, Ahmed M; Petronis, Sarunas; Agheli, Hossein; Emanuelsson, Lena; Thomsen, Peter; Omar, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mechanisms governing the cellular interactions with well-defined nanotopography are not well described in vivo. This is partly due to the difficulty in isolating a particular effect of nanotopography from other surface properties. This study employed colloidal lithography for nanofabrication on titanium implants in combination with an in vivo sampling procedure and different analytical techniques. The aim was to elucidate the effect of well-defined nanotopography on the molecular, cellular, and structural events of osseointegration. Materials and methods Titanium implants were nanopatterned (Nano) with semispherical protrusions using colloidal lithography. Implants, with and without nanotopography, were implanted in rat tibia and retrieved after 3, 6, and 28 days. Retrieved implants were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, histology, immunohistochemistry, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Results Surface characterization showed that the nanotopography was well defined in terms of shape (semispherical), size (79±6 nm), and distribution (31±2 particles/µm2). EDS showed similar levels of titanium, oxygen, and carbon for test and control implants, confirming similar chemistry. The molecular analysis of the retrieved implants revealed that the expression levels of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and the osteoclastic marker, CatK, were reduced in cells adherent to the Nano implants. This was consistent with the observation of less CD163-positive macrophages in the tissue surrounding the Nano implant. Furthermore, periostin immunostaining was frequently detected around the Nano implant, indicating higher osteogenic activity. This was supported by the EDS analysis of the retrieved implants showing higher content of calcium and phosphate on the Nano implants. Conclusion The results show that Nano implants elicit less periimplant macrophage infiltration and downregulate the early expression of inflammatory (TNF-α) and

  18. Modelling effects of tree population dynamics, tree throw and pit-mound formation/diffusion on microtopography over time in different forest settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Y. E.; Johnson, E. A.; Gallaway, J.; Chaikina, O.

    2011-12-01

    Herein we conduct a followup investigation to an earlier research project in which we developed a numerical model of tree population dynamics, tree throw, and sediment transport associated with the formation of pit-mound features for Hawk Creek watershed, Canadian Rockies (Gallaway et al., 2009). We extend this earlier work by exploring the most appropriate transport relations to simulate the diffusion over time of newly-formed pit-pound features due to tree throw. We combine our earlier model with a landscape development model that can incorporate these diffusive transport relations. Using these combined models, changes in hillslope microtopography over time associated with the formation of pit-mound features and their decay will be investigated. The following ideas have motivated this particular study: (i) Rates of pit-mound degradation remain a source of almost complete speculation, as there is almost no long-term information on process rates. Therefore, we will attempt to tackle the issue of pit-mound degradation in a methodical way that can guide future field studies; (ii) The degree of visible pit-mound topography at any point in time on the landscape is a joint function of the rate of formation of new pit-mound features due to tree death/topple and their magnitude vs. the rate of decay of pit-mound features. An example of one interesting observation that arises is the following: it appears that pit-mound topography is often more pronounced in some eastern North American forests vs. field sites along the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rockies. Why is this the case? Our investigation begins by considering whether pit-mound decay might occur by linear or nonlinear diffusion. What differences might arise depending on which diffusive approach is adopted? What is the magnitude of transport rates associated with these possible forms of transport relations? We explore linear and nonlinear diffusion at varying rates and for different sizes of pit-mound pairs using a

  19. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  20. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  1. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  2. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  3. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  4. Enhanced osseointegration and antibacterial action of zinc-loaded titania-nanotube-coated titanium substrates: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Chengcheng; Gao, Biao; Guan, Hanfeng; Cheng, Hao; Fu, Jijiang; Li, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Poor osseointegration and infection resulting from implants are serious medical issues, and it is not straightforward to manufacture implants that can simultaneously address both of these problems. In this study, we produced coatings containing titania nanotubes (TiO2 -NTs) incorporated with zinc (NT-Zn) on Ti substrates by anodization and hydrothermal treatment. The zinc content was controlled by varying the duration of the hydrothermal treatment. The NT-Zn implants not only exhibited improved bone formation (shown by both in vitro and in vivo studies), which enhances osseointegration between bone and implant, but also inhibited growth of bacteria. The cytotoxicity of locally high concentrations of zinc in the NT-Zn3h specimens observed during in vitro studies was mitigated by the effects of dilution in vivo. PMID:24339384

  5. Osseointegration of bioactive microarc oxidized amorphous phase/TiO2 nanocrystals composited coatings on titanium after implantation into rabbit tibia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Wei, Daqing; Yang, Haoyue; Cheng, Su; Feng, Wei; Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Yaming; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu

    2014-05-01

    The amorphous phase/TiO2 nanocrystals (APTN) composited coatings were prepared on Ti implants for biomedical applications. The Ti implants without and with the APTN composited coatings both do not cause any adverse effects after implantation into the rabbit tibia. The osseointegration of Ti implants after covering the APTN coatings is improved pronouncedly, greatly increasing the interface bonding strength between the implants and newly formed bones. In addition, it is interesting that the newly formed bone tissues appear in the micro-pores of the APTN coatings, promoting the interface bonding between the implants and new bones by the mechanical interlock. Moreover, the Ti implant with the APTN coatings formed at higher applied voltage exhibit higher shear strength and displacement during the pushing out experiment probably due to its better osseointegration. PMID:24481533

  6. Pulsed electromagnetic fields promote osteogenesis and osseointegration of porous titanium implants in bone defect repair through a Wnt/β-catenin signaling-associated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Zhai, Mingming; Tong, Shichao; Xu, Fei; Cai, Jing; Shen, Guanghao; Wu, Yan; Li, Xiaokang; Xie, Kangning; Liu, Juan; Xu, Qiaoling; Luo, Erping

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of osseous defects remains a formidable clinical challenge. Porous titanium alloys (pTi) have been emerging as ideal endosseous implants due to the excellent biocompatibility and structural properties, whereas inadequate osseointegration poses risks for unreliable long-term implant stability. Substantial evidence indicates that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF), as a safe noninvasive method, inhibit osteopenia/osteoporosis experimentally and clinically. We herein investigated the efficiency and potential mechanisms of PEMF on osteogenesis and osseointegration of pTi in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that PEMF enhanced cellular attachment and proliferation, and induced well-organized cytoskeleton for in vitro osteoblasts seeded in pTi. PEMF promoted gene expressions in Runx2, OSX, COL-1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PEMF-stimulated group exhibited higher Runx2, Wnt1, Lrp6 and β-catenin protein expressions. In vivo results via μCT and histomorphometry show that 6-week and 12-week PEMF promoted osteogenesis, bone ingrowth and bone formation rate of pTi in rabbit femoral bone defect. PEMF promoted femoral gene expressions of Runx2, BMP2, OCN and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Together, we demonstrate that PEMF improve osteogenesis and osseointegration of pTi by promoting skeletal anabolic activities through a Wnt/β-catenin signaling-associated mechanism. PEMF might become a promising biophysical modality for enhancing the repair efficiency and quality of pTi in bone defect. PMID:27555216

  7. Pulsed electromagnetic fields promote osteogenesis and osseointegration of porous titanium implants in bone defect repair through a Wnt/β-catenin signaling-associated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jing, Da; Zhai, Mingming; Tong, Shichao; Xu, Fei; Cai, Jing; Shen, Guanghao; Wu, Yan; Li, Xiaokang; Xie, Kangning; Liu, Juan; Xu, Qiaoling; Luo, Erping

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of osseous defects remains a formidable clinical challenge. Porous titanium alloys (pTi) have been emerging as ideal endosseous implants due to the excellent biocompatibility and structural properties, whereas inadequate osseointegration poses risks for unreliable long-term implant stability. Substantial evidence indicates that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF), as a safe noninvasive method, inhibit osteopenia/osteoporosis experimentally and clinically. We herein investigated the efficiency and potential mechanisms of PEMF on osteogenesis and osseointegration of pTi in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that PEMF enhanced cellular attachment and proliferation, and induced well-organized cytoskeleton for in vitro osteoblasts seeded in pTi. PEMF promoted gene expressions in Runx2, OSX, COL-1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PEMF-stimulated group exhibited higher Runx2, Wnt1, Lrp6 and β-catenin protein expressions. In vivo results via μCT and histomorphometry show that 6-week and 12-week PEMF promoted osteogenesis, bone ingrowth and bone formation rate of pTi in rabbit femoral bone defect. PEMF promoted femoral gene expressions of Runx2, BMP2, OCN and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Together, we demonstrate that PEMF improve osteogenesis and osseointegration of pTi by promoting skeletal anabolic activities through a Wnt/β-catenin signaling-associated mechanism. PEMF might become a promising biophysical modality for enhancing the repair efficiency and quality of pTi in bone defect. PMID:27555216

  8. Semaphorin 3A-modified adipose-derived stem cell sheet may improve osseointegration in a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Kaixiu; Song, Wen; Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Xiaoru; Tan, Naiwen; Zhang, Sijia; Wei, Hongbo; Song, Yingliang

    2016-01-01

    Although titanium (Ti) implants are considered to be an optimal choice for the replacement of missing teeth, it remains difficult to obtain sufficient osseointegration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study aimed to investigate whether adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) may be used to improve Ti implant osseointegration in T2DM conditions with the addition of semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a recently identified osteoprotective protein. Cell morphology was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Cell proliferation was determined using Cell Counting Kit-8. Osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the staining of alkaline phosphatase, collagen secretion and calcium deposition. An in vivo evaluation was performed in the T2DM rat model, which was induced by a high-fat diet and a low-dose streptozotocin intraperitoneal injection. A Sema3A-modified ASC sheet was wrapped around the Ti implant, which was subsequently inserted into the tibia. The rats were then exposed to Sema3A stimulation. The morphology and proliferation ability of ASCs remained unchanged; however, their osteogenic differentiation ability was increased. Micro-computed tomography scanning and histological observations confirmed that formation of new bone was improved with the use of the Sema3A-modified ASCs sheet. The present study indicated that the Sema3A-modified ASCs sheet may be used to improve osseointegration under T2DM conditions. PMID:27484405

  9. The effect of APH treatment on surface bonding and osseointegration of Ti-6Al-7Nb implants: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy-Duong Thi; Moon, So-Hee; Oh, Tae-Ju; Park, Il-Song; Lee, Min-Ho; Bae, Tae-Sung

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of anodization-cyclic precalcification-heat (APH) treatment on the bonding ability of Ca-P coating to the parent metal and osseointegration of Ti-6Al-7Nb implants. Eighteen Ti-6Al-7Nb discs, 9 untreated and 9 APH-treated, were cultured with osteoblast cells in vitro, and the cellular differentiation ability was assayed at 1, 2, and 3 weeks. For in vivo testing, 28 Ti-6Al-7Nb implants (14 implants of each group) were inserted to rat tibias, and after each 4 and 6 weeks of implantation, bone bonding, and osseointegration were evaluated through removal torque and histological analysis. Osteoblast-culturing showed twice as much of the alkaline phosphatase activity on the treated surface at 3 weeks than on the untreated surface (p < 0.05). The treated implants exhibited higher removal torque values than the untreated ones (15.5 vs. 1.8 Ncm at 4 weeks and 19.7 vs. 2.6 Ncm at 6 weeks, p < 0.05). Moreover, the excellent bonding quality of coats was confirmed by the existence of cohesive fractures on the surface of removed APH implants (field emission scanning electron microscopy and histological observation). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the APH treatment significantly enhanced osseointegration of the Ti-6Al-7Nb implant, with the stable bonding between the coating and the implant surface. PMID:24976109

  10. Semaphorin 3A-modified adipose-derived stem cell sheet may improve osseointegration in a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kaixiu; Song, Wen; Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Xiaoru; Tan, Naiwen; Zhang, Sijia; Wei, Hongbo; Song, Yingliang

    2016-09-01

    Although titanium (Ti) implants are considered to be an optimal choice for the replacement of missing teeth, it remains difficult to obtain sufficient osseointegration in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study aimed to investigate whether adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) may be used to improve Ti implant osseointegration in T2DM conditions with the addition of semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a recently identified osteoprotective protein. Cell morphology was observed using a scanning electron microscope. Cell proliferation was determined using Cell Counting Kit‑8. Osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the staining of alkaline phosphatase, collagen secretion and calcium deposition. An in vivo evaluation was performed in the T2DM rat model, which was induced by a high‑fat diet and a low‑dose streptozotocin intraperitoneal injection. A Sema3A‑modified ASC sheet was wrapped around the Ti implant, which was subsequently inserted into the tibia. The rats were then exposed to Sema3A stimulation. The morphology and proliferation ability of ASCs remained unchanged; however, their osteogenic differentiation ability was increased. Micro‑computed tomography scanning and histological observations confirmed that formation of new bone was improved with the use of the Sema3A-modified ASCs sheet. The present study indicated that the Sema3A‑modified ASCs sheet may be used to improve osseointegration under T2DM conditions. PMID:27484405

  11. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  12. Effect of zoledronate acid treatment on osseointegration and fixation of implants in autologous iliac bone grafts in ovariectomized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Qi, Mengchun; Hu, Jing; Li, Jianping; Li, Jinyuan; Dong, Wei; Feng, Xiaojie; Yu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    One main problem associated with alveolar bone augmentation in implant dentistry is resorption of grafted bone, which may be further compromised by systemic skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis. Zoledronate acid (ZOL) is the most potent bisphosphonate to treat osteoporosis and therefore it is hypothesized to be able to invert the negative effect of osteoporosis on osseointegration and fixation of dental implants in autologous bone grafts. In this study, 56 rabbits received bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) (40 rabbits) or sham operation (16 rabbits). Three months later, 8 animals from each group were sacrificed for bone mineral density (BMD) examination. Then the remaining animals underwent bilateral autologous iliac bone grafting with simultaneous implantation of titanium implants in tibiae and were divided into 5 groups (n=8): Sham, OVX, Loc-ZOL (local treatment), Sys-ZOL (systemic treatment) and Loc+Sys-ZOL (local plus systemic) group. At 3 months after implantation, all animals were sacrificed and specimens were harvested for examinations. Both BMD and histological examinations of femurs showed osteoporotic changes after ovariectomy, while systemic treatment with ZOL restored mineralized bone. Micro-CT examination demonstrated that OVX group showed significant decrease of mineralized bone and implant-bone contact when compared with sham control, whereas both systemic and local treatments of ZOL significantly increased mineralized bone and implant-bone contact in ovariectomized animals. However, the best effects were observed in Loc+Sys-ZOL group (combined use of ZOL) and most of bone indices were similar to (IBCR, p>0.05) or higher than (BV/TV, Conn.D and Tb.N) (p<0.01) those of the sham group, except Tb.Th, which was still significantly lower (p<0.01), and Tb.Sp, which was further decreased (p<0.01). The aforementioned effects were also confirmed by histomorphometric analysis of bone indices on implant-bone contact and mineralized bone. In addition, biomechanical

  13. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  14. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  15. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  16. Peri-implant evaluation of osseointegrated implants subjected to orthodontic forces: results after three years of functional loading

    PubMed Central

    Marins, Bruna de Rezende; Pramiu, Suy Ellen; Busato, Mauro Carlos Agner; Marchi, Luiz Carlos; Togashi, Adriane Yaeko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this study was to clinically and radiographically assess the peri-implant conditions of implants used as orthodontic anchorage. Methods: Two groups were studied: 1) a test group in which osseointegrated implants were used as orthodontic anchorage, with the application of 200-cN force; and 2) a control group in which implants were not subjected to orthodontic force, but supported a screw-retained prosthesis. Clinical evaluations were performed three, six and nine months after prosthesis installation and 1- and 3-year follow-up examinations. Intraoral periapical radiographs were obtained 30 days after surgical implant placement, at the time of prosthesis installation, and one, two and three years thereafter. The results were compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in clinical probing depth (p = 0.1078) or mesial and distal crestal bone resorption (p = 0.1832) during the study period. After three years of follow-up, the mean probing depth was 2.21 mm for the control group and 2.39 mm for the test group. The implants of the control group showed a mean distance between the bone crest and implant shoulder of 2.39 mm, whereas the implants used as orthodontic anchorage showed a mean distance of 2.58 mm at the distal site. Conclusion: Results suggest that the use of stable intraoral orthodontic anchorage did not compromise the health of peri-implant tissues or the longevity of the implant. PMID:27275618

  17. Effects of a Low-Intensity Laser on Dental Implant Osseointegration: Removal Torque and Resonance Frequency Analysis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Blay, Alberto; Blay, Claudia C; Tunchel, Samy; Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Groth, Eduardo B; Zezell, Denise M

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how a low-intensity laser affects the stability and reverse torque resistance of dental implants installed in the tibia of rabbits. Thirty rabbits received 60 dental implants with the same design and surface treatment, one in each proximal metaphysis of the tibia. Three groups were prepared (n = 10 animals each): conventional osseointegration without treatment (control group), surgical sites irradiated with a laser beam emitted in the visible range of 680 nm (Lg1 group), surgical sites irradiated with a laser beam with a wavelength in the infrared range of 830 nm (Lg2 group). Ten irradiation sessions were performed 48 hours apart; the first session was during the immediate postoperative period. Irradiation energy density was 4 J/cm(2) per point in 2 points on each side of the tibias. The resonance frequency and removal torque values were measured at 2 time points after the implantations (3 and 6 weeks). Both laser groups (Lg1 and Lg2) presented a significant difference between resonance frequency analysis values at the baseline and the values obtained after 3 and 6 weeks (P > .05). Although the removal torque values of all groups increased after 6 weeks (P < .05), both laser groups presented greater mean values than those of the control group (P < .01). Photobiomodulation using laser irradiation with wavelengths of 680 and 830 nm had a better degree of bone integration than the control group after 6 weeks of observation time. PMID:26652735

  18. Quantification of Osseointegration of Plasma-Polymer Coated Titanium Alloyed Implants by means of Microcomputed Tomography versus Histomorphometry

    PubMed Central

    Gabler, Carolin; Zietz, Carmen; Bieck, Richard; Göhler, Rebecca; Lindner, Tobias; Haenle, Maximilian; Meichsner, Jürgen; Testrich, Holger; Nowottnick, Mathias; Frerich, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A common method to derive both qualitative and quantitative data to evaluate osseointegration of implants is histomorphometry. The present study describes a new image reconstruction algorithm comparing the results of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) evaluated by means of µCT with histomorphometry data. Custom-made conical titanium alloyed (Ti6Al4V) implants were inserted in the distal tibial bone of female Sprague-Dawley rats. Different surface configurations were examined: Ti6Al4V implants with plasma-polymerized allylamine (PPAAm) coating and plasma-polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) coating as well as implants without surface coating. After six weeks postoperatively, tibiae were explanted and BIC was determined by µCT (3D) and afterwards by histomorphometry (2D). In comparison to uncoated Ti6Al4V implants demonstrating low BIC of 32.4% (histomorphometry) and 51.3% (µCT), PPAAm and PPEDA coated implants showed a nonsignificant increase in BIC (histomorphometry: 45.7% and 53.5% and µCT: 51.8% and 62.0%, resp.). Mean BIC calculated by µCT was higher for all surface configurations compared to BIC detected by histomorphometry. Overall, a high correlation coefficient of 0.70 (p < 0.002) was found between 3D and 2D quantification of BIC. The μCT analysis seems to be suitable as a nondestructive and accurate 3D imaging method for the evaluation of the bone-implant interface. PMID:26064874

  19. The Evaluation of Daily Life Activities after Application of an Osseointegrated Prosthesis Fixation in a Bilateral Transfemoral Amputee

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Stephanie A.F.; Jonkergouw, Niels; van der Meer, Fred; Swaan, Willem M.; Aschoff, Horst-H.; van der Wurff, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Individuals with a transfemoral amputation (TFA) may experience limitations in daily life due to reduced mobility and prosthesis-related problems. An osseointegrated prosthesis fixation (OPF) procedure in amputees might contribute to a solution for patients with short stumps or socket-related problems. To date, no study has specifically described the application of an OPF procedure in individuals with a TFA. This study evaluated the level of daily life activities of a 21-year old service member with a bilateral TFA and cerebral trauma. Due to a short stump length and coordination problems, an OPF procedure was deemed the most suitable option. The result of this procedure and the rehabilitation program showed an increased mobility and satisfaction as obtained by the assessment of life habits questionnaire (LIFE-H) and lower extremity functional scale. The participant was able to walk short distances and the Genium knee provided a stance position. Stair ambulation is impossible because of inadequate muscle capacity. In this specific case we conclude that the quality of life improved through the use of an OPF. However, OPF might not be the appropriate device for every individual with TFA, due to varying bone compositions, co-morbidities, and limited clinical experience and unknown long-term effects. PMID:26356693

  20. Osseointegration of Ti6Al4V alloy implants coated with titanium nitride by a new method.

    PubMed

    Sovak, G; Weiss, A; Gotman, I

    2000-03-01

    Coating titanium alloy implants with titanium nitride (TiN) by the method of Powder Immersion Reaction Assisted Coating (PIRAC) produces a stable layer on their surface. We have examined the ability of the new TiN coating to undergo osseointegration. We implanted TiN-coated and uncoated Ti6Al4V alloy pins into the femora of six-month-old female Wistar rats. SEM after two months showed a bone collar around both TiN-coated and uncoated implants. Morphometrical analysis revealed no significant differences between the percentage of the implant-bone contact and the area and volume of the bone around TiN-coated compared with uncoated implants. Electron-probe microanalysis indicated the presence of calcium and phosphorus at the implant-bone interface. Mineralisation around the implants was also confirmed by labelling with oxytetracycline. Strong activity of alkaline phosphatase and weak activity of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were shown histochemically. Very few macrophages were detected by the non-specific esterase reaction at the site of implantation. Our findings indicate good biocompatibility and bone-bonding properties of the new PIRAC TiN coatings which are comparable to those of uncoated Ti6Al4V alloy implants. PMID:10755443

  1. Preparation, characterization, cellular response and in vivo osseointegration of polyetheretherketone/nano-hydroxyapatite/carbon fiber ternary biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi; Zhou, Ping; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Lixin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Tang, Zhihui; Wei, Jie; Wei, Shicheng

    2015-12-01

    As FDA-approved implantable material, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is becoming a prime candidate to replace traditional surgical metallic implants made of titanium (Ti) and its alloys, since it has a lower elastic modulus than Ti. The bioinertness and defective osteointegration of PEEK, however, limit its clinical adoption as load-bearing dental/orthopedic material. The present work aimed at developing a PEEK bioactive ternary composite, polyetheretherketone/nano-hydroxyapatite/carbon fiber (PEEK/n-HA/CF), and evaluating it as a potential bone-repairing material by assessment of growth and differentiation of osteoblast-like MG63 cells and by estimation of osteointegration in vivo. Our results indicated that the adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of cells, as well as the mechanical properties were greatly promoted for the PEEK/n-HA/CF biocomposite compared with pure PEEK matrix. More importantly, the ternary composite implant boosted in vivo bioactivity and osseointegration in canine tooth defect model. Thus, the PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary biocomposite with enhanced mechanics and biological performances hold great potential as bioactive implant material in dental and orthopedic applications. PMID:26363268

  2. Osseointegration of Prostheses on the Stapes Footplate: Evaluation of the Biomechanical Feasibility by Using a Finite Element Model

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Matthias; Bornitz, Matthias; Beleites, Thomas; Ney, Michael; Zahnert, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of hearing is one of the main issues of tympanoplasty. Depending on the extent of destruction, the ossicular chain is partially or totally replaced by prostheses. In the unfavorable event of complete ossicular chain destruction with only the stapes footplate remaining in the oval niche, implanting of a columella prosthesis represents the gold standard. Besides ventilation problems, the main causes of unsatisfactory hearing results are dislocation of the prosthesis and poor coupling to the footplate. Therefore, stable fixation of prostheses is desirable but has not been realized to date. In line with our experimental intention to realize a bony prosthesis fixation on the footplate, we designed a finite element model for the simulation of the interacting forces once an osseointegration was achieved. These preliminary results predict the mechanical feasibility of this endeavor and the necessary general preconditions, which have to be carefully considered. A specially designed titanium prosthesis anchor needs a minimal bony fixation of 104 μm accretion height on the footplate to withstand all emerging forces. Therefore, providing a sort of artificial stapedial suprastructure in the form of a firm, preferably bony, integration of a prosthesis anchor on the footplate seems to be realistic and worthwhile from a mechanical and medical point of view. PMID:17828428

  3. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  4. Attention's Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Robert M G; McClenahan, Laura J; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2016-06-01

    How do people get attention to operate at peak efficiency in high-pressure situations? We tested the hypothesis that the general mechanism that allows this is the maintenance of multiple target representations in working and long-term memory. We recorded subjects' event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing the working memory and long-term memory representations used to control attention while performing visual search. We found that subjects used both types of memories to control attention when they performed the visual search task with a large reward at stake, or when they were cued to respond as fast as possible. However, under normal circumstances, one type of target memory was sufficient for slower task performance. The use of multiple types of memory representations appears to provide converging top-down control of attention, allowing people to step on the attentional accelerator in a variety of high-pressure situations. PMID:27056975

  5. Enhancement of osseointegration of polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament by coating of silk fibroin and depositing of hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jia; Wan, Fang; Yang, Jianjun; Hao, Wei; Wang, Yaxian; Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Liang; Chen, Shiyi

    2014-01-01

    Background Application of artificial ligament in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is one of the research focuses of sports medicine but the biological tendon–bone healing still remains a problem. The preliminary study of hydroxyapatite (HAP) coating on the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface could effectively induce the osteoblast differentiation, but the tendon–bone healing was still not stable. As a green synthesis process, the biomimetic mineralization can simulate the natural bone growth in vitro and in vivo. Methods HAP crystals were grown under the guide of silk fibroin (SF) PET surface by biomimetic route. Several techniques including scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were utilized for proving the introduction of both SF and HAP. The viability and osseointegration of bone marrow stromal cells on the surface of three kinds of ligament, including PET group (non-coating group), PET+SF group (SF-coating group), and PET+SF+HAP group (combined HAP- and SF-coating group), were analyzed by CCK-8 assays and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) detection. Seventy-two mature male New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into three groups. Among them, 36 rabbits were sacrificed for mechanical testing, and histological examination for the others. Results The SF and SF+HAP were successfully coated on the surface of PET fiber. The CCK-8 assay showed that the cell proliferation on PET+SF+HAP group was better than the other two groups from 24 to 120 hours. After 14 days of culture, the cells in the PET+SF+HAP group delivered higher levels of ALP than the other two groups. After 3 days of culture, the expression level of integrin β1 in the PET+SF+HAP group and PET+SF group were higher than in the PET group. The mean load to failure and the stiffness value of the PET+SF+HAP group were both higher than the other two groups. Hematoxylin and

  6. Loading of osseointegrated implants for bone conduction hearing at 3 weeks: 3-year stability, survival, and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Rik C; den Besten, Christine A; Faber, Hubert T; Dun, Catharina A J; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Hol, Myrthe K S

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the long-term safety of loading osseointegrated implants for bone conduction hearing 3 weeks post-surgery. Thirty consecutive adult patients were implanted with the Baha BI300 (Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions) in our tertiary referral center. Implants were loaded with the sound processor 3 weeks post-surgery. Follow-up examinations were performed at 10 days; 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks; 6 months; and 1, 2, and 3 years after implant surgery. At each follow-up visit, implant stability quotient (ISQ) values were recorded by means of resonance frequency analysis, and soft tissue status was evaluated according to Holgers' classification. ISQ trends, implant survival, and soft tissue reactions were compared to a population of 52 patients with the same type of implants loaded from 6 weeks post-surgery as part of another study. Subjective benefit was measured by means of the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI). After an initial dip in ISQ at 10 days after implantation, a gradually increasing trend in ISQ was found until 6 months in both populations, after which ISQ values remained above baseline values. Implant survival was 97 % in the study population and 96 % in the comparison population. Clinically relevant soft tissue reactions were found in 0.9 % (study population) and 1.7 % (comparison population) of all visits. Patients reported subjective benefit; the mean GBI score was 22.8. In conclusion, loading these implants at 3 weeks post-surgery is safe based on the current study, as long-term results show high ISQ values and good implant survival and tolerability. PMID:26272679

  7. Evaluation of different retention systems on a distal extension removable partial denture associated with an osseointegrated implant.

    PubMed

    Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Gennari Filho, Humberto

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of a mandibular distal extension removable partial denture (DERPD) associated with an implant and different retention system, by bidimensional finite element method. Five hemimandible models with a canine and external hexagon implant at second molar region associated with DERPD were simulated: model A, hemimandible with a canine and a DERPD; model B, hemimandible with a canine and implant with a healing abutment associated to a DERPD; model C, hemimandible with a canine and implant with an ERA attachment associated to a DERPD; model D, hemimandible with a canine and implant with an O'ring attachment associated to a DERPD; and model E, hemimandible with a canine and implant-supported prosthesis associated to a DERPD. Cusp tips were loaded with 50 N of axial or oblique force (45 degrees). Finite element analysis was performed in ANSYS 9.0. model E showed the higher displacement and overload in the supporting tissues; the patterns of stress distribution around the dental apex of models B, C, and D were similar. The association between a DERPD and an osseointegrated implant using the ERA or O'ring systems shows lower stress values. Oblique forces showed higher stress values and displacement. Oblique forces increased the displacement and stress levels in all models; model C displayed the best stress distribution in the supporting structures; healing abutment, ERA, and O'ring systems were viable with RPD, but DERPD association with a single implant-supported prosthesis was nonviable. PMID:20485037

  8. Effect of surface roughness on osteogenesis in vitro and osseointegration in vivo of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone–nanohydroxyapatite composite

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi; Liu, Xiaochen; Xu, Anxiu; Wang, Lixin; Luo, Zuyuan; Zheng, Yunfei; Deng, Feng; Wei, Jie; Tang, Zhihui; Wei, Shicheng

    2015-01-01

    As United States Food and Drug Administration-approved implantable material, carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) possesses an adjustable elastic modulus similar to cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace surgical metallic implants. The bioinertness and inferior osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK, however, limit its clinical application as orthopedic/dental implants. In this study, CFRPEEK–nanohydroxyapatite ternary composites (PEEK/n-HA/CF) with variable surface roughness have been successfully fabricated. The effect of surface roughness on their in vitro cellular responses of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells (attachment, proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation) and in vivo osseointegration is evaluated. The results show that the hydrophilicity and the amount of Ca ions on the surface are significantly improved as the surface roughness of composite increases. In cell culture tests, the results reveal that the cell proliferation rate and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of cells are a function of the size of surface roughness. The composite with moderate surface roughness significantly increases cell attachment/proliferation and promotes the production of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium nodule formation compared with the other groups. More importantly, the PEEK/n-HA/CF implant with appropriate surface roughness exhibits remarkably enhanced bioactivity and osseointegration in vivo in the animal experiment. These findings will provide critical guidance for the design of CFRPEEK-based implants with optimal roughness to regulate cellular behaviors, and to enhance biocompability and osseointegration. Meanwhile, the PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary composite with optimal surface roughness might hold great potential as bioactive biomaterial for bone grafting and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25733834

  9. Circadian Rhythm and Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Genes in Osseointegration: A Genome-Wide Screening of Implant Failure by Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mengatto, Cristiane Machado; Mussano, Federico; Honda, Yoshitomo; Colwell, Christopher S.; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Background Successful dental and orthopedic implants require the establishment of an intimate association with bone tissue; however, the mechanistic explanation of how biological systems accomplish osseointegration is still incomplete. We sought to identify critical gene networks involved in osseointegration by exploring the implant failure model under vitamin D deficiency. Methodology Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to control or vitamin D-deficient diet prior to the osteotomy surgery in the femur bone and the placement of T-shaped Ti4Al6V implant. Two weeks after the osteotomy and implant placement, tissue formed at the osteotomy site or in the hollow chamber of T-shaped implant was harvested and total RNA was evaluated by whole genome microarray analyses. Principal Findings Two-way ANOVA of microarray data identified 103 genes that were significantly (>2 fold) modulated by the implant placement and vitamin D deficiency. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses assigned the highest z-score to the circadian rhythm pathway including neuronal PAS domain 2 (NPAS2), and period homolog 2 (Per2). NPAS2 and Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (ARNTL/Bmal 1) were upregulated around implant and diminished by vitamin D deficiency, whereas the expression pattern of Per2 was complementary. Hierarchical cluster analysis further revealed that NPAS2 was in a group predominantly composed of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) genes. Whereas the expression of bone ECM genes around implant was not significantly affected by vitamin D deficiency, cartilage ECM genes were modulated by the presence of the implant and vitamin D status. In a proof-of-concept in vitro study, the expression of cartilage type II and X collagens was found upregulated when mouse mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on implant disk with 1,25D supplementation. Conclusions This study suggests that the circadian rhythm system and cartilage extracellular matrix may be

  10. Cytocompatibility and early osseointegration of nanoTiO2-modified Ti-24 Nb-4 Zr-7.9 Sn surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, X H; Wu, L; Ai, H J; Han, Y; Hu, Y

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cytocompatibility and early osseointegration of Ti-24 Nb-4 Zr-7.9 Sn (Ti-2448) surfaces that were modified with a nanoscale TiO2 coating. The coating was fabricated using a hydrothermal synthesis method to generate nanoTiO2/Ti-2448. The surface characteristics of the samples were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The cytotoxicity of the fabricated nanoTiO2/Ti-2448 was determined using MTT assays. The proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts cultured on nanoTiO2/Ti-2448 were compared with those cultured on Ti-2448. Disk-shaped implants were placed in Wistar rats. The histological sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin (HE), and the histocompatibility was analysed at 4 and 12weeks post-implantation. Cylindrical implants were embedded in Japanese white rabbits, and the histological sections were stained with HE and anti-TGF-β1 to evaluate the histocompatibility and early osseointegration at 4, 12 and 26weeks post-implantation. NanoTiO2/Ti-2448 exhibited a rougher surface than did Ti-2448. NanoTiO2/Ti-2448 was determined to be non-cytotoxic. More osteoblasts and higher ALP activity were observed for nanoTiO2/Ti-2448 than Ti-2448 (p<0.05). Few inflammatory cells were detected around nanoTiO2/Ti-2448, and the expression of TGF-β1 on nanoTiO2/Ti-2448 peaked at earlier time than that on Ti-2448. The results indicate that the cytocompatibility and early osseointegration were enhanced by the nanoTiO2 coating. PMID:25579921

  11. Effect of surface roughness on osteogenesis in vitro and osseointegration in vivo of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone-nanohydroxyapatite composite.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi; Liu, Xiaochen; Xu, Anxiu; Wang, Lixin; Luo, Zuyuan; Zheng, Yunfei; Deng, Feng; Wei, Jie; Tang, Zhihui; Wei, Shicheng

    2015-01-01

    As United States Food and Drug Administration-approved implantable material, carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) possesses an adjustable elastic modulus similar to cortical bone and is a prime candidate to replace surgical metallic implants. The bioinertness and inferior osteogenic properties of CFRPEEK, however, limit its clinical application as orthopedic/dental implants. In this study, CFRPEEK-nanohydroxyapatite ternary composites (PEEK/n-HA/CF) with variable surface roughness have been successfully fabricated. The effect of surface roughness on their in vitro cellular responses of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells (attachment, proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation) and in vivo osseointegration is evaluated. The results show that the hydrophilicity and the amount of Ca ions on the surface are significantly improved as the surface roughness of composite increases. In cell culture tests, the results reveal that the cell proliferation rate and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of cells are a function of the size of surface roughness. The composite with moderate surface roughness significantly increases cell attachment/proliferation and promotes the production of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium nodule formation compared with the other groups. More importantly, the PEEK/n-HA/CF implant with appropriate surface roughness exhibits remarkably enhanced bioactivity and osseointegration in vivo in the animal experiment. These findings will provide critical guidance for the design of CFRPEEK-based implants with optimal roughness to regulate cellular behaviors, and to enhance biocompability and osseointegration. Meanwhile, the PEEK/n-HA/CF ternary composite with optimal surface roughness might hold great potential as bioactive biomaterial for bone grafting and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25733834

  12. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  13. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  14. Effects of rhBMP-2 on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Titanium Implant Surfaces on Bone Regeneration and Osseointegration: Spilt-Mouth Designed Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Lee, So-Hyoun; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of rhBMP-2 applied at different concentrations to sandblasted and acid etched (SLA) implants on osseointegration and bone regeneration in a bone defect of beagle dogs as pilot study using split-mouth design. Methods. For experimental groups, SLA implants were coated with different concentrations of rhBMP-2 (0.1, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL). After assessment of surface characteristics and rhBMP-2 releasing profile, the experimental groups and untreated control groups (n = 6 in each group, two animals in each group) were placed in split-mouth designed animal models with buccal open defect. At 8 weeks after implant placement, implant stability quotients (ISQ) values were recorded and vertical bone height (VBH, mm), bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %), and bone volume (BV, %) in the upper 3 mm defect areas were measured. Results. The ISQ values were highest in the 1.0 group. Mean values of VBH (mm), BIC (%), and BV (%) were greater in the 0.5 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL groups than those in 0.1 and control groups in buccal defect areas. Conclusion. In the open defect area surrounding the SLA implant, coating with 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL concentrations of rhBMP-2 was more effective, compared with untreated group, in promoting bone regeneration and osseointegration. PMID:26504807

  15. Osseointegration of dental implants in 3D-printed synthetic onlay grafts customized according to bone metabolic activity in recipient site.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Faleh; Torres, Jesus; Al-Abedalla, Khadijeh; Lopez-Cabarcos, Enrique; Alkhraisat, Mohammad H; Bassett, David C; Gbureck, Uwe; Barralet, Jake E

    2014-07-01

    Onlay grafts made of monolithic microporous monetite bioresorbable bioceramics have the capacity to conduct bone augmentation. However, there is heterogeneity in the graft behaviour in vivo that seems to correlate with the host anatomy. In this study, we sought to investigate the metabolic activity of the regenerated bone in monolithic monetite onlays by using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in rats. This information was used to optimize the design of monetite onlays with different macroporous architecture that were then fabricated using a 3D-printing technique. In vivo, bone augmentation was attempted with these customized onlays in rabbits. PET-CT findings demonstrated that bone metabolism in the calvarial bone showed higher activity in the inferior and lateral areas of the onlays. Histological observations revealed higher bone volume (up to 47%), less heterogeneity and more implant osseointegration (up to 38%) in the augmented bone with the customized monetite onlays. Our results demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to achieve osseointegration of dental implants in bone augmented with 3D-printed synthetic onlays. It was also observed that designing the macropore geometry according to the bone metabolic activity was a key parameter in increasing the volume of bone augmented within monetite onlays. PMID:24726538

  16. Effects of rhBMP-2 on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Titanium Implant Surfaces on Bone Regeneration and Osseointegration: Spilt-Mouth Designed Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Ho; Lee, So-Hyoun; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate effects of rhBMP-2 applied at different concentrations to sandblasted and acid etched (SLA) implants on osseointegration and bone regeneration in a bone defect of beagle dogs as pilot study using split-mouth design. Methods. For experimental groups, SLA implants were coated with different concentrations of rhBMP-2 (0.1, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL). After assessment of surface characteristics and rhBMP-2 releasing profile, the experimental groups and untreated control groups (n = 6 in each group, two animals in each group) were placed in split-mouth designed animal models with buccal open defect. At 8 weeks after implant placement, implant stability quotients (ISQ) values were recorded and vertical bone height (VBH, mm), bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %), and bone volume (BV, %) in the upper 3 mm defect areas were measured. Results. The ISQ values were highest in the 1.0 group. Mean values of VBH (mm), BIC (%), and BV (%) were greater in the 0.5 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL groups than those in 0.1 and control groups in buccal defect areas. Conclusion. In the open defect area surrounding the SLA implant, coating with 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL concentrations of rhBMP-2 was more effective, compared with untreated group, in promoting bone regeneration and osseointegration. PMID:26504807

  17. The Influence of Low-Level Laser on Osseointegration Around Machined and Sandblasted Acid-Etched Implants: A Removal Torque and Histomorphometric Analyses.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Eduardo Rolim; Torres, Marco Antônio Rambo Osório; Meyer, Kleber Ricardo Monteiro; Zani, Sabrina Rebollo; Shinkai, Rosemary Sadami Arai; Grossi, Márcio Lima

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of the influence of laser application on osseointegration around implants with different surface characteristics is limited. This study aims to evaluate the influence of low-level lasers on the early stages of osseointegration. Ninety-six external hex implants (3.75 mm × 5.0 mm) were placed in 24 rabbits-one machined and one sandblasted acid-etched per tibia. The rabbits were later divided into the laser group, which received a total dose of 24 J/cm(2) of gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser over 15 days, and a control group. At 16 and 30 days after surgery, removal torque and histomorphometric analyses were performed. No statistical differences in removal torque or histomorphometric analyses were verified between laser and control groups regardless of implant surface (P > .05). Time was the only variable presenting significant differences between measurements (P < .05). Low-level laser had no significant short-term effect on bone-to-implant contact and removal torque values regardless of implant surface characteristics. PMID:23834724

  18. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  19. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  20. Novel hydrophilic nanostructured microtexture on direct metal laser sintered Ti-6Al-4V surfaces enhances osteoblast response in vitro and osseointegration in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hyzy, Sharon L; Cheng, Alice; Cohen, David J; Yatzkaier, Gustavo; Whitehead, Alexander J; Clohessy, Ryan M; Gittens, Rolando A; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biological effects in vivo of hierarchical surface roughness on laser sintered titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) implants to those of conventionally machined implants on osteoblast response in vitro and osseointegration. Laser sintered disks were fabricated to have micro-/nano-roughness and wettability. Control disks were computer numerical control (CNC) milled and then polished to be smooth (CNC-M). Laser sintered disks were polished smooth (LST-M), grit blasted (LST-B), or blasted and acid etched (LST-BE). LST-BE implants or implants manufactured by CNC milling and grit blasted (CNC-B) were implanted in the femurs of male New Zealand white rabbits. Most osteoblast differentiation markers and local factors were enhanced on rough LST-B and LST-BE surfaces in comparison to smooth CNC-M or LST-M surfaces for MG63 and normal human osteoblast cells. To determine if LST-BE implants were osteogenic in vivo, we compared them to implant surfaces used clinically. LST-BE implants had a unique surface with combined micro-/nano-roughness and higher wettability than conventional CNC-B implants. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated a significant improvement in cortical bone-implant contact of LST-BE implants compared to CNC-B implants after 3 and 6 weeks. However, mechanical testing revealed no differences between implant pullout forces at those time points. LST surfaces enhanced osteoblast differentiation and production of local factors in vitro and improved the osseointegration process in vivo. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2086-2098, 2016. PMID:27086616

  1. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  2. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  3. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  4. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  5. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  6. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  7. Angular Acceleration Without Torque?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.2

  8. Sustained linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, T. M.

    1973-01-01

    The subjective effects of sustained acceleration are discussed, including positive, negative, forward, backward, and lateral acceleration effects. Physiological effects, such as retinal and visual response, unconsciousness and cerebral function, pulmonary response, and renal output, are studied. Human tolerance and performance under sustained acceleration are ascertained.

  9. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  10. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  11. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  12. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  13. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  14. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  15. Plasma inverse transition acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    It can be proved fundamentally from the reciprocity theorem with which the electromagnetism is endowed that corresponding to each spontaneous process of radiation by a charged particle there is an inverse process which defines a unique acceleration mechanism, from Cherenkov radiation to inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) [1], from Smith-Purcell radiation to inverse Smith-Purcell acceleration (ISPA) [2], and from undulator radiation to inverse undulator acceleration (IUA) [3]. There is no exception. Yet, for nearly 30 years after each of the aforementioned inverse processes has been clarified for laser acceleration, inverse transition acceleration (ITA), despite speculation [4], has remained the least understood, and above all, no practical implementation of ITA has been found, until now. Unlike all its counterparts in which phase synchronism is established one way or the other such that a particle can continuously gain energy from an acceleration wave, the ITA to be discussed here, termed plasma inverse transition acceleration (PITA), operates under fundamentally different principle. As a result, the discovery of PITA has been delayed for decades, waiting for a conceptual breakthrough in accelerator physics: the principle of alternating gradient acceleration [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In fact, PITA was invented [7, 8] as one of several realizations of the new principle.

  16. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  17. Stability, Survival, and Tolerability of an Auditory Osseointegrated Implant for Bone Conduction Hearing: Long-Term Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    den Besten, Christine A.; Stalfors, Joacim; Wigren, Stina; Blechert, Johan Ivarsson; Flynn, Mark; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns; Aggarwal, Rohini; Green, Kevin; Nelissen, Rik C.; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Hol, Myrthe K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare implant stability, survival, and soft tissue reactions for a novel (test) and previous generation (control) percutaneous auditory osseointegrated implant for bone conduction hearing at long-term follow-up of 5 years. Study Design: Single follow-up visit of a previously completed multicenter, randomized, controlled trial. Patients: Fifty-seven of the 77 participants of a completed randomized controlled trial on a new auditory osseointegrated implant underwent a single follow-up visit 5 years after implantation, which comprised implant stability measurements and collection of Holgers scores. Additionally, implant survival was recorded for all 77 patients from the original trial. Results: The test implant showed significantly higher implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with the control implant throughout the 5-year follow-up. Mean area under the curve of ISQ high from baseline to 5 years was 71.6 (standard deviation [SD] ±2.0) and 66.7 (SD ±3.4) for the test and control implant, respectively (p < 0.0001). For both implants, the mean ISQ value recorded at 5 years was higher compared with implantation (test group +2.03 [SD ±2.55, within group p < 0.0001] and control group +2.25 [SD ±4.95, within group p = 0.12]). No difference was noticed in increase from baseline between groups (p = 0.64). Furthermore, evaluation of soft tissue reactions continued to show superiority of the test implant. At the 5-year follow-up visit, one patient (2.5%) presented with a Holgers grade 2 in the test group, compared with four patients (23.5%) in the control group (p = 0.048); no patient presented with more severe soft tissue reactions. Excluding explantations, the survival rate was 95.8% for the test group and 95.0% for the control group. The corresponding rates including explantations were 93.9 and 90.0%. Conclusion: The test implant showed superiority in terms of higher mean ISQ values and less adverse soft tissue reactions, both

  18. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  19. Space Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This training video, presented by the Lewis Research Center's Space Experiments Division, gives a background and detailed instructions for preparing the space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) for use. The SAMS measures, conditions, and records forces of low gravity accelerations, and is used to determine the effect of these forces on various experiments performed in microgravity. Inertial sensors are used to measure positive and negative acceleration over a specified frequency range. The video documents the SAMS' uses in different configurations during shuttle missions.

  20. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  1. Accelerating into the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Cherry

    2009-05-01

    Accelerator science has traditionally been associated with high-energy physics and nuclear physics. But the use of accelerators in other areas of science, as well as in medicine and industry, is steadily growing. Accelerators are now, for example, used to treat cancer using proton therapy, which can deposit radiation onto a tumour while causing much less damage to surrounding healthy tissue than with other treatment techniques.

  2. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  3. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  4. Miniaturization Techniques for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, James E.

    2003-05-27

    The possibility of laser driven accelerators [1] suggests the need for new structures based on micromachining and integrated circuit technology because of the comparable scales. Thus, we are exploring fully integrated structures including sources, optics (for both light and particle) and acceleration in a common format--an accelerator-on-chip (AOC). Tests suggest a number of preferred materials and techniques but no technical or fundamental roadblocks at scales of order 1 {micro}m or larger.

  5. Effects of Microtopography on Overmarsh Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. C.; Torres, R.; Garrett, A.

    2013-12-01

    Authors: J.C. Sullivan, R. Torres, A.J. Garrett In this study we systematically degrade a high-resolution, high precision salt marsh DEM and characterize the effects of DEM smoothing on overmarsh circulation. The question driving this effort is: How much topographic detail is needed to accurately simulate salt marsh circulation? The hydrodynamic model Delft3D was applied to data from a previous dye-tracer study in a 2 km2 semi-enclosed salt marsh basin at Skidaway Institute of Oceanography near Savannah, Georgia, USA. Overmarsh circulation was simulated for each smoothed DEM over a 5 day period corresponding to spring tide conditions. Results show that flood and ebb pathways differ significantly, but this effect is less apparent as the DEM is smoothed. Also, the flushing time (Tf) decreases with smoothing leading to greater dilution of a dye tracer with each tidal cycle. Observations at the macro, meso and micro scale show that flood and ebb flows become stronger through a consistent set of flow paths, including intertidal creeks, and differences in overmarsh circulation are more apparent in low marsh and channel head areas. This work shows that accurate representation of overmarsh circulation requires that the DEM resolve creek and low lying marsh structures at a spatial scale of 2-4m, but not necessarily the smallest tidal creeks (< 1m in width and depth). The next phase of this work will be to incorporate spatial variations in vegetation cover using RULLI (Remote Ultra Low-Light Imaging) remote sensing technology developed by the Department of Energy.

  6. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  7. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  8. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  9. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  10. Scaling FFAG accelerator for muon acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, JB.; Planche, T.; Mori, Y.

    2011-10-06

    Recent developments in scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerators have opened new ways for lattice design, with straight sections, and insertions like dispersion suppressors. Such principles and matching issues are detailed in this paper. An application of these new concepts is presented to overcome problems in the PRISM project.

  11. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  12. A new method to routinely achieve passive fit of ceramometal prostheses over Brånemark osseointegrated implants: a two-year report.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, C

    1994-10-01

    To maintain osseointegration, it is essential that the prosthesis fit with total passivity because the absence of a periodontal ligament makes the implant unable to adapt its position to a nonpassive framework. The traditional system of building a metal framework by melting over mechanized pieces--called gold cylinders in the Brånemark system--has been modified so these pieces are joined to the metal framework by means of physicochemical bonding. This bond is achieved by treating the metallic surfaces with a Silicoater system and a composite resin cement that sets in the mouth using an improved cementing protocol. In this paper, the clinical viability of this new philosophy, shown over 2 years, is presented. A total of 64 prostheses (39 maxillary and 25 mandibular) supported by 214 abutments, with an average observation period of 9 months, were evaluated. The results show that it is possible to routinely obtain a ceramometal prosthesis with a totally passive circular fitting while maintaining the possibility of retrieval, thus making postceramic soldering unnecessary. PMID:7751108

  13. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  14. J-PARC Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Yoshishige

    2008-02-21

    The Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is under construction in Tokai site. The linac beam commissioning started last fall, while the beam commissioning of the 3-GeV Rapid-Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) will start this fall. The status of the J-PARC accelerator is reported with emphasis on the technical development accomplished for the J-PARC.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  16. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  17. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  18. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  19. KEK digital accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, T.; Adachi, T.; Takayama, K.; Leo, K. W.; Arai, T.; Arakida, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Kadokura, E.; Kawai, M.; Kawakubo, T.; Kubo, Tomio; Koyama, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Okazaki, K.; Okamura, K.; Someya, H.; Takagi, A.; Tokuchi, A.; Wake, M.

    2011-07-01

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK digital accelerator (KEK-DA) is a renovation of the KEK 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron, which was shut down in 2006. The existing 40 MeV drift tube linac and rf cavities have been replaced by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source embedded in a 200 kV high-voltage terminal and induction acceleration cells, respectively. A DA is, in principle, capable of accelerating any species of ion in all possible charge states. The KEK-DA is characterized by specific accelerator components such as a permanent magnet X-band ECR ion source, a low-energy transport line, an electrostatic injection kicker, an extraction septum magnet operated in air, combined-function main magnets, and an induction acceleration system. The induction acceleration method, integrating modern pulse power technology and state-of-art digital control, is crucial for the rapid-cycle KEK-DA. The key issues of beam dynamics associated with low-energy injection of heavy ions are beam loss caused by electron capture and stripping as results of the interaction with residual gas molecules and the closed orbit distortion resulting from relatively high remanent fields in the bending magnets. Attractive applications of this accelerator in materials and biological sciences are discussed.

  20. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  1. Accelerating global forest mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    Forest mortality is apparently accelerating globally. The evidence supporting this contention is now substantial, as is the evidence suggesting the acceleration has just begun and will become progressively worse in upcoming decades. I will review the data and models used to make these contentions.

  2. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  3. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  4. Cascaded radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Lingang; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-07-15

    A cascaded radiation-pressure acceleration scheme is proposed. When an energetic proton beam is injected into an electrostatic field moving at light speed in a foil accelerated by light pressure, protons can be re-accelerated to much higher energy. An initial 3-GeV proton beam can be re-accelerated to 7 GeV while its energy spread is narrowed significantly, indicating a 4-GeV energy gain for one acceleration stage, as shown in one-dimensional simulations and analytical results. The validity of the method is further confirmed by two-dimensional simulations. This scheme provides a way to scale proton energy at the GeV level linearly with laser energy and is promising to obtain proton bunches at tens of gigaelectron-volts.

  5. Analyzing radial acceleration with a smartphone acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    This paper continues the sequence of experiments using the acceleration sensor of smartphones (for description of the function and the use of the acceleration sensor, see Ref. 1) within this column, in this case for analyzing the radial acceleration.

  6. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells as a Tool for Dental Implant Osseointegration: an Experimental Study in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Botticelli, Daniele; Sivolella, Stefano; Bengazi, Franco; Guazzo, Riccardo; Sbricoli, Luca; Ricci, Sara; Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Velez, Joaquin Urbizo; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The biological interaction between the jaw bones and dental implant is fundamental for the long-term success of dental implant placement. Nevertheless, the insufficient bone volume remains a major clinical problem, especially in case of immediate dental implant. Using a canine model, the present study proves the regenerative potential of adipose- derived stem cells (ADSCs) to repair peri-implant bone defects occurring in immediate dental implant placement. In six labradors, all mandibular premolars and the first molars were extracted bilaterally and three months later dental implants were installed with a marginal gap. The marginal defects were filled with hydroxyapatite (HA)-based scaffolds previously seeded with ADSCs. After one month of healing, specimens were prepared for histological and histomorphometric evaluations. Histological analyses of ground sections show that ADSCs significantly increase bone regeneration. Several new vessels, osteoblasts and new bone matrix were detected. By contrast, no inflammatory cells have been revealed. ADSCs could be used to accelerate bone healing in peri- implant defects in case of immediate dental implant placement. PMID:27014644

  7. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  8. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  9. The MESA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Aulenbacher, Kurt

    2013-11-07

    The MESA accelerator will operate for particle and nuclear physics experiments in two different modes. A first option is conventional c.w. acceleration yielding 150-200MeV spin-polarized external beam. Second, MESA will be operated as a superconducting multi-turn energy recovery linac (ERL), opening the opportunity to perform experiments with a windowless target with beam current of up to 10 mA. The perspectives for innovative experiments with such a machine are discussed together with a sketch of the accelerator physics issues that have to be solved.

  10. Confronting Twin Paradox Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2016-05-01

    The resolution to the classic twin paradox in special relativity rests on the asymmetry of acceleration. Yet most students are not exposed to a satisfactory analysis of what exactly happens during the acceleration phase that results in the nonaccelerated observer's more rapid aging. The simple treatment presented here offers both graphical and quantitative solutions to the problem, leading to the correct result that the acceleration-induced age gap is 2Lβ years when the one-way distance L is expressed in light-years and velocity β ≡v/c .

  11. Accelerator Toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Terebilo, Andrei

    2001-05-29

    This paper introduces Accelerator Toolbox (AT)--a collection of tools to model particle accelerators and beam transport lines in the MATLAB environment. At SSRL, it has become the modeling code of choice for the ongoing design and future operation of the SPEAR 3 synchrotron light source. AT was designed to take advantage of power and simplicity of MATLAB--commercially developed environment for technical computing and visualization. Many examples in this paper illustrate the advantages of the AT approach and contrast it with existing accelerator code frameworks.

  12. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  13. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  14. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  15. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  16. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  17. Non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses several topics which can be investigated without the use of accelerators. Topics covered are: (1) proton decay, (2) atmospheric neutrinos, (3) neutrino detection, (4) muons from Cygnus X-3, and (5) the double-beta decay.

  18. Principles of Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs*, Richard J.

    The basic concepts involved in induction accelerators are introduced in this chapter. The objective is to provide a foundation for the more detailed coverage of key technology elements and specific applications in the following chapters. A wide variety of induction accelerators are discussed in the following chapters, from the high current linear electron accelerator configurations that have been the main focus of the original developments, to circular configurations like the ion synchrotrons that are the subject of more recent research. The main focus in the present chapter is on the induction module containing the magnetic core that plays the role of a transformer in coupling the pulsed power from the modulator to the charged particle beam. This is the essential common element in all these induction accelerators, and an understanding of the basic processes involved in its operation is the main objective of this chapter. (See [1] for a useful and complementary presentation of the basic principles in induction linacs.)

  19. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2014-07-16

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  20. Rare Isotope Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy

    2002-04-01

    The next frontier for low-energy nuclear physics involves experimentation with accelerated beams of short-lived radioactive isotopes. A new facility, the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), is proposed to produce large amount of these rare isotopes and post-accelerate them to energies relevant for studies in nuclear physics, astrophysics and the study of fundamental interactions at low energy. The basic science motivation for this facility will be introduced. The general facility layout, from the 400 kW heavy-ion superconducting linac used for production of the required isotopes to the novel production and extraction schemes and the highly efficient post-accelerator, will be presented. Special emphasis will be put on a number of technical breakthroughs and recent R&D results that enable this new facility.

  1. Vibration control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the vast majority of accelerator applications, ground vibration amplitudes are well below tolerable magnet jitter amplitudes. In these cases, it is necessary and sufficient to design a rigid magnet support structure that does not amplify ground vibration. Since accelerator beam lines are typically installed at an elevation of 1-2m above ground level, special care has to be taken in order to avoid designing a support structure that acts like an inverted pendulum with a low resonance frequency, resulting in untolerable lateral vibration amplitudes of the accelerator components when excited by either ambient ground motion or vibration sources within the accelerator itself, such as cooling water pumps or helium flow in superconducting magnets. In cases where ground motion amplitudes already exceed the required jiter tolerances, for instance in future linear colliders, passive vibration damping or active stabilization may be considered.

  2. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-09-09

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  3. Accelerator vibration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Vibrations induced in accelerator structures can cause particle-beam jitter and alignment difficulties. Sources of these vibrations may include pump oscillations, cooling-water turbulence, and vibrations transmitted through the floor to the accelerator structure. Drift tubes (DT) in a drift tube linac (DTL) are components likely to affect beam jitter and alignment because they normally have a heavy magnet structure on the end of a long and relatively small support stem. The natural vibrational frequencies of a drift tube have been compared with theoretical predictions. In principle, by knowing natural frequencies of accelerator components and system vibrational frequncies, an accelerator can be designed that does not have these frequencies coinciding. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  5. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-08-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  6. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Briner, Clifton F.; Martin, Samuel B.

    1993-01-01

    A rolamite acceleration sensor which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently.

  7. Rolamite acceleration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P.; Briner, C.F.; Martin, S.B.

    1993-12-21

    A rolamite acceleration sensor is described which has a failsafe feature including a housing, a pair of rollers, a tension band wrapped in an S shaped fashion around the rollers, wherein the band has a force-generation cut out and a failsafe cut out or weak portion. The failsafe cut out or weak portion breaks when the sensor is subjected to an excessive acceleration so that the sensor fails in an open circuit (non-conducting) state permanently. 6 figures.

  8. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  9. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-23

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  10. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.B.; Marshall, T.C.; LaPointe, M.A.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM{sub 01} fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5{pi}mm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM{sub 01} mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Collective field accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Luce, John S.

    1978-01-01

    A collective field accelerator which operates with a vacuum diode and utilizes a grooved cathode and a dielectric anode that operates with a relativistic electron beam with a .nu./.gamma. of .about. 1, and a plurality of dielectric lenses having an axial magnetic field thereabout to focus the collectively accelerated electrons and ions which are ejected from the anode. The anode and lenses operate as unoptimized r-f cavities which modulate and focus the beam.

  12. CEBAF accelerator achievements

    SciTech Connect

    Y.C. Chao, M. Drury, C. Hovater, A. Hutton, G.A. Krafft, M. Poelker, C. Reece, M. Tiefenback

    2011-06-01

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  13. LHCb GPU acceleration project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalov, A.; Cámpora, D.; Neufeld, N.; Vilasís-Cardona, X.

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector is due to be upgraded for processing high-luminosity collisions, which will increase data bandwidth to the event filter farm from 100 GB/s to 4 TB/s, encouraging us to look for new ways of accelerating Online reconstruction. The Coprocessor Manager is a new framework for integrating LHCb's existing computation pipelines with massively parallel algorithms running on GPUs and other accelerators. This paper describes the system and analyzes its performance.

  14. Metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIIID) on screw-shaped titanium implant: The effects of ion source, ion dose and acceleration voltage on surface chemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung-Soo; Sul, Young-Taeg; Jeong, Yongsoo; Byon, Eungsun; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Cho, Suyeon; Oh, Se-Jung; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2011-07-01

    The present study investigated the effect of metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIIID) process parameters, i.e., plasma sources of magnesium and calcium, ion dose, and acceleration voltage on the surface chemistry and morphology of screw-type titanium implants that have been most widely used for osseointegrated implants. It is found that irrespective of plasma ion source, surface topography and roughness showed no differences at the nanometer level; that atom concentrations increased with ion dose but decreased with acceleration voltage. Data obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and auger electron spectroscopy suggested that MePIIID process produces 'intermixed' layer of cathodic arc deposition and plasma immersion ion implantation. The MePIIID process may create desired bioactive surface chemistry of dental and orthopaedic implants by tailoring ion and plasma sources and thus enable investigations of the effect of the surface chemistry on bone response. PMID:21334957

  15. Multimegawatt cyclotron autoresonance accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.; LaPointe, M.A.; Ganguly, A.K.; Yoder, R.B.; Wang, C.

    1996-05-01

    Means are discussed for generation of high-quality multimegawatt gyrating electron beams using rf gyroresonant acceleration. TE{sub 111}-mode cylindrical cavities in a uniform axial magnetic field have been employed for beam acceleration since 1968; such beams have more recently been employed for generation of radiation at harmonics of the gyration frequency. Use of a TE{sub 11}-mode waveguide for acceleration, rather than a cavity, is discussed. It is shown that the applied magnetic field and group velocity axial tapers allow resonance to be maintained along a waveguide, but that this is impractical in a cavity. In consequence, a waveguide cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA) can operate with near-100{percent} efficiency in power transfer from rf source to beam, while cavity accelerators will, in practice, have efficiency values limited to about 40{percent}. CARA experiments are described in which an injected beam of up to 25 A, 95 kV has had up to 7.2 MW of rf power added, with efficiencies of up to 96{percent}. Such levels of efficiency are higher than observed previously in any fast-wave interaction, and are competitive with efficiency values in industrial linear accelerators. Scaling arguments suggest that good quality gyrating megavolt beams with peak and average powers of 100 MW and 100 kW can be produced using an advanced CARA, with applications in the generation of high-power microwaves and for possible remediation of flue gas pollutants. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    The continuing development of powerful laser systems has permitted to extend the interaction of laser beams with matter far into the relativistic domain, and to demonstrate new approaches for producing energetic particle beams. The extremely large electric fields, with amplitudes exceeding the TV/m level, that are produced in plasma medium are of relevance particle acceleration. Since the value of this longitudinal electric field, 10,000 times larger than those produced in conventional radio-frequency cavities, plasma accelerators appear to be very promising for the development of compact accelerators. The incredible progresses in the understanding of laser plasma interaction physic, allows an excellent control of electron injection and acceleration. Thanks to these recent achievements, laser plasma accelerators deliver today high quality beams of energetic radiation and particles. These beams have a number of interesting properties such as shortness, brightness and spatial quality, and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine, radio-biology, chemistry, physics and material science,security (material inspection), and of course in accelerator science.

  17. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  18. Accelerators for America's Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  19. X-ray image review of the bone remodeling around an osseointegrated trans-femoral implant and a finite element simulation case study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Robinson, Kingsley

    2008-03-01

    The insertion of an implant into a bone leads to stress/strain redistribution, hence bone remodeling occurs adjacent to the implant. The study of the bone remodeling around the osseointegration implants can predict the long-term clinical success of the implant. The clinical medial-lateral X-rays of 11 patients were reviewed. To eliminate geometrical distortion of different X-rays, they were converted into a digital format and geometrical correction was carried out. Furthermore, the finite element (FE) method was used to investigate how the bone remodeling was affected by the stress/strain distribution in the femur. The review of clinical X-rays showed cortical bone growth around the proximal end of the implant and absorbtion at the distal end of the femur. The FE simulation revealed the stress/strain distribution in the femur of a selected patient. This provided a biomechanical interpretation of the bone remodeling. The existing bone remodeling theories such as minimal strain and strain rate theories were unable to offer satisfactory explanation for the cortical bone growth at the implant side of the proximal femur, where the stress/strain level was much lower than the one in the intact side of the femur. The study established the correlation between stress/strain distribution obtained from FE simulations and the bone remodeling of the clinical review. The cortical bone growth was initiated by the stress/strain gradient in the bone. Through the review of clinical X-rays and FE simulations, the study confirmed that the bone remodeling in a femur with an implant was influenced by the stress/strain redistribution. The strain level and stress gradient hypothesis is presented to offer an explanation for the implanted cortical bone remodeling observed in this study. PMID:18197477

  20. Improved osseointegration of dental titanium implants by TiO2 nanotube arrays with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: a pilot in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Kwan; Choi, Dong-Soon; Jang, Insan; Choi, Won-Youl

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 nanotube arrays on the surface of dental implants were fabricated by two-step anodic oxidation. Their effects on bone-implant contact were researched by a pilot in vivo study. The implants were classified into four groups. An implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was compared with various surface implants, including machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. The diameter of the TiO2 nanotube window and TiO2 nanotube were ~70 nm and ~110 nm, respectively. The rhBMP-2 was loaded into TiO2 nanotube arrays and elution was detected by an interferometric biosensing method. A change in optical thickness of ~75 nm was measured by flow cell testing for 9 days, indicating elution of rhBMP-2 from the TiO2 nanotube arrays. For the in vivo study, the four groups of implants were placed into the proximal tibia of New Zealand White rabbits. In the implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and rhBMP-2, the bone-to-implant contact ratio was 29.5% and the bone volume ratio was 77.3%. Bone remodeling was observed not only in the periosteum but also in the interface between the bone and implant threads. These values were higher than in the machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. Our results suggest that TiO2 nanotube arrays could potentially be used as a reservoir for rhBMP-2 to reinforce osseointegration on the surface of dental implants. PMID:25709438

  1. Improved osseointegration of dental titanium implants by TiO2 nanotube arrays with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: a pilot in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Kwan; Choi, Dong-Soon; Jang, Insan; Choi, Won-Youl

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 nanotube arrays on the surface of dental implants were fabricated by two-step anodic oxidation. Their effects on bone-implant contact were researched by a pilot in vivo study. The implants were classified into four groups. An implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was compared with various surface implants, including machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. The diameter of the TiO2 nanotube window and TiO2 nanotube were ~70 nm and ~110 nm, respectively. The rhBMP-2 was loaded into TiO2 nanotube arrays and elution was detected by an interferometric biosensing method. A change in optical thickness of ~75 nm was measured by flow cell testing for 9 days, indicating elution of rhBMP-2 from the TiO2 nanotube arrays. For the in vivo study, the four groups of implants were placed into the proximal tibia of New Zealand White rabbits. In the implant group with TiO2 nanotube arrays and rhBMP-2, the bone-to-implant contact ratio was 29.5% and the bone volume ratio was 77.3%. Bone remodeling was observed not only in the periosteum but also in the interface between the bone and implant threads. These values were higher than in the machined surface, sandblasted large-grit and acid-etched surface, and TiO2 nanotube array surface groups. Our results suggest that TiO2 nanotube arrays could potentially be used as a reservoir for rhBMP-2 to reinforce osseointegration on the surface of dental implants. PMID:25709438

  2. Diffusive Shock Acceleration and Reconnection Acceleration Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; Le Roux, J. A.; Li, Gang; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.; Cummings, A.; Stone, E.; Decker, R.

    2015-12-01

    Shock waves, as shown by simulations and observations, can generate high levels of downstream vortical turbulence, including magnetic islands. We consider a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes as an energization mechanism for charged particles. Observations of electron and ion distributions downstream of interplanetary shocks and the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) are frequently inconsistent with the predictions of classical DSA. We utilize a recently developed transport theory for charged particles propagating diffusively in a turbulent region filled with contracting and reconnecting plasmoids and small-scale current sheets. Particle energization associated with the anti-reconnection electric field, a consequence of magnetic island merging, and magnetic island contraction, are considered. For the former only, we find that (i) the spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed, and (ii) the downstream solution is constant. For downstream plasmoid contraction only, (i) the accelerated spectrum is a hard power law in particle speed; (ii) the particle intensity for a given energy peaks downstream of the shock, and the distance to the peak location increases with increasing particle energy, and (iii) the particle intensity amplification for a particular particle energy, f(x,c/{c}0)/f(0,c/{c}0), is not 1, as predicted by DSA, but increases with increasing particle energy. The general solution combines both the reconnection-induced electric field and plasmoid contraction. The observed energetic particle intensity profile observed by Voyager 2 downstream of the HTS appears to support a particle acceleration mechanism that combines both DSA and magnetic-island-reconnection-related processes.

  3. The APT Accelerator.*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, George P.

    1996-05-01

    The accelerator for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project is a high-power RF linac designed to produce a 100-mA CW proton beam at an energy of 1300 MeV. A heavy-metal target produces large quantities of spallation neutrons, which are slowed to thermal energies and captured in a feed material to make tritium. The baseline accelerator design consists of a 75-keV proton injector, a 7-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), a 100-MeV coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL), and a 1300-MeV side-coupled linac (SCL). The RFQ operates at a frequency of 350 MHz, while the CCDTL and SCL operate at 700-MHz. A quadrupole-magnet transport system conveys the 1300-MeV beam to production target/blanket assemblies where beam expanders using non-linear magnetic elements transform the linac output distribution into large-area rectangular distributions having a nearly uniform density. All the linac accelerating structures use conventional water-cooled copper technology. The SCL section is based on the well-proven 800-MeV LANSCE high-duty-factor linac at Los Alamos. The CCDTL is a new hybrid accelerating structure that combines the best features of the conventional drift-tube linac and the coupled-cavity linac to provide efficient and stable acceleration in the intermediate velocity range. Approximately 263 1-MW CW klystrons are needed to drive the 130-MW proton beam. The total ac-power requirement for the APT plant is about 438 MW, most of which is needed for the accelerator. An advanced-technology option is being considered that would replace the conventional SCL with a superconducting RF linac composed of sequences of 4-cell elliptical-type cavities. This option would reduce the electric power consumption significantly and would provide increased operational flexibility. * Work supported by the US Department of Energy.

  4. Advanced accelerator theory development

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Houck, T.L.; Poole, B.; Tishchenko, N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wang, I.

    1998-02-09

    A new accelerator technology, the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA), is potentially an ultra compact accelerator/pulsed power driver. This new accelerator relies on three new components: the ultra-high gradient insulator, the asymmetric Blumlein and low jitter switches. In this report, we focused our attention on the first two components of the DWA system the insulators and the asymmetric Blumlein. First, we sought to develop the necessary design tools to model and scale the behavior of the high gradient insulator. To perform this task we concentrated on modeling the discharge processes (i.e., initiation and creation of the surface discharge). In addition, because these high gradient structures exhibit favorable microwave properties in certain accelerator configurations, we performed experiments and calculations to determine the relevant electromagnetic properties. Second, we performed circuit modeling to understand energy coupling to dynamic loads by the asymmetric Blumlein. Further, we have experimentally observed a non-linear coupling effect in certain asymmetric Blumlein configurations. That is, as these structures are stacked into a complete module, the output voltage does not sum linearly and a lower than expected output voltage results. Although we solved this effect experimentally, we performed calculations to understand this effect more fully to allow better optimization of this DWA pulse-forming line system.

  5. High energy plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.

    1985-05-01

    Colinear intense laser beams ..omega../sub 0/, kappa/sub 0/ and ..omega../sub 1/, kappa/sub 1/ shone on a plasma with frequency separation equal to the electron plasma frequency ..omega../sub pe/ are capable of creating a coherent large longitudinal electric field E/sub L/ = mc ..omega../sub pe//e of the order of 1GeV/cm for a plasma density of 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ through the laser beat excitation of plasma oscillations. Accompanying favorable and deleterious physical effects using this process for a high energy beat-wave accelerator are discussed: the longitudinal dephasing, pump depletion, the transverse laser diffraction, plasma turbulence effects, self-steepening, self-focusing, etc. The basic equation, the driven nonlinear Schroedinger equation, is derived to describe this system. Advanced accelerator concepts to overcome some of these problems are proposed, including the plasma fiber accelerator of various variations. An advanced laser architecture suitable for the beat-wave accelerator is suggested. Accelerator physics issues such as the luminosity are discussed. Applications of the present process to the current drive in a plasma and to the excitation of collective oscillations within nuclei are also discussed.

  6. Acoustic particle acceleration sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, J.B.; Barry, P.J.

    1996-04-01

    A crossed dipole array provides a directional receiving capability in a relatively small sensor package and is therefore very attractive for many applications in acoustics. Particle velocity measurements on two axes perpendicular to each other are required to provide the dipole signals. These can be obtained directly using particle velocity sensors or via simple transfer functions using acceleration and displacement sensors. Also, the derivative of the acoustic pressure with respect to space provides a signal proportional to the particle acceleration and gives rise to the pressure gradient sensor. Each of these sensors has strengths and drawbacks depending on the frequency regime of interest, the noise background, and whether a point or a line configuration of dipole sensors is desired. In this paper, the performance of acceleration sensors is addressed using a sensor concept developed at DREA. These sensors exploit bending stresses in a cantilever beam of piezoelectric material to obtain wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. Models which predict the acceleration sensitivity, pressure sensitivity, and natural frequency for this type of sensor are described. Experimental results obtained using several different versions of these sensors are presented and compared with theory. The predicted performance of acceleration sensors are compared with that of pressure gradient arrays and particle velocity sensors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Dielectric laser accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, R. Joel; Noble, Robert J.; Bane, Karl; Dowell, David H.; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Spencer, James E.; Tantawi, Sami; Wu, Ziran; Byer, Robert L.; Peralta, Edgar; Soong, Ken; Chang, Chia-Ming; Montazeri, Behnam; Wolf, Stephen J.; Cowan, Benjamin; Dawson, Jay; Gai, Wei; Hommelhoff, Peter; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Jing, Chunguang; McGuinness, Christopher; Palmer, Robert B.; Naranjo, Brian; Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Mizrahi, Amit; Schachter, Levi; Sears, Christopher; Werner, Gregory R.; Yoder, Rodney B.

    2014-10-01

    The use of infrared lasers to power optical-scale lithographically fabricated particle accelerators is a developing area of research that has garnered increasing interest in recent years. The physics and technology of this approach is reviewed, which is referred to as dielectric laser acceleration (DLA). In the DLA scheme operating at typical laser pulse lengths of 0.1 to 1 ps, the laser damage fluences for robust dielectric materials correspond to peak surface electric fields in the GV /m regime. The corresponding accelerating field enhancement represents a potential reduction in active length of the accelerator between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. Power sources for DLA-based accelerators (lasers) are less costly than microwave sources (klystrons) for equivalent average power levels due to wider availability and private sector investment. Because of the high laser-to-particle coupling efficiency, required pulse energies are consistent with tabletop microJoule class lasers. Combined with the very high (MHz) repetition rates these lasers can provide, the DLA approach appears promising for a variety of applications, including future high-energy physics colliders, compact light sources, and portable medical scanners and radiative therapy machines.

  8. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1989-01-01

    The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass. The goal of the present program is to demonstrate feasibility of the EPA thruster concept through experimental and theoretical investigations of the EPA acceleration mechanism and discharge chamber performance. Experimental investigations will include operating the test bed ion (TBI) engine as an EPA thruster and parametrically varying the thruster geometry and operating conditions to quantify the electrostatic plasma acceleration effect. The theoretical investigations will include the development of a discharge chamber model which describes the relationships between the engine size, plasma properties, and overall performance. For the EPA thruster to be a viable propulsion concept, overall thruster efficiencies approaching 30% with specific impulses approaching 1000 s must be achieved.

  9. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  10. Issues regarding acceleration in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Cline, D.B.; Gabella, W.E.

    1992-12-01

    Both self-acceleration and laser-acoustic acceleration in crystals are considered. The conduction electrons in the crystal are treated as a plasma and are the medium through which the acceleration takes place. Self-acceleration is the possible acceleration of part of a bunch due to plasma oscillations driven by the leading part. Laser- acoustic acceleration uses a laser in quasi-resonance with an acoustic wave to pump up the plasma oscillation to accelerate a beam. Self-driven schemes though experimentally simple seem problematic because single bunch densities must be large.

  11. Laser acceleration with open waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1999-03-01

    A unified framework based on solid-state open waveguides is developed to overcome all three major limitations on acceleration distance and hence on the feasibility of two classes of laser acceleration. The three limitations are due to laser diffraction, acceleration phase slippage, and damage of waveguide structure by high power laser. The two classes of laser acceleration are direct-field acceleration and ponderomotive-driven acceleration. Thus the solutions provided here encompass all mainstream approaches for laser acceleration, either in vacuum, gases or plasmas.

  12. Uniform acceleration in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Yaakov; Scarr, Tzvi

    2015-10-01

    We extend de la Fuente and Romero's (Gen Relativ Gravit 47:33, 2015) defining equation for uniform acceleration in a general curved spacetime from linear acceleration to the full Lorentz covariant uniform acceleration. In a flat spacetime background, we have explicit solutions. We use generalized Fermi-Walker transport to parallel transport the Frenet basis along the trajectory. In flat spacetime, we obtain velocity and acceleration transformations from a uniformly accelerated system to an inertial system. We obtain the time dilation between accelerated clocks. We apply our acceleration transformations to the motion of a charged particle in a constant electromagnetic field and recover the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation.

  13. Accelerating the culture change!

    PubMed

    Klunk, S W; Panetta, J; Wooten, J

    1996-11-01

    Exide Electronics, a major supplier of uninterruptible power system equipment, embarked on a journey of changing a culture to improve quality, enhance customer responsiveness, and reduce costs. This case study examines the evolution of change over a period of seven years, with particular emphasis on the most recent years, 1992 through 1995. The article focuses on the Raleigh plant operations and describes how each succeeding year built on the successes and fixed the shortcomings of the prior years to accelerate the culture change, including corrective action and continuous improvement processes, organizational structures, expectations, goals, achievements, and pitfalls. The real challenge to changing the culture was structuring a dynamic approach to accelerate change! The presentation also examines how the evolutionary process itself can be created and accelerated through ongoing communication, regular feedback of progress and goals, constant evaluation and direction of the process, and measuring and paying for performance. PMID:10162360

  14. Acceleration radioisotope production simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-12-31

    We have identified 96 radionuclides now being used or under consideration for use in medical applications. Previously, we calculated the production of {sup 99}Mo from enriched and depleted uranium targets at the 800-MeV energy used in the LAMPF accelerator at Los Alamos. We now consider the production of isotopes using lower energy beams, which may become available as a result of new high-intensity spallation target accelerators now being planned. The production of four radionuclides ({sup 7}Be, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 99}Mo, and {sup 195m}Pt) in a simplified proton accelerator target design is being examined. The LAHET, MCNP, and CINDER90 codes were used to model the target, transport a beam of protons and secondary produced particles through the system, and compute the nuclide production from spallation and low-energy neutron interactions. Beam energies of 200 and 400 MeV were used, and several targets were considered for each nuclide.

  15. Cosmic Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Tajima, Toshiki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2002-10-01

    A cosmic acceleration mechanism is introduced which is based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically flowing plasma. We show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f([epsilon]) [is proportional to] 1/[epsilon]2. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations. [copyright] 2002 American Institute of Physics

  16. Microelectromechanical acceleration-sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Robb M.; Shul, Randy J.; Polosky, Marc A.; Hoke, Darren A.; Vernon, George E.

    2006-12-12

    An acceleration-sensing apparatus is disclosed which includes a moveable shuttle (i.e. a suspended mass) and a latch for capturing and holding the shuttle when an acceleration event is sensed above a predetermined threshold level. The acceleration-sensing apparatus provides a switch closure upon sensing the acceleration event and remains latched in place thereafter. Examples of the acceleration-sensing apparatus are provided which are responsive to an acceleration component in a single direction (i.e. a single-sided device) or to two oppositely-directed acceleration components (i.e. a dual-sided device). A two-stage acceleration-sensing apparatus is also disclosed which can sense two acceleration events separated in time. The acceleration-sensing apparatus of the present invention has applications, for example, in an automotive airbag deployment system.

  17. Studies of accelerated compact toruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.H.

    1983-01-04

    In an earlier publication we considered acceleration of plasma rings (Compact Torus). Several possible accelerator configurations were suggested and the possibility of focusing the accelerated rings was discussed. In this paper we consider one scheme, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focusing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force, F/sub a/ = kappaU/sub m//R where (kappa < 1), increases as R/sup -2/, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case, however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency.

  18. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  19. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed.

  20. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  1. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  2. Spallator - accelerator breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.

    1985-01-01

    The concept involves the use of spallation neutrons produced by interaction of a high energy proton (1 to 2 GeV) from a linear accelerator (LINAC) with a heavy metal target (uranium). The principal spallator concept is based on generating fissile fuel for use in LWR nuclear power plants. The spallator functions in conjunction with a reprocessing plant to regenerate and produce the Pu-239 or U-233 for fabrication into fresh LWR reactor fuel elements. Advances in proton accelerator technology has provided a solid base for predicting performance and optimizing the design of a reliable, continuous wave, high-current LINAC required by a fissile fuel production machine.

  3. 'Light Sail' Acceleration Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2009-08-21

    The dynamics of the acceleration of ultrathin foil targets by the radiation pressure of superintense, circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. By addressing self-induced transparency and charge separation effects, it is shown that for 'optimal' values of the foil thickness only a thin layer at the rear side is accelerated by radiation pressure. The simple 'light sail' model gives a good estimate of the energy per nucleon, but overestimates the conversion efficiency of laser energy into monoenergetic ions.

  4. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Osseointegrated Dental Implants Based on Platform-Switching Concept: Influence of Diameter, Length, Thread Shape, and In-Bone Positioning Depth on Stress-Based Performance

    PubMed Central

    Sannino, Gianpaolo

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of implant design (in terms of diameter, length, and thread shape), in-bone positioning depth, and bone posthealing crestal morphology on load transfer mechanisms of osseointegrated dental implants based on platform-switching concept. In order to perform an effective multiparametric comparative analysis, 11 implants different in dimensions and in thread features were analyzed by a linearly elastic 3-dimensional finite element approach, under a static load. Implant models were integrated with the detailed model of a maxillary premolar bone segment. Different implant in-bone positioning levels were modeled, considering also different posthealing crestal bone morphologies. Bone overloading risk was quantified by introducing proper local stress measures, highlighting that implant diameter is a more effective design parameter than the implant length, as well as that thread shape and thread details can significantly affect stresses at peri-implant bone, especially for short implants. Numerical simulations revealed that the optimal in-bone positioning depth results from the balance of 2 counteracting effects: cratering phenomena and bone apposition induced by platform-switching configuration. Proposed results contribute to identify the mutual influence of a number of factors affecting the bone-implant loading transfer mechanisms, furnishing useful insights and indications for choosing and/or designing threaded osseointegrated implants. PMID:23861722

  6. Osseointegration of Ti-6Al-4V alloy implants with a titanium nitride coating produced by a PIRAC nitriding technique: a long-term time course study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sovak, Guy; Gotman, Irena; Weiss, Anna

    2015-02-01

    This study examined bone tissue responses to Ti-6Al-4V alloy implants with a hard TiN coating applied by an original powder immersion reaction-assisted coating (PIRAC) nitriding method. Progression of implant fixation in the distal epiphysis and within the medullary cavity of the rat femur was evaluated between 3 days and 6 months postimplantation by scanning electron microscopy, oxytetracycline incorporation, and histochemistry. After 6 months, successful osseointegration was achieved in both epiphyseal and diaphyseal sites. Throughout, implant portions located within the epiphysis remained in close contact with bone trabeculae that gradually engulfed the implant forming a bone collar continuous with the trabecular network of the epiphysis. In the diaphysis, woven bone was first formed within the marrow cavity around the implant and later was replaced by a shell of compact bone around the implant. In general, higher osseointegration rates were measured for TiN-coated versus the uncoated implants, both in the epiphysis and in the diaphysis. In conclusion, our findings indicate an excellent long-term biocompatibility of TiN coatings applied by the PIRAC nitriding technique and superior osteoinductive ability in comparison with uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Such coatings can, therefore, be considered for improving the corrosion and wear resistance of titanium-based orthopedic implants. PMID:25482093

  7. Prospects for Accelerator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Alan

    2011-02-01

    Accelerator technology today is a greater than US$5 billion per annum business. Development of higher-performance technology with improved reliability that delivers reduced system size and life cycle cost is expected to significantly increase the total accelerator technology market and open up new application sales. Potential future directions are identified and pitfalls in new market penetration are considered. Both of the present big market segments, medical radiation therapy units and semiconductor ion implanters, are approaching the "maturity" phase of their product cycles, where incremental development rather than paradigm shifts is the norm, but they should continue to dominate commercial sales for some time. It is anticipated that large discovery-science accelerators will continue to provide a specialty market beset by the unpredictable cycles resulting from the scale of the projects themselves, coupled with external political and economic drivers. Although fraught with differing market entry difficulties, the security and environmental markets, together with new, as yet unrealized, industrial material processing applications, are expected to provide the bulk of future commercial accelerator technology growth.

  8. Radioisotope Dating with Accelerators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Richard A.

    1979-01-01

    Explains a new method of detecting radioactive isotopes by counting their accelerated ions rather than the atoms that decay during the counting period. This method increases the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, and allows one to find the ages of much older and smaller samples. (GA)

  9. Two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Selph, F.B.

    1984-09-01

    In the two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept, an electron linear accelerator structure is established in which two beams propagate. One is an intense low energy beam that is made to undergo free electron lasing to produce microwaves. These microwaves are then coupled to another part of the structure where they act to produce a high longitudinal electric gradient that is used to accelerate a second relatively low intensity electron beam to very high energies. The TBA was originally suggested by Sessler as a possible means for economically achieving linear collider energies of 100 GeV and above. Although still in a conceptual stage, the TBA is an inherently plausible concept that combines the free electron laser (FEL) with several well-known technologies - high current induction linacs, microwave waveguides, and traveling-wave linac structures - in a novel and interesting way. Two characteristics of the TBA that make it a particularly suitable candidate for achieving high energies are its ability to operate at higher frequencies than typical present-day linacs (say 30 GHz as compared with 3 GHz), and to be an efficient means for delivering power to a hitherto unattainable high-gradient structure (say 250 MV/m) that the higher frequency makes possible. These high accelerating gradients will permit much shorter linac structures for a given energy.

  10. FPGA Verification Accelerator (FVAX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Jane; Burke, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Is Verification Acceleration Possible? - Increasing the visibility of the internal nodes of the FPGA results in much faster debug time - Forcing internal signals directly allows a problem condition to be setup very quickly center dot Is this all? - No, this is part of a comprehensive effort to improve the JPL FPGA design and V&V process.

  11. Pulsed electromagnetic gas acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the axial velocity profile and electromagnetic structure of a high power, quasi-steady MPD discharge are used to formulate a gasdynamic model of the acceleration process. Conceptually dividing the accelerated plasma into an inner flow and an outer flow, it is found that more than two-thirds of the total power in the plasma is deposited in the inner flow, accelerating it to an exhaust velocity of 12.5 km/sec. The outer flow, which is accelerated to a velocity of only 6.2 km/sec, appears to provide a current conduction path between the inner flow and the anode. Related cathode studies have shown that the critical current for the onset of terminal voltage fluctuations, which was recently shown to be a function of the cathode area, appears to reach an asymptote for cathodes of very large surface area. Detailed floating potential measurements show that the fluctuations are confined to the vicinity of the cathode and hence reflect a cathode emission process rather than a fundamental limit on MPD performance.

  12. Menopause accelerates biological aging.

    PubMed

    Levine, Morgan E; Lu, Ake T; Chen, Brian H; Hernandez, Dena G; Singleton, Andrew B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salfati, Elias; Manson, JoAnn E; Quach, Austin; Kusters, Cynthia D J; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Widschwendter, Martin; Ritz, Beate R; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L; Horvath, Steve

    2016-08-16

    Although epigenetic processes have been linked to aging and disease in other systems, it is not yet known whether they relate to reproductive aging. Recently, we developed a highly accurate epigenetic biomarker of age (known as the "epigenetic clock"), which is based on DNA methylation levels. Here we carry out an epigenetic clock analysis of blood, saliva, and buccal epithelium using data from four large studies: the Women's Health Initiative (n = 1,864); Invecchiare nel Chianti (n = 200); Parkinson's disease, Environment, and Genes (n = 256); and the United Kingdom Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (n = 790). We find that increased epigenetic age acceleration in blood is significantly associated with earlier menopause (P = 0.00091), bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0018), and a longer time since menopause (P = 0.017). Conversely, epigenetic age acceleration in buccal epithelium and saliva do not relate to age at menopause; however, a higher epigenetic age in saliva is exhibited in women who undergo bilateral oophorectomy (P = 0.0079), while a lower epigenetic age in buccal epithelium was found for women who underwent menopausal hormone therapy (P = 0.00078). Using genetic data, we find evidence of coheritability between age at menopause and epigenetic age acceleration in blood. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we find that two SNPs that are highly associated with age at menopause exhibit a significant association with epigenetic age acceleration. Overall, our Mendelian randomization approach and other lines of evidence suggest that menopause accelerates epigenetic aging of blood, but mechanistic studies will be needed to dissect cause-and-effect relationships further. PMID:27457926

  13. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  14. NEW ACCELERATION METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    But a glance at the Livingston chart, Fig. 1, of accelerator particle energy as a function of time shows that the energy has steadily, exponentially, increased. Equally significant is the fact that this increase is the envelope of diverse technologies. If one is to stay on, or even near, the Livingston curve in future years then new acceleration techniques need to be developed. What are the new acceleration methods? In these two lectures I would like to sketch some of these new ideas. I am well aware that they will probably not result in high energy accelerators within this or the next decade, but conversely, it is likely that these ideas will form the basis for the accelerators of the next century. Anyway, the ideas are stimulating and suffice to show that accelerator physicists are not just 'engineers', but genuine scientists deserving to be welcomed into the company of high energy physicists. I believe that outsiders will find this field surprisingly fertile and, certainly fun. To put it more personally, I very much enjoy working in this field and lecturing on it. There are a number of review articles which should be consulted for references to the original literature. In addition there are three books on the subject. Given this material, I feel free to not completely reference the material in the remainder of this article; consultation of the review articles and books will be adequate as an introduction to the literature for references abound (hundreds are given). At last, by way of introduction, I should like to quote from the end of Ref. 2 for I think the remarks made there are most germane. Remember that the talk was addressed to accelerator physicists: 'Finally, it is often said, I think by physicists who are not well-informed, that accelerator builders have used up their capital and now are bereft of ideas, and as a result, high energy physics will eventually--rather soon, in fact--come to a halt. After all, one can't build too many machines greater than

  15. SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2012-05-10

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration is extended to the case of superdiffusive transport, i.e., when the mean square deviation grows proportionally to t{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} > 1. Superdiffusion can be described by a statistical process called Levy random walk, in which the propagator is not a Gaussian but it exhibits power-law tails. By using the propagator appropriate for Levy random walk, it is found that the indices of energy spectra of particles are harder than those obtained where a normal diffusion is envisaged, with the spectral index decreasing with the increase of {alpha}. A new scaling for the acceleration time is also found, allowing substantially shorter times than in the case of normal diffusion. Within this framework we can explain a number of observations of flat spectra in various astrophysical and heliospheric contexts, for instance, for the Crab Nebula and the termination shock of the solar wind.

  16. Pulsed electromagnetic gas acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental data were combined with one-dimensional conservation relations to yield information on the energy deposition ratio in a parallel-plate accelerator, where the downstream flow was confined to a constant area channel. Approximately 70% of the total input power was detected in the exhaust flow, of which only about 20% appeared as directed kinetic energy, thus implying that a downstream expansion to convert chamber enthalpy into kinetic energy must be an important aspect of conventional high power MPD arcs. Spectroscopic experiments on a quasi-steady MPD argon accelerator verified the presence of A(III) and the absence of A(I), and indicated an azimuthal structure in the jet related to the mass injection locations. Measurements of pressure in the arc chamber and impact pressure in the exhaust jet using a piezocrystal backed by a Plexiglas rod were in good agreement with the electromagnetic thrust model.

  17. Review of ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1990-06-01

    The field of ion acceleration to higher energies has grown rapidly in the last years. Many new facilities as well as substantial upgrades of existing facilities have extended the mass and energy range of available beams. Perhaps more significant for the long-term development of the field has been the expansion in the applications of these beams, and the building of facilities dedicated to areas outside of nuclear physics. This review will cover many of these new developments. Emphasis will be placed on accelerators with final energies above 50 MeV/amu. Facilities such as superconducting cyclotrons and storage rings are adequately covered in other review papers, and so will not be covered here.

  18. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  19. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  20. Commissioning the GTA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Brown, S.; Cole, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Garnett, R.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Johnson, K.F.; Kerstiens, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P. Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Yuan, V. ); Connolly, R.; Weiss, R. (Gr

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is supported by the Strategic Defense command as part of their Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program. Neutral particles have the advantage that in space they are unaffected by the earth's magnetic field and travel in straight lines unless they enter the earth's atmosphere and become charged by stripping. Heavy particles are difficult to stop and can probe the interior of space vehicles; hence, NPB can function as a discriminator between warheads and decoys. We are using GTA to resolve the physics and engineering issues related to accelerating, focusing, and steering a high-brightness, high-current H{sup -} beam and then neutralizing it. Our immediate goal is to produce a 24-MeV, 50mA device with a 2% duty factor.

  1. Commissioning the GTA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Brown, S.; Cole, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Garnett, R.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Johnson, K.F.; Kerstiens, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P. Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Yuan, V.; Connolly, R.; Weiss, R.; Saadatmand, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is supported by the Strategic Defense command as part of their Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program. Neutral particles have the advantage that in space they are unaffected by the earth`s magnetic field and travel in straight lines unless they enter the earth`s atmosphere and become charged by stripping. Heavy particles are difficult to stop and can probe the interior of space vehicles; hence, NPB can function as a discriminator between warheads and decoys. We are using GTA to resolve the physics and engineering issues related to accelerating, focusing, and steering a high-brightness, high-current H{sup -} beam and then neutralizing it. Our immediate goal is to produce a 24-MeV, 50mA device with a 2% duty factor.

  2. Adaptive control for accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Eaton, Lawrie E.; Jachim, Stephen P.; Natter, Eckard F.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive feedforward control loop is provided to stabilize accelerator beam loading of the radio frequency field in an accelerator cavity during successive pulses of the beam into the cavity. A digital signal processor enables an adaptive algorithm to generate a feedforward error correcting signal functionally determined by the feedback error obtained by a beam pulse loading the cavity after the previous correcting signal was applied to the cavity. Each cavity feedforward correcting signal is successively stored in the digital processor and modified by the feedback error resulting from its application to generate the next feedforward error correcting signal. A feedforward error correcting signal is generated by the digital processor in advance of the beam pulse to enable a composite correcting signal and the beam pulse to arrive concurrently at the cavity.

  3. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  4. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  5. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  6. [Osseointegrated implants in clinical dentistry. Practice of osseointegration implants].

    PubMed

    Furuya, H

    1989-10-01

    The average life span of the Japanese has grown to 75.61 years for men and 81.39 years for women: both Japanese men and women have the longest life spans of any peoples in the world. The Welfare Ministry has urged a review of the social security system including medicine and pensions, and is seeking to establish lives worth living in our old age for the coming aging society, because there is no sign of the increase in the average life span slowing down. Various functions of the living body change physiologically with aging. Figure 1 shows a well-known graph showing "Changes in Physiological Functions with Aging" reported by Shock in 1971. It shows that systemic basic metabolism decreases almost linearly with age after about 30 years that reaches the peak of body functions, as well as almost all autonomic functions, including the kidney, lung, heart, and nerves. The speed at which functions decrease varies with organs. The age when functions begin to decrease differs between individuals. Generally, however, the ability of the eye to adjust makes us aware of aging at the earliest stage of life. The distribution of all elements comprising a body decreases with age, except for extracellular fluid. There are many difficulties in establishing lives worth living in old age, because of the fact that aged people suffer from reduced physiological and physical functions. The pleasure of eating may be one of the things that make life worth living. Many aged people seem to wish that they could enjoy meals as they did in their youth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2489289

  7. ATLAS accelerator laboratory report

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, P.

    1986-01-01

    The operation of the ATLAS Accelerator is reported. Modifications are reported, including the installation of conductive tires for the Pelletron chain pulleys, installation of a new high frequency sweeper system at the entrance to the linac, and improvements to the rf drive ports of eight resonators to correct failures in the thermally conductive ceramic insulators. Progress is reported on the positive-ion injector upgrade for ATLAS. Also reported are building modifications and possible new uses for the tandem injector. (LEW)

  8. ION ACCELERATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.; Martin, J.A.

    1960-02-23

    Well focused, intense ion beams are obtained by providing a multi- apertured source grid in front of an ion source chamber and an accelerating multi- apertured grid closely spaced from and in alignment with the source grid. The longest dimensions of the elongated apertures in the grids are normal to the direction of the magnetic field used with the device. Large ion currents may be withdrawn from the source, since they do not pass through any small focal region between the grids.

  9. GPU accelerated dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Francesco; Tarleton, Edmund; Fitzgerald, Steven

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the computational bottlenecks in discrete dislocation dynamics modeling (associated with segment-segment interactions as well as the treatment of free surfaces), discuss the parallelization and optimization strategies, and demonstrate the effectiveness of Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) computation in accelerating dislocation dynamics simulations and expanding their scope. Individual algorithmic benchmark tests as well as an example large simulation of a thin film are presented.

  10. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a multi-track'' simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  11. Accelerator simulation using computers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Zambre, Y.; Corbett, W.

    1992-01-01

    Every accelerator or storage ring system consists of a charged particle beam propagating through a beam line. Although a number of computer programs exits that simulate the propagation of a beam in a given beam line, only a few provide the capabilities for designing, commissioning and operating the beam line. This paper shows how a ``multi-track`` simulation and analysis code can be used for these applications.

  12. Modulational effects in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, T.

    1997-12-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed.

  13. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence. PMID:17799689

  14. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  15. Applications of electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, G.A.; Klody, G.M.

    1995-10-01

    Most applications of electrostatic accelerators fit into two main groups, materials analysis and materials modification. Materials analysis includes routine use of Rutherford Backscattering for quality control applications in the semiconductor field. Particle induced x-ray emission (PDCE) is used in fields from art history through environmental sciences. X-ray imaging using 5 MeV DC electron beams and fast pulsed neutron analysis (PFNA) for plastic explosive and drug detection provide promise in the area of security. Accelerator based mass spectrometry (AMS) is having a profound effect in a wide variety of fields which rely on counting extremely rare isotopes in small samples. Materials modification provides a very significant economic impact in the field of semiconductors. Virtually all semiconductor devices now rely on ion implantation with ion beam energies ranging from a few kilovolts to several MeV. With some mention of electron beams, this talk will concentrate primarily on the applications of MeV ion beams from electrostatic accelerators.

  16. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  17. Tandem betatron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keinigs, Rhon K.

    1991-04-01

    1407_50The tandem betatron is a compact, high-current induction accelerator that has the capability to accelerate electrons to an energy of order one gigavolt. Based upon the operating principle of a conventional betatron, the tandem betatron employs two synchronized induction cores operating 180 degrees out of phase. Embedded within the cores are the vacuum chambers, and these are connected by linear transport sections to allow for moving the beam back and forth between the two betatrons. The 180 degree phase shift between the core fluxes permits the circumvention of the flux swing constraint that limits the maximum energy gain of a conventional betatron. By transporting the beam between the synchronized cores, an electron can access more than one acceleration cycle, and thereby continue to gain energy. This added degree of freedom also permits a significant decrease in the size of the magnet system. Biasing coils provide independent control of the confining magnetic field. Provided that efficient beam switching can be performed, it appears feasible that a one gigavolt electron beam can be generated and confined. At this energy, a high current electron beam circulating in a one meter radius orbit could provide a very intense source of short wavelength ((lambda) < 10 nm) synchrotron radiation. This has direct application to the emerging field of x-ray lithography. At more modest energies (10 MeV-30 MeV) a compact tandem betatron could be employed in the fields of medical radiation therapy, industrial radiography, and materials processing.

  18. ACCELERATION INTEGRATING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Wilkes, D.F.

    1961-08-29

    An acceleration responsive device is described. A housing has at one end normally open electrical contacts and contains a piston system with a first part of non-magnetic material having metering orifices in the side walls for forming an air bearing between it and the walls of the housing; this first piston part is normally held against the other end of the housing from the noted contacts by a second piston or reset part. The reset part is of partly magnetic material, is separable from the flrst piston part, and is positioned within the housing intermediate the contacts and the first piston part. A magnet carried by the housing imposes a retaining force upon the reset part, along with a helical compression spring that is between the reset part and the end with the contacts. When a predetermined acceleration level is attained, the reset part overcomes the bias or retaining force provided by the magnet and the spring'' snaps'' into a depression in the housing adjacent the contacts. The first piston part is then free to move toward the contacts with its movement responsive tc acceleration forces and the metering orifices. (AEC)

  19. TRACKING ACCELERATOR SETTINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    D OTTAVIO,T.; FU, W.; OTTAVIO, D.P.

    2007-10-15

    Recording setting changes within an accelerator facility provides information that can be used to answer questions about when, why, and how changes were made to some accelerator system. This can be very useful during normal operations, but can also aid with security concerns and in detecting unusual software behavior. The Set History System (SHS) is a new client-server system developed at the Collider-Accelerator Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory to provide these capabilities. The SHS has been operational for over two years and currently stores about IOOK settings per day into a commercial database management system. The SHS system consists of a server written in Java, client tools written in both Java and C++, and a web interface for querying the database of setting changes. The design of the SHS focuses on performance, portability, and a minimal impact on database resources. In this paper, we present an overview of the system design along with benchmark results showing the performance and reliability of the SHS over the last year.

  20. Acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2015-07-16

    The presentation begins with colorful depictions of solar x-ray flares and references to pulsar phenomena. Plasma reconnection is complex, could be x-point dominated or turbulent, field lines could break due to either resistivity or non-ideal effects, such as electron pressure anisotropy. Electron acceleration is sometimes observed, and sometimes not. One way to study this complex problem is to have many examples of the process (reconnection) and compare them; the other way is to simplify and come to something robust. Ideal MHD (E=0) turbulence driven by magnetic energy is assumed, and the first-order acceleration is sought. It is found that dissipation in big (length >100 ion skin depths) current sheets is universal and independent on microscopic resistivity and the mean imposed field; particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. One example of such flow is spontaneous reconnection. This explains hot electrons with a power-law tail in solar flares, as well as ultrashort time variability in some astrophysical sources.

  1. Accelerated Profile HMM Searches

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Sean R.

    2011-01-01

    Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs) and probabilistic inference methods have made important contributions to the theory of sequence database homology search. However, practical use of profile HMM methods has been hindered by the computational expense of existing software implementations. Here I describe an acceleration heuristic for profile HMMs, the “multiple segment Viterbi” (MSV) algorithm. The MSV algorithm computes an optimal sum of multiple ungapped local alignment segments using a striped vector-parallel approach previously described for fast Smith/Waterman alignment. MSV scores follow the same statistical distribution as gapped optimal local alignment scores, allowing rapid evaluation of significance of an MSV score and thus facilitating its use as a heuristic filter. I also describe a 20-fold acceleration of the standard profile HMM Forward/Backward algorithms using a method I call “sparse rescaling”. These methods are assembled in a pipeline in which high-scoring MSV hits are passed on for reanalysis with the full HMM Forward/Backward algorithm. This accelerated pipeline is implemented in the freely available HMMER3 software package. Performance benchmarks show that the use of the heuristic MSV filter sacrifices negligible sensitivity compared to unaccelerated profile HMM searches. HMMER3 is substantially more sensitive and 100- to 1000-fold faster than HMMER2. HMMER3 is now about as fast as BLAST for protein searches. PMID:22039361

  2. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  3. Progress on laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-04-01

    Several laser plasma accelerator schemes are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA). Theory indicates that a very high acceleration gradient, of order 1 GeV/m, can exist in the plasma wave driven by the beating lasers. Experimental results obtained on the PBWA experiment at UCLA confirms this. Parameters related to the PBWA as an accelerator system are derived, among them issues concerning the efficiency and the laser power and energy requirements are discussed.

  4. Overview of accelerators in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-06-01

    Accelerators used for medicine include synchrotrons, cyclotrons, betatrons, microtrons, and electron, proton, and light ion linacs. Some accelerators which were formerly found only at physics laboratories are now being considered for use in hospital-based treatment and diagnostic facilities. This paper presents typical operating parameters for medical accelerators and gives specific examples of clinical applications for each type of accelerator, with emphasis on recent developments in the field.

  5. KEKB accelerator control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaka, Nobumasa; Akiyama, Atsuyoshi; Araki, Sakae; Furukawa, Kazuro; Katoh, Tadahiko; Kawamoto, Takashi; Komada, Ichitaka; Kudo, Kikuo; Naito, Takashi; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Odagiri, Jun-ichi; Ohnishi, Yukiyoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Suetake, Masaaki; Takeda, Shigeru; Takeuchi, Yasunori; Yamamoto, Noboru; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kikutani, Eji

    2003-02-01

    The KEKB accelerator control system including a control computer system, a timing distribution system, and a safety control system are described. KEKB accelerators were installed in the same tunnel where the TRISTAN accelerator was. There were some constraints due to the reused equipment. The control system is based on Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). In order to reduce the cost and labor for constructing the KEKB control system, as many CAMAC modules as possible are used again. The guiding principles of the KEKB control computer system are as follows: use EPICS as the controls environment, provide a two-language system for developing application programs, use VMEbus as frontend computers as a consequence of EPICS, use standard buses, such as CAMAC, GPIB, VXIbus, ARCNET, RS-232 as field buses and use ergonomic equipment for operators and scientists. On the software side, interpretive Python and SAD languages are used for coding application programs. The purpose of the radiation safety system is to protect personnel from radiation hazards. It consists of an access control system and a beam interlock system. The access control system protects people from strong radiation inside the accelerator tunnel due to an intense beam, by controlling access to the beamline area. On the other hand, the beam interlock system prevents people from radiation exposure by interlocking the beam operation. For the convenience of accelerator operation and access control, the region covered by the safety system is divided into three major access control areas: the KEKB area, the PF-AR area, and the beam-transport (BT) area. The KEKB control system required a new timing system to match a low longitudinal acceptance due to a low-alpha machine. This timing system is based on a frequency divider/multiply technique and a digital delay technique. The RF frequency of the KEKB rings and that of the injector Linac are locked with a common divisor frequency. The common

  6. Direct Particle Acceleration in Astroplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, M.

    2002-10-01

    The high energy particle acceleration mechanisms are discussed by focusing on the direct acceleration in the astrophysical context. We specifically argue that the relativistic magnetic reconnection and the shock surfing/surfatron processes can efficiently accelerate charged particles to a relativistic energy, and that those mechanisms may produce a non-thermal, power-law energy spectrum. [copyright] 2002 American Institute of Physics

  7. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2007-03-19

    The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

  8. Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Alex

    2011-10-01

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  9. VLHC accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Blaskiewicz et al.

    2001-11-01

    A six-month design study for a future high energy hadron collider was initiated by the Fermilab director in October 2000. The request was to study a staged approach where a large circumference tunnel is built that initially would house a low field ({approx}2 T) collider with center-of-mass energy greater than 30 TeV and a peak (initial) luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The tunnel was to be scoped, however, to support a future upgrade to a center-of-mass energy greater than 150 TeV with a peak luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} using high field ({approx} 10 T) superconducting magnet technology. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a report of the Design Study was produced by Fermilab in June 2001. 1 The Design Study focused on a Stage 1, 20 x 20 TeV collider using a 2-in-1 transmission line magnet and leads to a Stage 2, 87.5 x 87.5 TeV collider using 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology. The article that follows is a compilation of accelerator physics designs and computational results which contributed to the Design Study. Many of the parameters found in this report evolved during the study, and thus slight differences between this text and the Design Study report can be found. The present text, however, presents the major accelerator physics issues of the Very Large Hadron Collider as examined by the Design Study collaboration and provides a basis for discussion and further studies of VLHC accelerator parameters and design philosophies.

  10. APT accelerator. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D.

    1995-03-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  11. Accelerated Innovation Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities: I. Engage NASA team (examples) a) Research and technology calls . provide suggestions to AES, HRP, OCT. b) Use NASA@Work to solicit other ideas; (possibly before R+D calls). II. Stimulate collaboration (examples) a) NHHPC. b) Wharton Mack Center for Technological Innovation (Feb 2013). c) International ] DLR ] :envihab (July 2013). d) Accelerated research models . NSF, Myelin Repair Foundation. III. Engage public Prizes (open platform: InnoCentive, yet2.com, NTL; Rice Business Plan, etc.) IV. Use same methods to engage STEM.

  12. Ion wave breaking acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Bamberg, K.-U.; Ma, W. J.; Liu, J.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-07-01

    Laser driven ion wave breaking acceleration (IWBA) in plasma wakefields is investigated by means of a one-dimensional (1D) model and 1D/3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. IWBA operates in relativistic transparent plasma for laser intensities in the range of 1020- 1023 W /cm2 . The threshold for IWBA is identified in the plane of plasma density and laser amplitude. In the region just beyond the threshold, self-injection takes place only for a fraction of ions and in a limited time period. This leads to well collimated ion pulses with peaked energy spectra, in particular for 3D geometry.

  13. Accelerating Commercial Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Through the Visiting Investigator Program (VIP) at Stennis Space Center, Community Coffee was able to use satellites to forecast coffee crops in Guatemala. Using satellite imagery, the company can produce detailed maps that separate coffee cropland from wild vegetation and show information on the health of specific crops. The data can control coffee prices and eventually may be used to optimize application of fertilizers, pesticides and irrigation. This would result in maximal crop yields, minimal pollution and lower production costs. VIP is a mechanism involving NASA funding designed to accelerate the growth of commercial remote sensing by promoting general awareness and basic training in the technology.

  14. Acceleration in Linear and Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellington, S. H.; Docherty, W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a simple accelerometer and explains its use in demonstrating acceleration, deceleration, constant speed, measurement of acceleration, acceleration and the inclined plane and angular and radial acceleration. (GS)

  15. Accelerations in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Allen, E T

    1921-01-01

    This report deals with the accelerations obtained in flight on various airplanes at Langley Field for the purpose of obtaining the magnitude of the load factors in flight and to procure information on the behavior of an airplane in various maneuvers. The instrument used in these tests was a recording accelerometer of a new type designed by the technical staff of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The instrument consists of a flat steel spring supported rigidly at one end so that the free end may be deflected by its own weight from its neutral position by any acceleration acting at right angles to the plane of the spring. This deflection is measured by a very light tilting mirror caused to rotate by the deflection of the spring, which reflected the beam of light onto a moving film. The motion of the spring is damped by a thin aluminum vane which rotates with the spring between the poles of an electric magnet. Records were taken on landings and takeoffs, in loops, spins, spirals, and rolls.

  16. Optical Bragg accelerators.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Amit; Schächter, Levi

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a Bragg waveguide consisting of a series of dielectric layers may form an excellent optical acceleration structure. Confinement of the accelerating fields is achieved, for both planar and cylindrical configurations by adjusting the first dielectric layer width. A typical structure made of silica and zirconia may support gradients of the order of 1 GV/m with an interaction impedance of a few hundreds of ohms and with an energy velocity of less than 0.5c. An interaction impedance of about 1000 Omega may be obtained by replacing the Zirconia with a (fictitious) material of epsilon=25. Special attention is paid to the wake field developing in such a structure. In the case of a relatively small number of layers, it is shown that the total electromagnetic power emitted is proportional to the square of the number of electrons in the macrobunch and inversely proportional to the number of microbunches; this power is also inversely proportional to the square of the internal radius of the structure for a cylindrical structure, and to the width of the vacuum core in a planar structure. Quantitative results are given for a higher number of dielectric layers, showing that in comparison to a structure bounded by metallic walls, the emitted power is significantly smaller due to propagation bands allowing electromagnetic energy to escape. PMID:15324182

  17. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  18. Broadband accelerator control network

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1983-01-01

    A broadband data communications network has been implemented at BNL for control of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AG) proton accelerator, using commercial CATV hardware, dual coaxial cables as the communications medium, and spanning 2.0 km. A 4 MHz bandwidth Digital Control channel using CSMA-CA protocol is provided for digital data transmission, with 8 access nodes available over the length of the RELWAY. Each node consists of an rf modem and a microprocessor-based store-and-forward message handler which interfaces the RELWAY to a branch line implemented in GPIB. A gateway to the RELWAY control channel for the (preexisting) AGS Computerized Accelerator Operating system has been constructed using an LSI-11/23 microprocessor as a device in a GPIB branch line. A multilayer communications protocol has been defined for the Digital Control Channel, based on the ISO Open Systems Interconnect layered model, and a RELWAY Device Language defined as the required universal language for device control on this channel.

  19. Introduction to Korean Accelerator Science and Activities in Industrial Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, Won

    2012-03-01

    After 20 years of the first large-scale accelerator in Korea, the Pohang Light Source (PLS) of 2.0 GeV at POSTECH, its upgrade (PLS-II) is now under commissioning with energy of 3.0 GeV. The users' service for synchrotron radiation is scheduled in April 2012. There are five big accelerator projects in various stages of construction, namely a high-intensity proton linac of 100 MeV, the PAL-XFEL of 10-GeV, a carbon therapy cyclotron of 400 MeV/u, and rare isotope accelerators for isotope separator on-line (ISOL) and In-flight Fragmentation (IFF). There are also strong demands for industrial uses of accelerators, especially in sterilization applications. In this paper, we report the current status of accelerator projects and its science in Korea, along with a brief review of accelerator R&D going back to the early 1960s at universities.

  20. Magnetic Insulation for Electrostatic Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.

    2011-09-26

    The voltage gradient which can be sustained between electrodes without electrical breakdowns is usually one of the most important parameters in determining the performance which can be obtained in an electrostatic accelerator. We have recently proposed a technique which might permit reliable operation of electrostatic accelerators at higher electric field gradients, perhaps also with less time required for the conditioning process in such accelerators. The idea is to run an electric current through each accelerator stage so as to produce a magnetic field which envelopes each electrode and its electrically conducting support structures. Having the magnetic field everywhere parallel to the conducting surfaces in the accelerator should impede the emission of electrons, and inhibit their ability to acquire energy from the electric field, thus reducing the chance that local electron emission will initiate an arc. A relatively simple experiment to assess this technique is being planned. If successful, this technique might eventually find applicability in electrostatic accelerators for fusion and other applications.

  1. Accelerator simulation of astrophysical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Phenomena that involve accelerated ions in stellar processes that can be simulated with laboratory accelerators are described. Stellar evolutionary phases, such as the CNO cycle, have been partially explored with accelerators, up to the consumption of He by alpha particle radiative capture reactions. Further experimentation is indicated on reactions featuring N-13(p,gamma)O-14, O-15(alpha, gamma)Ne-19, and O-14(alpha,p)F-17. Accelerated beams interacting with thin foils produce reaction products that permit a determination of possible elemental abundances in stellar objects. Additionally, isotopic ratios observed in chondrites can be duplicated with accelerator beam interactions and thus constraints can be set on the conditions producing the meteorites. Data from isotopic fractionation from sputtering, i.e., blasting surface atoms from a material using a low energy ion beam, leads to possible models for processes occurring in supernova explosions. Finally, molecules can be synthesized with accelerators and compared with spectroscopic observations of stellar winds.

  2. Laser acceleration and its future.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2010-01-01

    Laser acceleration is based on the concept to marshal collective fields that may be induced by laser. In order to exceed the material breakdown field by a large factor, we employ the broken-down matter of plasma. While the generated wakefields resemble with the fields in conventional accelerators in their structure (at least qualitatively), it is their extreme accelerating fields that distinguish the laser wakefield from others, amounting to tiny emittance and compact accelerator. The current research largely falls on how to master the control of acceleration process in spatial and temporal scales several orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional method. The efforts over the last several years have come to a fruition of generating good beam properties with GeV energies on a table top, leading to many applications, such as ultrafast radiolysis, intraoperative radiation therapy, injection to X-ray free electron laser, and a candidate for future high energy accelerators. PMID:20228616

  3. International Aspects of Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessler, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The development of particle accelerators -- an activity that started about 1930 and is still on-going -- is very much an international activity. There have been international contributions to this development all along the way. The result is remarkably effective accelerators, for many different activities, spread throughout the world. Because many don't appreciate this story and, furthermore, that it is very much worthy of explicit recognition, this session and this talk have been organized. In the talk, a survey will be made of the start of accelerators: electrostatic machines, cyclotrons, betatrons, linacs, synchrotrons, and colliders. Then a brief survey will be given of the more important contributions to particle accelerators. For each of these concepts we shall discuss the physics behind the concept, the origin of the concept, and the places where development and implementation took place. Some of the various applications of accelerators will then be presented. Finally we shall show, in broad terms, the present distribution of particle accelerators.

  4. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  5. Laser acceleration and its future

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2010-01-01

    Laser acceleration is based on the concept to marshal collective fields that may be induced by laser. In order to exceed the material breakdown field by a large factor, we employ the broken-down matter of plasma. While the generated wakefields resemble with the fields in conventional accelerators in their structure (at least qualitatively), it is their extreme accelerating fields that distinguish the laser wakefield from others, amounting to tiny emittance and compact accelerator. The current research largely falls on how to master the control of acceleration process in spatial and temporal scales several orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional method. The efforts over the last several years have come to a fruition of generating good beam properties with GeV energies on a table top, leading to many applications, such as ultrafast radiolysis, intraoperative radiation therapy, injection to X-ray free electron laser, and a candidate for future high energy accelerators. PMID:20228616

  6. [Linear accelerator radiosurgery].

    PubMed

    Brandt, R A; Salvajoli, J V; Oliveira, V C; Carmignani, M; da Cruz, J C; Leal, H D; Ferraz, L

    1995-03-01

    Radiosurgery is the precise radiation of a known intracranial target with a high dose of energy, sparing the adjacent nervous tissue. Technological advances in the construction of linear accelerators, stereotactic instruments and in computer sciences made this technique easier to perform and affordable. The main indications for radiosurgery are inoperable cerebral vascular malformations, vestibular and other cranial schwannomas, skull base meningiomas, deep seated gliomas and cerebral metastases. More recently, the development of fraccionated stereotactic radiotherapy increased the spectrum of indications to bigger lesions and to those adjacent to critical nervous structures. We present our initial experience in the treatment of 31 patients. An adequate control of the neoplastic lesions was obtained and the adequate time of observation is still needed to evaluate the results in arteriovenous malformations. PMID:7575207

  7. Lectures in accelerator theory

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M

    1980-01-01

    Lecture I deals with the behavior of particles in the nonlinear field arising from the electromagnetic interaction of colliding beams. The case treated, that of counter-rotating proton beams crossing each other at a non-zero angle, has the simple feature that the force between the beam is one dimensional. In lecture II, an analysis of the development of traveling waves on particle beams is presented. The situation studied is that of a uniform beam current in a circular accelerator and the excitation for the coherent motion is induced by the resistivity of the vacuum chamber wall. Finally, in lecture III, a description of the current accumulation process used at the proton storage rings at CERN (The ISR) is given. Particle pulses of rather low average current are injected and stored along the length and width of the vacuum chamber. The efficiency is very high and large currents (over 40 amperes) have been achieved.

  8. Dynamics of pyroelectric accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaderi, R.; Davani, F. Abbasi

    2015-01-26

    Pyroelectric crystals are used to produce high energy electron beams. We have derived a method to model electric potential generation on LiTaO{sub 3} crystal during heating cycle. In this method, effect of heat transfer on the potential generation is investigated by some experiments. In addition, electron emission from the crystal surface is modeled by measurements and analysis. These spectral data are used to present a dynamic equation of electric potential with respect to thickness of the crystal and variation of its temperature. The dynamic equation's results for different thicknesses are compared with measured data. As a result, to attain more energetic electrons, best thickness of the crystals could be extracted from the equation. This allows for better understanding of pyroelectric crystals and help to study about current and energy of accelerated electrons.

  9. Pulsed Plasma Accelerator Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, M.; Kazeminezhad, F.; Owens, T.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the main results of the modeling task of the PPA project. The objective of this task is to make major progress towards developing a new computational tool with new capabilities for simulating cylindrically symmetric 2.5 dimensional (2.5 D) PPA's. This tool may be used for designing, optimizing, and understanding the operation of PPA s and other pulsed power devices. The foundation for this task is the 2-D, cylindrically symmetric, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code PCAPPS (Princeton Code for Advanced Plasma Propulsion Simulation). PCAPPS was originally developed by Sankaran (2001, 2005) to model Lithium Lorentz Force Accelerators (LLFA's), which are electrode based devices, and are typically operated in continuous magnetic field to the model, and implementing a first principles, self-consistent algorithm to couple the plasma and power circuit that drives the plasma dynamics.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Finkel, R.; Nelson, D.E.

    1995-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) can be used for efficient detection of long-lived isotopes at part-per-quadrillion sensitivities with good precision. In this article we present an overview of AMS and its recent use in archaeology, geochemistry and biomolecular tracing. All AMS systems use cesium sputter ion sources to produce negative ions from a small button of a solid sample containing the element of interest, such as graphite, metal halide, or metal oxide, often mixed with a metal powder as binder and thermal conductor. Experience shows that both natural and biomedical samples are compatible in a single AMS system, but few other AMS sites make routine {sup 14}C measurements for both dating and tracing. AMS is, in one sense, just `a very sensitive decay counter`, but if AMS sensitivity is creatively coupled to analytical chemistry of certain isotopes, whole new areas of geosciences, archaeology, and life sciences can be explored. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Hadron accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Hywel; MacKay, Ranald; Peach, Ken; Smith, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Over the last twenty years the treatment of cancer with protons and light nuclei such as carbon ions has moved from being the preserve of research laboratories into widespread clinical use. A number of choices now exist for the creation and delivery of these particles, key amongst these being the adoption of pencil beam scanning using a rotating gantry; attention is now being given to what technologies will enable cheaper and more effective treatment in the future. In this article the physics and engineering used in these hadron therapy facilities is presented, and the research areas likely to lead to substantive improvements. The wider use of superconducting magnets is an emerging trend, whilst further ahead novel high-gradient acceleration techniques may enable much smaller treatment systems. Imaging techniques to improve the accuracy of treatment plans must also be developed hand-in-hand with future sources of particles, a notable example of which is proton computed tomography.

  12. The Accelerating Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, Roger

    2013-05-15

    From keV electrons in terrestrial aurorae to Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays from unidentified "Zevatrons", the cosmos shows a plutocratic proclivity to concentrate energy in a tiny minority of suprathermal particles. The mechanisms involved can be traced back to the ideas of Faraday, Fermi and Alfvén though we are learning that the details are idiosyncratic to the many environments that we have observed and that much can be learned from comparing and contrasting particle acceleration in laboratory and diverse astronomical locations. It will be argued that new mechanisms are required to account for recent observations of galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebulae and interplanetary, interstellar and intergalactic media and some candidates will be discussed.

  13. HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Courant, E.D.; Livingston, M.S.; Snyder, H.S.

    1959-04-14

    An improved apparatus is presented for focusing charged particles in an accelerator. In essence, the invention includes means for establishing a magnetic field in discrete sectors along the path of moving charged particles, the magnetic field varying in each sector in accordance with the relation. B = B/ sub 0/ STAln (r-r/sub 0/)/r/sub 0/!, where B/sub 0/ is the value of the magnetic field at the equilibrium orbit of radius r/sub 0/ of the path of the particles, B equals the magnetic field at the radius r of the chamber and n equals the magnetic field gradient index, the polarity of n being abruptly reversed a plurality of times as the particles travel along their arcuate path. With this arrangement, the particles are alternately converged towards the axis of their equillbrium orbit and diverged therefrom in successive sectors with a resultant focusing effect.

  14. Network acceleration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Patricia (Inventor); Awrach, James Michael (Inventor); Maccabe, Arthur Barney (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Splintered offloading techniques with receive batch processing are described for network acceleration. Such techniques offload specific functionality to a NIC while maintaining the bulk of the protocol processing in the host operating system ("OS"). The resulting protocol implementation allows the application to bypass the protocol processing of the received data. Such can be accomplished this by moving data from the NIC directly to the application through direct memory access ("DMA") and batch processing the receive headers in the host OS when the host OS is interrupted to perform other work. Batch processing receive headers allows the data path to be separated from the control path. Unlike operating system bypass, however, the operating system still fully manages the network resource and has relevant feedback about traffic and flows. Embodiments of the present disclosure can therefore address the challenges of networks with extreme bandwidth delay products (BWDP).

  15. Paraelectric gas flow accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Daniel M. (Inventor); Wilkinson, Stephen P. (Inventor); Roth, J. Reece (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A substrate is configured with first and second sets of electrodes, where the second set of electrodes is positioned asymmetrically between the first set of electrodes. When a RF voltage is applied to the electrodes sufficient to generate a discharge plasma (e.g., a one-atmosphere uniform glow discharge plasma) in the gas adjacent to the substrate, the asymmetry in the electrode configuration results in force being applied to the active species in the plasma and in turn to the neutral background gas. Depending on the relative orientation of the electrodes to the gas, the present invention can be used to accelerate or decelerate the gas. The present invention has many potential applications, including increasing or decreasing aerodynamic drag or turbulence, and controlling the flow of active and/or neutral species for such uses as flow separation, altering heat flow, plasma cleaning, sterilization, deposition, etching, or alteration in wettability, printability, and/or adhesion.

  16. The accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, Roger

    2013-02-01

    From keV electrons in the aurorae to Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in unidentified "Zevatrons", the cosmos shows a perverse, yet pervasive, proclivity to select a tiny minority of particles and boost them to high energy. The mechanisms involved can be traced back to the ideas of Faraday, Fermi and Alfvén though we are learning that the details are idiosyncratic to the many environments that we have explored. Much can be learned from comparing and contrasting particle acceleration in laboratory, interplanetary, interstellar and intergalactic locations. As it celebrates its centenary, cosmic ray physics, has assumed a new importance in solving one of the greatest problems consuming its illustrious scion - elementary particle physics - namely the nature of dark matter.

  17. Pulsed electromagnetic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    Direct measurements of the power deposited in the anode of a multimegawatt MPD accelerator using thermocouples attached to a thin shell anode reveal a dramatic decrease in the fractional anode power from 50% at 200 KW input power to less than 10% at 20 MW power. The corresponding local power flux peak at a value of 10,000 W/sq cm at the lip of the anode exhaust orifice, a distribution traced to a corresponding peak in the local current density at the anode. A comparison of voltage-current characteristics and spectral photographs of the MPD discharge using quartz, boron nitride and plexiglas insulators with various mass injection configurations led to the identification of different voltage modes and regions of ablation free operation. The technique of piezoelectric impact pressure measurement in the MPD exhaust flow was refined to account for the effects due to probe yaw angle.

  18. Accelerating Spectrum Sharing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Lynda L. Brighton; Rangam Subramanian; Hussein Moradi; Jose Loera

    2013-09-01

    Spectrum sharing potentially holds the promise of solving the emerging spectrum crisis. However, technology innovators face the conundrum of developing spectrum sharing technologies without the ability to experiment and test with real incumbent systems. Interference with operational incumbents can prevent critical services, and the cost of deploying and operating an incumbent system can be prohibitive. Thus, the lack of incumbent systems and frequency authorization for technology incubation and demonstration has stymied spectrum sharing research. To this end, industry, academia, and regulators all require a test facility for validating hypotheses and demonstrating functionality without affecting operational incumbent systems. This article proposes a four-phase program supported by our spectrum accountability architecture. We propose that our comprehensive experimentation and testing approach for technology incubation and demonstration will accelerate the development of spectrum sharing technologies.

  19. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  20. Particle accelerator development: Selected examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie

    2016-03-01

    About 30 years ago, I was among several students mentored by Professor Yang at Stony Brook to enter the field of particle accelerator physics. Since then, I have been fortunate to work on several major accelerator projects in USA and in China, guided and at times directly supported by Professor Yang. The field of accelerator physics is flourishing worldwide both providing indispensable tools for fundamental physics research and covering an increasingly wide spectrum of applications beneficial to our society.

  1. Particle Accelerator Development: Selected Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie

    About 30 years ago, I was among several students mentored by Professor Yang at Stony Brook to enter the field of particle accelerator physics. Since then, I have been fortunate to work on several major accelerator projects in USA and in China, guided and at times directly supported by Professor Yang. The field of accelerator physics is flourishing worldwide both providing indispensable tools for fundamental physics research and covering an increasingly wide spectrum of applications beneficial to our society.

  2. Progress in advanced accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-08-01

    A review is given of recent progress in this field, drawing heavily upon material presented at the Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts, The Abbey, June 12--18, 1994. Attention is addressed to (1) plasma based concepts, (2) photo-cathodes, (3) radio frequency sources and Two-Beam Accelerators, (4) near and far-field schemes (including collective accelerators), (5) beam handling and conditioning, and (6) exotic collider concepts (such as photon colliders and muon colliders).

  3. Basic concepts in plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Robert

    2006-03-15

    In this article, we present the underlying physics and the present status of high gradient and high-energy plasma accelerators. With the development of compact short pulse high-brightness lasers and electron and positron beams, new areas of studies for laser/particle beam-matter interactions is opening up. A number of methods are being pursued vigorously to achieve ultra-high-acceleration gradients. These include the plasma beat wave accelerator (PBWA) mechanism which uses conventional long pulse ( approximately 100 ps) modest intensity lasers (I approximately 10(14)-10(16) W cm(-2)), the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) which uses the new breed of compact high-brightness lasers (<1 ps) and intensities >10(18) W cm(-2), self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SMLWFA) concept which combines elements of stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS) and electron acceleration by nonlinear plasma waves excited by relativistic electron and positron bunches the plasma wakefield accelerator. In the ultra-high intensity regime, laser/particle beam-plasma interactions are highly nonlinear and relativistic, leading to new phenomenon such as the plasma wakefield excitation for particle acceleration, relativistic self-focusing and guiding of laser beams, high-harmonic generation, acceleration of electrons, positrons, protons and photons. Fields greater than 1 GV cm(-1) have been generated with monoenergetic particle beams accelerated to about 100 MeV in millimetre distances recorded. Plasma wakefields driven by both electron and positron beams at the Stanford linear accelerator centre (SLAC) facility have accelerated the tail of the beams. PMID:16483948

  4. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Forman, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth atmosphere, and gamma rays, neutrons, hard X-rays, and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere. The stochastic and shock acceleration theories in flares are reviewed and the implications of observations on particle energy spectra, particle confinement and escape, multiple acceleration phases, particle anistropies, and solar atmospheric abundances are discussed.

  5. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  6. Accelerators for research and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The newest particle accelerators are almost always built for extending the frontiers of research, at the cutting edge of science and technology. Once these machines are operating and these technologies mature, new applications are always found, many of which touch our lives in profound ways. The evolution of accelerator technologies will be discussed, with descriptions of accelerator types and characteristics. The wide range of applications of accelerators will be discussed, in fields such as nuclear science, medicine, astrophysics and space-sciences, power generation, airport security, materials processing and microcircuit fabrication. 13 figs.

  7. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We review the current status of the development of accelerator sources of epithermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a promising method of malignant tumor treatment. Particular attention is given to the source of epithermal neutrons on the basis of a new type of charged particle accelerator: tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium neutron-producing target. It is also shown that the accelerator with specialized targets makes it possible to generate fast and monoenergetic neutrons, resonance and monoenergetic gamma-rays, alpha-particles, and positrons.

  8. The Legacy of Cornell Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigner, M.; Cassel, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    This is the story of a culture and its evolution and legacy. Beginning with the invention of the cyclotron at Berkeley, the path of further accelerator development at Cornell via the Los Alamos experience of the primary actors is described. The science done with the accelerators and on the accelerators and beams themselves is reviewed and brought up to the current time. The evolution of the user community and the sources of support for accelerators and science done with them are discussed at the appropriate places in the story.

  9. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  10. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  11. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  12. Short Acceleration Times from Superdiffusive Shock Acceleration in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks allows particle transport properties to be inferred. The frequently observed power-law decay upstream, indeed, implies a superdiffusive particle transport when the level of magnetic field variance does not change as the time interval from the shock front increases. In this context, a superdiffusive shock acceleration (SSA) theory has been developed, allowing us to make predictions of the acceleration times. In this work we estimate for a number of interplanetary shocks, including the solar wind termination shock, the acceleration times for energetic protons in the framework of SSA and we compare the results with the acceleration times predicted by standard diffusive shock acceleration. The acceleration times due to SSA are found to be much shorter than in the classical model, and also shorter than the interplanetary shock lifetimes. This decrease of the acceleration times is due to the scale-free nature of the particle displacements in the framework of superdiffusion. Indeed, very long displacements are possible, increasing the probability for particles far from the front of the shock to return, and short displacements have a high probability of occurrence, increasing the chances for particles close to the front to cross the shock many times.

  13. Superdiffusive shock acceleration and short acceleration times at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shock waves has shown evidence for superdiffusive transport in the upstream region. Superdiffusive transport is characterized by a mean square displacement that grows faster than linearly in time and by non Gaussian statistics for the distribution of the particle jump lengths. In the superdiffusive framework it has been shown that particle time profiles upstream of a planar shock decay as power laws, at variance with exponential particle time profiles predicted in the case of diffusive transport. A large number of interplanetary shocks, including coronal mass ejection driven shocks, exhibit energetic particle time profiles that decay as power laws far upstream. In order to take this evidence into account, we have extended the standard theory of diffusive shock acceleration to the case of particle superdiffusive transport (superdiffusive shock acceleration). This has allowed us to derive both hard energy spectral indices and short acceleration times. This new theory has been tested for a number of interplanetary shock waves, observed by the Ulysses and the ACE spacecraft, and for the termination shock. The superdiffusive shock acceleration leads to a strong reduction of the acceleration times (even of about one order of magnitude) with respect to the diffusive shock acceleration. Thus, this new framework provides a substantial advancement in the understanding of the processes of particle acceleration and particle transport, which are among the main objectives of the new Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter space missions.

  14. Natural Acceleration: Supporting Creative Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, LeoNora M.

    2011-01-01

    "Natural acceleration" happens through an internal fire that burns to learn and may transcend school boundaries. Based on their passionate interests and connections with a domain, children who hunger for domain understandings outside school curricula require different types of acceleration, motivated by these interests. The lifeworks, domains, and…

  15. Collective acceleration in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.; Sessler, A.M.; Xie, M.; Gershtein, S.S.; Krishan, V.; Reiser, M.

    1993-11-01

    Solar flare data are examined with an eye to seeing if they suggest collective acceleration of ions. That, in fact, seems to be the case. The collective acceleration mechanism of Gershtein is reviewed and the possibilities of the mechanism are discussed.

  16. Thomas Edison Accelerated Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Henry M.; Chasin, Gene

    This paper describes early outcomes of a Sacramento, California, elementary school that participated in the Accelerated Schools Project. The school, which serves many minority and poor students, began training for the project in 1992. Accelerated Schools were designed to advance the learning rate of students through a gifted and talented approach,…

  17. General purpose programmable accelerator board

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Perry J.; Witzke, Edward L.

    2001-01-01

    A general purpose accelerator board and acceleration method comprising use of: one or more programmable logic devices; a plurality of memory blocks; bus interface for communicating data between the memory blocks and devices external to the board; and dynamic programming capabilities for providing logic to the programmable logic device to be executed on data in the memory blocks.

  18. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A. )

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  19. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A. ); Sandweiss, J. )

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e[sup [minus

  20. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of Positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Spencer

    2016-03-01

    Recent particle beam and laser-driven plasma wakefield experiments have produced high-quality electron beams accelerated by a GeV or more in less than a meter. Efforts are underway to put these beams to work as sources for free-electron lasers. By contrast, little work has been done to demonstrate the tractability of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) of positrons beams. The reasons for this are threefold: 1) positron beams are only useful for high-energy physics experiments, whereas electron beams are also useful as light sources, 2) there is a dearth of positron sources for PWFA experiments, and 3) the dynamics of accelerating positron beams in plasma is fundamentally different than that of electron beams. This talk will focus on the physics of accelerating positrons in plasma and contrast the dynamics of electron and positron beam-driven nonlinear plasma wakes. We describe recent experiments at the FACET test facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that for the first time demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of a positron beams in plasma. We also discuss an alternative acceleration technique called hollow channel acceleration that aims to symmetrize the dynamics of electron and positron beam-driven wakes.

  1. Critical Issues in Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Hosokai, T.

    2004-10-01

    Updated achievements and critical issues in plasma accelerators are summarized. As to laser plasma accelerators, we cover the results of plasma cathodes by U.Michigan, LBNL, LOA and U.Tokyo. Although many new results of accelerated electrons have been reported, the electrons do not yet form a bunch with narrow energy spread. Several injection schemes and measurements to verify ultrashort bunch (tens fs) with narrow energy spread, low emittance and many charges are planned. E-162 experiments by UCLA / USC / SLAC and a newly proposed experiment on density transition trapping are introduced for electron beam driven plasma accelerators. Their main purpose is realization of GeV plasma accelerator, but application to pump-and-probe analysis for investigation of ultrafast quantum phenomena is also promising.

  2. Maximal acceleration and radiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    We derive the radiation characteristics of an accelerated, charged particle in a model due to Caianiello in which the proper acceleration of a particle of mass m has the upper limit 𝒜m = 2mc3/ℏ. We find two power laws, one applicable to lower accelerations, the other more suitable for accelerations closer to 𝒜m and to the related physical singularity in the Ricci scalar. Geometrical constraints and power spectra are also discussed. By comparing the power laws due to the maximal acceleration (MA) with that for particles in gravitational fields, we find that the model of Caianiello allows, in principle, the use of charged particles as tools to distinguish inertial from gravitational fields locally.

  3. Efficient particle acceleration in shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, A. F.

    1984-10-01

    A self-consistent non-linear theory of acceleration of particles by shock waves is developed, using an extension of the two-fluid hydrodynamical model by Drury and Völk. The transport of the accelerated particles is governed by a diffusion coefficient which is initially assumed to be independent of particle momentum, to obtain exact solutions for the spectrum. It is found that steady-state shock structures with high acceleration efficiency are only possible for shocks with Mach numbers less than about 12. A more realistic diffusion coefficient is then considered, and this maximum Mach number is reduced to about 6. The efficiency of the acceleration process determines the relative importance of the non-relativistic and relativistic particles in the distribution of accelerated particles, and this determines the effective specific heat ratio.

  4. Electron cyclotron harmonic wave acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Menyuk, C. R.; Sprangle, P.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of particle acceleration in a finite bandwidth, obliquely propagating electromagnetic cyclotron wave is presented. It has been suggested by Sprangle and Vlahos in 1983 that the narrow bandwidth cyclotron radiation emitted by the unstable electron distribution inside a flaring solar loop can accelerate electrons outside the loop by the interaction of a monochromatic wave propagating along the ambient magnetic field with the ambient electrons. It is shown here that electrons gyrating and streaming along a uniform, static magnetic field can be accelerated by interacting with the fundamental or second harmonic of a monochromatic, obliquely propagating cyclotron wave. It is also shown that the acceleration is virtually unchanged when a wave with finite bandwidth is considered. This acceleration mechanism can explain the observed high-energy electrons in type III bursts.

  5. The ISAC post-accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Marchetto, M.

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration chain of the ISAC facility boosts the energy of both radioactive and stable light and heavy ions for beam delivery to both a medium energy area in ISAC-I and a high energy area in ISAC-II. The post-accelerator comprises a 35.4 MHz RFQ to accelerate beams of A/q ≤ 30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 106.1 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of A/q ≤ 6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. A 40 MV superconducting linac further accelerates beam from 1.5 MeV/u to energies above the Coulomb barrier. All linacs operate cw to preserve beam intensity.

  6. Accelerated adaptive integration method.

    PubMed

    Kaus, Joseph W; Arrar, Mehrnoosh; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-05-15

    Conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding may be too slow to observe on the time scales routinely accessible using molecular dynamics simulations. The adaptive integration method (AIM) leverages the notion that when a ligand is either fully coupled or decoupled, according to λ, barrier heights may change, making some conformational transitions more accessible at certain λ values. AIM adaptively changes the value of λ in a single simulation so that conformations sampled at one value of λ seed the conformational space sampled at another λ value. Adapting the value of λ throughout a simulation, however, does not resolve issues in sampling when barriers remain high regardless of the λ value. In this work, we introduce a new method, called Accelerated AIM (AcclAIM), in which the potential energy function is flattened at intermediate values of λ, promoting the exploration of conformational space as the ligand is decoupled from its receptor. We show, with both a simple model system (Bromocyclohexane) and the more complex biomolecule Thrombin, that AcclAIM is a promising approach to overcome high barriers in the calculation of free energies, without the need for any statistical reweighting or additional processors. PMID:24780083

  7. Accelerating momentum for change!

    PubMed

    Wenzel, S; Panetta, J

    1995-05-01

    As we develop strategies to compete globally, we are challenged with integrating our resources to execute these strategies effectively. Many companies are in the midst of dramatic shifts in corporate cultures, giving more responsibility to employees while raising expectations for their performance. The extent of these changes is far reaching and brings significant challenges to both employees and corporations. This article is a continuation of the evolution (over five years) of a corrective action/continuous improvement process implemented at Exide Electronics. It discusses organizational structures, including steering committees, corrective action teams, task teams, and work cells. Specific expectations, goals, and results of the teams are presented, along with ground rules for functioning within the organization. After structuring the organization and coordinating the resources effectively, the next challenge is accelerating momentum for change. The presentation also discusses the evolutionary process required to make a culture focused on change, including ongoing communication and feedback, constant evaluation and direction of the process, and measuring and paying for performance. PMID:10142097

  8. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  9. Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding may be too slow to observe on the time scales routinely accessible using molecular dynamics simulations. The adaptive integration method (AIM) leverages the notion that when a ligand is either fully coupled or decoupled, according to λ, barrier heights may change, making some conformational transitions more accessible at certain λ values. AIM adaptively changes the value of λ in a single simulation so that conformations sampled at one value of λ seed the conformational space sampled at another λ value. Adapting the value of λ throughout a simulation, however, does not resolve issues in sampling when barriers remain high regardless of the λ value. In this work, we introduce a new method, called Accelerated AIM (AcclAIM), in which the potential energy function is flattened at intermediate values of λ, promoting the exploration of conformational space as the ligand is decoupled from its receptor. We show, with both a simple model system (Bromocyclohexane) and the more complex biomolecule Thrombin, that AcclAIM is a promising approach to overcome high barriers in the calculation of free energies, without the need for any statistical reweighting or additional processors. PMID:24780083

  10. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  11. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  12. Pulsars and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for the studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. But even forty years after their discovery, we still do not understand their pulsed emission at any wavelength. I will review both the basic physics of pulsars as well as the latest developments in understanding their high-energy emission. Special and general relativistic effects play important roles in pulsar emission, from inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics. Fortunately the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), with launch in May 2008 will detect many new gamma-ray pulsars and test the predictions of these models with unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 300 GeV.

  13. Is Global Warming Accelerating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, J.; Delsole, T. M.; Tippett, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    A global pattern that fluctuates naturally on decadal time scales is identified in climate simulations and observations. This newly discovered component, called the Global Multidecadal Oscillation (GMO), is related to the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation and shown to account for a substantial fraction of decadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature. IPCC-class climate models generally underestimate the variance of the GMO, and hence underestimate the decadal fluctuations due to this component of natural variability. Decomposing observed sea surface temperature into a component due to anthropogenic and natural radiative forcing plus the GMO, reveals that most multidecadal fluctuations in the observed global average sea surface temperature can be accounted for by these two components alone. The fact that the GMO varies naturally on multidecadal time scales implies that it can be predicted with some skill on decadal time scales, which provides a scientific rationale for decadal predictions. Furthermore, the GMO is shown to account for about half of the warming in the last 25 years and hence a substantial fraction of the recent acceleration in the rate of increase in global average sea surface temperature. Nevertheless, in terms of the global average “well-observed” sea surface temperature, the GMO can account for only about 0.1° C in transient, decadal-scale fluctuations, not the century-long 1° C warming that has been observed during the twentieth century.

  14. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    1990-07-03

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations. 3 figs.

  15. RFQ accelerator tuning system

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1990-01-01

    A cooling system is provided for maintaining a preselected operating temperature in a device, which may be an RFQ accelerator, having a variable heat removal requirement, by circulating a cooling fluid through a cooling system remote from the device. Internal sensors in the device enable an estimated error signal to be generated from parameters which are indicative of the heat removal requirement from the device. Sensors are provided at predetermined locations in the cooling system for outputting operational temperature signals. Analog and digital computers define a control signal functionally related to the temperature signals and the estimated error signal, where the control signal is defined effective to return the device to the preselected operating temperature in a stable manner. The cooling system includes a first heat sink responsive to a first portion of the control signal to remove heat from a major portion of the circulating fluid. A second heat sink is responsive to a second portion of the control signal to remove heat from a minor portion of the circulating fluid. The cooled major and minor portions of the circulating fluid are mixed in response to a mixing portion of the control signal, which is effective to proportion the major and minor portions of the circulating fluid to establish a mixed fluid temperature which is effective to define the preselected operating temperature for the remote device. In an RFQ environment the stable temperature control enables the resonant frequency of the device to be maintained at substantially a predetermined value during transient operations.

  16. Accelerated shallow water modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandham, Rajesh; Medina, David; Warburton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    ln this talk we will describe our ongoing developments in accelerated numerical methods for modeling tsunamis, and oceanic fluid flows using two dimensional shallow water model and/or three dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes model discretized with high order discontinuous Galerkin methods. High order discontinuous Galerkin methods can be computationally demanding, requiring extensive computational time to simulate real time events on traditional CPU architectures. However, recent advances in computing architectures and hardware aware algorithms make it possible to reduce simulation time and provide accurate predictions in a timely manner. Hence we tailor these algorithms to take advantage of single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architecture that is seen in modern many core compute devices such as GPUs. We will discuss our unified and extensive many-core programming library OCCA that alleviates the need to completely re-design the solvers to keep up with constantly evolving parallel programming models and hardware architectures. We will present performance results for the flow simulations demonstrating performance leveraging multiple different multi-threading APIs on GPU and CPU targets.

  17. Electron acceleration in a two-stage laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxin; Liu, Jiansheng; Xia, Changquan; Wang, Wentao; Lu, Haiyang; Wang, Cheng; Deng, Aihua; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jianzhou; Shen, Baifei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Xu, Zhizhan

    2012-07-01

    Near-GeV electron beam generation from a two-stage laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is reported. Electron injection and acceleration are separated into two distinct LWFA stages and controlled independently from each other by employing two gas cells filled with a He/O2 mixture and pure He gas, respectively. Electrons with a Maxwellian spectrum, generated from the injection stage assisted by ionization-induced injection, are seeded into the acceleration stage with a 3-mm long gas cell and accelerated to produce a 0.8-GeV quasimonoenergetic electron beam for a 45 TW 40 fs laser pulse, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 187 GV/m. In the injection stage, the produced electron beam properties can be optimized by adjusting the input laser intensity and the plasma density so that quasimonoenergetic electron beams are obtained owing to the self-focusing effects of the laser beam. The ionization-induced injection scheme has been extensively employed for a capillary discharge plasma waveguide to demonstrate channel-guided LWFA beyond 1 GeV. Using a 4-cm capillary made of oxygen containing acrylic resin results in optically guiding 130 TW 55 fs laser pulse that accelerates electrons up to 1.8 GeV in contrast with no electron acceleration in a polyethylene capillary free of oxygen.

  18. CAS CERN Accelerator School 5th General Accelerator Physics Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S.

    1994-01-01

    The fifth CERN Accelerator School (CAS) basic course on General Accelerator Physics was given at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, from 7 to 18 September 1992. Its syllabus was based on the previous similar courses held at Gif-sur-Yvette in 1984, Aarhus 1986, Salamanca 1988 and Juelich 1990, and whose proceedings were published as CERN Reports 85-19, 87-10, 89-05 and 91-04, respectively. However, certain topics were treated in a different way, improved or extended, while new subjects were introduced. As far as the proceedings of this school are concerned the opportunity was taken not only to include the lectures presented but also to select and revise the most appropriate chapters from the previous similar schools. In this way the present volumes constitute a rather complete introduction to all aspects of the design and construction of particle accelerators, including optics, emittance, luminosity, longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics, insertions, chromaticity, transfer lines, resonances, accelerating structures, tune shifts, coasting beams, lifetime, synchrotron radiation, radiation damping, beam-beam effects, diagnostics, cooling, ion and positron sources, RF and vacuum systems, injection and extraction, conventional, permanent and superconducting magnets, cyclotrons, RF linear accelerators, microtrons, as well as applications of particle accelerators (including therapy) and the history of accelerators. See hints under the relevant topics.

  19. Beam acceleration through proton radio frequency quadrupole accelerator in BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, P. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Mathew, J. V.; Singh, S. K.; Jain, P.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, M.; Kumar, R.; Roychowdhury, P.; Kelwani, H.; Rama Rao, B. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Kukreti, B. M.; Singh, P.

    2016-05-01

    A 3 MeV proton Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India, for the Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) programme. The 352 MHz RFQ is built in 4 segments and in the first phase two segments of the LEHIPA RFQ were commissioned, accelerating a 50 keV, 1 mA pulsed proton beam from the ion source, to an energy of 1.24 MeV. The successful operation of the RFQ gave confidence in the physics understanding and technology development that have been achieved, and indicate that the road forward can now be traversed rather more quickly.

  20. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.