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Sample records for microtubule-independent focal-adhesion sliding

  1. Focal adhesions in osteoneogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M.J.P; Dalby, M.J

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of tissue engineering advances, the role of cellular adhesive mechanisms, in particular the interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device technology is to use the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to the material surface or chemical stimuli in order to help develop next-generation biomaterials. The focus of this review is on recent studies and developments concerning focal adhesion formation in osteoneogenesis, with an emphasis on the influence of synthetic constructs on integrin mediated cellular adhesion and function. PMID:21287830

  2. Focal adhesions, stress fibers and mechanical tension

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, Keith; Guilluy, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Stress fibers and focal adhesions are complex protein arrays that produce, transmit and sense mechanical tension. Evidence accumulated over many years led to the conclusion that mechanical tension generated within stress fibers contributes to the assembly of both stress fibers themselves and their associated focal adhesions. However, several lines of evidence have recently been presented against this model. Here we discuss the evidence for and against the role of mechanical tension in driving the assembly of these structures. We also consider how their assembly is influenced by the rigidity of the substratum to which cells are adhering. Finally, we discuss the recently identified connections between stress fibers and the nucleus, and the roles that these may play, both in cell migration and regulating nuclear function. PMID:26519907

  3. Mechanism of Focal Adhesion Kinase Mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; Sturm, Sebastian; Bullerjahn, Jakob Tómas; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-11-01

    Mechanosensing at focal adhesions regulates vital cellular processes. Here, we present results from molecular dynamics (MD) and mechano-biochemical network simulations that suggest a direct role of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) as a mechano-sensor. Tensile forces, propagating from the membrane through the PIP2 binding site of the FERM domain and from the cytoskeleton-anchored FAT domain, activate FAK by unlocking its central phosphorylation site (Tyr576/577) from the autoinhibitory FERM domain. Varying loading rates, pulling directions, and membrane PIP2 concentrations corroborate the specific opening of the FERM-kinase domain interface, due to its remarkably lower mechanical stability compared to the individual alpha-helical domains and the PIP2-FERM link. Analyzing downstream signaling networks provides further evidence for an intrinsic mechano-signaling role of FAK in broadcasting force signals through Ras to the nucleus. This distinguishes FAK from hitherto identified focal adhesion mechano-responsive molecules, allowing a new interpretation of cell stretching experiments. PMID:26544178

  4. Mechanism of Focal Adhesion Kinase Mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Sebastian; Bullerjahn, Jakob Tómas; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensing at focal adhesions regulates vital cellular processes. Here, we present results from molecular dynamics (MD) and mechano-biochemical network simulations that suggest a direct role of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) as a mechano-sensor. Tensile forces, propagating from the membrane through the PIP2 binding site of the FERM domain and from the cytoskeleton-anchored FAT domain, activate FAK by unlocking its central phosphorylation site (Tyr576/577) from the autoinhibitory FERM domain. Varying loading rates, pulling directions, and membrane PIP2 concentrations corroborate the specific opening of the FERM-kinase domain interface, due to its remarkably lower mechanical stability compared to the individual alpha-helical domains and the PIP2-FERM link. Analyzing downstream signaling networks provides further evidence for an intrinsic mechano-signaling role of FAK in broadcasting force signals through Ras to the nucleus. This distinguishes FAK from hitherto identified focal adhesion mechano-responsive molecules, allowing a new interpretation of cell stretching experiments. PMID:26544178

  5. Focal Adhesion Kinase-Dependent Regulation of Adhesive Force Involves Vinculin Recruitment to Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Steven K.; García, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    Background information Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an essential non-receptor tyrosine kinase, plays pivotal roles in migratory responses, adhesive signaling, and mechanotransduction. FAK-dependent regulation of cell migration involves focal adhesion turnover dynamics as well as actin cytoskeleton polymerization and lamellipodia protrusion. Whereas roles for FAK in migratory and mechanosensing responses have been established, the contributions of FAK to the generation of adhesive forces are not well understood. Results Using FAK-null cells expressing wild-type and mutant FAK under an inducible tetracycline promoter, we analyzed the role of FAK in the generation of steady-state adhesive forces using micropatterned substrates and a hydrodynamic adhesion assay. FAK expression reduced steady-state strength by 30% compared to FAK-null cells. FAK expression reduced vinculin localization to focal adhesions by 35% independently from changes in integrin binding and localization of talin and paxillin. RNAi knockdown of vinculin abrogated the FAK-dependent differences in adhesive force. FAK-dependent changes in vinculin localization and adhesive force were confirmed in human primary fibroblasts with FAK knocked down by RNAi. The autophosphorylation Y397 and kinase domain Y576/Y577 sites were differentially required for FAK-mediated adhesive responses. Conclusions We demonstrate that FAK reduces steady-state adhesion strength by modulating vinculin recruitment to focal adhesions. These findings provide insights into the role of FAK in mechanical interactions between a cell and the extracellular matrix. PMID:19883375

  6. A kinetic model for RNA-interference of focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Focal adhesions are integrin-based cell-matrix contacts that transduce and integrate mechanical and biochemical cues from the environment. They develop from smaller and more numerous focal complexes under the influence of mechanical force and are key elements for many physiological and disease-related processes, including wound healing and metastasis. More than 150 different proteins localize to focal adhesions and have been systematically classified in the adhesome project (http://www.adhesome.org). First RNAi-screens have been performed for focal adhesions and the effect of knockdown of many of these components on the number, size, shape and location of focal adhesions has been reported. Results We have developed a kinetic model for RNA interference of focal adhesions which represents some of its main elements: a spatially layered structure, signaling through the small GTPases Rac and Rho, and maturation from focal complexes to focal adhesions under force. The response to force is described by two complementary scenarios corresponding to slip and catch bond behavior, respectively. Using estimated and literature values for the model parameters, three time scales of the dynamics of RNAi-influenced focal adhesions are identified: a sub-minute time scale for the assembly of focal complexes, a sub-hour time scale for the maturation to focal adhesions, and a time scale of days that controls the siRNA-mediated knockdown. Our model shows bistability between states dominated by focal complexes and focal adhesions, respectively. Catch bonding strongly extends the range of stability of the state dominated by focal adhesions. A sensitivity analysis predicts that knockdown of focal adhesion components is more efficient for focal adhesions with slip bonds or if the system is in a state dominated by focal complexes. Knockdown of Rho leads to an increase of focal complexes. Conclusions The suggested model provides a kinetic description of the effect of RNA

  7. Focal adhesion kinases in adhesion structures and disease.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  8. Focal Adhesion Kinases in Adhesion Structures and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and embryonic development. Cells can contact the ECM through a wide range of matrix contact structures such as focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia. Although they are different in structural design and basic function, they share common remodeling proteins such as integrins, talin, paxillin, and the tyrosine kinases FAK, Pyk2, and Src. In this paper, we compare and contrast the basic organization and role of focal adhesions, podosomes, and invadopodia in different cells. In addition, we discuss the role of the tyrosine kinases, FAK, Pyk2, and Src, which are critical for the function of the different adhesion structures. Finally, we discuss the essential role of these tyrosine kinases from the perspective of human diseases. PMID:22888421

  9. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in mechanosensing during fibroblast migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Hanks, S. K.; Wang, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase localized at focal adhesions and is believed to mediate adhesion-stimulated effects. Although ablation of FAK impairs cell movement, it is not clear whether FAK might be involved in the guidance of cell migration, a role consistent with its putative regulatory function. We have transfected FAK-null fibroblasts with FAK gene under the control of the tetracycline repression system. Cells were cultured on flexible polyacrylamide substrates for the detection of traction forces and the application of mechanical stimulation. Compared with control cells expressing wild-type FAK, FAK-null cells showed a decrease in migration speed and directional persistence. In addition, whereas FAK-expressing cells responded to exerted forces by reorienting their movements and forming prominent focal adhesions, FAK-null cells failed to show such responses. Furthermore, FAK-null cells showed impaired responses to decreases in substrate flexibility, which causes control cells to generate weaker traction forces and migrate away from soft substrates. Cells expressing Y397F FAK, which cannot be phosphorylated at a key tyrosine site, showed similar defects in migration pattern and force-induced reorientation as did FAK-null cells. However, other aspects of F397-FAK cells, including the responses to substrate flexibility and the amplification of focal adhesions upon mechanical stimulation, were similar to that of control cells. Our results suggest that FAK plays an important role in the response of migrating cells to mechanical input. In addition, phosphorylation at Tyr-397 is required for some, but not all, of the functions of FAK in cell migration.

  10. Focal adhesion kinase-dependent focal adhesion recruitment of SH2 domains directs SRC into focal adhesions to regulate cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jui-Chung; Chen, Yu-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Wenshin Yu, Helen; Chen, Yin-Quan; Chiou, Arthur; Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Directed cell migration requires dynamical control of the protein complex within focal adhesions (FAs) and this control is regulated by signaling events involving tyrosine phosphorylation. We screened the SH2 domains present in tyrosine-specific kinases and phosphatases found within FAs, including SRC, SHP1 and SHP2, and examined whether these enzymes transiently target FAs via their SH2 domains. We found that the SRC_SH2 domain and the SHP2_N-SH2 domain are associated with FAs, but only the SRC_SH2 domain is able to be regulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The FAK-dependent association of the SRC_SH2 domain is necessary and sufficient for SRC FA targeting. When the targeting of SRC into FAs is inhibited, there is significant suppression of SRC-mediated phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK; this results in an inhibition of FA formation and maturation and a reduction in cell migration. This study reveals an association between FAs and the SRC_SH2 domain as well as between FAs and the SHP2_N-SH2 domains. This supports the hypothesis that the FAK-regulated SRC_SH2 domain plays an important role in directing SRC into FAs and that this SRC-mediated FA signaling drives cell migration. PMID:26681405

  11. Focal Adhesion Assembly Induces Phenotypic Changes and Dedifferentiation in Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunjun; Lee, Mi Nam; Choung, Jin Seung; Kim, Sanghee; Choi, Byung Hyune; Noh, Minsoo; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-08-01

    The expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate sufficient populations for cell-based therapies. However, during monolayer culture, chondrocytes lose inherent characteristics and shift to fibroblast-like cells as passage number increase. Here, we investigated passage-dependent changes in cellular physiology, including cellular morphology, motility, and gene and protein expression, as well as the role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal regulation in the dedifferentiation process. We found that the gene and protein expression levels of both the focal adhesion complex and small Rho GTPases are upregulated with increasing passage number and are closely linked to chondrocyte dedifferentiation. The inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) but not small Rho GTPases induced the loss of fibroblastic traits and the recovery of collagen type II, aggrecan, and SOX9 expression levels in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Based on these findings, we propose a strategy to suppress chondrogenic dedifferentiation by inhibiting the identified FAK or Src pathways while maintaining the expansion capability of chondrocytes in a 2D environment. These results highlight a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of skeletal diseases and the generation of cartilage in tissue-engineering approaches. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1822-1831, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661891

  12. Stability of focal adhesion enhanced by its inner force fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhi-Xiu; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Cells actively sense and respond to mechanical signals from the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. By representing a single focal adhesion as a cluster of slip bonds, it has been demonstrated that the cluster often became unstable under fluctuated forces. However, an unusual case was also reported, where the stability of the cluster might be substantially enhanced by a fluctuated force with a relatively low fluctuation frequency and high fluctuation amplitude. Such an observation cannot be explained by the conventional fracture theory of fatigue. Here, we intensively investigate this intriguing observation by carrying out systematic parametric studies. Our intensive simulation results indicate that stability enhancement of this kind is in fact quite robust, which can be affected by the stochastic features of a single bond and the profile of the fluctuated forces such as the average value of bond force. We then suggest that the fluctuation of traction force within a focal adhesion might enhance its stability in a certain way. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.*11372279).

  13. Neuronal polarity selection by topography-induced focal adhesion control.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Aldo; Cecchini, Marco; Serresi, Michela; Faraci, Paolo; Pisignano, Dario; Beltram, Fabio

    2010-06-01

    Interaction between differentiating neurons and the extracellular environment guides the establishment of cell polarity during nervous system development. Developing neurons read the physical properties of the local substrate in a contact-dependent manner and retrieve essential guidance cues. In previous works we demonstrated that PC12 cell interaction with nanogratings (alternating lines of ridges and grooves of submicron size) promotes bipolarity and alignment to the substrate topography. Here, we investigate the role of focal adhesions, cell contractility, and actin dynamics in this process. Exploiting nanoimprint lithography techniques and a cyclic olefin copolymer, we engineered biocompatible nanostructured substrates designed for high-resolution live-cell microscopy. Our results reveal that neuronal polarization and contact guidance are based on a geometrical constraint of focal adhesions resulting in an angular modulation of their maturation and persistence. We report on ROCK1/2-myosin-II pathway activity and demonstrate that ROCK-mediated contractility contributes to polarity selection during neuronal differentiation. Importantly, the selection process confined the generation of actin-supported membrane protrusions and the initiation of new neurites at the poles. Maintenance of the established polarity was independent from NGF stimulation. Altogether our results imply that focal adhesions and cell contractility stably link the topographical configuration of the extracellular environment to a corresponding neuronal polarity state. PMID:20304485

  14. Poldip2 controls vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating focal adhesion turnover and force polarization

    PubMed Central

    Datla, Srinivasa Raju; McGrail, Daniel J.; Vukelic, Sasa; Huff, Lauren P.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Pounkova, Lily; Lee, Minyoung; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Khalil, Mazen K.; Hilenski, Lula L.; Terada, Lance S.; Dawson, Michelle R.; Lassègue, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase-δ-interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) interacts with NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) and regulates migration; however, the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the role of Poldip2 in focal adhesion turnover, as well as traction force generation and polarization. Poldip2 overexpression (AdPoldip2) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) impairs PDGF-induced migration and induces a characteristic phenotype of long cytoplasmic extensions. AdPoldip2 also prevents the decrease in spreading and increased aspect ratio observed in response to PDGF and slightly impairs cell contraction. Moreover, AdPoldip2 blocks focal adhesion dissolution and sustains H2O2 levels in focal adhesions, whereas Poldip2 knockdown (siPoldip2) significantly decreases the number of focal adhesions. RhoA activity is unchanged when focal adhesion dissolution is stimulated in control cells but increases in AdPoldip2-treated cells. Inhibition of RhoA blocks Poldip2-mediated attenuation of focal adhesion dissolution, and overexpression of RhoA or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) reverses the loss of focal adhesions induced by siPoldip2, indicating that RhoA and FAK mediate the effect of Poldip2 on focal adhesions. Nox4 silencing prevents focal adhesion stabilization by AdPoldip2 and induces a phenotype similar to siPoldip2, suggesting a role for Nox4 in Poldip2-induced focal adhesion stability. As a consequence of impaired focal adhesion turnover, PDGF-treated AdPoldip2 cells are unable to reduce and polarize traction forces, a necessary first step in migration. These results implicate Poldip2 in VSMC migration via regulation of focal adhesion turnover and traction force generation in a Nox4/RhoA/FAK-dependent manner. PMID:25063792

  15. Poldip2 controls vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating focal adhesion turnover and force polarization.

    PubMed

    Datla, Srinivasa Raju; McGrail, Daniel J; Vukelic, Sasa; Huff, Lauren P; Lyle, Alicia N; Pounkova, Lily; Lee, Minyoung; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Khalil, Mazen K; Hilenski, Lula L; Terada, Lance S; Dawson, Michelle R; Lassègue, Bernard; Griendling, Kathy K

    2014-10-01

    Polymerase-δ-interacting protein 2 (Poldip2) interacts with NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) and regulates migration; however, the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the role of Poldip2 in focal adhesion turnover, as well as traction force generation and polarization. Poldip2 overexpression (AdPoldip2) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) impairs PDGF-induced migration and induces a characteristic phenotype of long cytoplasmic extensions. AdPoldip2 also prevents the decrease in spreading and increased aspect ratio observed in response to PDGF and slightly impairs cell contraction. Moreover, AdPoldip2 blocks focal adhesion dissolution and sustains H2O2 levels in focal adhesions, whereas Poldip2 knockdown (siPoldip2) significantly decreases the number of focal adhesions. RhoA activity is unchanged when focal adhesion dissolution is stimulated in control cells but increases in AdPoldip2-treated cells. Inhibition of RhoA blocks Poldip2-mediated attenuation of focal adhesion dissolution, and overexpression of RhoA or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) reverses the loss of focal adhesions induced by siPoldip2, indicating that RhoA and FAK mediate the effect of Poldip2 on focal adhesions. Nox4 silencing prevents focal adhesion stabilization by AdPoldip2 and induces a phenotype similar to siPoldip2, suggesting a role for Nox4 in Poldip2-induced focal adhesion stability. As a consequence of impaired focal adhesion turnover, PDGF-treated AdPoldip2 cells are unable to reduce and polarize traction forces, a necessary first step in migration. These results implicate Poldip2 in VSMC migration via regulation of focal adhesion turnover and traction force generation in a Nox4/RhoA/FAK-dependent manner. PMID:25063792

  16. Allosteric regulation of focal adhesion kinase by PIP₂ and ATP.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Le Coq, Johanne; Lietha, Daniel; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-02-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell signaling, proliferation, migration, and development. A major mechanism of regulation of FAK activity is an intramolecular autoinhibitory interaction between two of its domains--the catalytic and FERM domains. Upon cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, FAK is being translocated toward focal adhesion sites and activated. Interactions of FAK with phosphoinositide phosphatidylinsositol-4,5-bis-phosphate (PIP₂) are required to activate FAK. However, the molecular mechanism of the activation remains poorly understood. Recent fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments revealed a closure of the FERM-kinase interface upon ATP binding, which is reversed upon additional binding of PIP₂. Here, we addressed the allosteric regulation of FAK by performing all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations of a FAK fragment containing the catalytic and FERM domains, and comparing the dynamics in the absence or presence of ATP and PIP₂. As a major conformational change, we observe a closing and opening motion upon ATP and additional PIP₂ binding, respectively, in good agreement with the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. To reveal how the binding of the regulatory PIP₂ to the FERM F2 lobe is transduced to the very distant F1/N-lobe interface, we employed force distribution analysis. We identified a network of mainly charged residue-residue interactions spanning from the PIP₂ binding site to the distant interface between the kinase and FERM domains, comprising candidate residues for mutagenesis to validate the predicted mechanism of FAK activation. PMID:25650936

  17. Nanotopographical modification: a regulator of cellular function through focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Manus Jonathan Paul; Richards, R. Geoff; Dalby, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of biomedical engineering advances, the role of cellular mechanisms, in particular adhesive interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device design has evolved from the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to topographical features or chemical stimuli, a process that has led to the development of next-generation biomaterials for a wide variety of clinical disorders. In vitro studies have identified nanoscale features as potent modulators of cellular behavior through the onset of focal adhesion formation. The focus of this review is on the recent developments concerning the role of nanoscale structures on integrin-mediated adhesion and cellular function with an emphasis on the generation of medical constructs with regenerative applications. PMID:20138244

  18. Mechanotransduction at focal adhesions: integrating cytoskeletal mechanics in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are complex plasma membrane-associated macromolecular assemblies that serve to physically connect the actin cytoskeleton to integrins that engage with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). FAs undergo maturation wherein they grow and change composition differentially to provide traction and to transduce the signals that drive cell migration, which is crucial to various biological processes, including development, wound healing and cancer metastasis. FA-related signalling networks dynamically modulate the strength of the linkage between integrin and actin and control the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we have summarized a number of recent investigations exploring how FA composition is affected by the mechanical forces that transduce signalling networks to modulate cellular function and drive cell migration. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of how force governs adhesion signalling provides insights that will allow the manipulation of cell migration and help to control migration-related human diseases. PMID:23551528

  19. Crystal Structure of the FERM Domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli,D.; Song, H.; Poy, F.; Schaller, M.; Eck, M.

    2006-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that localizes to focal adhesions in adherent cells. Through phosphorylation of proteins assembled at the cytoplasmic tails of integrins, FAK promotes signaling events that modulate cellular growth, survival, and migration. The amino-terminal region of FAK contains a region of sequence homology with band 4.1 and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins termed a FERM domain. FERM domains are found in a variety of signaling and cytoskeletal proteins and are thought to mediate intermolecular interactions with partner proteins and phospholipids at the plasma membrane and intramolecular regulatory interactions. Here we report two crystal structures of an NH2-terminal fragment of avian FAK containing the FERM domain and a portion of the regulatory linker that connects the FERM and kinase domains. The tertiary folds of the three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3) are similar to those of known FERM structures despite low sequence conservation. Differences in the sequence and relative orientation of the F3 subdomain alters the nature of the interdomain interface, and the phosphoinositide binding site found in ERM family FERM domains is not present in FAK. A putative protein interaction site on the F3 lobe is masked by the proximal region of the linker. Additionally, in one structure the adjacent Src SH3 and SH2 binding sites in the linker associate with the surfaces of the F3 and F1 lobes, respectively. These structural features suggest the possibility that protein interactions of the FAK FERM domain can be regulated by binding of Src kinases to the linker segment.

  20. Requirement of focal adhesion kinase in branching tubulogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Chun; Kopec, Anna K; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that alpha3beta1 integrins are essential to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-independent branching tubulogenesis in Mardin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells. However, the involvement of integrin downstream signaling molecules remains unclear. In the present study, we successfully isolated cell lines possessing different tubulogenic potentials from the MDCK cells; cyst clones (CA4, CA6) forming cystic structures when cultured in 0.3% type I collagen gel and mass clones (M610, M611, M612) forming aggregated masses. Cyst clones maintained cystic structure in 0.1% collagen gel, whereas mass clones spontaneously developed into tubules. Both clones exhibited various morphologies when cultured on a dish: cyst clones formed aggregated islands, while mass clones were more scattered and exhibited higher migration capacity. Among several focal adhesion machinery proteins examined, only the expression and phosphorylation level of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in mass clones was higher than in cyst clones, while other proteins showed no obvious differences. However, overexpression of wild type FAK in CA6 cells did not facilitate branching tubule formation in 0.1% collagen gel. Targeted decrease in the expression level of FAK in M610 cells with the application of antisense cDNA resulted in a marked reduction of branching tubule formation in 0.1% collagen gel and showed a down-regulation of fibronectin assembly, which is known to promote tubulogenesis. In contrast, overexpression of wild type FAK in CA6 cells had no effect on fibronectin assembly. Taken together, our data demonstrates that FAK is required, but not sufficient for HGF-independent branching tubulogenesis in MDCK cells. PMID:19272169

  1. α-Actinin-4 Enhances Colorectal Cancer Cell Invasion by Suppressing Focal Adhesion Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tesshi; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2015-01-01

    α-Actinins (ACTNs) are known to crosslink actin filaments at focal adhesions in migrating cells. Among the four isoforms of mammalian ACTNs, ACTN1 and ACTN4 are ubiquitously expressed. Recently, ACTN4 was reported to enhance cancer cell motility, invasion, and metastasis. However, the mechanism by which ACTN4 drives these malignant phenotypes remains unclear. Here, we show that ACTN4, but not ACTN1, induces the formation of immature focal adhesions in DLD-1 cells, leading to the rapid turnover of focal adhesions. Interestingly, zyxin (ZYX) assembly to focal adhesions was markedly decreased in ACTN4-expressing DLD-1 cells, while the recruitment of paxillin (PAX) occurred normally. On the other hand, in ACTN1-expressing DLD-1 cells, PAX and ZYX were normally recruited to focal adhesions, suggesting that ACTN4 specifically impairs focal adhesion maturation by inhibiting the recruitment of ZYX to focal complexes. Using purified recombinant proteins, we found that ZYX binding to ACTN4 was defective under conditions where ZYX binding to ACTN1 was observed. Furthermore, Matrigel invasion of SW480 cells that express high endogenous levels of ACTN4 protein was inhibited by ectopic expression of ACTN1. Altogether, our results suggest that ZYX defective binding to ACTN4, which occupies focal adhesions instead of ACTN1, induces the formation of immature focal adhesions, resulting in the enhancement of cell motility and invasion. PMID:25860875

  2. Focal Adhesion of Osteoblastic Cells on Titanium Surface with Amine Functionalities Formed by Plasma Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Heesang; Jung, Sang Chul; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2012-08-01

    To enhance the focal adhesion of osteoblastic cells on a titanium surface, plasma polymerized allyl amine (AAm) thin films were deposited by plasma polymerization. This plasma polymer functionalization of titanium is advantageous for osteoblastic focal adhesion formation. Such Ti surfaces are useful for the fabrication of titanium-based dental implants for enhancement of osseointegration.

  3. Cell morphology and focal adhesion location alters internal cell stress.

    PubMed

    Mullen, C A; Vaughan, T J; Voisin, M C; Brennan, M A; Layrolle, P; McNamara, L M

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular mechanical cues have been shown to have a profound effect on osteogenic cell behaviour. However, it is not known precisely how these cues alter intracellular mechanics to initiate changes in cell behaviour. In this study, a combination of in vitro culture of MC3T3-E1 cells and finite-element modelling was used to investigate the effects of passive differences in substrate stiffness on intracellular mechanics. Cells on collagen-based substrates were classified based on the presence of cell processes and the dimensions of various cellular features were quantified. Focal adhesion (FA) density was quantified from immunohistochemical staining, while cell and substrate stiffnesses were measured using a live-cell atomic force microscope. Computational models of cell morphologies were developed using an applied contraction of the cell body to simulate active cell contraction. The results showed that FA density is directly related to cell morphology, while the effect of substrate stiffness on internal cell tension was modulated by both cell morphology and FA density, as investigated by varying the number of adhesion sites present in each morphological model. We propose that the cells desire to achieve a homeostatic stress state may play a role in osteogenic cell differentiation in response to extracellular mechanical cues. PMID:25297316

  4. Lipid binding promotes oligomerization and focal adhesion activity of vinculin

    PubMed Central

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Patil, Dipak N.; George, Eric M.; Brown, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and focal adhesion (FA) complexes are necessary for cell migration and morphogenesis, and for the development, growth, and survival of all metazoans. Vinculin is an essential regulator of both AJs and FAs, where it provides links to the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) affects the functions of many targets, including vinculin. Here we report the crystal structure of vinculin in complex with PIP2, which revealed that PIP2 binding alters vinculin structure to direct higher-order oligomerization and suggests that PIP2 and F-actin binding to vinculin are mutually permissive. Forced expression of PIP2-binding–deficient mutants of vinculin in vinculin-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts revealed that PIP2 binding is necessary for maintaining optimal FAs, for organization of actin stress fibers, and for cell migration and spreading. Finally, photobleaching experiments indicated that PIP2 binding is required for the control of vinculin dynamics and turnover in FAs. Thus, through oligomerization, PIP2 directs a transient vinculin sequestration at FAs that is necessary for proper FA function. PMID:25488920

  5. DFak56 is a novel Drosophila melanogaster focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R H; Fessler, L I; Edeen, P T; Madigan, S J; McKeown, M; Hunter, T

    1999-12-10

    The mammalian focal adhesion kinase (FAK) family of nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinases have been implicated in controlling a multitude of cellular responses to the engagement of cell surface integrins and G protein-coupled receptors. We describe here a Drosophila melanogaster FAK homologue, DFak56, which maps to band 56D on the right arm of the second chromosome. Full-length DFak56 cDNA encodes a phosphoprotein of 140 kDa, which shares strong sequence similarity not only with mammalian p125(FAK) but also with the more recently described mammalian Pyk2 (also known as CAKbeta, RAFTK, FAK2, and CADTK) FAK family member. DFak56 has intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and is phosphorylated on tyrosine in vivo. As is the case for FAK, tyrosine phosphorylation of DFak56 is increased upon plating Drosophila embryo cells on extracellular matrix proteins. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence staining analysis showed that DFak56 is ubiquitously expressed with particularly high levels within the developing central nervous system. We utilized the UAS-GAL4 expression system to express DFak56 and analyze its function in vivo. Overexpression of DFak56 in the wing imaginal disc results in wing blistering in adults, a phenotype also observed with both position-specific integrin loss of function and position-specific integrin overexpression. Our results imply a role for DFak56 in adhesion-dependent signaling pathways in vivo during D. melanogaster development. PMID:10585440

  6. Talin determines the nanoscale architecture of focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jaron; Wang, Yilin; Goh, Wah Ing; Goh, Honzhen; Baird, Michelle A.; Ruehland, Svenja; Teo, Shijia; Bate, Neil; Critchley, David R.; Davidson, Michael W.; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2015-01-01

    Insight into how molecular machines perform their biological functions depends on knowledge of the spatial organization of the components, their connectivity, geometry, and organizational hierarchy. However, these parameters are difficult to determine in multicomponent assemblies such as integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We have previously applied 3D superresolution fluorescence microscopy to probe the spatial organization of major FA components, observing a nanoscale stratification of proteins between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton. Here we combine superresolution imaging techniques with a protein engineering approach to investigate how such nanoscale architecture arises. We demonstrate that talin plays a key structural role in regulating the nanoscale architecture of FAs, akin to a molecular ruler. Talin diagonally spans the FA core, with its N terminus at the membrane and C terminus demarcating the FA/stress fiber interface. In contrast, vinculin is found to be dispensable for specification of FA nanoscale architecture. Recombinant analogs of talin with modified lengths recapitulated its polarized orientation but altered the FA/stress fiber interface in a linear manner, consistent with its modular structure, and implicating the integrin–talin–actin complex as the primary mechanical linkage in FAs. Talin was found to be ∼97 nm in length and oriented at ∼15° relative to the plasma membrane. Our results identify talin as the primary determinant of FA nanoscale organization and suggest how multiple cellular forces may be integrated at adhesion sites. PMID:26283369

  7. Microtubules regulate focal adhesion dynamics through MAP4K4.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jiping; Xie, Min; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Schneider, Michael D; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-01

    Disassembly of focal adhesions (FAs) allows cell retraction and integrin detachment from the extracellular matrix, processes critical for cell movement. Growth of microtubules (MTs) can promote FA turnover by serving as tracks to deliver proteins essential for FA disassembly. The molecular nature of this FA "disassembly factor," however, remains elusive. By quantitative proteomics, we identified mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4) as an FA regulator that associates with MTs. Knockout of MAP4K4 stabilizes FAs and impairs cell migration. By exploring underlying mechanisms, we further show that MAP4K4 associates with ending binding 2 (EB2) and IQ motif and SEC7 domain-containing protein 1 (IQSEC1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor specific for Arf6, whose activation promotes integrin internalization. Together, our findings provide critical insight into FA disassembly, suggesting that MTs can deliver MAP4K4 toward FAs through EB2, where MAP4K4 can, in turn, activate Arf6 via IQSEC1 and enhance FA dissolution. PMID:25490267

  8. Microtubules Regulate Focal Adhesion Dynamics through MAP4K4

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jiping; Xie, Min; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Schneider, Michael D; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2014-01-01

    Disassembly of focal adhesions (FAs) allows cell retraction and integrin detachment from the ECM, processes critical for cell movement. Growth of MT (microtubule) can promote FA turnover by serving as tracks to deliver proteins essential for FA disassembly. The molecular nature of this FA “disassembly factor”, however, remains elusive. By quantitative proteomics, we identified MAP4K4 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4) as a FA regulator that associates with MTs. Conditional knockout (cKO) of MAP4K4 in skin stabilizes FAs and impairs epidermal migration. By exploring underlying mechanisms, we further show that MAP4K4 associates with EB2, a MT binding protein, and IQSEC1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) specific for Arf6, whose activation promotes integrin internalization. Together, our findings provide critical insights into FA disassembly, suggesting that MTs can deliver MAP4K4 toward FAs through EB2, where MAP4K4 can in turn activate Arf6 via IQSEC1 and enhance FA dissolution. PMID:25490267

  9. Talin determines the nanoscale architecture of focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jaron; Wang, Yilin; Goh, Wah Ing; Goh, Honzhen; Baird, Michelle A; Ruehland, Svenja; Teo, Shijia; Bate, Neil; Critchley, David R; Davidson, Michael W; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2015-09-01

    Insight into how molecular machines perform their biological functions depends on knowledge of the spatial organization of the components, their connectivity, geometry, and organizational hierarchy. However, these parameters are difficult to determine in multicomponent assemblies such as integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We have previously applied 3D superresolution fluorescence microscopy to probe the spatial organization of major FA components, observing a nanoscale stratification of proteins between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton. Here we combine superresolution imaging techniques with a protein engineering approach to investigate how such nanoscale architecture arises. We demonstrate that talin plays a key structural role in regulating the nanoscale architecture of FAs, akin to a molecular ruler. Talin diagonally spans the FA core, with its N terminus at the membrane and C terminus demarcating the FA/stress fiber interface. In contrast, vinculin is found to be dispensable for specification of FA nanoscale architecture. Recombinant analogs of talin with modified lengths recapitulated its polarized orientation but altered the FA/stress fiber interface in a linear manner, consistent with its modular structure, and implicating the integrin-talin-actin complex as the primary mechanical linkage in FAs. Talin was found to be ∼97 nm in length and oriented at ∼15° relative to the plasma membrane. Our results identify talin as the primary determinant of FA nanoscale organization and suggest how multiple cellular forces may be integrated at adhesion sites. PMID:26283369

  10. Focal adhesion protein abnormalities in myelodysplastic mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana; Eloae, Florin Zugun; Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Carasevici, Eugen; Guyotat, Denis; Campos, Lydia

    2011-11-01

    Direct cell-cell contact between haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and their cellular microenvironment is essential to maintain 'stemness'. In cancer biology, focal adhesion (FA) proteins are involved in survival signal transduction in a wide variety of human tumours. To define the role of FA proteins in the haematopoietic microenvironment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), CD73-positive mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were immunostained for paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and p130CAS, and analysed for reactivity, intensity and cellular localisation. Immunofluorescence microscopy allowed us to identify qualitative and quantitative differences, and subcellular localisation analysis revealed that in pathological MSCs, paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} formed nuclear molecular complexes. Increased expression of paxillin, pFAK [Y{sup 397}], and HSP90{alpha}/{beta} and enhanced nuclear co-localisation of these proteins correlated with a consistent proliferative advantage in MSCs from patients with refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB) and negatively impacted clonogenicity of HPCs. These results suggest that signalling via FA proteins could be implicated in HPC-MSC interactions. Further, because FAK is an HSP90{alpha}/{beta} client protein, these results suggest the utility of HSP90{alpha}/{beta} inhibition as a target for adjuvant therapy for myelodysplasia.

  11. Cell morphology and focal adhesion location alters internal cell stress

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, C. A.; Vaughan, T. J.; Voisin, M. C.; Brennan, M. A.; Layrolle, P.; McNamara, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular mechanical cues have been shown to have a profound effect on osteogenic cell behaviour. However, it is not known precisely how these cues alter intracellular mechanics to initiate changes in cell behaviour. In this study, a combination of in vitro culture of MC3T3-E1 cells and finite-element modelling was used to investigate the effects of passive differences in substrate stiffness on intracellular mechanics. Cells on collagen-based substrates were classified based on the presence of cell processes and the dimensions of various cellular features were quantified. Focal adhesion (FA) density was quantified from immunohistochemical staining, while cell and substrate stiffnesses were measured using a live-cell atomic force microscope. Computational models of cell morphologies were developed using an applied contraction of the cell body to simulate active cell contraction. The results showed that FA density is directly related to cell morphology, while the effect of substrate stiffness on internal cell tension was modulated by both cell morphology and FA density, as investigated by varying the number of adhesion sites present in each morphological model. We propose that the cells desire to achieve a homeostatic stress state may play a role in osteogenic cell differentiation in response to extracellular mechanical cues. PMID:25297316

  12. NBR1 enables autophagy-dependent focal adhesion turnover

    PubMed Central

    Kenific, Candia M.; Stehbens, Samantha J.; Goldsmith, Juliet; Leidal, Andrew M.; Faure, Nathalie; Ye, Jordan; Wittmann, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic pathway involving the sequestration of cellular contents into a double-membrane vesicle, the autophagosome. Although recent studies have demonstrated that autophagy supports cell migration, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Using live-cell imaging, we uncover that autophagy promotes optimal migratory rate and facilitates the dynamic assembly and disassembly of cell-matrix focal adhesions (FAs), which is essential for efficient motility. Additionally, our studies reveal that autophagosomes associate with FAs primarily during disassembly, suggesting autophagy locally facilitates the destabilization of cell-matrix contact sites. Furthermore, we identify the selective autophagy cargo receptor neighbor of BRCA1 (NBR1) as a key mediator of autophagy-dependent FA remodeling. NBR1 depletion impairs FA turnover and decreases targeting of autophagosomes to FAs, whereas ectopic expression of autophagy-competent, but not autophagy-defective, NBR1 enhances FA disassembly and reduces FA lifetime during migration. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into how autophagy promotes migration by revealing a requirement for NBR1-mediated selective autophagy in enabling FA disassembly in motile cells. PMID:26903539

  13. Focal adhesion kinase overexpression and its impact on human osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Aizhen; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Sujia; Shi, Xin; Wang, Chen; Sun, Xiaoliang

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been implicated in tumorigenesis in various malignancies. We sought to examine the expression patterns of FAK and the activated form, phosphorylated FAK (pFAK), in human osteosarcoma and to investigate the correlation of FAK expression with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis. In addition, the functional consequence of manipulating the FAK protein level was investigated in human osteosarcoma cell lines. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect FAK and pFAK in pathologic archived materials from 113 patients with primary osteosarcoma. Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the prognoses. The role of FAK in the cytological behavior of MG63 and 143B human osteosarcoma cell lines was studied via FAK protein knock down with siRNA. Cell proliferation, migration, invasiveness and apoptosis were assessed using the CCK8, Transwell and Annexin V/PI staining methods. Both FAK and pFAK were overexpressed in osteosarcoma. There were significant differences in overall survival between the FAK-/pFAK- and FAK+/pFAK- groups (P = 0.016), the FAK+/pFAK- and FAK+/pFAK+ groups (P = 0.012) and the FAK-/pFAK- and FAK+/pFAK+ groups (P < 0.001). There were similar differences in metastasis-free survival between groups. The Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that the FAK expression profile was an independent indicator of both overall and metastasis-free survival. siRNA-based knockdown of FAK not only dramatically reduced the migration and invasion of MG63 and 143B cells, but also had a distinct effect on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and apoptosis. These results collectively suggest that FAK overexpression and phosphorylation might predict more aggressive biologic behavior in osteosarcoma and may be an independent predictor of poor prognosis. PMID:26393679

  14. Actin cap associated focal adhesions and their distinct role in cellular mechanosensing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hwee; Khatau, Shyam B.; Feng, Yunfeng; Walcott, Sam; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.; Wirtz, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The ability for cells to sense and adapt to different physical microenvironments plays a critical role in development, immune responses, and cancer metastasis. Here we identify a small subset of focal adhesions that terminate fibers in the actin cap, a highly ordered filamentous actin structure that is anchored to the top of the nucleus by the LINC complexes; these differ from conventional focal adhesions in morphology, subcellular organization, movements, turnover dynamics, and response to biochemical stimuli. Actin cap associated focal adhesions (ACAFAs) dominate cell mechanosensing over a wide range of matrix stiffness, an ACAFA-specific function regulated by actomyosin contractility in the actin cap, while conventional focal adhesions are restrictively involved in mechanosensing for extremely soft substrates. These results establish the perinuclear actin cap and associated ACAFAs as major mediators of cellular mechanosensing and a critical element of the physical pathway that transduce mechanical cues all the way to the nucleus. PMID:22870384

  15. Highly Multiplexed Imaging Uncovers Changes in Compositional Noise within Assembling Focal Adhesions.

    PubMed

    Harizanova, Jana; Fermin, Yessica; Malik-Sheriff, Rahuman S; Wieczorek, Jakob; Ickstadt, Katja; Grecco, Hernán E; Zamir, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Integrin adhesome proteins bind each other in alternative manners, forming within the cell diverse cell-matrix adhesion sites with distinct properties. An intriguing question is how such modular assembly of adhesion sites is achieved correctly solely by self-organization of their components. Here we address this question using high-throughput multiplexed imaging of eight proteins and two phosphorylation sites in a large number of single focal adhesions. We found that during the assembly of focal adhesions the variances of protein densities decrease while the correlations between them increase, suggesting reduction in the noise levels within these structures. These changes correlate independently with the area and internal density of focal adhesions, but not with their age or shape. Artificial neural network analysis indicates that a joint consideration of multiple components improves the predictability of paxillin and zyxin levels in internally dense focal adhesions. This suggests that paxillin and zyxin densities in focal adhesions are fine-tuned by integrating the levels of multiple other components, thus averaging-out stochastic fluctuations. Based on these results we propose that increase in internal protein densities facilitates noise suppression in focal adhesions, while noise suppression enables their stable growth and further density increase-hence forming a feedback loop giving rise to a quality-controlled assembly. PMID:27519053

  16. Nuclear transport of paxillin depends on focal adhesion dynamics and FAT domains

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Aneesh R.; Shivashankar, G. V.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear transport of paxillin appears to be crucial for paxillin function but the mechanism of transport remains unclear. Here, we show that the nuclear transport of paxillin is regulated by focal adhesion turnover and the presence of FAT domains. Focal adhesion turnover was controlled using triangular or circular fibronectin islands. Circular islands caused higher focal adhesion turnover and increased the nuclear transport of paxillin relative to triangular islands. Mutating several residues of paxillin had no effect on its nuclear transport, suggesting that the process is controlled by multiple domains. Knocking out FAK (also known as PTK2) and vinculin caused an increase in nuclear paxillin. This could be reversed by rescue with wild-type FAK but not by FAK with a mutated FAT domain, which inhibits paxillin binding. Expressing just the FAT domain of FAK not only brought down nuclear levels of paxillin but also caused a large immobile fraction of paxillin to be present at focal adhesions, as demonstrated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies. Taken together, focal adhesion turnover and FAT domains regulate the nuclear localization of paxillin, suggesting a possible role for transcriptional control, through paxillin, by focal adhesions. PMID:27068537

  17. Highly Multiplexed Imaging Uncovers Changes in Compositional Noise within Assembling Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Harizanova, Jana; Fermin, Yessica; Malik-Sheriff, Rahuman S.; Wieczorek, Jakob; Ickstadt, Katja; Grecco, Hernán E.; Zamir, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Integrin adhesome proteins bind each other in alternative manners, forming within the cell diverse cell-matrix adhesion sites with distinct properties. An intriguing question is how such modular assembly of adhesion sites is achieved correctly solely by self-organization of their components. Here we address this question using high-throughput multiplexed imaging of eight proteins and two phosphorylation sites in a large number of single focal adhesions. We found that during the assembly of focal adhesions the variances of protein densities decrease while the correlations between them increase, suggesting reduction in the noise levels within these structures. These changes correlate independently with the area and internal density of focal adhesions, but not with their age or shape. Artificial neural network analysis indicates that a joint consideration of multiple components improves the predictability of paxillin and zyxin levels in internally dense focal adhesions. This suggests that paxillin and zyxin densities in focal adhesions are fine-tuned by integrating the levels of multiple other components, thus averaging-out stochastic fluctuations. Based on these results we propose that increase in internal protein densities facilitates noise suppression in focal adhesions, while noise suppression enables their stable growth and further density increase—hence forming a feedback loop giving rise to a quality-controlled assembly. PMID:27519053

  18. RhoJ interacts with the GIT-PIX complex and regulates focal adhesion disassembly.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eleanor; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Poulter, Natalie S; Edelmann, Francesca; Salisbury, Victoria A; Noy, Peter J; Bacon, Andrea; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Heath, John K; Bicknell, Roy; Heath, Victoria L

    2014-07-15

    RhoJ is a Rho GTPase expressed in endothelial cells and tumour cells, which regulates cell motility, invasion, endothelial tube formation and focal adhesion numbers. This study aimed to further delineate the molecular function of RhoJ. Using timelapse microscopy RhoJ was found to regulate focal adhesion disassembly; small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of RhoJ increased focal adhesion disassembly time, whereas expression of an active mutant (daRhoJ) decreased it. Furthermore, daRhoJ co-precipitated with the GIT-PIX complex, a regulator of focal adhesion disassembly. An interaction between daRhoJ and GIT1 was confirmed using yeast two-hybrid experiments, and this depended on the Spa homology domain of GIT1. GIT1, GIT2, β-PIX (also known as ARHGEF7) and RhoJ all colocalised in focal adhesions and depended on each other for their recruitment to focal adhesions. Functionally, the GIT-PIX complex regulated endothelial tube formation, with knockdown of both GIT1 and GIT2, or β-PIX phenocopying RhoJ knockdown. RhoJ-knockout mice showed reduced tumour growth and diminished tumour vessel density, identifying a role for RhoJ in mediating tumour angiogenesis. These studies give new insight into the molecular function of RhoJ in regulating cell motility and tumour vessel formation. PMID:24928894

  19. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei-Jen; Chen, Shao-Yu; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essential for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Together, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement. PMID:27216888

  20. In vivo epidermal migration requires focal adhesion targeting of ACF7

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Jiping; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Wenguang G.; Gou, Xuewen; Lee, Philbert; Liu, Han; Lyu, Wanqing; Tang, Wei -Jen; Chen, Shao -Yu; Yang, Feng; et al

    2016-05-24

    Turnover of focal adhesions allows cell retraction, which is essential for cell migration. The mammalian spectraplakin protein, ACF7 (Actin-Crosslinking Factor 7), promotes focal adhesion dynamics by targeting of microtubule plus ends towards focal adhesions. However, it remains unclear how the activity of ACF7 is regulated spatiotemporally to achieve focal adhesion-specific guidance of microtubule. To explore the potential mechanisms, we resolve the crystal structure of ACF7's NT (amino-terminal) domain, which mediates F-actin interactions. Structural analysis leads to identification of a key tyrosine residue at the calponin homology (CH) domain of ACF7, whose phosphorylation by Src/FAK (focal adhesion kinase) complex is essentialmore » for F-actin binding of ACF7. Using skin epidermis as a model system, we further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of ACF7 plays an indispensable role in focal adhesion dynamics and epidermal migration in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our findings provide critical insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement.« less

  1. Assembly and mechanosensory function of focal adhesions: experiments and models.

    PubMed

    Bershadsky, Alexander D; Ballestrem, Christoph; Carramusa, Letizia; Zilberman, Yuliya; Gilquin, Benoit; Khochbin, Saadi; Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Shemesh, Tom; Kozlov, Michael M

    2006-04-01

    Initial integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions (focal complexes) appear underneath the lamellipodia, in the regions of the "fast" centripetal flow driven by actin polymerization. Once formed, these adhesions convert the flow behind them into a "slow", myosin II-driven mode. Some focal complexes then turn into elongated focal adhesions (FAs) associated with contractile actomyosin bundles (stress fibers). Myosin II inhibition does not suppress formation of focal complexes but blocks their conversion into mature FAs and further FA growth. Application of external pulling force promotes FA growth even under conditions when myosin II activity is blocked. Thus, individual FAs behave as mechanosensors responding to the application of force by directional assembly. We proposed a thermodynamic model for the mechanosensitivity of FAs, taking into account that an elastic molecular aggregate subject to pulling forces tends to grow in the direction of force application by incorporating additional subunits. This simple model can explain a variety of processes typical of FA behavior. Assembly of FAs is triggered by the small G-protein Rho via activation of two major targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and the formin homology protein, Dia1. ROCK controls creation of myosin II-driven forces, while Dia1 is involved in the response of FAs to these forces. Expression of the active form of Dia1, allows the external force-induced assembly of mature FAs, even in conditions when Rho is inhibited. Conversely, downregulation of Dia1 by siRNA prevents FA maturation even if Rho is activated. Dia1 and other formins cap barbed (fast growing) ends of actin filaments, allowing insertion of the new actin monomers. We suggested a novel mechanism of such "leaky" capping based on an assumption of elasticity of the formin/barbed end complex. Our model predicts that formin-mediated actin polymerization should be greatly enhanced by application of external pulling force. Thus, the formin-actin complex

  2. A focal adhesion protein-based mechanochemical checkpoint regulates cleft progression during branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daley, William P.; Kohn, Joshua M.; Larsen, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Cleft formation is the initial step of branching morphogenesis in many organs. We previously demonstrated that ROCK 1 regulates a non-muscle myosin II-dependent mechanochemical checkpoint to transition initiated clefts to progressing clefts in developing submandibular salivary glands. Here, we report that ROCK-mediated integrin activation and subsequent formation of focal adhesion complexes comprise this mechanochemical checkpoint. Inhibition of ROCK1 and non-muscle myosin II activity decreased integrin β1 activation in the cleft region and interfered with localization and activation of focal adhesion complex proteins, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK activity also prevented cleft progression, by disrupting recruitment of the focal adhesion proteins talin and vinculin and subsequent fibronectin assembly in the cleft region while decreasing ERK1/2 activation. These results demonstrate that inside-out integrin signaling leading to a localized recruitment of active FAK-containing focal adhesion protein complexes generates a mechanochemical checkpoint that facilitates progression of branching morphogenesis. PMID:22016182

  3. Tuning the material-cytoskeleton crosstalk via nanoconfinement of focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Natale, Carlo F; Ventre, Maurizio; Netti, Paolo A

    2014-03-01

    Material features proved to exert a potent influence on cell behaviour in terms of adhesion, migration and differentiation. In particular, biophysical and biochemical signals on material surfaces are able to affect focal adhesion distribution and cytoskeletal assemblies, which are known to regulate signalling pathways that ultimately influence cell fate and functions. However, a general, unifying model that correlates cytoskeletal-generated forces with genetic events has yet to be developed. Therefore, it is crucial to gain a better insight into the material-cytoskeleton crosstalk in order to design and fabricate biomaterials able to govern cell fate more accurately. In this work, we demonstrate that confining focal adhesion distribution and growth dramatically alters the cytoskeleton's structures and dynamics, which in turn dictate cellular and nuclear shape and polarization. MC3T3 preosteoblasts were cultivated on nanograted polydimethylsiloxane substrates and a thorough quantification - in static and dynamic modes - of the morphological and structural features of focal adhesions and cytoskeleton was performed. Nanoengineered surfaces provided well-defined zones for focal adhesions to form and grow. Unique cytoskeletal structures spontaneously assembled when focal adhesions were confined and, in fact, they proved to be very effective in deforming the nuclei. The results here presented provide elements to engineer surfaces apt to guide and control cell behaviour through the material-cytoskeleton-nucleus axis. PMID:24388800

  4. Retrograde Fluxes of Focal Adhesion Proteins in Response to Cell Migration and Mechanical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei-hui

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that mechanical signals mediated by the extracellular matrix play an essential role in various physiological and pathological processes; yet, how cells respond to mechanical stimuli remains elusive. Using live cell fluorescence imaging, we found that actin filaments, in association with a number of focal adhesion proteins, including zyxin and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, undergo retrograde fluxes at focal adhesions in the lamella region. This flux is inversely related to cell migration, such that it is amplified in fibroblasts immobilized on micropatterned islands. In addition, the flux is regulated by mechanical signals, including stretching forces applied to flexible substrates and substrate stiffness. Conditions favoring the flux share the common feature of causing large retrograde displacements of the interior actin cytoskeleton relative to the substrate anchorage site, which may function as a switch translating mechanical input into chemical signals, such as tyrosine phosphorylation. In turn, the stimulation of actin flux at focal adhesions may function as part of a feedback mechanism, regulating structural assembly and force production in relation to cell migration and mechanical load. The retrograde transport of associated focal adhesion proteins may play additional roles in delivering signals from focal adhesions to the interior of the cell. PMID:17804814

  5. Integrin upregulation and localization to focal adhesion sites in pregnant human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Burkin, Heather R; Rice, Monica; Sarathy, Apurva; Thompson, Sara; Singer, Cherie A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2013-07-01

    Focal adhesions are integrin-rich microdomains that structurally link the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and transmit mechanical signals. In the pregnant uterus, increases in integrin expression and activation are thought to be critical for the formation of the mechanical syncytium required for labor. The aim of this study was to determine which integrins are upregulated and localized to focal adhesions in pregnant human myometrium. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy to determine the expression levels and colocalization with focal adhesion proteins. We observed increases in several integrin transcripts in pregnant myometrium. At the protein level, integrins such as α5-integrin (ITGA5), ITGA7, ITGAV, and ITGB3 were significantly increased during pregnancy. The integrins ITGA3, ITGA5, ITGA7, and ITGB1 colocalized with focal adhesion proteins in term human myometrium. These data suggest that integrins α3β1, α5β1, and α7β1 are the most likely candidates to transmit mechanical signals from the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions in pregnant human myometrium. PMID:23298868

  6. Theory of the mechanical response of focal adhesions to shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biton, Y. Y.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-05-01

    The response of cells to shear flow is primarily determined by the asymmetry of the external forces and moments that are sensed by each member of a focal adhesion pair connected by a contractile stress fiber. In the theory presented here, we suggest a physical model in which each member of such a pair of focal adhesions is treated as an elastic body subject to both a myosin-activated contractile force and the shear stress induced by the external flow. The elastic response of a focal adhesion complex is much faster than the active cellular processes that determine the size of the associated focal adhesions and the direction of the complex relative to the imposed flow. Therefore, the complex attains its mechanical equilibrium configuration which may change because of the cellular activity. Our theory is based on the experimental observation that focal adhesions modulate their cross-sectional area in order to attain an optimal shear. Using this assumption, our elastic model shows that such a complex can passively change its orientation to align parallel to the direction of the flow.

  7. Functional Characterization of KIN-32, the Caenorhabditis elegans Homolog of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erin J.; Fontanez, Kristina Marie; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified the single Caenorhabditis elegans focal adhesion kinase (FAK) homolog KIN-32, which has the signature FAK structure including an N-terminal Four.1-Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (FERM) domain followed by a tyrosine kinase domain and a C-terminal domain with weak homology to the focal adhesion targeting domain. The functional requirements for KIN-32 were examined using RNA interference depletion experiments and analysis of a deletion allele, kin-32(ok166), in which a large segment of the FERM domain is missing. Our results show that reduced levels of expression or absence of the FERM domain do not affect viability, fertility, or anatomy in C. elegans. Expression of an analogous FERM deletion in mouse FAK showed kinase activity in vitro and supported normal focal adhesion localization in cell culture. Thus, the FERM domain of KIN-32, and possibly KIN-32 activity in general, appears to be dispensable for normal C. elegans physiology. PMID:18297732

  8. Crystallization of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Targeting (FAT) Domain in a Primitive Orthorhombic Space Group

    SciTech Connect

    Magis,A.; Bailey, K.; Kurenova, E.; Hernandez Prada, J.; Cance, W.; Ostrov, D.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data from the targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were collected from a single crystal that diffracted to 1.99 Angstroms resolution and reduced to the primitive orthorhombic lattice. A single molecule was predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit based on the Matthews coefficient. The data were phased using molecular-replacement methods using an existing model of the FAK FAT domain. All structures of human focal adhesion kinase FAT domains solved to date have been solved in a C-centered orthorhombic space group.

  9. Comparing the mechanical influence of vinculin, focal adhesion kinase and p53 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, Anna H.; Diez, Gerold; Alonso, Jose-Luis

    2009-02-13

    Cytoskeletal reorganization is an ongoing process when cells adhere, move or invade extracellular substrates. The cellular force generation and transmission are determined by the intactness of the actomyosin-(focal adhesion complex)-integrin connection. We investigated the intracellular course of action in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the nuclear matrix protein p53 using magnetic tweezer and nanoparticle tracking techniques. Results show that the lack of these proteins decrease cellular stiffness and affect cell rheological behavior. The decrease in cellular binding strength was higher in FAK- to vinculin-deficient cells, whilst p53-deficient cells showed no effect compared to wildtype cells. The intracellular cytoskeletal activity was lowest in wildtype cells, but increased in the following order when cells lacked FAK+p53 > p53 > vinculin. In summary, cell mechanical processes are differently affected by the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and FAK than by the nuclear matrix protein, p53.

  10. Role of focal adhesion kinase in lung remodeling of endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Petroni, Ricardo Costa; Teodoro, Walcy R; Guido, Maria Carolina; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Abatepaulo, Fátima; Theobaldo, Mariana Cardillo; Biselli, Paolo Cesare; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant advances in the care of critically ill patients, acute lung injury continues to be a complex problem with high mortality. The present study was designed to characterize early lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary injury and small interfering RNA targeting focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as a possible therapeutic tool in the septic lung remodeling process. Male Wistar rats were assigned into endotoxemic group and control group. Total collagen deposition was performed 8, 16, and 24 h after LPS injection. Focal adhesion kinase expression, interstitial and vascular collagen deposition, and pulmonary mechanics were analyzed at 24 h. Intravenous injection of small interfering RNA targeting FAK was used to silence expression of the kinase in pulmonary tissue. Focal adhesion kinase, total collagen deposition, and pulmonary mechanics showed increased in LPS group. Types I, III, and V collagen showed increase in pulmonary parenchyma, but only type V increased in vessels 24 h after LPS injection. Focal adhesion kinase silencing prevented lung remodeling in pulmonary parenchyma at 24 h. In conclusion, LPS induced a precocious and important lung remodeling. There was fibrotic response in the lung characterized by increased amount in total and specific-type collagen. These data may explain the frequent clinical presentation during sepsis of reduced lung compliance, oxygen diffusion, and pulmonary hypertension. The fact that FAK silencing was protective against lung collagen deposition underscores the therapeutic potential of FAK targeting by small interfering RNA. PMID:22293597

  11. High-Resolution Quantification of Focal Adhesion Spatiotemporal Dynamics in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Klaus M.; Gomez, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are macromolecular complexes that provide a linkage between the cell and its external environment. In a motile cell, focal adhesions change size and position to govern cell migration, through the dynamic processes of assembly and disassembly. To better understand the dynamic regulation of focal adhesions, we have developed an analysis system for the automated detection, tracking, and data extraction of these structures in living cells. This analysis system was used to quantify the dynamics of fluorescently tagged Paxillin and FAK in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts followed via Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRF). High content time series included the size, shape, intensity, and position of every adhesion present in a living cell. These properties were followed over time, revealing adhesion lifetime and turnover rates, and segregation of properties into distinct zones. As a proof-of-concept, we show how a single point mutation in Paxillin at the Jun-kinase phosphorylation site Serine 178 changes FA size, distribution, and rate of assembly. This study provides a detailed, quantitative picture of FA spatiotemporal dynamics as well as a set of tools and methodologies for advancing our understanding of how focal adhesions are dynamically regulated in living cells. A full, open-source software implementation of this pipeline is provided at http://gomezlab.bme.unc.edu/tools. PMID:21779367

  12. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  13. The Regulation of Traction Force in Relation to Cell Shape and Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Rape, Andrew; Guo, Wei-hui; Wang, Yu-li

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical forces provide critical inputs for proper cellular functions. The interplay between the generation of, and response to, mechanical forces regulate such cellular processes as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. We postulate that adherent cells respond to a number of physical and topographical factors, including cell size and shape, by detecting the magnitude and/or distribution of traction forces under different conditions. To address this possibility we introduce a new simple method for precise micropatterning of hydrogels, and then apply the technique to systematically investigate the relationship between cell geometry, focal adhesions, and traction forces in cells with a series of spread areas and aspect ratios. Contrary to previous findings, we find that traction force is not determined primarily by the cell spreading area but by the distance from cell center to the perimeter. This distance in turn controls traction forces by regulating the size of focal adhesions, such that constraining the size of focal adhesions by micropatterning can override the effect of geometry. We propose that the responses of traction forces to center-periphery distance, possibly through a positive feedback mechanism that regulates focal adhesions, provide the cell with the information on its own shape and size. A similar positive feedback control may allow cells to respond to a variety of physical or topographical signals via a unified mechanism. PMID:21163521

  14. Neuropilin-2 regulates α6β1 integrin in the formation of focal adhesions and signaling.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Pursell, Bryan; Standley, Clive; Fogarty, Kevin; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2012-01-15

    The neuropilins (NRPs) contribute to the function of cancer cells in their capacity as VEGF receptors. Given that NRP2 is induced in breast cancer and correlates with aggressive disease, we examined the role of NRP2 in regulating the interaction of breast cancer cells with the ECM. Using epithelial cells from breast tumors, we defined NRP2(high) and NRP2(low) populations that differed in integrin expression and adhesion to laminin. Specifically, the NRP2(high) population adhered more avidly to laminin and expressed high levels of the α6β1 integrin than the NRP2(low) population. The NRP2(high) population formed numerous focal adhesions on laminin that were not seen in the NRP2(low) population. These results were substantiated using breast carcinoma cell lines that express NRP2 and α6β1 integrin. Depletion experiments revealed that adhesive strength on laminin but not collagen is dependent on NRP2, and that VEGF is needed for adhesion on laminin. A specific interaction between NRP2 and α6β1 integrin was detected by co-immunoprecipitation. NRP2 is necessary for focal adhesion formation on laminin and for the association of α6β1 integrin with the cytoskeleton. NRP2 also facilitates α6β1-integrin-mediated activation of FAK and Src. Unexpectedly, we discovered that NRP2 is located in focal adhesions on laminin. The mechanism by which NRP2 regulates the interaction of α6β1 integrin with laminin to form focal adhesions involves PKC activation. Together, our data reveal a new VEGF-NRP2 signaling pathway that activates the α6β1 integrin and enables it to form focal adhesions and signal. This pathway is important in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:22302985

  15. Role of focal adhesions and mechanical stresses in the formation and progression of the lamellipodium-lamellum interface [corrected].

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Tom; Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Svitkina, Tatyana M; Bershadsky, Alexander D; Kozlov, Michael M

    2009-09-01

    Actin network in the front part of a moving cell is organized into a lamellipodium and a lamellum. A distinct lamellipodium-lamellum interface is associated with focal adhesions and consists of a series of arclike segments linking neighboring focal adhesions in the front row. The interface advances by leaping onto new rows of focal adhesions maturating underneath the lamellipodium. We propose a mechanism of the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary generation, shape formation, and progression based on the elastic stresses generated in the lamellipodial actin gel by its friction against the focal adhesions. The crucial assumption of the model is that stretching stresses trigger actin gel disintegration. We compute the stress distribution throughout the actin gel and show that the gel-disintegrating stresses drive formation of a gel boundary passing through the row of focal adhesions. Our computations recover the lamellipodium-lamellum boundary shapes detected in cells and predict the mode of the boundary transition to the row of the newly maturing focal adhesions in agreement with the experimental observations. The model fully accounts for the current phenomenology of the lamellipodium-lamellum interface formation and advancing, and makes experimentally testable predictions on the dependence of these phenomena on the sizes of the focal adhesions, the character of the focal adhesion distribution on the substrate, and the velocity of the actin retrograde flow with respect to the focal adhesions. The phase diagram resulting from the model provides a background for quantitative classification of different cell types with respect to their ability to form a lamellipodium-lamellum interface. In addition, the model suggests a mechanism of nucleation of the dorsal and arclike actin bundles found in the lamellum. PMID:19720013

  16. Focal adhesion molecules as potential target of lead toxicity in NRK-52E cell line.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Roberta; Bettoni, Francesca; Leali, Daria; Morandini, Fausta; Apostoli, Pietro; Grigolato, Piergiovanni; Cesana, Bruno Mario; Aleo, Maria Francesca

    2005-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of inorganic lead (Pb(II)), an environmental pollutant having nephrotoxic action, on the focal adhesion (FA) organization of a rat kidney epithelial cell line (NRK-52E). In particular, we evaluated the effects of the metal on the recruitment of paxillin, focal adhesion kinase, vinculin and cytoskeleton proteins at the FAs complexes. We provided evidences that, in proliferating NRK-52E cell cultures, low concentrations of Pb(II) affect the cell adhesive ability and stimulate the disassembly of FAs, thus inhibiting the integrin-activated signalling. These effects appeared to be strictly associated to the Pb-induced arrest of cell cycle at G0/G1 phase also proved in this cell line. PMID:16253243

  17. Image Analysis for the Quantitative Comparison of Stress Fibers and Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Jorge-Peñas, Alvaro; Moreno-Arotzena, Oihana; Oregi, Amaia; Lasa, Marta; García-Aznar, José Manuel; De Juan-Pardo, Elena M.; Aldabe, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Actin stress fibers (SFs) detect and transmit forces to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and molecules in this pathway determine cellular behavior. Here, we designed two different computational tools to quantify actin SFs and the distribution of actin cytoskeletal proteins within a normalized cellular morphology. Moreover, a systematic cell response comparison between the control cells and those with impaired actin cytoskeleton polymerization was performed to demonstrate the reliability of the tools. Indeed, a variety of proteins that were present within the string beginning at the focal adhesions (vinculin) up to the actin SFs contraction (non-muscle myosin II (NMMII)) were analyzed. Finally, the software used allows for the quantification of the SFs based on the relative positions of FAs. Therefore, it provides a better insight into the cell mechanics and broadens the knowledge of the nature of SFs. PMID:25269086

  18. Interaction of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli protein, translocated intimin receptor (Tir), with focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Zurawski, D V; Chowrashi, P; Ayoob, J C; Huang, L; Mittal, B; Sanger, J M; Sanger, J W

    2000-12-01

    When enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) attach and infect host cells, they induce a cytoskeletal rearrangement and the formation of cytoplasmic columns of actin filaments called pedestals. The attached EPEC and pedestals move over the surface of the host cell in an actin-dependent reaction [Sanger et al., 1996: Cell Motil Cytoskeleton 34:279-287]. The discovery that EPEC inserts the protein, translocated intimin receptor (Tir), into the membrane of host cells, where it binds the EPEC outer membrane protein, intimin [Kenny et al., 1997: Cell 91:511-520], suggests Tir serves two functions: tethering the bacteria to the host cell and providing a direct connection to the host's cytoskeleton. The sequence of Tir predicts a protein of 56.8 kD with three domains separated by two predicted trans-membrane spanning regions. A GST-fusion protein of the N-terminal 233 amino acids of Tir (Tir1) binds to alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin from cell extracts. GST-Tir1 also coprecipitates purified forms of alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin while GST alone does not bind these three focal adhesion proteins. Biotinylated probes of these three proteins also bound Tir1 cleaved from GST. Similar associations of alpha-actinin, talin, and vinculin were also detected with the C-terminus of Tir, i.e., Tir3, the last 217 amino acids. Antibody staining of EPEC-infected cultured cells reveals the presence of focal adhesion proteins beneath the attached bacteria. Our experiments support a model in which the cytoplasmic domains of Tir recruit a number of focal adhesion proteins that can bind actin filaments to form pedestals. Since pedestals also contain villin, tropomyosin and myosin II [Sanger et al., 1996: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 34:279-287], the pedestals appear to be a novel structure sharing properties of both focal adhesions and microvilli. PMID:11093251

  19. Proximity biotinylation provides insight into the molecular composition of focal adhesions at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing-Ming; Tay, Felicia Pei-Ling; Swa, Hannah Lee-Foon; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Leung, Thomas; Burke, Brian; Manser, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Focal adhesions are protein complexes that link metazoan cells to the extracellular matrix through the integrin family of transmembrane proteins. Integrins recruit many proteins to these complexes, referred to as the "adhesome." We used proximity-dependent biotinylation (BioID) in U2OS osteosarcoma cells to label proteins within 15 to 25 nm of paxillin, a cytoplasmic focal adhesion protein, and kindlin-2, which directly binds β integrins. Using mass spectrometry analysis of the biotinylated proteins, we identified 27 known adhesome proteins and 8 previously unknown components close to paxillin. However, only seven of these proteins interacted directly with paxillin, one of which was the adaptor protein Kank2. The proteins in proximity to β integrin included 15 of the adhesion proteins identified in the paxillin BioID data set. BioID also correctly established kindlin-2 as a cell-cell junction protein. By focusing on this smaller data set, new partners for kindlin-2 were found, namely, the endocytosis-promoting proteins liprin β1 and EFR3A, but, contrary to previous reports, not the filamin-binding protein migfilin. A model adhesome based on both data sets suggests that focal adhesions contain fewer components than previously suspected and that paxillin lies away from the plasma membrane. These data not only illustrate the power of using BioID and stable isotope-labeled mass spectrometry to define macromolecular complexes but also enable the correct identification of therapeutic targets within the adhesome. PMID:27303058

  20. Talin-KANK1 interaction controls the recruitment of cortical microtubule stabilizing complexes to focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet, Benjamin P; Gough, Rosemarie E; Ammon, York-Christoph; van de Willige, Dieudonnée; Post, Harm; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Heck, Albert JR; Goult, Benjamin T; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cross-talk between dynamic microtubules and integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix plays a crucial role in cell polarity and migration. Microtubules regulate the turnover of adhesion sites, and, in turn, focal adhesions promote the cortical microtubule capture and stabilization in their vicinity, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that cortical microtubule stabilization sites containing CLASPs, KIF21A, LL5β and liprins are recruited to focal adhesions by the adaptor protein KANK1, which directly interacts with the major adhesion component, talin. Structural studies showed that the conserved KN domain in KANK1 binds to the talin rod domain R7. Perturbation of this interaction, including a single point mutation in talin, which disrupts KANK1 binding but not the talin function in adhesion, abrogates the association of microtubule-stabilizing complexes with focal adhesions. We propose that the talin-KANK1 interaction links the two macromolecular assemblies that control cortical attachment of actin fibers and microtubules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18124.001 PMID:27410476

  1. Arginine stimulates intestinal cell migration through a focal adhesion kinase dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, J M; Chen, W; Gookin, J; Wu, G Y; Fu, Q; Blikslager, A T; Rippe, R A; Argenzio, R A; Cance, W G; Weaver, E M; Romer, L H

    2004-01-01

    Background: l-Arginine is a nutritional supplement that may be useful for promoting intestinal repair. Arginine is metabolised by the oxidative deiminase pathway to form nitric oxide (NO) and by the arginase pathway to yield ornithine and polyamines. Aims: To determine if arginine stimulates restitution via activation of NO synthesis and/or polyamine synthesis. Methods: We determined the effects of arginine on cultured intestinal cell migration, NO production, polyamine levels, and activation of focal adhesion kinase, a key mediator of cell migration. Results: Arginine increased the rate of cell migration in a dose dependent biphasic manner, and was additive with bovine serum concentrate (BSC). Arginine and an NO donor activated focal adhesion kinase (a tyrosine kinase which localises to cell matrix contacts and mediates β1 integrin signalling) after wounding. Arginine stimulated cell migration was dependent on focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signalling, as demonstrated using adenovirus mediated transfection with a kinase negative mutant of FAK. Arginine stimulated migration was dependent on NO production and was blocked by NO synthase inhibitors. Arginine dependent migration required synthesis of polyamines but elevating extracellular arginine concentration above 0.4 mM did not enhance cellular polyamine levels. Conclusions: These results showed that l-arginine stimulates cell migration through NO and FAK dependent pathways and that combination therapy with arginine and BSC may enhance intestinal restitution via separate and convergent pathways. PMID:15016745

  2. Mechanotransduction through fibronectin-integrin focal adhesion in microvascular smooth muscle cells: is calcium essential?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaohui; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that increased transmural pressure exerts force on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and triggers Ca2+ signaling as an initiating event responsible for the arteriolar myogenic response. However, the mechanisms linking the pressure increase to Ca2+ signaling are unclear. We have shown previously using atomic force microscopy (AFM) that mechanical force induces a VSMC contractile response when applied to single fibronectin (FN; Sun Z, Martinez-Lemus LA, Hill MA, Meininger GA. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 295; C268–C278, 2008) focal adhesion sites. This current study seeks to determine whether application of force to single focal adhesions can cause a change in VSMC Ca2+. Experiments were performed in low passage (p3∼10) as well as in freshly isolated skeletal muscle arteriole VSMCs. AFM-attached microbeads (5 μm) were coated with FN or collagen type I (CN-I) or type IV (CN-IV) and placed on a VSMC for 20 min, resulting in formation of a focal adhesion between the cell and the microbead. In low passage VSMCs, mechanically pulling on the FN-coated beads (800∼3000 pN) did not induce a Ca2+ increase but did cause a contractile response. In freshly isolated VSMCs, application of an FN or CN-I-coated bead onto the cell surface induced global Ca2+ increases. However, these Ca2+ increases were not correlated with the application of AFM pulling force to the bead or with the VSMC contractile responses to FN-coupled pulling. Chelating cytosolic Ca2+ using BAPTA loading had no negative effect on the focal adhesion-related contractile response in both freshly isolated and low passage VSMCs, while the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 abolished the micromyogenic response in both cases. These observations suggest that, in freshly isolated and cultured VSMCs, application of mechanical force to a focal adhesion does not invoke an acute global Ca2+ increase. On the other hand, our data support a role for Rho-linked signaling mechanism involved in mechanotransduction

  3. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility. PMID:26110647

  4. Structural Basis for Paxillin Binding and Focal Adhesion Targeting of β-Parvin*

    PubMed Central

    Stiegler, Amy L.; Draheim, Kyle M.; Li, Xiaofeng; Chayen, Naomi E.; Calderwood, David A.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2012-01-01

    β-Parvin is a cytoplasmic adaptor protein that localizes to focal adhesions where it interacts with integrin-linked kinase and is involved in linking integrin receptors to the cytoskeleton. It has been reported that despite high sequence similarity to α-parvin, β-parvin does not bind paxillin, suggesting distinct interactions and cellular functions for these two closely related parvins. Here, we reveal that β-parvin binds directly and specifically to leucine-aspartic acid repeat (LD) motifs in paxillin via its C-terminal calponin homology (CH2) domain. We present the co-crystal structure of β-parvin CH2 domain in complex with paxillin LD1 motif to 2.9 Å resolution and find that the interaction is similar to that previously observed between α-parvin and paxillin LD1. We also present crystal structures of unbound β-parvin CH2 domain at 2.1 Å and 2.0 Å resolution that show significant conformational flexibility in the N-terminal α-helix, suggesting an induced fit upon paxillin binding. We find that β-parvin has specificity for the LD1, LD2, and LD4 motifs of paxillin, with KD values determined to 27, 42, and 73 μm, respectively, by surface plasmon resonance. Furthermore, we show that proper localization of β-parvin to focal adhesions requires both the paxillin and integrin-linked kinase binding sites and that paxillin is important for early targeting of β-parvin. These studies provide the first molecular details of β-parvin binding to paxillin and help define the requirements for β-parvin localization to focal adhesions. PMID:22869380

  5. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-06-15

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca(2+)-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca(2+)-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  6. Inhibition of smooth muscle force generation by focal adhesion kinase inhibitors in the hyperplastic human prostate.

    PubMed

    Kunit, Thomas; Gratzke, Christian; Schreiber, Andrea; Strittmatter, Frank; Waidelich, Raphaela; Rutz, Beata; Loidl, Wolfgang; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Stief, Christian G; Hennenberg, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Smooth muscle contraction may be critical for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia and requires stable anchorage of the cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. These connections are regulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Here, we addressed the involvement of FAK in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction in hyperplastic human prostate tissues. Prostate tissues were obtained from radical prostatectomy. Expression of FAK and focal adhesion proteins was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical stainings. Effects of the FAK inhibitors PF-573228 and Y-11 on contraction of prostate strips were examined in the organ bath. Expression of FAK and focal adhesion proteins (integrin-5α, paxilin, and c-Src) was detected by Western blot analysis in prostate samples. By double immunofluorescence staining with calponin and pan-cytokeratin, expression of FAK was observed in stromal and epithelial cells. Immunoreactivity for FAK colocalized with integrin-5α, paxilin, talin, and c-Src. Stimulation of prostate tissues with the α1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine increased the phosphorylation state of FAK at Tyr³⁹⁷ and Tyr⁹²⁵ with different kinetics, which was blocked by the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist tamsulosin. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine induced concentration-dependent contractions of prostate strips. Both FAK inhibitors PF-573228 and Y-11 significantly inhibited norepinephrine- and phenylephrine-induced contractions. Finally, PF-573228 and Y-11 inhibited contractions induced by electric field stimulation, which was significant at the highest frequency. In conclusion, α1-adrenergic smooth muscle contraction or its regulation involves FAK in the human prostate. Consequently, FAK may be involved in the pathophysiology of LUTS and in current or future LUTS therapies. PMID:25056351

  7. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca2+-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca2+-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  8. Autocrine netrin function inhibits glioma cell motility and promotes focal adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Jarjour, Andrew A; Durko, Margaret; Luk, Tamarah L; Marçal, Nathalie; Shekarabi, Masoud; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    Deregulation of mechanisms that control cell motility plays a key role in tumor progression by promoting tumor cell dissemination. Secreted netrins and their receptors, Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC), neogenin, and the UNC5 homologues, regulate cell and axon migration, cell adhesion, and tissue morphogenesis. Netrin and netrin receptor expression have previously been shown to be disrupted in invasive tumors, including glioblastoma. We determined that the human glioblastoma cell lines U87, U343, and U373 all express neogenin, UNC5 homologues, and netrin-1 or netrin-3, but only U87 cells express DCC. Using transfilter migration assays, we demonstrate DCC-dependent chemoattractant migration of U87 cells up a gradient of netrin-1. In contrast, U343 and U373 cells, which do not express DCC, were neither attracted nor repelled. Ectopic expression of DCC by U343 and U373 cells resulted in these cells becoming competent to respond to a gradient of netrin-1 as a chemoattractant, and also slowed their rate of spontaneous migration. Here, in addition to netrins' well-characterized chemotropic activity, we demonstrate an autocrine function for netrin-1 and netrin-3 in U87 and U373 cells that slows migration. We provide evidence that netrins promote the maturation of focal complexes, structures associated with cell movement, into focal adhesions. Consistent with this, netrin, DCC, and UNC5 homologues were associated with focal adhesions, but not focal complexes. Disrupting netrin or DCC function did not alter cell proliferation or survival. Our findings provide evidence that DCC can slow cell migration, and that neogenin and UNC5 homologues are not sufficient to substitute for DCC function in these cells. Furthermore, we identify a role for netrins as autocrine inhibitors of cell motility that promote focal adhesion formation. These findings suggest that disruption of netrin signalling may disable a mechanism that normally restrains inappropriate cell migration. PMID

  9. Disrupting the scaffold to improve focal adhesion kinase-targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cance, William G; Kurenova, Elena; Marlowe, Timothy; Golubovskaya, Vita

    2013-03-26

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is emerging as a promising cancer target because it is highly expressed at both the transcriptional and translational level in cancer and is involved in many aspects of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Existing FAK-based therapeutics focus on inhibiting the kinase's catalytic function and not the large scaffold it creates that includes many oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases and tumor suppressor proteins. Targeting the FAK scaffold is a feasible and promising approach for developing highly specific therapeutics that disrupt FAK signaling pathways in cancer. PMID:23532331

  10. Signal transduction in endothelial cells by the angiogenesis inhibitor histidine-rich glycoprotein targets focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chunsik; Dixelius, Johan; Thulin, Asa; Kawamura, Harukiyo; Claesson-Welsh, Lena; Olsson, Anna-Karin . E-mail: Anna-Karin.Olsson@genpat.uu.se

    2006-08-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) is an abundant heparin-binding plasma protein. We have shown that a fragment released from the central histidine/proline-rich (His/Pro-rich) domain of HRGP blocks endothelial cell migration in vitro and vascularization and growth of murine fibrosarcoma in vivo. The minimal active HRGP domain exerting the anti-angiogenic effect was recently narrowed down to a 35 amino acid peptide, HRGP330, derived from the His/Pro-rich domain of HRGP. By use of a signal transduction antibody array representing 400 different signal transduction molecules, we now show that HRGP and the synthetic peptide HRGP330 specifically induce tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and its downstream substrate paxillin in endothelial cells. HRGP/HRGP330 treatment of endothelial cells induced disruption of actin stress fibers, a process reversed by treatment of cells with the FAK inhibitor geldanamycin. In addition, VEGF-mediated endothelial cell tubular morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen matrix was inhibited by HRGP and HRGP330. In contrast, VEGF-induced proliferation was not affected by HRGP or HRGP330, demonstrating the central role of cell migration during tube formation. In conclusion, our data show that HRGP targets focal adhesions in endothelial cells, thereby disrupting the cytoskeletal organization and the ability of endothelial cells to assemble into vessel structures.

  11. Regulation of brain tumor dispersal by NKCC1 through a novel role in focal adhesion regulation.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Muvdi, Tomas; Schiapparelli, Paula; ap Rhys, Colette; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Smith, Christopher; Kim, Deok-Ho; Kone, Lyonell; Farber, Harrison; Lee, Danielle Y; An, Steven S; Levchenko, Andre; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is a highly invasive and lethal brain tumor due to its universal recurrence. Although it has been suggested that the electroneutral Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) can play a role in glioma cell migration, the precise mechanism by which this ion transporter contributes to GB aggressiveness remains poorly understood. Here, we focused on the role of NKCC1 in the invasion of human primary glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. NKCC1 expression levels were significantly higher in GB and anaplastic astrocytoma tissues than in grade II glioma and normal cortex. Pharmacological inhibition and shRNA-mediated knockdown of NKCC1 expression led to decreased cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, knockdown of NKCC1 in glioma cells resulted in the formation of significantly larger focal adhesions and cell traction forces that were approximately 40% lower than control cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), which promotes migration of glioma cells, increased the phosphorylation of NKCC1 through a PI3K-dependant mechanism. This finding is potentially related to WNK kinases. Taken together, our findings suggest that NKCC1 modulates migration of glioma cells by two distinct mechanisms: (1) through the regulation of focal adhesion dynamics and cell contractility and (2) through regulation of cell volume through ion transport. Due to the ubiquitous expression of NKCC1 in mammalian tissues, its regulation by WNK kinases may serve as new therapeutic targets for GB aggressiveness and can be exploited by other highly invasive neoplasms. PMID:22570591

  12. Focal adhesions control cleavage furrow shape and spindle tilt during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Nilay; Fenix, Aidan M.; Rathbun, Lindsay; Millis, Bryan A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Hehnly, Heidi; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    The geometry of the cleavage furrow during mitosis is often asymmetric in vivo and plays a critical role in stem cell differentiation and the relative positioning of daughter cells during development. Early observations of adhesive cell lines revealed asymmetry in the shape of the cleavage furrow, where the bottom (i.e., substrate attached side) of the cleavage furrow ingressed less than the top (i.e., unattached side). This data suggested substrate attachment could be regulating furrow ingression. Here we report a population of mitotic focal adhesions (FAs) controls the symmetry of the cleavage furrow. In single HeLa cells, stronger adhesion to the substrate directed less ingression from the bottom of the cell through a pathway including paxillin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vinculin. Cell-cell contacts also direct ingression of the cleavage furrow in coordination with FAs in epithelial cells—MDCK—within monolayers and polarized cysts. In addition, mitotic FAs established 3D orientation of the mitotic spindle and the relative positioning of mother and daughter centrosomes. Therefore, our data reveals mitotic FAs as a key link between mitotic cell shape and spindle orientation, and may have important implications in our understanding stem cell homeostasis and tumorigenesis. PMID:27432211

  13. Crystal Structures of Free and Ligand-Bound Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Pyk2

    SciTech Connect

    Lulo, J.; Yuzawa, S; Schlessinger, J

    2009-01-01

    Focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domains target the non-receptor tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2 to cellular focal adhesion areas, where the signaling molecule paxillin is also located. Here, we report the crystal structures of the Pyk2 FAT domain alone or in complex with paxillin LD4 peptides. The overall structure of Pyk2-FAT is an antiparallel four-helix bundle with an up-down, up-down, right-handed topology. In the LD4-bound FAT complex, two paxillin LD4 peptides interact with two opposite sides of Pyk2-FAT, at the surfaces of the a1a4 and a2a3 helices of each FAT molecule. We also demonstrate that, while paxillin is phosphorylated by Pyk2, complex formation between Pyk2 and paxillin does not depend on Pyk2 tyrosine kinase activity. These experiments reveal the structural basis underlying the selectivity of paxillin LD4 binding to the Pyk2 FAT domain and provide insights about the molecular details which influence the different behavior of these two closely-related kinases.

  14. Focal adhesion kinase regulation in stem cell alignment and spreading on nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Andalib, Mohammad Nahid; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Dzenis, Yuris; Lim, Jung Yul

    2016-05-13

    While electrospun nanofibers have demonstrated the potential for novel tissue engineering scaffolds, very little is known about the molecular mechanism of how cells sense and adapt to nanofibers. Here, we revealed the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), one of the key molecular sensors in the focal adhesion complex, in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) shaping on nanofibers. We produced uniaxially aligned and randomly distributed nanofibers from poly(l-lactic acid) to have the same diameters (about 130 nm) and evaluated MSC behavior on these nanofibers comparing with that on flat PLLA control. C3H10T1/2 murine MSCs exhibited upregulations in FAK expression and phosphorylation (pY397) on nanofibrous cultures as assessed by immunoblotting, and this trend was even greater on aligned nanofibers. MSCs showed significantly elongated and well-spread morphologies on aligned and random nanofibers, respectively. In the presence of FAK silencing via small hairpin RNA (shRNA), cell elongation length in the aligned nanofiber direction (cell major axis length) was significantly decreased, while cells still showed preferred orientation along the aligned nanofibers. On random nanofibers, MSCs with FAK-shRNA showed impaired cell spreading resulting in smaller cell area and higher circularity. Our study provides new data on how MSCs shape their morphologies on aligned and random nanofibrous cultures potentially via FAK-mediated mechanism. PMID:27040763

  15. Cell locomotion and focal adhesions are regulated by substrate flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Pelham, Robert J.; Wang, Yu-li

    1997-01-01

    Responses of cells to mechanical properties of the adhesion substrate were examined by culturing normal rat kidney epithelial and 3T3 fibroblastic cells on a collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrate that allows the flexibility to be varied while maintaining a constant chemical environment. Compared with cells on rigid substrates, those on flexible substrates showed reduced spreading and increased rates of motility or lamellipodial activity. Microinjection of fluorescent vinculin indicated that focal adhesions on flexible substrates were irregularly shaped and highly dynamic whereas those on firm substrates had a normal morphology and were much more stable. Cells on flexible substrates also contained a reduced amount of phosphotyrosine at adhesion sites. Treatment of these cells with phenylarsine oxide, a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, induced the formation of normal, stable focal adhesions similar to those on firm substrates. Conversely, treatment of cells on firm substrates with myosin inhibitors 2,3-butanedione monoxime or KT5926 caused the reduction of both vinculin and phosphotyrosine at adhesion sites. These results demonstrate the ability of cells to survey the mechanical properties of their surrounding environment and suggest the possible involvement of both protein tyrosine phosphorylation and myosin-generated cortical forces in this process. Such response to physical parameters likely represents an important mechanism of cellular interaction with the surrounding environment within a complex organism. PMID:9391082

  16. Micrometer scale spacings between fibronectin nanodots regulate cell morphology and focal adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horzum, Utku; Ozdil, Berrin; Pesen-Okvur, Devrim

    2014-04-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is an important process for both health and disease states. Surface protein patterns that are topographically flat, and do not introduce other chemical, topographical or rigidity related functionality and, more importantly, that mimic the organization of the in vivo extracellular matrix are desired. Previous work showed that vinculin and cytoskeletal organization are modulated by size and shape of surface nanopatterns. However, quantitative analysis on cell morphology and focal adhesions as a function of micrometer scale spacings of FN nanopatterns was absent. Here, electron beam lithography was used to pattern fibronectin nanodots with micrometer scale spacings on a K-casein background on indium tin oxide coated glass which, unlike silicon, is transparent and thus suitable for many light microscopy techniques. Exposure times were significantly reduced using the line exposure mode with micrometer scale step sizes. Micrometer scale spacings of 2, 4 and 8 μm between fibronectin nanodots proved to modulate cell adhesion through modification of cell area, focal adhesion number, size and circularity. Overall, cell behavior was shown to shift at the apparent threshold of 4 μm spacing. The findings presented here offer exciting new opportunities for cell biology research.

  17. Novel Phosphotidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Binding Sites on Focal Adhesion Kinase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Mertz, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a protein tyrosine kinase that is ubiquitously expressed, recruited to focal adhesions, and engages in a variety of cellular signaling pathways. Diverse cellular responses, such as cell migration, proliferation, and survival, are regulated by FAK. Prior to activation, FAK adopts an autoinhibited conformation in which the FERM domain binds the kinase domain, blocking access to the activation loop and substrate binding site. Activation of FAK occurs through conformational change, and acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) are known to facilitate this process. PIP2 binding alters the autoinhibited conformation of the FERM and kinase domains and subsequently exposes the activation loop to phosphorylation. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of PIP2 binding and its role in FAK activation remain unclear. In this study, we conducted coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the binding of FAK to PIP2. Our simulations identified novel areas of basic residues in the kinase domain of FAK that potentially undergo transient binding to PIP2 through electrostatic attractions. Our investigation provides a molecular picture of PIP2-initiated FAK activation and introduces promising new pathways for future studies of FAK regulation. PMID:26186725

  18. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  19. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  20. Specific induction of pp125 focal adhesion kinase in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watermann, D O; Gabriel, B; Jäger, M; Orlowska-Volk, M; Hasenburg, A; zur Hausen, A; Gitsch, G; Stickeler, E

    2005-01-01

    The pp125 focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is involved in integrin-mediated cell signalling and overexpressed in a variety of solid tumours. Focal adhesion kinase expression has been correlated to invasion and metastasis, but the data on breast cancer are inconclusive. We analysed FAK mRNA, protein levels and expression patterns in primary breast cancer and normal breast tissue. FAK expression on the functional protein level and mRNA was determined in 55 matched pairs of breast cancer and corresponding normal tissue by Western blot, immunohistochemistry and RT–PCR. Using a score ranging from 0 to +5 for Western blots, we determined in normal breast tissue a score of 1.51±0.84 (mean±standard deviation), which was strongly induced to 2.91 (±1.22) in breast cancers (P<0.001). Overall, 45 out of 55 tissue pairs (81.8%) showed this upregulation of FAK protein in tumours in comparison to normal tissue. Immunohistochemistry confirmed these findings with a significant higher score for tumours vs physiological tissue (1.0±0.63 vs 2.27±0.91; P=0.001). Interestingly, no overall significant difference in the mRNA levels (P=0.359) was observed. In conclusion, expression levels of the FAK protein are specifically upregulated in breast cancer in comparison to matched normal breast tissue supporting its pivotal role in neoplastic signal transduction and representing a potential marker for malignant transformation. PMID:16136050

  1. Hormonal regulation of focal adhesions in bovine adrenocortical cells: induction of paxillin dephosphorylation by adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Vilgrain, I; Chinn, A; Gaillard, I; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1998-01-01

    A study of bovine adrenocortical cell shape on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge showed that the cells round up and develop arborized processes. This effect was found to be (1) specific for ACTH because angiotensin II and basic fibroblast growth factor have no effect; (2) mediated by a cAMP-dependent pathway because forskolin reproduces the effect of the hormone; (3) inhibited by sodium orthovanadate, a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, but unchanged by okadaic acid, a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor; and (4) correlated with a complete loss of focal adhesions. Biochemical studies of the focal-adhesion-associated proteins showed that pp125fak, vinculin (110 kDa) and paxillin (70 kDa) were detected in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction from adrenocortical cells. During cell adhesion on fibronectin as substratum, two major phosphotyrosine-containing proteins of molecular masses 125 and 68 kDa were immunodetected in the same fraction. A dramatic decrease in the extent of tyrosine phosphorylation of these proteins was observed within 60 min after treatment with ACTH. No change in pp125fak tyrosine phosphorylation nor in Src activity was detected. In contrast, paxillin was found to be tyrosine-dephosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in ACTH-treated cells. Sodium orthovanadate completely prevented the effect of ACTH. These observations suggest a possible role for phosphotyrosine phosphatases in hormone-dependent cellular regulatory processes. PMID:9601084

  2. The Focal Adhesion-Localized CdGAP Regulates Matrix Rigidity Sensing and Durotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wormer, Duncan B.; Davis, Kevin A.; Henderson, James H.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Motile cells are capable of sensing the stiffness of the surrounding extracellular matrix through integrin-mediated focal adhesions and migrate towards regions of higher rigidity in a process known as durotaxis. Durotaxis plays an important role in normal development and disease progression, including tumor invasion and metastasis. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying focal adhesion-mediated rigidity sensing and durotaxis are poorly understood. Utilizing matrix-coated polydimethylsiloxane gels to manipulate substrate compliance, we show that cdGAP, an adhesion-localized Rac1 and Cdc42 specific GTPase activating protein, is necessary for U2OS osteosarcoma cells to coordinate cell shape changes and migration as a function of extracellular matrix stiffness. CdGAP regulated rigidity-dependent motility by controlling membrane protrusion and adhesion dynamics, as well as by modulating Rac1 activity. CdGAP was also found to be necessary for U2OS cell durotaxis. Taken together, these data identify cdGAP as an important component of an integrin-mediated signaling pathway that senses and responds to mechanical cues in the extracellular matrix in order to coordinate directed cell motility. PMID:24632816

  3. Structured illumination microscopy reveals focal adhesions are composed of linear subunits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shiqiong; Tee, Yee-Han; Kabla, Alexandre; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Bershadsky, Alexander; Hersen, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    The ability to mechanically interact with the extracellular matrix is a fundamental feature of adherent eukaryotic cells. Cell-matrix adhesion in many cell types is mediated by protein complexes called focal adhesions (FAs). Recent progress in super resolution microscopy revealed FAs possess an internal organization, yet such methods do not enable observation of the formation and dynamics of their internal structure in living cells. Here, we combine structured illumination microscopy (SIM) with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to show that the proteins inside FA patches are distributed along elongated subunits, typically 300 ± 100 nm wide, separated by 400 ± 100 nm, and individually connected to actin cables. We further show that the formation and dynamics of these linear subunits are intimately linked to radial actin fiber formation and actomyosin contractility. We found FA growth to be the result of nucleation of new linear subunits and their coordinated elongation. Taken together, this study reveals that the basic units of mature focal adhesion are 300-nm-wide elongated, dynamic structures. We anticipate this ultrastructure to be relevant to investigation of the function of FAs and their behavior in response to mechanical stress. PMID:26012525

  4. Osteogenic lineage restriction by osteoprogenitors cultured on nanometric grooved surfaces: the role of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, John W; Roberts, Jemma N; Smith, Carol-Anne; Robertson, Mary; White, Kate; Biggs, Manus J; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dalby, Matthew J

    2014-02-01

    The differentiation of progenitor cells is dependent on more than biochemical signalling. Topographical cues in natural bone extracellular matrix guide cellular differentiation through the formation of focal adhesions, contact guidance, cytoskeletal rearrangement and ultimately gene expression. Osteoarthritis and a number of bone disorders present as growing challenges for our society. Hence, there is a need for next generation implantable devices to substitute for, or guide, bone repair in vivo. Cellular responses to nanometric topographical cues need to be better understood in vitro in order to ensure the effective and efficient integration and performance of these orthopedic devices. In this study, the FDA-approved plastic polycaprolactone was embossed with nanometric grooves and the response of primary and immortalized osteoprogenitor cells observed. Nanometric groove dimensions were 240 nm or 540 nm deep and 12.5 μm wide. Cells cultured on test surfaces followed contact guidance along the length of groove edges, elongated along their major axis and showed nuclear distortion; they formed more focal complexes and lower proportions of mature adhesions relative to planar controls. Down-regulation of the osteoblast marker genes RUNX2 and BMPR2 in primary and immortalized cells was observed on grooved substrates. Down-regulation appeared to directly correlate with focal adhesion maturation, indicating the involvement of ERK 1/2 negative feedback pathways following integrin-mediated FAK activation. PMID:24252447

  5. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation.

  6. Selected Contribution: Skeletal muscle focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, and serum response factor are loading dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. E.; Fluck, M.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation examined the effect of mechanical loading state on focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and serum response factor (SRF) in rat skeletal muscle. We found that FAK concentration and tyrosine phosphorylation, paxillin concentration, and SRF concentration are all lower in the lesser load-bearing fast-twitch plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles compared with the greater load-bearing slow-twitch soleus muscle. Of these three muscles, 7 days of mechanical unloading via tail suspension elicited a decrease in FAK tyrosine phosphorylation only in the soleus muscle and decreases in FAK and paxillin concentrations only in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. Unloading decreased SRF concentration in all three muscles. Mechanical overloading (via bilateral gastrocnemius ablation) for 1 or 8 days increased FAK and paxillin concentrations in the soleus and plantaris muscles. Additionally, whereas FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and SRF concentration were increased by < or =1 day of overloading in the soleus muscle, these increases did not occur until somewhere between 1 and 8 days of overloading in the plantaris muscle. These data indicate that, in the skeletal muscles of rats, the focal adhesion complex proteins FAK and paxillin and the transcription factor SRF are generally modulated in association with the mechanical loading state of the muscle. However, the somewhat different patterns of adaptation of these proteins to altered loading in slow- vs. fast-twitch skeletal muscles indicate that the mechanisms and time course of adaptation may partly depend on the prior loading state of the muscle.

  7. Displacement of p130Cas from focal adhesions links actomyosin contraction to cell migration.

    PubMed

    Machiyama, Hiroaki; Hirata, Hiroaki; Loh, Xia Kun; Kanchi, Madhu Mathi; Fujita, Hideaki; Tan, Song Hui; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-15

    Cell adhesion complexes provide platforms where cell-generated forces are transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins is crucial for cells to communicate with the extracellular environment. However, the mechanisms that transmit actin cytoskeletal motion to the extracellular environment to drive cell migration are poorly understood. We find that the movement of p130Cas (Cas, also known as BCAR1), a mechanosensor at focal adhesions, correlates with actin retrograde flow and depends upon actomyosin contraction and phosphorylation of the Cas substrate domain (CasSD). This indicates that CasSD phosphorylation underpins the physical link between Cas and the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal that CasSD phosphorylation, as opposed to the association of Cas with Src, facilitates Cas displacement from adhesion complexes in migrating cells. Furthermore, the stabilization of Src-Cas binding and inhibition of myosin II, both of which sustain CasSD phosphorylation but mitigate Cas displacement from adhesion sites, retard cell migration. These results indicate that Cas promotes cell migration by linking actomyosin contractions to the adhesion complexes through a dynamic interaction with Src as well as through the phosphorylation-dependent association with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24928898

  8. A Microtubule-Independent Role for Centrosomes and Aurora A in Nuclear Envelope Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Portier, Nathan; Audhya, Anjon; Maddox, Paul S.; Green, Rebecca A.; Dammermann, Alexander; Desai, Arshad; Oegema, Karen

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Aurora A kinase localizes to centrosomes and is required for centrosome maturation and spindle assembly. Here, we describe a microtubule-independent role for aurora A and centrosomes in nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) during the first mitotic division of the C. elegans embryo. Aurora A depletion does not alter the onset or kinetics of chromosome condensation, but dramatically lengthens the interval between the completion of condensation and NEBD. Inhibiting centrosome assembly by other means also lengthens this interval, albeit to a lesser extent than aurora A depletion. By contrast, centrosomally-nucleated microtubules and the nuclear envelope-associated motor dynein are not required for timely NEBD. These results indicate that mitotic centrosomes generate a diffusible factor, which we propose is activated aurora A, that promotes NEBD. A positive feedback loop, in which an aurora A-dependent increase in centrosome size promotes aurora A activation, may temporally couple centrosome maturation to NEBD during mitotic entry. PMID:17419991

  9. Targeting the C-terminal focal adhesion kinase scaffold in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Priyanka N; Kurenova, Elena V; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Liao, Jianqun; Yemma, Michael; Sen, Arindam; Pandey, Ravindra K; Cance, William G

    2014-10-28

    Preliminary studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the importance of both the NH2 and COOH terminus scaffolding functions of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Here, we describe a new small molecule inhibitor, C10, that targets the FAK C-terminus scaffold. C10 showed marked selectivity for cells overexpressing VEGFR3 when tested in isogenic cell lines, MCF7 and MCF7-VEGFR3. C10 preferentially inhibited pancreatic tumor growth in vivo in cells with high FAK-Y925 and VEGFR3 expression. Treatment with C10 led to a significant inhibition in endothelial cell proliferation and tumor endothelial and lymphatic vessel density and decrease in interstitial fluid pressure. These results highlight the underlying importance of targeting the FAK scaffold to treat human cancers. PMID:25067788

  10. New partners and phosphorylation sites of focal adhesion kinase identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Maria del Mar; Armendáriz, Beatriz G; Soriano, Eduardo; Ureña, Jesús Mariano; Burgaya, Ferran

    2016-07-01

    The regulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) involves phosphorylation and multiple interactions with other signaling proteins. Some of these pathways are relevant for nervous system functions such as branching, axonal guidance, and plasticity. In this study, we screened mouse brain to identify FAK-interactive proteins and phosphorylatable residues as a first step to address the neuronal functions of this kinase. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we identified new phosphorylated sites (Thr 952, Thr 1048, and Ser 1049), which lie in the FAT domain; and putative new partners for FAK, which include cytoskeletal proteins such as drebrin and MAP 6, adhesion regulators such as neurabin-2 and plakophilin 1, and synapse-associated proteins such as SynGAP and a NMDA receptor subunit. Our findings support the participation of brain-localized FAK in neuronal plasticity. PMID:27033120

  11. Sub-micron lateral topography affects endothelial migration by modulation of focal adhesion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Antonini, S; Meucci, S; Jacchetti, E; Klingauf, M; Beltram, F; Poulikakos, D; Cecchini, M; Ferrari, A

    2015-06-01

    Through the interaction with topographical features, endothelial cells tune their ability to populate target substrates, both in vivo and in vitro. Basal textures interfere with the establishment and maturation of focal adhesions (FAs) thus inducing specific cell-polarization patterns and regulating a plethora of cell activities that govern the overall endothelial function. In this study, we analyze the effect of topographical features on FAs in primary human endothelial cells. Reported data demonstrate a functional link between FA dynamics and cell polarization and spreading on structured substrates presenting variable lateral feature size. Our results reveal that gratings with 2 µm lateral periodicity maximize contact guidance. The effect is linked to the dynamical state of FAs. We argue that these results are readily applicable to the rational design of active surfaces at the interface with the blood stream. PMID:26106866

  12. A new link between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-11-01

    The retrograde actin flow, continuous centripetal movement of the cell peripheral actin networks, is widely observed in adherent cells. The retrograde flow is believed to facilitate cell migration when linked to cell adhesion molecules. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the functional relationship between the retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions (FAs). We also introduce our recent study in which single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy dissected the complex interactions between FAs and the local actin flow. FAs do not simply impede the actin flow, but actively attract and remodel the local actin network. Our findings provide a new insight into the mechanisms for protrusion and traction force generation at the cell leading edge. Furthermore, we discuss possible roles of the actin flow-FA interaction based on the accumulated knowledge and our SiMS study. PMID:25190817

  13. Insights into the Role of Focal Adhesion Modulation in Myogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haiyang; Lui, Yuan Siang; Xiong, Sijing; Leong, Wen Shing; Wen, Feng; Nurkahfianto, Himawan; Rana, Sravendra; Leong, David Tai; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-01-01

    We report the establishment of a novel platform to induce myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) via focal adhesion (FA) modulation, giving insights into the role of FA on stem cell differentiation. Micropatterning of collagen type I on a polyacrylamide gel with a stiffness of 10.2 kPa efficiently modulated elongated FA. This elongated FA profile preferentially recruited the β3 integrin cluster and induced specific myogenic differentiation at both transcription and translation levels with expression of myosin heavy chain and α-sarcomeric actin. This was initiated with elongation of FA complexes that triggered the RhoA downstream signaling toward a myogenic lineage commitment. This study also illustrates how one could partially control myogenic differentiation outcomes of similar-shaped hMSCs by modulating FA morphology and distribution. This technology increases our toolkit choice for controlled differentiation in muscle engineering. PMID:22765653

  14. Human fibroblasts display a differential focal adhesion phenotype relative to chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Advani, Alexander S; Chen, Annie Y; Babbitt, Courtney C

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of documented differences between humans and our closest relatives in responses to wound healing and in disease susceptibilities, suggesting a differential cellular response to certain environmental factors. In this study, we sought to look at a specific cell type, fibroblasts, to examine differences in cellular adhesion between humans and chimpanzees in visualized cells and in gene expression. We have found significant differences in the number of focal adhesions between primary human and chimpanzee fibroblasts. Additionally, we see that adhesion related gene ontology categories are some of the most differentially expressed between human and chimpanzee in normal fibroblast cells. These results suggest that human and chimpanzee fibroblasts may have somewhat different adhesive properties, which could play a role in differential disease phenotypes and responses to external factors. PMID:26971204

  15. Novel anticancer agent, SQAP, binds to focal adhesion kinase and modulates its activity

    PubMed Central

    Izaguirre-Carbonell, Jesus; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Murata, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Tsukuda, Senko; Hirakawa, Takeshi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Miura, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Sahara, Hiroeki; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    SQAP is a novel and promising anticancer agent that was obtained by structural modifications from a natural compound. SQAP inhibits angiogenesis in vivo resulting in increased hypoxia and reduced tumor volume. In this study, the mechanism by which SQAP modifies the tumor microenvironment was revealed through the application of a T7 phage display screening. This approach identified five SQAP-binding proteins including sterol carrier protein 2, multifunctional enzyme type 2, proteasomal ubiquitin receptor, UV excision repair protein and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). All the interactions were confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Since FAK plays an important role in cell turnover and angiogenesis, the influence of SQAP on FAK was the principal goal of this study. SQAP decreased FAK phosphorylation and cell migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and A549 cancer cells. These findings suggest that inhibition of FAK phosphorylation works as the mechanism for the anti-angiogenesis activity of SQAP. PMID:26456697

  16. Visualizing the interior architecture of focal adhesions with high-resolution traction maps.

    PubMed

    Morimatsu, Masatoshi; Mekhdjian, Armen H; Chang, Alice C; Tan, Steven J; Dunn, Alexander R

    2015-04-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are micron-sized protein assemblies that coordinate cell adhesion, migration, and mechanotransduction. How the many proteins within FAs are organized into force sensing and transmitting structures is poorly understood. We combined fluorescent molecular tension sensors with super-resolution light microscopy to visualize traction forces within FAs with <100 nm spatial resolution. We find that αvβ3 integrin selectively localizes to high force regions. Paxillin, which is not generally considered to play a direct role in force transmission, shows a higher degree of spatial correlation with force than vinculin, talin, or α-actinin, proteins with hypothesized roles as force transducers. These observations suggest that αvβ3 integrin and paxillin may play important roles in mechanotransduction. PMID:25730141

  17. Phosphotyrosine enrichment identifies focal adhesion kinase and other tyrosine kinases for targeting in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Marley, K; Maier, C S; Helfand, S C

    2012-09-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is an endothelial cell malignancy driven, in part, by activating mutations in receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Proteomics, Western blots and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor were used to elucidate activating mechanisms in HSA cell lines. Phosphotyrosine peptides from focal adhesion kinase (FAK) STAT3, Lyn, Fyn and other signal transduction kinases were identified by mass spectrometry. FAK was constitutively activated at tyrosine 397, the autophosphorylation site, and this was reversible with high concentrations of a FAK inhibitor. FAK inhibitor-14 suppressed migration and phosphorylation of FAK tyrosine 397 and tyrosines 576/577 and was cytotoxic to HSA cells suggesting FAK signalling may be an important contributor to canine HSA survival. PMID:22487216

  18. Haematopoietic focal adhesion kinase deficiency alters haematopoietic homeostasis to drive tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Batista, Silvia; Maniati, Eleni; Reynolds, Louise E; Tavora, Bernardo; Lees, Delphine M; Fernandez, Isabelle; Elia, George; Casanovas, Oriol; Lo Celso, Cristina; Hagemann, Thorsten; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of cancer-related death and thus understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this process is critical. Here, our data demonstrate, contrary to established dogma, that loss of haematopoietic-derived focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is sufficient to enhance tumour metastasis. Using both experimental and spontaneous metastasis models, we show that genetic ablation of haematopoietic FAK does not affect primary tumour growth but enhances the incidence of metastasis significantly. At a molecular level, haematopoietic FAK deletion results in an increase in PU-1 levels and decrease in GATA-1 levels causing a shift of hematopoietic homeostasis towards a myeloid commitment. The subsequent increase in circulating granulocyte number, with an increase in serum CXCL12 and granulocyte CXCR4 levels, was required for augmented metastasis in mice lacking haematopoietic FAK. Overall our findings provide a mechanism by which haematopoietic FAK controls cancer metastasis. PMID:25270220

  19. Netrin requires focal adhesion kinase and Src family kinases for axon outgrowth and attraction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guofa; Beggs, Hilary; Jürgensen, Claudia; Park, Hwan-Tae; Tang, Hao; Gorski, Jessica; Jones, Kevin R; Reichardt, Louis F; Wu, Jane; Rao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Although netrins are an important family of neuronal guidance proteins, intracellular mechanisms that mediate netrin function are not well understood. Here we show that netrin-1 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the Src family kinase Fyn. Blockers of Src family kinases inhibited FAK phosphorylation and axon outgrowth and attraction by netrin. Dominant-negative FAK and Fyn mutants inhibited the attractive turning response to netrin. Axon outgrowth and attraction induced by netrin-1 were significantly reduced in neurons lacking the FAK gene. Our results show the biochemical and functional links between netrin, a prototypical neuronal guidance cue, and FAK, a central player in intracellular signaling that is crucial for cell migration. PMID:15494732

  20. Human fibroblasts display a differential focal adhesion phenotype relative to chimpanzee

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Alexander S.; Chen, Annie Y.; Babbitt, Courtney C.

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of documented differences between humans and our closest relatives in responses to wound healing and in disease susceptibilities, suggesting a differential cellular response to certain environmental factors. In this study, we sought to look at a specific cell type, fibroblasts, to examine differences in cellular adhesion between humans and chimpanzees in visualized cells and in gene expression. We have found significant differences in the number of focal adhesions between primary human and chimpanzee fibroblasts. Additionally, we see that adhesion related gene ontology categories are some of the most differentially expressed between human and chimpanzee in normal fibroblast cells. These results suggest that human and chimpanzee fibroblasts may have somewhat different adhesive properties, which could play a role in differential disease phenotypes and responses to external factors. PMID:26971204

  1. Focal Adhesion Kinase Is Involved in Rabies Virus Infection through Its Interaction with Viral Phosphoprotein P

    PubMed Central

    Fouquet, Baptiste; Nikolic, Jovan; Larrous, Florence; Bourhy, Hervé; Wirblich, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rabies virus (RABV) phosphoprotein P is a multifunctional protein: it plays an essential role in viral transcription and replication, and in addition, RABV P has been identified as an interferon antagonist. Here, a yeast two-hybrid screen revealed that RABV P interacts with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The binding involved the 106-to-131 domain, corresponding to the dimerization domain of P and the C-terminal domain of FAK containing the proline-rich domains PRR2 and PRR3. The P-FAK interaction was confirmed in infected cells by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of FAK with P in Negri bodies. By alanine scanning, we identified a single mutation in the P protein that abolishes this interaction. The mutant virus containing a substitution of Ala for Arg in position 109 in P (P.R109A), which did not interact with FAK, is affected at a posttranscriptional step involving protein synthesis and viral RNA replication. Furthermore, FAK depletion inhibited viral protein expression in infected cells. This provides the first evidence of an interaction of RABV with FAK that positively regulates infection. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus exhibits a small genome that encodes a limited number of viral proteins. To maintain efficient virus replication, some of them are multifunctional, such as the phosphoprotein P. We and others have shown that P establishes complex networks of interactions with host cell components. These interactions have revealed much about the role of P and about host-pathogen interactions in infected cells. Here, we identified another cellular partner of P, the focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Our data shed light on the implication of FAK in RABV infection and provide evidence that P-FAK interaction has a proviral function. PMID:25410852

  2. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuharu; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Chou, Joshua; de Vega, Susana; Mizuniwa, Chihiro; Sekimoto, Kaori; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2014-01-01

    Teneurin-4 (Ten-4), a transmembrane protein, is highly expressed in the central nervous system; however, its cellular and molecular function in neuronal differentiation remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in neurite outgrowth. Ten-4 expression was induced during neurite outgrowth of the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro-2a. Ten-4 protein was localized at the neurite growth cones. Knockdown of Ten-4 expression in Neuro-2a cells decreased the formation of the filopodia-like protrusions and the length of individual neurites. Conversely, overexpression of Ten-4 promoted filopodia-like protrusion formation. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of Ten-4 reduced and elevated the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho-family small GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1, key molecules for the membranous protrusion formation downstream of FAK, respectively. Inhibition of the activation of FAK and neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is a downstream regulator of FAK and Cdc42, blocked protrusion formation by Ten-4 overexpression. Further, Ten-4 colocalized with phosphorylated FAK in the filopodia-like protrusion regions. Together, our findings show that Ten-4 is a novel positive regulator of cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through the FAK signaling pathway.—Suzuki, N., Numakawa, T., Chou, J., de Vega, S., Mizuniwa, C., Sekimoto, K., Adachi, N., Kunugi, H., Arikawa-Hirasawa, E., Yamada, Y., Akazawa, C. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling. PMID:24344332

  3. Association between tensin 1 and p130Cas at focal adhesions links actin inward flux to cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhihai; Tan, Song Hui; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Kawauchi, Keiko; Araki, Keigo; Hirata, Hiroaki; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell migration is a highly dynamic process that plays pivotal roles in both physiological and pathological processes. We have previously reported that p130Cas supports cell migration through the binding to Src as well as phosphorylation-dependent association with actin retrograde flow at focal adhesions. However, it remains elusive how phosphorylated Cas interacts with actin cytoskeletons. We observe that the actin-binding protein, tensin 1, co-localizes with Cas, but not with its phosphorylation-defective mutant, at focal adhesions in leading regions of migrating cells. While a truncation mutant of tensin 1 that lacks the phosphotyrosine-binding PTB and SH2 domains (tensin 1-SH2PTB) poorly co-localizes or co-immunoprecitates with Cas, bacterially expressed recombinant tensin 1-SH2PTB protein binds to Cas in vitro in a Cas phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, exogenous expression of tensin 1-SH2PTB, which is devoid of the actin-interacting motifs, interferes with the Cas-driven cell migration, slows down the inward flux of Cas molecules, and impedes the displacement of Cas molecules from focal adhesions. Taken together, our results show that tensin 1 links inwardly moving actin cytoskeletons to phosphorylated Cas at focal adhesions, thereby driving cell migration. PMID:27029899

  4. PROLACTIN-INDUCED TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION, ACTIVATION AND RECEPTOR ASSOCIATION OF FOCAL ADHESION KINASE (FAK) IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prolactin-Induced Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Activation and Receptor
    Association of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Mammary Epithelial Cells.
    Suzanne E. Fenton1 and Lewis G. Sheffield2. 1U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, MD-72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and

  5. Label-free proteomics uncovers energy metabolism and focal adhesion regulations responsive for endometrium receptivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Zhang, Aijun; Yu, Feng; Gao, Jing; Liu, Yue; Yu, Chengli; Zhou, Hu; Xu, Chen

    2015-04-01

    The menstrual cycle of the female uterus leads to periodic changes of the endometrium. These changes are important for developing the endometrial receptivity and for achieving competency of embryo implantation. However, the molecular events underlying the endometrial receptivity process remain poorly understood. Here we applied an LC-MS-based label-free quantitative proteomic approach to compare the endometrial tissues in the midsecretory (receptive) phase with the endometrial tissues in the proliferative phase from age-matched woman (n = 6/group). The proteomes of endometrial tissues were extracted using an SDS-based detergent, digested by the filter-aided sample preparation procedures, and subsequently analyzed by nano-LC-MS/MS (Orbitrap XL) with a 4 h gradient. Reliable protein expression profiles were reproducibly obtained from the endometrial tissues in the receptive and proliferative phases. A total of 2138 protein groups were quantified under highly stringent criteria with a false discovery rate of <1% for peptide and protein groups. Among these proteins, 317 proteins had differences in expression that were statistically significant between the receptive and proliferative phases. Direct protein-protein interaction network analyses of these significantly changed proteins showed that the up-regulation of creatine kinase B-type (CKB) in the receptive phase may be related to endometrium receptivity. The interaction network also showed that proteins related to cell-cell adhesion were down-regulated. Moreover, the results from KEGG pathway analyses are consistent with the protein-protein interaction results. The proteins, including alpha-actinin (ACTN), extracellular matrix proteins, integrin alpha-V, and so on, that are involved in the focal adhesion pathway were down-regulated in the receptive phase compared with the proliferative phase, which may facilitate the implantation of the fertilized ovum. Selected proteins were validated by Western blot analysis and

  6. Src Kinase Determines the Dynamic Exchange of the Docking Protein NEDD9 (Neural Precursor Cell Expressed Developmentally Down-regulated Gene 9) at Focal Adhesions*

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Peta; Bach, Cuc T.; Paul, Andre; O'Neill, Geraldine M.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic exchange of molecules between the cytoplasm and integrin-based focal adhesions provides a rapid response system for modulating cell adhesion. Increased residency time of molecules that regulate adhesion turnover contributes to adhesion stability, ultimately determining migration speed across two-dimensional surfaces. In the present study we test the role of Src kinase in regulating dynamic exchange of the focal adhesion protein NEDD9/HEF1/Cas-L. Using either chemical inhibition or fibroblasts genetically null for Src together with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we find that Src significantly reduces NEDD9 exchange at focal adhesions. Analysis of NEDD9 mutant constructs with the two major Src-interacting domains disabled revealed the greatest effects were due to the NEDD9 SH2 binding domain. This correlated with a significant change in two-dimensional migratory speed. Given the emerging role of NEDD9 as a regulator of focal adhesion stability, the time of NEDD9 association at the focal adhesions is key in modulating rates of migration and invasion. Our study suggests that Src kinase activity determines NEDD9 exchange at focal adhesions and may similarly modulate other focal adhesion-targeted Src substrates to regulate cell migration. PMID:25059660

  7. Focal adhesion kinase autophosphorylation inhibition decreases colon cancer cell growth and enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita M; Dunn, Kelli M Bullard; Cance, William

    2013-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) increasingly has been implicated in cancer growth and progression. 1,2,4,5-Benzenetetraamine tetrahydrochloride (Y15) is a small molecule FAK inhibitor that blocks the Y397 autophosphorylation site. FAK inhibitor, Y15 decreased Y397 FAK in different colon cancer cells lines in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, Y15 decreased phosphorylated Src in SW480 and SW620 cells. Y15 decreased cell viability, increased detachment, and increased apoptosis in SW480 and SW620 cells in vitro. Combination of FAK inhibitor Y15 and Src inhibitor PP2 decreased colon cancer cell viability more effectively than each agent alone. In addition, when combined with 5-FU, oxaliplatin or 5-FU and oxaliplatin, colon cancer viability was decreased further, demonstrating that dual and triple therapy synergistically inhibits cell viability. In vivo, Y15 decreased subcutaneous SW620 tumor growth by 28%. Combination of oral Y15 with 5-FU/or oxaliplatin decreased tumor growth by 48% more effectively than each inhibitor alone. Finally, tumors treated with Y15 expressed less Y397 phosphorylation, Src phosphorylation and had greater apoptosis than controls. Thus, the small molecule FAK inhibitor, Y15, inhibits cell growth in vitro and in vivo and enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy, demonstrating that it can be an effective therapeutic inhibitor for treating colon cancer. PMID:23792569

  8. Cbl-b promotes cell detachment via ubiquitination of focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yibo; Qu, Xiujuan; Ma, Yanju; Liu, Yunpeng; Hu, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell detachment from the primary tumor site represents the first stage of metastasis. Previous studies have identified that cell detachment is triggered by cytoskeletal disruption, which may induce a wide variety of cellular changes. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) exhibits crucial cellular functions, including regulation of the cytoskeleton. These observations have provided exciting insights into the effect of FAK in cell detachment; however, the involvement of FAK in cell detachment remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of FAK and its function in the process of cell detachment. The results revealed that FAK expression was downregulated following trypsin treatment in human gastric, lung, colon and breast cancer cell lines, as well as a human gastric epithelial cell line. Knockdown of FAK enhanced cell detachment in gastric cancer MGC803 cells, indicating that FAK inhibits cell detachment. Further investigation revealed that trypsin induced monoubiquitination of FAK. In addition, the lysosome inhibitor, NH4Cl, decreased trypsin-induced degradation of FAK. Casitas B-lineage lymphoma-b (Cbl-b), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, was involved in this process, which interacted with FAK, as demonstrated by co-precipitation experiments, and promoted trypsin-induced ubiquitin-lysosome degradation of FAK. These results indicate that Cbl-b promotes cell detachment via ubiquitination of FAK. These findings provide novel insights regarding the effect of FAK and Cbl-b in the process of cancer cell detachment.

  9. Mechanically Induced Focal Adhesion Assembly Amplifies Anti-Adipogenic Pathways in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Buer; Guilluy, Christophe; Xie, Zhihui; Case, Natasha; Styner, Maya; Thomas, Jacob; Oguz, Ipek; Rubin, Clinton; Burridge, Keith; Rubin, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The fate of pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is determined through integration of chemical, spatial, and physical signals. The suppression of MSC adipogenesis by mechanical stimuli, which requires Akt-induced inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) with β-catenin activation, can be enhanced by repetitive dosing within a single day. Here, we demonstrate that reapplication of cyclic strain within a 24-hour period leads to amplification of both Akt activation and its subsequent inhibition of GSK3β, such that total cycle number can be reduced while still inhibiting adipogenesis. Amplification of Akt signaling is facilitated by a dynamic restructuring of the cell in response to mechanical signals, as evidenced by a transient increase in focal adhesion (FA) number and increased RhoA activity. Preventing FA assembly or development of tension blocks activation of Akt by mechanical signals, but not by insulin. This indicates that the FA infrastructure is essential to the physical, but not necessarily the chemical, sensitivity, and responsiveness of the cell. Exploiting the transient nature of cytoskeletal remodeling may represent a process to enhance cell responsiveness to mechanical input and ultimately define the fate of MSCs with a minimal input. PMID:21898699

  10. β1 Integrin-Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Signaling Modulates Retinal Ganglion Cell (RGC) Survival

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Andrea Rachelle C.; Corredor, Raul G.; Obeso, Betty Albo; Trakhtenberg, Ephraim F.; Wang, Ying; Ponmattam, Jamie; Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Ivanov, Dmitry; Shestopalov, Valery I.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Fini, Mary Elizabeth; Bajenaru, Michaela Livia

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity in the central nervous system (CNS) is essential for neuronal homeostasis. Signals from the ECM are transmitted to neurons through integrins, a family of cell surface receptors that mediate cell attachment to ECM. We have previously established a causal link between the activation of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), degradation of laminin in the ECM of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), and RGC death in a mouse model of retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (RIRI). Here we investigated the role of laminin-integrin signaling in RGC survival in vitro, and after ischemia in vivo. In purified primary rat RGCs, stimulation of the β1 integrin receptor with laminin, or agonist antibodies enhanced RGC survival in correlation with activation of β1 integrin’s major downstream regulator, focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Furthermore, β1 integrin binding and FAK activation were required for RGCs’ survival response to laminin. Finally, in vivo after RIRI, we observed an up-regulation of MMP-9, proteolytic degradation of laminin, decreased RGC expression of β1 integrin, FAK and Akt dephosphorylation, and reduced expression of the pro-survival molecule bcl-xL in the period preceding RGC apoptosis. RGC death was prevented, in the context of laminin degradation, by maintaining β1 integrin activation with agonist antibodies. Thus, disruption of homeostatic RGC-laminin interaction and signaling leads to cell death after retinal ischemia, and maintaining integrin activation may be a therapeutic approach to neuroprotection. PMID:23118988

  11. Integrin binding and mechanical tension induce movement of mRNA and ribosomes to focal adhesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Singer, R. H.; Meyer, C. J.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) activates signalling pathways that control cell behaviour by binding to cell-surface integrin receptors and inducing the formation of focal adhesion complexes (FACs). In addition to clustered integrins, FACs contain proteins that mechanically couple the integrins to the cytoskeleton and to immobilized signal-transducing molecules. Cell adhesion to the ECM also induces a rapid increase in the translation of preexisting messenger RNAs. Gene expression can be controlled locally by targeting mRNAs to specialized cytoskeletal domains. Here we investigate whether cell binding to the ECM promotes formation of a cytoskeletal microcompartment specialized for translational control at the site of integrin binding. High-resolution in situ hybridization revealed that mRNA and ribosomes rapidly and specifically localized to FACs that form when cells bind to ECM-coated microbeads. Relocation of these protein synthesis components to the FAC depended on the ability of integrins to mechanically couple the ECM to the contractile cytoskeleton and on associated tension-moulding of the actin lattice. Our results suggest a new type of gene regulation by integrins and by mechanical stress which may involve translation of mRNAs into proteins near the sites of signal reception.

  12. Diamagnetic levitation causes changes in the morphology, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion proteins expression in osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Qian, A R; Wang, L; Gao, X; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Han, J; Li, J B; Di, S M; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Diamagnetic levitation technology is a novel simulated weightless technique and has recently been applied in life-science research. We have developed a superconducting magnet platform with large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels, namely, μg (diamagnetic levitation), 1g, and 2g for diamagnetic materials. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on the activity, morphology, and cytoskeleton (actin filament, microtubules, and vimentin intermediate filaments) in osteocyte - like cell line MLO-Y4 were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) methods, hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), respectively. The changes induced by LG-HMF in distribution and expression of focal adhesion (FA) proteins, including vinculin, paxillin, and talin in MLO-Y4 were determined by LSCM and Western blotting. The results showed that LG-HMF produced by superconducting magnet had no lethal effects on MLO-Y4. Compared to control, diamagnetic levitation (μg) affected MLO-Y4 morphology, nucleus size, cytoskeleton architecture, and FA proteins distribution and expression. The study indicates that osteocytes are sensitive to altered gravity and FA proteins (vinculin, paxillin, and talin) may be involved in osteocyte mechanosensation. The diamagnetic levitation may be a novel ground-based space-gravity simulator and can be used for biological experiment at cellular level. PMID:21216704

  13. MUC16 contributes to the metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma through focal adhesion mediated signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Seema; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Gupta, Suprit; Seshacharyulu, Parthasarathy; Smith, Lynette M.; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2016-01-01

    MUC16, a heavily glycosylated type-I transmembrane mucin is overexpressed in several cancers including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Previously, we have shown that MUC16 is significantly overexpressed in human PDAC tissues. However, the functional consequences and its role in PDAC is poorly understood. Here, we show that MUC16 knockdown decreases PDAC cell proliferation, colony formation and migration in vitro. Also, MUC16 knockdown decreases the tumor formation and metastasis in orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Mechanistically, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analyses confirms MUC16 interaction with galectin-3 and mesothelin in PDAC cells. Adhesion assay displayed decreased cell attachment of MUC16 knockdown cells with recombinant galectin-1 and galectin-3 protein. Further, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated MUC16 knockout cells show decreased tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (T and Tn) in PDAC cells. Importantly, carbohydrate antigens were decreased in the region that corresponds to MUC16 and suggests for the decreased MUC16-galectin interactions. Co-immunoprecipitation also revealed a novel interaction between MUC16 and FAK in PDAC cells. Interestingly, we observed decreased expression of mesenchymal and increased expression of epithelial markers in MUC16-silenced cells. Additionally, MUC16 loss showed a decreased FAK-mediated Akt and ERK/MAPK activation. Altogether, these findings suggest that MUC16-focal adhesion signaling may play a critical role in facilitating PDAC growth and metastasis. PMID:27382435

  14. Paxillin and Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Regulate Cardiac Contractility in the Zebrafish Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, Sofia; Bühler, Anja; Bührdel, John B.; Rudeck, Steven; Dahme, Tillman; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Just, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    An orchestrated interplay of adaptor and signaling proteins at mechano-sensitive sites is essential to maintain cardiac contractility and when defective leads to heart failure. We recently showed that Integrin-linked Kinase (ILK), ß-Parvin and PINCH form the IPP-complex to grant tuned Protein Kinase B (PKB) signaling in the heart. Loss of one of the IPP-complex components results in destabilization of the whole complex, defective PKB signaling and finally heart failure. Two components of IPP, ILK and ß-Parvin directly bind to Paxillin; however, the impact of this direct interaction on the maintenance of heart function is not known yet. Here, we show that targeted gene inactivation of Paxillin results in progressive decrease of cardiac contractility and heart failure in zebrafish without affecting IPP-complex stability and PKB phosphorylation. However, we found that Paxillin deficiency leads to the destabilization of its known binding partner Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and vice versa resulting in degradation of Vinculin and thereby heart failure. Our findings highlight an essential role of Paxillin and FAK in controlling cardiac contractility via the recruitment of Vinculin to mechano-sensitive sites in cardiomyocytes. PMID:26954676

  15. The focal adhesion protein PINCH-1 associates with EPLIN at integrin adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Karaköse, Esra; Geiger, Tamar; Flynn, Kevin; Lorenz-Baath, Katrin; Zent, Roy; Mann, Matthias; Fässler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT PINCH-1 is a LIM-only domain protein that forms a ternary complex with integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and parvin (to form the IPP complex) downstream of integrins. Here, we demonstrate that PINCH-1 (also known as Lims1) gene ablation in the epidermis of mice caused epidermal detachment from the basement membrane, epidermal hyperthickening and progressive hair loss. PINCH-1-deficient keratinocytes also displayed profound adhesion, spreading and migration defects in vitro that were substantially more severe than those of ILK-deficient keratinocytes indicating that PINCH-1 also exerts functions in an ILK-independent manner. By isolating the PINCH-1 interactome, the LIM-domain-containing and actin-binding protein epithelial protein lost in neoplasm (EPLIN, also known as LIMA1) was identified as a new PINCH-1-associated protein. EPLIN localized, in a PINCH-1-dependent manner, to integrin adhesion sites of keratinocytes in vivo and in vitro and its depletion severely attenuated keratinocyte spreading and migration on collagen and fibronectin without affecting PINCH-1 levels in focal adhesions. Given that the low PINCH-1 levels in ILK-deficient keratinocytes were sufficient to recruit EPLIN to integrin adhesions, our findings suggest that PINCH-1 regulates integrin-mediated adhesion of keratinocytes through the interactions with ILK as well as EPLIN. PMID:25609703

  16. Dasatinib affects focal adhesion and myosin regulation to inhibit matrix contraction by Müller cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Rintaro; Umazume, Kazuhiko; Yamakawa, Naoyuki; McDonald, Kevin; Kaplan, Henry J; Tamiya, Shigeo

    2015-10-01

    Epiretinal membrane (ERM) contraction is associated with a variety of ocular diseases that cause macular dysfunction. Trans-differentiated Müller cells have been identified in ERMs, and have been implicated to be involved in the contractile process. In this study, we tested the effect of dasatinib, an FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on matrix contraction caused by Müller cells, and examined molecular mechanism of action. Type I collagen matrix contraction assays were used to examine the effect of drugs on matrix contraction by trans-differentiated Müller cells. Fluophore-conjugated phalloidin was used for the detection of actin cytoskeleton, and Western-blot analyses were carried out to examine protein expression and phosphorylation status. Dasatinib inhibited collagen matrix contraction by trans-differentiated Müller cells that was associated with decreased cell spreading and reduction of actomyosin stress fibers. Concomitantly, dasatinib-treated Müller cells had reduced phosphorylation of Src family kinase, paxillin, as well as myosin II light chain. Specific inhibitors of Rho/ROCK and myosin II confirmed the critical role played by this pathway in Müller cell contraction. Our data demonstrate that dasatinib significantly reduced matrix contraction by Müller cells via inhibition of focal adhesion, as well as actomyosin contraction. PMID:26240967

  17. Molecular mechanism of vinculin activation and nano-scale spatial organization in focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Case, Lindsay B.; Baird, Michelle A.; Shtengel, Gleb; Campbell, Sharon L.; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) link the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the actin cytoskeleton to mediate cell adhesion, migration, mechanosensing and signaling. FAs have conserved nanoscale protein organization, suggesting that the position of proteins within FAs regulates their activity and function. Vinculin binds different FA proteins to mediate distinct cellular functions, but how vinculin’s interactions are spatiotemporally organized within FA is unknown. Using interferometric photo-activation localization (iPALM) super-resolution microscopy to assay vinculin nanoscale localization and a FRET biosensor to assay vinculin conformation, we found that upward repositioning within the FA during FA maturation facilitates vinculin activation and mechanical reinforcement of FA. Inactive vinculin localizes to the lower integrin signaling layer in FA by binding to phospho-paxillin. Talin binding activates vinculin and targets active vinculin higher in FA where vinculin can engage retrograde actin flow. Thus, specific protein interactions are spatially segregated within FA at the nano-scale to regulate vinculin activation and function. PMID:26053221

  18. Two distinct actin networks mediate traction oscillations to confer mechanosensitivity of focal adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhanghan; Plotnikov, Sergey; Waterman, Clare; Liu, Jian

    Cells sense the mechanical stiffness of their extracellular matrix (ECM) by exerting traction force through focal adhesions (FAs), which are integrin-based protein assemblies. Strikingly, FA-mediated traction forces oscillate in time and space and govern durotaxis - the tendency of most cell types to migrate toward stiffer ECM. The underlying mechanism of this intriguing oscillation of FA traction force is unknown. Combing theory and experiment, we develop a model of FA growth, which integrates coordinated contributions of a branched actin network and stress fibers in the process. We show that retrograde flux of branched actin network contributes to a traction peak near the FA distal tip and that stress fiber-mediated actomyosin Contractility generates a second traction peak near the FA center. Formin-mediated stress fiber elongation negatively feeds back with actomyosin Contractility, resulting in the central traction peak oscillation. This underpins observed spatio-temporal patterns of the FA traction, and broadens the ECM stiffness range, over which FAs could accurately adapt with traction force generation. Our findings shed light on the fundamental mechanism of FA mechanosensing and hence durotaxis.

  19. Focal Adhesion Kinase regulates cell-cell contact formation in epithelial cells via modulation of Rho

    SciTech Connect

    Playford, Martin P.; Vadali, Kavita; Cai Xinming; Burridge, Keith; Schaller, Michael D.

    2008-10-15

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a key role in cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and survival. Recent studies have also implicated FAK in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion. Here, evidence is presented showing that siRNA-mediated suppression of FAK levels in NBT-II cells and expression of dominant negative mutants of FAK caused loss of epithelial cell morphology and inhibited the formation of cell-cell adhesions. Rac and Rho have been implicated in the regulation of cell-cell adhesions and can be regulated by FAK signaling. Expression of active Rac or Rho in NBT-II cells disrupted formation of cell-cell contacts, thus promoting a phenotype similar to FAK-depleted cells. The loss of intercellular contacts in FAK-depleted cells is prevented upon expression of a dominant negative Rho mutant, but not a dominant negative Rac mutant. Inhibition of FAK decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP and elevated the level of GTP-bound Rho. This suggests that FAK regulates cell-cell contact formation by regulation of Rho.

  20. Rac1 inactivation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii modifies focal adhesions upstream of actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Geny, Blandine; Grassart, Alexandre; Manich, Maria; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Payrastre, Bernard; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Popoff, Michel R

    2010-02-01

    Inactivation of different small GTPases upon their glucosylation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii strain IP82 (LT-82) is already known to lead to cell rounding, adherens junction (AJ) disorganization and actin depolymerization. In the present work, we observed that LT-82 induces a rapid dephosphorylation of paxillin, a protein regulating focal adhesion (FA), independently of inactivation of paxillin kinases such as Src, Fak and Pyk2. Among the small GTPases inactivated by this toxin, including Rac, Ras, Rap and Ral, we identified Rac1, as responsible for paxillin dephosphorylation using cells overexpressing Rac1(V12). Rac1 inactivation by LT-82 modifies interactions between proteins from AJ and FA complexes as shown by pull-down assays. We showed that in Triton X-100-insoluble membrane proteins from these complexes, namely E-cadherin, beta-catenin, p120-catenin and talin, are decreased upon LT-82 intoxication, a treatment that also induces a rapid decrease in cell phosphoinositide content. Therefore, we proposed that Rac inactivation by LT-82 alters phosphoinositide metabolism leading to FA and AJ complex disorganization and actin depolymerization. PMID:19840028

  1. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  2. Inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Src Increases Detachment and Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Beierle, Elizabeth A.; Ma, Xiaojie; Trujillo, Angelica; Kurenova, Elena V.; Cance, William G.; Golubovskaya, Vita M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that is overexpressed in a number of human tumors including neuroblastoma, and regulates both cellular adhesion and survival. We have studied the effects of FAK inhibition upon neuroblastoma using adenovirus-containing FAK-CD (AdFAK-CD). Utilizing an isogenic MYCN+ / MYCN− neuroblastoma cell line, we found that the MYCN+ cells are more sensitive to FAK inhibition with AdFAK-CD than their MYCN negative counterparts. In addition, we have shown that phosphorylation of Src is increased in the untreated isogenic MYCN− neuroblastoma cells, and that the decreased sensitivity of the MYCN− neuroblastoma cells to FAK inhibition with AdFAK-CD is abrogated by the addition of the Src family kinase inhibitor, PP2. The results of the current study suggest that both FAK and Src play a role in protecting neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis, and that dual inhibition of these kinases may be important when designing therapeutic interventions for this tumor. PMID:19885861

  3. Focal adhesion kinase regulates expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Baotran; Huang, Grace; Golubovskaya, Vita M

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) plays an important role in cancer cell survival. Previous microarray gene profiling study detected inverse regulation between expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and FAK, where down-regulation of FAK by siRNA in MCF-7 cells caused up-regulation of TXNIP mRNA level, and in contrast up-regulation of doxycyclin- induced FAK caused repression of TXNIP. In the present report, we show that overexpression of FAK in MCF-7 cells repressed TXNIP promoter activity. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) down-regulated endogenous FAK and up-regulated TXNIP protein level, and treatment with 5-FU decreased FAK protein expression and up-regulated TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. Moreover, silencing of FAK with siRNA increased TXNIP protein expression, while overexpression of FAK inhibited TXNIP protein expression in 293 cells. In addition, treatment of DBTRG glioblastoma cells with FAK inhibitor Y15 increased TXNIP mRNA, decreased cancer cell viability and increased apoptosis. These results for the first time demonstrate FAK-regulated TXNIP expression which is important for apoptotic, survival and oxidative stress signaling pathways in cancer cells. PMID:23387972

  4. The simulation of stress fibre and focal adhesion development in cells on patterned substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Amit; Deshpande, Vikram S; McMeeking, Robert M; Evans, Anthony G

    2007-01-01

    The remodelling of the cytoskeleton and focal adhesion (FA) distributions for cells on substrates with micro-patterned ligand patches is investigated using a bio-chemo-mechanical model. We investigate the effect of ligand pattern shape on the cytoskeletal arrangements and FA distributions for cells having approximately the same area. The cytoskeleton model accounts for the dynamic rearrangement of the actin/myosin stress fibres. It entails the highly nonlinear interactions between signalling, the kinetics of tension-dependent stress-fibre formation/dissolution and stress-dependent contractility. This model is coupled with another model that governs FA formation and accounts for the mechano-sensitivity of the adhesions from thermodynamic considerations. This coupled modelling scheme is shown to capture a variety of key experimental observations including: (i) the formation of high concentrations of stress fibres and FAs at the periphery of circular and triangular, convex-shaped ligand patterns; (ii) the development of high FA concentrations along the edges of the V-, T-, Y- and U-shaped concave ligand patterns; and (iii) the formation of highly aligned stress fibres along the non-adhered edges of cells on the concave ligand patterns. When appropriately calibrated, the model also accurately predicts the radii of curvature of the non-adhered edges of cells on the concave-shaped ligand patterns. PMID:17939980

  5. The proline-rich focal adhesion and microfilament protein VASP is a ligand for profilins.

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, M; Giehl, K; Abel, K; Haffner, C; Jarchau, T; Hoppe, V; Jockusch, B M; Walter, U

    1995-01-01

    Profilins are small proteins that form complexes with G-actin and phosphoinositides and are therefore considered to link the microfilament system to signal transduction pathways. In addition, they bind to poly-L-proline, but the biological significance of this interaction is not yet known. The recent molecular cloning of the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), an established in vivo substrate of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, revealed the presence of a proline-rich domain which prompted us to investigate a possible interaction with profilins. VASP is a microfilament and focal adhesion associated protein which is also concentrated in highly dynamic regions of the cell cortex. Here, we demonstrate that VASP is a natural proline-rich profilin ligand. Human platelet VASP bound directly to purified profilins from human platelets, calf thymus and birch pollen. Moreover, VASP and a novel protein were specifically extracted from total cell lysates by profilin affinity chromatography and subsequently eluted either with poly-L-proline or a peptide corresponding to a proline-rich VASP motif. Finally, the subcellular distributions of VASP and profilin suggest that both proteins also interact within living cells. Our data support the hypothesis that profilin and VASP act in concert to convey signal transduction to actin filament formation. Images PMID:7737110

  6. Focal adhesion kinase as a mechanotransducer during rapid brain growth of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Mary E; Knepper, Janice E; DiBenedetto, Angela J; Malaugh, Elizabeth; Callejo, Sagrario; Carretero, Raquel; Alonso, Maria-Isabel; Gato, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of the hollow fluid-filled embryonic brain occurs by an increase in intraluminal pressure created by accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Experiments have shown a direct correlation between cavity pressure and cell proliferation within the neuroepithelium. These findings lead us to ask how mechanistically this might come about. Are there perhaps molecules on the luminal surface of the embryonic neuroepithelium, such as focal adhesion kinases (FAKs) known to respond to tension in other epithelial cells? Immunodetection using antibodies to total FAK and p-FAK was performed with subsequent confocal analysis of the pattern of their activation under normal intraluminal pressure and induced chronic pressure. Western analysis was also done to look at the amount of FAK expression, as well as its activation under these same conditions. Using immunolocalization, we have shown that FAK is present and activated on both apical and basolateral surfaces and within the cytoplasm of the neuroepithelial cells. This pattern changed profoundly when the neuroepithelium was under pressure. By Western blot, we have shown that FAK was upregulated and activated in the neuroepithelium of the embryos just after the neural tube becomes a closed pressurized system, with phosphorylation detected on the luminal instead of the basal surface, along with an increase in cell proliferation. Chronic hyper-pressure does not induce an increase in phosphorylation of FAK. In conclusion, here we show that neuroepithelial cells respond to intraluminal pressure via FAK phosphorylation on the luminal surface. PMID:24860993

  7. LRRK2 G2019S mutation attenuates microglial motility by inhibiting focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Insup; Kim, Beomsue; Byun, Ji-Won; Baik, Sung Hoon; Huh, Yun Hyun; Kim, Jong-Hyeon; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Song, Woo Keun; Shin, Joo-Ho; Seo, Hyemyung; Suh, Young Ho; Jou, Ilo; Park, Sang Myun; Kang, Ho Chul; Joe, Eun-Hye

    2015-01-01

    In response to brain injury, microglia rapidly extend processes that isolate lesion sites and protect the brain from further injury. Here we report that microglia carrying a pathogenic mutation in the Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated gene, G2019S-LRRK2 (GS-Tg microglia), show retarded ADP-induced motility and delayed isolation of injury, compared with non-Tg microglia. Conversely, LRRK2 knockdown microglia are highly motile compared with control cells. In our functional assays, LRRK2 binds to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phosphorylates its Thr–X–Arg/Lys (TXR/K) motif(s), eventually attenuating FAK activity marked by decreased pY397 phosphorylation (pY397). GS-LRRK2 decreases the levels of pY397 in the brain, microglia and HEK cells. In addition, treatment with an inhibitor of LRRK2 kinase restores pY397 levels, decreased pTXR levels and rescued motility of GS-Tg microglia. These results collectively suggest that G2019S mutation of LRRK2 may contribute to the development of PD by inhibiting microglial response to brain injury. PMID:26365310

  8. High-Content Microscopy Analysis of Subcellular Structures: Assay Development and Application to Focal Adhesion Quantification.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Torsten; Schmidt, David; Schwanitz, Georg; Ahmad, Mubashir; Hamann, Jana; Schlosser, Corinne; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Böhm, Konrad J; Tuckermann, Jan; Ploubidou, Aspasia

    2016-01-01

    High-content analysis (HCA) converts raw light microscopy images to quantitative data through the automated extraction, multiparametric analysis, and classification of the relevant information content. Combined with automated high-throughput image acquisition, HCA applied to the screening of chemicals or RNAi-reagents is termed high-content screening (HCS). Its power in quantifying cell phenotypes makes HCA applicable also to routine microscopy. However, developing effective HCA and bioinformatic analysis pipelines for acquisition of biologically meaningful data in HCS is challenging. Here, the step-by-step development of an HCA assay protocol and an HCS bioinformatics analysis pipeline are described. The protocol's power is demonstrated by application to focal adhesion (FA) detection, quantitative analysis of multiple FA features, and functional annotation of signaling pathways regulating FA size, using primary data of a published RNAi screen. The assay and the underlying strategy are aimed at researchers performing microscopy-based quantitative analysis of subcellular features, on a small scale or in large HCS experiments. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367288

  9. Plectin-containing, centrally localized focal adhesions exert traction forces in primary lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Jessica L.; Beaumont, Kristin G.; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B.; Mrksich, Milan; Budinger, G. R. Scott; Jones, Jonathan C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Receptor clustering upon cell attachment to the substrate induces assembly of cytoplasmic protein complexes termed focal adhesions (FAs), which connect, albeit indirectly, the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton. A subset of cultured primary alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) display a unique pattern of vinculin/paxillin/talin-rich FAs in two concentric circles when cultured on glass and micropatterned substrates: one ring of FAs located at the cell periphery (pFAs), and another FA ring located centrally in the cell (cFAs). Unusually, cFAs associate with an aster-like actin array as well as keratin bundles. Moreover, cFAs show rapid paxillin turnover rates following fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and exert traction forces similar to those generated by FAs at the cell periphery. The plakin protein plectin localizes to cFAs and is normally absent from pFAs, whereas tensin, a marker of mature/fibrillar adhesions, is found in both cFAs and pFAs. In primary AEC in which plectin expression is depleted, cFAs are largely absent, with an attendant reorganization of both the keratin and actin cytoskeletons. We suggest that the mechanical environment in the lung gives rise to the assembly of unconventional FAs in AEC. These FAs not only show a distinctive arrangement, but also possess unique compositional and functional properties. PMID:23750011

  10. Talin tension sensor reveals novel features of focal adhesion force transmission and mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Ouyang, Mingxing; Van den Dries, Koen; McGhee, Ewan James; Tanaka, Keiichiro; Anderson, Marie D; Groisman, Alexander; Goult, Benjamin T; Anderson, Kurt I; Schwartz, Martin A

    2016-05-01

    Integrin-dependent adhesions are mechanosensitive structures in which talin mediates a linkage to actin filaments either directly or indirectly by recruiting vinculin. Here, we report the development and validation of a talin tension sensor. We find that talin in focal adhesions is under tension, which is higher in peripheral than central adhesions. Tension on talin is increased by vinculin and depends mainly on actin-binding site 2 (ABS2) within the middle of the rod domain, rather than ABS3 at the far C terminus. Unlike vinculin, talin is under lower tension on soft substrates. The difference between central and peripheral adhesions requires ABS3 but not vinculin or ABS2. However, differential stiffness sensing by talin requires ABS2 but not vinculin or ABS3. These results indicate that central versus peripheral adhesions must be organized and regulated differently, and that ABS2 and ABS3 have distinct functions in spatial variations and stiffness sensing. Overall, these results shed new light on talin function and constrain models for cellular mechanosensing. PMID:27161398

  11. Targeting Focal Adhesion Kinase Suppresses the Malignant Phenotype in Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Waters, Alicia M; Stafman, Laura L; Garner, Evan F; Mruthyunjayappa, Smitha; Stewart, Jerry E; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-08-01

    Despite the tremendous advances in the treatment of childhood solid tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) continues to provide a therapeutic challenge. Children with metastatic or relapsed disease have a disease-free survival rate under 30%. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that is important in many facets of tumorigenesis. Signaling pathways both upstream and downstream to FAK have been found to be important in sarcoma tumorigenesis, leading us to hypothesize that FAK would be present in RMS and would impact cellular survival. In the current study, we showed that FAK was present and phosphorylated in pediatric alveolar and embryonal RMS tumor specimens and cell lines. We also examined the effects of FAK inhibition upon two RMS cell lines utilizing parallel approaches including RNAi and small molecule inhibitors. FAK inhibition resulted in decreased cellular survival, invasion, and migration and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, small molecule inhibition of FAK led to decreased tumor growth in a nude mouse RMS xenograft model. The findings from this study will help to further our understanding of the regulation of tumorigenesis in RMS and may provide desperately needed novel therapeutic strategies for these difficult-to-treat tumors. PMID:27567948

  12. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound promotes chondrogenic progenitor cell migration via focal adhesion kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kee W; Ding, Lei; Seol, Dongrim; Lim, Tae-Hong; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2014-06-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been studied frequently for its beneficial effects on the repair of injured articular cartilage. We hypothesized that these effects are due to stimulation of chondrogenic progenitor cell (CPC) migration toward injured areas of cartilage through focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. CPC chemotaxis in bluntly injured osteochondral explants was examined by confocal microscopy, and migratory activity of cultured CPCs was measured in transwell and monolayer scratch assays. FAK activation by LIPUS was analyzed in cultured CPCs by Western blot. LIPUS effects were compared with the effects of two known chemotactic factors: N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. LIPUS significantly enhanced CPC migration on explants and in cell culture assays. Phosphorylation of FAK at the kinase domain (Tyr 576/577) was maximized by 5 min of exposure to LIPUS at a dose of 27.5 mW/cm(2) and frequency of 3.5 MHz. Treatment with fMLF, but not HMBG1, enhanced FAK activation to a degree similar to that of LIPUS, but neither fMLF nor HMGB1 enhanced the LIPUS effect. LIPUS-induced CPC migration was blocked by suppressing FAK phosphorylation with a Src family kinase inhibitor that blocks FAK phosphorylation. Our results imply that LIPUS might be used to promote cartilage healing by inducing the migration of CPCs to injured sites, which could delay or prevent the onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. PMID:24612644

  13. Deciphering Mode of Action of Functionally Important Regions in the Intrinsically Disordered Paxillin (Residues 1-313) Using Its Interaction with FAT (Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase)

    PubMed Central

    Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Bairy, Sneha G.; Mysore, Sumukh

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play a major role in various cellular functions ranging from transcription to cell migration. Mutations/modifications in such IDPs are shown to be associated with various diseases. Current strategies to study the mode of action and regulatory mechanisms of disordered proteins at the structural level are time consuming and challenging. Therefore, using simple and swift strategies for identifying functionally important regions in unstructured segments and understanding their underlying mechanisms is critical for many applications. Here we propose a simple strategy that employs dissection of human paxillin (residues 1–313) that comprises intrinsically disordered regions, followed by its interaction study using FAT (Focal adhesion targeting domain of focal adhesion kinase) as its binding partner to retrace structural behavior. Our findings show that the paxillin interaction with FAT exhibits a masking and unmasking effect by a putative intra-molecular regulatory region. This phenomenon suggests how cancer associated mutations in paxillin affect its interactions with Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK). The strategy could be used to decipher the mode of regulations and identify functionally relevant constructs for other studies. PMID:26928467

  14. Numerically bridging lamellipodial and filopodial activity during cell spreading reveals a potentially novel trigger of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Y; Vianay, B; Luginbuehl, R; Snedeker, J G

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel approach to modeling cell spreading, and use it to reveal a potentially central mechanism regulating focal adhesion maturation in various cell phenotypes. Actin bundles that span neighboring focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface were assumed to be loaded by intracellular forces in proportion to bundle length. We hypothesized that the length of an actin bundle (with the corresponding accumulated force at its adhesions) may thus regulate adhesion maturation to ensure cell mechanical stability and morphological integrity. We developed a model to test this hypothesis, implementing a "top-down" approach to simplify certain cellular processes while explicitly incorporating complexity of other key subcellular mechanisms. Filopodial and lamellipodial activities were treated as modular processes with functional spatiotemporal interactions coordinated by rules regarding focal adhesion turnover and actin bundle dynamics. This theoretical framework was able to robustly predict temporal evolution of cell area and cytoskeletal organization as reported from a wide range of cell spreading experiments using micropatterned substrates. We conclude that a geometric/temporal modeling framework can capture the key functional aspects of the rapid spreading phase and resultant cytoskeletal complexity. Hence the model is used to reveal mechanistic insight into basic cell behavior essential for spreading. It demonstrates that actin bundles spanning nascent focal adhesions such that they are aligned to the leading edge may accumulate centripetal endogenous forces along their length, and could thus trigger focal adhesion maturation in a force-length dependent fashion. We suggest that this mechanism could be a central "integrating" factor that effectively coordinates force-mediated adhesion maturation at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface. PMID:22453759

  15. Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor mediates muscarinic stimulation of focal adhesion kinase in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Calandrella, Sean O; Barrett, Kim E; Keely, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    We have previously shown that the Gq protein coupled receptor (GqPCR) agonist, carbachol (CCh), transactivates and recruits epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr)-dependent signaling mechanisms in intestinal epithelial cells. Increasing evidence suggests that GqPCR agonists can also recruit focal adhesion-dependent signaling pathways in some cell types. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if CCh stimulates activation of the focal adhesion-associated protein, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), in intestinal epithelia and, if so, to examine the signaling mechanisms involved. Experiments were carried out on monolayers of T84 cells grown on permeable supports. CCh rapidly induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK in T84 cells. This effect was accompanied by phosphorylation of another focal adhesion-associated protein, paxillin, and association of FAK with paxillin. CCh-stimulated FAK phosphorylation was inhibited by a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, BAPTA/AM (20 microM), and was mimicked by thapsigargin (2 microM), which mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ in a receptor-independent fashion. CCh also induced association of FAK with the EGFr and FAK phosphorylation was attenuated by an EGFr inhibitor, tyrphostin AG1478, and an inhibitor of Src family kinases, PP2. The actin cytoskeleton disruptor, cytochalasin D (20 microM), abolished FAK phosphorylation in response to CCh but did not alter CCh-induced EGFr or ERK MAPK activation. In summary, these data demonstrate that agonists of GqPCRs have the ability to induce FAK activation in intestinal epithelial cells. GqPCR-induced FAK activation is mediated by via a pathway involving transactivation of the EGFr and alterations in the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:15389641

  16. Molecular cloning, structural analysis and functional expression of the proline-rich focal adhesion and microfilament-associated protein VASP.

    PubMed Central

    Haffner, C; Jarchau, T; Reinhard, M; Hoppe, J; Lohmann, S M; Walter, U

    1995-01-01

    The vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), a substrate for cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases in vitro and in intact cells, is associated with actin filaments, focal adhesions and dynamic membrane regions. VASP, cloned here from human HL-60 and canine MDCK cells, is organized into three distinct domains. A central proline-rich domain contains a GPPPPP motif as a single copy and as a 3-fold tandem repeat, as well as three conserved phosphorylation sites for cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases. A C-terminal domain contains a repetitive mixed-charge cluster which is predicted to form an alpha-helix. The hydrodynamic properties of purified human VASP together with the calculated molecular mass of cloned VASP suggest that the native protein is a homotetramer with an elongated structure. VASP over-expressed in transiently transfected BHK21 cells was predominantly detected at stress fibres, at focal adhesions and in F-actin-containing cell surface protrusions, whereas truncated VASP lacking the C-terminal domain was no longer concentrated at focal adhesions. These data indicate that the C-terminal domain is required for anchoring VASP at focal adhesion sites, whereas the central domain is suggested to mediate VASP interaction with profilin. Our results provide evidence for the structural basis by which VASP, both a target of the cAMP and cGMP signal transduction pathways and a component of the actin-based cytoskeleton, including the cytoskeleton-membrane interface, may be able to exchange signals between these networks. Images PMID:7828592

  17. Vasoconstrictor-induced endocytic recycling regulates focal adhesion protein localization and function in vascular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Poythress, Ransom H.; Gallant, Cynthia; Vetterkind, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Turnover of focal adhesions (FAs) is known to be critical for cell migration and adhesion of proliferative vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. However, it is often assumed that FAs in nonmigratory, differentiated VSM (dVSM) cells embedded in the wall of healthy blood vessels are stable structures. Recent work has demonstrated agonist-induced actin polymerization and Src-dependent FA phosphorylation in dVSM cells, suggesting that agonist-induced FA remodeling occurs. However, the mechanisms and extent of FA remodeling are largely unknown in dVSM. Here we show, for the first time, that a distinct subpopulation of dVSM FA proteins, but not the entire FA, remodels in response to the α-agonist phenylephrine. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and zyxin displayed the largest redistributions, while β-integrin and FA kinase showed undetectable redistribution. Vinculin, metavinculin, Src, Crk-associated substrate, and paxillin displayed intermediate degrees of redistribution. Redistributions into membrane fractions were especially prominent, suggesting endosomal mechanisms. Deconvolution microscopy, quantitative colocalization analysis, and Duolink proximity ligation assays revealed that phenylephrine increases the association of FA proteins with early endosomal markers Rab5 and early endosomal antigen 1. Endosomal disruption with the small-molecule inhibitor primaquine inhibits agonist-induced redistribution of FA proteins, confirming endosomal recycling. FA recycling was also inhibited by cytochalasin D, latrunculin B, and colchicine, indicating that the redistribution is actin- and microtubule-dependent. Furthermore, inhibition of endosomal recycling causes a significant inhibition of the rate of development of agonist-induced dVSM contractions. Thus these studies are consistent with the concept that FAs in dVSM cells, embedded in the wall of the aorta, remodel during the action of a vasoconstrictor. PMID:23703522

  18. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase prevents experimental lung fibrosis and myofibroblast formation

    PubMed Central

    Lagares, David; Busnadiego, Oscar; García-Fernández, Rosa Ana; Kapoor, Mohit; Liu, Shangxi; Carter, David E.; Abraham, David; Shi-Wen, Xu; Carreira, Patricia; Fontaine T, Benjamin A; Shea, Barry S; Tager, Andrew M; Leask, Andrew; Lamas, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enhanced adhesive signaling including activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a hallmark of fibroblasts from lung fibrosis patients, and FAK has been therefore hypothesized to be a key mediator of this disease. This study was undertaken to characterize the contribution of FAK to the development of pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro. Methods FAK expression and activity were analyzed in lung tissue samples from lung fibrosis patients by immunohistochemistry. Mice orally treated with the FAK inhibitor, PF-562,271, or with siRNA-mediated silencing of FAK, were exposed to intratracheally instilled bleomycin to induce lung fibrosis, and the lungs were harvested for histological and biochemical analysis. Using endothelin-1 (ET-1) as stimulus, cell adhesion and contraction, as well as profibrotic gene expression were studied in fibroblasts isolated from wild type and FAK-deficient mouse embryos. ET-1-mediated FAK activation and gene expression were studied in primary mouse lung fibroblasts, as well as in wild type and integrin β1-deficient fibroblasts. Results Increased FAK expression and activity are upregulated in fibroblast foci and remodeled vessels in lung fibrosis patients. Pharmacological or siRNA-mediated targeting of FAK resulted in marked abrogation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. Loss of FAK impaired the acquisition of a profibrotic phenotype in response to ET-1. Profibrotic gene expression leading to myofibroblast differentiation required cell adhesion, and was driven by Jun N-terminal kinase activation through integrin β1/FAK signaling. Conclusion These results implicate FAK as a central mediator of fibrogenesis, and highlight this kinase as a potential therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases. PMID:22492165

  19. Laminin α2-Mediated Focal Adhesion Kinase Activation Triggers Alport Glomerular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Delimont, Duane; Dufek, Brianna M.; Meehan, Daniel T.; Zallocchi, Marisa; Gratton, Michael Anne; Phillips, Grady; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages. PMID:24915008

  20. A Chemomechanical Model of Matrix and Nuclear Rigidity Regulation of Focal Adhesion Size.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Lin, Yuan; Driscoll, Tristian P; Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Cukierman, Edna; Mauck, Robert L; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a chemomechanical model describing the growth dynamics of cell-matrix adhesion structures (i.e., focal adhesions (FAs)) is developed. We show that there are three regimes for FA evolution depending on their size. Specifically, nascent adhesions with initial lengths below a critical value that are yet to engage in actin fibers will dissolve, whereas bigger ones will grow into mature FAs with a steady state size. In adhesions where growth surpasses the steady state size, disassembly will occur until their sizes are reduced to the equilibrium state. This finding arises from the fact that polymerization of adhesion proteins is force-dependent. Under actomyosin contraction, individual integrin bonds within small FAs (i.e., nascent adhesions or focal complexes) must transmit higher loads while the phenomenon of stress concentration occurs at the edge of large adhesion patches. As such, an effective stiffness of the FA-extracellular matrix complex that is either too small or too large will be relatively low, resulting in a limited actomyosin pulling force developed at the edge that is insufficient to prevent disassembly. Furthermore, it is found that a stiffer extracellular matrix and/or nucleus, as well as a stronger chemomechanical feedback, will induce larger adhesions along with a higher level of contraction force. Interestingly, switching the extracellular side from an elastic half-space, corresponding to some widely used in vitro gel substrates, to a one-dimensional fiber (as in the case of cells anchoring to a fibrous scaffold in vivo) does not qualitative change these conclusions. Our model predictions are in good agreement with a variety of experimental observations obtained in this study as well as those reported in the literature. Furthermore, this new model, to our knowledge, provides a framework with which to understand how both intracellular and extracellular perturbations lead to changes in adhesion structure number and size. PMID:26536258

  1. Non-channel mechanosensors working at focal adhesion-stress fiber complex.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs) have long been the only established molecular class of cell mechanosensors; however, in the last decade, a variety of non-channel type mechanosensor molecules have been identified. Many of them are focal adhesion-associated proteins that include integrin, talin, and actin. Mechanosensors must be non-soluble molecules firmly interacting with relatively rigid cellular structures such as membranes (in terms of lateral stiffness), cytoskeletons, and adhesion structures. The partner of MSCs is the membrane in which MSC proteins efficiently transduce changes in the membrane tension into conformational changes that lead to channel opening. By contrast, the integrin, talin, and actin filament form a linear complex of which both ends are typically anchored to the extracellular matrices via integrins. Upon cell deformation by forces, this structure turns out to be a portion that efficiently transduces the generated stress into conformational changes of composite molecules, leading to the activation of integrin (catch bond with extracellular matrices) and talin (unfolding to induce vinculin bindings). Importantly, this structure also serves as an "active" mechanosensor to detect substrate rigidity by pulling the substrate with contraction of actin stress fibers (SFs), which may induce talin unfolding and an activation of MSCs in the vicinity of integrins. A recent study demonstrates that the actin filament acts as a mechanosensor with unique characteristics; the filament behaves as a negative tension sensor in which increased torsional fluctuations by tension decrease accelerate ADF/cofilin binding, leading to filament disruption. Here, we review the latest progress in the study of those non-channel mechanosensors and discuss their activation mechanisms and physiological roles. PMID:24965068

  2. LOW-INTENSITY PULSED ULTRASOUND PROMOTES CHONDROGENIC PROGENITOR CELL MIGRATION VIA FOCAL ADHESION KINASE PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kee W.; Ding, Lei; Seol, Dongrim; Lim, Tae-hong; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been frequently studied for its beneficial effects on the repair of injured articular cartilage. Here, we hypothesized that these effects are due to stimulation of chondrogenic progenitor cell (CPC) migration toward injured areas in cartilage through focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. CPC chemotaxis in bluntly impacted osteochondral explants was examined by confocal microscopy and migratory activity of cultured CPCs was measured in trans-well and monolayer scratch assays. FAK activation by LIPUS was analyzed in cultured CPCs by western blot. LIPUS effects were compared with the effects of two known chemotactic factors; formylated-methionine peptides (fMLF), and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. LIPUS significantly enhanced CPC migration on explants and in cell culture assays. Phosphorylation of FAK at the kinase domain (Tyr 576/577) was maximized by 5 minute exposure to LIPUS at a dose of 27.5 mW/cm2 and at a frequency of 3.5 MHz. Treatment with fMLF, but not HMBG1 enhanced FAK activation to a degree similar to LIPUS, but neither fMLF nor HMGB1 enhanced the LIPUS effect. LIPUS-induced CPC migration was blocked by suppressing FAK phosphorylation with a Src family kinases (SFKs) inhibitor that blocks FAK phosphorylation. Our results imply that LIPUS might be utilized to promote cartilage healing by inducing the migration of CPCs to injured sites, which could delay or prevent the onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). PMID:24612644

  3. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton via transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes by myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs/MAL/MKLs)

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Tsuyoshi; Mayanagi, Taira; Sobue, Kenji

    2007-10-01

    RhoA is a crucial regulator of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation through the activation of actin nucleation and polymerization. It also regulates the nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor-A and -B (MRTF-A/B, MAL or MKL 1/2), which are co-activators of serum response factor (SRF). In dominant-negative MRTF-A (DN-MRTF-A)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the expressions of several cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes were down-regulated, and the formation of stress fiber and focal adhesion was severely diminished. MRTF-A/B-knockdown cells also exhibited such cytoskeletal defects. In reporter assays, both RhoA and MRTF-A enhanced promoter activities of these genes in a CArG-box-dependent manner, and DN-MRTF-A inhibited the RhoA-mediated activation of these promoters. In dominant-negative RhoA (RhoA-N19)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the nuclear translocation of MRTF-A/B was predominantly prevented, resulting in the reduced expression of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins. Further, constitutive-active MRTF-A/B increased the expression of endogenous cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins, and thereby rescued the defective phenotype of stress fibers and focal adhesions in RhoA-N19 expressing cells. These results indicate that MRTF-A/B act as pivotal mediators of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation via the transcriptional regulation of a subset of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes.

  4. A Discovery Strategy for Selective Inhibitors of c-Src in Complex with the Focal Adhesion Kinase SH3/SH2-binding Region

    PubMed Central

    Moroco, Jamie A.; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Rust, Heather L.; Choi, Hwan Geun; Hur, Wooyoung; Gray, Nathanael S.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Src tyrosine kinase co-operates with the focal adhesion kinase to regulate cell adhesion and motility. Focal adhesion kinase engages the regulatory SH3 and SH2 domains of c-Src, resulting in localized kinase activation that contributes to tumor cell metastasis. Using assay conditions where c-Src kinase activity required binding to a tyrosine phosphopeptide based on the focal adhesion kinase SH3-SH2 docking sequence, we screened a kinase-biased library for selective inhibitors of the Src/focal adhesion kinase peptide complex versus c-Src alone. This approach identified an aminopyrimidinyl carbamate compound, WH-4-124-2, with nanomolar inhibitory potency and fivefold selectivity for c-Src when bound to the phospho-focal adhesion kinase peptide. Molecular docking studies indicate that WH-4-124-2 may preferentially inhibit the ‘DFG-out’ conformation of the kinase active site. These findings suggest that interaction of c-Src with focal adhesion kinase induces a unique kinase domain conformation amenable to selective inhibition. PMID:25376742

  5. Organization and post-transcriptional processing of focal adhesion kinase gene

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, Jean-Marc; Rouer, Evelyne; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Enslen, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Background Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase critical for processes ranging from embryo development to cancer progression. Although isoforms with specific molecular and functional properties have been characterized in rodents and chicken, the organization of FAK gene throughout phylogeny and its potential to generate multiple isoforms are not well understood. Here, we study the phylogeny of FAK, the organization of its gene, and its post-transcriptional processing in rodents and human. Results A single orthologue of FAK and the related PYK2 was found in non-vertebrate species. Gene duplication probably occurred in deuterostomes after the echinoderma embranchment, leading to the evolution of PYK2 with distinct properties. The amino acid sequence of FAK and PYK2 is conserved in their functional domains but not in their linker regions, with the absence of autophosphorylation site in C. elegans. Comparison of mouse and human FAK genes revealed the existence of multiple combinations of conserved and non-conserved 5'-untranslated exons in FAK transcripts suggesting a complex regulation of their expression. Four alternatively spliced coding exons (13, 14, 16, and 31), previously described in rodents, are highly conserved in vertebrates. Cis-regulatory elements known to regulate alternative splicing were found in conserved alternative exons of FAK or in the flanking introns. In contrast, other reported human variant exons were restricted to Homo sapiens, and, in some cases, other primates. Several of these non-conserved exons may correspond to transposable elements. The inclusion of conserved alternative exons was examined by RT-PCR in mouse and human brain during development. Inclusion of exons 14 and 16 peaked at the end of embryonic life, whereas inclusion of exon 13 increased steadily until adulthood. Study of various tissues showed that inclusion of these exons also occurred, independently from each other, in a tissue-specific fashion

  6. Focal adhesion proteins connect IgE receptors to the cytoskeleton as revealed by micropatterned ligand arrays

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Alexis J.; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Holowka, David; Baird, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    Patterned surfaces that present specific ligands in spatially defined arrays are used to examine structural linkages between clustered IgE receptors (IgE-FcεRI) and the cytoskeleton in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) mast cells. We showed with fluorescence microscopy that cytoskeletal F-actin concentrates in the same regions as cell surface IgE-FcεRI that bind to the micrometer-size patterned ligands. However, the proteins mediating these cytoskeletal connections and their functional relevance were not known. We now show that whereas the adaptor proteins ezrin and moesin do not detectably concentrate with the array of clustered IgE-FcεRI, focal adhesion proteins vinculin, paxillin, and talin, which are known to link F-actin with integrins, accumulate in these regions on the same time scale as F-actin. Moreover, colocalization of these focal adhesion proteins with clustered IgE-FcεRI is enhanced after addition of fibronectin-RGD peptides. Significantly, the most prominent rat basophilic leukemia cell integrin (α5) avoids the patterned regions occupied by the ligands and associates preferentially with exposed regions of the silicon substrate. Thus, spatial separation provided by the patterned surface reveals that particular focal adhesion proteins, which connect to the actin cytoskeleton, associate with ligand-cross-linked IgE-FcεRI, independently of integrins. We investigated the functional role of one of these proteins, paxillin, in IgE-FcεRI-mediated signaling by using small interfering RNA. From these results, we determine that paxillin reduces stimulated phosphorylation of the FcεRI β subunit but enhances stimulated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. The results suggest that paxillin associated with clustered IgE-FcεRI has a net positive effect on FcεRI signaling. PMID:19004813

  7. Simulated Microgravity Alters Actin Cytoskeleton and Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions of Cultured Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovic, J. G.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2008-06-01

    Cytoskeletal alterations occur in several cell types including lymphocytes, glial cells, and osteoblasts, during spaceflight and under simulated microgravity (SMG) (3, 4). One potential mechanism for cytoskeletal gravisensitivity is disruption of extracellular matrix (ECM) and integrin interactions. Focal adhesions are specialized sites of cell-matrix interaction composed of integrins and the diversity of focal adhesion-associated cytoplasmic proteins including vinculin, talin, α-actinin, and actin filaments (4, 5). Integrins produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SMG on F-actin cytoskeleton structure, vinculin focal adhesions, expression of some integrin subtypes and cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow (hMSCs). Simulated microgravity was produced by 3D-clinostat (Dutch Space, Netherlands). Staining of actin fibers with TRITC-phalloidin showed reorganization even after 30 minutes of simulated microgravity. The increasing of cells number with abnormal F-actin was observed after subsequent terms of 3D-clinorotation (6, 24, 48, 120 hours). Randomization of gravity vector altered dimensional structure of stress fibers and resulted in remodeling of actin fibers inside the cells. In addition, we observed vinculin redistribution inside the cells after 6 hours and prolonged terms of clinorotation. Tubulin fibers in a contrast with F-actin and vinculin didn't show any reorganization even after long 3Dclinorotation (120 hours). The expression of integrin α2 increased 1,5-6-fold in clinorotated hMSCs. Also we observed decrease in number of VCAM-1-positive cells and changes in expression of ICAM-1. Taken together, our findings indicate that SMG leads to microfilament and adhesion alterations of hMSCs most probably associated with involvement of some integrin subtypes.

  8. Focal adhesion kinase: predictor of tumour response and risk factor for recurrence after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha; Fernández-Aceñero, Maria Jesús; Borrero-Palacios, Aurea; Del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Martínez-Useros, Javier; Marín-Arango, Juan Pablo; Caramés, Cristina; Vega-Bravo, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Remírez, María; Cruz-Ramos, Marlid; Manzarbeitia, Félix; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Rectal cancer represents about 30% of colorectal cancers, being around 50% locally advanced at presentation. Chemoradiation (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision is the standard of care for these locally advanced stages. However, it is not free of adverse effects and toxicity and the complete pathologic response rate is between 10% and 30%. This makes it extremely important to define factors that can predict response to this therapy. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression has been correlated with worse prognosis in several tumours and its possible involvement in cancer radio- and chemosensitivity has been suggested; however, its role in rectal cancer has not been analysed yet. To analyse the association of FAK expression with tumour response to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer. This study includes 73 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving standard neoadjuvant CRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Focal adhesion kinase protein levels were immunohistochemically analysed in the pre-treatment biopsies of these patients and correlated with tumour response to CRT and patients survival. Low FAK expression was significantly correlated with local and distant recurrence (P = 0.013). Low FAK expression was found to be a predictive marker of tumour response to neoadjuvant therapy (P = 0.007) and patients whose tumours did not express FAK showed a strong association with lower disease-free survival (P = 0.01). Focal adhesion kinase expression predicts neoadjuvant CRT response in rectal cancer patients and it is a clinically relevant risk factor for local and distant recurrence. PMID:27171907

  9. Discovery of Clinical Candidate CEP-37440, a Selective Inhibitor of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK).

    PubMed

    Ott, Gregory R; Cheng, Mangeng; Learn, Keith S; Wagner, Jason; Gingrich, Diane E; Lisko, Joseph G; Curry, Matthew; Mesaros, Eugen F; Ghose, Arup K; Quail, Matthew R; Wan, Weihua; Lu, Lihui; Dobrzanski, Pawel; Albom, Mark S; Angeles, Thelma S; Wells-Knecht, Kevin; Huang, Zeqi; Aimone, Lisa D; Bruckheimer, Elizabeth; Anderson, Nathan; Friedman, Jay; Fernandez, Sandra V; Ator, Mark A; Ruggeri, Bruce A; Dorsey, Bruce D

    2016-08-25

    Analogues structurally related to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor 1 were optimized for metabolic stability. The results from this endeavor not only led to improved metabolic stability, pharmacokinetic parameters, and in vitro activity against clinically derived resistance mutations but also led to the incorporation of activity for focal adhesion kinase (FAK). FAK activation, via amplification and/or overexpression, is characteristic of multiple invasive solid tumors and metastasis. The discovery of the clinical stage, dual FAK/ALK inhibitor 27b, including details surrounding SAR, in vitro/in vivo pharmacology, and pharmacokinetics, is reported herein. PMID:27527804

  10. Kinetic Mechanism and Rate-Limiting Steps of Focal Adhesion Kinase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, Jessica L.; Briand, Jacques; Chen, Stephanie; Lehr, Ruth; McDevitt, Patrick; Zhao, Baoguang; Smallwood, Angela; Concha, Nestor; Oza, Khyati; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Yan, Kang; Villa, James P.; Meek, Thomas D.; Thrall, Sara H.

    2010-12-07

    Steady-state kinetic analysis of focal adhesion kinase-1 (FAK1) was performed using radiometric measurement of phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide substrate (Ac-RRRRRRSETDDYAEIID-NH{sub 2}, FAK-tide) which corresponds to the sequence of an autophosphorylation site in FAK1. Initial velocity studies were consistent with a sequential kinetic mechanism, for which apparent kinetic values k{sub cat} (0.052 {+-} 0.001 s{sup -1}), K{sub MgATP} (1.2 {+-} 0.1 {micro}M), K{sub iMgATP} (1.3 {+-} 0.2 {micro}M), K{sub FAK-tide} (5.6 {+-} 0.4 {micro}M), and K{sub iFAK-tide} (6.1 {+-} 1.1 {micro}M) were obtained. Product and dead-end inhibition data indicated that enzymatic phosphorylation of FAK-tide by FAK1 was best described by a random bi bi kinetic mechanism, for which both E-MgADP-FAK-tide and E-MgATP-P-FAK-tide dead-end complexes form. FAK1 catalyzed the {beta}{gamma}-bridge:{beta}-nonbridge positional oxygen exchange of [{gamma}-{sup 18}O{sub 4}]ATP in the presence of 1 mM [{gamma}-{sup 18}O{sub 4}]ATP and 1.5 mM FAK-tide with a progressive time course which was commensurate with catalysis, resulting in a rate of exchange to catalysis of k{sub x}/k{sub cat} = 0.14 {+-} 0.01. These results indicate that phosphoryl transfer is reversible and that a slow kinetic step follows formation of the E-MgADP-P-FAK-tide complex. Further kinetic studies performed in the presence of the microscopic viscosogen sucrose revealed that solvent viscosity had no effect on k{sub cat}/K{sub FAK-tide}, while k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub MgATP} were both decreased linearly at increasing solvent viscosity. Crystallographic characterization of inactive versus AMP-PNP-liganded structures of FAK1 showed that a large conformational motion of the activation loop upon ATP binding may be an essential step during catalysis and would explain the viscosity effect observed on k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for MgATP but not on k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for FAK-tide. From the positional isotope exchange, viscosity, and

  11. Role of stress fibers and focal adhesions as a mediator for mechano-signal transduction in endothelial cells in situ

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Kazuo; Kano, Yumiko; Ookawara, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    Fluid shear stress is the mechanical force generated by the blood flow which is applied over the apical surface of endothelial cells in situ. The findings of a recent study suggest that stress fibers and its associated focal adhesions play roles in mechano-signal transduction mechanism. Stress fibers are present along the apical and the basal portion of the endothelial cells. Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress and change their morphological characteristics in both their cell shape and cytoskeletal organization. Atherosclerosis is a common disease of the arteries and it occurs in areas around the branching site of blood vessels where the cells are exposed to low fluid shear stress. The organization of stress fibers and focal adhesions are strongly influenced by shear stress, and therefore the generation of atherosclerotic lesions seem to be associated with the cytoskeletal components of endothelial cells. This review describes the possible role of the cytoskeleton as a mechano-transducer in endothelial cells in situ. PMID:19337541

  12. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  13. Focal adhesion linker proteins expression of fibroblast related to adhesion in response to different transmucosal abutment surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Yeon-Hee; Yoon, Mi-Kyeong; Moon, Jung-Sun; Kang, Jee-Hae; Kim, Sun-Hun; Yang, Hong-Seo

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate adherence of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) to transmucosal abutment of dental implant with different surface conditions with time and to investigate the roles of focal adhesion linker proteins (FALPs) involved in HGFs adhesion to abutment surfaces. MATERIALS AND METHODS Morphologies of cultured HGFs on titanium and ceramic discs with different surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Biocompatibility and focal adhesion were evaluated by ultrasonic wave application and cell viability assay. FALPs expression levels were assessed by RT-PCR and western blot. RESULTS There seemed to be little difference in biocompatibility and adhesion strength of HGFs depending on the surface conditions and materials. In all experimental groups, the number of cells remaining on the disc surface after ultrasonic wave application increased more than 2 times at 3 days after seeding compared to 1-day cultured cells and this continued until 7 days of culture. FALPs expression levels, especially of vinculin and paxillin, also increased in 5-day cultured cells compared to 1-day cultured fibroblasts on the disc surface. CONCLUSION These results might suggest that the strength of adhesion of fibroblasts to transmucosal abutment surfaces increases with time and it seemed to be related to expressions of FALPs. PMID:24049577

  14. Focal adhesions are foci for tyrosine-based signal transduction via GIV/Girdin and G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Lo, I-Chung; Kabir, Firooz; Midde, Krishna K.; Wang, Honghui; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    GIV/Girdin is a multimodular signal transducer and a bona fide metastasis-related protein. As a guanidine exchange factor (GEF), GIV modulates signals initiated by growth factors (chemical signals) by activating the G protein Gαi. Here we report that mechanical signals triggered by the extracellular matrix (ECM) also converge on GIV-GEF via β1 integrins and that focal adhesions (FAs) serve as the major hubs for mechanochemical signaling via GIV. GIV interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ligand-activated β1 integrins. Phosphorylation of GIV by FAK enhances PI3K-Akt signaling, the integrity of FAs, increases cell–ECM adhesion, and triggers ECM-induced cell motility. Activation of Gαi by GIV-GEF further potentiates FAK-GIV-PI3K-Akt signaling at the FAs. Spatially restricted signaling via tyrosine phosphorylated GIV at the FAs is enhanced during cancer metastasis. Thus GIV-GEF serves as a unifying platform for integration and amplification of adhesion (mechanical) and growth factor (chemical) signals during cancer progression. PMID:26446841

  15. Ezrin regulates focal adhesion and invadopodia dynamics by altering calpain activity to promote breast cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hoskin, Victoria; Szeto, Alvin; Ghaffari, Abdi; Greer, Peter A.; Côté, Graham P.; Elliott, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Up-regulation of the cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin frequently occurs in aggressive cancer types and is closely linked with metastatic progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms detailing how ezrin is involved in the invasive and metastatic phenotype remain unclear. Here we report a novel function of ezrin in regulating focal adhesion (FA) and invadopodia dynamics, two key processes required for efficient invasion to occur. We show that depletion of ezrin expression in invasive breast cancer cells impairs both FA and invadopodia turnover. We also demonstrate that ezrin-depleted cells display reduced calpain-mediated cleavage of the FA and invadopodia-associated proteins talin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and cortactin and reduced calpain-1–specific membrane localization, suggesting a requirement for ezrin in maintaining proper localization and activity of calpain-1. Furthermore, we show that ezrin is required for cell directionality, early lung seeding, and distant organ colonization but not primary tumor growth. Collectively our results unveil a novel mechanism by which ezrin regulates breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26246600

  16. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Guillermina M; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M Teresa; Eck, Michael J; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  17. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Guillermina M.; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M. Teresa; Eck, Michael J.; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  18. Molecular mechanisms underlying the force-dependent regulation of actin-to-ECM linkage at the focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Sokabe, Masahiro; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2014-01-01

    The linkage of the actin cytoskeleton to extracellular matrices (ECMs) at focal adhesions provides a physical path for cells to exert traction forces on substrates during cellular processes such as migration and morphogenesis. Mechanical strength of the actin-to-ECM linkage increases in response to forces loaded at this linkage. This is achieved by local accumulations of actin filaments, as well as linker proteins connecting actins to integrins, at force-bearing adhesion sites, which leads to an increase in the number of molecular bonds between the actin cytoskeleton- and ECM-bound integrins. Zyxin-dependent actin polymerization and filamin-mediated actin bundling are seemingly involved in the force-dependent actin accumulation. Each actin-integrin link is primarily mediated by the linker protein talin, which is strengthened by another linker protein vinculin connecting the actin filaments to talin in a force-dependent manner. This eliminates slippage between the actin cytoskeleton and talin (clutch mechanism), thus playing a crucial role in creating cell membrane protrusions mediated by actin polymerization. Finally, each integrin-ECM bond is also strengthened when a force is loaded on it, which ensures force transmission at focal adhesions, contributing to stable cell-substrate adhesion in cell migration. PMID:25081617

  19. Expression of DFak56, a Drosophila homolog of vertebrate focal adhesion kinase, supports a role in cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fox, George L.; Rebay, Ilaria; Hynes, Richard O.

    1999-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a highly conserved, cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that has been implicated in promoting cell migration and transmission of antiapoptotic signals in vertebrate cells. In cultured cells, integrin engagement with the extracellular matrix promotes the recruitment of FAK to focal contacts and increases in its phosphotyrosine content and kinase activity, suggesting FAK is an intracellular mediator of integrin signaling. We have identified a Drosophila FAK homolog, DFak56, that is 33% identical to vertebrate FAK, with the highest degree of homology in domains critical for FAK function, including the kinase and focal adhesion targeting domains, and several protein–protein interaction motifs. Furthermore, when expressed in NIH 3T3 cells, DFak56 both localizes to focal contacts and displays the characteristic elevation of phosphotyrosine content in response to plating the cells on fibronectin. During embryogenesis, DFak56 is broadly expressed, and it becomes elevated in the gut and central nervous system at later stages. Consistent with a role in cell migration, we also observe that DFak56 is abundant in the border cells of developing egg chambers before the onset of, and during, their migration. PMID:10611323

  20. Comparative Dynamics of Retrograde Actin Flow and Focal Adhesions: Formation of Nascent Adhesions Triggers Transition from Fast to Slow Flow

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrova, Antonina Y.; Arnold, Katya; Schaub, Sébastien; Vasiliev, Jury M.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Bershadsky, Alexander D.; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow), and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body). Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces) retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base. PMID:18800171

  1. Comparative dynamics of retrograde actin flow and focal adhesions: formation of nascent adhesions triggers transition from fast to slow flow.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Arnold, Katya; Schaub, Sébastien; Vasiliev, Jury M; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Bershadsky, Alexander D; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic actin network at the leading edge of the cell is linked to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions (FAs), and at the same time it undergoes retrograde flow with different dynamics in two distinct zones: the lamellipodium (peripheral zone of fast flow), and the lamellum (zone of slow flow located between the lamellipodium and the cell body). Cell migration involves expansion of both the lamellipodium and the lamellum, as well as formation of new FAs, but it is largely unknown how the position of the boundary between the two flow zones is defined, and how FAs and actin flow mutually influence each other. We investigated dynamic relationship between focal adhesions and the boundary between the two flow zones in spreading cells. Nascent FAs first appeared in the lamellipodium. Within seconds after the formation of new FAs, the rate of actin flow decreased locally, and the lamellipodium/lamellum boundary advanced towards the new FAs. Blocking fast actin flow with cytochalasin D resulted in rapid dissolution of nascent FAs. In the absence of FAs (spreading on poly-L-lysine-coated surfaces) retrograde flow was uniform and the velocity transition was not observed. We conclude that formation of FAs depends on actin dynamics, and in its turn, affects the dynamics of actin flow by triggering transition from fast to slow flow. Extension of the cell edge thus proceeds through a cycle of lamellipodium protrusion, formation of new FAs, advance of the lamellum, and protrusion of the lamellipodium from the new base. PMID:18800171

  2. KSHV-TK is a tyrosine kinase that disrupts focal adhesions and induces Rho-mediated cell contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Michael B; Turner, Rachel; Stevenson, Philip G; Way, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paradoxically, the thymidine kinase (TK) encoded by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an extremely inefficient nucleoside kinase, when compared to TKs from related herpesviruses. We now show that KSHV-TK, in contrast to HSV1-TK, associates with the actin cytoskeleton and induces extensive cell contraction followed by membrane blebbing. These dramatic changes in cell morphology depend on the auto-phosphorylation of tyrosines 65, 85 and 120 in the N-terminus of KSHV-TK. Phosphorylation of tyrosines 65/85 and 120 results in an interaction with Crk family proteins and the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3-Kinase, respectively. The interaction of Crk with KSHV-TK leads to tyrosine phoshorylation of this cellular adaptor. Auto-phosphorylation of KSHV-TK also induces a loss of FAK and paxillin from focal adhesions, resulting in activation of RhoA-ROCK signalling to myosin II and cell contraction. In the absence of FAK or paxillin, KSHV-TK has no effect on focal adhesion integrity or cell morphology. Our observations demonstrate that by acting as a tyrosine kinase, KSHV-TK modulates signalling and cell morphology. PMID:25471072

  3. Phosphoproteomic profiling identifies focal adhesion kinase as a mediator of docetaxel resistance in castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian Y; Hochgräfe, Falko; Lin, Hui-Ming; Castillo, Lesley; Wu, Jianmin; Raftery, Mark J; Martin Shreeve, S; Horvath, Lisa G; Daly, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Docetaxel remains the standard-of-care for men diagnosed with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, only approximately 50% of patients benefit from treatment and all develop docetaxel-resistant disease. Here, we characterize global perturbations in tyrosine kinase signaling associated with docetaxel resistance and thereby develop a potential therapeutic strategy to reverse this phenotype. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics, we identified that metastatic docetaxel-resistant prostate cancer cell lines (DU145-Rx and PC3-Rx) exhibit increased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on Y397 and Y576, in comparison with parental controls (DU145 and PC3, respectively). Bioinformatic analyses identified perturbations in pathways regulating focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton and in protein-protein interaction networks related to these pathways in docetaxel-resistant cells. Treatment with the FAK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) PF-00562271 reduced FAK phosphorylation in the resistant cells, but did not affect cell viability or Akt phosphorylation. Docetaxel administration reduced FAK and Akt phosphorylation, whereas cotreatment with PF-00562271 and docetaxel resulted in an additive attenuation of FAK and Akt phosphorylation and overcame the chemoresistant phenotype. The enhanced efficacy of cotreatment was due to increased autophagic cell death, rather than apoptosis. These data strongly support that enhanced FAK activation mediates chemoresistance in CRPC, and identify a potential clinical niche for FAK TKIs, where coadministration with docetaxel may be used in patients with CRPC to overcome chemoresistance. PMID:24194567

  4. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-01-01

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells. PMID:25965826

  5. Fluid-flow-induced mesenchymal stem cell migration: role of focal adhesion kinase and RhoA kinase sensors.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Brandon D; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-03-01

    The study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration under flow conditions with investigation of the underlying molecular mechanism could lead to a better understanding and outcome in stem-cell-based cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We used peer-reviewed open source software to develop methods for efficiently and accurately tracking, measuring and processing cell migration as well as morphology. Using these tools, we investigated MSC migration under flow-induced shear and tested the molecular mechanism with stable knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RhoA kinase (ROCK). Under steady flow, MSCs migrated following the flow direction in a shear stress magnitude-dependent manner, as assessed by root mean square displacement and mean square displacement, motility coefficient and confinement ratio. Silencing FAK in MSCs suppressed morphology adaptation capability and reduced cellular motility for both static and flow conditions. Interestingly, ROCK silencing significantly increased migration tendency especially under flow. Blocking ROCK, which is known to reduce cytoskeletal tension, may lower the resistance to skeletal remodelling during the flow-induced migration. Our data thus propose a potentially differential role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal tension signalling elements in MSC migration under flow shear. PMID:25589570

  6. Fluid-flow-induced mesenchymal stem cell migration: role of focal adhesion kinase and RhoA kinase sensors

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Brandon D.; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Lim, Jung Yul

    2015-01-01

    The study of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration under flow conditions with investigation of the underlying molecular mechanism could lead to a better understanding and outcome in stem-cell-based cell therapy and regenerative medicine. We used peer-reviewed open source software to develop methods for efficiently and accurately tracking, measuring and processing cell migration as well as morphology. Using these tools, we investigated MSC migration under flow-induced shear and tested the molecular mechanism with stable knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and RhoA kinase (ROCK). Under steady flow, MSCs migrated following the flow direction in a shear stress magnitude-dependent manner, as assessed by root mean square displacement and mean square displacement, motility coefficient and confinement ratio. Silencing FAK in MSCs suppressed morphology adaptation capability and reduced cellular motility for both static and flow conditions. Interestingly, ROCK silencing significantly increased migration tendency especially under flow. Blocking ROCK, which is known to reduce cytoskeletal tension, may lower the resistance to skeletal remodelling during the flow-induced migration. Our data thus propose a potentially differential role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal tension signalling elements in MSC migration under flow shear. PMID:25589570

  7. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces endothelial barrier dysregulation by setting the cross talk between VE-cadherin, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Feng, Shan; Bai, Huiyuan; Zeng, Panying; Chen, Feng; Wu, Chengxiang; Peng, Yi; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Qiuyao; Ye, Qichao; Xue, Qiang; Xu, Xiaoyu; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2015-05-15

    Environmental hazardous material polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction, which may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer metastasis. Our previous studies illustrated the cytotoxic, antiproliferative, and genotoxic effects of a synthetic, quinone-type, highly reactive metabolite of PCB, 2,3,5-trichloro-6-phenyl-[1,4]benzoquinone (PCB29-pQ). Here, we used it as the model compound to investigate its effects on vascular endothelial integrity and permeability. We demonstrated that noncytotoxic doses of PCB29-pQ induced vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin junction disassembly by increasing the phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at Y658. We also found that focal adhesion assembly was required for PCB29-pQ-induced junction breakdown. Focal adhesion site-associated actin stress fibers may serve as holding points for cytoskeletal tension to regulate the cellular contractility. PCB29-pQ exposure promoted the association of actin stress fibers with paxillin-containing focal adhesion sites and enlarged the size/number of focal adhesions. In addition, PCB29-pQ treatment induced phosphorylation of paxillin at Y118. By using pharmacological inhibition, we further demonstrated that p38 activation was necessary for paxillin phosphorylation, whereas extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 activation regulated VE-cadherin phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results indicated that PCB29-pQ stimulates endothelial hyperpermeability by mediating VE-cadherin disassembly, junction breakdown, and focal adhesion formation. Intervention strategies targeting focal adhesion and MAPK signaling could be used as therapeutic approaches for preventing adverse cardiovascular health effects induced by environmental toxicants such as PCBs. PMID:25770237

  8. Identification of methyl violet 2B as a novel blocker of focal adhesion kinase signaling pathway in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwan; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Jiyeon; Han, Gyoonhee; Sim, Taebo

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •FAK signaling cascade in cancer cells is profoundly inhibited by methyl violet 2B. •Methyl violet 2B identified by virtual screening is a novel allosteric FAK inhibitor. •Methyl violet 2B possesses extremely high kinase selectivity. •Methyl violet 2B suppresses strongly the proliferation of cancer cells. •Methyl violet 2B inhibits focal adhesion, invasion and migration of cancer cells. -- Abstract: The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling cascade in cancer cells was profoundly inhibited by methyl violet 2B identified with the structure-based virtual screening. Methyl violet 2B was shown to be a non-competitive inhibitor of full-length FAK enzyme vs. ATP. It turned out that methyl violet 2B possesses extremely high kinase selectivity in biochemical kinase profiling using a large panel of kinases. Anti-proliferative activity measurement against several different cancer cells and Western blot analysis showed that this substance is capable of suppressing significantly the proliferation of cancer cells and is able to strongly block FAK/AKT/MAPK signaling pathways in a dose dependent manner at low nanomolar concentration. Especially, phosphorylation of Tyr925-FAK that is required for full activation of FAK was nearly completely suppressed even with 1 nM of methyl violet 2B in A375P cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, it has never been reported that methyl violet possesses anti-cancer effects. Moreover, methyl violet 2B significantly inhibited FER kinase phosphorylation that activates FAK in cell. In addition, methyl violet 2B was found to induce cell apoptosis and to exhibit strong inhibitory effects on the focal adhesion, invasion, and migration of A375P cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Taken together, these results show that methyl violet 2B is a novel, potent and selective blocker of FAK signaling cascade, which displays strong anti-proliferative activities against a variety of human cancer cells and suppresses adhesion

  9. Activation of focal adhesion kinase through an interaction with β4 integrin contributes to tumorigenicity of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yu-Ling; Lai, I-Rue; Peng, Yu-Ju; Ding, Shih-Torng; Shen, Tang-Long

    2016-06-01

    High expression of either β4 integrin or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been reported in human colon cancer. However, it remains unclear how β4 integrin together with FAK contributes to the tumorigenicity of colon cancer. Here, we demonstrate that the co-overexpression of β4 integrin and FAK positively correlates with advanced stages of human colon cancer. Activated β4 integrin interacts with FAK and subsequently induces FAK phosphorylation at Tyr397. Furthermore, ablation of the β4 integrin/FAK complex and/or FAK activation impair colon cancer cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity. Our data indicate that the β4 integrin/FAK complex and subsequent FAK activation are essential regulators during the tumorigenicity of colon cancer, and we suggest an alternative strategy for colon cancer therapy. PMID:27178753

  10. Expression of focal adhesion kinase in the eutopic endometrium of women with adenomyosis varies with dysmenorrhea and pelvic pain

    PubMed Central

    MU, LIN; CHEN, WEIMIN; MA, YANYAN; ZHENG, WEI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is altered in the eutopic endometrium of female patients with adenomyosis, as compared with that of females without adenomyosis. The expression of FAK was assessed by immunohistochemical, western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses. An elevated expression of FAK mRNA and protein was identified in the eutopic endometrium of patients with adenomyosis compared with patients without adenomyosis (P<0.05). In addition, a positive correlation was detected between FAK protein expression and dysmenorrhea and pelvic pain in females with adenomyosis (P<0.05). The significant increase of FAK expression identified in the eutopic endometrium of females with adenomyosis, as well as the association of FAK protein expression with dysmenorrhea and pelvic pain, suggested that FAK may play a role in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. PMID:26640570

  11. Effects of PPARgamma agonists on cell survival and focal adhesions in a Chinese thyroid carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Seu-Mei; Wu, Jiahn-Chun; Huang, Shih-Horng

    2006-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonists cause cell death in several types of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of two PPARgamma agonists, ciglitazone and 15-deoxy-delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2), on the survival of thyroid carcinoma CGTH W-2 cells. Both ciglitazone and 15dPGJ2 decreased cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell death was mainly due to apoptosis, with a minor contribution from necrosis. Increased levels of active caspase 3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and cytosolic cytochrome-c were noted. In addition, ciglitazone and 15dPGJ2 induced detachment of CGTH W-2 cells from the culture substratum. Both the protein levels and immunostaining signals of focal adhesion (FA) proteins, including vinculin, integrin beta1, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and paxillin were decreased after PPARgamma agonist treatment. Meanwhile, reduced phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin was noted. Furthermore, PPARgamma agonists induced expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase-PEST (PTP-PEST), and of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN). The upregulation of these phosphatases might contribute to the dephosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, since pre-treatment with orthovanadate prevented PPARgamma agonist-induced dephosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. Perturbation of CGTH W-2 cells with anti-integrin beta1 antibodies induced FA disruption and apoptosis in the same cells, thus the downregulation of integrin beta1 by PPARgamma agonists resulted in FA disassembly and might induce apoptosis via anoikis. Our results suggested the presence of crosstalk between apoptosis and integrin-FA signaling. Moreover, upregulation and activation of PTEN was correlated with reduced phosphorylation of Akt, and this consequence disfavored cell survival. In conclusion, PPARgamma agonists induced apoptosis of thyroid carcinoma cells via the cytochrome-c caspase 3 and PTEN

  12. The mysterious nature of bacterial surface (gliding) motility: A focal adhesion-based mechanism in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Islam, Salim T; Mignot, Tâm

    2015-10-01

    Motility of bacterial cells promotes a range of important physiological phenomena such as nutrient detection, harm avoidance, biofilm formation, and pathogenesis. While much research has been devoted to the mechanism of bacterial swimming in liquid via rotation of flagellar filaments, the mechanisms of bacterial translocation across solid surfaces are poorly understood, particularly when cells lack external appendages such as rotary flagella and/or retractile type IV pili. Under such limitations, diverse bacteria at the single-cell level are still able to "glide" across solid surfaces, exhibiting smooth translocation of the cell along its long axis. Though multiple gliding mechanisms have evolved in different bacterial classes, most remain poorly characterized. One exception is the gliding motility mechanism used by the Gram-negative social predatory bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. The available body of research suggests that M. xanthus gliding motility is mediated by trafficked multi-protein (Glt) cell envelope complexes, powered by proton-driven flagellar stator homologues (Agl). Through coupling to the substratum via polysaccharide slime, Agl-Glt assemblies can become fixed relative to the substratum, forming a focal adhesion site. Continued directional transport of slime-associated substratum-fixed Agl-Glt complexes would result in smooth forward movement of the cell. In this review, we have provided a comprehensive synthesis of the latest mechanistic and structural data for focal adhesion-mediated gliding motility in M. xanthus, with emphasis on the role of each Agl and Glt protein. Finally, we have also highlighted the possible connection between the motility complex and a new type of spore coat assembly system, suggesting that gliding and cell envelope synthetic complexes are evolutionarily linked. PMID:26520023

  13. Quantitative changes in focal adhesion kinase and its inhibitor, FRNK, drive load-dependent expression of costamere components.

    PubMed

    Klossner, Stephan; Li, Ruowei; Ruoss, Severin; Durieux, Anne-Cécile; Flück, Martin

    2013-09-15

    Costameres are mechanosensory sites of focal adhesion in the sarcolemma that reinforce the muscle-fiber composite and provide an anchor for myofibrillogenesis. We hypothesized that elevated content of the integrin-associated regulator of costamere turnover in culture, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), drives changes in costamere component content in antigravity muscle in a load-dependent way in correspondence with altered muscle weight. The content of FAK in soleus muscle being phosphorylated at autoregulatory tyrosine 397 (FAK-pY397) was increased after 20 s of stretch. FAK-pY397 content remained elevated after 24 h of stretch-overload due to upregulated FAK content. Overexpression of FAK in soleus muscle fibers by means of gene electrotransfer increased the β1-integrin (+56%) and meta-vinculin (+88%) content. α7-Integrin (P = 0.46) and γ-vinculin (P = 0.18) content was not altered after FAK overexpression. Co-overexpression of the FAK inhibitor FAK-related nonkinase (FRNK) reduced FAK-pY397 content by 33% and increased the percentage of fast-type fibers that arose in connection with hybrid fibers with gene transfer. Transplantation experiments confirmed the association of FRNK expression with slow-to-fast fiber transformation. Seven days of unloading blunted the elevation of FAK-pY397, β1-integrin, and meta-vinculin content with FAK overexpression, and this was reversed by 1 day of reloading. The results highlight that the expression of components for costameric attachment sites of myofibrils is under load- and fiber type-related control via FAK and its inhibitor FRNK. PMID:23904105

  14. Formation of focal adhesion-stress fibre complexes coordinated by adhesive and non-adhesive surface domains.

    PubMed

    Zimerman, B; Arnold, M; Ulmer, J; Blümmel, J; Besser, A; Spatz, J P; Geiger, B

    2004-04-01

    Cell motility consists of repeating cycles of protrusion of a leading edge in the direction of migration, attachment of the advancing membrane to the matrix, and pulling of the trailing edge forward. In this dynamic process there is a major role for the cytoskeleton, which drives the protrusive events via polymerisation of actin in the lamellipodium, followed by actomyosin contractility. To study the transition of the actin cytoskeleton from a 'protrusive' to 'retractive' form, we have monitored the formation of focal adhesions and stress fibres during cell migration on a micro-patterned surface. This surface consisted of parallel arrays of 2 microm-wide, fibronectin-coated gold stripes, separated by non-adhesive (poly(ethylene glycol)-coated) glass areas with variable width, ranging from 4-12 microm. Monitoring the spreading of motile cells indicated that cell spreading was equally effective along and across the adhesive stripes, as long as the non-adhesive spaces between them did not exceed 6 microm. When the width of the PEG region was 8 microm or more, cells became highly polarised upon spreading, and failed to reach the neighboring adhesive stripes. It was also noted that as soon as the protruding lamella successfully crossed the PEG-coated area and reached an adhesive region, the organisation of actin in that area was transformed from a diffuse meshwork into a bundle, oriented perpendicularly to the stripes and anchored at its ends in focal adhesions. This transition depends on actomyosin-based contractility and is apparently triggered by the adhesion to the rigid fibronectin surface. PMID:16475844

  15. Dipeptidyl peptidase 9 subcellular localization and a role in cell adhesion involving focal adhesion kinase and paxillin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Yiqian; Wadham, Carol; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Keane, Fiona M; Gorrell, Mark D

    2015-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 9 (DPP9) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the DPP4 gene and protease family. Deciphering the biological functions of DPP9 and its roles in pathogenesis has implicated DPP9 in tumor biology, the immune response, apoptosis, intracellular epidermal growth factor-dependent signaling and cell adhesion and migration. We investigated the intracellular distribution of DPP9 chimeric fluorescent proteins and consequent functions of DPP9. We showed that while some DPP9 is associated with mitochondria, the strongest co-localization was with microtubules. Under steady state conditions, DPP9 was not seen at the plasma membrane, but upon stimulation with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or epidermal growth factor, some DPP9 re-distributed towards the ruffling membrane. DPP9 was seen at the leading edge of the migrating cell and co-localized with the focal adhesion proteins, integrin-β1 and talin. DPP9 gene silencing and treatment with a DPP8/DPP9 specific inhibitor both reduced cell adhesion and migration. Expression of integrin-β1 and talin was decreased in DPP9-deficient and DPP9-enzyme-inactive cells. There was a concomitant decrease in the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and paxillin, indicating that DPP9 knockdown or enzyme inhibition suppressed the associated adhesion signaling pathway, causing impaired cell movement. These novel findings provide mechanistic insights into the regulatory role of DPP9 in cell movement, and may thus implicate DPP9 in tissue and tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:25486458

  16. Mammary gland-specific ablation of focal adhesion kinase reduces the incidence of p53-mediated mammary tumour formation

    PubMed Central

    van Miltenburg, M H A M; van Nimwegen, M J; Tijdens, I; Lalai, R; Kuiper, R; Klarenbeek, S; Schouten, P C; de Vries, A; Jonkers, J; van de Water, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elevated expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) occurs in numerous human cancers including colon-, cervix- and breast cancer. Although several studies have implicated FAK in mammary tumour formation induced by ectopic oncogene expression, evidence supporting a role for FAK in spontaneous mammary tumour development caused by loss of tumour suppressor genes such as p53 is lacking. Alterations in the tumour suppressor gene p53 have been implicated in over 50% of human breast cancers. Given that elevated FAK expression highly correlates with p53 mutation status in human breast cancer, we set out to investigate the importance of FAK in p53-mediated spontaneous mammary tumour development. Methods: To directly assess the role of FAK, we generated mice with conditional inactivation of FAK and p53. We generated female p53lox/lox/FAK+/+/WapCre, p53lox/lox/FAKflox/+/WapCre and p53lox/lox/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice, and mice with WapCre-mediated conditional expression of p53R270H, the mouse equivalent of human p53R273H hot spot mutation, together with conditional deletion of FAK, P53R270H/+/FAKlox/+/WapCre and p53R270H/+/FAKflox/−/WapCre mice. All mice were subjected to one pregnancy to induce WapCre-mediated deletion of p53 or expression of p53 R270H, and Fak genes flanked by two loxP sites, and subsequently followed the development of mammary tumours. Results: Using this approach, we show that FAK is important for p53-induced mammary tumour development. In addition, mice with the mammary gland-specific conditional expression of p53 point mutation R270H, the mouse equivalent to human R273H, in combination with conditional deletion of Fak showed reduced incidence of p53R270H-induced mammary tumours. In both models these effects of FAK were related to reduced proliferation in preneoplastic lesions in the mammary gland ductal structures. Conclusions: Mammary gland-specific ablation of FAK hampers p53-regulated spontaneous mammary tumour formation. Focal adhesion

  17. New single-molecule speckle microscopy reveals modification of the retrograde actin flow by focal adhesions at nanometer scales.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Smith, Matthew B; Ryan, Gillian L; Kiuchi, Tai; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-04-01

    Speckle microscopy directly visualizes the retrograde actin flow, which is believed to promote cell-edge protrusion when linked to focal adhesions (FAs). However, it has been argued that, due to rapid actin turnover, the use of green fluorescent protein-actin, the lack of appropriate analysis algorithms, and technical difficulties, speckle microscopy does not necessarily report the flow velocities of entire actin populations. In this study, we developed a new, user-friendly single-molecule speckle (SiMS) microscopy using DyLight dye-labeled actin. Our new SiMS method enables in vivo nanometer-scale displacement analysis with a low localization error of ±8-8.5 nm, allowing accurate flow-velocity measurement for actin speckles with lifetime <5 s. In lamellipodia, both short- and long-lived F-actin molecules flow with the same speed, indicating they are part of a single actin network. These results do not support coexistence of F-actin populations with different flow speeds, which is referred to as the lamella hypothesis. Mature FAs, but not nascent adhesions, locally obstruct the retrograde flow. Interestingly, the actin flow in front of mature FAs is fast and biased toward FAs, suggesting that mature FAs attract the flow in front and actively remodel the local actin network. PMID:24501425

  18. Therapeutic effects of tyroservatide on metastasis of lung cancer and its mechanism affecting integrin–focal adhesion kinase signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Lan; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Meng; Song, Xiao-meng; Jia, Jing; Wang, Song; Li, Jin-ping; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Lin, Gang; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Tyroservatide (YSV) can inhibit the growth and metastasis of mouse lung cancer significantly. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of tripeptide YSV on metastasis of human lung cancer cells and explored its possible mechanism that affects integrin–focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signal transduction in tumor cells. YSV significantly inhibited the adhesion and the invasion of highly metastatic human lung cancer cell lines 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299. In addition, YSV significantly inhibited phosphorylation of FAK Tyr397 and FAK Tyr576/577 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells in vitro. And the mRNA level and protein expression of FAK in these human lung cancer cells decreased at the same time. YSV also significantly inhibited mRNA and protein levels of integrin β1 and integrin β3 in the 95D, A549, and NCI-H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our research showed that YSV inhibited adhesion and invasion of human lung cancer cells and exhibited therapeutic effects on metastasis of lung cancer. PMID:27041993

  19. Structural Basis of Focal Adhesion Localization of LIM-only Adaptor PINCH by Integrin-linked Kinase*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanwu; Wang, Xiaoxia; Hawkins, Cheryl A.; Chen, Kan; Vaynberg, Julia; Mao, Xian; Tu, Yizeng; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wang, Jinbu; Wang, Yun-xing; Wu, Chuanyue; Tjandra, Nico; Qin, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The LIM-only adaptor PINCH (the particularly interesting cysteine- and histidine-rich protein) plays a pivotal role in the assembly of focal adhesions (FAs), supramolecular complexes that transmit mechanical and biochemical information between extracellular matrix and actin cytoskeleton, regulating diverse cell adhesive processes such as cell migration, cell spreading, and survival. A key step for the PINCH function is its localization to FAs, which depends critically on the tight binding of PINCH to integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Here we report the solution NMR structure of the core ILK·PINCH complex (28 kDa, KD ∼ 68 nm) involving the N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of ILK and the first LIM domain (LIM1) of PINCH. We show that the ILK ARD exhibits five sequentially stacked ankyrin repeat units, which provide a large concave surface to grip the two contiguous zinc fingers of the PINCH LIM1. The highly electrostatic interface is evolutionally conserved but differs drastically from those of known ARD and LIM bound to other types of protein domains. Consistently mutation of a hot spot in LIM1, which is not conserved in other LIM domains, disrupted the PINCH binding to ILK and abolished the PINCH targeting to FAs. These data provide atomic insight into a novel modular recognition and demonstrate how PINCH is specifically recruited by ILK to mediate the FA assembly and cell-extracellular matrix communication. PMID:19117955

  20. The small G-protein MglA connects to the MreB actin cytoskeleton at bacterial focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Treuner-Lange, Anke; Macia, Eric; Guzzo, Mathilde; Hot, Edina; Faure, Laura M.; Jakobczak, Beata; Espinosa, Leon; Alcor, Damien; Ducret, Adrien; Keilberg, Daniela; Castaing, Jean Philippe; Lacas Gervais, Sandra; Franco, Michel

    2015-01-01

    In Myxococcus xanthus the gliding motility machinery is assembled at the leading cell pole to form focal adhesions, translocated rearward to propel the cell, and disassembled at the lagging pole. We show that MglA, a Ras-like small G-protein, is an integral part of this machinery. In this function, MglA stimulates the assembly of the motility complex by directly connecting it to the MreB actin cytoskeleton. Because the nucleotide state of MglA is regulated spatially and MglA only binds MreB in the guanosine triphosphate–bound form, the motility complexes are assembled at the leading pole and dispersed at the lagging pole where the guanosine triphosphatase activating protein MglB disrupts the MglA–MreB interaction. Thus, MglA acts as a nucleotide-dependent molecular switch to regulate the motility machinery spatially. The function of MreB in motility is independent of its function in peptidoglycan synthesis, representing a coopted function. Our findings highlight a new function for the MreB cytoskeleton and suggest that G-protein–cytoskeleton interactions are a universally conserved feature. PMID:26169353

  1. Vascular growth responses to chronic arterial occlusion are unaffected by myeloid specific focal adhesion kinase (FAK) deletion

    PubMed Central

    Heuslein, Joshua L.; Murrell, Kelsey P.; Leiphart, Ryan J.; Llewellyn, Ryan A.; Meisner, Joshua K.; Price, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Arteriogenesis, or the lumenal expansion of pre-existing arterioles in the presence of an upstream occlusion, is a fundamental vascular growth response. Though alterations in shear stress stimulate arteriogenesis, the migration of monocytes into the perivascular space surrounding collateral arteries and their differentiation into macrophages is critical for this vascular growth response to occur. Focal adhesion kinase’s (FAK) role in regulating cell migration has recently been expanded to primary macrophages. We therefore investigated the effect of the myeloid-specific conditional deletion of FAK on vascular remodeling in the mouse femoral arterial ligation (FAL) model. Using laser Doppler perfusion imaging, whole mount imaging of vascular casted gracilis muscles, and immunostaining for CD31 in gastrocnemius muscles cross-sections, we found that there were no statistical differences in perfusion recovery, arteriogenesis, or angiogenesis 28 days after FAL. We therefore sought to determine FAK expression in different myeloid cell populations. We found that FAK is expressed at equally low levels in Ly6Chi and Ly6Clo blood monocytes, however expression is increased over 2-fold in bone marrow derived macrophages. Ultimately, these results suggest that FAK is not required for monocyte migration to the perivascular space and that vascular remodeling following arterial occlusion occurs independently of myeloid specific FAK. PMID:27244251

  2. Expression, purification and crystallization of a BH domain from the GTPase regulatory protein associated with focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, P J; Derewenda, U; Taylor, J; Parsons, T J; Derewenda, Z S

    1999-01-01

    Signaling by small GTPases is down-regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) which enhance the rate of GTP hydrolysis. The activity of GAPs specific for Rho GTPases resides in the BH domain, many homologues of which are found in any mammalian genome. One of them was identified in the GTPase regulator associated with focal-adhesion kinase (GRAF). It shares approximately 20% sequence identity with p50RhoGAP. This GAP activates RhoA and Cdc42Hs, but not Rac. In order to dissect the molecular basis of this specificity, a 231-residue-long fragment corresponding to the BH domain of GRAF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Trigonal crystals, of space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 63.5, c = 90.38 A were grown from solutions of PEG 6000. Data to 2.15 A were collected from a flash-frozen sample on an R-AXIS IV imaging-plate detector mounted on a rotating anode X-ray generator. PMID:10232922

  3. Autophosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase, pp125FAK, directs SH2-dependent binding of pp60src.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, M D; Hildebrand, J D; Shannon, J D; Fox, J W; Vines, R R; Parsons, J T

    1994-01-01

    The phosphorylation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) on tyrosine residues is a critical regulatory event that modulates catalytic activity and triggers the physical association of PTKs with Src homology 2 (SH2)-containing proteins. The integrin-linked focal adhesion kinase, pp125FAK, exhibits extracellular matrix-dependent phosphorylation on tyrosine and physically associates with two nonreceptor PTKs, pp60src and pp59fyn, via their SH2 domains. Herein, we identify Tyr-397 as the major site of tyrosine phosphorylation on pp125FAK both in vivo and in vitro. Tyrosine 397 is located at the juncture of the N-terminal and catalytic domains, a novel site for PTK autophosphorylation. Mutation of Tyr-397 to a nonphosphorylatable residue dramatically impairs the phosphorylation of pp125FAK on tyrosine in vivo and in vitro. The mutation of Tyr-397 to Phe also inhibits the formation of stable complexes with pp60src in cells expressing Src and FAK397F, suggesting that autophosphorylation of pp125FAK may regulate the association of pp125FAK with Src family kinases in vivo. The identification of Tyr-397 as a major site for FAK autophosphorylation provides one of the first examples of a cellular protein containing a high-affinity binding site for a Src family kinase SH2 domain. This finding has implications for models describing the mechanisms of action of pp125FAK, the regulation of the Src family of PTKs, and signal transduction through the integrins. Images PMID:7509446

  4. Vascular growth responses to chronic arterial occlusion are unaffected by myeloid specific focal adhesion kinase (FAK) deletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuslein, Joshua L.; Murrell, Kelsey P.; Leiphart, Ryan J.; Llewellyn, Ryan A.; Meisner, Joshua K.; Price, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    Arteriogenesis, or the lumenal expansion of pre-existing arterioles in the presence of an upstream occlusion, is a fundamental vascular growth response. Though alterations in shear stress stimulate arteriogenesis, the migration of monocytes into the perivascular space surrounding collateral arteries and their differentiation into macrophages is critical for this vascular growth response to occur. Focal adhesion kinase’s (FAK) role in regulating cell migration has recently been expanded to primary macrophages. We therefore investigated the effect of the myeloid-specific conditional deletion of FAK on vascular remodeling in the mouse femoral arterial ligation (FAL) model. Using laser Doppler perfusion imaging, whole mount imaging of vascular casted gracilis muscles, and immunostaining for CD31 in gastrocnemius muscles cross-sections, we found that there were no statistical differences in perfusion recovery, arteriogenesis, or angiogenesis 28 days after FAL. We therefore sought to determine FAK expression in different myeloid cell populations. We found that FAK is expressed at equally low levels in Ly6Chi and Ly6Clo blood monocytes, however expression is increased over 2-fold in bone marrow derived macrophages. Ultimately, these results suggest that FAK is not required for monocyte migration to the perivascular space and that vascular remodeling following arterial occlusion occurs independently of myeloid specific FAK.

  5. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase interacts with vinculin at focal adhesions during fatty acid-stimulated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    George, Margaret D.; Wine, Robert N.; Lackford, Brad; Kissling, Grace E.; Akiyama, Steven K.; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid stimulates cell adhesion by activating α2β1 integrins in a process that depends on protein kinases, including p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. Here, we describe the interaction of cytoskeletal components with key signaling molecules that contribute to spreading of, and morphological changes in, arachidonic acid-treated MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells. Arachidonic acid-treated cells showed increased attachment and spreading on collagen type IV as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Fatty acid-treated cells displayed short cortical actin filaments associated with an increased number of β1 integrin-containing pseudopodia whereas untreated cells displayed elongated stress fibers and fewer clusters of β1 integrins. Confocal microscopy of arachidonic acid-treated cells showed that vinculin and phospho-p38 both appeared enriched in pseudopodia and at the tips of actin filaments, and fluorescence ratio imaging indicated the increase was specific for the phospho-(active) form of p38. Immunoprecipitates of phospho-p38 from extracts of arachidonic acid-treated cells contained vinculin, and GST-vinculin fusion proteins carrying the central region of vinculin bound phospho-p38, whereas fusion proteins expressing the terminal portions of vinculin did not. These data suggest that phospho-p38 associates with particular domains on critical focal adhesion proteins that are involved in tumor cell adhesion and spreading and that this association can be regulated by factors in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24219282

  6. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiangyang; Wang, Yao; Liu, Chengmei; Lu, Quqin; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guoan; Rao, Hai; Luo, Shiwen

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  7. Cell nanomechanics and focal adhesions are regulated by retinol and conjugated linoleic acid in a dose-dependent manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberberg, Yaron R.; Yakubov, Gleb E.; Horton, Michael A.; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2009-07-01

    Retinol and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) have previously been shown to have an important role in gene expression and various cellular processes, including differentiation, proliferation and cell death. In this study we have investigated the effect of retinol and CLA, both individually and in combination, on the intracellular cytoskeleton, focal adhesions (FAs) and the nanomechanical properties of 3T3 fibroblasts. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in the formation of FAs following treatment with either compound, which was directly correlated to an increase in cell height (>30%) and a decrease in the measured Young's modulus (~28%). Furthermore, treatments with both compounds demonstrated an increased effect and led to a reduction of>70% in the average number of FAs per cell and a decrease of >50% in average cell stiffness. These data reveal that retinol and CLA disrupt FA formation, leading to an increase in cell height and a significant decrease in stiffness. These results may broaden our understanding of the interplay between cell nanomechanics and cellular contact with the external microenvironment, and help to shed light on the important role of retinoids and CLA in health and disease.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis Initiated by Dephosphorylation and Downregulation of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Jiang, Guoqiang; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Hunter, Tony

    2001-01-01

    Upregulated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) expression and EGFR-induced signaling have been correlated with progression to invasion and metastasis in a wide variety of carcinomas, but the mechanism behind this is not well understood. We show here that, in various human carcinoma cells that overexpress EGFR, EGF treatment induced rapid tyrosine dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) associated with downregulation of its kinase activity. The downregulation of FAK activity was both required and sufficient for EGF-induced refractile morphological changes, detachment of cells from the extracellular matrix, and increased tumor cell motility, invasion, and metastasis. Tumor cells with downregulated FAK activity became less adherent to the extracellular matrix. However, once cells started reattaching, FAK activity was restored by activated integrin signaling. Moreover, this process of readhesion and spreading could not be abrogated by further EGF stimulation. Interruption of transforming growth factor alpha-EGFR autocrine regulation with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor led to a substantial increase in FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibition of tumor cell invasion in vitro. Consistent with this, FAK tyrosine phosphorylation was reduced in cells from tumors growing in transplanted, athymic, nude mice, which have an intact autocrine regulation of the EGFR. We suggest that the dynamic regulation of FAK activity, initiated by EGF-induced downregulation of FAK leading to cell detachment and increased motility and invasion, followed by integrin-dependent reactivation during readhesion, plays a role in EGF-associated tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:11359909

  9. Down-regulation of integrin β1 and focal adhesion kinase in renal glomeruli under various hemodynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoli; Wang, Wei; Wang, Juan; Yin, Xiaohui; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Wang, Lining; Li, Kai; Li, Zilong

    2014-01-01

    Given that integrin β1 is an important component of the connection to maintain glomerular structural integrity, by binding with multiple extracellular matrix proteins and mediating intracellular signaling. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is the most essential intracellular integrator in the integrin β1-FAK signalling pathway. Here, we investigated the changes of the two molecules and visualized the possible interaction between them under various hemodynamic conditions in podocytes. Mice kidney tissues were prepared using in vivo cryotechnique (IVCT) and then were stained and observed using light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. The expression of these molecules were examined by western blot. Under the normal condition, integrin β1 stained continually and evenly at the membrane, and FAK was located in the cytoplasm and nuclei of the podocytes. There were significant colocalized plaques of two molecules. But under acute hypertensive and cardiac arrest conditions, integrin β1 decreased and stained intermittently. Similarly, FAK decreased and appeared uneven. Additionally, FAK translocated to the nuclei of the podocytes. As a result, the colocalization of integrin β1 and FAK reduced obviously under these conditions. Western blot assay showed a consistent result with the immunostaining. Collectively, the abnormal redistribution and decreased expressions of integrin β1 and FAK are important molecular events in regulating the functions of podocytes under abnormal hemodynamic conditions. IVCT could offer considerable advantages for morphological analysis when researching renal diseases. PMID:24705394

  10. Stonin1 mediates endocytosis of the proteoglycan NG2 and regulates focal adhesion dynamics and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Feutlinske, Fabian; Browarski, Marietta; Ku, Min-Chi; Trnka, Philipp; Waiczies, Sonia; Niendorf, Thoralf; Stallcup, William B.; Glass, Rainer; Krause, Eberhard; Maritzen, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Cellular functions, ranging from focal adhesion (FA) dynamics and cell motility to tumour growth, are orchestrated by signals cells receive from outside via cell surface receptors. Signalling is fine-tuned by the exo–endocytic cycling of these receptors to control cellular responses such as FA dynamics, which determine cell motility. How precisely endocytosis regulates turnover of the various cell surface receptors remains unclear. Here we identify Stonin1, an endocytic adaptor of unknown function, as a regulator of FA dynamics and cell motility, and demonstrate that it facilitates the internalization of the oncogenic proteoglycan NG2, a co-receptor of integrins and platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Embryonic fibroblasts obtained from Stonin1-deficient mice display a marked surface accumulation of NG2, increased cellular signalling and defective FA disassembly as well as altered cellular motility. These data establish Stonin1 as a specific adaptor for the endocytosis of NG2 and as an important factor for FA dynamics and cell migration. PMID:26437238

  11. Role of c-Src and focal adhesion kinase in progression and metastasis of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Planas-Silva, Maricarmen D. . E-mail: mcplanas@psu.edu; Bruggeman, Richard D.; Grenko, Ronald T.; Stanley Smith, J.

    2006-03-03

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinases c-Src and focal adhesion kinase (Fak) mediate signal transduction pathways that regulate cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and metastasis. Here, we investigated whether c-Src and Fak are activated during progression of hormone-dependent breast cancer. Maximally active c-Src was overexpressed in a subset of tamoxifen-resistant variants and in metastases of recurrent hormone-treated breast cancer. Active Fak was also frequently observed in these tumors. We also show that estrogen receptor (ER) can bind to Fak and that estrogen can modulate Fak autophosphorylation supporting a cross-talk between these two pathways. Inhibition of c-Src activity blocked proliferation of all tamoxifen-resistant variants, suggesting that inhibitors of c-Src-Fak activity may delay or prevent progression and metastasis of ER-positive tumors. These studies also raise the possibility that fully active forms of c-Src and Fak in breast tumors may be biomarkers to predict tamoxifen resistance and/or risk of recurrence in ER-positive breast cancer.

  12. The small G-protein MglA connects to the MreB actin cytoskeleton at bacterial focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Treuner-Lange, Anke; Macia, Eric; Guzzo, Mathilde; Hot, Edina; Faure, Laura M; Jakobczak, Beata; Espinosa, Leon; Alcor, Damien; Ducret, Adrien; Keilberg, Daniela; Castaing, Jean Philippe; Lacas Gervais, Sandra; Franco, Michel; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Mignot, Tâm

    2015-07-20

    In Myxococcus xanthus the gliding motility machinery is assembled at the leading cell pole to form focal adhesions, translocated rearward to propel the cell, and disassembled at the lagging pole. We show that MglA, a Ras-like small G-protein, is an integral part of this machinery. In this function, MglA stimulates the assembly of the motility complex by directly connecting it to the MreB actin cytoskeleton. Because the nucleotide state of MglA is regulated spatially and MglA only binds MreB in the guanosine triphosphate-bound form, the motility complexes are assembled at the leading pole and dispersed at the lagging pole where the guanosine triphosphatase activating protein MglB disrupts the MglA-MreB interaction. Thus, MglA acts as a nucleotide-dependent molecular switch to regulate the motility machinery spatially. The function of MreB in motility is independent of its function in peptidoglycan synthesis, representing a coopted function. Our findings highlight a new function for the MreB cytoskeleton and suggest that G-protein-cytoskeleton interactions are a universally conserved feature. PMID:26169353

  13. Mutation of Drosophila Focal Adhesion Kinase Induces Bang-Sensitive Behavior and Disrupts Glial Function, Axonal Conduction and Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Atsushi; Grabbe, Caroline; Lee, Jihye; Lee, Jisue; Palmer, Ruth H.; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2009-01-01

    The role of the conserved Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the development and physiological functions of the CNS has long been an area of interest among neuroscientists. In this report, we observe that Drosophila mutants lacking Fak56 exhibit a decreased life span, accompanied by a bang-sensitive phenotype, which is characterised by sensitivity to mechanical and high-frequency electrical stimulation. Fak56 mutant animals display lower thresholds and higher rates of seizures in response to electroconvulsive stimuli, and direct measurements of action potential conduction in larval segmental nerves demonstrate a slowed propagation speed and failure during high-frequency nerve stimulation. In addition, neuromuscular junctions in Fak56 mutant animals display transmission blockade during high-frequency activity as a result of action potential failure. Endogenous Fak56 protein is abundant in glial cells ensheathing the axon bundles, and structural alterations of segmental nerve bundles can be observed in mutants. Manipulation of Fak56 function specifically in glial cells also disrupts action potential conduction and neurotransmission, suggesting a glial component in the Fak56 bang-sensitive phenotype. Furthermore, we show that increased intracellular calcium levels result in the dephosphorylation of endogenous Fak56 protein in Drosophila cell lines, in parallel with our observations of highly variable synaptic potentials at a higher Ca2+ level in Fak56 mutant larvae. Together these findings suggest that modulation of Fak56 function is important for action potential propagation and Ca2+-regulated neuromuscular transmission in vivo. PMID:18540882

  14. Structural Basis of Focal Adhesion Localization of LIM-only Adaptor PINCH by Integrin-linked Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yanwu; Wang, Xiaoxia; Hawkins, Cheryl A.; Chen, Kan; Vaynberg, Julia; Mao, Xian; Tu, Yizeng; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wang, Jinbu; Wang, Yun-xing; Wu, Chuanyue; Tjandra, Nico; Qin, Jun

    2010-11-22

    The LIM-only adaptor PINCH (the particularly interesting cysteine- and histidine-rich protein) plays a pivotal role in the assembly of focal adhesions (FAs), supramolecular complexes that transmit mechanical and biochemical information between extracellular matrix and actin cytoskeleton, regulating diverse cell adhesive processes such as cell migration, cell spreading, and survival. A key step for the PINCH function is its localization to FAs, which depends critically on the tight binding of PINCH to integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Here we report the solution NMR structure of the core ILK {center_dot} PINCH complex (28 kDa, K{sub D} {approx} 68 nm) involving the N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of ILK and the first LIM domain (LIM1) of PINCH. We show that the ILK ARD exhibits five sequentially stacked ankyrin repeat units, which provide a large concave surface to grip the two contiguous zinc fingers of the PINCH LIM1. The highly electrostatic interface is evolutionally conserved but differs drastically from those of known ARD and LIM bound to other types of protein domains. Consistently mutation of a hot spot in LIM1, which is not conserved in other LIM domains, disrupted the PINCH binding to ILK and abolished the PINCH targeting to FAs. These data provide atomic insight into a novel modular recognition and demonstrate how PINCH is specifically recruited by ILK to mediate the FA assembly and cell-extracellular matrix communication.

  15. Inverted formin 2 in focal adhesions promotes dorsal stress fiber and fibrillar adhesion formation to drive extracellular matrix assembly

    PubMed Central

    Skau, Colleen T.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments and integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs) form integrated systems that mediate dynamic cell interactions with their environment or other cells during migration, the immune response, and tissue morphogenesis. How adhesion-associated actin structures obtain their functional specificity is unclear. Here we show that the formin-family actin nucleator, inverted formin 2 (INF2), localizes specifically to FAs and dorsal stress fibers (SFs) in fibroblasts. High-resolution fluorescence microscopy and manipulation of INF2 levels in cells indicate that INF2 plays a critical role at the SF–FA junction by promoting actin polymerization via free barbed end generation and centripetal elongation of an FA-associated actin bundle to form dorsal SF. INF2 assembles into FAs during maturation rather than during their initial generation, and once there, acts to promote rapid FA elongation and maturation into tensin-containing fibrillar FAs in the cell center. We show that INF2 is required for fibroblasts to organize fibronectin into matrix fibers and ultimately 3D matrices. Collectively our results indicate an important role for the formin INF2 in specifying the function of fibrillar FAs through its ability to generate dorsal SFs. Thus, dorsal SFs and fibrillar FAs form a specific class of integrated adhesion-associated actin structure in fibroblasts that mediates generation and remodeling of ECM. PMID:25918420

  16. Insulin-induced tyrosine dephosphorylation of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase requires active phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1D.

    PubMed Central

    Ouwens, D M; Mikkers, H M; van der Zon, G C; Stein-Gerlach, M; Ullrich, A; Maassen, J A

    1996-01-01

    Insulin stimulation of fibroblasts rapidly induces the tyrosine dephosphorylation of proteins of 68 kDa and 125 kDa, in addition to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor beta-chain, insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2, and Shc. Using specific antibodies, the 68 kDa and 125 kDa proteins were identified as paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (pp125FAK) respectively. We have examined whether dephosphorylation of paxillin and pp125FAK requires interaction of the cells with the extracellular matrix. For this, cells were grown on poly(L-lysine) plates, and the tyrosine phosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin was increased by addition of lysophosphatidic acid. Under these conditions, insulin still induced the complete dephosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin, indicating that this process can occur independently of the interaction of integrins with extracellular matrix proteins. We also studied whether dephosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin results from the action of a phosphotyrosine phosphatase. It was found that phenylarsine oxide, a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, prevented the insulin-induced dephosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin. Furthermore, this insulin-induced dephosphorylation was also impaired in cells expressing a dominant-negative mutant of phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1D (PTP 1D). Thus we have identified paxillin as a target for dephosphorylation by insulin. In addition, we have obtained evidence that the insulin-mediated dephosphorylation of paxillin and pp125FAK requires active PTP 1D. PMID:8809054

  17. Vascular growth responses to chronic arterial occlusion are unaffected by myeloid specific focal adhesion kinase (FAK) deletion.

    PubMed

    Heuslein, Joshua L; Murrell, Kelsey P; Leiphart, Ryan J; Llewellyn, Ryan A; Meisner, Joshua K; Price, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Arteriogenesis, or the lumenal expansion of pre-existing arterioles in the presence of an upstream occlusion, is a fundamental vascular growth response. Though alterations in shear stress stimulate arteriogenesis, the migration of monocytes into the perivascular space surrounding collateral arteries and their differentiation into macrophages is critical for this vascular growth response to occur. Focal adhesion kinase's (FAK) role in regulating cell migration has recently been expanded to primary macrophages. We therefore investigated the effect of the myeloid-specific conditional deletion of FAK on vascular remodeling in the mouse femoral arterial ligation (FAL) model. Using laser Doppler perfusion imaging, whole mount imaging of vascular casted gracilis muscles, and immunostaining for CD31 in gastrocnemius muscles cross-sections, we found that there were no statistical differences in perfusion recovery, arteriogenesis, or angiogenesis 28 days after FAL. We therefore sought to determine FAK expression in different myeloid cell populations. We found that FAK is expressed at equally low levels in Ly6C(hi) and Ly6C(lo) blood monocytes, however expression is increased over 2-fold in bone marrow derived macrophages. Ultimately, these results suggest that FAK is not required for monocyte migration to the perivascular space and that vascular remodeling following arterial occlusion occurs independently of myeloid specific FAK. PMID:27244251

  18. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Karin; Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew; Grawé, Jan; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Daley, George Q.; Welsh, Michael

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via increased

  19. Raver1 Interactions with Vinculin and RNA Suggest a Feed-Forward Pathway in Directing mRNA to Focal Adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Yogesha, S.D.; Izard, Tina; Scripps

    2009-09-11

    The translational machinery of the cell relocalizes to focal adhesions following the activation of integrin receptors. This response allows for rapid, local production of components needed for adhesion complex assembly and signaling. Vinculin links focal adhesions to the actin cytoskeleton following its activation by integrin signaling, which severs intramolecular interactions of vinculin's head and tail (Vt) domains. Our vinculin:raver1 crystal structures and binding studies show that activated Vt selectively interacts with one of the three RNA recognition motifs of raver1, that the vinculin:raver1 complex binds to F-actin, and that raver1 binds selectively to RNA, including a sequence found in vinculin mRNA. Further, mutation of residues that mediate interaction of raver1 with vinculin abolish their colocalization in cells. These findings suggest a feed-forward model where vinculin activation at focal adhesions provides a scaffold for recruitment of raver1 and its mRNA cargo to facilitate the production of components of adhesion complexes.

  20. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity prevents anchorage-independent ovarian carcinoma cell growth and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kristy K.; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lawson, Christine; Miller, Nichol L.G.; Jean, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Uryu, Sean; Kim, Josephine; Tarin, David; Stupack, Dwayne G.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence and spread of ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of death for women in the United States. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase located on chromosome 8q24.3 (gene is Ptk2), a site commonly amplified in serous ovarian cancer. Elevated FAK mRNA levels in serous ovarian carcinoma are associated with decreased (logrank P = 0.0007, hazard ratio 1.43) patient overall survival, but how FAK functions in tumor progression remains undefined. We have isolated aggressive ovarian carcinoma cells termed ID8-IP after intraperitoneal (IP) growth of murine ID8 cells in C57Bl6 mice. Upon orthotopic implantation within the periovarian bursa space, ID8-IP cells exhibit greater tumor growth, local and distant metastasis, and elevated numbers of ascites-associated cells compared to parental ID8 cells. ID8-IP cells exhibit enhanced growth under non-adherent conditions with elevated FAK and c-Src tyrosine kinase activation compared to parental ID8 cells. In vitro, the small molecule FAK inhibitor (Pfizer, PF562,271, PF-271) at 0.1 uM selectively prevented anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell growth with the inhibition of FAK tyrosine (Y)397 but not c-Src Y416 phosphorylation. Oral PF-271 administration (30 mg/kg, twice daily) blocked FAK but not c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation in ID8-IP tumors. This was associated with decreased tumor size, prevention of peritoneal metastasis, reduced tumor-associated endothelial cell number, and increased tumor cell-associated apoptosis. FAK knockdown and re-expression assays showed that FAK activity selectively promoted anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell survival. These results support the continued evaluation of FAK inhibitors as a promising clinical treatment for ovarian cancer. PMID:23275034

  1. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation is not required for genistein-induced FAK-beta-1-integrin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kyle, E; Lieberman, R; Crowell, J; Kellof, G; Bergan, R C

    2000-01-01

    It has previously been shown that changes in the activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and its binding to beta-1-integrin, accompany genistein-induced adhesion of prostate cells. Consumption of genistein world wide is associated with a lower incidence of metastatic prostate cancer. Early human clinical trials of genistein are under way to evaluate genistein's potential causal role in this regard. Though an important cell adhesion-associated signaling molecule, FAK's role in regulating prostate cell adhesion was not clear. Elucidation of this process would provide important information relating to both biology and potential clinical endpoints. It was hypothesized that FAK activation and complex formation are temporally related in prostate cells, and can thus be separated. Significant activation of FAK was demonstrated when cells adhered to fibronectin, as compared to poly-L-lysine, thus demonstrating that beta-1-integrin plays a significant role in activating FAK. Neither FAK activation, nor FAK-integrin complex formation, required beta-1-integrin ligand. However, disruption of the cellular cytoskeleton by cytochalasin D prevented FAK activation, but did not block genistein-induced complex formation. In the face of a disrupted cytoskeleton, signaling through FAK could not be restored through either integrin cross linking, or re-establishment of tensile forces via attachment to solid matrix. These studies demonstrate that FAK-beta-1-integrin complex formation does not require FAK activation, suggesting that it is an early event in prostate cell adhesion. An intact cytoskeleton is necessary for FAK activation. The functional importance of beta-1-integrin in prostate cells is demonstrated. Current findings support plans to test genistein in prostate cancer. PMID:11315093

  2. Focal adhesion kinase-promoted tumor glucose metabolism is associated with a shift of mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Gao, Q; Zhou, Y; Dier, U; Hempel, N; Hochwald, S N

    2016-04-14

    Cancer cells often gains a growth advantage by taking up glucose at a high rate and undergoing aerobic glycolysis through intrinsic cellular factors that reprogram glucose metabolism. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key transmitter of growth factor and anchorage stimulation, is aberrantly overexpressed or activated in most solid tumors, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We determined whether FAK can act as an intrinsic driver to promote aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. FAK inhibition decreases and overexpression increases intracellular glucose levels during unfavorable conditions, including growth factor deficiency and cell detachment. Amplex glucose assay, fluorescence and carbon-13 tracing studies demonstrate that FAK promotes glucose consumption and glucose-to-lactate conversion. Extracellular flux analysis indicates that FAK enhances glycolysis and decreases mitochondrial respiration. FAK increases key glycolytic proteins, including enolase, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter. Furthermore, active/tyrosine-phosphorylated FAK directly binds to PKM2 and promotes PKM2-mediated glycolysis. On the other hand, FAK-decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I can result in reduced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Attenuation of FAK-enhanced glycolysis re-sensitizes cancer cells to growth factor withdrawal, decreases cell viability and reduces growth of tumor xenografts. These observations, for the first time, establish a vital role of FAK in cancer glucose metabolism through alterations in the OXPHOS-to-glycolysis balance. Broadly targeting the common phenotype of aerobic glycolysis and more specifically FAK-reprogrammed glucose metabolism will disrupt the bioenergetic and biosynthetic supply for uncontrolled growth of tumors, particularly glycolytic PDAC. PMID:26119934

  3. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  4. Expression and organization of basement membranes and focal adhesion proteins in pregnant myometrium is regulated by uterine stretch.

    PubMed

    Shynlova, Oksana; Chow, Michelle; Lye, Stephen J

    2009-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying the preparation of the uterus for labor are not fully understood. We have previously found a significant increase in the expression of messenger RNA (mRNAs) encoding extracellular basement membrane (BM) proteins of the smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in late pregnant rat myometrium. At term, the myometrium is stretched by growing fetuses and these mechanical signals are transmitted from extracellular matrix into SMCs through focal adhesions (FA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gravidity on the expression and spatiotemporal distribution of major BM proteins, laminin-gamma2 and collagen IV, as well as typical FA constituents, vinculin and paxillin, in the myometrium during gestation and parturition, using a unilaterally pregnant rat model. We found that the expression of laminin-gamma2 and collagen IV proteins increased significantly with gestational age (P < .05) and was dependent on gravidity whereas vinculin and paxillin proteins were not affected. Near term, BM proteins from gravid horn myometrium demonstrated increased extracellular immunostaining and major rearrangement from sporadic protein distribution to organized, continuous, and regular structures surrounding the plasma membrane of each myocyte. Examination of FA proteins revealed that paxillin was translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell periphery, while vinculin was sequestered specifically to FAs. At labor, BM and FA proteins, organized in similar bead-like structures, were localized on opposing sides of SMC plasma membrane into 2 different compartments. We suggest that these stretch-induced changes facilitate formation of stable cell-matrix adhesions and provide the molecular basis for optimal force transduction during labor contractions. PMID:19602722

  5. Focal adhesion kinase regulates the activity of the osmosensitive transcription factor TonEBP/NFAT5 under hypertonic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Küper, Christoph; Lichtnekert, Julia; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Rupanagudi, Khader V.; Fraek, Maria-Luisa; Bartels, Helmut; Beck, Franz-Xaver

    2014-01-01

    TonEBP/NFAT5 is a major regulator of the urinary concentrating process and is essential for the osmoadaptation of renal medullary cells. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a mechanosensitive non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase expressed abundantly in the renal medulla. Since osmotic stress causes cell shrinkage, the present study investigated the contribution of FAK on TonEBP/NFAT5 activation. Osmotic stress induced time-dependent activation of FAK as evidenced by phosphorylation at Tyr-397, and furosemide reduces FAK Tyr-397 phosphorylation in the rat renal medulla. Both pharmacological inhibition of FAK and siRNA-mediated knockdown of FAK drastically reduced TonEBP/NFAT5 transcriptional activity and target gene expression in HEK293 cells. This effect was not mediated by impaired nuclear translocation or by reduced transactivating activity of TonEBP/NFAT5. However, TonEBP/NFAT5 abundance under hypertonic conditions was diminished by 50% by FAK inhibition or siRNA knockdown of FAK. FAK inhibition only marginally reduced transcription of the TonEBP/NFAT5 gene. Rather, TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA stability was diminished significantly by FAK inhibition, which correlated with reduced reporter activity of the TonEBP/NFAT5 mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). In conclusion, FAK is a major regulator of TonEBP/NFAT5 activity by increasing its abundance via stabilization of the mRNA. This in turn, depends on the presence of the TonEBP/NFAT5 3′-UTR. PMID:24772088

  6. Focal adhesion kinase is a load-dependent governor of the slow contractile and oxidative muscle phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Durieux, Anne-Cécile; D’Antona, Giuseppe; Desplanches, Dominique; Freyssenet, Damien; Klossner, Stephan; Bottinelli, Roberto; Flück, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Striated muscle exhibits a pronounced structural–functional plasticity in response to chronic alterations in loading. We assessed the implication of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signalling in mechano-regulated differentiation of slow-oxidative muscle. Load-dependent consequences of FAK signal modulation were identified using a multi-level approach after electrotransfer of rat soleus muscle with FAK-expression plasmid vs. empty plasmid-transfected contralateral controls. Muscle fibre-targeted over-expression of FAK in anti-gravitational muscle for 9 days up-regulated transcript levels of gene ontologies underpinning mitochondrial metabolism and contraction in the transfected belly portion. Concomitantly, mRNA expression of the major fast-type myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform, MHC2A, was reduced. The promotion of the slow-oxidative expression programme by FAK was abolished after co-expression of the FAK inhibitor FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK). Elevated protein content of MHC1 (+9%) and proteins of mitochondrial respiration (+165–610%) with FAK overexpression demonstrated the translation of transcript differentiation in targeted muscle fibres towards a slow-oxidative muscle phenotype. Coincidentally MHC2A protein was reduced by 50% due to protection of muscle from de-differentiation with electrotransfer. Fibre cross section in FAK-transfected muscle was elevated by 6%. The FAK-modulated muscle transcriptome was load-dependent and regulated in correspondence to tyrosine 397 phosphorylation of FAK. In the context of overload, the FAK-induced gene expression became manifest at the level of contraction by a slow transformation and the re-establishment of normal muscle force from the lowered levels with transfection. These results highlight the analytic power of a systematic somatic transgene approach by mapping a role of FAK in the dominant mechano-regulation of muscular motor performance via control of gene expression. PMID:19470782

  7. Preferential phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase tyrosine 861 is critical for mediating an anti-apoptotic response to hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Lunn, J Adrian; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2007-04-01

    The results presented here demonstrate that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) Tyr-861 is the predominant tyrosine phosphorylation site stimulated by hyperosmotic stress in a variety of cell types, including epithelial cell lines (ileum-derived IEC-18, colon-derived Caco2, and stomach-derived NCI-N87), FAK null fibroblasts re-expressing FAK, and Src family kinase triple null fibroblasts (SYF cells) in which c-Src has been restored (YF cells). We show that hyperosmotic stress-stimulated FAK phosphorylation in epithelial cells is inhibited by Src family kinase inhibitors PP2 and SU6656 and that it does not occur in SYF cells. Unexpectedly, hyperosmotic stress-induced phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-397, Tyr-576, and most dramatically at Tyr-861 was completely insensitive to the F-actin-disrupting agents, latrunculin A and cytochalasin D. Finally, we show that in FAK null cells exposed to hyperosmotic stress or growth factor withdrawal, re-expression of wild type FAK restored cell survival, whereas re-expression of FAK mutated from tyrosine to phenylalanine at position 861 (FAKY861F) did not. Our results indicate that FAK Tyr-861 phosphorylation is required for mammalian cell survival of hyperosmotic stress. Furthermore, the results suggest that FAK is an upstream regulator (rather than downstream effector) of F-actin reorganization in response to hyperosmotic stress. We propose that FAK/c-Src bipartite enzyme is a sensor of cytoplasmic shrinkage, and that the phosphorylation on FAK Tyr-861 by Src and subsequent reorganization of F-actin can initiate an anti-apoptotic signaling pathway that protects cells from hyperosmotic stress. PMID:17289681

  8. Pelargonidin attenuates PDGF-BB-induced aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration by direct inhibition of focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Son, Joe Eun; Jeong, Hyein; Kim, Heejoo; Kim, Yeong A; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won

    2014-05-15

    Pelargonidin is a natural red pigment found in fruits and vegetables, and has been reported to exhibit various effects potentially beneficial for human health. However, the possible preventive effects of pelargonidin toward atherosclerosis and mechanisms involved have not been investigated to date. Here, we compared the effects of pelargonidin and its glucoside-conjugated form, pelargonidin-3-glucoside (P3G), on proliferation and migration induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Pelargonidin, but not P3G, exhibited strong inhibitory effects against PDGF-BB-induced HASMC proliferation and migration, while suppressing PDGF-BB-induced ex vivo rat aortic ring sprouting. Immunoblot analysis revealed that pelargonidin inhibited PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as well as F-actin reduction, whereas Src, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt phosphorylation status were not altered. We also observed that the anti-proliferative and migratory effects of both pelargonidin and P3G corresponded with the extent of FAK inhibition. Both in vitro and ex vivo pull-down assays revealed that pelargonidin binds directly with FAK in an adenosine triphosphate-competitive manner, suggesting that FAK could be a molecular target of pelargonidin. Interestingly, pelargonidin did not exhibit inhibitory effects on the proliferation, migration or FAK phosphorylation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Taken together, our results suggest that pelargonidin exhibits potential preventive effects toward atherosclerosis through the attenuation of HASMC proliferation and migration, as well as aortic sprouting via the direct inhibition of FAK activity. PMID:24582770

  9. Focal adhesion kinases and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases regulate protein tyrosine phosphorylation in stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Lauro; Macías-García, Beatriz; Loux, Shavahn C; Varner, Dickson D; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PY) is a hallmark of sperm capacitation. In stallion sperm, calcium inhibits PY at pH <7.8, mediated by calmodulin. To explore the mechanism of that inhibition, we incubated stallion sperm in media without added calcium, with calcium, or with calcium plus the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 (Ca/W-7 treatment). Treatment with inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, protein kinase A (PRKA), or Src family kinases suppressed the PY induced by the absence of added calcium, but not that induced by the Ca/W-7 treatment, indicating that PY in the absence of added calcium occurred via the canonical PRKA pathway, but that PY in the Ca/W-7 treatment did not. This suggested that when calmodulin was inhibited, calcium stimulated PY via a noncanonical pathway. Incubation with PF-431396, an inhibitor of focal adhesion kinases (FAKs), a family of calcium-induced protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the PY induced both by the absence of added calcium and by the Ca/W-7 treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that both FAK family members, protein tyrosine kinases 2 and 2B, were phosphorylated in the absence of added calcium and in the Ca/W-7 treatment, but not in the presence of calcium without calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibition of FAK proteins inhibited PY in stallion sperm incubated under capacitating conditions (in the presence of calcium, bovine serum albumin, and bicarbonate at pH >7.8). These results show for the first time a role for calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases in PRKA-dependent sperm PY; a non-PRKA-dependent pathway regulating sperm PY; and the apparent involvement of the FAK family of protein tyrosine kinases downstream in both pathways. PMID:23595906

  10. An occludin-focal adhesion kinase protein complex at the blood-testis barrier: a study using the cadmium model.

    PubMed

    Siu, Erica R; Wong, Elissa W P; Mruk, Dolores D; Sze, K L; Porto, Catarina S; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-07-01

    Several integral membrane proteins that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) in mammalian testes, in particular rodents, are known to date. These include tight junction (TJ) proteins (e.g. occludin, junctional adhesion molecule-A, claudins), basal ectoplasmic specialization proteins (e.g. N-cadherin), and gap junction proteins (e.g. connexin43). However, the regulators (e.g. protein kinases and phosphatases) that affect these proteins, such as their interaction with the cytoskeletal actin, which in turn confer cell adhesion at the TJ, remain largely unknown. We report herein that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a putative interacting partner of occludin, but not claudin-11 or junctional adhesion molecule-A. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy studies illustrated that the expression of FAK in the seminiferous epithelium of adult rat testes was stage specific. FAK colocalized with occludin at the BTB in virtually all stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle but considerably diminished in stages VIII-IX, at the time of BTB restructuring to facilitate the transit of primary leptotene spermatocytes. Using Sertoli cells cultured in vitro with established TJ-permeability barrier and ultrastructures of TJ, basal ectoplasmic specialization and desmosome-like junction that mimicked the BTB in vivo, FAK was shown to colocalize with occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) at the Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface. When these Sertoli cell cultures were treated with CdCl(2) to perturb the TJ-barrier function, occludin underwent endocytic-mediated internalization in parallel with FAK and ZO-1. Thus, these findings demonstrate that FAK is an integrated regulatory component of the occludin-ZO-1 protein complex, suggesting that functional studies can be performed to study the role of FAK in BTB dynamics. PMID:19213829

  11. An Occludin-Focal Adhesion Kinase Protein Complex at the Blood-Testis Barrier: A Study Using the Cadmium Model

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Erica R.; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Sze, K. L.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Several integral membrane proteins that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) in mammalian testes, in particular rodents, are known to date. These include tight junction (TJ) proteins (e.g. occludin, junctional adhesion molecule-A, claudins), basal ectoplasmic specialization proteins (e.g. N-cadherin), and gap junction proteins (e.g. connexin43). However, the regulators (e.g. protein kinases and phosphatases) that affect these proteins, such as their interaction with the cytoskeletal actin, which in turn confer cell adhesion at the TJ, remain largely unknown. We report herein that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a putative interacting partner of occludin, but not claudin-11 or junctional adhesion molecule-A. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy studies illustrated that the expression of FAK in the seminiferous epithelium of adult rat testes was stage specific. FAK colocalized with occludin at the BTB in virtually all stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle but considerably diminished in stages VIII–IX, at the time of BTB restructuring to facilitate the transit of primary leptotene spermatocytes. Using Sertoli cells cultured in vitro with established TJ-permeability barrier and ultrastructures of TJ, basal ectoplasmic specialization and desmosome-like junction that mimicked the BTB in vivo, FAK was shown to colocalize with occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) at the Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface. When these Sertoli cell cultures were treated with CdCl2 to perturb the TJ-barrier function, occludin underwent endocytic-mediated internalization in parallel with FAK and ZO-1. Thus, these findings demonstrate that FAK is an integrated regulatory component of the occludin-ZO-1 protein complex, suggesting that functional studies can be performed to study the role of FAK in BTB dynamics. PMID:19213829

  12. Akt1 binds focal adhesion kinase via the Akt1 kinase domain independently of the pleckstrin homology domain.

    PubMed

    Basson, M D; Zeng, B; Wang, S

    2015-10-01

    Akt1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) are protein kinases that play key roles in normal cell signaling. Individually, aberrant expression of these kinases has been linked to a variety of cancers. Together, Akt1/FAK interactions facilitate cancer metastasis by increasing cell adhesion under conditions of increased extracellular pressure. Pathological and iatrogenic sources of pressure arise from tumor growth against constraining stroma or direct perioperative manipulation. We previously reported that 15 mmHg increased extracellular pressure causes Akt1 to both directly interact with FAK and to phosphorylate and activate it. We investigated the nature of the Akt1/FAK binding by creating truncations of recombinant FAK, conjugated to glutathione S-transferase (GST), to pull down full-length Akt1. Western blots probing for Akt1 showed that FAK/Akt1 binding persisted in FAK truncations consisting of only amino acids 1-126, FAK(NT1), which contains the F1 subdomain of its band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin (FERM) domain. Using FAK(NT1) as bait, we then pulled down truncated versions of recombinant Akt1 conjugated to HA (human influenza hemagglutinin). Probes for GST-FAK(NT1) showed Akt1-FAK binding to occur in the absence of the both the Akt1 (N)-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and its adjacent hinge region. The Akt1 (C)-terminal regulatory domain was equally unnecessary for Akt1/FAK co-immunoprecipitation. Truncations involving the Akt1 catalytic domain showed that the domain by itself was enough to pull down FAK. Additionally, a fragment spanning from the PH domain to half way through the catalytic domain demonstrated increased FAK binding compared to full length Akt1. These results begin to delineate the Akt1/FAK interaction and can be used to manipulate their force-activated signal interactions. Furthermore, the finding that the N-terminal half of the Akt1 catalytic domain binds so strongly to FAK when cleaved from the rest of the protein may suggest a means

  13. Focal Adhesion Kinase Directly Interacts with TSC2 Through Its FAT Domain and Regulates Cell Proliferation in Cashmere Goat Fetal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xu; Bao, Wenlei; Yang, Jiaofu; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Dongsheng; Liang, Yan; Li, Shuyu; Wang, Yanfeng; Feng, Xue; Hao, Huifang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that senses a variety of extracellular signals, such as growth factors and integrins, to control the process of cell proliferation and metabolism. We cloned three goat FAK transcript variants (KM655805, KM658268, and KM658269) that encode 1052, 1006, and 962 amino-acid residue proteins. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the putative FAK protein contains an FERM domain, a PTK domain, two Proline-rich regions, and a focal adhesion-targeting (FAT) domain. All the three transcript variants of FAK were detected in seven different goat tissues, and variant 1 had the most accumulation whereas variant 2 and variant 3 had lower accumulation. Treatment of goat fetal fibroblasts (GFbs) with a specific FAK inhibitor, TAE226, inhibited cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and induced damage to the cell morphology in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further research demonstrated that FAK directly interacted with TSC2 (Tuberous sclerosis 2) tuberin domain through its C-terminus, which contains the complete FAT domain. In conclusion, our results indicated that FAK may be widely expressed in Cashmere goat tissues and its products participate in the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and cell proliferation through a direct interaction with TSC2 in GFBs. PMID:27380318

  14. Ankyrin repeat domain 28 (ANKRD28), a novel binding partner of DOCK180, promotes cell migration by regulating focal adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Mitsuhiro; Kiyokawa, Etsuko; Hara, Shigeo; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Manabe, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2009-03-10

    DOCK180 is a guanine exchange factor of Rac1 originally identified as a protein bound to an SH3 domain of the Crk adaptor protein. DOCK180 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of p130(Cas), and recruits the Crk-p130(Cas) complex to focal adhesions. To understand the role of DOCK180 in cell adhesion and migration, we searched for DOCK180-binding proteins with a nano-LC/MS/MS system, and identified ANKRD28, a protein that contains twenty-six ankyrin domain repeats. Knockdown of ANKRD28 by RNA interference reduced the velocity of migration of HeLa cells, suggesting that this protein plays a physiologic role in the DOCK180-Rac1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, knockdown of ANKRD28 was found to alter the distribution of focal adhesion proteins such as Crk, paxillin, and p130(Cas). On the other hand, expression of ANKRD28, p130(Cas), Crk, and DOCK180 induced hyper-phosphorylation of p130(Cas), and impaired detachment of the cell membrane during migration. Consequently, cells expressing ANKRD28 exhibited multiple long cellular processes. ANKRD28 associated with DOCK180 in an SH3-dependent manner and competed with ELMO, another protein bound to the SH3 domain of DOCK180. In striking contrast to ANKRD28, overexpression of ELMO induced extensive lamellipodial protrusion around the entire circumference. These data suggest that ANKRD28 specifies the localization and the activity of the DOCK180-Rac1 pathway. PMID:19118547

  15. Pulsed ultrasound promotes melanoblast migration through upregulation of macrophage colony-stimulating factor/focal adhesion kinase autocrine signaling and paracrine mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yu-Ting; Deng, Jhu-Yun; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Jee, Shiou-Hwa

    2013-09-01

    Repigmentation of vitiliginous lesions relies on the proliferation and migration of melanoblasts from hair follicles to the epidermis. Pulsed ultrasound has been demonstrated to have stimulatory effects on cell proliferation and migration and has been applied clinically to enhance tissue repair. To clarify the biologic effects and signaling mechanisms of pulsed ultrasound on melanoblast proliferation and migration, two melanoblast cell lines, the undifferentiated NCCmelb4 cells and the differentiated NCCmelan5 cells, were examined. We demonstrated that pulsed ultrasound increased cell migration in a dose-dependent manner without altering cell proliferation. Pulsed ultrasound enhanced autocrine secretion of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), which subsequently activated the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway to promote melanoblast migration. Furthermore, conditioned medium from mouse embryonic fibroblasts NIH 3T3 and primary human keratinocytes treated with pulsed ultrasound could stimulate melanoblast migration through a paracrine effect. Our results provide a novel mechanism to promote migration of melanoblasts by pulsed ultrasound stimulation. PMID:23725022

  16. Autophagy Promotes Focal Adhesion Disassembly and Cell Motility of Metastatic Tumor Cells through the Direct Interaction of Paxillin with LC3.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Marina N; Mowers, Erin E; Drake, Lauren E; Collier, Chris; Chen, Hong; Zamora, Marta; Mui, Stephanie; Macleod, Kay F

    2016-05-24

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process that plays a housekeeping role in eliminating protein aggregates and organelles and is activated during nutrient deprivation to generate metabolites and energy. Autophagy plays a significant role in tumorigenesis, although opposing context-dependent functions of autophagy in cancer have complicated efforts to target autophagy for therapeutic purposes. We demonstrate that autophagy inhibition reduces tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro and attenuates metastasis in vivo. Numerous abnormally large focal adhesions (FAs) accumulate in autophagy-deficient tumor cells, reflecting a role for autophagy in FA disassembly through targeted degradation of paxillin. We demonstrate that paxillin interacts with processed LC3 through a conserved LIR motif in the amino-terminal end of paxillin and that this interaction is regulated by oncogenic SRC activity. Together, these data establish a function for autophagy in FA turnover, tumor cell motility, and metastasis. PMID:27184837

  17. Kindlin-2 phosphorylation by Src at Y193 enhances Src activity and is involved in Migfilin recruitment to the focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoli; Lu, Danyu; Wang, Xiang; Wan, Junhu; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Hongquan

    2015-07-01

    Kindlin-2 regulates external to internal cell signaling by interaction with integrins in a process that involves the tyrosine kinase, Src. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we report that Src binds to and phosphorylates Kindlin-2 at Y193. Reciprocally, Kindlin-2-Y193 phosphorylation activates and maintains Src kinase activity. Kindlin-2-Y193 phosphorylation is also involved in its binding capacity with Migfilin and the recruitment of Migfilin to the focal adhesions. Functionally, we demonstrate that Kindlin-2-Y193 phosphorylation regulates Kindlin-2-mediated cell spreading and migration. These findings suggest that Src, Kindlin-2 and Migfilin together constitute a positive feedback loop that controls Src activity and regulates integrin-mediated cellular functions. PMID:26037143

  18. Deregulation of focal adhesion pathway mediated by miR-659-3p is implicated in bone marrow infiltration of stage M neuroblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Lagazio, Corrado; Persico, Luca; Carlini, Barbara; Varesio, Luigi; Morandi, Fabio; Morini, Martina; Gigliotti, Anna Rita; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Viscardi, Elisabetta; Cecinati, Valerio; Conte, Massimo; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2015-01-01

    To get insights on the metastatic process of human neuroblastoma (NB), the miRNA expression profile of bone marrow (BM)-infiltrating cells has been determined and compared to that of primary tumors. Twenty-two BM-infiltrating cells, 22 primary tumors, and 4 paired samples from patients with metastatic NB aged > 12 months were analyzed for the expression of 670 miRNAs by stem-loop RT-qPCR. The miRNAs whose expression was significantly different were subjected to selection criteria, and 20 selected miRNAs were tested in 10 additional BM-infiltrating cells and primary tumors. Among the miRNAs confirmed to be differentially expressed, miR-659-3p was further analyzed. Transfection of miR-659-3p mimic and inhibitor demonstrated the specific suppression and over-expression, respectively, of the miR-659-3p target gene CNOT1, a regulator of transcription of genes containing AU-rich element (ARE) sequence. Among the ARE-containing genes, miR-659-3p mimic and inhibitor specifically modified the expression of AKT3, BCL2, CYR61 and THSB2, belonging to the focal adhesion pathway. Most importantly, in BM-infiltrating cells CNOT1 expression was significantly higher, and that of AKT3, BCL2, THSB2 and CYR61 was significantly lower than in primary tumors. Thus, our study suggests a role of the focal adhesion pathway, regulated by miR-659-3p through CNOT1, in the human NB metastatic process. PMID:25980492

  19. Annexin A6 contributes to the invasiveness of breast carcinoma cells by influencing the organization and localization of functional focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakwe, Amos M.; Koumangoye, Rainelli; Guillory, Bobby; Ochieng, Josiah

    2011-04-01

    The interaction of annexin A6 (AnxA6) with membrane phospholipids and either specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components or F-actin suggests that it may influence cellular processes associated with rapid plasma membrane reorganization such as cell adhesion and motility. Here, we examined the putative roles of AnxA6 in adhesion-related cellular processes that contribute to breast cancer progression. We show that breast cancer cells secrete annexins via the exosomal pathway and that the secreted annexins are predominantly cell surface-associated. Depletion of AnxA6 in the invasive BT-549 breast cancer cells is accompanied by enhanced anchorage-independent cell growth but cell-cell cohesion, cell adhesion/spreading onto collagen type IV or fetuin-A, cell motility and invasiveness were strongly inhibited. To explain the loss in adhesion/motility, we show that vinculin-based focal adhesions in the AnxA6-depleted BT-549 cells are elongated and randomly distributed. These focal contacts are also functionally defective because the activation of focal adhesion kinase and the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt pathway were strongly inhibited while the MAP kinase pathway remained constitutively active. Compared with normal human breast tissues, reduced AnxA6 expression in breast carcinoma tissues correlates with enhanced cell proliferation. Together this suggests that reduced AnxA6 expression contributes to breast cancer progression by promoting the loss of functional cell-cell and/or cell-ECM contacts and anchorage-independent cell proliferation.

  20. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  1. Inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 interaction leads to decreased survival in human neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Beierle, Elizabeth A; Ma, Xiaojie; Stewart, Jerry E; Megison, Michael; Cance, William G; Kurenova, Elena V

    2014-03-01

    Neuroblastoma continues to be a devastating childhood solid tumor and is responsible for over 15% of all childhood cancer-related deaths. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) are protein tyrosine kinases that are overexpressed in a number of human cancers, including neuroblastoma. These two kinases can directly interact and provide survival signals to cancer cells. In this study, we utilized siRNA to VEGFR-3 to demonstrate the biologic importance of this kinase in neuroblastoma cell survival. We also used confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation to show that FAK and VEGFR-3 bind in neuroblastoma. Finally, employing a 12-amino-acid peptide (AV3) specific to VEGFR-3, we showed that the colocalization between FAK and VEGFR-3 could be disrupted, and that disruption resulted in decreased neuroblastoma cell survival. These studies provide insight to the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction in neuroblastoma and demonstrate its importance in this tumor type. Focusing upon the FAK-VEGFR-3 interaction may provide a novel therapeutic target for the development of new strategies for treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:23065847

  2. CFTR Cl– channel functional regulation by phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase at tyrosine 407 in osmosensitive ion transporting mitochondria rich cells of euryhaline killifish

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, William S.; Watters, Kaitlyn D.; Hovdestad, Leah R.; Cozzi, Regina R. F.; Katoh, Fumi

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channels are the regulated exit pathway in Cl– secretion by teleost mitochondria rich salt secreting (MR) cells of the gill and opercular epithelia of euryhaline teleosts. By confocal light immunocytochemistry, immunogold transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and co-immunoprecipitation, using regular and phospho-antibodies directed against conserved sites, we found that killifish CFTR (kfCFTR) and the tyrosine kinase focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylated at Y407 (FAK pY407) are colocalized in the apical membrane and in subjacent membrane vesicles of MR cells. We showed previously that basolateral FAK pY407, unlike other FAK phosphorylation sites, is osmosensitive and dephosphorylates during hypotonic shock of epithelial cells (Marshall et al., 2008). In the present study, we found that hypotonic shock and the α2-adrenergic agonist clonidine (neither of which affects cAMP levels) rapidly and reversibly inhibit Cl– secretion by isolated opercular membranes, simultaneous with dephosphorylation of FAK pY407, located in the apical membrane. FAK pY407 is rephosphorylated and Cl– secretion rapidly restored by hypertonic shock as well as by forskolin and isoproterenol, which operate via cAMP and protein kinase A. We conclude that hormone mediated, cAMP dependent and osmotically mediated, cAMP independent pathways converge on a mechanism to activate CFTR and Cl– secretion, possibly through tyrosine phosphorylation of CFTR by FAK. PMID:19617429

  3. The late endosomal p14–MP1 (LAMTOR2/3) complex regulates focal adhesion dynamics during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Schiefermeier, Natalia; Scheffler, Julia M.; de Araujo, Mariana E.G.; Stasyk, Taras; Yordanov, Teodor; Ebner, Hannes L.; Offterdinger, Martin; Munck, Sebastian; Hess, Michael W.; Wickström, Sara A.; Lange, Anika; Wunderlich, Winfried; Fässler, Reinhard; Teis, David

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is mediated by the dynamic remodeling of focal adhesions (FAs). Recently, an important role of endosomal signaling in regulation of cell migration was recognized. Here, we show an essential function for late endosomes carrying the p14–MP1 (LAMTOR2/3) complex in FA dynamics. p14–MP1-positive endosomes move to the cell periphery along microtubules (MTs) in a kinesin1- and Arl8b-dependent manner. There they specifically target FAs to regulate FA turnover, which is required for cell migration. Using genetically modified fibroblasts from p14-deficient mice and Arl8b-depleted cells, we demonstrate that MT plus end–directed traffic of p14–MP1-positive endosomes triggered IQGAP1 disassociation from FAs. The release of IQGAP was required for FA dynamics. Taken together, our results suggest that late endosomes contribute to the regulation of cell migration by transporting the p14–MP1 scaffold complex to the vicinity of FAs. PMID:24841562

  4. The Interaction between Cancer Stem Cell Marker CD133 and Src Protein Promotes Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Phosphorylation and Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chanjuan; Li, Yinan; Xing, Yang; Cao, Benjin; Yang, Fan; Yang, Tianxiao; Ai, Zhilong; Wei, Yuanyan; Jiang, Jianhai

    2016-07-22

    CD133, a widely known cancer stem cell marker, has been proved to promote tumor metastasis. However, the mechanism by which CD133 regulates metastasis remains largely unknown. Here, we report that CD133 knockdown inhibits cancer cell migration, and CD133 overexpression promotes cell migration. CD133 expression is beneficial to activate the Src-focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. Further studies show that CD133 could interact with Src, and the region between amino acids 845 and 857 in the CD133 C-terminal domain is indispensable for its interaction with Src. The interaction activates Src to phosphorylate its substrate FAK and to promote cell migration. Likewise, a Src binding-deficient CD133 mutant loses the abilities to increase Src and FAK phosphorylation and to promote cell migration. Inhibition of Src activity by PP2, a known Src activity inhibitor, could block the activation of FAK phosphorylation and cell migration induced by CD133. In summary, our data suggest that activation of FAK by the interaction between CD133 and Src promotes cell migration, providing clues to understand the migratory mechanism of CD133(+) tumor cells. PMID:27226554

  5. RAFTK, a Novel Member of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Family, Is Phosphorylated and Associates with Signaling Molecules upon Activation of Mature T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Ramesh K.; Hatch, William C.; Avraham, Hava; Ona, Mel A.; Druker, Brian; Avraham, Shalom; Groopman, Jerome E.

    1997-01-01

    The related adhesion focal tyrosine kinase (RAFTK), a recently discovered member of the focal adhesion kinase family, has previously been reported to participate in signal transduction in neuronal cells, megakaryocytes, and B lymphocytes. We have found that RAFTK is constitutively expressed in human T cells and is rapidly phosphorylated upon the activation of the T cell receptor (TCR). This activation also results in an increase in the autophosphorylation and kinase activity of RAFTK. After its stimulation, there was an increase in the association of the src cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase Fyn and the adapter protein Grb2. This association was mediated through the SH2 domains of Fyn and Grb2. RAFTK also co-immunoprecipitates with the SH2 domain of Lck and with the cytoskeletal protein paxillin through its COOH-terminal proline-rich domain. The tyrosine phosphorylation of RAFTK after T cell receptor-mediated stimulation was reduced by the pretreatment of cells with cytochalasin D, suggesting the role of the cytoskeleton in this process. These observations indicate that RAFTK participates in T cell receptor signaling and may act to link signals from the cell surface to the cytoskeleton and thereby affect the host immune response. PMID:9091579

  6. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies. PMID:26703626

  7. Rac1 recruitment to the archipelago structure of the focal adhesion through the fluid membrane as revealed by single-molecule analysis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Akihiro C E; Chen, Limin H; Nagai, Rie; Ishidate, Fumiyoshi; Chadda, Rahul; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Shirai, Yuki M; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2013-03-01

    The focal adhesion (FA) is an integrin-based structure built in/on the plasma membrane (PM), linking the extracellular matrix to the actin stress-fibers, working as cell migration scaffolds. Previously, we proposed the archipelago architecture of the FA, in which FA largely consists of fluid membrane, dotted with small islands accumulating FA proteins: membrane molecules enter the inter-island channels in the FA zone rather freely, and the integrins in the FA-protein islands rapidly exchanges with those in the bulk membrane. Here, we examined how Rac1, a small G-protein regulating FA formation, and its activators αPIX and βPIX, are recruited to the FA zones. PIX molecules are recruited from the cytoplasm to the FA zones directly. In contrast, majorities of Rac1 molecules first arrive from the cytoplasm on the general inner PM surface, and then enter the FA zones via lateral diffusion on the PM, which is possible due to rapid Rac1 diffusion even within the FA zones, slowed only by a factor of two to four compared with that outside. The constitutively-active Rac1 mutant exhibited temporary and all-time immobilizations in the FA zone, suggesting that upon PIX-induced Rac1 activation at the FA-protein islands, Rac1 tends to be immobilized at the FA-protein islands. PMID:23341328

  8. Synaptopodin-2 induces assembly of peripheral actin bundles and immature focal adhesions to promote lamellipodia formation and prostate cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kai, FuiBoon; Fawcett, James P; Duncan, Roy

    2015-05-10

    Synaptopodin-2 (Synpo2), an actin-binding protein and invasive cancer biomarker, induces formation of complex stress fiber networks in the cell body and promotes PC3 prostate cancer cell migration in response to serum stimulation. The role of these actin networks in enhanced cancer cell migration is unknown. Using time-course analysis and live cell imaging of mock- and Synpo2-transduced PC3 cells, we now show that Synpo2 induces assembly of actin fibers near the cell periphery and Arp2/3-dependent lamellipodia formation. Lamellipodia formed in a non-directional manner or repeatedly changed direction, explaining the enhanced chemokinetic activity of PC3 cells in response to serum stimulation. Myosin contraction promotes retrograde flow of the Synpo2-associated actin filaments at the leading edge and their merger with actin networks in the cell body. Enhanced PC3 cell migration correlates with Synpo2-induced formation of lamellipodia and immature focal adhesions (FAs), but is not dependent on myosin contraction or FA maturation. The previously reported correlation between Synpo2-induced stress fiber assembly and enhanced PC3 cell migration therefore reflects the role of Synpo2 as a newly identified regulator of actin bundle formation and nascent FA assembly near the leading cell edge. PMID:25883213

  9. A Small Physiological Electric Field Mediated Responses of Extravillous Trophoblasts Derived from HTR8/SVneo Cells: Involvement of Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Ren, Rongmei; Luo, Xuefeng; Fan, Ping; Liu, Xinghui; Liang, Shanshan; Ma, Lei; Yu, Ping; Bai, Huai

    2014-01-01

    Moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into endometrium is essential for the placental development and normal pregnancy. Electric field (EF)-induced effects on cellular behaviors have been observed in many cell types. This study was to investigate the effect of physiological direct current EF (dc EF) on cellular responses such as elongation, orientation and motility of trophoblast cells. Immortalized first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells (HTR-8/SVneo) were exposed to the dc EF at physiological magnitude. Cell images were recorded and analyzed by image analyzer. Cell lysates were used to detect protein expression by Western blot. Cultured in the dc EFs the cells showed elongation, orientation and enhanced migration rate compared with non-EF stimulated cells at field strengths of 100 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. EF exposure increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner and increased expression levels of MMP-2. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK impaired the EF-induced responses including motility and abrogated the elevation of MMP-2 expression. However, the expression levels of integrins like integrin α1, α5, αV and β1 were not affected by EF stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of FAK activation in migration/motility of trophobalst cells driven by EFs. In addition, it raises the feasibility of using applied EFs to promote placentation through effects on trophoblast cells. PMID:24643246

  10. Focal adhesion kinase-mediated activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β regulates IL-33 receptor internalization and IL-33 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Bowser, Rachel K; Traister, Russell S; Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhao, Yutong

    2014-01-01

    IL-33, a relatively new member of the IL-1 cytokine family, plays a crucial role in allergic inflammation and acute lung injury. ST2L, the receptor for IL-33, is expressed on immune effector cells and lung epithelia, and plays a critical role in triggering inflammation. We have previously shown that ST2L stability is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, however its upstream internalization has not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) regulates ST2L internalization and IL-33 signaling. IL-33 treatment induced ST2L internalization, an effect was attenuated by inhibition or downregulation of GSK3β. GSK3β was found to interact with ST2L on serine residue 446 in response to IL-33 treatment. GSK3β binding site mutant (ST2LS446A) and phosphorylation site mutant (ST2LS442A) are resistant to IL-33-induced ST2L internalization. We also found that IL-33 activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK impaired IL-33-induced GSK3β activation and ST2L internalization. Further, inhibition of ST2L internalization enhanced IL-33-induced cytokine release in lung epithelial cells. These results suggest that modulation of the ST2L internalization by FAK/GSK3β might serve as a unique strategy to lessen pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25472995

  11. Non-Smad transforming growth factor-β signaling regulated by focal adhesion kinase binding the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Hong, Min; Wilkes, Mark C; Penheiter, Sumedha G; Gupta, Shiv K; Edens, Maryanne; Leof, Edward B

    2011-05-20

    TGF-β modulates numerous diverse cellular phenotypes including growth arrest in epithelial cells and proliferation in fibroblasts. Although the Smad pathway is fundamental for the majority of these responses, recent evidence indicates that non-Smad pathways may also have a critical role. Here we report a novel mechanism whereby the nonreceptor tyrosine focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions as an adaptor necessary for cell type-specific responses to TGF-β. We show that in contrast to Smad actions, non-Smad pathways, including c-Abl, PAK2, and Akt, display an obligate requirement for FAK. Interestingly, this occurs in Src null SYF cells and is independent of FAK tyrosine phosphorylation, kinase activity, and/or proline-rich sequences in the C-terminal FAT domain. FAK binds the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85 regulatory subunit following TGF-β treatment in a subset of fibroblasts but not epithelial cells and has an obligate role in TGF-β-stimulated anchorage-independent growth and migration. Together, these results uncover a new scaffolding role for FAK as the most upstream component regulating the profibrogenic action of TGF-β and suggest that inhibiting this interaction may be useful in treating a number of fibrotic diseases. PMID:21454615

  12. PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in triple-negative breast cancer cells to alter actin structure and substrate adhesion properties critical for cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; DeGala, Gregory D; Ray, Rahul; Lucia, M Scott; Lambert, James R

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are among the most aggressive cancers characterized by a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. We previously reported that the TNBC-specific inhibitor, AMPI-109, significantly impairs the ability of TNBC cells to migrate and invade by reducing levels of the metastasis-promoting phosphatase, PRL-3. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPI-109 and loss of PRL-3 impede cell migration and invasion. AMPI-109 treatment or knock down of PRL-3 expression were associated with deactivation of Src and ERK signaling and concomitant downregulation of RhoA and Rac1/2/3 GTPase protein levels. These cellular changes led to rearranged filamentous actin networks necessary for cell migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of PRL-3 promoted TNBC cell invasion by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase 10, which resulted in increased TNBC cell adherence to, and degradation of, the major basement membrane component laminin. Our data demonstrate that PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in TNBC cells as a key mechanism for promoting TNBC cell migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that blocking PRL-3 activity may be an effective method for reducing the metastatic potential of TNBC cells. PMID:27452906

  13. Focal Adhesion Kinase Controls pH-Dependent Epidermal Barrier Homeostasis by Regulating Actin-Directed Na+/H+ Exchanger 1 Plasma Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Dusko; Mao-Qiang, Man; Crumrine, Debra; Dolganov, Gregory; Larocque, Nicholas; Xu, Pu; Demerjian, Marianne; Brown, Barbara E.; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Ossovskaya, Valeria; Schlaepfer, David D.; Fisher, Susan J.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitously expressed focal adhesion kinase (FAK), linked to multiple intracellular signaling pathways, has previously been shown to control cell motility, invasion, proliferation, and survival. Using mice with a keratinocyte-restricted deletion of fak (FAKK5 KO), we report here a novel role for FAK: maintenance of adult epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. Abundant lacunae of unprocessed lipids in stratum corneum (SC) of FAKK5 KO mice and delayed barrier recovery pointed to malfunction of pH-dependent enzymes active in extracellular space of SC. Measuring the SC pH gradient showed significantly more neutral pH values in FAKK5 KO mice, suggesting the importance of FAK for acidification. Moreover, normal functions were restored when FAKK5 KO mice were exposed to a surface pH typical of mouse SC (pH = 5.5). Baseline levels and response to barrier disruption of secretory phospholipase A2 isoforms, enzymes that mediate generation of free fatty acids in epidermis, appeared similar in both FAKK5 KO and control littermates. We found that the critical SC acidification regulator Na+/H+ exchanger 1 failed to localize to the plasma membrane in FAK-deficient keratinocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, for plasma membrane localization in terminally differentiated keratinocytes, Na+/H+ exchanger 1 requires an intact actin cytoskeleton, which is impaired in FAK-deficient cells. PMID:17525272

  14. A ternary complex comprising FAK, PTPα and IP3 receptor 1 functionally engages focal adhesions and the endoplasmic reticulum to mediate IL-1-induced Ca2+ signalling in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Yongqiang; Downey, Gregory P; Plotnikov, Sergey; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2016-02-15

    Ca(2+) release is tightly sequestered in eukaryotic cells to enable fine spatio-temporal control of signalling but how Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is linked to cell adhesions is not defined. We examined the spatial restriction of Ca(2+) release through the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 (IP3R1) in response to interleukin-1 (IL-1) and the functions of the adhesion-associated proteins, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and protein tyrosine phosphatase-α (PTPα). In cultured fibroblasts IL-1 treatment promoted co-localization of PTPα and FAK with the ER and increased association of IP3R1 with PTPα and FAK at focal adhesions (FAs). GST pull-down assays of purified proteins demonstrated that PTPα and FAK directly interacted with IP3R1. These interactions depended on the focal adhesion-targeting (FAT) and band4.1-ezrin-radixin-moesin (FERM) domains of FAK. PTPα was required for the association of IP3R1 with Src, which mediated IP3R1 phosphorylation and consequently ER Ca(2+) release. Collectively, these data indicate that PTPα and FAK, which are enriched in FAs, interact with IP3R1 at adjacent ER sites to spatially sequester IL-1-induced Ca(2+) signalling. PMID:26611753

  15. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β sustains invasion of glioblastoma via the focal adhesion kinase, Rac1, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Chikano, Yuri; Domoto, Takahiro; Furuta, Takuya; Sabit, Hemragul; Kitano-Tamura, Ayako; Pyko, Ilya V; Takino, Takahisa; Sai, Yoshimichi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Sato, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2015-02-01

    The failure of current treatment options for glioblastoma stems from their inability to control tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Biologically targeted therapies offer great hope and one promising target is glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), implicated in various diseases, including cancer. We previously reported that inhibition of GSK3β compromises the survival and proliferation of glioblastoma cells, induces their apoptosis, and sensitizes them to temozolomide and radiation. Here, we explore whether GSK3β also contributes to the highly invasive nature of glioblastoma. The effects of GSK3β inhibition on migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells were examined by wound-healing and Transwell assays, as well as in a mouse model of glioblastoma. We also investigated changes in cellular microarchitectures, cytoskeletal components, and proteins responsible for cell motility and invasion. Inhibition of GSK3β attenuated the migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells in vitro and that of tumor cells in a mouse model of glioblastoma. These effects were associated with suppression of the molecular axis involving focal adhesion kinase, guanine nucleotide exchange factors/Rac1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Changes in cellular phenotypes responsible for cell motility and invasion were also observed, including decreased formation of lamellipodia and invadopodium-like microstructures and alterations in the subcellular localization, and activity of Rac1 and F-actin. These changes coincided with decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Our results confirm the potential of GSK3β as an attractive therapeutic target against glioblastoma invasion, thus highlighting a second role in this tumor type in addition to its involvement in chemo- and radioresistance. PMID:25504636

  16. Ling Zhi-8 reduces lung cancer mobility and metastasis through disruption of focal adhesion and induction of MDM2-mediated Slug degradation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that recombinant Ling Zhi-8 (rLZ-8), a medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum recombinant protein, effectively prevents lung cancer cells proliferation in vivo mice model. In our current study, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 suppressed tumor metastasis and increased the survival rate in Lewis lung carcinoma cell-bearing mice. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is regarded as the critical event in tumor metastasis. Herein, we showed that rLZ-8 effectively induced changes in EMT by interfering with cell adhesion and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions in lung cancer cells. Slug, a transcription factor, represses E-cadherin transcription and is regarded as a critical event in EMT and tumor metastasis. Functional studies revealed that downregulation of Slug as a result of rLZ-8-induced FAK inactivation enhanced E-cadherin expression and repressed cancer cell mobility. Moreover, we found that rLZ-8 enhanced the ubiquitination proteasome pathway (UPP)-mediated degradation of Slug in CL1-5 cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 promoted the interaction between MDM2 and Slug, resulting in Slug degradation; however, MDM2-shRNA abolished rLZ-8-enhanced Slug degradation. This study is the first to determine anti-metastatic activity of rLZ-8 and its potential mechanism, with how the regulation of EMT and cell mobility is via the negative modulation of FAK, and thereby leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of Slug. Our findings suggest that the targets of FAK play a key role in metastasis. Moreover, rLZ-8 may be useful as a chemotherapeutic agent for treating lung cancer. PMID:26992741

  17. Janus kinases and focal adhesion kinases play in the 4.1 band: a superfamily of band 4.1 domains important for cell structure and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Girault, J. A.; Labesse, G.; Mornon, J. P.; Callebaut, I.

    1998-01-01

    The band 4.1 domain was first identified in the red blood cell protein band 4.1, and subsequently in ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM proteins) and other proteins, including tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin, talin, unconventional myosins VIIa and X, and protein tyrosine phosphatases. Recently, the presence of a structurally related domain has been demonstrated in the N-terminal region of two groups of tyrosine kinases: the focal adhesion kinases (FAK) and the Janus kinases (JAK). Additional proteins containing the 4.1/JEF (JAK, ERM, FAK) domain include plant kinesin-like calmodulin-binding proteins (KCBP) and a number of uncharacterized open reading frames identified by systematic DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences suggests that band 4.1/JEF domains can be grouped in several families that have probably diverged early during evolution. Hydrophobic cluster analysis indicates that the band 4.1/JEF domains might consist of a duplicated module of approximately 140 residues and a central hinge region. A conserved property of the domain is its capacity to bind to the membrane-proximal region of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of proteins with a single transmembrane segment. Many proteins with band 4.1/JEF domains undergo regulated intra- or intermolecular homotypic interactions. Additional properties common to band 4.1/JEF domains of several proteins are binding of phosphoinositides and regulation by GTPases of the Rho family. Many proteins with band 4. 1/JEF domains are associated with the actin-based cytoskeleton and are enriched at points of contact with other cells or the extracellular matrix, from which they can exert control over cell growth. Thus, proteins with band 4.1/JEF domain are at the crossroads between cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction in multicellular organisms. Their importance is underlined by the variety of diseases that can result from their mutations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:9990861

  18. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M

    2015-11-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell migration, proliferation and wound closure. TSC2-positive and TSC2-negative mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), 323-TSC2-positive and 323-TSC2-null MEF and Eker rat uterine leiomyoma (ELT3) cells were treated with doxycycline or rapamycin alone, or in combination. Migration, wound closure and proliferation were assessed using a transwell migration assay, time-lapse microscopy and manual cell counts respectively. RhoA-GTPase activity, phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in TSC2-negative MEF treated with doxycycline were examined using ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. The enhanced migration of TSC2-null cells was reduced by doxycycline at concentrations as low as 20 pM, while the rate of wound closure was reduced at 2-59 μM. Doxycycline decreased RhoA-GTPase activity and phosphorylation of FAK in these cells but had no effect on the phosphorylation of p70S6K, ERK1/2 or AKT. Combining doxycycline with rapamycin significantly reduced the rate of wound closure at lower concentrations than achieved with either drug alone. This study shows that doxycycline inhibits TSC2-null cell migration. Thus doxycycline has potential as an anti-migratory agent in the treatment of diseases with TSC2 dysfunction. PMID:26282580

  19. Epstein–Barr virus LMP1 induces focal adhesions and epithelial cell migration through effects on integrin-α5 and N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Wasil, L R; Shair, K H Y

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a γ-herpesvirus associated with human epithelial and B-cell malignancies. The EBV latent membrane protein (LMP) 1 is expressed in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and promotes oncogenic intracellular signaling mechanisms. LMP1 also promotes a pro-migratory phenotype through potential effects on cell surface proteins, as expression of LMP1 induces an epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in epithelial cell lines. In this study, LMP1 was examined for potential effects on cadherin and integrin surface interactions, and assessed for biological effects on adhesion and motility to fibronectin. Expression of LMP1 in the non-tumorigenic epithelial cell line MCF10a induced an EMT-associated cadherin switch. The induced N-cadherin was ligated and localized to the cell surface as determined by triton-solubility and immunofluorescence assays. In addition, LMP1 induced the assembly of focal adhesions (FAs) with increased production of fibronectin in MCF10a and NP460hTERT-immortalized nasopharyngeal cells. Biochemical enrichment of fibronectin-associated proteins indicated that LMP1 selectively promoted the recruitment of integrin-α5 and Src family kinase proteins to FA complexes. Neutralizing antibodies to N-cadherin and integrin-α5, but not integrin-αV, blocked the adhesion and transwell motility of MCF10a cells to fibronectin induced by LMP1. LMP1-induced transwell motility was also decreased by Src inhibition with the PP2 kinase inhibitor and short hairpin RNAs. These studies reveal that LMP1 has multiple mechanisms to promote the adhesive and migratory properties of epithelial cells through induction of fibronectin and modulation of cell surface interactions involving integrin-α5 and N-cadherin, which may contribute to the metastatic potential of NPC. PMID:26479443

  20. Divergent modulation of Rho‐kinase and Ca2+ influx pathways by Src family kinases and focal adhesion kinase in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shaifta, Yasin; Irechukwu, Nneka; Prieto‐Lloret, Jesus; MacKay, Charles E; Marchon, Keisha A; Ward, Jeremy P T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The importance of tyrosine kinases in airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Src‐family kinases (SrcFK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in GPCR‐mediated ASM contraction and associated signalling events. Experimental Approach Contraction was recorded in intact or α‐toxin permeabilized rat bronchioles. Phosphorylation of SrcFK, FAK, myosin light‐chain‐20 (MLC20) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit‐1 (MYPT‐1) was evaluated in cultured human ASM cells (hASMC). [Ca2+]i was evaluated in Fura‐2 loaded hASMC. Responses to carbachol (CCh) and bradykinin (BK) and the contribution of SrcFK and FAK to these responses were determined. Key Results Contractile responses in intact bronchioles were inhibited by antagonists of SrcFK, FAK and Rho‐kinase, while after α‐toxin permeabilization, they were sensitive to inhibition of SrcFK and Rho‐kinase, but not FAK. CCh and BK increased phosphorylation of MYPT‐1 and MLC20 and auto‐phosphorylation of SrcFK and FAK. MYPT‐1 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibition of Rho‐kinase and SrcFK, but not FAK. Contraction induced by SR Ca2+ depletion and equivalent [Ca2+]i responses in hASMC were sensitive to inhibition of both SrcFK and FAK, while depolarization‐induced contraction was sensitive to FAK inhibition only. SrcFK auto‐phosphorylation was partially FAK‐dependent, while FAK auto‐phosphorylation was SrcFK‐independent. Conclusions and Implications SrcFK mediates Ca2+‐sensitization in ASM, while SrcFK and FAK together and individually influence multiple Ca2+ influx pathways. Tyrosine phosphorylation is therefore a key upstream signalling event in ASM contraction and may be a viable target for modulating ASM tone in respiratory disease. PMID:26294392

  1. Focal adhesion kinase is required for IGF-I-mediated growth of skeletal muscle cells via a TSC2/mTOR/S6K1-associated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Crossland, Hannah; Kazi, Abid A.; Lang, Charles H.; Timmons, James A.; Pierre, Philippe; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Smith, Kenneth; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an attachment complex protein associated with the regulation of muscle mass through as-of-yet unclear mechanisms. We tested whether FAK is functionally important for muscle hypertrophy, with the hypothesis that FAK knockdown (FAK-KD) would impede cell growth associated with a trophic stimulus. C2C12 skeletal muscle cells harboring FAK-targeted (FAK-KD) or scrambled (SCR) shRNA were created using lentiviral transfection techniques. Both FAK-KD and SCR myotubes were incubated for 24 h with IGF-I (10 ng/ml), and additional SCR cells (±IGF-1) were incubated with a FAK kinase inhibitor before assay of cell growth. Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and putative FAK signaling mechanisms (immunoblotting and coimmunoprecipitation) were assessed. IGF-I-induced increases in myotube width (+41 ± 7% vs. non-IGF-I-treated) and total protein (+44 ± 6%) were, after 24 h, attenuated in FAK-KD cells, whereas MPS was suppressed in FAK-KD vs. SCR after 4 h. These blunted responses were associated with attenuated IGF-I-induced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and markedly suppressed phosphorylation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) and critical downstream mTOR signaling (ribosomal S6 kinase, eIF4F assembly) in FAK shRNA cells (all P < 0.05 vs. IGF-I-treated SCR cells). However, binding of FAK to TSC2 or its phosphatase Shp-2 was not affected by IGF-I or cell phenotype. Finally, FAK-KD-mediated suppression of cell growth was recapitulated by direct inhibition of FAK kinase activity in SCR cells. We conclude that FAK is required for IGF-I-induced muscle hypertrophy, signaling through a TSC2/mTOR/S6K1-dependent pathway via means requiring the kinase activity of FAK but not altered FAK-TSC2 or FAK-Shp-2 binding. PMID:23695213

  2. PKCθ signaling is required for myoblast fusion by regulating the expression of caveolin-3 and β1D integrin upstream focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Madaro, Luca; Marrocco, Valeria; Fiore, Piera; Aulino, Paola; Smeriglio, Piera; Adamo, Sergio; Molinaro, Mario; Bouché, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Fusion of mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers is an essential phase of skeletal myogenesis, which occurs during muscle development as well as during postnatal life for muscle growth, turnover, and regeneration. Many cell adhesion proteins, including integrins, have been shown to be important for myoblast fusion in vertebrates, and recently focal adhesion kinase (FAK), has been proposed as a key mediator of myoblast fusion. Here we focused on the possible role of PKCθ, the PKC isoform predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle, in myoblast fusion. We found that the expression of PKCθ is strongly up-regulated following freeze injury–induced muscle regeneration, as well as during in vitro differentiation of satellite cells (SCs; the muscle stem cells). Using both PKCθ knockout and muscle-specific PKCθ dominant-negative mutant mouse models, we observed delayed body and muscle fiber growth during the first weeks of postnatal life, when compared with wild-type (WT) mice. We also found that myofiber formation, during muscle regeneration after freeze injury, was markedly impaired in PKCθ mutant mice, as compared with WT. This phenotype was associated with reduced expression of the myogenic differentiation program executor, myogenin, but not with that of the SC marker Pax7. Indeed in vitro differentiation of primary muscle-derived SCs from PKCθ mutants resulted in the formation of thinner myotubes with reduced numbers of myonuclei and reduced fusion rate, when compared with WT cells. These effects were associated to reduced expression of the profusion genes caveolin-3 and β1D integrin and to reduced activation/phosphorylation of their up-stream regulator FAK. Indeed the exogenous expression of a constitutively active mutant form of PKCθ in muscle cells induced FAK phosphorylation. Moreover pharmacologically mediated full inhibition of FAK activity led to similar fusion defects in both WT and PKCθ-null myoblasts. We thus propose that PKC

  3. Doxycycline reduces the migration of tuberous sclerosis complex-2 null cells - effects on RhoA-GTPase and focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ho Yin; Oliver, Brian Gregory George; Burgess, Janette Kay; Krymskaya, Vera P; Black, Judith Lee; Moir, Lyn M

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is associated with dysfunction of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration. This study aims to examine whether doxycycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, can inhibit the enhanced migration of TSC2-deficient cells, identify signalling pathways through which doxycycline works and to assess the effectiveness of combining doxycycline with rapamycin (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor) in controlling cell migration, proliferation and wound closure. TSC2-positive and TSC2-negative mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), 323-TSC2-positive and 323-TSC2-null MEF and Eker rat uterine leiomyoma (ELT3) cells were treated with doxycycline or rapamycin alone, or in combination. Migration, wound closure and proliferation were assessed using a transwell migration assay, time-lapse microscopy and manual cell counts respectively. RhoA-GTPase activity, phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in TSC2-negative MEF treated with doxycycline were examined using ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. The enhanced migration of TSC2-null cells was reduced by doxycycline at concentrations as low as 20 pM, while the rate of wound closure was reduced at 2–59 μM. Doxycycline decreased RhoA-GTPase activity and phosphorylation of FAK in these cells but had no effect on the phosphorylation of p70S6K, ERK1/2 or AKT. Combining doxycycline with rapamycin significantly reduced the rate of wound closure at lower concentrations than achieved with either drug alone. This study shows that doxycycline inhibits TSC2-null cell migration. Thus doxycycline has potential as an anti-migratory agent in the treatment of diseases with TSC2 dysfunction. PMID:26282580

  4. Disruption of focal adhesion kinase and p53 interaction with small molecule compound R2 reactivated p53 and blocked tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a 125 kDa non-receptor kinase that plays a major role in cancer cell survival and metastasis. Methods We performed computer modeling of the p53 peptide containing the site of interaction with FAK, predicted the peptide structure and docked it into the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of FAK involved in the complex with p53. We screened small molecule compounds that targeted the site of the FAK-p53 interaction and identified compounds (called Roslins, or R compounds) docked in silico to this site. Results By different assays in isogenic HCT116p53+/+ and HCT116 p53-/- cells we identified a small molecule compound called Roslin 2 (R2) that bound FAK, disrupted the binding of FAK and p53 and decreased cancer cell viability and clonogenicity in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, dual-luciferase assays demonstrated that the R2 compound increased p53 transcriptional activity that was inhibited by FAK using p21, Mdm-2, and Bax-promoter targets. R2 also caused increased expression of p53 targets: p21, Mdm-2 and Bax proteins. Furthermore, R2 significantly decreased tumor growth, disrupted the complex of FAK and p53, and up-regulated p21 in HCT116 p53+/+ but not in HCT116 p53-/- xenografts in vivo. In addition, R2 sensitized HCT116p53+/+ cells to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. Conclusions Thus, disruption of the FAK and p53 interaction with a novel small molecule reactivated p53 in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and can be effectively used for development of FAK-p53 targeted cancer therapy approaches. PMID:23841915

  5. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase suppresses the adverse phenotype of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells and improves endocrine response in endocrine-sensitive cells.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Stephen; Barnfather, Peter; Hayes, Edd; Bramble, Pamela; Christensen, James; Nicholson, Robert I; Barrett-Lee, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is a major clinical problem. Previous reports have demonstrated that cell models of acquired endocrine resistance have altered cell-matrix adhesion and a highly migratory phenotype, features which may impact on tumour spread in vivo. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that regulates signalling pathways central to cell adhesion, migration and survival and its expression is frequently deregulated in breast cancer. In this study, we have used the novel FAK inhibitor PF573228 to address the role of FAK in the development of endocrine resistance. Whilst total-FAK expression was similar between endocrine-sensitive and endocrine-resistant MCF7 cells, FAK phosphorylation status (Y397 or Y861) was altered in resistance. PF573228 promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Y397 but did not affect other FAK activation sites (pY407, pY576 and pY861). Endocrine-resistant cells were more sensitive to these inhibitory effects versus MCF7 (mean IC(50) for FAK pY397 inhibition: 0.43 μM, 0.05 μM and 0.13 μM for MCF7, TamR and FasR cells, respectively). Inhibition of FAK pY397 was associated with a reduction in TamR and FasR adhesion to, and migration over, matrix components. PF573228 as a single agent (0-1 μM) did not affect the growth of MCF7 cells or their endocrine-resistant counterparts. However, treatment of endocrine-sensitive cells with PF573228 and tamoxifen combined resulted in greater suppression of proliferation versus single agent treatment. Together these data suggest the importance of FAK in the process of endocrine resistance, particularly in the development of an aggressive, migratory cell phenotype and demonstrate the potential to improve endocrine response through combination treatment. PMID:20354780

  6. Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK)-related Non-kinase Inhibits Myofibroblast Differentiation through Differential MAPK Activation in a FAK-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiang; Gladson, Candece L.; Wu, Hongju; Hayasaka, Haurko; Olman, Mitchell A.

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 induces fibroblast transdifferentiation to myofibroblasts, a process that requires the involvement of integrin-mediated signaling and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK) is known for its role in inhibiting integrin-mediated cell migration; however, its role in myofibroblast differentiation has not been defined. Here, we report that FRNK abrogates TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. TGF-β1 can induce α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in the presence or absence of FAK; however, TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression is reduced (∼73%) in FAK-deficient fibroblasts. Although both ERK and p38 MAPK activation is required for maximal TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression, ERK is the major signaling intermediate in cells that express FAK. In contrast, p38 MAPK is the dominant mediator of TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression in FAK-deficient cells. FRNK overexpression blocks TGF-β1-induced ERK or p38 MAPK activation in the presence, and surprisingly, in the absence of FAK. The loss of FRNK was tested in vivo during experimentally induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. FRNK knock-out mice have a greater increase in α-SMA-expressing cells in response to a pulmonary fibrotic stimulus in vivo, as compared with congenic wild type mice. This is the first time that FRNK loss has been shown to modify the pathobiology in any animal disease model. Together, the data demonstrate that FRNK negatively regulates myofibroblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. These data further suggest that modulation FRNK expression may be a novel avenue for therapeutic intervention in tissue fibrosis. PMID:18669633

  7. P130Cas Src-Binding and Substrate Domains Have Distinct Roles in Sustaining Focal Adhesion Disassembly and Promoting Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Meenderink, Leslie M.; Ryzhova, Larisa M.; Donato, Dominique M.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Kaverina, Irina; Hanks, Steven K.

    2010-01-01

    The docking protein p130Cas is a prominent Src substrate found in focal adhesions (FAs) and is implicated in regulating critical aspects of cell motility including FA disassembly and protrusion of the leading edge plasma membrane. To better understand how p130Cas acts to promote these events we examined requirements for established p130Cas signaling motifs including the SH3-binding site of the Src binding domain (SBD) and the tyrosine phosphorylation sites within the substrate domain (SD). Expression of wild type p130Cas in Cas −/− mouse embryo fibroblasts resulted in enhanced cell migration associated with increased leading-edge actin flux, increased rates of FA assembly/disassembly, and uninterrupted FA turnover. Variants lacking either the SD phosphorylation sites or the SBD SH3-binding motif were able to partially restore the migration response, while only a variant lacking both signaling functions was fully defective. Notably, the migration defects associated with p130Cas signaling-deficient variants correlated with longer FA lifetimes resulting from aborted FA disassembly attempts. However the SD mutational variant was fully defective in increasing actin assembly at the protruding leading edge and FA assembly/disassembly rates, indicating that SD phosphorylation is the sole p130Cas signaling function in regulating these processes. Our results provide the first quantitative evidence supporting roles for p130Cas SD tyrosine phosphorylation in promoting both leading edge actin flux and FA turnover during cell migration, while further revealing that the p130Cas SBD has a function in cell migration and sustained FA disassembly that is distinct from its known role of promoting SD tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:20976150

  8. Concentrated growth factor promotes Schwann cell migration partly through the integrin β1-mediated activation of the focal adhesion kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jie; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yidi; Yang, Tingting; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-05-01

    Nerve injury is a serious complication associated with dental implant surgery. Following nerve injury, the migration of Schwann cells (SCs) supports nerve regeneration. Concentrated growth factor (CGF) belongs to a new generation of biomaterials that contain fibrin matrix, as well as a number of growth factors that affect the migration of various types of cells, including endothelial cells and cancer cells. To the very best of our knowledge, there are no available studies to date on the promoting effect of CGF on the migration of SCs. Thus, the aim of the present study was to characterize the structure of CGF and growth factor release, examine the effects of CGF on the migration of SCs, and to examine the role of integrin β1 and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway in the CGF-induced migration of SCs. For this purpose, CGF was prepared by centrifuging rat venous blood, which produced a fiber-like matrix capable of releasing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) over a sustained period of time (at least 13 days). The soluble component of CGF was used to produce conditioned media to treat the SC cells in culture. The results demonstrated that CGF promoted the migration of SCs and increased the expression of integrin β1. These effects appeared to involve FAK phosphorylation, which occurred downstream of integrin β1 activation. The short-interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated downregulation of integrin β1 expression did not block the ability of CGF to promote the migration of SCs. These data suggest that CGF promotes the migration of SCs partly through the integrin β1-mediated activation of the FAK pathway. PMID:26986804

  9. Role of Suspended Fiber Structural Stiffness and Curvature on Single-Cell Migration, Nucleus Shape, and Focal-Adhesion-Cluster Length

    PubMed Central

    Meehan, Sean; Nain, Amrinder S.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that cellular migration, persistence, and associated cytoskeletal arrangement are highly dependent on substrate stiffness (modulus: N/m2 and independent of geometry), but little is known on how cells respond to subtle changes in local geometry and structural stiffness (N/m). Here, using fibers of varying diameter (400, 700, and 1200 nm) and length (1 and 2 mm) deposited over hollow substrates, we demonstrate that single mouse C2C12 cells attached to single suspended fibers form spindle morphologies that are sensitive to fiber mechanical properties. Over a wide range of increasing structural stiffness (2 to 100+ mN/m), cells exhibited decreases in migration speed and average nucleus shape index of ∼57% (from 58 to 25 μm/h) and ∼26% (from 0.78 to 0.58), respectively, whereas the average paxillin focal-adhesion-cluster (FAC, formed at poles) length increased by ∼38% (from 8 to 11 μm). Furthermore, the increase in structural stiffness directly correlates with cellular persistence, with 60% of cells moving in the direction of increasing structural stiffness. At similar average structural stiffness (25 ± 5 mN/m), cells put out longer FAC lengths on smaller diameters, suggesting a conservation of FAC area, and also exhibited higher nucleus shape index and migration speeds on larger-diameter fibers. Interestingly, cells were observed to deform fibers locally or globally through forces applied through the FAC sites and cells undergoing mitosis were found to be attached to the FAC sites by single filamentous tethers. These varied reactions have implications in developmental and disease biology models as they describe a strong dependence of cellular behavior on the cell’s immediate mechanistic environment arising from alignment and geometry of fibers. PMID:25468339

  10. MiR-138 and MiR-135 directly target focal adhesion kinase, inhibit cell invasion, and increase sensitivity to chemotherapy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Golubovskaya, Vita M; Sumbler, Brittany; Ho, Baotran; Yemma, Michael; Cance, William G

    2014-01-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase is a 125 kDa non-receptor kinase and overexpressed in many types of tumors. Recently, short noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs have been discovered as regulators of gene expression mainly through binding to the untranslated region (UTR) of mRNA. In this report we show that MiR-138 and MiR-135 down-regulated FAK expression in cancer cells. MiR-138 and MiR-135 inhibited FAK protein expression in different cancer cell lines. The computer analysis of 3'FAK-untranslated region (FAKUTR) identified one conserved MiR-138 binding site (CACCAGCA) at positions 3514-3521 and one conserved MiR-135 (AAGCCAU) binding site at positions 4278-4284 in the FAK-UTR. By a dual-luciferase assay we demonstrate that MiR-138 and MiR-135 directly bound the FAK untranslated region using FAK-UTR-Target (FAK-UTR) luciferase plasmid and inhibited its luciferase activity. The sitedirected mutagenesis of the MiR-138 and MiR-135 binding sites in the FAK-UTR abrogated MiR-138 and MiR-135-directed inhibition of FAK-UTR. Real-time PCR demonstrated that cells transfected with MiR-138 and MiR-135 expressed decreased FAK mRNA levels. Moreover, stable expression of MiR-138 and MiR-135 in 293 and HeLa cells decreased cell invasion and increased sensitivity to 5- fluorouracil (5-FU), FAK inhibitor, Y15, and doxorubicin. In addition, MiR-138 significantly decreased 293 xenograft tumor growth in vivo. This is the first report on regulation of FAK expression by MiR-135 and MiR138 that affected invasion, drug sensitivity, and tumor growth in cancer cells, which is important to the development of FAK-targeted therapeutics and understanding their novel regulations and functions. PMID:23438844