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Sample records for microvascular resistance methods

  1. Microvascular resistance in essential hypertension and flowmetry as a diagnostic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukjanov, Valdimir F.

    2001-08-01

    New Doppler-Laser flowmetry diagnostic test of functional condition of microcirculation was worked out of find precapillar and postcapillar resistance. Flowmetry was used to measure vasomotion and blood flow after arterial compression, decompression and venous hyperemia were held. Patients of essential hypertension were examined with the help of Doppler-Laser Flowmetry, optical photometry (540 nm). Precapillar resistance included next basis parameters: vasomotion with high frequency (10-16 per/min) and low amplitude, latent time after decompression, large postocclusive reactive hyperemia, absent venous hyperemia. Postcapillar resistance included next basis parameters: vasomotion with low frequency (4-8 per/min) and high amplitude, paradoxical hyperemia in arterial compression, little or absent postocclusive reactive hyperemia, large venous hyperemia. This test-method was applied to select patogenetic treatment of essential hypertension.

  2. Hypertension Management and Microvascular Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is in essence a vascular disease and is frequently associated with hypertension, macrovascular events, and microvascular complications. Microvascular dysfunction, including impaired recruitment and capillary rarefaction, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Microvascular insulin resistance and renin-angiotensin system upregulation are present in diabetes, and each contributes to the development of hypertension and microvascular dysfunction. In the insulin-sensitive state, insulin increases microvascular perfusion by increasing endothelial nitric oxide production, but this effect is abolished by insulin resistance. Angiotensin II, acting via the type 1 receptors, induces inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to impaired insulin signaling, reduced nitric oxide availability, and vasoconstriction. Conversely, it acts on the type 2 receptors to cause vasodilatation. Because substrate and hormonal exchanges occur in the microvasculature, antihypertensive agents targeted to improve microvascular insulin sensitivity and function may have beneficial effects beyond their capacity to lower blood pressure in patients with diabetes. PMID:20582734

  3. Peripheral microvascular vasodilatory response to estradiol and genistein in women with insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wenner, Megan M.; Taylor, Hugh S.; Stachenfeld, Nina S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estradiol enhances vasodilation in healthy women, but vascular effects of the phytoestrogen genistein are still under investigation. Insulin resistance (IR) compromises microvascular function. We therefore examined the interaction of estradiol, genistein, and IR on microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness. Methods We hypothesized that estradiol and genistein increase microvascular vasodilation in healthy women (control, n=8, 23±2 yr, BMI 25.9±2.9 kg/m2) but not in women with IR (n=7, 20±1 yr, BMI 27.3±3.0 kg/m2). We used the cutaneous circulation as a model of microvascular vasodilatory function. We determined cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) with laser Doppler flowmetry and beat-to-beat blood pressure during local cutaneous heating (42°C) with estradiol or genistein microdialysis perfusions. Because heat induced vasodilation is primarily an NO mediated response, we examined microvascular vasodilation with and without L-NMMA. Results In control women, estradiol enhanced CVC (94.4±2.6 % vs. saline 81.6±4.2 % CVCmax, P<0.05), which was reversed with L-NMMA (80.9±7.8 % CVCmax, P<0.05), but genistein did not affect vasodilation. Neither estradiol nor genistein altered CVC in IR, although L-NMMA attenuated CVC during genistein. Conclusions Our study does not support improved microvascular responsiveness during genistein exposure in healthy young women, and demonstrates that neither estradiol nor genistein improve microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness in women with IR. PMID:25996650

  4. Peroxynitrite mediates testosterone-induced vasodilation of microvascular resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Puttabyatappa, Yashoda; Stallone, John N; Ergul, Adviye; El-Remessy, Azza B; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen; Johnson, Maribeth; Owen, Mary P; White, Richard E

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of how androgens influence the cardiovascular system is far from complete, and this lack of understanding is especially true of how androgens affect resistance vessels. Our aim was to identify the signaling mechanisms stimulated by testosterone (TES) in microvascular arteries and to understand how these mechanisms mediate TES-induced vasodilation. Mesenteric microvessels were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Tension studies demonstrated a rapid, concentration-dependent, vasodilatory response to TES that did not involve protein synthesis or aromatization to 17β-estradiol. Dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and nitrotyrosine immunoblot experiments indicated that TES stimulated peroxynitrite formation in microvessels, and functional studies demonstrated that TES-induced vasodilation was inhibited by scavenging peroxynitrite. As predicted, TES enhanced the production of both peroxynitrite precursors (i.e., superoxide and nitic oxide), and xanthine oxidase was identified as the likely source of TES-stimulated superoxide production. Functional and biochemical studies indicated that TES signaling involved activity of the phosphoinositide 3 (PI3) kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor and culminated in enhanced production of cGMP and microvascular vasodilation. These findings, derived from a variety of analytical and functional approaches, provide evidence for a novel nongenomic signaling mechanism for androgen action in the microvasculature: TES-stimulated vasodilation mediated primarily by peroxynitrite formed from xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide and NO. This response was associated with activation of the PI3 kinase-Akt signaling cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor. We propose this mechanism could account for TES-stimulated cGMP production in microvessels and, ultimately, vasodilation. PMID:23318471

  5. Peroxynitrite Mediates Testosterone-Induced Vasodilation of Microvascular Resistance Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Puttabyatappa, Yashoda; Stallone, John N.; Ergul, Adviye; El-Remessy, Azza B.; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen; Johnson, Maribeth; Owen, Mary P.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of how androgens influence the cardiovascular system is far from complete, and this lack of understanding is especially true of how androgens affect resistance vessels. Our aim was to identify the signaling mechanisms stimulated by testosterone (TES) in microvascular arteries and to understand how these mechanisms mediate TES-induced vasodilation. Mesenteric microvessels were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Tension studies demonstrated a rapid, concentration-dependent, vasodilatory response to TES that did not involve protein synthesis or aromatization to 17β-estradiol. Dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and nitrotyrosine immunoblot experiments indicated that TES stimulated peroxynitrite formation in microvessels, and functional studies demonstrated that TES-induced vasodilation was inhibited by scavenging peroxynitrite. As predicted, TES enhanced the production of both peroxynitrite precursors (i.e., superoxide and nitic oxide), and xanthine oxidase was identified as the likely source of TES-stimulated superoxide production. Functional and biochemical studies indicated that TES signaling involved activity of the phosphoinositide 3 (PI3) kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor and culminated in enhanced production of cGMP and microvascular vasodilation. These findings, derived from a variety of analytical and functional approaches, provide evidence for a novel nongenomic signaling mechanism for androgen action in the microvasculature: TES-stimulated vasodilation mediated primarily by peroxynitrite formed from xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide and NO. This response was associated with activation of the PI3 kinase-Akt signaling cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor. We propose this mechanism could account for TES-stimulated cGMP production in microvessels and, ultimately, vasodilation. PMID:23318471

  6. Isolation of Microvascular Endothelial Tubes from Mouse Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Socha, Matthew J.; Segal, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    The control of blood flow by the resistance vasculature regulates the supply of oxygen and nutrients concomitant with the removal of metabolic by-products, as exemplified by exercising skeletal muscle. Endothelial cells (ECs) line the intima of all resistance vessels and serve a key role in controlling diameter (e.g. endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and, thereby, the magnitude and distribution of tissue blood flow. The regulation of vascular resistance by ECs is effected by intracellular Ca2+ signaling, which leads to production of diffusible autacoids (e.g. nitric oxide and arachidonic acid metabolites)1-3 and hyperpolarization4,5 that elicit smooth muscle cell relaxation. Thus understanding the dynamics of endothelial Ca2+ signaling is a key step towards understanding mechanisms governing blood flow control. Isolating endothelial tubes eliminates confounding variables associated with blood in the vessel lumen and with surrounding smooth muscle cells and perivascular nerves, which otherwise influence EC structure and function. Here we present the isolation of endothelial tubes from the superior epigastric artery (SEA) using a protocol optimized for this vessel. To isolate endothelial tubes from an anesthetized mouse, the SEA is ligated in situ to maintain blood within the vessel lumen (to facilitate visualizing it during dissection), and the entire sheet of abdominal muscle is excised. The SEA is dissected free from surrounding skeletal muscle fibers and connective tissue, blood is flushed from the lumen, and mild enzymatic digestion is performed to enable removal of adventitia, nerves and smooth muscle cells using gentle trituration. These freshly-isolated preparations of intact endothelium retain their native morphology, with individual ECs remaining functionally coupled to one another, able to transfer chemical and electrical signals intercellularly through gap junctions6,7. In addition to providing new insight into calcium signaling and membrane

  7. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W.; Barrett, Eugene J.; Cao, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications. PMID:26265791

  8. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications. PMID:26265791

  9. Endurance, interval sprint, and resistance exercise training: impact on microvascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Olver, T Dylan; Laughlin, M Harold

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) alters capillary hemodynamics, causes capillary rarefaction in skeletal muscle, and alters endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype, resulting in impaired vasodilatory responses. These changes contribute to altered blood flow responses to physiological stimuli, such as exercise and insulin secretion. T2D-induced microvascular dysfunction impairs glucose and insulin delivery to skeletal muscle (and other tissues such as skin and nervous), thereby reducing glucose uptake and perpetuating hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. In patients with T2D, exercise training (EX) improves microvascular vasodilator and insulin signaling and attenuates capillary rarefaction in skeletal muscle. EX-induced changes subsequently augment glucose and insulin delivery as well as glucose uptake. If these adaptions occur in a sufficient amount of tissue, and skeletal muscle in particular, chronic exposure to hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia and the risk of microvascular complications in all vascular beds will decrease. We postulate that EX programs that engage as much skeletal muscle mass as possible and recruit as many muscle fibers within each muscle as possible will generate the greatest improvements in microvascular function, providing that the duration of the stimulus is sufficient. Primary improvements in microvascular function occur in tissues (skeletal muscle primarily) engaged during exercise, and secondary improvements in microvascular function throughout the body may result from improved blood glucose control. We propose that the added benefit of combined resistance and aerobic EX programs and of vigorous intensity EX programs is not simply "more is better." Rather, we believe the additional benefit is the result of EX-induced adaptations in and around more muscle fibers, resulting in more muscle mass and the associated microvasculature being changed. Thus, to acquire primary and secondary improvements in microvascular function and improved

  10. Globular adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance via AMPK-mediated restoration of microvascular insulin responses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-09-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity and diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in muscle microvasculature and this may contribute to decreased insulin delivery to, and action in, muscle. In this study we examined whether adiponectin ameliorates metabolic insulin resistance by affecting muscle microvascular recruitment. We demonstrated that a high-fat diet induces vascular adiponectin and insulin resistance but globular adiponectin administration can restore vascular insulin responses and improve insulin's metabolic action via an AMPK- and nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. This suggests that globular adiponectin might have a therapeutic potential for improving insulin resistance and preventing cardiovascular complications in patients with diabetes via modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Hypoadiponectinaemia is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and microvasculature plays a critical role in the regulation of insulin action in muscle. Here we tested whether adiponectin replenishment could improve metabolic insulin sensitivity in male rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) via the modulation of microvascular insulin responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) for 4 weeks. Small resistance artery myograph changes in tension, muscle microvascular recruitment and metabolic response to insulin were determined. Compared with rats fed a LFD, HFD feeding abolished the vasodilatory actions of globular adiponectin (gAd) and insulin on pre-constricted distal saphenous arteries. Pretreatment with gAd improved insulin responses in arterioles isolated from HFD rats, which was blocked by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition. Similarly, HFD abolished microvascular responses to either gAd or insulin and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose disposal by

  11. RESISTIVITY METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistivity methods were among the first geophysical techniques developed. The basic concept originated with Conrad Schlumberger, who conducted the initial resistivity field tests in Normandy, France during 1912. The resistivity method, employed in its earliest and most conventional form, uses an ex...

  12. Measurement of Pulmonary Flow Reserve and Pulmonary Index of Microcirculatory Resistance for Detection of Pulmonary Microvascular Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ilsar, Rahn; Chawantanpipat, Chirapan; Chan, Kim H.; Dobbins, Timothy A.; Waugh, Richard; Hennessy, Annemarie; Celermajer, David S.; Ng, Martin K. C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The pulmonary microcirculation is the chief regulatory site for resistance in the pulmonary circuit. Despite pulmonary microvascular dysfunction being implicated in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary vascular conditions, there are currently no techniques for the specific assessment of pulmonary microvascular integrity in humans. Peak hyperemic flow assessment using thermodilution-derived mean transit-time (Tmn) facilitate accurate coronary microcirculatory evaluation, but remain unvalidated in the lung circulation. Using a high primate model, we aimed to explore the use of Tmn as a surrogate of pulmonary blood flow for the purpose of measuring the novel indices Pulmonary Flow Reserve [PFR = (maximum hyperemic)/(basal flow)] and Pulmonary Index of Microcirculatory Resistance [PIMR = (maximum hyperemic distal pulmonary artery pressure)×(maximum hyperemic Tmn)]. Ultimately, we aimed to investigate the effect of progressive pulmonary microvascular obstruction on PFR and PIMR. Methods and Results Temperature- and pressure-sensor guidewires (TPSG) were placed in segmental pulmonary arteries (SPA) of 13 baboons and intravascular temperature measured. Tmn and hemodynamics were recorded at rest and following intra-SPA administration of the vasodilator agents adenosine (10–400 µg/kg/min) and papaverine (3–24 mg). Temperature did not vary with intra-SPA sensor position (0.010±0.009 v 0.010±0.009°C; distal v proximal; p = 0.1), supporting Tmn use in lung for the purpose of hemodynamic indices derivation. Adenosine (to 200 µg/kg/min) & papaverine (to 24 mg) induced dose-dependent flow augmentations (40±7% & 35±13% Tmn reductions v baseline, respectively; p<0.0001). PFR and PIMR were then calculated before and after progressive administration of ceramic microspheres into the SPA. Cumulative microsphere doses progressively reduced PFR (1.41±0.06, 1.26±0.19, 1.17±0.07 & 1.01±0.03; for 0, 104, 105 & 106 microspheres; p = 0.009) and

  13. Induction of nuclear receptors and drug resistance in the brain microvascular endothelial cells treated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Laura; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Balazy, Michael; Cardile, Venera

    2008-05-01

    Our work contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of drug resistance in epilepsis. This study aimed to investigate i) the levels of expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP)1 and 2, ii) the activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and iii) the relationship between increased P-gp and MRPs expression and PXR and CAR activation, in immortalized rat brain microvascular endothelial cell lines, GPNT and RBE4, following treatment with the antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), topiramate, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, tiagabine, levetiracetam, and phenytoin, using Western blotting and immunocytochemistry methods. Carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin induced the highest levels of P-gp and MPRs expression that was associated with increased activation of PXR and CAR receptors as compared to levetiracetam, tiagabine and topiramate. We conclude that P-gp and MRPs are differently overexpressed in GPNT and RBE4 by various AEDs and both PXR and CAR are involved in the drug-resistant epilepsy induced by carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin. PMID:18473823

  14. Microvascular blood flow resistance: Role of red blood cell migration and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Katanov, Dinar; Gompper, Gerhard; Fedosov, Dmitry A

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular blood flow resistance has a strong impact on cardiovascular function and tissue perfusion. The flow resistance in microcirculation is governed by flow behavior of blood through a complex network of vessels, where the distribution of red blood cells across vessel cross-sections may be significantly distorted at vessel bifurcations and junctions. In this paper, the development of blood flow and its resistance starting from a dispersed configuration of red blood cells is investigated in simulations for different hematocrit levels, flow rates, vessel diameters, and aggregation interactions between red blood cells. Initially dispersed red blood cells migrate toward the vessel center leading to the formation of a cell-free layer near the wall and to a decrease of the flow resistance. The development of cell-free layer appears to be nearly universal when scaled with a characteristic shear rate of the flow. The universality allows an estimation of the length of a vessel required for full flow development, lc ≲ 25D, for vessel diameters in the range 10 μm < D < 100 μm. Thus, the potential effect of red blood cell dispersion at vessel bifurcations and junctions on the flow resistance may be significant in vessels which are shorter or comparable to the length lc. Aggregation interactions between red blood cells generally lead to a reduction of blood flow resistance. The simulations are performed using the same viscosity for both external and internal fluids and the RBC membrane viscosity is not considered; however, we discuss how the viscosity contrast may affect the results. Finally, we develop a simple theoretical model which is able to describe the converged cell-free-layer thickness at steady-state flow with respect to flow rate. The model is based on the balance between a lift force on red blood cells due to cell-wall hydrodynamic interactions and shear-induced effective pressure due to cell-cell interactions in flow. We expect that these results can

  15. In vivo microvascular network imaging of the human retina combined with an automatic three-dimensional segmentation method

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shenghai; Piao, Zhonglie; Zhu, Jiang; Lu, Fan; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Microvascular network of the retina plays an important role in diagnosis and monitoring of various retinal diseases. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) segmentation method with intensity-based Doppler variance (IBDV) based on swept-source optical coherence tomography. The automatic 3-D segmentation method is used to obtain seven surfaces of intraretinal layers. The microvascular network of the retina, which is acquired by the IBDV method, can be divided into six layers. The microvascular network of the six individual layers is visualized, and the morphology and contrast images can be improved by using the segmentation method. This method has potential for earlier diagnosis and precise monitoring in retinal vascular diseases. PMID:26169790

  16. In vivo microvascular network imaging of the human retina combined with an automatic three-dimensional segmentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shenghai; Piao, Zhonglie; Zhu, Jiang; Lu, Fan; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-07-01

    Microvascular network of the retina plays an important role in diagnosis and monitoring of various retinal diseases. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) segmentation method with intensity-based Doppler variance (IBDV) based on swept-source optical coherence tomography. The automatic 3-D segmentation method is used to obtain seven surfaces of intraretinal layers. The microvascular network of the retina, which is acquired by the IBDV method, can be divided into six layers. The microvascular network of the six individual layers is visualized, and the morphology and contrast images can be improved by using the segmentation method. This method has potential for earlier diagnosis and precise monitoring in retinal vascular diseases.

  17. The influence of elective percutaneous coronary intervention on microvascular resistance: a serial assessment using the index of microcirculatory resistance.

    PubMed

    Murai, Tadashi; Lee, Tetsumin; Kanaji, Yoshihisa; Matsuda, Junji; Usui, Eisuke; Araki, Makoto; Niida, Takayuki; Hishikari, Keiichi; Ichijyo, Sadamitsu; Hamaya, Rikuta; Yonetsu, Taishi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Kakuta, Tsunekazu

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates whether hyperemic microvascular resistance (MR) is influenced by elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) by using the index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR). Seventy-one consecutive patients with stable angina pectoris undergoing elective PCI were prospectively studied. The IMR was measured before and after PCI and at the 10-mo follow-up. The IMR significantly decreased until follow-up; the pre-PCI, post-PCI, and follow-up IMRs had a median of 19.8 (interquartile range, 14.6-28.9), 16.2 (11.8-22.1), and 14.8 (11.8-18.7), respectively (P < 0.001). The pre-PCI IMR was significantly correlated with the change in IMR between pre- and post-PCI (r = 0.84, P < 0.001) and between pre-PCI and follow-up (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Pre-PCI IMR values were significantly higher in territories with decreases in IMR than in those with increases in IMR [pre-PCI IMR: 25.4 (18.4-35.5) vs. 12.5 (9.4-16.8), P < 0.001]. At follow-up, IMR values in territories showing decreases in IMR were significantly lower than those with increases in IMR [IMR at follow-up: 13.9 (10.9-17.6) vs. 16.6 (14.0-21.4), P = 0.013]. The IMR decrease was significantly associated with a greater shortening of mean transit time, indicating increases in coronary flow (P < 0.001). The optimal cut-off values of pre-PCI IMR to predict a decrease in IMR after PCI and at follow-up were 16.8 and 17.0, respectively. In conclusion, elective PCI affected hyperemic MR and its change was associated with pre-PCI MR, resulting in showing a wide distribution. Overall hyperemic MR significantly decreased until follow-up. The modified hyperemic MR introduced by PCI may affect post-PCI coronary flow. PMID:27342881

  18. Oxidative DNA damage is associated with inflammatory response, insulin resistance and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tatsch, Etiane; De Carvalho, José A M; Hausen, Bruna S; Bollick, Yãnaí S; Torbitz, Vanessa D; Duarte, Thiago; Scolari, Rogério; Duarte, Marta M M F; Londero, Sílvia W K; Vaucher, Rodrigo A; Premaor, Melissa O; Comim, Fabio V; Moresco, Rafael N

    2015-12-01

    Urinary markers of nucleic acid oxidation may be useful biomarkers in diabetes. It has been demonstrated that T2DM patients have an increased level of oxidative DNA damage; however, it is unclear whether increased DNA damage may be related to a greater degree of inflammation and insulin resistance. Thus, the aim of this present study was to investigate the relation of the impact of oxidative DNA damage, assessed by urinary 8-OHdG, on the levels of inflammatory cytokines, as well as insulin resistance. In addition, we also investigated the diagnostic ability of urinary 8-OHdG in the identification of microvascular complications in T2DM.A case-control study, enrolling 22 healthy controls and 54 subjects with T2DM, was performed to evaluate the relation between oxidative DNA damage and interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1,tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), IL-10, and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR) index. T2DM patients presented higher urinary 8-OHdG, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α levels and HOMA-IR, and lower IL-10 levels than control subjects. Moreover, urinary 8-OHdG levels were significantly higher in the group T2DM with microvascular complications when compared to the without complications. The areas under the curve for urinary 8-OHdG and urinary albumin were, respectively, 0.836 (P<0.001) and 0.786 (P=0.002). Thus, urinary 8-OHdG has a slightly higher ability to discriminate microvascular complications in T2DM compared with urinary albumin. It was also demonstrated that T2DM patients with higher median of urinary 8-OHdG had significantly elevated levels of IL-6, TNF-α and HOMA-IR, and decreased IL-10 levels. Our findings showed that T2DM patients with higher urinary 8-OHdG levels showed a greater inflammatory degree and higher insulin resistance. It is possible to speculate that T2DM patients present a cascade of events as increasing metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance and inflammatory activation, as well as increased ROS generation factors that may

  19. Differential effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on microvascular recruitment and glucose metabolism in short- and long-term insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sjøberg, Kim A; Rattigan, Stephen; Jeppesen, Jacob F; Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Holst, Jens J; Kiens, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute infusion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has potent effects on blood flow distribution through the microcirculation in healthy humans and rats. A high fat diet induces impairments in insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment (MVR) and muscle glucose uptake, and here we examined whether this could be reversed by GLP-1. Using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, microvascular recruitment was assessed by continuous real-time imaging of gas-filled microbubbles in the microcirculation after acute (5 days) and prolonged (8 weeks) high fat diet (HF)-induced insulin resistance in rats. A euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (3 mU min−1 kg−1), with or without a co-infusion of GLP-1 (100 pmol l−1), was performed in anaesthetized rats. Consumption of HF attenuated the insulin-mediated MVR in both 5 day and 8 week HF interventions which was associated with a 50% reduction in insulin-mediated glucose uptake compared to controls. Acute administration of GLP-1 restored the normal microvascular response by increasing the MVR after both 5 days and 8 weeks of HF intervention (P < 0.05). This effect of GLP-1 was associated with a restoration of both whole body insulin sensitivity and increased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle by 90% (P < 0.05) after 5 days of HF but not after 8 weeks of HF. The present study demonstrates that GLP-1 increases MVR in rat skeletal muscle and can reverse early stages of high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in vivo. Key points Acute glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) infusion reversed the high fat diet-induced microvascular insulin resistance that occurred after both 5 days and 8 weeks of a high fat diet intervention. When GLP-1 was co-infused with insulin it had overt effects on whole body insulin sensitivity as well as insulin-mediated skeletal muscle glucose uptake after 5 days of a high fat diet, but not after 8 weeks of high fat diet intervention. Acute GLP-1 infusion did not have an additive

  20. Microvascular decompression for intractable singultus.

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsushi; Hatayama, Toru; Kon, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Taigen; Sasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    Intractable singultus due to cerebrovascular disease is very rare. We report a case of intractable singultus that improved after microvascular decompression and present a literature review. The patient was a 58-year-old man with a 30-year history of persistent singultus. Its frequency and duration gradually increased and it was resistant to multiple medical treatments. Microvascular decompression to relieve pressure on the anterolateral surface of the lower medulla oblongata from the vertebral artery resulted in the resolution of singultus. Patients with intractable idiopathic singultus who fail to respond to medical therapy need to be considered for the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases and microvascular decompression. PMID:27335312

  1. Autologous Microvascular Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Venkat

    2013-01-01

    Autologous microvascular breast reconstruction is widely accepted as a key component of breast cancer treatment. There are two basic donor sites; the anterior abdominal wall and the thigh/buttock region. Each of these regions provides for a number of flaps that are successfully utilised in breast reconstruction. Refinement of surgical technique and the drive towards minimising donor site morbidity whilst maximising flap vascularity in breast reconstruction has seen an evolution towards perforator based flap reconstructions, however myocutaneous flaps are still commonly practiced. We review herein the current methods of autologous microvascular breast reconstruction. PMID:23362474

  2. How to assess microvascular structure in humans.

    PubMed

    Rizzoni, Damiano; Aalkjaer, Christian; De Ciuceis, Carolina; Porteri, Enzo; Rossini, Claudia; Rosei, Claudia Agabiti; Sarkar, Annamaria; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti

    2011-12-01

    Structural alterations of subcutaneous small resistance arteries, as indicated by an increased media to lumen ratio, are frequently present in hypertensive and/or diabetic patients. However, the evaluation of microvascular structure is not an easy task. Among the methods that may be applied to humans, plethysmographic evaluation of small arteries and wire or pressure micromyography were extensively used in the last decades. Media to lumen ratio of small arteries evaluated by micromyography was demonstrated to possess a strong prognostic significance; however, its extensive evaluation is limited by the invasiveness of the assessment, since a biopsy of subcutaneous fat is needed. Non-invasive approaches were then proposed, including capillaroscopy, which provides information about microvascular rarefaction. Recently, the interest of investigators has focused on the retinal microvascular bed. In particular, a non-invasive measurement of wall thickness to internal lumen ratio of retinal arterioles using scanning laser Doppler flowmetry has been recently introduced. Preliminary data suggest a fairly good agreement between this approach and micromyographic measurements, generally considered the gold standard approach. Therefore, the evaluation of microvascular structure is progressively moving from bench to bedside, and it could represent, in the immediate future, an evaluation to be performed in all hypertensive patients, in order to obtain a better stratification of cardiovascular risk. PMID:22283671

  3. Microvascular flow vectors in normal and hypertrophic myocardium as determined by the method of colored microspheres.

    PubMed

    Cicutti, N; Rakusan, K

    1992-05-01

    Sequential in vivo infusion of two differently colored microsphere suspensions into the left atrium of normal and hypertrophic rat myocardium revealed that certain coronary capillaries contained microsphere aggregates of both colors. A capillary flow vector was established based on the sequence of colors embolized within each aggregate. Critical examination of flow vectors among neighboring capillaries enabled the characterization of capillary flow direction. Results indicated a predominance in concurrent flow direction, which decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) with capillaries further removed from an individual reference capillary. The percentage of concurrent flow was also found to be significantly lower in subendocardium (P less than 0.001) than in midmyocardium. Cardiac hypertrophy was not a contributing factor to the above findings. This study provides previously unattainable data regarding transmural capillary flow direction and suggests regional adaptations in coronary microvascular flow. PMID:1386134

  4. Studies of pathological dynamics after microvascular injury using nonlinear optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosidi, Nathanael L.

    Microvascular lesions are a common feature in the aging brain and clinical evidence has correlated microvascular pathology with the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Traditional animal models that replicate hemorrhagic and ischemic lesions in the brain typically affect large regions in the cortex and do not reproduce the small-scale lesions linked to neurodegeneration that likely stem from injuries to single microvessels. Due in part to this lack of small-scale injury animal models, there remains an incomplete understanding of the cellular and pathophysiological dynamics following small-scale vascular lesions, making progress on therapeutic strategies difficult. We used tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses to injure single penetrating arterioles (PA) (i.e., arterioles that plunge into the brain) in the cortex of live anesthetized rodents and used two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) imaging to quantify blood flow changes and to determine the time course of pathological consequences in the brain after injury. We find that after ischemic occlusion of a PA, nearby pial and penetrating arterioles do not actively compensate for the reduction of blood flow observed near the occluded blood vessel. We find that capillaries connected downstream to the clotted vessel dilate but other capillaries in the vicinity do not, suggesting that any compensatory signal that results in a physiological response travels vascularly. We ruptured individual PAs to induce microhemorrhages that resulted in extravasation of blood into the parenchyma. We find that tissue compression due to the hematoma does not collapse capillaries and cause acute ischemia. 2PEF imaging of mice expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in a subset of cortical neurons revealed no dendrite degeneration out to seven days after microhemorrhage. However, we did observe an inflammatory response by microglia/macrophages as quickly as 1.5-hrs after

  5. Mechanical behavior of pathological and normal red blood cells in microvascular flow based on modified level-set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, XiWen; Ma, FangChao; Hao, PengFei; Yao, ZhaoHui

    2016-01-01

    The research of the motion and deformation of the RBCs is important to reveal the mechanism of blood diseases. A numerical method has been developed with level set formulation for elastic membrane immersed in incompressible fluid. The numerical model satisfies mass and energy conservation without the leaking problems in classical Immersed Boundary Method (IBM), at the same time, computing grid we used can be much smaller than the general literatures. The motion and deformation of a red blood cell (including pathological & normal status) in microvascular flow are simulated. It is found that the Reynolds number and membrane's stiffness play an important role in the transmutation and oscillation of the elastic membrane. The normal biconcave shape of the RBC is propitious to create high deformation than other pathological shapes. With reduced viscosity of the interior fluid both the velocity of the blood and the deformability of the cell reduced. With increased viscosity of the plasma both the velocity of the blood and the deformability of the cell reduced. The tank treading of the RBC membrane is observed at low enough viscosity contrast in shear flow. The tank tread fixed inclination angle of the cell depends on the shear ratio and viscosity contrast, which can be compared with the experimental observation well.

  6. A novel technique for modeling susceptibility-based contrast mechanisms for arbitrary microvascular geometries: the finite perturber method.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arvind P; Ward, B Douglas; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2008-04-15

    Recently, we demonstrated that vessel geometry is a significant determinant of susceptibility-induced contrast in MRI. This is especially relevant for susceptibility-contrast enhanced MRI of tumors with their characteristically abnormal vessel morphology. In order to better understand the biophysics of this contrast mechanism, it is of interest to model how various factors, including microvessel morphology contribute to the measured MR signal, and was the primary motivation for developing a novel computer modeling approach called the Finite Perturber Method (FPM). The FPM circumvents the limitations of traditional fixed-geometry approaches, and enables us to study susceptibility-induced contrast arising from arbitrary microvascular morphologies in 3D, such as those typically observed with brain tumor angiogenesis. Here we describe this new modeling methodology and some of its applications. The excellent agreement of the FPM with theory and the extant susceptibility modeling data, coupled with its computational efficiency demonstrates its potential to transform our understanding of the factors that engender susceptibility contrast in MRI. PMID:18308587

  7. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry. PMID:27238174

  8. Environmental Growth Conditions Influence the Ability of Escherichia coli K1 To Invade Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Confer Serum Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Badger, Julie L.; Kim, Kwang Sik

    1998-01-01

    A major limitation to advances in prevention and therapy of neonatal meningitis is our incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease. In an effort to understand the pathogenesis of meningitis due to Escherichia coli K1, we examined whether environmental growth conditions similar to those that the bacteria might be exposed to in the blood could influence the ability of E. coli K1 to invade brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) in vitro and to cross the blood-brain barrier in vivo. We found that the following bacterial growth conditions enhanced E. coli K1 invasion of BMEC 3- to 10-fold: microaerophilic growth, media buffered at pH 6.5, and media supplemented with 50% newborn bovine serum (NBS), magnesium, or iron. Growth conditions that significantly repressed invasion (i.e., 2- to 250-fold) included iron chelation, a pH of 8.5, and high osmolarity. More importantly, E. coli K1 traversal of the blood-brain barrier was significantly greater for the growth condition enhancing BMEC invasion (50% NBS) than for the condition repressing invasion (osmolarity) in newborn rats with experimental hematogenous meningitis. Of interest, bacterial growth conditions that enhanced or repressed invasion also elicited similar serum resistance phenotype patterns. This is the first demonstration that bacterial ability to enter the central nervous system can be affected by environmental growth conditions. PMID:9826343

  9. What Causes Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors ... Microvascular Disease? The same risk factors that cause atherosclerosis may cause coronary microvascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a ...

  10. Microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Emre; İdilman, İlkay Sedakat; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular invasion is a crucial histopathologic prognostic factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. We reviewed the literature and aimed to draw attention to clinicopathologic and imaging findings that may predict the presence of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma. Imaging findings suggesting microvascular invasion are disruption of capsule, irregular tumor margin, peritumoral enhancement, multifocal tumor, increased tumor size, and increased glucose metabolism on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In the presence of typical findings, microvascular invasion may be predicted. PMID:26782155

  11. Acute Alcohol Intoxication-Induced Microvascular Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, Travis M.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol intoxication can increase inflammation and worsen injury, yet the mechanisms involved are not clear. We investigated whether acute alcohol intoxication elevates microvascular permeability, and investigated potential signaling mechanisms in endothelial cells that may be involved. Methods Conscious rats received a 2.5 g/kg alcohol bolus via gastric catheters to produce acute intoxication. Microvascular leakage of intravenously administered FITC-albumin from the mesenteric microcirculation was assessed by intravital microscopy. Endothelial-specific mechanisms were studied using cultured endothelial cell monolayers. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of barrier function, before and after treatment with alcohol or its metabolite acetaldehyde. Pharmacologic agents were used to test the roles of alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), rho kinase (ROCK), and exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac). VE-cadherin localization was investigated to assess junctional integrity. Rac1 and RhoA activation were assessed by ELISA assays. Results Alcohol significantly increased FITC-albumin extravasation from the mesenteric microcirculation. Alcohol also significantly decreased TER and disrupted VE-cadherin organization at junctions. Acetaldehyde significantly decreased TER, but inhibition of ADH or application of a superoxide dismutase mimetic failed to prevent alcohol-induced decreases in TER. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase, but not MLCK or ROCK, significantly attenuated the alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction. Alcohol rapidly decreased GTP-bound Rac1 but not RhoA during the drop in TER. Activation of Epac increased TER, but did not prevent alcohol from decreasing TER. However, activation of Epac after initiation of alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction quickly resolved TER to baseline levels. Conclusions Our results suggest that alcohol intoxication increases

  12. Methods for resistive switching of memristors

    DOEpatents

    Mickel, Patrick R.; James, Conrad D.; Lohn, Andrew; Marinella, Matthew; Hsia, Alexander H.

    2016-05-10

    The present invention is directed generally to resistive random-access memory (RRAM or ReRAM) devices and systems, as well as methods of employing a thermal resistive model to understand and determine switching of such devices. In particular example, the method includes generating a power-resistance measurement for the memristor device and applying an isothermal model to the power-resistance measurement in order to determine one or more parameters of the device (e.g., filament state).

  13. Impact of an endothelial progenitor cell capturing stent on coronary microvascular function: comparison with drug-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woong Gil; Kim, Soo Hyun; Yoon, Hyung Seok; Lee, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Although drug-eluting stents (DESs) effectively reduce restenosis following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), they also delay re-endothelialization and impair microvascular function, resulting in adverse clinical outcomes. Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) capturing stents, by providing a functional endothelial layer on the stent, have beneficial effects on microvascular function. However, data on coronary microvascular function in patients with EPC stents versus DESs are lacking. Methods Seventy-four patients who previously underwent PCI were enrolled in this study. Microvascular function was evaluated 6 months after PCI based on the index of microvascular resistance (IMR) and the coronary flow reserve (CFR). IMR was calculated as the ratio of the mean distal coronary pressure at maximal hyperemia to the inverse of the hyperemic mean transit time (hTmn). The CFR was calculated by dividing the hTmn by the baseline mean transit time. Results Twenty-one patients (age, 67.2 ± 9.6 years; male:female, 15:6) with an EPC stent and 53 patients (age, 61.5 ± 14.7 years; male:female, 40:13) with second-generation DESs were included in the study. There were no significant differences in the baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics of the two groups. Angiography performed 6 months postoperatively did not show significant differences in their CFR values. However, patients with the EPC stent had a significantly lower IMR than patients with second-generation DESs (median, 25.5 [interquartile range, 12.85 to 28.18] vs. 29.0 [interquartile range, 15.42 to 39.23]; p = 0.043). Conclusions Microvascular dysfunction was significantly improved after 6 months in patients with EPC stents compared to those with DESs. The complete re-endothelialization achieved with the EPC stent may provide clinical benefits over DESs, especially in patients with microvascular dysfunction. PMID:25589834

  14. Applications of microvascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Miller, C W; Fowler, J D

    1990-09-01

    The advent of microvascular surgery has radically changed the discipline of human reconstructive surgery over the last decade. The ability to anastomose vessels less than 1 mm in diameter allows the distant transfer of tissues with a known blood supply from one area of the body to another. These tissues can be detached from their local blood supply and reperfused by anastomosing vessels supplying the tissue transfer to vessels near the recipient site. This technique has been used to transfer a variety of tissues and combinations of tissues including skin, muscle, bone, and bowel to solve a variety of difficult reconstructive problems. Applications, potential applications, and problems associated with microvascular free tissue transfer will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:2134600

  15. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Borges, J P; Lopes, G O; Verri, V; Coelho, M P; Nascimento, P M C; Kopiler, D A; Tibirica, E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men. PMID:27599202

  16. Method Analysis of Microbial Resistant Gypsum Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Several commercially available gypsum products are marketed as microbial-resistant. During previous test method research on a microbial resistant gypsum wallboard study, a common theme from both stakeholders and product vendors was the need for a unified and accepted m...

  17. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  18. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  19. New Methods for Modeling Laterolog Resistivity Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzyna, Jadwiga Anna; Cichy, Adam; Drahos, Dezső; Galsa, Attila; Bała, Maria Joanna; Ossowski, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents methods for laterolog response modeling. In Coulomb's charges method, Laplace's equation is solved for the electric field distribution in rock medium with internal boundaries between different resistivity layers. There, the boundary problem is reduced to Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. The second method uses a finite element array to model apparent resistivity from laterolog. The task is treated as DC problem and the Laplace equation is solved numerically. The presented methods were applied to borehole data covering a typical stratigraphic section of the Fore-Sudetic Monocline in southwestern Poland. Apparent resistivity was calculated using the Coulomb's charges method and alternatively modeled using a finite element method which gave similar results. Then, a series of linear corrections for borehole, shoulder bed, and filtration effects for apparent resistivity obtained by the Coulomb's charges method demonstrated the feasibility of calculating true resistivity of virgin and invaded zones. The proposed methods provide a flexible solution in modeling which can be adapted to other logs.

  20. Reproducibility and repeatability of peripheral microvascular assessment using iontophoresis in conjunction with laser Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sachin; Sattar, Naveed; Petrie, John R; Cobbe, Stuart M; Ferrell, William R

    2007-09-01

    Interrogation of peripheral vascular function is increasingly recognized as a noninvasive surrogate marker for coronary vascular function and carries with it important prognostic information regarding future cardiovascular risk. Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) is a completely noninvasive method for looking at peripheral microvascular function. We sought to look at reproducibility and repeatability of LDI-derived assessment of peripheral microvascular function between arms and 8 weeks apart. We used LDI in conjunction with iontophoretic application of ACh and SNP to look at endothelium-dependent and -independent microvascular function, respectively, in a mixture of women with cardiac syndrome X and healthy volunteers. We looked at variation between arms (n = 40) and variation at 8 weeks apart (n = 22). When measurements were corrected for skin resistance, there was nonsignificant variation between arms for ACh (2.7%) and SNP (3.8%) and nonsignificant temporal variation for ACh (3.5%) and SNP (4.7%). Construction of Bland-Altman plots reinforce that measurements have good repeatability. Elimination of the baseline perfusion response had deleterious effects on repeatability. LDI can be used to assess peripheral vascular response with good repeatability as long as measurements are corrected for skin resistance, which affects drug delivery. This has important implications for the future use of LDI. PMID:17878765

  1. Laser-Doppler flowmetry--a non-invasive and continuous method for blood flow evaluation in microvascular studies.

    PubMed

    Oberg, P A; Tenland, T; Nilsson, G E

    1984-01-01

    Skin viability has during the last decades been studied by a number of different techniques. Some of these are briefly presented in this paper. One method, based on the laser-Doppler principle, makes possible continuous and noninvasive measurement of blood flow in the outermost layer (1 mm) of the skin. The basic physical principles and the properties of this flowmeter are presented. Some clinical and research applications of laser-Doppler flowmetry in a number of medical disciplines are discussed. PMID:6236674

  2. A novel method for identifying a graph-based representation of 3-D microvascular networks from fluorescence microscopy image stacks

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyin; Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Gu, Chenghua; Miller, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach to determine the global topological structure of a microvasculature network from noisy and low-resolution fluorescence microscopy data that does not require the detailed segmentation of the vessel structure is proposed here. The method is most appropriate for problems where the tortuosity of the network is relatively low and proceeds by directly computing a piecewise linear approximation to the vasculature skeleton through the construction of a graph in three dimensions whose edges represent the skeletal approximation and vertices are located at Critical Points (CPs) on the microvasculature. The CPs are defined as vessel junctions or locations of relatively large curvature along the centerline of a vessel. Our method consists of two phases. First, we provide a CP detection technique that, for junctions in particular, does not require any a priori geometric information such as direction or degree. Second, connectivity between detected nodes is determined via the solution of a Binary Integer Program (BIP) whose variables determine whether a potential edge between nodes is or is not included in the final graph. The utility function in this problem reflects both intensity-based and structural information along the path connecting the two nodes. Qualitative and quantitative results confirm the usefulness and accuracy of this method. This approach provides a mean of correctly capturing the connectivity patterns in vessels that are missed by more traditional segmentation and binarization schemes because of imperfections in the images which manifest as dim or broken vessels. PMID:25515433

  3. A novel method for identifying a graph-based representation of 3-D microvascular networks from fluorescence microscopy image stacks.

    PubMed

    Almasi, Sepideh; Xu, Xiaoyin; Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Gu, Chenghua; Miller, Eric L

    2015-02-01

    A novel approach to determine the global topological structure of a microvasculature network from noisy and low-resolution fluorescence microscopy data that does not require the detailed segmentation of the vessel structure is proposed here. The method is most appropriate for problems where the tortuosity of the network is relatively low and proceeds by directly computing a piecewise linear approximation to the vasculature skeleton through the construction of a graph in three dimensions whose edges represent the skeletal approximation and vertices are located at Critical Points (CPs) on the microvasculature. The CPs are defined as vessel junctions or locations of relatively large curvature along the centerline of a vessel. Our method consists of two phases. First, we provide a CP detection technique that, for junctions in particular, does not require any a priori geometric information such as direction or degree. Second, connectivity between detected nodes is determined via the solution of a Binary Integer Program (BIP) whose variables determine whether a potential edge between nodes is or is not included in the final graph. The utility function in this problem reflects both intensity-based and structural information along the path connecting the two nodes. Qualitative and quantitative results confirm the usefulness and accuracy of this method. This approach provides a mean of correctly capturing the connectivity patterns in vessels that are missed by more traditional segmentation and binarization schemes because of imperfections in the images which manifest as dim or broken vessels. PMID:25515433

  4. Influenza Infects Lung Microvascular Endothelium Leading to Microvascular Leak: Role of Apoptosis and Claudin-5

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan M.; Wang, Changsen; Tigdi, Jayesh; Si, Xiaoe; Dumpit, Carlo; Charles, Steffany; Gamage, Asela; Moraes, Theo J.; Lee, Warren L.

    2012-01-01

    Severe influenza infections are complicated by acute lung injury, a syndrome of pulmonary microvascular leak. The pathogenesis of this complication is unclear. We hypothesized that human influenza could directly infect the lung microvascular endothelium, leading to loss of endothelial barrier function. We infected human lung microvascular endothelium with both clinical and laboratory strains of human influenza. Permeability of endothelial monolayers was assessed by spectrofluorimetry and by measurement of the transendothelial electrical resistance. We determined the molecular mechanisms of flu-induced endothelial permeability and developed a mouse model of severe influenza. We found that both clinical and laboratory strains of human influenza can infect and replicate in human pulmonary microvascular endothelium, leading to a marked increase in permeability. This was caused by apoptosis of the lung endothelium, since inhibition of caspases greatly attenuated influenza-induced endothelial leak. Remarkably, replication-deficient virus also caused a significant degree of endothelial permeability, despite displaying no cytotoxic effects to the endothelium. Instead, replication-deficient virus induced degradation of the tight junction protein claudin-5; the adherens junction protein VE-cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton were unaffected. Over-expression of claudin-5 was sufficient to prevent replication-deficient virus-induced permeability. The barrier-protective agent formoterol was able to markedly attenuate flu-induced leak in association with dose-dependent induction of claudin-5. Finally, mice infected with human influenza developed pulmonary edema that was abrogated by parenteral treatment with formoterol. Thus, we describe two distinct mechanisms by which human influenza can induce pulmonary microvascular leak. Our findings have implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of acute lung injury from severe influenza. PMID:23115643

  5. Speckle contrast optical spectroscopy, a non-invasive, diffuse optical method for measuring microvascular blood flow in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, Claudia P.; Varma, Hari M.; Kristoffersen, Anna K.; Dragojevic, Tanja; Culver, Joseph P.; Durduran, Turgut

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new, non-invasive, diffuse optical technique, speckle contrast optical spectroscopy (SCOS), for probing deep tissue blood flow using the statistical properties of laser speckle contrast and the photon diffusion model for a point source. The feasibility of the method is tested using liquid phantoms which demonstrate that SCOS is capable of measuring the dynamic properties of turbid media non-invasively. We further present an in vivo measurement in a human forearm muscle using SCOS in two modalities: one with the dependence of the speckle contrast on the source-detector separation and another on the exposure time. In doing so, we also introduce crucial corrections to the speckle contrast that account for the variance of the shot and sensor dark noises. PMID:25136500

  6. Heterogeneous ageing of skeletal muscle microvascular function.

    PubMed

    Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2016-04-15

    The distribution of blood flow to skeletal muscle during exercise is altered with advancing age. Changes in arteriolar function that are muscle specific underlie age-induced changes in blood flow distribution. With advancing age, functional adaptations that occur in resistance arterioles from oxidative muscles differ from those that occur in glycolytic muscles. Age-related adaptations of morphology, as well as changes in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle signalling, differ in muscle of diverse fibre type. Age-induced endothelial dysfunction has been reported in most skeletal muscle arterioles; however, unique alterations in signalling contribute to the dysfunction in arterioles from oxidative muscles as compared with those from glycolytic muscles. In resistance arterioles from oxidative muscle, loss of nitric oxide signalling contributes significantly to endothelial dysfunction, whereas in resistance arterioles from glycolytic muscle, alterations in both nitric oxide and prostanoid signalling underlie endothelial dysfunction. Similarly, adaptations of the vascular smooth muscle that occur with advancing age are heterogeneous between arterioles from oxidative and glycolytic muscles. In both oxidative and glycolytic muscle, late-life exercise training reverses age-related microvascular dysfunction, and exercise training appears to be particularly effective in reversing endothelial dysfunction. Patterns of microvascular ageing that develop among muscles of diverse fibre type and function may be attributable to changing patterns of physical activity with ageing. Importantly, aerobic exercise training, initiated even at an advanced age, restores muscle blood flow distribution patterns and vascular function in old animals to those seen in their young counterparts. PMID:26575597

  7. Reduced cortical microvascular oxygenation in multiple sclerosis: a blinded, case-controlled study using a novel quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Runze; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-11-01

    Hypoxia (low oxygen) is associated with many brain disorders as well as inflammation, but the lack of widely available technology has limited our ability to study hypoxia in human brain. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a poorly understood neurological disease with a significant inflammatory component which may cause hypoxia. We hypothesized that if hypoxia were to occur, there should be reduced microvascular hemoglobin saturation (StO2). In this study, we aimed to determine if reduced StO2 can be detected in MS using frequency domain near-infrared spectroscopy (fdNIRS). We measured fdNIRS data in cortex and assessed disability of 3 clinical isolated syndrome (CIS), 72 MS patients and 12 controls. Control StO2 was 63.5 ± 3% (mean ± SD). In MS patients, 42% of StO2 values were more than 2 × SD lower than the control mean. There was a significant relationship between StO2 and clinical disability. A reduced microvascular StO2 is supportive (although not conclusive) that there may be hypoxic regions in MS brain. This is the first study showing how quantitative NIRS can be used to detect reduced StO2 in patients with MS, opening the door to understanding how microvascular oxygenation impacts neurological conditions.

  8. Reduced cortical microvascular oxygenation in multiple sclerosis: a blinded, case-controlled study using a novel quantitative near-infrared spectroscopy method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runze; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia (low oxygen) is associated with many brain disorders as well as inflammation, but the lack of widely available technology has limited our ability to study hypoxia in human brain. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a poorly understood neurological disease with a significant inflammatory component which may cause hypoxia. We hypothesized that if hypoxia were to occur, there should be reduced microvascular hemoglobin saturation (StO2). In this study, we aimed to determine if reduced StO2 can be detected in MS using frequency domain near-infrared spectroscopy (fdNIRS). We measured fdNIRS data in cortex and assessed disability of 3 clinical isolated syndrome (CIS), 72 MS patients and 12 controls. Control StO2 was 63.5 ± 3% (mean ± SD). In MS patients, 42% of StO2 values were more than 2 × SD lower than the control mean. There was a significant relationship between StO2 and clinical disability. A reduced microvascular StO2 is supportive (although not conclusive) that there may be hypoxic regions in MS brain. This is the first study showing how quantitative NIRS can be used to detect reduced StO2 in patients with MS, opening the door to understanding how microvascular oxygenation impacts neurological conditions. PMID:26563581

  9. Microvascular dysfunction in the course of metabolic syndrome induced by high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). One important feature underlying the pathophysiology of many types of CVD is microvascular dysfunction. Although components of MetS are themselves CVD risk factors, the risk is increased when the syndrome is considered as one entity. We aimed to characterize microvascular function and some of its influencing factors in the course of MetS development. Methods Development of MetS in C57BL/6 mice on a high-fat diet (HFD, 51% of energy from fat) was studied. The initial phase of MetS (I-MetS) was defined as the first 2 weeks of HFD feeding, with the fully developed phase occurring after 8 weeks of HFD. We characterized these phases by assessing changes in adiposity, blood pressure, and microvascular function. All data are presented as mean ± standard error (SEM). Differences between cumulative dose–response curves of myograph experiments were calculated using non-linear regression analysis. In other experiments, comparisons between two groups were made with Student’s t-test. Comparisons between more than two groups were made using one-way ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc test. A probability value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results I-MetS mice presented with weight gain, blood pressure elevation, and microvascular dysfunction characterized by augmented vasoconstriction. This finding, contrary to those in mice with fully developed MetS, was not associated with endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, or systemic inflammation. In the initial phase, perivascular adipose tissue showed no sign of inflammation and had no influence on the pattern of vasoconstriction. These findings suggest that the onset of hypertension in MetS is strongly influenced by vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction and independent of important factors known to influence microvascular function and consequently blood pressure levels. Conclusion We identified in I

  10. Retinal microvascular network attenuation in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael A.; McGowan, Amy J.; Cardwell, Chris R.; Cheung, Carol Y.; Craig, David; Passmore, Peter; Silvestri, Giuliana; Maxwell, Alexander P.; McKay, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral small-vessel disease has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The retinal microvasculature enables the noninvasive visualization and evaluation of the systemic microcirculation. We evaluated retinal microvascular parameters in a case-control study of AD patients and cognitively normal controls. Methods Retinal images were computationally analyzed and quantitative retinal parameters (caliber, fractal dimension, tortuosity, and bifurcation) measured. Regression models were used to compute odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) for AD with adjustment for confounders. Results Retinal images were available in 213 AD participants and 294 cognitively normal controls. Persons with lower venular fractal dimension (OR per standard deviation [SD] increase, 0.77 [CI: 0.62–0.97]) and lower arteriolar tortuosity (OR per SD increase, 0.78 [CI: 0.63–0.97]) were more likely to have AD after appropriate adjustment. Discussion Patients with AD have a sparser retinal microvascular network and retinal microvascular variation may represent similar pathophysiological events within the cerebral microvasculature of patients with AD. PMID:26634224

  11. Coronary microvascular dysfunction, microvascular angina, and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Mark A; Löffler, Adrián I; Ouellette, Michelle; Smith, Lavone; Kramer, Christopher M; Bourque, Jamieson M

    2015-02-01

    Angina without coronary artery disease (CAD) has substantial morbidity and is present in 10% to 30% of patients undergoing angiography. Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is present in 50% to 65% of these patients. The optimal treatment of this cohort is undefined. We performed a systematic review to evaluate treatment strategies for objectively-defined CMD in the absence of CAD. We included studies assessing therapy in human subjects with angina and coronary flow reserve or myocardial perfusion reserve <2.5 by positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, dilution methods, or intracoronary Doppler in the absence of coronary artery stenosis ≥50% or structural heart disease. Only 8 papers met the strict inclusion criteria. The papers were heterogeneous, using different treatments, endpoints, and definitions of CMD. The small sample sizes severely limit the power of these studies, with an average of 11 patients per analysis. Studies evaluating sildenafil, quinapril, estrogen, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation application demonstrated benefits in their respective endpoints. No benefit was found with L-arginine, doxazosin, pravastatin, and diltiazem. Our systematic review highlights that there is little data to support therapies for CMD. We assess the data meeting rigorous inclusion criteria and review the related but excluded published data. We additionally describe the next steps needed to address this research gap, including a standardized definition of CMD, routine assessment of CMD in studies of chest pain without obstructive CAD, and specific therapy assessment in the population with confirmed CMD. PMID:25677893

  12. Systemic Microvascular Dysfunction and Inflammation after Pulmonary Particulate Matter Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Porter, Dale W.; Barger, Mark; Millecchia, Lyndell; Rao, K. Murali K.; Marvar, Paul J.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Castranova, Vincent; Boegehold, Matthew A.

    2006-01-01

    polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs). In ROFA- and TiO2-exposed rats, MPO was found in PMNLs adhering to the systemic microvascular wall. Evidence suggests that some of this MPO had been deposited in the microvascular wall. There was also evidence for oxidative stress in the microvascular wall. These results indicate that after PM exposure, the impairment of endothelium-dependent dilation in the systemic microcirculation coincides with PMNL adhesion, MPO deposition, and local oxidative stress. Collectively, these microvascular observations are consistent with events that contribute to the disruption of the control of peripheral resistance and/or cardiac dysfunction associated with PM exposure. PMID:16507465

  13. Systemic microvascular dysfunction and inflammation after pulmonary particulate matter exposure.

    PubMed

    Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Porter, Dale W; Barger, Mark; Millecchia, Lyndell; Rao, K Murali K; Marvar, Paul J; Hubbs, Ann F; Castranova, Vincent; Boegehold, Matthew A

    2006-03-01

    polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs). In ROFA- and TiO2-exposed rats, MPO was found in PMNLs adhering to the systemic microvascular wall. Evidence suggests that some of this MPO had been deposited in the microvascular wall. There was also evidence for oxidative stress in the microvascular wall. These results indicate that after PM exposure, the impairment of endothelium-dependent dilation in the systemic microcirculation coincides with PMNL adhesion, MPO deposition, and local oxidative stress. Collectively, these microvascular observations are consistent with events that contribute to the disruption of the control of peripheral resistance and/or cardiac dysfunction associated with PM exposure. PMID:16507465

  14. Tank leak detection using electrical resistance methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Binley, A.; LaBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    Large volumes of hazardous liquids and high-level radioactive wastes are stored worldwide in surface and underground tanks. Frequently these tanks are found to leak, thereby resulting in not only a loss of stored inventory, but in contamination to soils and groundwater. It is important to develop a reliable method of detecting leaks before large quantities are emitted into the environment surround the tanks. Two field experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) as a leak detection method under metal underground storage tanks (UST). This paper provides a summary of the field experiments performed under a 15 m diameter steel tank mockup located at the Hanford Reservation.

  15. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  16. The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Microvascular dysfunction in schizophrenia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Martin W; Martin, Billie-Jean; Fung, Marinda; Pajevic, Milada; Anderson, Todd J; Raedler, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is a mental illness associated with cardiovascular disease at a younger age than in the general population. Endothelial dysfunction has predictive value for future cardiovascular events; however, the impact of a diagnosis of schizophrenia on this marker is unknown. Aims: We tested the hypothesis that subjects with schizophrenia have impaired endothelial function. Methods: A total of 102 subjects (34.5±7.5 years) participated in this study. This sample consisted of 51 subjects with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 51 healthy subjects, who were matched for age (P=0.442), sex (P>0.999), and smoking status (P=0.842). Peripheral artery microvascular and conduit vessel endothelial function was measured using hyperemic velocity time integral (VTI), pulse arterial tonometry (PAT), and flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results: Significantly lower values of VTI were noted in subjects with schizophrenia (104.9±33.0 vs. 129.1±33.8 cm, P<0.001), whereas FMD (P=0.933) and PAT (P=0.862) did not differ between the two groups. A multivariable-linear-regression analysis, built on data from univariate and partial correlations, showed that only schizophrenia, sex, lipid-lowering medications, antihypertensive medications, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol were predictive of attenuated VTI, whereas age, ethnicity, family history of cardiovascular disease, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), antidiabetic medications, antidepressant medications, mood stabilizers, benzodiazepines, and anticholinergic medications did not predict VTI in this model (adjusted R 2=0.248). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that a diagnosis of schizophrenia is associated with impaired microvascular function as indicated by lower values of VTI, irrespective of many other clinical characteristics. It might be an early indicator of

  18. Sudomotor function assessment as a screening tool for microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Eranki, V G; Santosh, R; Rajitha, K; Pillai, A; Sowmya, P; Dupin, J; Calvet, J H

    2013-09-01

    Sudoscan, a non invasive, quick, and simple method to measure sweat function, was evaluated as a screening tool for microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes. AUC of the ROC curve for detection of microvascular complication was 0.75 for an autonomic risk score, with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 61%. PMID:23880037

  19. Vesicles sensing using resistive-pulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzevich, Yauheni; Lin, Yuqing; Chow, Lee

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a ``resistive-pulse'' method that allows translocations, counting and measuring size distribution liposomes with radii from 25 nm to 125 nm. This technique is based on using two chambers filled with electrolyte solution and separated by a partition with a nanopore between electrodes. It was found that ionic current drops when nanoparticle entering sensing nanopore of a pulled glass micropipette, producing a clear translocation signal. Pulled borosilicate micropipette with opening 50 ~ 150 nm was used as a sensing instrument. This method provides a direct, fast and inexpensive way to characterize inorganic and organic nanoparticles in a solution. LC acknowledges the financial support of National Science Foundation through Grant ECCS 0901361.

  20. Globular Adiponectin Enhances Muscle Insulin Action via Microvascular Recruitment and Increased Insulin Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Chai, Weidong; Fu, Zhuo; Dong, Zhenhua; Aylor, Kevin W.; Barrett, Eugene J.; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Adiponectin enhances insulin action and induces nitric oxide–dependent vasodilatation. Insulin delivery to muscle microcirculation and transendothelial transport are 2 discrete steps that limit insulin's action. We have shown that expansion of muscle microvascular surface area increases muscle insulin delivery and action. Objective To examine whether adiponectin modulates muscle microvascular recruitment thus insulin delivery and action in vivo. Methods and Results Overnight fasted adult male rats were studied. We determined the effects of adiponectin on muscle microvascular recruitment, using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, on insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment and whole-body glucose disposal, using contrast-enhanced ultrasound and insulin clamp, and on muscle insulin clearance and uptake with 125I-insulin. Globular adiponectin potently increased muscle microvascular blood volume without altering microvascular blood flow velocity, leading to a significantly increased microvascular blood flow. This was paralleled by a ≈30% to 40% increase in muscle insulin uptake and clearance, and ≈30% increase in insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose disposal. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase abolished globular adiponectin-mediated muscle microvascular recruitment and insulin uptake. In cultured endothelial cells, globular adiponectin dose-dependently increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation but had no effect on endothelial cell internalization of insulin. Conclusions Globular adiponectin increases muscle insulin uptake by recruiting muscle microvasculature, which contributes to its insulin-sensitizing action. PMID:23459195

  1. Pulmonary particulate matter and systemic microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Porter, Dale W; Hubbs, Ann F; Stone, Samuel; Moseley, Amy M; Cumpston, Jared L; Goodwill, Adam G; Frisbee, Stephanie J; Perrotta, Peter L; Brock, Robert W; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Boegehold, Matthew A; Frazer, David G; Chen, Bean T; Castranova, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Pulmonary particulate matter (PM) exposure has been epidemiologically associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the mechanistic foundations for this association are unclear. Exposure to certain types of PM causes changes in the vascular reactivity of several macrovascular segments. However, no studies have focused upon the systemic microcirculation, which is the primary site for the development of peripheral resistance and, typically, the site of origin for numerous pathologies. Ultrafine PM--also referred to as nanoparticles, which are defined as ambient and engineered particles with at least one physical dimension less than 100 nm (Oberdorster et al. 2005)--has been suggested to be more toxic than its larger counterparts by virtue of a larger surface area per unit mass. The purpose of this study was fourfold: (1) determine whether particle size affects the severity of postexposure microvascular dysfunction; (2) characterize alterations in microvascular nitric oxide (NO) production after PM exposure; (3) determine whether alterations in microvascular oxidative stress are associated with NO production, arteriolar dysfunction, or both; and (4) determine whether circulating inflammatory mediators, leukocytes, neurologic mechanisms, or a combination of these play a fundamental role in mediating pulmonary PM exposure and peripheral microvascular dysfunction. To achieve these goals, we created an inhalation chamber that generates stable titanium dioxide (TiO2) aerosols at concentrations up to 20 mg/m3. TiO2 is a well-characterized particle devoid of soluble metals. Sprague Dawley and Fischer 344 (F-344) rats were exposed to fine or nano-TiO2 PM (primary count modes of approximately 710 nm and approximately 100 nm in diameter, respectively) at concentrations of 1.5 to 16 mg/m3 for 4 to 12 hours to produce pulmonary loads of 7 to 150 microg in each rat. Twenty-four hours after pulmonary exposure, the following procedures were

  2. Albumin interacts specifically with a 60-kDa microvascular endothelial glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, J E; Carley, W W; Palade, G E

    1988-01-01

    Confluent monolayers of microvascular endothelial cells, derived from the rat epididymal fat pad and grown in culture, were radioiodinated by using the lactoper-oxidase method. Their radioiodinated surface polypeptides were detected by NaDodSO4/PAGE (followed by autoradiography) and were characterized by both lectin affinity chromatography and protease digestion to identify the proteins involved in albumin binding. All detected polypeptides were sensitive to Pronase digestion, whereas several polypeptides were resistant to trypsin. Pronase treatment of the cell monolayer significantly reduced the specific binding of radioiodinated rat serum albumin, but trypsin digestion did not. Limax flavus, Ricinus communis, and Triticum vulgaris agglutinins competed significantly with radioiodinated rat serum albumin binding, whereas other lectins did not. A single 60-kDa glyco-protein was precipitated in common by these three lectins and was trypsin-resistant and Pronase-sensitive. Rat serum albumin affinity chromatography columns weakly but specifically bound a 60-kDa polypeptide from cell lysates derived from radioiodinated cell monolayers. These findings indicate that the 60-kDa glycoprotein is directly involved in a specific interaction of albumin with the cultured microvascular endothelial cells used in these experiments. Images PMID:3413125

  3. Safety of guidewire-based measurement of fractional flow reserve and the index of microvascular resistance using intravenous adenosine in patients with acute or recent myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nadeem; Layland, Jamie; Carrick, David; Petrie, Mark C.; McEntegart, Margaret; Eteiba, Hany; Hood, Stuart; Lindsay, Mitchell; Watkins, Stuart; Davie, Andrew; Mahrous, Ahmed; Carberry, Jaclyn; Teng, Vannesa; McConnachie, Alex; Curzen, Nick; Oldroyd, Keith G.; Berry, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Coronary guidewire-based diagnostic assessments with hyperemia may cause iatrogenic complications. We assessed the safety of guidewire-based measurement of coronary physiology, using intravenous adenosine, in patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Methods We prospectively enrolled invasively managed STEMI and NSTEMI patients in two simultaneously conducted studies in 6 centers (NCT01764334; NCT02072850). All of the participants underwent a diagnostic coronary guidewire study using intravenous adenosine (140 μg/kg/min) infusion for 1–2 min. The patients were prospectively assessed for the occurrence of serious adverse events (SAEs) and symptoms and invasively measured hemodynamics were also recorded. Results 648 patients (n = 298 STEMI patients in 1 hospital; mean time to reperfusion 253 min; n = 350 NSTEMI in 6 hospitals; median time to angiography from index chest pain episode 3 (2, 5) days) were included between March 2011 and May 2013. Two NSTEMI patients (0.3% overall) experienced a coronary dissection related to the guidewire. No guidewire dissections occurred in the STEMI patients. Chest symptoms were reported in the majority (86%) of patient's symptoms during the adenosine infusion. No serious adverse events occurred during infusion of adenosine and all of the symptoms resolved after the infusion ceased. Conclusions In this multicenter analysis, guidewire-based measurement of FFR and IMR using intravenous adenosine was safe in patients following STEMI or NSTEMI. Self-limiting symptoms were common but not associated with serious adverse events. Finally, coronary dissection in STEMI and NSTEMI patients was noted to be a rare phenomenon. PMID:26418191

  4. Method for producing heat-resistant semi-inorganic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Okamura, K.; Shishido, T.; Hasegawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The method for producing a heat resistant, semi-inorganic compound is discussed. Five examples in which various alcohols, phenols, and aromatic carbonic acids are used to test heat resistance and solubility are provided.

  5. Effect of Qi-regulating,Phlegm-resolving,and Blood-promoting Prescription on Rat Coronary Microvascular Thrombosis and Coronary Microvascular Occlusion.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Objective To explore the effect of qi-regulating,phlegm-resolving,and blood-promoting prescription on coronary microvascular thrombosis and coronary microvascular occlusion in rat models. Methods Totally 125 healthy clean-grade male SD rats weighing (300±25) g were sequentially numbered and then randomly divided into treatment group (n=60),control group (n=60) and blank group (n=5).Rats in the treatment group and control group received apical left ventricular injection of sodium laurate to establish rat models of coronary microvascular thrombosis. Then,rats in the control group were given distilled water by gavage one day before operation and after surgery. In contrast,rats in the treatment group were given qi-regulating,phlegm-resolving,and blood-promoting prescription by gavage one day before operation and after surgery. Five rats from both treatment group and control group were killed at each of six time points (1 hour,24th hour,7th day,14th day,21th day,and 28th day),and the myocardium specimens were harvested. The 5 rats in the blank group did not receive any special treatment and were given normal feeding;in the 28th day,they were sacrificed to obtain the myocardial specimens. Pathological sections of rat myocardial tissues were made to observe and compare the degrees of coronary microvascular thrombosis and coronary microvascular obstruction. Results In the treatment group and the control group,coronary microvascular thrombosis occurred 1 hour after apical sodium laurate injection and reached the peak at the 24th hour. Compared with the blank group,the treatment group and the control group showed different degree of coronary microvascular obstruction. Comparison between the treatment group and the control group at each time point showed that the coronary microvascular thrombosis in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01).The severity of coronary

  6. Noninvasive assessment of alveolar microvascular recruitment in conscious nonsedated rats

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, Dan M.; Ravikumar, Priya; Unger, Roger H.; Hsia, Connie C.W.

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of alveolar microvascular reserves, assessed from the relationship between pulmonary diffusing capacity (DLCO) and perfusion (Q̇c), is critical to maintenance of arterial blood oxygenation. Leptin-resistant ZDF fatty diabetic (fa/fa) rats exhibit restricted cardiopulmonary physiology under anesthesia. To assess alveolar microvascular function in conscious, non-sedated, non-instrumented, and minimally restrained animals, we adapted a rebreathing technique to fa/fa and control non-diabetic (+/+) rats (4-5 and 7-11 mo old) at rest and mild spontaneous activity. Measurements included O2 uptake, lung volume, Q̇c, DLCO, membrane diffusing capacity (DMCO), capillary blood volume (Vc) and septal tissue-blood volume. In older fa/fa than +/+ animals, DLCO and DMCO at a given Q̇c were lower; Vc was reduced in proportion to Q̇c. Results demonstrate the consequences of alveolar microangiopathy in metabolic syndrome: lung volume restriction, reduced Q̇c, and elevated membrane resistance to diffusion. At a given Q̇c, DLCO is lower in rats and guinea pigs than dogs or humans, consistent with limited alveolar microvascular reserves in small animals. PMID:24100202

  7. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3-dependent microvascular endothelial cell barrier function is disrupted under septic conditions.

    PubMed

    Arpino, Valerie; Mehta, Sanjay; Wang, Lefeng; Bird, Ryan; Rohan, Marta; Pape, Cynthia; Gill, Sean E

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is associated with dysfunction of microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC) leading to tissue edema and multiple organ dysfunction. Metalloproteinases can regulate MVEC function through processing of cell surface proteins, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) regulates metalloproteinase activity in the lung following injury. We hypothesize that TIMP3 promotes normal pulmonary MVEC barrier function through inhibition of metalloproteinase activity. Naive Timp3(-/-) mice had significantly higher basal pulmonary microvascular Evans blue (EB) dye-labeled albumin leak vs. wild-type (WT) mice. Additionally, cecal-ligation/perforation (CLP)-induced sepsis significantly increased pulmonary microvascular EB-labeled albumin leak in WT but not Timp3(-/-) mice. Similarly, PBS-treated isolated MVEC monolayers from Timp3(-/-) mice displayed permeability barrier dysfunction vs. WT MVEC, evidenced by lower transendothelial electrical resistance and greater trans-MVEC flux of fluorescein-dextran and EB-albumin. Cytomix (equimolar interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 1β) treatment of WT MVEC induced significant barrier dysfunction (by all three methods), and was associated with a time-dependent decrease in TIMP3 mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, basal Timp3(-/-) MVEC barrier dysfunction was associated with disrupted MVEC surface VE-cadherin localization, and both barrier dysfunction and VE-cadherin localization were rescued by treatment with GM6001, a synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor. TIMP3 promotes normal MVEC barrier function, at least partially, through inhibition of metalloproteinase-dependent disruption of adherens junctions, and septic downregulation of TIMP3 may contribute to septic MVEC barrier dysfunction. PMID:26993226

  8. Can Molecular Methods Detect 1% Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Folkvardsen, Dorte Bek; Thomsen, Vibeke Ø.; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Bang, Didi; Werngren, Jim; Hoffner, Sven; Hillemann, Doris; Rigouts, Leen

    2013-01-01

    Patients may harbor both drug-susceptible and -resistant bacteria, representing heteroresistance. We studied mixtures of isoniazid-resistant and -susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Conventional drug susceptibility testing was the most sensitive method of detection, whereas the line probe assay and sequencing were not able to detect the clinically relevant 1% proportion of resistant bacteria. PMID:23447641

  9. Normal Muscle Oxygen Consumption and Fatigability in Sickle Cell Patients Despite Reduced Microvascular Oxygenation and Hemorheological Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, Xavier; Pichon, Aurélien; Lemonne, Nathalie; Mougenel, Danièle; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Lamarre, Yann; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Hue, Olivier; Connes, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Although it has been hypothesized that muscle metabolism and fatigability could be impaired in sickle cell patients, no study has addressed this issue. Methods We compared muscle metabolism and function (muscle microvascular oxygenation, microvascular blood flow, muscle oxygen consumption and muscle microvascular oxygenation variability, which reflects vasomotion activity, maximal muscle force and local muscle fatigability) and the hemorheological profile at rest between 16 healthy subjects (AA), 20 sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease (SC) patients and 16 sickle cell anemia (SS) patients. Results Muscle microvascular oxygenation was reduced in SS patients compared to the SC and AA groups and this reduction was not related to hemorhelogical abnormalities. No difference was observed between the three groups for oxygen consumption and vasomotion activity. Muscle microvascular blood flow was higher in SS patients compared to the AA group, and tended to be higher compared to the SC group. Multivariate analysis revealed that muscle oxygen consumption was independently associated with muscle microvascular blood flow in the two sickle cell groups (SC and SS). Finally, despite reduced muscle force in sickle cell patients, their local muscle fatigability was similar to that of the healthy subjects. Conclusions Sickle cell patients have normal resting muscle oxygen consumption and fatigability despite hemorheological alterations and, for SS patients only, reduced muscle microvascular oxygenation and increased microvascular blood flow. Two alternative mechanisms can be proposed for SS patients: 1) the increased muscle microvascular blood flow is a way to compensate for the lower muscle microvascular oxygenation to maintain muscle oxygen consumption to normal values or 2) the reduced microvascular oxygenation coupled with a normal resting muscle oxygen consumption could indicate that there is slight hypoxia within the muscle which is not sufficient to limit

  10. Metagenomics and other Methods for Measuring Antibiotic Resistance in Agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: There is broad concern regarding antibiotic resistance on farms and in fields, however there is no standard method for defining or measuring antibiotic resistance in environmental samples. Methods: We used metagenomic, culture-based, and molecular methods to characterize the amount, t...

  11. Endoscopic and Microscopic Microvascular Decompression.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Matthew; Lee, John Y K

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of the endoscope into the neurosurgeon's armamentarium has revolutionized ventral and anterior skull-base surgery and, more recently, has been used in the surgical treatment of cerebellopontine angle (CPA) pathology. The utilization of the endoscope in microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia and other associated cranial nerve hyperactivity syndromes allows for unparalleled panoramic views and illumination of the neurovascular structures within the CPA and identification of vessel-nerve contact traditionally unseen using the microscope. In this article, the technical advantages and challenges of using the endoscope for MVD, operative technique, and patient outcomes of endoscopic MVD are discussed. PMID:27324997

  12. Endothelialized Microfluidics for Studying Microvascular Interactions in Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Reginald; Ahn, Byungwook; Hardy, Elaissa Trybus; Mannino, Robert; Kita, Ashley; Tsai, Michelle; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in microfabrication techniques have enabled the production of inexpensive and reproducible microfluidic systems for conducting biological and biochemical experiments at the micro- and nanoscales 1,2. In addition, microfluidics have also been specifically used to quantitatively analyze hematologic and microvascular processes, because of their ability to easily control the dynamic fluidic environment and biological conditions3-6. As such, researchers have more recently used microfluidic systems to study blood cell deformability, blood cell aggregation, microvascular blood flow, and blood cell-endothelial cell interactions6-13.However, these microfluidic systems either did not include cultured endothelial cells or were larger than the sizescale relevant to microvascular pathologic processes. A microfluidic platform with cultured endothelial cells that accurately recapitulates the cellular, physical, and hemodynamic environment of the microcirculation is needed to further our understanding of the underlying biophysical pathophysiology of hematologic diseases that involve the microvasculature. Here, we report a method to create an "endothelialized" in vitro model of the microvasculature, using a simple, single mask microfabrication process in conjunction with standard endothelial cell culture techniques, to study pathologic biophysical microvascular interactions that occur in hematologic disease. This "microvasculature-on-a-chip" provides the researcher with a robust assay that tightly controls biological as well as biophysical conditions and is operated using a standard syringe pump and brightfield/fluorescence microscopy. Parameters such as microcirculatory hemodynamic conditions, endothelial cell type, blood cell type(s) and concentration(s), drug/inhibitory concentration etc., can all be easily controlled. As such, our microsystem provides a method to quantitatively investigate disease processes in which microvascular flow is impaired due to alterations in

  13. Surgical variation of microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: A technical note and anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Otávio T.; de Almeida, César C.; Iglesio, Ricardo F.; de Navarro, Jessie M.; Teixeira, Manoel J.; Duarte, Kleber P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In this article, the authors described their experience in microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: The microvascular decompression technique used in the authors’ institution is described in a step by step manner with some illustrative cases as well as a cadaver dissection to highlight the differences with other previously described techniques. Results: Since 2013, 107 patients were operated in the Neurosurgery Division of the University of São Paulo using the described technique, with a shorter operative time and avoiding cerebellar retractor compared with classic techniques. Conclusion: Our modified microvascular decompression technique for trigeminal neuralgia can be used with safety and efficiency for treating trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:27625893

  14. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Resistance Phenotypes and Phenotypic Highlighting Methods

    PubMed Central

    BĂLĂŞOIU, MARIA; BĂLĂŞOIU, A.T.; MĂNESCU, RODICA; AVRAMESCU, CARMEN; IONETE, OANA

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa genus bacteria are well known for their increased drug resistance (phenotypic ang genotypic resistance). The most important resistance mechanisms are: enzyme production, reduction of pore expression, reduction of the external membrane proteins expression, efflux systems, topoisomerase mutations. These mechanisms often accumulate and lead to multidrug ressitance strains emergence. The most frequent acquired resistance mechanisms are betalactamase-type enzyme production (ESBLs, AmpC, carbapenemases), which determine variable phenotypes of betalactamines resistance, phenotypes which are associated with aminoglycosides and quinolones resistance. The nonenzymatic drug resistance mechanisms are caused by efflux systems, pore reduction and penicillin-binding proteins (PBP) modification, which are often associated to other resistance mechanisms. Phenotypic methods used for testing these mechanisms are based on highlighting these phenotypes using Kirby Bauer antibiogram, clinical breakpoints, and “cut off” values recommended by EUCAST 2013 standard, version 3.1. PMID:25729587

  15. Relationship Between Serum Zinc Level and Microvascular Complications in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ying-Ying; Zhao, Jie; Han, Xue-Yao; Zhou, Xiang-Hai; Wu, Jing; Ji, Li-Nong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggested that zinc level was related to a certain diabetic microvascular complication. However, the relationship between zinc level and all the microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between zinc level and each diabetic microvascular complication and identify the features related to low serum zinc level. Methods: We included the hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) at our department from May 30, 2013 to March 31, 2014. We initially compared the serum zinc levels between patients with specific microvascular complications and those without. We then analyzed the association between zinc level and each microvascular complication. Furthermore, we identified the unique features of patients with high and low serum zinc levels and analyzed the risk factors related to low zinc level. Results: The 412 patients included 271 with microvascular complications and 141 without any microvascular complications. Serum zinc level was significantly lower in patients with diabetic retinopathy (P < 0.001), diabetic nephropathy (DN, P < 0.001), or diabetic peripheral neuropathy (P = 0.002) compared with patients without that specific complication. Lower zinc level was an independent risk factor for DN (odds ratio = 0.869, 95% confidence interval = 0.765–0.987, P < 0.05). The subjects with lower serum zinc level had manifested a longer duration of diabetes, higher level of hemoglobin A1c, higher prevalence of hypertension and microvascular complications, and lower fasting and 2-h C-peptide levels. Conclusions: Lower serum zinc level in T2D patients was related to higher prevalence of diabetic microvascular complications, and represented as an independent risk factor for DN. Patients with lower zinc level were more likely to have a longer duration of diabetes, poorer glucose control, and worse β-cell function. PMID:26668140

  16. METHOD FOR MEASURING BACTERIAL RESISTANCE TO METALS EMPLOYING EPIFLUORESCENT MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct viable counting method has been developed which can be used to measure resistance of bacteria to metal (DVCMR bio-assay). Results obtained using DVCMR was compared with classical culture methods and proven superior. Evaluation of test strains resistant to arsenic or mang...

  17. Non-invasive assessment of microvascular and endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cynthia; Daskalakis, Constantine; Falkner, Bonita

    2013-01-01

    The authors have utilized capillaroscopy and forearm blood flow techniques to investigate the role of microvascular dysfunction in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Capillaroscopy is a non-invasive, relatively inexpensive methodology for directly visualizing the microcirculation. Percent capillary recruitment is assessed by dividing the increase in capillary density induced by postocclusive reactive hyperemia (postocclusive reactive hyperemia capillary density minus baseline capillary density), by the maximal capillary density (observed during passive venous occlusion). Percent perfused capillaries represents the proportion of all capillaries present that are perfused (functionally active), and is calculated by dividing postocclusive reactive hyperemia capillary density by the maximal capillary density. Both percent capillary recruitment and percent perfused capillaries reflect the number of functional capillaries. The forearm blood flow (FBF) technique provides accepted non-invasive measures of endothelial function: The ratio FBF(max)/FBF(base) is computed as an estimate of vasodilation, by dividing the mean of the four FBF(max) values by the mean of the four FBFbase values. Forearm vascular resistance at maximal vasodilation (FVR(max)) is calculated as the mean arterial pressure (MAP) divided by FBF(max). Both the capillaroscopy and forearm techniques are readily acceptable to patients and can be learned quickly. The microvascular and endothelial function measures obtained using the methodologies described in this paper may have future utility in clinical patient cardiovascular risk-reduction strategies. As we have published reports demonstrating that microvascular and endothelial dysfunction are found in initial stages of hypertension including prehypertension, microvascular and endothelial function measures may eventually aid in early identification, risk-stratification and prevention of end-stage vascular pathology, with its potentially fatal

  18. Marine permafrost detection using galvanic electrical resistivity methods

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, R.F.

    1983-05-01

    Because of the high electrical resistivity contrast between ice-bonded sediments (permafrost) and the same sediments in an unfrozen state, galvanic (direct-current) electrical resistivity measurements are capable of determining the depth below the sea floor of marine permafrost layers. Unlike the seismic refraction method usually used for offshore permafrost surveying, resistivity measurements can determine the thickness as well as the depth of a permafrost layer. Also, the resistivity method is usable in acoustic anomaly areas where seismic data cannot be obtained and in shallow water where air gun sources are not effective. Marine resistivity measurements may be made through the sea ice in the winter or from a stationary or moving boat in the summer. The results of field trials conducted in the Prudhoe Bay area indicated that marine permafrost depths and thicknesses determined from resistivity measurements agreed well with those obtained from borehole data.

  19. Coronary microvascular dysfunction: an update

    PubMed Central

    Crea, Filippo; Camici, Paolo G.; Bairey Merz, Cathleen Noel

    2014-01-01

    Many patients undergoing coronary angiography because of chest pain syndromes, believed to be indicative of obstructive atherosclerosis of the epicardial coronary arteries, are found to have normal angiograms. In the past two decades, a number of studies have reported that abnormalities in the function and structure of the coronary microcirculation may occur in patients without obstructive atherosclerosis, but with risk factors or with myocardial diseases as well as in patients with obstructive atherosclerosis; furthermore, coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) can be iatrogenic. In some instances, CMD represents an epiphenomenon, whereas in others it is an important marker of risk or may even contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and myocardial diseases, thus becoming a therapeutic target. This review article provides an update on the clinical relevance of CMD in different clinical settings and also the implications for therapy. PMID:24366916

  20. Apparatus and method for measuring and imaging surface resistance

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-08-24

    Apparatus and method for determining and imaging superconductor surface resistance. The apparatus comprises modified Gaussian confocal resonator structure with the sample remote from the radiating mirror. Surface resistance is determined by analyzing and imaging reflected microwaves; imaging reveals anomalies due to surface impurities, non-stoichiometry, and the like, in the surface of the superconductor.

  1. A method for dynamic system characterization using hydraulic series resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongshin; Chesler, Naomi C; Beebe, David J

    2006-05-01

    The pressure required to drive flow through a microfluidic device is an important characteristic of that device. We present a method to measure the flow rate through microfluidic components and systems, including micropumps and microvalves. The measurement platform is composed of two pressure sensors and a glass tube, which provides series resistance. The principle of the measurement is the fluid dynamical equivalent of Ohm's law, which defines the relationship between current, resistance, and voltage that are analogues to flow rate, hydraulic resistance, and pressure drop, respectively. Once the series resistance is known, it is possible to compute the flow rate through a device based on pressure alone. In addition, the dynamic system characteristics of the device-resistance and capacitance-can be computed. The benefits of this method are its simple configuration, capability of measuring flow rate accurately from the more easily measured pressure, and the ability to predict the dynamic response of microfluidic devices. PMID:16652179

  2. Interactions of the Gasotransmitters Contribute to Microvascular Tone (Dys)regulation in the Preterm Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Rebecca M.; Palliser, Hannah K.; Latter, Joanna L.; Kelly, Megan A.; Chwatko, Grazyna; Glowacki, Rafal; Wright, Ian M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), nitric oxide (NO), and carbon monoxide (CO) are involved in transitional microvascular tone dysregulation in the preterm infant; however there is conflicting evidence on the interaction of these gasotransmitters, and their overall contribution to the microcirculation in newborns is not known. The aim of this study was to measure the levels of all 3 gasotransmitters, characterise their interrelationships and elucidate their combined effects on microvascular blood flow. Methods 90 preterm neonates were studied at 24h postnatal age. Microvascular studies were performed by laser Doppler. Arterial COHb levels (a measure of CO) were determined through co-oximetry. NO was measured as nitrate and nitrite in urine. H2S was measured as thiosulphate by liquid chromatography. Relationships between levels of the gasotransmitters and microvascular blood flow were assessed through partial correlation controlling for the influence of gestational age. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow and derive a theoretical model of their interactions. Results No relationship was observed between NO and CO (p = 0.18, r = 0.18). A positive relationship between NO and H2S (p = 0.008, r = 0.28) and an inverse relationship between CO and H2S (p = 0.01, r = -0.33) exists. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow. The model with the best fit is presented. Conclusions The relationships between NO and H2S, and CO and H2S may be of importance in the preterm newborn, particularly as NO levels in males are associated with higher H2S levels and higher microvascular blood flow and CO in females appears to convey protection against vascular dysregulation. Here we present a theoretical model of these interactions and their overall effects on microvascular flow in the preterm newborn, upon which future mechanistic studies may

  3. Microorganisms having enhanced resistance to acetate and methods of use

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Yang, Shihui

    2014-10-21

    The present invention provides isolated or genetically modified strains of microorganisms that display enhanced resistance to acetate as a result of increased expression of a sodium proton antiporter. The present invention also provides methods for producing such microbial strains, as well as related promoter sequences and expression vectors. Further, the present invention provides methods of producing alcohol from biomass materials by using microorganisms with enhanced resistance to acetate.

  4. [Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori and molecular methods for the detection of resistance].

    PubMed

    Demiray, Ebru; Yilmaz, Ozlem

    2005-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori which is the major agent causing peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, is identified as a class I carcinogen. Invasive and non-invasive tests have been used in the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Clarithromycin resistance in H. pylori strains is increasing nowadays, thus leading to failures in eradication therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method which can simultaneously detect the presence of H. pylori and clarithromycin resistance is a non-culture dependent molecular technique. In this review article the prevalence and clinical outcome of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori, molecular mechanisms of the resistance and molecular methods to detect the resistance, with priority of FISH technique have been discussed. PMID:16358500

  5. A new measurement method for the dynamic resistance signal during the resistance spot welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijing; Hou, Yanyan; Zhang, Hongjie; Zhao, Jian; Xi, Tao; Qi, Xiangyang; Li, Yafeng

    2016-09-01

    To measure the dynamic resistance signal during the resistance spot welding process, some original work was carried out and a new measurement method was developed. Compared with the traditional method, using the instantaneous electrode voltage and welding current at peak current point in each half cycle, the resistance curve from the newly proposed method can provide more details of the dynamic resistance changes over time. To test the specific performance of the proposed method, a series of welding experiments were carried out and the tensile shear strengths of the weld samples were measured. Then, the measurement error of the proposed method was evaluated. Several features were extracted from the dynamic resistance curves. The correlations between the extracted features and weld strength were analyzed and the results show that these features are closely related to the weld strength and they can be used for welding quality monitoring. Moreover, the dynamic resistance curve from the newly proposed method can also be used to monitor some abnormal welding conditions.

  6. The Use of Resistivity Methods in Terrestrial Forensic Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R. C.; Raisuddin, I.; Bank, C.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing use of near-surface geophysical methods in forensic searches has demonstrated the need for further studies to identify the ideal physical, environmental and temporal settings for each geophysical method. Previous studies using resistivity methods have shown promising results, but additional work is required to more accurately interpret and analyze survey findings. The Ontario Provincial Police's UCRT (Urban Search and Rescue; Chemical, Biolgical, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives; Response Team) is collaborating with the University of Toronto and two additional universities in a multi-year study investigating the applications of near-surface geophysical methods to terrestrial forensic searches. In the summer of 2012, on a test site near Bolton, Ontario, the OPP buried weapons, drums and pigs (naked, tarped, and clothed) to simulate clandestine graves and caches. Our study aims to conduct repeat surveys using an IRIS Syscal Junior with 48 electrode switching system resistivity-meter. These surveys will monitor changes in resistivity reflecting decomposition of the object since burial, and identify the strengths and weaknesses of resistivity when used in a rural, clandestine burial setting. Our initial findings indicate the usefulness of this method, as prominent resistivity changes have been observed. We anticipate our results will help to assist law enforcement agencies in determining the type of resistivity results to expect based on time since burial, depth of burial and state of dress of the body.

  7. Microvascular Abnormality in Schizophrenia as Shown by Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Madeline H.; Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Kapur, Shitij; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Wong, Tien; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Retinal and cerebral microvessels are structurally and functionally homologous, but, unlike cerebral microvessels, retinal microvessels can be noninvasively measured in vivo via retinal imaging. Here we test the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality and evaluate the utility of retinal imaging as a tool for future schizophrenia research. Methods Participants were members of the Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed from birth with 95% retention. Study members underwent retinal imaging at age 38 years. We assessed retinal arteriolar and venular caliber for all members of the cohort, including individuals who developed schizophrenia. Results Study members who developed schizophrenia were distinguished by wider retinal venules, suggesting microvascular abnormality reflective of insufficient brain oxygen supply. Analyses that controlled for confounding health conditions suggested that wider retinal venules are not simply an artifact of co-occurring health problems in schizophrenia patients. Wider venules were also associated with a dimensional measure of adult psychosis symptoms and with psychosis symptoms reported in childhood. Conclusions Findings provide initial support for the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality. Moreover, results suggest that the same vascular mechanisms underlie subthreshold symptoms and clinical disorder and that these associations may begin early in life. These findings highlight the promise of retinal imaging as a tool for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:24030514

  8. Method of preparing corrosion resistant composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    Method of manufacture of ceramic materials which require stability in severely-corrosive environment having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These surfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  9. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stumble. Share this page from the NHLBI on Tumblr. Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Microvascular Disease? Coronary microvascular disease can affect both men and ...

  10. Neutrophils, nitric oxide, and microvascular permeability in severe sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Alterations in microvascular permeability are prevalent in patients with sepsis; a recent study reported that patients with septic shock had increased capillary filtration coefficient (Kf), a noninvasive index of microvascular permeability. We aimed to determine whether patients wi...

  11. Method of stimulus combination impacts resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Bai, John Y H

    2015-07-01

    Reinforcing an alternative response in the presence of the stimuli governing a target response increases resistance to extinction of target responding, relative to training target responding on its own. Conversely, training alternative and target responses in the presence of different stimuli and combining those stimuli only decreases resistance to extinction of target responding, relative to target responding on its own. The present study assessed how different methods of combining discriminative stimuli influence resistance to extinction of responding in pigeons. As in previous studies, combining stimuli across different keys only decreased resistance to extinction of target responding relative to target responding on its own. In comparison, combining stimuli on the same key initially increased resistance to extinction of target responding, but repeated tests resulted in similar levels of responding as target responding with stimuli combined on separate keys. Moreover, greater overall reinforcement rates produced greater resistance to extinction with both methods of combining stimuli, consistent with behavioral momentum theory. These findings reveal several behavioral processes influence the outcome of combining stimuli--including perceptual processes, discriminative control by contingencies, response competition, and behavioral momentum. PMID:25929758

  12. Topical Combinations to Treat Microvascular Dysfunction of Chronic Postischemia Pain

    PubMed Central

    Laferrière, André; Abaji, Rachid; Tsai, Cheng-Yu Mark; Ragavendran, J. Vaigunda; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Growing evidence indicates that patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) exhibit tissue abnormalities caused by microvascular dysfunction in the blood vessels of skin, muscle and nerve. We tested whether topical combinations aimed at improving microvascular function would relieve allodynia in an animal model of CRPS. We hypothesized that topical administration of either α2-adrenergic (α2A) receptor agonists or nitric oxide (NO) donors given to increase arterial blood flow, combined with either phosphatidic acid (PA) or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors to increase capillary blood flow, would effectively reduce allodynia and signs of microvascular dysfunction in the animal model of chronic pain. Methods Mechanical allodynia was induced in the hind paws of rats with chronic postischemia pain (CPIP). Allodynia was assessed before and after topical application of vehicle, single drugs or combinations of an α2A receptor agonist (apraclonidine) or an NO donor (linsidomine), with PA or PDE inhibitors (lisofylline, pentoxifylline). A topical combination of apraclonidine + lisofylline was also evaluated for its effects on a measure of microvascular function (post-occlusive reactive hyperemia) and tissue oxidative capacity (formazan production by tetrazolium reduction) in CPIP rats. Results Each of the single topical drugs produced significant dose-dependent antiallodynic effects compared to vehicle in CPIP rats (n = 30), and the antiallodynic dose-response curves of either PA or PDE inhibitors were shifted 5 to 10 fold to the left when combined with nonanalgesic doses of α2A receptor agonists or NO donors (n = 28). The potent antiallodynic effects of ipsilateral treatment with combinations of α2A receptor agonists or NO donors with PA or PDE inhibitors, were not reproduced by the same treatment of the contralateral hindpaw (n = 28). Topical combinations produced antiallodynic effects lasting up to 6 h (n = 15), and were significantly enhanced by

  13. Coronary microvascular obstruction in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Scalone, Giancarla; Lerman, Amir; Crea, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The success of a primary percutaneous intervention (PCI) in the setting of ST elevation myocardial infarction depends on the functional and structural integrity of coronary microcirculation. Coronary microvascular dysfunction and obstruction (CMVO) occurs in up to half of patients submitted to apparently successful primary PCI and is associated to a much worse outcome. The current review summarizes the complex mechanisms responsible for CMVO, including pre-existing coronary microvascular dysfunction, and highlights the current limitations in the assessment of microvascular function. More importantly, at the light of the substantial failure of trials hitherto published on the treatment of CMVO, this review proposes a novel integrated therapeutic approach, which should overcome the limitations of previous studies. PMID:26364289

  14. A computational model of oxygen delivery by hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers in three-dimensional microvascular networks

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukias, Nikolaos M.; Goldman, Daniel; Vadapalli, Arjun; Pittman, Roland N.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed computational model is developed to simulate oxygen transport from a three-dimensional microvascular network to surrounding tissue in the presence of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers. The model accounts for nonlinear O2 consumption, myoglobin facilitated diffusion and nonlinear oxyhemoglobin dissociation in the RBCs and plasma. It also includes a detailed description of intravascular resistance to O2 transport and is capable of incorporating realistic three-dimensional microvascular network geometries. Simulations in this study were performed using a computer-generated microvascular architecture that mimics morphometric parameters for the hamster cheek pouch retractor muscle. Theoretical results are presented next to corresponding experimental data. Phosphoresence quenching microscopy provided PO2 measurements at the arteriolar and venular ends of capillaries in the hamster retractor muscle before and after isovolemic hemodilution with three different hemodilutents; a non-oxygen-carrying plasma expander and two hemoglobin solutions with different oxygen affinities. Sample results in a microvascular network show an enhancement of diffusive shunting between arterioles, venules and capillaries and a decrease in hemoglobin’s effectiveness for tissue oxygenation when its affinity for O2 is decreased. Model simulations suggest that microvascular network anatomy can affect the optimal hemoglobin affinity for reducing tissue hypoxia. O2 transport simulations in realistic representations of microvascular networks should provide a theoretical framework for choosing optimal parameter values in the development of hemoglobin-based blood-substitutes. PMID:17686494

  15. Method Analysis of Microbial-Resistant Gypsum Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method Analysis of Microbial-Resistant Gypsum ProductsD.A. Betancourt1, T.R.Dean1, A. Evans2, and G.Byfield2 1. US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory; RTP, NC 277112. RTI International, RTP, NCSeveral...

  16. Metabolic Actions of Angiotensin II and Insulin: A Microvascular Endothelial Balancing Act

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Ranganath; Yavuz, Shazene

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic actions of insulin to promote glucose disposal are augmented by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent increases in microvascular blood flow to skeletal muscle. The balance between NO-dependent vasodilator actions and endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstrictor actions of insulin is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent (PI3K) - and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent signaling in vascular endothelium, respectively. Angiotensin II acting on AT2 receptor increases capillary blood flow to increase insulin-mediated glucose disposal. In contrast, AT1 receptor activation leads to reduced NO bioavailability, impaired insulin signaling, vasoconstriction, and insulin resistance. Insulin-resistant states are characterized by dysregulated local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Under insulin-resistant conditions, pathway-specific impairment in PI3K-dependent signaling may cause imbalance between production of NO and secretion of endothelin-1, leading to decreased blood flow, which worsens insulin resistance. Similarly, excess AT1 receptor activity in the microvasculature may selectively impair vasodilation while simultaneously potentiating the vasoconstrictor actions of insulin. Therapeutic interventions that target pathway-selective impairment in insulin signaling and the imbalance in AT1 and AT2 receptor signaling in microvascular endothelium may simultaneously ameliorate endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. In the present review, we discuss molecular mechanisms in the endothelium underlying microvascular and metabolic actions of insulin and Angiotensin II, the mechanistic basis for microvascular endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in RAAS dysregulated clinical states, and the rationale for therapeutic strategies that restore the balance in vasodilator and constrictor actions of insulin and Angiotensin II in the microvasculature. PMID:22684034

  17. Computational design of microvascular biomimetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, Alejandro Marcos

    Biomimetic microvascular materials are increasingly considered for a variety of autonomic healing, cooling and sensing applications. The microvascular material of interest in this work consists of a network of hollow microchannels, with diameters as small as 10 mum, embedded in a polymeric matrix. Recent advances in the manufacturing of this new class of materials have allowed for the creation of very complex 2D and 3D structures. The computational design of such network structures, which is the focus of this work, involves a set of particular challenges, including a large number of design variables (e.g., topology of the network, number of diameters to consider and their sizes) that define the network, and a large number of multidisciplinary objective functions and constraints that drive the optimization process. The computational design tool to be developed must be capable of capturing the trade-off between the different objective and constraint functions, as, for example, networks designed for flow efficiency are likely to have a topology that is very different from those designed for structural integrity or thermal control. In this work, we propose to design these materials using Genetic Algorithms (GAs), the most common methodology within a broader category of Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs). GAs can be combined with a Pareto-selection mechanism to create Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithms (MOGAs), which enable the optimization of an arbitrary number of objective functions. As a result, a Pareto-optimal front is obtained, where all candidates are optimal solutions to the optimization problem. Adding a procedure to deal with constraints results in a powerful tool for multi-objective constrained optimization. The method allows the use of discrete variable problems and it does not require any a priori knowledge of the optimal solution. Furthermore, GAs search the entire decision space so the optimal solutions found are likely to be global. The

  18. Roles of LOX-1 in microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Valter; Balzan, Silvana

    2016-05-01

    Studies from human and animal models with metabolic disease and hypertension highlight atrophic remodeling, reduced lumen size and thinner vascular walls of microvessels with profound density reduction. This impaired vascular response limits the perfusion of peripheral tissues inducing organ damage. These conditions are strongly associated with oxidative stress and in particular with the up-regulation of lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1). Several factors such as cytokines, shear stress, and advanced glycation end-products, especially oxLDL, can up-regulate LOX-1. The activation of this receptor induces the production of adhesion molecules, cytokines and the release of reactive oxygen species via NADPH oxidase. LOX-1 is considered a potent mediator of endothelial dysfunction and it is significantly associated with reduced microvascular endothelium NO-dependent vasodilation in hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Microvascular endothelial cells increased the expression of IL-6 in association with the increased concentration of LDL and its degree of oxidation. Moreover, increased IL-6 levels are associated with up-regulation of LOX-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Another consequence of microvascular inflammation is the generation of small amounts of ROS, similar to those induced by low concentration of oxLDL (<5 μg/mL) which induces capillary tube formation of endothelial cells, through LOX-1 up-regulation. In light of its central role, LOX-1 represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human atherosclerotic diseases and microvascular disorders. PMID:26907636

  19. A new method to measure rolling resistance in treadmill cycling.

    PubMed

    Henchoz, Yves; Crivelli, Giacomo; Borrani, Fabio; Millet, Grégoire P

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new method of measuring rolling resistance in treadmill cycling and to establish its sensitivity and reproducibility. One participant was asked to keep a bicycle in equilibrium on a treadmill without pedalling at a constant speed of 5.56 m x s(-1), which was held in place in the front by a dynamometer. For each condition, the method consisted of 11 measurements of the force required to hold the cycle at different treadmill slopes (0-10%, increment 1%). The coefficient of rolling resistance was calculated based on the forces applied to the bicycle in equilibrium. To test the sensitivity of the method, the bicycle was successively equipped with three tyre types (700 x 28, 700 x 23, 700 x 22) and inflation pressure was set at 150, 300, 600, 900, and 1100 kPa. To test the reproducibility of the method, a second experimenter repeated all measurements done with the 700 x 23 tyres. The method was sensitive enough to detect an effect of both tyre type and inflation pressure (P < 0.001: two-way ANOVA). The measurement of the coefficient of rolling resistance by two separate experimenters resulted in a small bias of 0.00029 (95% CI, -0.00011 to 0.00068). In conclusion, the new method is sensitive and reliable, as well as being simple and affordable. PMID:20686997

  20. Method for applying photographic resists to otherwise incompatible substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhr, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method for applying photographic resists to otherwise incompatible substrates, such as a baking enamel paint surface, is described wherein the uncured enamel paint surface is coated with a non-curing lacquer which is, in turn, coated with a partially cured lacquer. The non-curing lacquer adheres to the enamel and a photo resist material satisfactorily adheres to the partially cured lacquer. Once normal photo etching techniques are employed the lacquer coats can be easily removed from the enamel leaving the photo etched image. In the case of edge lighted instrument panels, a coat of uncured enamel is placed over the cured enamel followed by the lacquer coats and the photo resists which is exposed and developed. Once the etched uncured enamel is cured, the lacquer coats are removed leaving an etched panel.

  1. Method for starting operation of a resistance melter

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Christopher Charles

    1977-01-01

    A method for starting the operation of a resistance furnace, where heating occurs by passing a current through the charge between two furnace electrodes and the charge is a material which is essentially electrically nonconductive when in a solid physical state but which becomes more electrically conductive when in a molten physical state, by connecting electrical resistance heating wire between the furnace electrodes, placing the wire in contact with the charge material between the electrodes and passing a current through the wire to heat the wire to a temperature sufficient to melt the material between the furnace electrodes so that as the material melts, current begins to pass between the electrodes through the melted material, further heating and melting more material until all current between the electrodes passes through the charge material without the aid or presence of the resistance element.

  2. The influence of the cyclosporine vehicle, cremophor EL, on renal microvascular blood flow in the rat.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J S; Bentley, F R; Garrison, R N; Cryer, H M

    1991-07-01

    Cyclosporine nephrotoxicity may be due to glomerular hypoperfusion. Previous experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated a decrease in renal blood flow and an increase in renal vascular resistance. Cremophor EL, which is the vehicle in which CsA is dissolved, is thought to be a factor involved in intrarenal arteriolar vasoconstriction. To determine the relative contributions of the vehicle and CsA to intrarenal arteriolar vasoconstriction, we used in vivo videomicroscopy and Doppler velocimetry to measure changes in renal microvascular blood flow in the rat. A 5-min intravenous infusion of 20 mg/kg of CsA resulted in a 17% mean reduction (P less than 0.05) in the diameter of preglomerular interlobular arterioles and an associated 60% reduction (P less than 0.05) in microvascular blood flow by 15 min. Cremophor EL/ethanol equivalent caused less vasoconstriction (up to 10%) but resulted in a 42% mean decrease (P less than 0.05) in microvascular blood flow, probably secondary to a 38% mean decrease (P less than 0.05) in cardiac output and 13% decrease in arterial pressure. We conclude that cremophor EL does contribute to in vivo reduction of preglomerular microvascular blood flow in the rat. This may be particularly important when using this intravenous preparation in the study of CsA nephrotoxicity. PMID:1858136

  3. Microvascular Reconstructions of Full-Thickness Oncological Chest Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Tukiainen, Erkki; Popov, Pentscho; Asko-Seljavaara, Sirpa

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the suitability of microvascular flaps for the reconstruction of extensive full-thickness defects of the chest wall. Summary Background Data: Chest wall defects are conventionally reconstructed with pedicular musculocutaneous flaps or the omentum. Sometimes, however, these flaps have already been used, are not reliable due to previous operations or radiotherapy, or are of inadequate size. In such cases, microvascular flaps offer the only option for reconstruction. Methods: From 1988 to 2001, 26 patients with full-thickness resections of the chest wall underwent reconstruction with microvascular flaps. There were 8 soft tissue sarcomas, 8 recurrent breast cancers, 5 chondrosarcomas, 2 desmoid tumors, 1 large cell pulmonary cancer metastasis, 1 renal cancer metastasis, and 1 bronchopleural fistula. The surgery comprised 5 extended forequarter amputations, 5 lateral resections, 8 thoracoabdominal resections, and 8 sternal resections. The mean diameter of a resection was 28 cm. The soft tissue defect was reconstructed with 16 tensor fasciae latae, 5 tensor fascia latae combined with rectus femoris, and 3 transversus rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps. In 2 patients with a forequarter amputation, the remnant forearm was used as the osteomusculocutaneous free flap. Results: There were no flap losses or perioperative mortality. Four patients needed tracheostomy owing to prolonged respiratory difficulties. The mean survival time for patients with sarcomas was 39 months and for those with recurrent breast cancer 18 months. Conclusions: Extensive chest wall resections are possible with acceptable results. In patients with breast cancer, the surgery may offer valuable palliation and in those with sarcomas it can be curative. PMID:14631216

  4. Computational methods for structural load and resistance modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, B. H.; Millwater, H. R.; Harren, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    An automated capability for computing structural reliability considering uncertainties in both load and resistance variables is presented. The computations are carried out using an automated Advanced Mean Value iteration algorithm (AMV +) with performance functions involving load and resistance variables obtained by both explicit and implicit methods. A complete description of the procedures used is given as well as several illustrative examples, verified by Monte Carlo Analysis. In particular, the computational methods described in the paper are shown to be quite accurate and efficient for a material nonlinear structure considering material damage as a function of several primitive random variables. The results show clearly the effectiveness of the algorithms for computing the reliability of large-scale structural systems with a maximum number of resolutions.

  5. Method of making sulfur-resistant composite metal membranes

    DOEpatents

    Way, J Douglas [Boulder, CO; Lusk, Mark [Golden, CO; Thoen, Paul [Littleton, CO

    2012-01-24

    The invention provides thin, hydrogen-permeable, sulfur-resistant membranes formed from palladium or palladium-alloy coatings on porous, ceramic or metal supports. Also disclosed are methods of making these membranes via sequential electroless plating techniques, wherein the method of making the membrane includes decomposing any organic ligands present on the substrate, reducing the palladium crystallites on the substrate to reduced palladium crystallites, depositing a film of palladium metal on the substrate and then depositing a second, gold film on the palladium film. These two metal films are then annealed at a temperature between about 200.degree. C. and about 1200.degree. C. to form a sulfur-resistant, composite PdAu alloy membrane.

  6. Testing Method for Heat Resistance Under Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Kawasaki, A.; Itoh, Y.; Harada, Y.; Ono, F.

    2007-12-01

    “Testing Method for Heat Resistance under Temperature Gradient” is a Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) newly established by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, after deliberations by the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, in accordance with the Industrial Standardization Law. This standard specified the testing method for heat resistance under temperature gradient of materials and coated members of equipment exposed to high temperature, such as aircraft engines, gas turbines, and so on. This paper introduces the principle and overview of the established standard. In addition, taking the heat cycle test using the burner rig for instance, we specifically illustrate the acquirable data and their analysis in the standard. Monitoring of the effective thermal conductivity and acoustic emission particularly enables to the non-destructive evaluation of failure cycle.

  7. Using Session RPE to Monitor Different Methods of Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    D. Egan, Alison; B. Winchester, Jason; Foster, Carl; R. McGuigan, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare session rating of perceived exertion for different resistance training techniques in the squat exercise. These techniques included traditional resistance training, super slow, and maximal power training. Fourteen college-age women (Mean ± SD; age = 22 ± 3 years; height = 1.68 ± 0. 07 m) completed three experimental trials in a randomized crossover design. The traditional resistance training protocol consisted of 6 sets of 6 repetitions of squats using 80% of 1-RM. The super slow protocol consisted of 6 sets of 6 repetitions using 55% of 1-RM. The maximal power protocol consisted of 6 sets of 6 repetitions using 30% of 1-RM. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) measures were obtained following each set using Borg’s CR-10 scale. In addition, a session RPE value was obtained 30 minutes following each exercise session. When comparing average RPE and session RPE, no significant difference was found. However, power training had significantly lower (p < 0.05) average and session RPE (4.50 ± 1.9 and 4.5 ± 2.1) compared to both super slow training (7.81 ± 1.75 and 7.43 ± 1.73) and traditional training (7.33 ± 1.52 and 7.13 ± 1.73). The results indicate that session RPE values are not significantly different from the more traditional methods of measuring RPE during exercise bouts. It does appear that the resistance training mode that is used results in differences in perceived exertion that does not relate directly to the loading that is used. Using session RPE provides practitioners with the same information about perceived exertion as the traditional RPE measures. Taking a single measure following a training session would appear to be much easier than using multiple measures of RPE throughout a resistance training workout. However, practitioners should also be aware that the RPE does not directly relate to the relative intensity used and appears to be dependent on the mode of resistance exercise that is used. Key Points The

  8. The use of prefabrication technique in microvascular reconstructive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maciejewski, Adam; Szymczyk, Cezary; Wierzgoń, Janusz; Szumniak, Ryszard; Jędrzejewski, Piotr; Grajek, Maciej; Dobrut, Mirosław; Ulczok, Rafał; Półtorak, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study The aim of the study was to develop standards for the prefabrication of free microvascular flaps in an animal model, followed by their application in clinical practice, and quantitative/qualitative microscopic assessment of the extent of development of a new microvascular network. Material and methods The study was carried out in 10 experimental pigs. As the first stage, a total of 20 prefabricated flaps were created using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a support material, placed horizontally over an isolated and distally closed vascular pedicle based on superficial abdominal vessels. After completing the animal model study, one patient was selected for the grafting of the prefabricated free flap. Results All 20 free flaps prefabricated in the animal model were analyzed microscopically, exhibiting connective tissue rich in fibroblasts and small blood vessels in the porous areas across the entire thickness of the PTFE element. Conclusions Flap prefabrication is a new and fast developing reconstruction technique. The usefulness of prefabrication techniques and their status in reconstructive surgery still needs to be investigated experimentally and clinically. The method based on prefabricated free flaps is the first step towards anatomical bioengineering that will make it possible to replace missing organs with their anatomically perfect equivalents. PMID:23788942

  9. Test method to measure resistance towards fragmentation by studded tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viman, L.

    1995-01-01

    In the Nordic countries most cars are equipped with studded tires during the winter. The studs increase the wear on the road surfaces and a special test method has been developed to measure the aggregates' resistance towards fragmentation by studded tires. The method has proven to correlate very well with the actual wear on the road surfaces. The Nordic countries Sweden, Norway and Finland have agreed to propose this method as a European Standard test method. One reason is to be able to set requirements on aggregates to be used in countries where studded tires are allowed. A cross-testing project regarding this Nordic abrasion test for studded tires was set up in order to determine the repeatability and the reproducibility of the methods to become European Standard.

  10. Sex-Specific Factors in Microvascular Angina

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Karin H.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2014-01-01

    Among women presenting for evaluation of suspected ischemic symptoms, a diagnosis of normal coronary arteries is five times more common, as compared to men. These women are often labeled as cardiac syndrome X (CSX), a subset of which have microvascular angina (MA) due to microvascular coronary dysfunction (MCD). MCD is not benign and is associated with an annual 2.5% cardiac event rate. Non-invasive testing for MCD remains insensitive although newer imaging modalities such as adenosine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) appear promising. The gold standard for diagnosis of MCD is coronary reactivity testing (CRT), an invasive technique which is not available in many countries. With regard to treatment, large scale trials are lacking. While research is ongoing, the current platform of therapy consists of anti-anginal, anti-platelet and endothelial modifying agents (primarily angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and statins). PMID:24582724

  11. Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction and Microvascular Angina: A Systematic Review of Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Marinescu, Mark A; Löffler, Adrián I.; Ouellette, Michelle; Smith, Lavone; Kramer, Christopher M.; Bourque, Jamieson

    2015-01-01

    Angina without coronary artery disease (CAD) has substantial morbidity and is present in 10–30% of patients undergoing angiography. Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is present in 50–65% of these patients. The optimal treatment of this cohort is undefined. We performed a systematic review to evaluate treatment strategies for objectively defined CMD in the absence of CAD. We included studies assessing therapy in human subjects with angina and coronary flow reserve (CFR) or myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) <2.5 by positron emission tomography (PET), cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), dilution methods, or intracoronary Doppler in the absence of coronary artery stenosis ≥50% or structural heart disease. Only 8 articles met strict inclusion criteria. The articles were heterogeneous, using different treatments, end-points, and definitions of CMD. Small sample sizes severely limit the power of these studies, with an average of 11 patients per analysis. Studies evaluating, sildenafil, quinapril, estrogen, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) application demonstrated benefits in their respective endpoints. No benefit was found with L-arginine, doxazosin, pravastatin, and diltiazem. Our systematic review highlights that there is little data to support therapies for CMD. We assess the data meeting rigorous inclusion criteria and review the related but excluded literature. We additionally describe the next steps needed to address this research gap, including a standardized definition of CMD, routine assessment of CMD in studies of chest pain without obstructive CAD, and specific therapy assessment in the population with confirmed CMD. PMID:25677893

  12. Predictors of Microvascular Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Shirabe, Ken; Aishima, Shinichi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-09-01

    This chapter covers a range of important topics in the evaluation of the microvascular invasion (MVI) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before treatment. The malignant potential of HCC is reflected by the types of MVI such as portal venous (vp), hepatic vein (vv) or bile duct (b) infiltration. The identification of the type of MVI in HCC has a key role in decisions regarding the effective treatment of HCC. Here, we describe the possible and important predictors of MVI in HCC. PMID:26398341

  13. Method of manufacturing a shapeable short-resistant capacitor

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Ralph S.; Myers, John D.; Baney, William J.

    2013-04-02

    A method that employs a novel combination of conventional fabrication techniques provides a ceramic short-resistant capacitor that is bendable and/or shapeable to provide a multiple layer capacitor that is extremely compact and amenable to desirable geometries. The method allows thinner and more flexible ceramic capacitors to be made. The method includes forming a first thin metal layer on a substrate; depositing a thin, ceramic dielectric layer over the metal layer; depositing a second thin metal layer over the dielectric layer to form a capacitor exhibiting a benign failure mode; and separating the capacitor from the substrate. The method may also include bending the resulting capacitor into a serpentine arrangement with gaps between the layers that allow venting of evaporated electrode material in the event of a benign failure.

  14. Determinants of Microvascular Network Topologies in Implanted Neovasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Carlos C.; Krishnan, Laxminarayanan; Nunes, Sara S.; Church, Kenneth H.; Edgar, Lowell T.; Boland, Eugene D.; Weiss, Jeffery A.; Williams, Stuart K.; Hoying, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives During neovascularization, the end result is a new functional microcirculation comprised of a network of mature microvessels with specific topologies. While much is known concerning the mechanisms underlying the initiation of angiogenesis, it remains unclear how the final architecture of microcirculatory beds is regulated. To begin to address this, we determined the impact of angiogenic neovessel pre-patterning on the final microvascular network topology using an implant model of implant neovascularization. Methods and Results To test this, we used 3-D direct-write bioprinting or physical constraints in a manner permitting post-angiogenesis vascular remodeling and adaptation to pattern angiogenic microvascular precursors (neovessels formed from isolated microvessel segments) in 3-dimensional collagen gels prior to implantation and subsequent network formation. Neovasculatures pre-patterned into parallel arrays formed functional networks following 4 weeks post-implantation, but lost the pre-patterned architecture. However, maintenance of uniaxial physical constraints during post-angiogenesis remodeling of the implanted neovasculatures produced networks with aligned microvessels as well as an altered proportional distribution of arterioles, capillaries and venules. Conclusions Here we show that network topology resulting from implanted microvessel precursors is independent from pre-patterning of precursors but can be influenced by a patterning stimulus involving tissue deformation during post-angiogenesis remodeling and maturation. PMID:22053070

  15. Optically measured microvascular blood flow contrast of malignant breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Choe, Regine; Putt, Mary E; Carlile, Peter M; Durduran, Turgut; Giammarco, Joseph M; Busch, David R; Jung, Ki Won; Czerniecki, Brian J; Tchou, Julia; Feldman, Michael D; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark A; Schnall, Mitchell D; DeMichele, Angela; Yodh, Arjun G

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval) tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92-2.63); tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94-2.66), and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90-2.70). Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography. PMID:24967878

  16. Monitoring microvascular free flaps with tissue oxygen measurement and PET.

    PubMed

    Schrey, Aleksi R; Kinnunen, Ilpo A J; Grénman, Reidar A; Minn, Heikki R I; Aitasalo, Kalle M J

    2008-07-01

    Tissue oxygen measurement and positron emission tomography (PET) were evaluated as methods for predicting ischemia in microvascular free flaps of the head and neck. Ten patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer underwent resection of the tumour followed by microvascular reconstruction with a free flap. Tissue oxygenation of the flap (P(ti)O(2)) was continuously monitored for three postoperative (POP) days and the blood flow of the flap was assessed using oxygen-15 labelled water and PET. In three free flaps a perfusion problem was suspected due to a remarkable drop in P(ti)O(2)-values, due to two anastomosis problems and due to POP turgor. No flap losses occurred. During the blood flow measurements with PET [mean 8.5 mL 100 g(-1) min(-1 )(SD 2.5)], the mean P(ti)O(2) of the flaps [46.8 mmHg (SD 17.0)] appeared to correlate with each other in each patient (p<0.05, n=10). Tissue oxygenation measurement is a feasible monitoring system of free flaps. The perfusion-study with PET correlates with P(ti)O(2)-measurement. PMID:18231800

  17. Tissue viability imaging for assessment of microvascular events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Doherty, Jim; Nilsson, Gert E.; Henricson, Joakim; Sjoberg, Folke; Leahy, Martin J.

    2005-08-01

    A new technique for the investigation of microvascular tissue blood concentration is presented, based on the method of polarisation spectroscopy of blood in superficial skin tissue. Linearly polarised light incident on the skin is partly reflected by the surface layers, and partly backscattered from the dermal tissue. Use of orthogonal polarisation filters over both a light source and a CCD suppresses the reflections from the surface, and only the depolarised light backscattered from the dermal matrix reaches the CCD array. By separating the colour planes of an image acquired in this manner and applying a dedicated image processing algorithm, spectroscopic information about the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) in the underlying area of tissue can be discovered. The algorithm incorporates theory that utilises the differences in light absorption of RBCs and dermal tissue in the red and green wavelength regions. In vitro fluid models compare well to computer simulations in describing a linear relationship between output signal (called TiViindex) and RBC concentration in the physiological range of 0%-4%. In vivo evaluation of the technique via transepidermal application of acetylcholine by iontophoresis displayed a heterogeneity pattern of vasodilation, which is typical of the vasoactive agent. Extension of the technique to capture and process continuous real-time data creates a new possibility of online real-time image processing. Application of tissue viability (TiVi) imaging include skin care products and drug development, as well as investigations of microvascular angiogenesis.

  18. Monitoring microvascular reactivity in dental subjects.

    PubMed

    Roth, G I; Matheny, J L; Gonty, A A; Paterson, R L

    1980-01-01

    In this section of a larger study, a system for monitoring changes in the microcirculation, in humans in the dental setting, is described. The technique involves clinical nailfold capillary photomicroscopy and electronic image-scan measurements. The system was tested using reactive hyperemia after vascular occlusion; it proved reliable and sufficiently sensitive for measuring vascular reactivity in humans. (In a subsequent paper, clinical findings relative to the use of this technique with patients undergoing nitrous oxide/oxygen anesthesia will be presented).The importance of the microcirculation for the integrity of the tissues cannot be overemphasized. Since the term "microcirculation" can be defined as the microscopic subdivisions of the vascular system that lie within the tissue proper and are exposed to its immediate environment,(1) it is evident that most of the exchange of nutrients and waste products occuring in the tissue will occur at this level. Furthermore, the adequacy of tissue perfusion during drug administration, or during and after anesthesia, is dependent on the adequacy and reactivity of this subdivision of the vascular system.(2)A basic prerequisite to the understanding of microcirculatory function in a given vascular bed is the precise quantitation of dimensional changes in those vessels(3). Dynamic measurements in vivo are required, since it is difficult, if not impossible, to ensure that the dimensions obtained from fixed tissue specimens are accurate measures of those occurring in the living state. This is especially true where vessel dimensions are rapidly changing in response to endogenous or exogenous influences. Unfortunately the task of in vivo measurement of microvascular dimensions is difficult in most microcirculatory beds. Since the vessels are an integral part of a threedimensional structure,(4) the tasks of visualizing, isolating and measuring the vessels are formidable. These difficulties are compounded if the particular vessels

  19. Minimally implicit Runge-Kutta methods for Resistive Relativistic MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, Miguel-Á.; Cordero-Carrión, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    The Relativistic Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) equations are a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations used to describe the dynamics of relativistic magnetized fluids with a finite conductivity. Close to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic regime, the source term proportional to the conductivity becomes potentially stiff and cannot be handled with standard explicit time integration methods. We propose a new class of methods to deal with the stiffness fo the system, which we name Minimally Implicit Runge-Kutta methods. These methods avoid the development of numerical instabilities without increasing the computational costs in comparison with explicit methods, need no iterative extra loop in order to recover the primitive (physical) variables, the analytical inversion of the implicit operator is trivial and the several stages can actually be viewed as stages of explicit Runge-Kutta methods with an effective time-step. We test these methods with two different one-dimensional test beds in varied conductivity regimes, and show that our second-order schemes satisfy the theoretical expectations.

  20. Noninvasive assessment of alveolar microvascular recruitment in conscious non-sedated rats.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, Dan M; Ravikumar, Priya; Unger, Roger H; Hsia, Connie C W

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment of alveolar microvascular reserves, assessed from the relationship between pulmonary diffusing capacity (DLCO) and perfusion (Q˙c), is critical to the maintenance of arterial blood oxygenation. Leptin-resistant ZDF fatty diabetic (fa/fa) rats exhibit restricted cardiopulmonary physiology under anesthesia. To assess alveolar microvascular function in conscious, non-sedated, non-instrumented, and minimally restrained animals, we adapted a rebreathing technique to study fa/fa and control non-diabetic (+/+) rats (4-5 and 7-11mo old) at rest and during mild spontaneous activity. Measurements included O2 uptake, lung volume, Q˙c, DLCO, membrane diffusing capacity (DMCO), capillary blood volume (Vc) and septal tissue-blood volume. In older fa/fa than +/+ animals, DLCO and DMCO at a given Q˙c were lower; Vc was reduced in proportion to Q˙c. Results demonstrate the consequences of alveolar microangiopathy in the metabolic syndrome: lung volume restriction, reduced Q˙c, and elevated membrane resistance to diffusion. At a given Q˙c, DLCO is lower in rats and guinea pigs than dogs or humans, consistent with limited alveolar microvascular reserves in small animals. PMID:24100202

  1. Imaging Microvascular Dysfunction and Mechanisms for Female-Male Differences in CAD.

    PubMed

    Patel, Monica B; Bui, Linh P; Kirkeeide, Richard L; Gould, K Lance

    2016-04-01

    Microvascular dysfunction or disease is most commonly associated with diffuse epicardial coronary atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction, whereas it is less common as a distinct, separate, isolated pathophysiology. The different manifestations of coronary artery disease in women relate in part to their smaller coronary arteries, higher coronary blood flow, and higher endothelial shear stress, which have profound effects on endothelial function and development or resistance to atherosclerosis, its symptomatic presentation, outcomes, and treatment. The complex interactions of focal stenosis, diffuse epicardial atherosclerotic coronary narrowing, and microvascular dysfunction make definitive diagnosis and management difficult by use of standard noninvasive and invasive physiological and anatomic technologies. However, quantitative rest-stress myocardial perfusion, best documented by positron emission tomography, combined with clinical circumstances usually provides a definitive diagnosis to guide management, including vigorous risk factor management and revascularization for patients with physiologically severe epicardial stenosis by quantitative positron emission tomography. PMID:27056165

  2. Direct ink writing of microvascular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Willie

    Nature is replete with examples of embedded microvascular systems that enable efficient fluid flow and distribution for autonomic healing, cooling, and energy harvesting. The ability to incorporate microvascular networks in functional materials systems is therefore both scientifically and technologically important. In this PhD thesis, the direct-write assembly of planar and 3D biomimetic microvascular networks within polymer and hydrogel matrices is demonstrated. In addition, the influence of network design of fluid transport efficiency is characterized. Planar microvascular networks composed of periodic lattices of uniformal microchannels and hierarchical, branching architectures are constructed by direct-write assembly of a fugitive organic ink. Several advancements are required to facilitate their patterning, including pressure valving, dual ink printing, and dynamic pressure variation to allow tunable control of ink deposition. The hydraulic conductance is measured using a high pressure flow meter as a function of network design. For a constant vascular volume and areal coverage, 2- and 4-generation branched architectures that obey Murray's Law exhibited the highest hydraulic conductivity. These experimental observations are in good agreement with predictions made by analytic models. 3D microvascular networks are fabricated by omnidirectional printing a fugitive organic ink into a photopolymerizable hydrogel matrix that is capped with fluid filler of nearly identical composition. Using this approach, 3D networks of arbitrary design can be patterned. After ink deposition is complete, the matrix and fluid filler are chemically cross-linked via UV irradiation, and the ink is removed by liquefication. Aqueous solutions composed of a triblock copolymer of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-polypropylene oxide (PPO)-PEO constitute the materials system of choice due to their thermal- and concentration-dependent phase behavior. Specifically, the fugitive ink consists of a 23 w

  3. Adaptive detection of microvascular edge in microcirculatory images for auto-tracking measurement of spontaneous vasomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiaoyou; Bao, Yongjian; Xiu, Rui-juan; Karras, Matti

    1994-05-01

    We developed a dynamic microvascular edge detection method which is based on an adaptive thresholding and multijudgmental criteria. To realize the on-line measurement with video rate, we first set changeable measuring lines which are perpendicular to a microvessel axis and cover the possible edge location at a cross- section of the microvessel as a sampling window. A dynamic threshold, which can frame-by-frame automatically adapt to the change of light intensity in the sampling window, will be generated based on the on-line analysis of light intensity distribution along the measuring lines. The judgment of microvascular edges is based on the pattern characteristics of the light intensity distribution curve in the microvascular edge areas and the possible range of the microvascular diameters. Multiple criteria for the edge detection were set for accurately detecting the edges and skipping the non-edge zones to speed the edge recognizing procedure. To further improve reliability of this edge detection, a dynamic graphic indicator can be generated according to the detected vessel edge location, and simultaneously displayed with the original image. This algorithm has been successfully applied for autotracking measurement of spontaneous vasomotion in microcirculation, even when the microcirculatory image had complex background and low contrast.

  4. Sonothrombolysis with BR38 Microbubbles Improves Microvascular Patency in a Rat Model of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kampschulte, Marian; Hyvelin, Jean-Marc; Botteron, Catherine; Juenemann, Martin; Yeniguen, Mesut; Krombach, Gabriele A.; Kaps, Manfred; Spratt, Neil J.; Gerriets, Tibo; Nedelmann, Max

    2016-01-01

    Background Early recanalization of large cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is associated with improved clinical outcome, however persisting hypoperfusion leads to poor clinical recovery despite large vessel recanalization. Limited experimental sonothrombolysis studies have shown that addition of microbubbles during treatment can improve microvascular patency. We aimed to determine the effect of two different microbubble formulations on microvascular patency in a rat stroke model. Methods We tested BR38 and SonoVue® microbubble-enhanced sonothrombolysis in Wistar rats submitted to 90-minute filament occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Rats were randomized to treatment (n = 6/group): control, rt-PA, or rt-PA+3-MHz ultrasound insonation with BR38 or SonoVue® at full or 1/3 dose. Treatment duration was 60 minutes, beginning after withdrawal of the filament, and sacrifice was immediately after treatment. Vascular volumes were evaluated with microcomputed tomography. Results Total vascular volume of the ipsilateral hemisphere was reduced in control and rt-PA groups (p<0.05), but was not significantly different from the contralateral hemisphere in all microbubble-treated groups (p>0.1). Conclusions Microbubble-enhanced sonothrombolysis improves microvascular patency. This effect is not dose- or microbubble formulation-dependent suggesting a class effect of microbubbles promoting microvascular reopening. This study demonstrates that microbubble-enhanced sonothrombolysis may be a therapeutic strategy for patients with persistent hypoperfusion of the ischemic territory. PMID:27077372

  5. The effect of different training modes on skeletal muscle microvascular density and endothelial enzymes controlling NO availability.

    PubMed

    Cocks, Matthew; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2016-04-15

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that a high vasodilator response of the skeletal muscle microvasculature to insulin and exercise is of critical importance for adequate muscle perfusion and long-term microvascular and muscle metabolic health. Previous research has shown that a sedentary lifestyle, obesity and ageing lead to impairments in the vasodilator response, while a physically active lifestyle keeps both microvascular density and vasodilator response high. To investigate the molecular mechanisms behind these impairments and the benefits of exercise training interventions, our laboratory has recently developed quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy methods to measure protein content of eNOS and NAD(P)Hoxidase specifically in the endothelial layer of capillaries and arterioles of human skeletal muscle. As eNOS produces nitric oxide (NO) and NAD(P)Hoxidase produces superoxide anions (O2 (-) , quenching NO) we propose that the eNOS/NAD(P)Hoxidase protein ratio is a marker of vasodilator capacity. The novel methods show that endurance training (ET) and high intensity interval training (HIT), generally regarded as a time-efficient alternative to ET, increase eNOS protein content and the eNOS/NADP(H)oxidase protein ratio in previously sedentary lean and obese young men. Resistance exercise training had smaller but qualitatively similar effects. Western blot data of other laboratories suggest that endurance exercise training leads to similar changes in sedentary elderly men. Future research will be required to investigate the relative importance of other sources and tissues in the balance between NO and O2 (-) production seen by the vascular smooth muscle layer of terminal arterioles. PMID:25809076

  6. Microvascular transplantation of the rat submandibular gland.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, J H; Zhang, F; Levin, D E; Singer, M I; Buncke, H J

    2000-11-01

    Xerostomia results from salivary gland irradiation during treatment of head and neck malignancies. In addition to having difficulty with speech and swallowing, these patients experience loss of taste, dental caries, and chronic fungal infections. The paired submandibular glands provide 70 percent of the normal salivary flow and are difficult to shield during radiation therapy. Another sicca condition, xerophthalmia, may result from facial nerve injury or other medical disorders and results in pain, corneal ulceration, and possible vision loss. Treatment options for xerostomia are limited, and management of xerophthalmia usually focuses on the eyelids, rather than the fundamental problem of inadequate secretory protection. In this study, a rat model for submandibular gland microvascular transplantation was developed to assess the feasibility of salivary tissue transfer. Sixteen rats underwent submandibular gland transplantation from the neck to the groin. Fourteen of these rats underwent microvascular anastomosis of the vascular pedicle. Ten glands were assessed for viability at 4 days after transplantation, and four glands were examined after 7, 10, 14, or 21 days. By gross and histologic examination, 93 percent of transplanted glands showed expected long-term viability after at least 4 postoperative days. Microvascular techniques were shown to be applicable to the transplantation of submandibular gland salivary tissue. This has not previously been shown in a rat model. It is possible that submandibular glands could be transplanted to the eye for treatment of xerophthalmia and out of the neck during irradiation of the head and neck, with subsequent replantation after treatment as a means of preventing permanent xerostomia. PMID:11083564

  7. Assessment of Perfused Foveal Microvascular Density and Identification of Nonperfused Capillaries in Healthy and Vasculopathic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Pinhas, Alexander; Razeen, Moataz; Dubow, Michael; Gan, Alexander; Chui, Toco Y.; Shah, Nishit; Mehta, Mitul; Gentile, Ronald C.; Weitz, Rishard; Walsh, Joseph B.; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the foveal microvasculature of young healthy eyes and older vasculopathic eyes, imaged using in vivo adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography (AOSLO FA). Methods. AOSLO FA imaging of the superficial retinal microvasculature within an 800-μm radius from the foveal center was performed using simultaneous confocal infrared (IR) reflectance (790 nm) and fluorescence (488 nm) channels. Corresponding IR structural and FA perfusion maps were compared with each other to identify nonperfused capillaries adjacent to the foveal avascular zone. Microvascular densities were calculated from skeletonized FA perfusion maps. Results. Sixteen healthy adults (26 eyes; mean age 25 years, range, 21–29) and six patients with a retinal vasculopathy (six eyes; mean age 55 years, range, 44–70) were imaged. At least one nonperfused capillary was observed in five of the 16 healthy nonfellow eyes and in four of the six vasculopathic eyes. Compared with healthy eyes, capillary nonperfusion in the vasculopathic eyes was more extensive. Microvascular density of the 16 healthy nonfellow eyes was 42.0 ± 4.2 mm−1 (range, 33–50 mm−1). All six vasculopathic eyes had decreased microvascular densities. Conclusions. AOSLO FA provides an in vivo method for estimating foveal microvascular density and reveals occult nonperfused retinal capillaries. Nonperfused capillaries in healthy young adults may represent a normal variation and/or an early sign of pathology. Although limited, the normative data presented here is a step toward developing clinically useful microvascular parameters for ocular and/or systemic diseases. PMID:25414179

  8. Directed assembly of three-dimensional microvascular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therriault, Daniel

    Three-dimensional (3-D) microvascular networks with pervasive, interconnected channels less than 300 mum in diameter may find widespread application in microfluidic devices, biotechnology, sensors, and autonomic healing materials. Although microchannel arrays are readily constructed in two-dimensions by photolithographic or soft lithographic techniques, their construction in three-dimensions remains a challenging problem. The development of a microfabrication method to build 3-D microvascular networks based on direct-write assembly is described is this thesis. The method is based on the robotic deposition of a fugitive organic ink to form a free-standing scaffold structure. Secondary infiltration of a structural resin followed by setting of the matrix and removal of the scaffold yields an embedded pervasive network of smooth cylindrical channels (˜10--500 mum) with defined connectivity. Rheological and other material properties studies of fugitive organic ink were performed in order to identify the critical characteristics required for successful deposition of 3-D scaffolds by direct-write assembly. Guided by the results of these studies, several new ink formulations were screened for improved deposition performance. The most successful of these inks (40wt% microcrystalline wax, 60wt% petroleum jelly) showed excellent deposition and had an equilibrium modulus at room temperature (G 'eq ˜ 7.70 kPa 1 Hz) nearly two orders of magnitude higher than the original ink. The optimized ink was used to successfully build thick (i.e., ˜100 layers) scaffold structures at room temperature with negligible time-dependent deformation post-deposition. Secondary infiltration of the resin was accomplished at room temperature while maintaining the scaffold architecture. The optimized ink was also successfully extruded through small micronozzles (1 mum). The construction of 3-D microvascular networks enables microfluidic devices with unparallel geometric complexity. In one example, a

  9. Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

  10. Listeriolysin O mediates cytotoxicity against human brain microvascular

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penetration of the brain microvascular endothelial layer is one of the routes L. monocytogenes use to breach the blood-brain barrier. Because host factors in the blood severely limit direct invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) by L. monocytogenes, alternative mechanisms m...

  11. The importance of endothelin-1 for microvascular dysfunction in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Majid

    2008-01-01

    Most of the late diabetic complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy, have their basis in disturbed microvascular function. Structural and functional changes in the micro-circulation are present in diabetes mellitus irrespective of the organ studied, and the pathogenesis is complex. Endothelial dysfunction, characterized by an imbalance between endothelium-derived vasodilator and vasoconstrictor substances, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy. Increased circulating levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, has been found in patients with diabetes, and a positive correlation between plasma ET-1 levels and microangiopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes has been demonstrated. In addition to its direct vasoconstrictor effects, enhanced levels of ET-1 may contribute to endothelial dysfunction through inhibitory effects on nitric oxide (NO) production. Vascular endothelial dysfunction may precede insulin resistance, although the feature of insulin resistance syndrome includes factors that have negative effects on endothelial function. Furthermore, ET-1 induces a reduction in insulin sensitivity and may take part in the development of the metabolic syndrome. In the following, the mechanisms by which ET-1 contributes to the development of diabetic microangiopathy and the potentially beneficial effect of selective ETA receptor antagonists are discussed. PMID:19183753

  12. Changes in retinal microvascular diameter in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Andréa Vasconcellos Batista; Gouvea, Sonia Alves; da Silva, Aurélio Paulo Batista; Bortolon, Saulo; Rodrigues, Anabel Nunes; Abreu, Glaucia Rodrigues; Herkenhoff, Fernando Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Diabetic retinopathy is the main microvascular complication in diabetes mellitus and needs to be diagnosed early to prevent severe sight-threatening retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to quantify the retinal microvasculature pattern and analyze the influence of blood glucose level and the duration of diabetes mellitus on the retinal microvasculature. Methods Two groups were analyzed: patients with diabetes (N=26) and patients without diabetes, ie, controls (N=26). A quantitative semiautomated method analyzed retinal microvasculature. The diameters of arterioles and venules were measured. The total numbers of arterioles and venules were counted. The ratio of arteriole diameter to venule diameter was calculated. The retinal microvasculature pattern was related to clinical and biochemical parameters. Results Patients with diabetes exhibited larger venule diameters in the upper temporal quadrant of the retina compared to the lower temporal quadrant (124.85±38.03 µm vs 102.92±15.69 µm; P<0.01). Patients with diabetes for 5 or more years had larger venule diameters in the upper temporal quadrant than patients without diabetes (141.62±44.44 vs 112.58±32.11 µm; P<0.05). The degree of venodilation in the upper temporal quadrant was positively correlated with blood glucose level and the estimated duration of diabetes mellitus. Interpretation and conclusion The employed quantitative method demonstrated that patients with diabetes exhibited venule dilation in the upper temporal quadrant, and the duration of diabetes mellitus was positively correlated with blood glucose level. Therefore, the early assessment of retinal microvascular changes is possible prior to the onset of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26345217

  13. Method for characterizing the contact resistance of metal-vanadium dioxide thin film interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Percy, R.; Stan, M.; Weikle, R. M.; Kittiwatanakul, S.; Lu, J.; Wolf, S.

    2014-07-14

    The standard method for determining the contact resistance of planar metal-semiconductor interfaces can underestimate the true contact resistance under normal operating conditions, as it relies on the resistivity of the semiconductor material remaining constant during measurement. However, the strong temperature dependence of the resistivity of VO{sub 2} requires a modified approach that maintains a constant power density dissipated within the film to account for Joule heating. We develop a method for measuring contact resistance in semiconductors with a high thermal coefficient of resistivity, demonstrate this method with an example, and compare the results with the standard technique.

  14. Current Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies in Microvascular Angina

    PubMed Central

    Mumma, Bryn; Flacke, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular angina is common among patients with signs and symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Unfortunately, microvascular is often under-recognized in clinical settings. The diagnosis of microvascular angina relies on assessment of the functional status of the coronary microvasculature. Invasive strategies include acetylcholine provocation, intracoronary Doppler ultrasound, and intracoronary thermodilution; noninvasive strategies include cardiac positron emission tomography (PET), cardiac magnetic resonance, and Doppler echocardiography. Once the diagnosis of microvascular angina is established, treatment is focused on improving symptoms and reducing future risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Pharmacologic options and lifestyle modifications for patients with microvascular angina are similar to those for patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:25685641

  15. Influence of Resistance Method on Motor Winding Temperature Rise Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beges, G.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this article is presentation of influences when measuring the motor winding temperature rise in the scope of safety testing of electrical appliances, with respect to conformity assessment. The temperature measurement in testing is one of the most defined fields of measurement, but it is very important how the measurement is performed. Standards only describe that the resistance method shall be used for determination of the temperature rise (heating) of the winding. The temperature rise is defined as the average temperature rise of the windings above the ambient (surrounding) temperature, at the specified load of the unit under test. It is not explicitly defined how to approach this measurement when using cooling characteristics of the winding for determination of the temperature rise. Since the extrapolation curve is used, the procedure is also very important to obtain a result as accurate as possible. It is important that measurement results and their associated uncertainties are correctly evaluated, and on that basis, appropriate conclusions of conformity of the product with specifications are made. The resistance method influence on the motor winding temperature rise measurement is a case study in this article. The article focuses on the measurement of the temperature rise of electrical motors used in electrical appliances according to the standard EN 60335-1, clause 11 (2002) (identical as standard IEC 60335-1, 2001). In this article, the influencing parameters are analyzed when measuring the temperature rise of electromotor winding. As a case study, concrete measurements are presented. The optimal time after which the performer has to start measurement of the cooling characteristics is analyzed, since the motors are typically mounted deep into appliances. Especially for a collector motor winding, it takes some time for a performer to be able to connect the measuring instrument to collector's lamellas because this contact has an important

  16. Closing microvascular lesions with fibrin sealant-attached muscle pads.

    PubMed

    Fehm, Nando Percy; Vatankhah, Bijan; Dittmar, Michael S; Tevetoglu, Yesim; Retzl, Gerald; Horn, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Fibrin sealants are used in a variety of surgical procedures, mainly for purposes of hemostasis and assisted wound healing. The combined use of fibrin sealant and autologous muscle pads for hemostasis was not reported previously. Arterial incisions in the common carotid artery in rats were closed by the combined application of fibrin sealant and an autologous muscle pad. Postsurgical vessel patency and degree of stenosis were evaluated by color duplex sonography, computed tomography angiography, and postmortem histology. The combined application of muscle pad and fibrin sealant and achievement of hemostasis was feasible in all animals. Seventy-eight percent of animals showed no or only slight postsurgical vessel stenosis. Our method is simple and quick to perform, showing a high potential for hemostasis in microvascular lesions. Therefore, it might be used in future experimental studies for conservation of vessel patency after arterial catheterization and in experimental or clinical vascular surgery. PMID:16184526

  17. Microvascular filtration in subjects with connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J C; Snaith, M L

    1984-01-01

    A simple non-invasive method for studying microvascular filtration in the non-articular tissues of the forearm is described. Rates of filtration under a standard hydrostatic pressure were measured in 20 normal female subjects and 44 female subjects with connective tissue disorders. An increased mean filtration rate was found in 14 subjects with rheumatoid arthritis. In 20 subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus and 10 subjects with scleroderma no such generalised increase in filtration rates was seen, but isolated cases had very high filtration rates, suggesting a more heterogeneous physiological disturbance. Increased filtration was not associated with the presence of oedema. This confirms doubts raised by other workers about the importance of filtration in the genesis of clinical oedema. Images PMID:6476914

  18. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  19. Microvascular Repair: Post-Angiogenesis Vascular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Amanda J.; Krishnan, Laxminarayanan; Sullivan, Christopher J.; Williams, Stuart K.; Hoying, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular compromise and the accompanying perfusion deficits cause or complicate a large array of disease conditions and treatment failures. This has prompted the exploration of therapeutic strategies to repair or regenerate vasculatures thereby establishing more competent microcirculatory beds. Growing evidence indicates that an increase in vessel numbers within a tissue does not necessarily promote an increase in tissue perfusion. Effective regeneration of a microcirculation entails the integration of new stable microvessel segments into the network via neovascularization. Beginning with angiogenesis, neovascularization entails an integrated series of vascular activities leading to the formation of a new mature microcirculation and includes vascular guidance and inosculation, vessel maturation, pruning, arterio-venous specification, network patterning, structural adaptation, intussusception, and microvascular stabilization. While the generation of new vessel segments is necessary to expand a network, without the concomitant neovessel remodeling and adaptation processes intrinsic to microvascular network formation, these additional vessel segments give rise to a dysfunctional microcirculation. While many of the mechanisms regulating angiogenesis have been detailed, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms driving post-angiogenesis activities specific to neovascularization has yet to be fully realized, but is necessary in order to develop effective therapeutic strategies for repairing compromised microcirculations as a means to treat disease. PMID:22734666

  20. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels.

  1. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-12-26

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  2. Low-resistance and high-resistance states in strontium titanate films formed by the sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi Anaraki, H.; Gaponenko, N. V.; Litvinov, V. G.; Ermachikhin, A. V.; Kolos, V. V.; Pyatlitski, A. N.; Ivanov, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    A change in the resistance of strontium titanate structures formed by the sol-gel method has been demonstrated. The transition of a strontium titanate film with a thickness of about 300 nm from the highresistance to low-resistance state occurs when the bias voltage on the silicon/titanium dioxide/platinum/strontium titanate/nickel capacitor structure reaches the values of about 10 V. The resistance changes from several ohms to several tens of kiloohms. For a thicker film (~400 nm), the switching voltage increases while the resistance of the structure in the high-resistance state reaches several hundreds of kiloohms. Supposedly, the main role in changing the resistance is played by deep levels whose population changes by the applied voltage. The prospects for the application of strontium titanate films in memory memristor elements have been discussed.

  3. Ion implantation method for preparing polymers having oxygen erosion resistant surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Eal H.; Mansur, Louis K.; Heatherly, Jr., Lee

    1995-01-01

    Hard surfaced polymers and the method for making them are generally described. Polymers are subjected to simultaneous multiple ion beam bombardment, that results in a hardening of the surface, improved wear resistance, and improved oxygen erosion resistance.

  4. Ion implantation method for preparing polymers having oxygen erosion resistant surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Lee, E.H.; Mansur, L.K.; Heatherly, L. Jr.

    1995-04-18

    Hard surfaced polymers and the method for making them are generally described. Polymers are subjected to simultaneous multiple ion beam bombardment, that results in a hardening of the surface, improved wear resistance, and improved oxygen erosion resistance. 8 figs.

  5. A novel patterning method of low-resistivity metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Chang-Ho; Kim, Jin-Young; Lee, Ho-Chul; Hwang, Ok-Chae; Cho, Sung-Heon; Song, Ki-Yong; Kim, Jong-Min

    2005-05-01

    A new metal patterning process using photocatalyst was developed to reduce the number of chemical processing steps and to obtain high resolution. Films of amorphous TiO2 and water-soluble polyvinyl alcohol were used as photocatalytic layers. UV light was illuminated through a photomask onto the photocatalytic layers. Pd(II) in an aqueous solution was reduced to Pd(0) by the exposed TiO2 and deposited on the exposed regions. Selective electroless Ni/Cu plating on the Pd patterns showed high resolution metal patterns. Process parameters such as exposure dose and postexposure time delay were optimized to confirm the feasibility of this method. It was established that high resolution metal patterns of low resistivity with good adhesion were formed only at a small process steps without using high cost materials and equipments. Selective growth of carbon nanotubes on the Ni patterns was carried out by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. It"s expected that this methods will have several benefits for fabricating the microelectronic devices, especially in the large size flat panel display.

  6. Isolation of Primary Murine Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruck, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Epping, Lisa; Herrmann, Alexander M.; Meuth, Sven G.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier is ultrastructurally assembled by a monolayer of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) interconnected by a junctional complex of tight and adherens junctions. Together with other cell-types such as astrocytes or pericytes, they form the neurovascular unit (NVU), which specifically regulates the interchange of fluids, molecules and cells between the peripheral blood and the CNS. Through this complex and dynamic system BMECs are involved in various processes maintaining the homeostasis of the CNS. A dysfunction of the BBB is observed as an essential step in the pathogenesis of many severe CNS diseases. However, specific and targeted therapies are very limited, as the underlying mechanisms are still far from being understood. Animal and in vitro models have been extensively used to gain in-depth understanding of complex physiological and pathophysiological processes. By reduction and simplification it is possible to focus the investigation on the subject of interest and to exclude a variety of confounding factors. However, comparability and transferability are also reduced in model systems, which have to be taken into account for evaluation. The most common animal models are based on mice, among other reasons, mainly due to the constantly increasing possibilities of methodology. In vitro studies of isolated murine BMECs might enable an in-depth analysis of their properties and of the blood-brain-barrier under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Further insights into the complex mechanisms at the BBB potentially provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies. This protocol describes a method to isolate primary murine microvascular endothelial cells by a sequence of physical and chemical purification steps. Special considerations for purity and cultivation of MBMECs as well as quality control, potential applications and limitations are discussed. PMID:25489873

  7. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Muffley, Lara A.; Pan, Shin-Chen; Smith, Andria N.; Ga, Maricar; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  8. Diagnosis of coronary microvascular dysfunction - Present status.

    PubMed

    Mittal, S R

    2015-01-01

    Definite clinical diagnosis of microvascular angina is not possible with the existing knowledge. Resting electrocardiogram may be normal, and exercise electrocardiogram may be unremarkable. Echocardiography usually does not show regional wall motion abnormalities. Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography can satisfactorily evaluate only left anterior descending coronary artery and that too in some patients. Radio-isotope imaging can detect only severe localized disease. Noninvasive diagnosis needs high index of suspicion. At present, definite diagnosis is based on documentation of normal epicardial coronaries, coronary flow reserve less than 2.5 on adenosine induced hyperemia, and absence of spasm of epicardial coronaries on acetylcholine provocation. Invasive evaluation is costly, needs sophisticated equipments and expertise. Therapeutic and prognostic implications of various parameters remains to be evaluated. At present invasive evaluation is recommended only for patients with intractable symptoms with unconfirmed diagnosis, requiring repeated hospitalization and evaluation with failure of empirical therapy. PMID:26702685

  9. Phase transition of the microvascular network architecture in human pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Giorgio; Traversi, Claudio; Cattaneo, Ruggero; De Felice, Claudia; Monaco, Annalisa; Tosi, Gianmarco; Parrini, Stefano; Latini, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the microvascular pattern in acquired or genetic diseases in humans. The lower gingival and vestibular oral mucosa, as well as the optic nerve head, was chosen to characterize the vascular pattern complexity due to the simple accessibility and visibility Local fractal dimensions, fractal dimension of the minimum path and Lempel-Ziv complexity have been used as operational numerical tools to characterize the microvascular networks. In the normal healthy subjects microvascular networks show nonlinear values corresponding to the complexity of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, while in several acquired or genetic diseases they are approaching the ones of an invasion percolation model. PMID:23193796

  10. Endoneurial Microvascular Pathology in Feline Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Jeannelyn S.; Nelson, Richard N.; Sturges, B.K.; Vernau, Karen M.; Williams, D. Collette; LeCouteur, Richard A.; Shelton, G. Diane; Mizisin, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Endoneurial capillaries in nerve biopsies from 12 adult diabetic cats with varying degrees of neurological dysfunction were examined for evidence of microvascular pathology and compared to nerves obtained at autopsy from 7 adult non-diabetic cats without clinical evidence of neurological dysfunction. As reported previously (Mizisin et al., 2007), the diabetic cats had elevated glycosylated hemoglobin and serum fructosamine levels, decreased motor nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), and markedly decreased myelinated nerve fiber densities. Compared to non-diabetic cats, there was a non-significant 26% increase in capillary density and a significant (P<0.009) 45% increase in capillary size in diabetic cats. Capillary luminal size was also significantly (P<0.001) increased, while an index of vasoconstriction was significantly decreased (P<0.001) in diabetic cats compared to non-diabetic controls. No differences in endothelial cell size, endothelial cell number or pericyte size were detected between non-diabetic and diabetic cats. In diabetic cats, basement membrane thickening, seen as a reduplication of the basal lamina, was significantly (P<0.0002) increased by 73% compared to non-diabetic controls. Regression analysis of either myelinated nerve fiber density or CMAP amplitude against basement membrane size demonstrated a negative correlation with significant slopes (P<0.03 and P<0.04, respectively). These data demonstrate that myelinated nerve fiber injury in feline diabetic neuropathy is associated with microvascular pathology and that some of these changes parallel those documented in experimental rodent and human diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18207200

  11. Robust, cross-laboratory validated PCR methods to track antibiotic resistance in agricultural settings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to make informed decisions on how best to manage agricultural antibiotics, we need to be able to track and quantify the antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes. PCR-based methods are widely used to both detect and quantify antibiotic resistance genes, however there ar...

  12. A new detection method for a newly revealed mechanism of pyrethroid resistance development in Varroa destructor.

    PubMed

    Strachecka, Aneta; Borsuk, Grzegorz; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Paleolog, Jerzy

    2015-11-01

    The Varroa destructor mite has recently displayed an ever increasing resistance to new drugs, contributing to CCD proliferation. This work was aimed at determining new viable methods for identifying the pyrethroid resistance of V. destructor and DNA methylation in resistant and sensitive mites. DNA was extracted from Varroa mites. Nucleotide changes in the DNA of pyrethroid-resistant, pyrethroid-sensitive, and control mites were identified with polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) in the case of five mitochondrial gene fragments. More bands were observed in the drug-resistant mites than in the other two groups. Sequencing confirmed these observations. Decreased global DNA methylation levels were observed in the pyrethroid-resistant mites. There exists a previously undescribed mechanism of pyrethroid resistance development in Varroa mites. The PCR-SSCP methods can be considered and further developed as useful tools for detecting V. destructor resistance. PMID:26210302

  13. Method of lift-off patterning thin films in situ employing phase change resists

    DOEpatents

    Bahlke, Matthias Erhard; Baldo, Marc A; Mendoza, Hiroshi Antonio

    2014-09-23

    Method for making a patterned thin film of an organic semiconductor. The method includes condensing a resist gas into a solid film onto a substrate cooled to a temperature below the condensation point of the resist gas. The condensed solid film is heated selectively with a patterned stamp to cause local direct sublimation from solid to vapor of selected portions of the solid film thereby creating a patterned resist film. An organic semiconductor film is coated on the patterned resist film and the patterned resist film is heated to cause it to sublime away and to lift off because of the phase change.

  14. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, Carleton H.; Evans, Jr., Joseph Tate

    1998-01-01

    A method for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100.degree. C. and 300.degree. C. for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer.

  15. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, C.H.; Evans, J.T. Jr.

    1998-11-24

    A method is described for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100 C and 300 C for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer. 1 fig.

  16. Screening for antimicrobial resistance in fecal samples by the replica plating method.

    PubMed Central

    Osterblad, M; Leistevuo, T; Huovinen, P

    1995-01-01

    Replica plating can be used for the detection of antibiotic resistance in normal flora. We have evaluated this application of the replica plating method by comparing it with a five-colony method. The replica plating method uses a single plate for each antibiotic, with a concentration just above that for borderline resistance. By the five-colony method, five colonies per sample were picked, chosen to represent all different colony morphologies present, and MICs were determined by a standard agar dilution method. The gram-negative, aerobic floras of 131 fecal samples were screened for resistance to ampicillin, cefuroxime, nalidixic acid, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline by both methods. The rate of resistance detection by the two methods did not differ statistically for any of the antibiotics tested. The breakpoint concentrations used for the replica plates in the study gave results similar to those produced by the agar dilution method and the breakpoint values of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards and can thus be recommended. As the only currently used resistance detection method, replica plating facilitates an exact determination of the percentage of resistant colonies/total number of colonies (between 1 and 100%) in a sample. This revealed an uneven distribution, with only 23% of the samples having resistance frequencies in the range of 10 to 85%; usually, the resistant flora either was a small minority or was very dominant in samples with resistance. This phenomenon was present for all of the antibiotics. PMID:8586690

  17. Protein osmotic pressure gradients and microvascular reflection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Drake, R E; Dhother, S; Teague, R A; Gabel, J C

    1997-08-01

    Microvascular membranes are heteroporous, so the mean osmotic reflection coefficient for a microvascular membrane (sigma d) is a function of the reflection coefficient for each pore. Investigators have derived equations for sigma d based on the assumption that the protein osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane (delta II) does not vary from pore to pore. However, for most microvascular membranes, delta II probably does vary from pore to pore. In this study, we derived a new equation for sigma d. According to our equation, pore-to-pore differences in delta II increase the effect of small pores and decrease the effect of large pores on the overall membrane osmotic reflection coefficient. Thus sigma d for a heteroporous membrane may be much higher than previously derived equations indicate. Furthermore, pore-to-pore delta II differences increase the effect of plasma protein osmotic pressure to oppose microvascular fluid filtration. PMID:9277520

  18. Impact of hetastarch on the intestinal microvascular barrier during ECLS.

    PubMed

    Cox, C S; Brennan, M; Allen, S J

    2000-04-01

    The effects of hetastarch on microvascular fluid flux were determined in anesthetized dogs undergoing extracorporeal life support (ECLS) with a roller pump and membrane oxygenator. ECLS with a lactated Ringer priming solution resulted in a decrease in microvascular protein reflection coefficient and an increase in transvascular protein clearance. Use of a 6% hetastarch priming solution attenuated the decrease in microvascular protein reflection coefficient and blunted the increase in transvascular protein clearance. Ileal tissue water increased in the group treated with the lactated Ringer priming solution compared with the group treated with 6% hetastarch. The effective plasma-to-interstitial colloid osmotic pressure gradient was greater in the group treated with hetastarch than in the group treated with lactated Ringer solution. Hetastarch decreases the edema associated with ECLS. The reduction in edema is due to the maintenance of the plasma-to-interstitial colloid osmotic pressure gradient and the reduction in the microvascular permeability to protein. PMID:10749832

  19. Microvascular temporalis fascia transfer for penile girth enhancement.

    PubMed

    Küçükçelebi, A; Ertaş, N M; Aydin, A; Eroğlu, A; Ozmen, E; Velidedeoğlu, H

    2001-07-01

    The authors report a 44-year-old man with inadequate penile girth that caused psychological problems. Using microvascular temporalis fascia transfer, they achieved satisfactory penile girth enhancement based on reliable vascularity in a single stage. PMID:11756810

  20. Analysis of microvascular density in early gastric carcinoma using magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Masashi; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Shibuya, Rie; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakai, Yoshitaka; Nagasaki, Futoshi; Nomura, Eiki; Suzuki, Noriaki; Saito, Eri

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Intramucosal vascular density differs between differentiated and undifferentiated type gastric carcinomas. This study aimed to evaluate the microvascular density characteristics of these two types of carcinoma using magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (ME-NBI). Patients and methods: In total, 42 differentiated and 10 undifferentiated types were evaluated. The microvessels observed using ME-NBI were extracted from stored still images and the microvascular density in the two carcinoma types was analyzed. Histological vascular density in resected specimens was also evaluated using CD34 immunostaining. Results: There were significant differences between the microvascular density in the differentiated and undifferentiated types of carcinoma (10.02 ± 4.72 % vs 4.02 ± 0.40 %; P < 0.001) using ME-NBI. Vascular density assessed histologically also differed significantly between differentiated and undifferentiated types in both the whole mucosal (5.81 ± 3.17 % vs 3.25 ± 1.21 %) and the superficial mucosal layers (0 – 100 μm) (6.38 ± 3.73 % vs 3.66 ± 1.46 %). However, the vascular density in the surrounding non-carcinomatous mucosa assessed using ME-NBI and histologically, was significantly lower in the differentiated than in the undifferentiated types (P < 0.001). There was good agreement between ME-NBI and histologically assessed microvascular density in both the whole (r = 0.740; P < 0.001) and superficial mucosal layers (r = 0.764; P < 0.001). White opaque substance (WOS) was seen in eight patients who had the differentiated type carcinoma. In almost all cases with WOS, the appearance of the carcinoma was discolored. Conclusions: There was a close relationship between ME-NBI assessed microvascular density and histologically assessed vascular density in the mucosal layer. Microvascular density differed significantly between the differentiated and undifferentiated

  1. Microvascular Plasticity: Angiogenesis in Health and Disease--Preface.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Timothy W; Pries, Axel R

    2016-02-01

    This Special Topic Issue is concerned with the mechanisms that determine the structure of microvascular networks. The vast number of vessels and the highly plastic character of the microcirculation give evidence that microvascular network structures emerge as a result of responses of individual vessels and cells to the local stimuli that they experience, through a combination of angiogenesis, remodeling and pruning. The articles in this issue of Microcirculation address a range of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. PMID:26639099

  2. Screening for resistance to adult spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) in Brachiaria spp.: methods and categories of resistance.

    PubMed

    López, Francisco; Cardona, Cesar; Miles, John W; Sotelo, Guillermo; Montoya, James

    2009-06-01

    Both nymphal and adult stages of several species of spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) are key economic pests of brachiariagrasses (Brachiaria spp.) in tropical America. Progress has been made in the characterization and development of antibiosis resistance to nymphs in brachiariagrasses. Essentially no attention has been given to screening germplasm for resistance to adults. To support current breeding programs, a series of experiments was conducted to develop a methodology to screen for adult damage and to study categories of resistance to adult feeding damage. Six host brachiariagrass genotypes were used: two susceptible checks (CIAT 0606 and CIAT 0654) and four nymph-resistant genotypes (CIAT 6294, CIAT 36062, CIAT 36087, and SX01NO/0102). Test insects were Aeneolamia varia (F.) and Zulia carbonaria (Lallemand). None of the nymph-resistant genotypes was antibiotic to adults. All four nymph-resistant genotypes showed tolerance to A. varia and Z. carbonaria feeding damage. The levels of tolerance to adults of Z. carbonaria, a larger, more aggressive species, were lower. Of the four nymph-resistant genotypes, only CIAT 6294 and CIAT 36087 showed some tolerance to Z. carbonaria expressed as lower leaf damage scores, less chlorophyll loss, and lower functional plant loss indices. The fact that a genotype like SX01NO/0102, which is highly antibiotic to nymphs, is susceptible to adult damage suggests that mechanisms of resistance to the two spittlebug life stages may be independent. Results of these studies suggest a need to incorporate routine screening for tolerance to adult feeding damage as an additional selection criterion in the breeding scheme. PMID:19610452

  3. Colistin and tigecycline resistance in carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria: emerging resistance mechanisms and detection methods.

    PubMed

    Osei Sekyere, J; Govinden, U; Bester, L A; Essack, S Y

    2016-09-01

    A literature review was undertaken to ascertain the molecular basis for tigecycline and colistin resistance mechanisms and the experimental basis for the detection and delineation of this resistance particularly in carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria. Pubmed, Google Scholar and Science Direct were searched with the keywords colistin, tigecycline, resistance mechanisms and detection methods. Trans-complementation and comparative MIC studies, mass spectrometry, chromatography, spectrofluorometry, PCR, qRT-PCR and whole genome sequencing (WGS) were commonly used to determine tigecycline and colistin resistance mechanisms, specifically modifications in the structural and regulatory efflux (acrAB, OqxAB, kpgABC adeABC-FGH-IJK, mexAB-XY-oprJM and soxS, rarA robA, ramRAB marRABC, adeLRS, mexRZ and nfxb) and lipid A (pmrHFIJFKLM, lpxA, lpxC lpxD and mgrB, pmrAB, phoPQ,) genes respectively. Mutations in the ribosomal 16S rRNA operon rrnBC, also yielded resistance to tigecycline through target site modifications. The mcr-1 gene conferring resistance to colistin was identified via WGS, trans-complementation and a murine thigh infection model studies. Common detection methods are mainly antibiotic sensitivity testing with broth microdilution while molecular identification tools are mostly PCR and WGS. Spectrofluorometry, MALDI-TOF MS, micro-array and real-time multiplex PCR hold much promise for the future as new detection tools. PMID:27153928

  4. Method for making high resistance chromium-free semiconductor substrate body with low resistance active semiconductor layer by surface irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kniepkamp, H.

    1984-10-30

    A high resistance semiconductor substrate body with a thin low resistance active semiconductor layer thereon is generated by a method including the steps of subjecting the semiconductor substrate body to neutron bombardment to a degree which produces high resistance in the semiconductor body and whereby doping substances are generated in the substrate body by the thermal neutron bombardment. A thin low resistant active semiconductor layer is then generated on the substrate body by annealing, a surface of the semiconductor substrate body up to a selected depth by laser radiation or electron radiation such that the lattice deterioration which was caused by the neutron bombardment is eliminated but the doping which was generated by the transmutation of elements during neutron bombardment remains. The annealing can be undertaken only in selected regions on the surface of the semiconductor substrate body, thereby facilitating the construction of integrated circuit components thereon.

  5. Anopheles sinensis mosquito insecticide resistance: comparison of three mosquito sample collection and preparation methods and mosquito age in resistance measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance monitoring in malaria mosquitoes is essential for guiding the rational use of insecticides in vector control programs. Resistance bioassay is the first step for insecticide monitoring and it lays an important foundation for molecular examination of resistance mechanisms. In the literature, various mosquito sample collection and preparation methods have been used, but how mosquito sample collection and preparation methods affect insecticide susceptibility bioassay results is largely unknown. The objectives of this study were to determine whether mosquito sample collection and preparation methods affected bioassay results, which may cause incorrect classification of mosquito resistance status. Methods The study was conducted in Anopheles sinensis mosquitoes in two study sites in central China. Three mosquito sample collection and preparation methods were compared for insecticide susceptibility, kdr frequencies and metabolic enzyme activities: 1) adult mosquitoes collected from the field; 2) F1 adults from field collected, blood-fed mosquitoes; and 3) adult mosquitoes reared from field collected larvae. Results Mosquito sample collection and preparation methods significantly affected mortality rates in the standard WHO tube resistance bioassay. Mortality rate of field-collected female adults was 10-15% higher than in mosquitoes reared from field-collected larvae and F1 adults from field collected blood-fed females. This pattern was consistent in mosquitoes from the two study sites. High kdr mutation frequency (85-95%) with L1014F allele as the predominant mutation was found in our study populations. Field-collected female adults consistently exhibited the highest monooxygenase and GST activities. The higher mortality rate observed in the field-collected female mosquitoes may have been caused by a mixture of mosquitoes of different ages, as older mosquitoes were more susceptible to deltamethrin than younger mosquitoes. Conclusions

  6. Differential resistances to anthracnose in Capsicum baccatum as responding to two Colletotrichum pathotypes and inoculation methods.

    PubMed

    Mahasuk, Pitchayapa; Chinthaisong, Jittima; Mongkolporn, Orarat

    2013-09-01

    Chili anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum spp., is one of the major diseases to chili production in the tropics and subtropics worldwide. Breeding for durable anthracnose resistance requires a good understanding of the resistance mechanisms to different pathotypes and inoculation methods. This study aimed to investigate the inheritances of differential resistances as responding to two different Colletotrichum pathotypes, PCa2 and PCa3 and as by two different inoculation methods, microinjection (MI) and high pressure spray (HP). Detached ripe fruit of Capsicum baccatum 'PBC80' derived F2 and BC1s populations was assessed for anthracnose resistance. Two dominant genes were identified responsible for the differential resistance to anthracnose. One was responsible for the resistance to PCa2 and PCa3 by MI and the other was responsible for the resistance to PCa3 by HP. The two genes were linked with 16.7 cM distance. PMID:24273429

  7. Differential resistances to anthracnose in Capsicum baccatum as responding to two Colletotrichum pathotypes and inoculation methods

    PubMed Central

    Mahasuk, Pitchayapa; Chinthaisong, Jittima; Mongkolporn, Orarat

    2013-01-01

    Chili anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum spp., is one of the major diseases to chili production in the tropics and subtropics worldwide. Breeding for durable anthracnose resistance requires a good understanding of the resistance mechanisms to different pathotypes and inoculation methods. This study aimed to investigate the inheritances of differential resistances as responding to two different Colletotrichum pathotypes, PCa2 and PCa3 and as by two different inoculation methods, microinjection (MI) and high pressure spray (HP). Detached ripe fruit of Capsicum baccatum ‘PBC80’ derived F2 and BC1s populations was assessed for anthracnose resistance. Two dominant genes were identified responsible for the differential resistance to anthracnose. One was responsible for the resistance to PCa2 and PCa3 by MI and the other was responsible for the resistance to PCa3 by HP. The two genes were linked with 16.7 cM distance. PMID:24273429

  8. Computational complexity and length of recorded data for fluctuation enhanced sensing method in resistive gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentka, Ł.; Smulko, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers complexity and accuracy of data processing for gas detection using resistance fluctuation data observed in resistance gas sensors. A few selected methods were considered (Principal Component Analysis - PCA, Support Vector Machine - SVM). Functions like power spectral density or histogram were used to create input data vector for these algorithms from the observed resistance fluctuations. The presented considerations are important for proposing relatively cheap and mobile gas detection devices of limited computations abilities and utilizing fluctuation enhanced gas sensing method.

  9. Adaptive Motor Resistance Video Game Exercise Apparatus and Method of Use Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, Alton (Inventor); Shaw, James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The invention comprises a method and/or an apparatus using computer configured exercise equipment and an electric motor provided physical resistance in conjunction with a game system, such as a video game system, where the exercise system provides real physical resistance to a user interface. Results of user interaction with the user interface are integrated into a video game, such as running on a game console. The resistance system comprises: a subject interface, software control, a controller, an electric servo assist/resist motor, an actuator, and/or a subject sensor. The system provides actual physical interaction with a resistance device as input to the game console and game run thereon.

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring resistivity of an earth formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chemali, R.E.; Dirk, W.C.

    1987-02-24

    An apparatus is described for correcting anomaly induced errors in resistivity measurements of an earth formation traversed by a borehole. The resistivity measurement is accomplished utilizing voltage measurements between a sonde suspended in the borehole from a conductive cable and a first reference electrode disposed above the sonde. The apparatus comprises: means for emitting a first focusing current from the sonde at a selected frequency; a second reference electrode disposed between the first reference electrode and the sonde; means for measuring a first voltage induced by the first focusing current between the anode and the second reference electrode; means for emitting a second focusing current from the sonde at a frequency substantially below the selected frequency; means for measuring a second voltage induced by the second focusing current between the second reference electrode and the first reference electrode; means for combining the first voltage and the second voltage wherein the resultant voltage is a corrected measurement of the voltage measurement between the sonde and the first reference electrode; and means for combining the resultant voltage with the resistivity measurement to correct the resistivity measurement.

  11. LEAF WHORL INOCULATION METHOD FOR SCREENING SUGARCANE RUST RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Sugarcane rust diseases, brown rust caused by Puccinia melanocephala, and orange rust caused by P. kuehnii, are agronomically important diseases in Florida. Cultivar resistance is the best means of controlling these diseases. Natural infection has been the primary means of asses...

  12. Scalp reconstruction by microvascular free tissue transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Furnas, H.; Lineaweaver, W.C.; Alpert, B.S. )

    1990-05-01

    We report on a series of patients with scalp defects who have been treated with a variety of free flaps, spanning the era of microvascular free tissue transfer from its incipient stages to the present. Between 1971 and 1987, 18 patients underwent scalp reconstruction with 21 free flaps: 11 latissimus dorsi, 3 scalp transfers between identical twins, 3 groin, one combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior, two serratus anterior, and one omentum. These flaps were used to cover scalp defects resulting from burns, trauma, radiation, and tumors in patients ranging from 7 to 79 years of age. Follow-up has ranged from 3 weeks to 7 years. All of our flaps survived and covered complex defects, many of which had failed more conservative attempts at cover. One patient received radiation therapy to his flap without unfavorable sequelae. This experience began with a pioneering omental flap and includes cutaneous and muscle flaps. The latissimus dorsi is our first choice for free flap reconstruction of extensive, complicated scalp wounds because of its large size, predictable blood supply, ease of harvesting, and provision of excellent vascularity to compromised beds.

  13. Microvascular pathology in late-life depression.

    PubMed

    Santos, Micaela; Xekardaki, Aikaterini; Kövari, Enikö; Gold, Gabriel; Bouras, Constantin; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2012-11-15

    Since the era of Gaupp who introduced the concept of atheroscletic depressive disorder, the concept of late-life depression has been correlated with cerebrovascular comorbidities, microvascular lesions, frontal cortical and subcortical gray and white matter hyperintensities. The predominant neuropsychological deficits concern the domains of planning, organization and abstraction, with executive dysfunction being the predominant finding. MRI studies reveal a higher prevalence of white matter lesions in elderly patients with depression. Molecular mechanisms underlying the disease still remain unclear. Hyperhomocysteinemia has been associated with depression through its toxicity to neurons and blood vessels. Endothelial dysfunction is another possible mechanism referring to the loss of vasodilatation capacity. Inflammatory phenomena, such as increased peripheral leucocytes, elevated CRP and cytokine levels, could play a role in endothelial dysfunction. In this review we will briefly combine findings from neurobiological, epidemiological, structural and post-mortem data. A more complex model in late-life depression combining different modalities could be an elucidating approach to the disease's etiopathogeny in the future. PMID:22687957

  14. Prognosis of invasive breast cancer after adjuvant therapy evaluated with VEGF microvessel density and microvascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Wei, Xi; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ultrasonographic microvascular imaging in the evaluation of prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies. A total of 121 patients with invasive breast cancer underwent ultrasonographic contrast-enhanced imaging, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) staining, and microvessel density (MVD) counts. The parameters of microvascular imaging and the expression of VEGF and MVD in primary breast cancer were calculated. The correlation between these factors and the overall and progression-free survival rate were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Among 121 cases, the positive VEGF cases were 75 and negative ones were 46. The cut point of 52.3 was calculated by the regressive curve for MVD counts. The data showed the mean intensity (MI) was positively associated with both the MVD counts (r = .51, p < .001) and VEGF expression (r = .35, p < .001). For the prognosis of patients, high VEGF expression and MVD counts were associated with reduced progressive and survival times (PFS, p = .032 and p = .034; OS, p = .041 and p = .038, respectively). The correlation between parameters of microvascular imaging, VEGF expressive status, and the MVD counts were established. The cut point of mean intensity (MI = 40) was used to investigate as an independent predictor for PFS (p = .021) and OS (p = .025), respectively, due to a strong correlation between MVD counts and VEGF expression in patients with invasive breast cancer. The microvascular imaging could be a visual and helpful tool to predict the prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies. PMID:26052072

  15. Prevalence of Microvascular Complications in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Iqbal, Farrukh; Taj, Azeem; Iqbal, Zafar; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Qasim Zafar

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objective: Microvascular complications are the major outcome of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus progression, which reduce the quality of life, incur heavy economic burdens to the health care system and increase diabetic mortality. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of microvascular complications among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and to analyze the association between these complications and poor glycemic control. Methods: This cross sectional hospital based study was carried out in Diabetic Clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore Pakistan. The study was conducted from November 2011 to November 2012 among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant information of all patients was recorded with the help of a proforma. They were investigated for retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Results: We have divided the patients into two groups: Group I with good glycemic control (HbA1c <6.5) and group II with poor glycemic control (HbA1c >6.5). In group II microvascular complications were 89.8%. Neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy were present in 68.5%, 56.2% and 31.4% respectively. These similar percentages in Group I were 50%, 0% and 31% respectively and are significantly lower. Conclusion: The study showed that even in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients who had poor glycemic control, frequency of microvascular complications is much higher as compared to those who had average glycemic control. Thus tight glycemic control does count even in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics to prevent and minimize the occurrence of complications. PMID:24353655

  16. A Micro-delivery Approach for Studying Microvascular Responses to Localized Oxygen Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ghonaim, Nour W.; Lau, Leo W. M.; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G.; Yang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    In vivo video microscopy has been used to study blood flow regulation as a function of varying oxygen concentration in microcirculatory networks. However, previous studies have measured the collective response of stimulating large areas of the microvascular network at the tissue surface. Objective We aim to limit the area being stimulated by controlling oxygen availability to highly localized regions of the microvascular bed within intact muscle. Design and Method Gas of varying O2 levels was delivered to specific locations on the surface of the Extensor Digitorum Longus muscle of rat through a set of micro-outlets (100 μm diameter) patterned in ultrathin glass using state-of-the-art microfabrication techniques. O2 levels were oscillated and digitized video sequences were processed for changes in capillary hemodynamics and erythrocyte O2 saturation. Results and Conclusions Oxygen saturations in capillaries positioned directly above the micro-outlets were closely associated with the controlled local O2 oscillations. Radial diffusion from the micro-outlet is limited to ~75 μm from the center as predicted by computational modelling and as measured in vivo. These results delineate a key step in the design of a novel micro-delivery device for controlled oxygen delivery to the microvasculature to understand fundamental mechanisms of microvascular regulation of O2 supply. PMID:21914035

  17. Microvascular Reconstruction of Free Jejunal Graft in Larynx-preserving Esophagectomy for Cervical Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Natori, Yuhei; Komoto, Masakazu; Matsumura, Takashi; Horiguchi, Masatoshi; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Tsurumaru, Masahioko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Losing the ability to speak severely affects the quality of life, and patients who have undergone laryngectomy tend to become depressed, which may lead to social withdrawal. Recently, with advancements in chemoradiotherapy and with alternative perspectives on postoperative quality of life, larynx preservation has been pursued; however, the selection of candidates and the optimal reconstructive procedure remain controversial. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed our experience with free jejunal graft for larynx-preserving cervical esophagectomy (LPCE), focusing on microvascular reconstruction. Methods: Seven patients underwent LPCE for cervical esophageal carcinoma, and defects were reconstructed by free jejunal transfer subsequently. We collected preoperative and postoperative data of the patients and assessed the importance of the procedure. Results: We mostly used the transverse cervical artery as the recipient, and a longer operative time was required, particularly for the regrowth cases. The operative field for microvascular anastomosis was more limited and deeper than those in the laryngectomy cases. Two graft necrosis cases were confirmed at postoperative day 9 or 15, and vessels contralateral from the graft were chosen as recipients in both patients. Conclusions: Microvascular reconstruction for free jejunal graft in LPCE differed in several ways from the procedure combined with laryngectomy. Compression from the tracheal cartilage to the pedicle was suspected as the reason of the necrosis clinically and pathologically. Therefore, we should select recipient vessels from the ipsilateral side of the graft, and careful and extended monitoring of the flap should be considered to make this procedure successful. PMID:27257562

  18. Air Pollution Particulate Matter Collected from an Appalachian Mountaintop Mining Site Induces Microvascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    KNUCKLES, TRAVIS L.; STAPLETON, PHOEBE A.; MINARCHICK, VALERIE C.; ESCH, LAURA; MCCAWLEY, MICHAEL; HENDRYX, MICHAEL; NURKIEWICZ, TIMOTHY R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Air pollution PM is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In Appalachia, PM from mining may represent a health burden to this sensitive population that leads the nation in cardiovascular disease, among others. Cardiovascular consequences following inhalation of PMMTM are unclear, but must be identified to establish causal effects. Methods PM was collected within 1 mile of an active MTM site in southern WV. The PM was extracted and was primarily <10μm in diameter (PM10), consisting largely of sulfur (38%) and silica (24%). Adult male rats were IT with 300 μg PMMTM. Twenty-four hours following exposure, rats were prepared for intravital microscopy, or isolated arteriole experiments. Results PMMTM exposure blunted endothelium-dependent dilation in mesenteric and coronary arterioles by 26%, and 25%, respectively, as well as endothelium-independent dilation. In vivo, PMMTM exposure inhibited endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation (60% reduction). α-adrenergic receptor blockade inhibited PVNS-induced vasoconstriction in exposed animals compared with sham. Conclusions These data suggest that PMMTM exposure impairs microvascular function in disparate microvascular beds, through alterations in NO-mediated dilation and sympathetic nerve influences. Microvascular dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular disease in regions with MTM sites. PMID:22963349

  19. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Inconsistencies in Vancomycin Susceptibility Testing Methods, Limitations and Advantages of each Method

    PubMed Central

    Himani; Madan, Molly; Pandey, Anita; Thakuria, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Background Vancomycin may be ineffective against an increasing proportion of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) well within the susceptible range. On the other hand it is common knowledge that determination of vancomycin MICs is method dependent. Therefore, given the apparent variability in vancomycin MIC results obtained with the different methods, the use of the vancomycin MIC to predict the outcome of serious S. aureus infections needs to take into account the method used and the results of studies using that particular method. Aim Comparative study was carried out to evaluate the MICs obtained by BMD method, E-test, and Vitek 2 method and to detect inconsistencies in these vancomycin for 66 MRSA isolates obtained from various samples of patients attending the OPDs & IPDs within a period of one year. Materials and Methods A comparative study was carried out to evaluate the MICs obtained by BMD method, E-test, and Vitek 2 method to detect vancomycin susceptibility in 66 clinical isolates of MRSA obtained from various samples of patients attending the OPDs & IPDs within a period of one year. The study was conducted in Department of Microbiology, Subharti Medical College, Meerut from January to December 2012. Results On determination of MICs for vancomycin for the MRSA isolates, all were identified as VSSA by BMD, E-Test & Vitek 2 methods. However, the vancomycin MIC values obtained by E-test correlated better with BMD method (correlation factor= 0.6727) than Vitek 2 (correlation factor=0.5316), indicating E-Test to be a better method for determination of vancomycin MICs as compared to Vitek 2. Conclusion MRSA isolates with higher vancomycin MICs, even within the susceptibility range, are being observed more frequently which result in treatment failures with vancomycin. Because of the discrepancy that exists in vancomycin MIC results from different methods, the prediction of outcome of serious S

  20. Multifractal and Lacunarity Analysis of Microvascular Morphology and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Daniel J.; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Poché, Ross A.; Dickinson, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Classical measures of vessel morphology including diameter and density are employed to study microvasculature in endothelial membrane labeled mice. These measurements prove sufficient for some studies; however they are less well suited for quantifying changes in microcirculatory networks lacking hierarchical structure. We demonstrate automated multifractal analysis and lacunarity may be used with classical methods to quantify microvascular morphology. Methods We present an automated extraction tool with a processing pipeline to characterize 2D representations of 3D microvasculature, using multifractal analysis and lacunarity. We apply our analysis on four tissues and the hyaloid vasculature during remodeling. Results We found that the vessel networks analyzed have multifractal geometries and that kidney microvasculature has the largest fractal dimension and the lowest lacunarity compared to microvasculature networks in the cortex, skin, and thigh muscle. Also, we found that during hyaloid remodeling, there were differences in multifractal spectra reflecting the functional transition from a space filling vasculature which nurtures the lens to a less dense vasculature as it regresses, permitting unobstructed vision. Conclusion Multifractal analysis and lacunarity are valuable additions to classical measures of vascular morphology and will have utility in future studies of normal, developing and pathological tissues. PMID:21166933

  1. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F.; Boas, David A.; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These “bottom-up” models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans.

  2. METHOD FOR REDUCING THE IMPURITY RESISTIVITY OF SODIUM

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-08-13

    The inherent resistivity of sodium, at cryogenic temperatures, can be reduced by clustering the impurity atoms within the crystal latiice structure of the sodium, thereby reducing the effective electron collision cross section and thus reducing the number of collisions between the electrons and such lattice imperfections. The clustering is effected by heating the sodium to a temperature approaching its melting point, and maintaining the temperature for a period of time ranging generally from two to six days. (AEC)

  3. Comparison of two bioassay methods for determining deltamethrin resistance in German cockroaches (Blattodea: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Choo, L E; Tang, C S; Pang, F Y; Ho, S H

    2000-06-01

    Susceptibility to deltamethrin of 10 strains of the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.), trapped in hotel kitchens in Singapore was determined. Two resistance detection bioassay methods (topical application and World Health Organization glass jar method) were compared. Resistance ratios based on 50% knockdown, obtained by comparison with the S strain, ranged from 17.7 to 4,235 for topical application and from 2.2 to 22 for the glass jar method. A field strain, with consistently low resistance ratios (topical method = 17.7, glass jar method = 2.2), was identified as a potential field strain to be used as a baseline for comparison with other field strains. Resistance ratios for the other field strains obtained by comparison with the R5 strain ranged from 24.5 to 239 for topical application and from 1.2 to 9.8 for the glass jar method. The results of our study demonstrate that deltamethrin-resistant German cockroaches are numerous in Singapore. Comparison between the two bioassay methods showed that there was significant correlation between KD50 and KT50 values. The glass jar method is similar to field situations but topical application is sensitive enough to define the magnitude of resistance. Differences between the two detection bioassays and the factors governing the choice of bioassay in monitoring resistance in German cockroaches are discussed. PMID:10902348

  4. Cell-microenvironment interactions and architectures in microvascular systems.

    PubMed

    Bersini, Simone; Yazdi, Iman K; Talò, Giuseppe; Shin, Su Ryon; Moretti, Matteo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-11-01

    In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the design and optimization of novel biomaterials and microfabrication techniques to generate vascularized tissues. Novel microfluidic systems have facilitated the development and optimization of in vitro models for exploring the complex pathophysiological phenomena that occur inside a microvascular environment. To date, most of these models have focused on engineering of increasingly complex systems, rather than analyzing the molecular and cellular mechanisms that drive microvascular network morphogenesis and remodeling. In fact, mutual interactions among endothelial cells (ECs), supporting mural cells and organ-specific cells, as well as between ECs and the extracellular matrix, are key driving forces for vascularization. This review focuses on the integration of materials science, microengineering and vascular biology for the development of in vitro microvascular systems. Various approaches currently being applied to study cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions, as well as biochemical/biophysical cues promoting vascularization and their impact on microvascular network formation, will be identified and discussed. Finally, this review will explore in vitro applications of microvascular systems, in vivo integration of transplanted vascularized tissues, and the important challenges for vascularization and controlling the microcirculatory system within the engineered tissues, especially for microfabrication approaches. It is likely that existing models and more complex models will further our understanding of the key elements of vascular network growth, stabilization and remodeling to translate basic research principles into functional, vascularized tissue constructs for regenerative medicine applications, drug screening and disease models. PMID:27417066

  5. Microvascular Coronary Dysfunction in Women- Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Kothawade, Kamlesh; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2011-01-01

    Women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. Microvascular Coronary Dysfunction (MCD) defined as limited coronary flow reserve (CFR) and/or coronary endothelial dysfunction is the predominant etiological mechanism of ischemia in women with the triad of persistent chest pain, no obstructive CAD, and ischemia evidenced by stress testing. Evidence shows that approximately 50% of these patients have physiologic evidence of MCD. MCD is associated with a 2.5% annual major adverse event rate that includes death, nonfatal MI, nonfatal stroke and congestive heart failure. Although tests such as adenosine stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) may be a useful non-invasive method to predict subendocardial ischemia, the gold standard test to diagnose MCD is an invasive Coronary Reactivity Testing (CRT). Early identification of MCD by CRT may be beneficial in prognostication and stratifying these patients for optimal medical therapy. Currently, understanding of MCD pathophysiology can be used to guide diagnosis and therapy. Continued research in MCD is needed to further advance our understanding. PMID:21723447

  6. Atrial natriuretic factor increases splenic microvascular pressure and fluid extravasation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Sultanian, Richard; Deng, Yiming; Kaufman, Susan

    2001-01-01

    The spleen is an important site of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-induced fluid extravasation into the systemic lymphatic system. The mechanism underlying this process was studied in a blood-perfused (1 ml min−1) rat spleen using the double occlusion technique. To ensure that our observations were spleen specific, a similar protocol was repeated in the hindquarters. Rat ANF(1-28), infused into the splenic artery of anaesthetized male rats, caused a dose-dependent (0.3-59 pmol min−1) increase in microvascular pressure from 11.3 ± 0.7 to 14.9 ± 0.5 mmHg and in post-capillary resistance from 7.2 ± 0.6 to 10.1 ± 1.1 mmHg ml−1. ANF elicited no change in splenic pre-capillary resistance or in hindquarter haemodynamics. Intrasplenic ANF (6.5 pmol min−1) caused a sustained increase in intrasplenic fluid efflux from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 0.3 ± 0.1 ml min−1, and in capillary filtration coefficient (Kf) from 1.2 ± 0.5 to 2.4 ± 0.6 ml mmHg−1 min−1 (100 g tissue)−1. Mechanical elevation of splenic intravascular pressure (from 11.3 ± 0.7 to 22.4 ± 0.2 mmHg) significantly increased intrasplenic fluid extravasation (from 0.4 ± 0.3 to 1.4 ± 0.3 ml min−1). The natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPRC)-specific agonist C-ANF(4-23) (12.5 and 125 pmol min−1) did not alter splenic intravascular pressure or pre-/post-capillary resistance. The ANF antagonist A71915 (8.3 and 83 pmol min−1), which blocks ANF-stimulated cGMP production via natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), inhibited the ANF-induced changes in splenic microvascular pressure and post-capillary resistance. It is concluded that ANF enhances the extravasation of isoncotic fluid from the splenic vasculature both by raising intrasplenic microvascular pressure (increased post-capillary resistance) and by increasing filtration area. The constrictive activity of ANF on the splenic vasculature is mediated through NPRA. PMID:11351034

  7. Bioengineering human microvascular networks in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2011-01-01

    The future of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies for tissue regeneration will likely rely on our ability to generate functional vascular networks in vivo. In this regard, the search for experimental models to build blood vessel networks in vivo is of utmost importance. The feasibility of bioengineering microvascular networks in vivo was first shown using human tissue-derived mature endothelial cells (ECs); however, such autologous endothelial cells present problems for wide clinical use, because they are difficult to obtain in sufficient quantities and require harvesting from existing vasculature. These limitations have instigated the search for other sources of ECs. The identification of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) in blood presented an opportunity to non-invasively obtain ECs (5-7). We and other authors have shown that adult and cord blood-derived ECFCs have the capacity to form functional vascular networks in vivo. Importantly, these studies have also shown that to obtain stable and durable vascular networks, ECFCs require co-implantation with perivascular cells. The assay we describe here illustrates this concept: we show how human cord blood-derived ECFCs can be combined with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a single cell suspension in a collagen/fibronectin/fibrinogen gel to form a functional human vascular network within 7 days after implantation into an immunodeficient mouse. The presence of human ECFC-lined lumens containing host erythrocytes can be seen throughout the implants indicating not only the formation (de novo) of a vascular network, but also the development of functional anastomoses with the host circulatory system. This murine model of bioengineered human vascular network is ideally suited for studies on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of human vascular network formation and for the development of strategies to vascularize engineered tissues. PMID:21775960

  8. Oxygen-resistant hydrogenases and methods for designing and making same

    DOEpatents

    King, Paul; Ghirardi, Maria L; Seibert, Michael

    2009-03-10

    The invention provides oxygen- resistant iron-hydrogenases ([Fe]-hydrogenases) for use in the production of H2. Methods used in the design and engineering of the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases are disclosed, as are the methods of transforming and culturing appropriate host cells with the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases. Finally, the invention provides methods for utilizing the transformed, oxygen insensitive, host cells in the bulk production of H.sub.2 in a light catalyzed reaction having water as the reactant.

  9. Oxygen-resistant hydrogenases and methods for designing and making same

    DOEpatents

    King, Paul; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Seibert, Michael

    2014-03-04

    The invention provides oxygen-resistant iron-hydrogenases ([Fe]-hydrogenases) for use in the production of H.sub.2. Methods used in the design and engineering of the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases are disclosed, as are the methods of transforming and culturing appropriate host cells with the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases. Finally, the invention provides methods for utilizing the transformed, oxygen insensitive, host cells in the bulk production of H.sub.2 in a light catalyzed reaction having water as the reactant.

  10. Mixed-Methods Resistance Training Increases Power and Strength of Young and Older Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Hakkinen, Arja; McCormick, Matt; Volek, Jeff; Kraemer, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week, mixed-methods resistance training program on young and older men. Although results confirmed some age-related reductions in muscle strength and power, the older men demonstrated similar capacity to the younger men for increases in muscle strength and power via an appropriate, periodized resistance training…

  11. The Pleiotropic Effects of Simvastatin on Retinal Microvascular Endothelium Has Important Implications for Ischaemic Retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Reinhold J.; O'Neill, Christina L.; Devine, Adrian B.; Gardiner, Tom A.; Stitt, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Current guidelines encourage the use of statins to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients; however the impact of these drugs on diabetic retinopathy is not well defined. Moreover, pleiotropic effects of statins on the highly specialised retinal microvascular endothelium remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of simvastatin on retinal endothelium in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Findings Retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) were treated with 0.01–10 µM simvastatin and a biphasic dose-related response was observed. Low concentrations enhanced microvascular repair with 0.1 µM simvastatin significantly increasing proliferation (p<0.05), and 0.01 µM simvastatin significantly promoting migration (p<0.05), sprouting (p<0.001), and tubulogenesis (p<0.001). High concentration of simvastatin (10 µM) had the opposite effect, significantly inhibiting proliferation (p<0.01), migration (p<0.01), sprouting (p<0.001), and tubulogenesis (p<0.05). Furthermore, simvastatin concentrations higher than 1 µM induced cell death. The mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy was used to investigate the possible effects of simvastatin treatment on ischaemic retinopathy. Low dose simvastatin(0.2 mg/Kg) promoted retinal microvascular repair in response to ischaemia by promoting intra-retinal re-vascularisation (p<0.01). By contrast, high dose simvastatin(20 mg/Kg) significantly prevented re-vascularisation (p<0.01) and concomitantly increased pathological neovascularisation (p<0.01). We also demonstrated that the pro-vascular repair mechanism of simvastatin involves VEGF stimulation, Akt phosphorylation, and nitric oxide production; and the anti-vascular repair mechanism is driven by marked intracellular cholesterol depletion and related disorganisation of key intracellular structures. Conclusions A beneficial effect of low-dose simvastatin on ischaemic

  12. Regional cutaneous microvascular flow responses during gravitational and LBNP stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Gregory A.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Ballard, Richard E.; Murthy, Gita; Hargens, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the regional variability of local hydrostatic pressures, microvascular flow responses to gravitational stress probably vary along the length of the body. Although these differences in local autoregulation have been observed previously during whole-body tilting, they have not been investigated during application of artificial gravitational stresses, such as lower body negative pressure or high gravity centrifugation. Although these stresses can create equivalent G-levels at the feet, they result in distinct distributions of vascular transmural pressure along the length of the body, and should consequently elicit different magnitudes and distributions of microvascular response. In the present study, the effects of whole-body tilting and lower body negative pressure on the level and distribution of microvascular flows within skin along the length of the body were compared.

  13. Microvascular remodelling in chronic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Thurston, G; Maas, K; Labarbara, A; Mclean, J W; McDonald, D M

    2000-10-01

    1. Chronic inflammation is associated with blood vessel remodelling, including vessel proliferation and enlargement, and changes in vessel phenotype. We sought to characterize these changes in chronic airway inflammation and to determine whether corticosteroids that inhibit inflammation, such as dexamethasone, can also reduce microvascular remodelling. 2. Chronic airway inflammation was induced in C3H mice by infection with Mycoplasmapulmonis and the tracheal vessels treatment also decreased the immunoreactivity for P-selectin and the number of adherent leucocytes (595 +/- 203 vs 2,024 +/- 393 cells/ mm2 in treated and non-treated infected mice, respectively). 6. We conclude that microvascular enlargement and changes in vessel phenotype are features of some types of chronic inflammation and, furthermore, that dexamethasone reverses the microvascular enlargement, changes in vessel phenotype and leucocyte influx associated with chronic inflammatory airway disease. PMID:11022979

  14. Vascular grafts in microvascular surgery. An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Marrangoni, A.G.; Marcelli, G.; Culig, M.; Simone, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    The patency of microvascular grafts depends on the luminal diameter, which is determined by the amount of fibrin and platelets deposited on the intraluminal surface and the anastomotic site, and the extent of pseudointimal formation. An experimental microvascular model in rats has been developed in our laboratory using Indium-111-labeled platelets to measure the amount of deposition on grafts inserted into the infrarenal aorta. This study was designed to assess the patency rates in these grafts and the pathologic maturation as determined by light and electron microscopy. Our study suggests that substantial patency rates can be achieved in aspirin-treated rats, although there was little influence on the pathologic maturation. Indium-111 oxine-labeled platelets can be used to document platelet aggregation, and the technique can be a valuable adjunct in the study of microvascular grafts.

  15. Comparison of diltiazem and verapamil on rat microvascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Taherzadeh, M; Warren, J B

    1997-11-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are among the most widely prescribed cardiovascular drugs. Their benefit is limited by the side effect of edema, the microvascular mechanism of which is not known. We compared the local effect on edema formation in rat skin and skeletal muscle of two calcium channel antagonists, diltiazem and verapamil, and determined if the edema effect correlated with changes in microvascular flow. An increase in microvascular flow can potentiate edema formation by increasing microvascular hydrostatic pressure and the proportion of the bed that is perfused. Diltiazem, but not verapamil or control, injected s.c. in scrotal skin caused plasma albumin leakage visualized as local bluing of tissue in rats that had been pretreated with Evans blue dye systemically. Topographic studies using Monastral blue dye showed that in the underlying cremaster muscle, diltiazem increased leakage of dye particles not from capillaries but from postcapillary venules. The postcapillary venule is associated with inflammatory edema, suggesting a direct effect of diltiazem on endothelial permeability. The local injection of diltiazem also increased significantly (P < 0.05) plasma leakage quantified as the local accumulation of systemically injected 125I-radiolabeled albumin, from 14.5 +/- 2.0 and 6.9 +/- 1.0 microliters in control sites to 30.0 +/- 7.3 and 18.0 +/- 2.5 microliters in dorsal skin and abdominal rat skin, respectively. In contrast, verapamil at similar doses did not increase plasma albumin leakage significantly. At the doses that caused local skin edema, diltiazem had less effect on microvascular skin blood flow, measured by a laser Doppler flow probe, (12.6 +/- 5.3% at 15 min and 2.8 +/- 8.4% change at 30 min) than verapamil (39.0 +/- 7.3% at 15 min 30.0 +/- 6.7% change at 30 min, P < 0.01). The microvascular effects of these two calcium channel antagonists differ in that diltiazem had a significant effect on microvascular permeability whereas verapamil had a

  16. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: Cultural methods and gaps in knowledge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varying cultural methodologies are used in assessment of antibiotic resistance in environmental samples. Culture based methods commonly involve isolation of target bacteria on general or selective media, and assessing growth in response to specific concentrations of antibiotics. Though time consumin...

  17. Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    2001-06-05

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  18. Abrasion Resistant Coating and Method of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    1999-06-25

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  19. Does Pre-Treatment with High Dose Atorvastatin Prevent Microvascular Dysfunction after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong-Ki; Nam, Chang-Wook; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Chung, Woo-Young; Cho, Byung-Ryul; Fearon, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is controversy surrounding whether or not high dose statin administration before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) decreases peri-procedural microvascular injury. We performed a prospective randomized study to investigate the mechanisms and effects of pre-treatment high dose atorvastatin on myocardial damage in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) undergoing PCI. Subjects and Methods Seventy seven patients with NSTE-ACS were randomly assigned to either the high dose group (atorvastatin 80 mg loading 12 to 24 h before PCI with a further 40 mg loading 2 h before PCI, n=39) or low dose group (atorvastatin 10 mg administration 12 to 24 h before PCI, n=38). Index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was measured after stent implantation. Creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before and after PCI. Results The baseline characteristics were not different between the two patient groups. Compared to the low dose group, the high dose group had lower post PCI IMR (14.1±5.0 vs. 19.2±9.3 U, p=0.003). Post PCI CK-MB was also lower in the high dose group (median: 1.40 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR: 0.75 to 3.45] vs. 4.00 [IQR: 1.70 to 7.37], p=0.002) as was the post-PCI CRP level (0.09 mg/dL [IQR: 0.04 to 0.16] vs. 0.22 [IQR: 0.08 to 0.60], p=0.001). Conclusion Pre-treatment with high dose atorvastatin reduces peri-PCI microvascular dysfunction verified by post-PCI IMR and exerts an immediate anti-inflammatory effect in patients with NSTE-ACS. PMID:27482255

  20. Comparison of Several Methods for Determining the Internal Resistance of Lithium Ion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Hans-Georg; Obeidi, Ossama; Komesker, Oliver; Raschke, André; Schiemann, Michael; Zehner, Christian; Gehnen, Markus; Keller, Michael; Birke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The internal resistance is the key parameter for determining power, energy efficiency and lost heat of a lithium ion cell. Precise knowledge of this value is vital for designing battery systems for automotive applications. Internal resistance of a cell was determined by current step methods, AC (alternating current) methods, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and thermal loss methods. The outcomes of these measurements have been compared with each other. If charge or discharge of the cell is limited, current step methods provide the same results as energy loss methods. PMID:22219678

  1. Simple method to demonstrate radiation-inducible radiation resistance in microbial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, S.T.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    A simple method for detection of radiation-inducible radiation resistance was developed by irradiating aliquots (0.01 ml) of cell suspension on agar plates. Part of each experimental plate was subjected to an induction treatment, and subsequent radiation resistance was compared with that of untreated cells on the same plate. The UV radiation resistance of a Micrococcus sp. was increased approximately 1.6 times by an induction treatment. This simple procedure of irradiating cells in a fixed position on agar avoided washing, centrifugation, and cell enumeration required in traditional methods.

  2. Microvascular destruction identifies murine allografts that cannot be rescued from airway fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ashok N.; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Thurman, Joshua M.; Miller, Edmund J.; Henson, Peter M.; Zamora, Martin R.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Small airway fibrosis (bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome) is the primary obstacle to long-term survival following lung transplantation. Here, we show the importance of functional microvasculature in the prevention of epithelial loss and fibrosis due to rejection and for the first time, relate allograft microvascular injury and loss of tissue perfusion to immunotherapy-resistant rejection. To explore the role of alloimmune rejection and airway ischemia in the development of fibroproliferation, we used a murine orthotopic tracheal transplant model. We determined that transplants were reperfused by connection of recipient vessels to donor vessels at the surgical anastomosis site. Microcirculation through the newly formed vascular anastomoses appeared partially dependent on VEGFR2 and CXCR2 pathways. In the absence of immunosuppression, the microvasculature in rejecting allografts exhibited vascular complement deposition, diminished endothelial CD31 expression, and absent perfusion prior to the onset of fibroproliferation. Rejecting grafts with extensive endothelial cell injury were refractory to immunotherapy. After early microvascular loss, neovascularization was eventually observed in the membranous trachea, indicating a reestablishment of graft perfusion in established fibrosis. One implication of this study is that bronchial artery revascularization at the time of lung transplantation may decrease the risk of subsequent airway fibrosis. PMID:18060031

  3. Scoring Methods for Building Genotypic Scores: An Application to Didanosine Resistance in a Large Derivation Set

    PubMed Central

    Houssaini, Allal; Assoumou, Lambert; Miller, Veronica; Calvez, Vincent; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Flandre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Several attempts have been made to determine HIV-1 resistance from genotype resistance testing. We compare scoring methods for building weighted genotyping scores and commonly used systems to determine whether the virus of a HIV-infected patient is resistant. Methods and Principal Findings Three statistical methods (linear discriminant analysis, support vector machine and logistic regression) are used to determine the weight of mutations involved in HIV resistance. We compared these weighted scores with known interpretation systems (ANRS, REGA and Stanford HIV-db) to classify patients as resistant or not. Our methodology is illustrated on the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research didanosine database (N = 1453). The database was divided into four samples according to the country of enrolment (France, USA/Canada, Italy and Spain/UK/Switzerland). The total sample and the four country-based samples allow external validation (one sample is used to estimate a score and the other samples are used to validate it). We used the observed precision to compare the performance of newly derived scores with other interpretation systems. Our results show that newly derived scores performed better than or similar to existing interpretation systems, even with external validation sets. No difference was found between the three methods investigated. Our analysis identified four new mutations associated with didanosine resistance: D123S, Q207K, H208Y and K223Q. Conclusions We explored the potential of three statistical methods to construct weighted scores for didanosine resistance. Our proposed scores performed at least as well as already existing interpretation systems and previously unrecognized didanosine-resistance associated mutations were identified. This approach could be used for building scores of genotypic resistance to other antiretroviral drugs. PMID:23555613

  4. Methods for Specific Electrode Resistance Measurement during Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Niranjan; Rahman, Asif; Sarantos, Chris; Truong, Dennis Q.; Bikson, Marom

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is investigated to treat a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, for rehabilitation, and for enhancing cognitive performance. The monitoring of electrode resistance before and during tDCS is considered important for tolerability and safety, where an unusually high resistance is indicative of undesired electrode or poor skin contact conditions. Conventional resistance measurement methods do not isolate individual electrode resistance but rather measures overall voltage. Moreover, for HD-tDCS devices, cross talk across electrodes makes concurrent resistance monitoring unreliable. Objective We propose a novel method for monitoring of the individual electrode resistance during tDCS, using a super-position of direct current with a test-signal (low-intensity and low-frequency sinusoids with electrode– specific frequencies) and a single sentinel electrode (not used for DC). Methods To validate this methodology, we developed lumped-parameter models of two and multi-electrode tDCS. Approaches with and without a sentinel electrode were solved and underlying assumptions identified. Assumptions were tested and parameterized in healthy participants using forearm stimulation combining tDCS (2 mA) and sinusoidal test-signals (38 μA and 76 μA peak to peak at 1 Hz, 10 Hz, and 100 Hz) and an in vitro test (where varied electrode failure modes were created). DC and AC component voltages across the electrodes were compared and participants were asked to rate subjective pain. Results A sentinel electrode is required to isolate electrode resistance in a two-electrode tDCS system. For multi-electrode resistance tracking, cross talk was aggravated with electrode proximity and current/resistance mismatches, but could be corrected using proposed approaches. Average voltage and average pain scores were not significantly different across test current intensities and frequencies (two-way repeated measures ANOVA) indicating the

  5. Determining the base resistance of InP HBTs: An evaluation of methods and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardmann, Tobias; Krause, Julia; Pawlak, Andreas; Schroter, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Many different methods can be found in the literature for determining both the internal and external base series resistance based on single transistor terminal characteristics. Those methods are not equally reliable or applicable for all technologies, device sizes and speeds. In this review, the most common methods are evaluated regarding their suitability for InP heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) based on both measured and simulated data. Using data generated by a sophisticated physics-based compact model allows an evaluation of the extraction method precision by comparing the extracted parameter value to its known value. Based on these simulations, this study provides insight into the limitations of the applied methods, causes for errors and possible error mitigation. In addition to extraction methods based on just transistor terminal characteristics, test structures for separately determining the components of the base resistance from sheet and specific contact resistances are discussed and applied to serve as reference for the experimental evaluation.

  6. Monolithic multigrid methods for two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adler, James H.; Benson, Thomas R.; Cyr, Eric C.; MacLachlan, Scott P.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.

    2016-01-06

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) representations are used to model a wide range of plasma physics applications and are characterized by a nonlinear system of partial differential equations that strongly couples a charged fluid with the evolution of electromagnetic fields. The resulting linear systems that arise from discretization and linearization of the nonlinear problem are generally difficult to solve. In this paper, we investigate multigrid preconditioners for this system. We consider two well-known multigrid relaxation methods for incompressible fluid dynamics: Braess--Sarazin relaxation and Vanka relaxation. We first extend these to the context of steady-state one-fluid viscoresistive MHD. Then we compare the two relaxationmore » procedures within a multigrid-preconditioned GMRES method employed within Newton's method. To isolate the effects of the different relaxation methods, we use structured grids, inf-sup stable finite elements, and geometric interpolation. Furthermore, we present convergence and timing results for a two-dimensional, steady-state test problem.« less

  7. Simple Molecular Methods for Early Detection of Chloroquine Drug Resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raksha; Urhehar, Anant Dattatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malaria is a human disease of which causes high morbidity and mortality. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the resistance to antimalarial drugs, especially chloroquine (CQ) is one of the paramount factors contributing to the global increase in morbidity and mortality, due to malaria. Hence, there is a need for detection of chloroquine drug resistance genes i.e., pfcrt-o (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pfmdr-1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1) of P. falciparum and pvcrt-o (Plasmodium vivax chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pvmdr-1 (Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance-1) of P. vivax by using molecular methods to prevent mortality in malarial cases. Aim To standardize chloroquine drug sensitivity testing by molecular method so as to provide reports of chloroquine within 6-8 hours to physicians for better treatment. Materials and Methods This study was conducted over a period of one year from January to December 2014. A Total of 300 blood samples were collected from malaria suspected patient attending MGM Hospital, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, India. Out of 300 blood samples, 44 were malaria positive as assessed by Thick and Thin blood smear stained, by Leishman’s method and examination with light microscope. Chloroquine drug sensitivity testing was performed using WHO III plate method (micro test). Nested PCR was done for detection of pfcrt-o and pfmdr-1 for P. falciparum and pvcrt-o, pvmdr-1 genes for P. vivax. Results Total 44 samples were included in this study, out of which 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum and 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium vivax. Out of 22 P. falciparum 15 (68.18%) samples were chloroquine resistant. P. vivax showed chloroquine resistance to 5 samples (22.73%) by method similar to WHO III plate method (micro test) and nested PCR. Conclusion Drug resistance testing by molecular methods is useful for early detection of antimalarial drug resistance. pfmdr-1 along with

  8. Targeting brain microvascular endothelial cells: a therapeutic approach to neuroprotection against stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qi-jin; Tao, Hong; Wang, Xin; Li, Ming-chang

    2015-01-01

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells form the interface between nervous tissue and circulating blood, and regulate central nervous system homeostasis. Brain microvascular endothelial cells differ from peripheral endothelial cells with regards expression of specific ion transporters and receptors, and contain fewer fenestrations and pinocytotic vesicles. Brain microvascular endothelial cells also synthesize several factors that influence blood vessel function. This review describes the morphological characteristics and functions of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and summarizes current knowledge regarding changes in brain microvascular endothelial cells during stroke progression and therapies. Future studies should focus on identifying mechanisms underlying such changes and developing possible neuroprotective therapeutic interventions. PMID:26807131

  9. Xenobiotic Particle Exposure and Microvascular Endpoints: A Call to Arms

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; McCawley, Michael; Knuckles, Travis L.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenobiotic particles can be considered in two genres: air pollution particulate matter and engineered nanoparticles. Particle exposures can occur in the greater environment, the workplace, and our homes. The majority of research in this field has, justifiably, focused on pulmonary reactions and outcomes. More recent investigations indicate that cardiovascular effects are capable of correlating with established mortality and morbidity epidemiological data following particle exposures. While the preliminary and general cardiovascular toxicology has been defined, the mechanisms behind these effects, specifically within the microcirculation, are largely unexplored. Therefore, the purpose of this review is several fold: first, a historical background on toxicological aspects of particle research is presented. Second, essential definitions, terminology, and techniques that may be unfamiliar to the microvascular scientist will be discussed. Third, the most current concepts and hypotheses driving cardiovascular research in this field will be reviewed. Lastly, potential future directions for the microvascular scientist will be suggested. Collectively speaking, microvascular research in the particle exposure field represents far more than a “niche”. The immediate demand for basic, translational, and clinical studies is high and diverse. Microvascular scientists at all career stages are strongly encouraged to expand their research interests to include investigations associated with particle exposures. PMID:21951337

  10. Thermal provocation to evaluate microvascular reactivity in human skin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With increased interest in predictive medicine, development of a relatively noninvasive technique that can improve prediction of major clinical outcomes has gained considerable attention. Current tests that are the target of critical evaluation, such as flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery and pulse-wave velocity, are specific to the larger conduit vessels. However, evidence is mounting that functional changes in the microcirculation may be an early sign of globalized microvascular dysfunction. Thus development of a test of microvascular reactivity that could be used to evaluate cardiovascular risk or response to treatment is an exciting area of innovation. This mini-review is focused on tests of microvascular reactivity to thermal stimuli in the cutaneous circulation. The skin may prove to be an ideal site for evaluation of microvascular dysfunction due to its ease of access and growing evidence that changes in skin vascular reactivity may precede overt clinical signs of disease. Evaluation of the skin blood flow response to locally applied heat has already demonstrated prognostic utility, and the response to local cooling holds promise in patients in whom cutaneous disorders are present. Whether either of these tests can be used to predict cardiovascular morbidity or mortality in a clinical setting requires further evaluation. PMID:20507974

  11. Evidence of microvascular dysfunction in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Thomas, Jeffrey; Seigler, Nichole; Crandall, Reva; McKie, Kathleen T; Forseen, Caralee; Harris, Ryan A

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic, multisystemic disorder with broad clinical manifestations apart from the well-characterized pulmonary dysfunction. Recent findings have described impairment in conduit vessel function in patients with CF; however, whether microvascular function is affected in this population has yet to be elucidated. Using laser-Doppler imaging, we evaluated microvascular function through postocclusive reactive hyperemia (PORH), local thermal hyperemia (LTH), and iontophoresis with acetylcholine (ACh). PORH [518 ± 174% (CF) and 801 ± 125% (control), P = 0.039], LTH [1,338 ± 436% (CF) and 1,574 ± 620% (control), P = 0.045], and iontophoresis with ACh [416 ± 140% (CF) and 617 ± 143% (control), P = 0.032] were significantly lower in patients with CF than control subjects. In addition, the ratio of PORH to LTH was significantly (P = 0.043) lower in patients with CF (55.3 ± 5.1%) than control subjects (68.8 ± 3.1%). Significant positive correlations between LTH and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%predicted) (r = 0.441, P = 0.013) and between the PORH-to-LTH ratio and exercise capacity (r = 0.350, P = 0.049) were observed. These data provide evidence of microvascular dysfunction in patients with CF compared with control subjects. In addition, our data demonstrate a complex relationship between microvascular function and classical markers of disease severity (i.e., pulmonary function and exercise capacity) in CF. PMID:27084387

  12. Energy requirements for methods improving gas detection by modulating physical properties of resistive gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawka, M.; Kotarski, M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important disadvantage of resistive gas sensors is their limited gas selectivity. Therefore, various methods modulating their physical properties are used to improve gas detection. These methods are usually limited to temperature modulation or UV light irradiation for the layers exhibiting photocatalytic effect. These methods cause increased energy consumption. In our study we consider how much energy has to be supplied to utilize such methods and what kind of additional information can be gathered. We present experimental results of selected resistive gas sensors, including commercial and prototype constructions, and practical solutions of modulating their physical properties.

  13. Explosion resistant insulator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Jeffry R.; Billings, Jr., John S.; Spindle, Harvey E.; Hofmann, Charles F.

    1983-01-01

    An electrical insulator assembly and method of manufacturing same, having a generally cylindrical or conical body portion formed of a breakable cast solid insulation system and a reinforcing member having a corrugated configuration and formed of a web or mesh type reinforcing fabric. When the breakable body member has been broken, the corrugated configured reinforcing web member provides a path of escape for pressurized insulating fluid while limiting the movement of body member fragments in the direction of escape of the pressurized fluid.

  14. Numerical simulation of red blood cell distributions in three-dimensional microvascular bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Hyakutake, Toru; Nagai, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    We constructed three-dimensional microvascular bifurcation models using a parent vessel of diameter 10μm and investigated the flow behavior of the red blood cells (RBCs) through bifurcations. We considered symmetric and asymmetric model types. Two cases of equal daughter vessel diameter were employed for the asymmetric models, where the first was 10μm, which is the same as the parent vessel and the second was 7.94μm, which satisfies Murray's law. Simulated blood flow was computed using the lattice Boltzmann method in conjunction with the immersed boundary method for incorporating fluid-membrane interactions between the flow field and deformable RBCs. First, we investigated the flow behavior of a single RBC through microvascular bifurcations. In the case of the symmetric bifurcation, the turning point of the fractional plasma flow wherein the RBC flow changed from one daughter vessel to the other was 0.50. This turning point was however different for asymmetric bifurcations. Additionally, we varied the initial offset of RBCs from the centerline of the parent vessel. The simulation results indicated that the RBCs preferentially flow through the branch of a larger flow ratio. Next, we investigated the distribution characteristics of multiple RBCs. Simulations indicated that the results of the symmetric model were similar to those predicted by a previously published empirical model. On the other hand, results of asymmetric models deviated from those of the symmetric and empirical models. These results suggest that the distribution of RBCs varies according to the bifurcation angle and daughter vessel diameter in a microvascular bifurcation of the size considered. PMID:25446286

  15. A simple method for the determination of resistance to gas diffusion in plant organs.

    PubMed

    Cameron, A C; Yang, S F

    1982-07-01

    A simple method was developed for the determination of resistance coefficients for ethylene diffusion in plant tissues based on the kinetic analysis of the efflux of preloaded ethane gas. Efflux curves were analyzed to obtain first-order rate constants and resistance coefficients. Resistance coefficients determined by the ethane efflux and steady-state methods were found to agree well. Employing the ethane efflux method, it was shown that over 97% of gas exchange of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill., cv. ;Ace') fruits occurs through the stem scar. The resistances to diffusion of tomato skin and stem scar were found to be 280,000 and 300 seconds per centimeter, respectively; the combined resistance of intact tomato fruits was approximately 7,800 seconds per centimeter. The ethane efflux method was employed to show that plastic shrink-wrapping of English cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L. var anglicus Bailey) increased the resistance to ethane diffusion from 1.1 x 10(3) to 23 x 10(3) seconds per centimeter. PMID:16662447

  16. Sublingual microvascular perfusion is altered during normobaric and hyperbaric hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Dan M J; Helmers, Renée; Hackmann, Sanne; Belterman, Charly N W; van Hulst, Robert A; de Lange, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Hyperoxia and hyperbaric oxygen therapy can restore oxygen tensions in tissues distressed by ischemic injury and poor vascularization and is believed to also yield angiogenesis and regulate tissue perfusion. The aim of this study was to develop a model in which hyperoxia-driven microvascular changes could be quantified and to test the hypothesis that microcirculatory responses to both normobaric (NB) and hyperbaric (HB) hyperoxic maneuvers are reversible. Sublingual mucosa microcirculation vessel density, proportion of perfused vessels, vessel diameters, microvascular flow index, macrohemodynamic, and blood gas parameters were examined in male rabbits breathing sequential O2/air mixtures of 21%, 55%, 100%, and return to 21% during NB (1.0bar) and HB (2.5bar) conditions. The results indicate that NB hyperoxia (55% and 100%) produced significant decreases in microvascular density and vascular diameters (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively) accompanied by significant increases in systolic and mean arterial blood pressure (p<0.05, respectively) with no changes in blood flow indices when compared to NB normoxia. HB normoxia/hyperoxia resulted in significant decreases in microvascular density (p<0.05), a transient rise in systolic blood pressure at 55% (p<0.01), and no changes in blood vessel diameter and blood flow indices when compared to NB hyperoxia. All microcirculation parameters reverted back to normal values upon return to NB normoxia. We conclude that NB/HB hyperoxia-driven changes elicit reversible physiological control of sublingual mucosa blood perfusion in the presence of steady cardiovascular function and that the absence of microvascular vasoconstriction during HB conditions suggests a beneficial mechanism associated with maintaining peak tissue perfusion states. PMID:26851620

  17. Endothelial Dysfunction and Microvascular Complications in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seon Mi; Yang, Sei Won; Bae, Eun Jung; Shin, Choong Ho; Chung, Hae Rim; Kim, You Yeh; Yun, Yong Soo

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether alterations in vascular endothelial function and early structural changes in atherosclerosis are associated with microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement were performed in 70 young adults (aged 19 to 35 yr), 48 with type 1 DM, and 22 normal controls. Patients with diabetes had a lower peak FMD response (7.8±3.9 vs. 11.1±1.9%, p<0.001) and increased IMT (0.51±0.10 vs. 0.42±0.07 mm, p<0.001) compared with controls. Twenty (41.7%) of the patients had microvascular complications including neuropathy, nephropathy, or retinopathy. In these complicated diabetic patients, we found a lower FMD response (6.1±2.5 vs. 9.9±3.5%, p=0.001) compared with diabetics without microvascular complications. The presence of microvascular complications was also associated with older age and longer duration of the disease. However, no differences were observed in IMT, body size, blood pressure, HbA1c, C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels between complicated and non-complicated patients. Endothelial dysfunction and early structural atherosclerotic changes are common manifestations in type 1 DM, and endothelial dysfunction is thought to be an early event in the atherosclerotic process and important in the pathogenesis of microvascular complications. PMID:18303203

  18. Choroid Sprouting Assay: An Ex Vivo Model of Microvascular Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhuo; Friedlander, Mollie; Hurst, Christian G.; Cui, Zhenghao; Pei, Dorothy T.; Evans, Lucy P.; Juan, Aimee M.; Tahir, Houda; Duhamel, François; Chen, Jing; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Chemtob, Sylvain; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis of the microvasculature is central to the etiology of many diseases including proliferative retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and cancer. A mouse model of microvascular angiogenesis would be very valuable and enable access to a wide range of genetically manipulated tissues that closely approximate small blood vessel growth in vivo. Vascular endothelial cells cultured in vitro are widely used, however, isolating pure vascular murine endothelial cells is technically challenging. A microvascular mouse explant model that is robust, quantitative and can be reproduced without difficulty would overcome these limitations. Here we characterized and optimized for reproducibility an organotypic microvascular angiogenesis mouse and rat model from the choroid, a microvascular bed in the posterior of eye. The choroidal tissues from C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEvTac mice and Sprague Dawley rats were isolated and incubated in Matrigel. Vascular sprouting was comparable between choroid samples obtained from different animals of the same genetic background. The sprouting area, normalized to controls, was highly reproducible between independent experiments. We developed a semi-automated macro in ImageJ software to allow for more efficient quantification of sprouting area. Isolated choroid explants responded to manipulation of the external environment while maintaining the local interactions of endothelial cells with neighboring cells, including pericytes and macrophages as evidenced by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. This reproducible ex vivo angiogenesis assay can be used to evaluate angiogenic potential of pharmacologic compounds on microvessels and can take advantage of genetically manipulated mouse tissue for microvascular disease research. PMID:23922736

  19. Helicobacter pylori resistance to antibiotics in 2014 in France detected by phenotypic and genotypic methods.

    PubMed

    Ducournau, A; Bénéjat, L; Sifré, E; Bessède, E; Lehours, P; Mégraud, F

    2016-08-01

    A large survey of antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori was performed in France in 2014: 984 patients were enrolled by 75 gastroenterologists all over the country. Among the 783 patients who had never received eradication treatment before, 266 (33.9%) were H. pylori positive. The strains showed a high rate of clarithromycin resistance (22.2%), moderate rate of resistance to levofloxacin (15.4%) and high rate of resistance to metronidazole (45.9%). In all, 187 patients had received previous treatment, of which 115 were H. pylori positive with very high resistance to clarithromycin (73.9%) and metronidazole (78.3%). None of the patients receiving PYLERA (Bismuth salt-Tetracycline HCl-Metronidazole) proton-pump inhibitor developed resistance to tetracycline. A real-time PCR applied to gastric biopsy specimens detected all the cases that were positive by culture as well as 30 additional cases. A good correlation was found between the clarithromycin resistance detected by phenotypic methods and the associated mutations for clarithromycin resistance, which has continued to increase in the last decade but at a lower rate than previously observed. PMID:27345177

  20. Method for contact resistivity measurements on photovoltaic cells and cell adapted for such measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method is disclosed for scribing at least three grid contacts of a photovoltaic cell to electrically isolate them from the grid contact pattern used to collect solar current generated by the cell, and using the scribed segments for determining parameters of the cell by a combination of contact end resistance (CER) measurements using a minimum of three equally or unequally spaced lines, and transmission line modal (TLM) measurements using a minimum of four unequally spaced lines. TLM measurements may be used to determine sheet resistance under the contact, R.sub.sk, while CER measurements are used to determine contact resistivity, .rho..sub.c, from a nomograph of contact resistivity as a function of contact end resistance and sheet resistivity under the contact. In some cases, such as the case of silicon photovoltaic cells, sheet resistivity under the contact may be assumed to be equal to the known sheet resistance, R.sub.s, of the semiconductor material, thereby obviating the need for TLM measurements to determine R.sub.sk.

  1. Obesity Is Associated with Lower Coronary Microvascular Density

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Duncan J.; Somaratne, Jithendra B.; Prior, David L.; Yii, Michael; Kenny, James F.; Newcomb, Andrew E.; Kelly, Darren J.; Black, Mary Jane

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with diastolic dysfunction, lower maximal myocardial blood flow, impaired myocardial metabolism and increased risk of heart failure. We examined the association between obesity, left ventricular filling pressure and myocardial structure. Methods We performed histological analysis of non-ischemic myocardium from 57 patients (46 men and 11 women) undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery who did not have previous cardiac surgery, myocardial infarction, heart failure, atrial fibrillation or loop diuretic therapy. Results Non-obese (body mass index, BMI, ≤30 kg/m2, n=33) and obese patients (BMI >30 kg/m2, n=24) did not differ with respect to myocardial total, interstitial or perivascular fibrosis, arteriolar dimensions, or cardiomyocyte width. Obese patients had lower capillary length density (1145±239, mean±SD, vs. 1371±333 mm/mm3, P=0.007) and higher diffusion radius (16.9±1.5 vs. 15.6±2.0 μm, P=0.012), in comparison with non-obese patients. However, the diffusion radius/cardiomyocyte width ratio of obese patients (0.73±0.11 μm/μm) was not significantly different from that of non-obese patients (0.71±0.11 μm/μm), suggesting that differences in cardiomyocyte width explained in part the differences in capillary length density and diffusion radius between non-obese and obese patients. Increased BMI was associated with increased pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP, P<0.0001), and lower capillary length density was associated with both increased BMI (P=0.043) and increased PCWP (P=0.016). Conclusions Obesity and its accompanying increase in left ventricular filling pressure were associated with lower coronary microvascular density, which may contribute to the lower maximal myocardial blood flow, impaired myocardial metabolism, diastolic dysfunction and higher risk of heart failure in obese individuals. PMID:24312359

  2. Microvascular circulation of the ascending colon in horses.

    PubMed

    Snyder, J R; Tyler, W S; Pascoe, J R; Olander, H J; Bleifer, D R; Hinds, D M; Neves, J W

    1989-12-01

    Microvascular circulation of the ascending colon in healthy horses was studied using microangiography, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The pelvic flexure with 30 cm of ventral and dorsal colon attached was removed from 14 adult horses immediately after horses were euthanatized. The lumen was flushed with warm water, and this section of the ascending colon was placed in a 37-C bath of isotonic NaCl. In sections from 8 horses, colic vessels were perfused with a radio-opaque medium for microangiography. After angiographic evaluation, tissue sections were prepared for light microscopic observation, using standard histologic methods. In sections from 6 horses, injection replicas were made by perfusing the vessels with 2 types of plastics. The results of microangiography, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy of vascular replicas were correlated, providing a comprehensive documentation of the microvasculature of the ascending colon at the pelvic flexure. Arteries branched from mesenteric colic vessels approximately every 2 cm toward the colonic tissue. Immediately after branching, arterial vessels formed an anastomotic plexus, the colonic rete. However, each branch from the colic vessel eventually continued into the colonic tissue. A second set of vessels originated from the colonic tissue. A second set of vessels originated from the colonic rete and supplied the mesenteric lymph nodes. Arterial vessels penetrated the tunica muscularis into the submucosa 3 to 4 cm toward the antimesenteric border forming a submucosal vascular network. From the submucosal arterioles, branching took place at right angles to supply the mucosal capillaries. Capillaries surrounded the colonic glands and anastomosed at the luminal surface, forming a superficial luminal honeycomb-appearing vascular plexus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2610433

  3. [Molecular genetic and bacteriological methods for the diagnosis of multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Agaev, F F; Aliev, K A; Salimova, N A; Abuzarov, R M; Gasymov, I A; Griadunov, D A

    2009-01-01

    For the early diagnosis of multidrug resistant tuberculosis, 67 sputum samples obtained from primary patients with different clinical forms of pulmonary tuberculosis were examined by the molecular genetic test using the TB-Biochip test system. Having a high sensitivity and specificity, the molecular genetic test for determining the drug sensitivity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis substantially accelerates its diagnosis (2-3 days) before the real-time mode of a patient's admission to the clinic. The method allows identification of mutations in the rpoB (resistance to R), katG, inhG, and ahpC (resistance to H) genes, which permits timely correction of performed specific treatment. PMID:19886013

  4. Hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ostenak, C.A.; Mackay, H.A.

    1985-07-18

    A hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication are disclosed. The composite window comprises a window having first and second sides. The first side is oriented towards an environment containing hydrofluoric acid. An adhesive is applied to the first side. A layer of transparent hydrofluoric acid-resistant material, such as Mylar, is applied to the adhesive and completely covers the first side. The adhesive is then cured.

  5. Hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ostenak, Carl A.; Mackay, Harold A.

    1987-01-01

    A hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication are disclosed. The composite window comprises a window having first and second sides. The first side is oriented towards an environment containing hydrofluoric acid. An adhesive is applied to the first side. A layer of transparent hydrofluoric acid-resistant material, such as Mylar, is applied to the adhesive and completely covers the first side. The adhesive is then cured.

  6. Comparison of methods for acid quantification: impact of resist components on acid-generating efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, James F.; Fradkin, Leslie; Moore, Kathryn; Pohlers, Gerd

    2000-06-01

    Chemically amplified deep UV (CA-DUV) positive resists are the enabling materials for manufacture of devices at and below 0.18 micrometer design rules in the semiconductor industry. CA-DUV resists are typically based on a combination of an acid labile polymer and a photoacid generator (PAG). Upon UV exposure, a catalytic amount of a strong Bronsted acid is released and is subsequently used in a post-exposure bake step to deprotect the acid labile polymer. Deprotection transforms the acid labile polymer into a base soluble polymer and ultimately enables positive tone image development in dilute aqueous base. As CA-DUV resist systems continue to mature and are used in increasingly demanding situations, it is critical to develop a fundamental understanding of how robust these materials are. One of the most important factors to quantify is how much acid is photogenerated in these systems at key exposure doses. For the purpose of quantifying photoacid generation several methods have been devised. These include spectrophotometric methods, ion conductivity methods and most recently an acid-base type titration similar to the standard addition method. This paper compares many of these techniques. First, comparisons between the most commonly used acid sensitive dye, tetrabromophenol blue sodium salt (TBPB) and a less common acid sensitive dye, Rhodamine B base (RB) are made in several resist systems. Second, the novel acid-base type titration based on the standard addition method is compared to the spectrophotometric titration method. During these studies, the make up of the resist system is probed as follows: the photoacid generator and resist additives are varied to understand the impact of each of these resist components on the acid generation process.

  7. An Alternative Field Method for Screening Soybean Genotypes for Resistance to Heterodera glycines

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, N. E.; Mauro, A. O.; Tihohood, D.

    1998-01-01

    The soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) has become an increasingly severe problem in soybean production areas in Brazil. The development and use of resistant cultivars is the most efficient method of minimizing losses due to this pathogen. Our objective was to test the efficiency of an alternative method for screening soybean genotypes for resistance to H. glycines in field plots. The alternative method was compared to the standard method of sowing the test genotypes in fields found to be infested during the previous crop season. In the alternative method, the test genotypes are sown in the furrow following the uprooting of 45-day-old infected plants. The alternative method resulted in twice the cyst population and fewer escapes, and more consistent results than the standard method. The major advantage of the alternative method is that it permits screening in a more homogeneous distribution of H. glycines in the soil. PMID:19274244

  8. A simple and accurate resist parameter extraction method for sub-80-nm DRAM patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sook; Hwang, Chan; Park, Dong-Woon; Kim, In-Sung; Kim, Ho-Chul; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Cho, Han-Ku; Moon, Joo-Tae

    2004-05-01

    Due to the polarization effect of high NA lithography, the consideration of resist effect in lithography simulation becomes increasingly important. In spite of the importance of resist simulation, many process engineers are reluctant to consider resist effect in lithography simulation due to time-consuming procedure to extract required resist parameters and the uncertainty of measurement of some parameters. Weiss suggested simplified development model, and this model does not require the complex kinetic parameters. For the device fabrication engineers, there is a simple and accurate parameter extraction and optimizing method using Weiss model. This method needs refractive index, Dill"s parameters and development rate monitoring (DRM) data in parameter extraction. The parameters extracted using referred sequence is not accurate, so that we have to optimize the parameters to fit the critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CD SEM) data of line and space patterns. Hence, the FiRM of Sigma-C is utilized as a resist parameter-optimizing program. According to our study, the illumination shape, the aberration and the pupil mesh point have a large effect on the accuracy of resist parameter in optimization. To obtain the optimum parameters, we need to find the saturated mesh points in terms of normalized intensity log slope (NILS) prior to an optimization. The simulation results using the optimized parameters by this method shows good agreement with experiments for iso-dense bias, Focus-Exposure Matrix data and sub 80nm device pattern simulation.

  9. Multilayer sulfur-resistant composite metal membranes and methods of making and repairing the same

    DOEpatents

    Way, J. Douglas; Hatlevik, Oyvind

    2014-07-15

    The invention relates to thin, hydrogen-permeable, sulfur-resistant membranes formed from multi-layers of palladium or palladium-alloy coatings on porous, ceramic or metal supports, methods of making these membranes, methods of repairing layers of these membranes and devices that incorporate these membranes.

  10. Which side of the balance determines the frequency of vaso-occlusive crises in children with sickle cell anemia: Blood viscosity or microvascular dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Charlot, Keyne; Romana, Marc; Moeckesch, Berenike; Jumet, Stéphane; Waltz, Xavier; Divialle-Doumdo, Lydia; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Petras, Marie; Tressières, Benoît; Tarer, Vanessa; Hue, Olivier; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Antoine-Jonville, Sophie; Connes, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Vascular resistance and tissue perfusion may be both affected by impaired vascular function and increased blood viscosity. Little is known about the effects of vascular function on the occurrence of painful vaso-occlusive crises (VOC) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). The aim of the present study was to determine which side of the balance (blood viscosity or vascular function) is the most deleterious in SCA and increases the risk for frequent hospitalized VOC. Microvascular function, microcirculatory oxygenation and blood viscosity were determined in a group of 22 SCA children/adolescents at steady state and a group of 13 healthy children/adolescents. Univariate analyses demonstrated blunted microvascular reactivity during local thermal heating test and decreased microcirculatory oxygenation in SCA children compared to controls. Multivariate analysis revealed that increased blood viscosity and decreased microcirculatory oxygenation were independent risk factors of frequent VOC in SCA. In contrast, the level of microvascular dysfunction does not predict VOC rate. In conclusion, increased blood viscosity is usually well supported in healthy individuals where vascular function is not impaired. However, in the context of SCA, microvascular function is impaired and any increase of blood viscosity or decrease in microcirculatory oxygenation would increase the risks for frequent VOC. PMID:26603723

  11. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  12. Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities and Risk of Renal Failure in Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yip, WanFen; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Teo, Boon Wee; Tay, Wan Ting; Ikram, M. Kamran; Tai, E. Shyong; Chow, Khuan Yew; Wong, Tien Y.; Cheung, Carol Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinal microvascular signs may provide insights into the structure and function of small vessels that are associated with renal disease. We examined the relationship of retinal microvascular signs with both prevalent and incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a multi-ethnic Asian population. Methods A total of 5763 subjects (aged ≥40 years) from two prospective population-based studies (the Singapore Malay Eye Study and the Singapore Prospective Study) were included for the current analysis. Retinopathy was graded using the modified Airlie House classification system. Retinal vascular parameters were measured using computer-assisted programs to quantify the retinal vessel widths (arteriolar and venular caliber) and retinal vascular network (fractal dimension). Data on ESRD was obtained by record linkage with the ESRD cases registered by National Registry of Diseases Office, Singapore. Multi-variable adjusted regression analyses were performed to assess the associations of baseline retinal vascular parameters and prevalent and incident ESRD. Results At baseline, 21(0.36%) persons had prevalent ESRD. During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, 33 (0.57%) subjects developed ESRD. In our analyses, retinopathy was associated with prevalent ESRD (multi-variable adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–8.05) and incident ESRD (multi-variable adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.51, 95%CI: 1.14–5.54). This association was largely seen in person with diabetes (HR, 2.60, 95%CI: 1.01–6.66) and not present in persons without diabetes (HR, 1.65, 95%CI: 0.14–18.98). Retinal arteriolar caliber, retinal venular caliber and retinal vascular fractal dimension were not associated with ESRD. Conclusion Retinopathy signs in persons with diabetes are related to an increased risk of ESRD; however, other microvascular changes in the retina are not associated with ESRD. PMID:25658337

  13. AST-120 Improves Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jung-Hwa; Yu, Mina; Lee, Sihna; Ryu, Dong-Ryeol; Kim, Seung-Jung; Kang, Duk-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is a pivotal phenomenon in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD). Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a known uremic toxin that induces ED in patients with chronic kidney disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AST-120, an absorbent of IS, improves microvascular or macrovascular ED in HD patients. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective, case-controlled trial. Fourteen patients each were enrolled in respective AST-120 and control groups. The subjects in the AST-120 group were treated with AST-120 (6 g/day) for 6 months. Microvascular function was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry using iontophoresis of acetylcholine (Ach) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) at baseline and again at 3 and 6 months. Carotid arterial intima-media thickness (cIMT) and flow-mediated vasodilation were measured at baseline and 6 months. The Wilcoxon rank test was used to compare values before and after AST-120 treatment. Results Ach-induced iontophoresis (endothelium-dependent response) was dramatically ameliorated at 3 months and 6 months in the AST-120 group. SNP-induced response showed delayed improvement only at 6 months in the AST-120 group. The IS level was decreased at 3 months in the AST-120 group, but remained stable thereafter. cIMT was significantly reduced after AST-120 treatment. No significant complications in patients taking AST-120 were reported. Conclusion AST-120 ameliorated microvascular ED and cIMT in HD patients. A randomized study including a larger population will be required to establish a definitive role of AST-120 as a preventive medication for CVD in HD patients. PMID:27189289

  14. Effect of Irradiation on Microvascular Endothelial Cells of Parotid Glands in the Miniature Pig

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Junji; Yan Xing; Gao Runtao; Mao Lisha; Cotrim, Ana P.; Zheng Changyu; Zhang Chunmei; Baum, Bruce J.; Wang Songlin

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of irradiation on microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. Methods and Materials: A single 25-Gy dose of irradiation (IR) was delivered to parotid glands of 6 miniature pigs. Three other animals served as non-IR controls. Local blood flow rate in glands was measured pre- and post-IR with an ultrasonic Doppler analyzer. Samples of parotid gland tissue were taken at 4 h, 24 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks after IR for microvascular density (MVD) analysis and sphingomyelinase (SMase) assay. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining (anti-CD31 and anti-AQP1) were used to assess morphological changes. MVD was determined by calculating the number of CD31- or AQP1-stained cells per field. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) apoptosis assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. The activity of acid and neutral Mg{sup 2+}-dependent SMase (ASMase and NSMase, respectively) was also assayed. Results: Local parotid gland blood flow rate decreased rapidly at 4 h post-IR and remained below control levels throughout the 14-day observation period. Parotid MVD also declined from 4 to 24 hours and remained below control levels thereafter. The activity levels of ASMase and NSMase in parotid glands increased rapidly from 4 to 24 h post-IR and then declined gradually. The frequency of detecting apoptotic nuclei in the glands followed similar kinetics. Conclusions: Single-dose IR led to a significant reduction of MVD and local blood flow rate, indicating marked damage to microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. The significant and rapid increases of ASMase and NSMase activity levels may be important in this IR-induced damage.

  15. Coronary Microvascular Rarefaction and Myocardial Fibrosis in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Selma F.; Hussain, Saad; Mirzoyev, Sultan A.; Edwards, William D.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Redfield, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Characterization of myocardial structural changes in heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has been hindered by limited availability of human cardiac tissue. Cardiac hypertrophy, coronary artery disease (CAD), coronary microvascular rarefaction and myocardial fibrosis may contribute to HFpEF pathophysiology. Methods and Results We identified HFpEF patients (n=124) and age-appropriate control patients (non-cardiac death, no HF diagnosis; n=104) who underwent autopsy. Heart weight and CAD severity were obtained from the autopsy reports. Using whole field digital microscopy and automated analysis algorithms in full thickness left ventricular (LV) sections, microvascular density (MVD), myocardial fibrosis and their relationship were quantified. Subjects with HFpEF had heavier hearts (median 538 g; 169% of age/sex/body size expected heart weight vs. 335 g; 112% in controls), more severe CAD (65% with ≥ one vessel with >50% diameter stenosis in HFpEF vs 13% in controls), more LV fibrosis (median % area fibrosis, 9.6 vs. 7.1) and lower MVD (median 961 vs. 1316 vessels per mm2) than control (p <0.0001 for all). Myocardial fibrosis increased with decreasing MVD in controls (r = − 0.28, p=0.004) and HFpEF (r = − 0.26, p=0.004). Adjusting for MVD attenuated the group differences in fibrosis. Heart weight, fibrosis and MVD were similar in HFpEF patients with vs without CAD. Conclusions In this study, patients with HFpEF had more cardiac hypertrophy, epicardial CAD, coronary microvascular rarefaction and myocardial fibrosis than controls. Each of these findings may contribute to the LV diastolic dysfunction and cardiac reserve function impairment characteristic of HFpEF. PMID:25552356

  16. Printing Cancer Cells into Intact Microvascular Networks: A Model for Investigating Cancer Cell Dynamics during Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phamduy, Theresa B.; Sweat, Richard S.; Azimi, Mohammad S.; Burow, Matthew E.; Murfee, Walter L.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    While cancer cell invasion and metastasis is dependent on cancer cell-stroma, cancer cell-blood vessel, and cancer cell-lymphatic vessel interactions, our understanding of these interactions remain largely unknown. A need exists for physiologically-relevant models that more closely mimic the complexity of cancer cell dynamics in a real tissue environment. The objective of this study was to combine laser-based cell printing and tissue culture methods to create a novel ex vivo model in which cancer cell dynamics can be tracked during angiogenesis in an intact microvascular network. Laser direct-write (LDW) was utilized to reproducibly deposit breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and fibroblasts into spatially-defined patterns on cultured rat mesenteric tissues. In addition, heterogeneous patterns containing co-printed MDA-MB-231/fibroblasts or MDA-MB-231/MCF-7 cells were generated for fibroblast-directed and collective cell invasion models. Printed cells remained viable and the cells retained the ability to proliferate in serum-rich media conditions. Over a culture period of five days, time-lapse imaging confirmed fibroblast and MDA-MB-231 cell migration within the microvascular networks. Confocal microscopy indicated that printed MDA-MB-231 cells infiltrated the tissue thickness and were capable of interacting with endothelial cells. Angiogenic network growth in tissue areas containing printed cancer cells was characterized by significantly increased capillary sprouting compared to control tissue areas containing no printed cells. Our results establish an innovative ex vivo experimental platform that enables time-lapse evaluation of cancer cell dynamics during angiogenesis within a real microvascular network scenario. PMID:26190039

  17. Zingiber officinale attenuates retinal microvascular changes in diabetic rats via anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dongare, Shirish; Mathur, Rajani; Saxena, Rohit; Mathur, Sandeep; Agarwal, Renu; Nag, Tapas C.; Srivastava, Sushma; Kumar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of long-standing diabetes. Several complex interconnecting biochemical pathways are activated in response to hyperglycemia. These pathways culminate into proinflammatory and angiogenic effects that bring about structural and functional damage to the retinal vasculature. Since Zingiber officinale (ginger) is known for its anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties, we investigated the effects of its extract standardized to 5% 6-gingerol, the major active constituent of ginger, in attenuating retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Methods Diabetic rats were treated orally with the vehicle or the ginger extract (75 mg/kg/day) over a period of 24 weeks along with regular monitoring of bodyweight and blood glucose and weekly fundus photography. At the end of the 24-week treatment, the retinas were isolated for histopathological examination under a light microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and determination of the retinal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Results Oral administration of the ginger extract resulted in significant reduction of hyperglycemia, the diameter of the retinal vessels, and vascular basement membrane thickness. Improvement in the architecture of the retinal vasculature was associated with significantly reduced expression of NF-κB and reduced activity of TNF-α and VEGF in the retinal tissue in the ginger extract–treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group. Conclusions The current study showed that ginger extract containing 5% of 6-gingerol attenuates the retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes through anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic actions. Although precise molecular targets remain to be determined, 6-gingerol seems to be a potential candidate for further investigation. PMID:27293376

  18. Computer-based analysis of microvascular alterations in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzer, Stefan; Müller, Ralph; Stampanoni, Marco; Abela, Rafael; Meyer, Eric P.; Ulmann-Schuler, Alexandra; Krucker, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Vascular factors associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have recently gained increased attention. To investigate changes in vascular, particularly microvascular architecture, we developed a hierarchical imaging framework to obtain large-volume, high-resolution 3D images from brains of transgenic mice modeling AD. In this paper, we present imaging and data analysis methods which allow compiling unique characteristics from several hundred gigabytes of image data. Image acquisition is based on desktop micro-computed tomography (µCT) and local synchrotron-radiation µCT (SRµCT) scanning with a nominal voxel size of 16 µm and 1.4 µm, respectively. Two visualization approaches were implemented: stacks of Z-buffer projections for fast data browsing, and progressive-mesh based surface rendering for detailed 3D visualization of the large datasets. In a first step, image data was assessed visually via a Java client connected to a central database. Identified characteristics of interest were subsequently quantified using global morphometry software. To obtain even deeper insight into microvascular alterations, tree analysis software was developed providing local morphometric parameters such as number of vessel segments or vessel tortuosity. In the context of ever increasing image resolution and large datasets, computer-aided analysis has proven both powerful and indispensable. The hierarchical approach maintains the context of local phenomena, while proper visualization and morphometry provide the basis for detailed analysis of the pathology related to structure. Beyond analysis of microvascular changes in AD this framework will have significant impact considering that vascular changes are involved in other neurodegenerative diseases as well as in cancer, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and arthritis.

  19. Prediabetes as a toxic environment for the initiation of microvascular and macrovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Brannick, Ben; Wynn, Anne; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Prediabetes is a state characterized by impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. Evidence is increasingly demonstrating that prediabetes is a toxic state, in addition to being a harbinger of future development of diabetes mellitus. This minireview discusses the pathophysiology and clinical significance of prediabetes, and approach to its management, in the context of the worldwide diabetes epidemic. The pathophysiologic defects underlying prediabetes include insulin resistance, β cell dysfunction, increased lipolysis, inflammation, suboptimal incretin effect, and possibly hepatic glucose overproduction. Recent studies have revealed that the long-term complications of diabetes may manifest in some people with prediabetes; these complications include classical microvascular and macrovascular disorders, and our discussion explores the role of glycemia in their development. Finally, landmark intervention studies in prediabetes, including lifestyle modification and pharmacologic treatment, are reviewed. PMID:27302176

  20. ROLE OF ATP IN REGULATING RENAL MICROVASCULAR FUNCTION AND IN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhengrong; Inscho, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an essential energy substrate for cellular metabolism but it can also influence many biological processes when released into the extracellular milieu. Research has established that extracellular ATP acts as an autocrine/paracrine factor that regulates many physiological functions. Alternatively, excessive extracellular ATP levels contribute to pathophysiological processes such as inflammation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and atherosclerosis. Renal P2 receptors are widely distributed throughout glomeruli, vasculature and tubular segments, and participate in controlling renal vascular resistance, mediating renal autoregulation, and regulating tubular transport function. This review will focus on the role of ATP-P2 receptor signaling in regulating renal microvascular function and autoregulation, recent advances on the role of ATP-P2 signaling in hypertension-associated renal vascular injury, and emerging new directions. PMID:21768526

  1. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (Biolog(TM)) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  2. Fast and Accurate Microplate Method (Biolog MT2) for Detection of Fusarium Fungicides Resistance/Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Frąc, Magdalena; Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Kotowicz, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The need for finding fungicides against Fusarium is a key step in the chemical plant protection and using appropriate chemical agents. Existing, conventional methods of evaluation of Fusarium isolates resistance to fungicides are costly, time-consuming and potentially environmentally harmful due to usage of high amounts of potentially toxic chemicals. Therefore, the development of fast, accurate and effective detection methods for Fusarium resistance to fungicides is urgently required. MT2 microplates (BiologTM) method is traditionally used for bacteria identification and the evaluation of their ability to utilize different carbon substrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no reports concerning the use of this technical tool to determine fungicides resistance of the Fusarium isolates. For this reason, the objectives of this study are to develop a fast method for Fusarium resistance to fungicides detection and to validate the effectiveness approach between both traditional hole-plate and MT2 microplates assays. In presented study MT2 microplate-based assay was evaluated for potential use as an alternative resistance detection method. This was carried out using three commercially available fungicides, containing following active substances: triazoles (tebuconazole), benzimidazoles (carbendazim) and strobilurins (azoxystrobin), in six concentrations (0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2%), for nine selected Fusarium isolates. In this study, the particular concentrations of each fungicides was loaded into MT2 microplate wells. The wells were inoculated with the Fusarium mycelium suspended in PM4-IF inoculating fluid. Before inoculation the suspension was standardized for each isolates into 75% of transmittance. Traditional hole-plate method was used as a control assay. The fungicides concentrations in control method were the following: 0, 0.0005, 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, and 50%. Strong relationships between MT2 microplate and traditional hole

  3. A Novel Method of Modeling the Deformation Resistance for Clad Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Jianliang; Yi Youping; Xie Mantang

    2011-08-22

    Because of the excellent thermal conductivity, the clad sheet (3003/4004/3003) of aluminum alloy is extensively used in various heat exchangers, such as radiator, motorcar air conditioning, evaporator, and so on. The deformation resistance model plays an important role in designing the process parameters of hot continuous rolling. However, the complex behaviors of the plastic deformation of the clad sheet make the modeling very difficult. In this work, a novel method for modeling the deformation resistance of clad sheet was proposed by combining the finite element analysis with experiments. The deformation resistance model of aluminum 3003 and 4004 was proposed through hot compression test on the Gleeble-1500 thermo-simulation machine. And the deformation resistance model of clad sheet was proposed through finite element analysis using DEFORM-2D software. The relationship between cladding ratio and the deformation resistance was discussed in detail. The results of hot compression simulation demonstrate that the cladding ratio has great effects on the resistance of the clad sheet. Taking the cladding ratio into consideration, the mathematical model of the deformation resistance for clad sheet has been proved to have perfect forecasting precision of different cladding ratio. Therefore, the presented model can be used to predict the rolling force of clad sheet during the hot continuous rolling process.

  4. A method for the continuous measurement and display of pulmonary resistance in man.

    PubMed

    Lane, R; Freedman, S; Guz, A

    1993-06-01

    1. We have validated a method for the continuous display and 'on-line' measurement of total pulmonary resistance in man, using a hybrid digital/analog computer. 2. The basic variables, which are measured by standard techniques, are flow rate of the mouth (V) and oesophageal pressure (Poes), and these are the only analog inputs necessary to the computer. 3. Resistance (RL,cont) is calculated continuously as: RL,cont = (Poes-V/C)/V where V is tidal volume and C is the dynamic compliance. RL,cont is continuously displayed as an analog signal on an oscilloscope. 4. Changes in resistance, measured by this method over a wide range of values in three subjects, showed an almost exact correlation with those measured by a standard method (Mead-Whittenberger). PMID:8334814

  5. A Modified Time-Delay Addition Method to Extract Resistive Leakage Current of MOSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodsuz, Masume; Mirzaie, Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    Metal oxide surge arresters are one of the most important equipment for power system protection against switching and lightning over-voltages. High-energy stresses and environmental features are the main factors which degrade surge arresters. In order to verify surge arresters good condition, their monitoring is necessary. The majority of surge arrester monitoring techniques is based on total leakage current decomposition of their capacitive and resistive components. This paper introduces a new approach based on time-delay addition method to extract the resistive current from the total leakage current without measuring voltage signal. Surge arrester model for calculating leakage current has been performed in ATP-EMTP. In addition, the signal processing has been done using MATLAB software. To show the accuracy of the proposed method, experimental tests have been performed to extract resistive leakage current by the proposed method.

  6. Calculating development parameters for chemically amplified resists by the film-reducing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sensu, Yoshihisa

    2013-03-01

    We obtained development parameters for a chemically amplified resist from calculations involving the conversion of the relationship between exposure dose and development rate to the relationship between protection ratio and development rate using the conventional ABC parameter[1] and development rate data (RDA data) [2]. However, calculations by this method require the ABC parameter. Since chemically amplified resists have no bleaching effect, the C parameter must be measured by the FT-IR [3-5] or coumarin addition method [6-8]. Given this constraint, we examined the method of obtaining development parameters based on the film reduction observed in the resist exposed or the film reduction observed after PEB, without using the ABC parameter. This paper presents the results.

  7. Forward modeling of marine DC resistivity method for a layered anisotropic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Ping; Cai, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Since the ocean bottom is a sedimentary environment wherein stratification is well developed, the use of an anisotropic model is best for studying its geology. Beginning with Maxwell's equations for an anisotropic model, we introduce scalar potentials based on the divergence-free characteristic of the electric and magnetic (EM) fields. We then continue the EM fields down into the deep earth and upward into the seawater and couple them at the ocean bottom to the transmitting source. By studying both the DC apparent resistivity curves and their polar plots, we can resolve the anisotropy of the ocean bottom. Forward modeling of a high-resistivity thin layer in an anisotropic half-space demonstrates that the marine DC resistivity method in shallow water is very sensitive to the resistive reservoir but is not influenced by airwaves. As such, it is very suitable for oil and gas exploration in shallowwater areas but, to date, most modeling algorithms for studying marine DC resistivity are based on isotropic models. In this paper, we investigate one-dimensional anisotropic forward modeling for marine DC resistivity method, prove the algorithm to have high accuracy, and thus provide a theoretical basis for 2D and 3D forward modeling.

  8. Association of low educational status with microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes: Jaipur diabetes registry-1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Niharikaa; Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Maheshwari, Vitthal D.; Sharma, Krishna Kumar; Gupta, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of educational status (ES), as a marker of socioeconomic status, with the prevalence of microvascular complications in diabetes. Methods: Successive patients (n = 1214) presenting to our centre were evaluated for sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical, and therapeutic variables. Subjects were classified according to ES into Group 1 (illiterate, 216); Group 2 (microvascular disease (peripheral, ocular or renal) in 20.7%. Microvascular disease was significantly greater in illiterate (25.9%) and low (23.6%) compared to middle (15.0%) and high (14.7%) ES groups (P < 0.05). Age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed that in illiterate and low ES groups respectively, prevalence of smoking/tobacco use (odds ratio 3.84, confidence intervals 2.09–7.05 and 2.15, 1.36–3.41); low fruit/vegetable (2.51, 1.53–4.14 and 1.99, 1.30–3.04) and low fibre intake (4.02, 2.50–6.45 and 1.78, 1.23–2.59) was greater compared to high ES. Poor diabetes control (HbA1c >8.0%) was significantly greater in illiterate (38.0%), low (46.0%) and middle (41.0%) compared to high (31.5%) ES subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a greater prevalence of the microvascular disease in illiterate and low ES diabetes patients in India. This is associated with the higher prevalence of smoking/tobacco use, poor quality diet and sub-optimal diabetes control. PMID:26425480

  9. Association of low educational status with microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes: Jaipur diabetes registry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Niharikaa; Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Maheshwari, Vitthal D.; Sharma, Krishna Kumar; Gupta, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of educational status (ES), as marker of socioeconomic status, with the prevalence of microvascular complications in diabetes. Methods: Successive patients (n = 1214) presenting to our center were evaluated for sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical, and therapeutic variables. Subjects were classified according to ES into Group 1 (illiterate, 216); Group 2 (≤ primary, 537), Group 3 (≤ higher secondary, 312), and Group 4 (any college, 149). Descriptive statistics is reported. Results: Mean age of patients was 52 ± 10 years, duration of diabetes 7 ± 7 years and 55% were men. Prevalence of various risk factors was smoking/tobacco 25.5%, obesity body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 64.0%, abdominal obesity 63.4%, hypertension 67.5%, high fat diet 14.5%, low fruits/vegetables 31.8%, low fiber intake 60.0%, high salt diet 16.9%, physical inactivity 27.5%, coronary or cerebrovascular disease 3.0%, and microvascular disease (peripheral, ocular or renal) in 20.7%. Microvascular disease was significantly greater in illiterate (25.9%) and low (23.6%) compared to middle (15.0%) and high (14.7%) ES groups (P < 0.05). Age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed that in illiterate and low ES groups respectively, prevalence of smoking/tobacco use (odds ratio 3.84, confidence interval: 09–7.05 and 2.15, 1.36–3.41); low fruit/vegetable (2.51, 1.53–4.14 and 1.99, 1.30–3.04) and low fiber intake (4.02, 2.50–6.45 and 1.78, 1.23–2.59) was greater compared to high ES. Poor diabetes control (HbA1c >.0%) was significantly greater in illiterate (38.0%), low (46.0%), and middle (41.0%) compared to high (31.5%) ES subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a greater prevalence of the microvascular disease in illiterate and low ES diabetes patients in India. This is associated with the higher prevalence of smoking/tobacco use, poor quality diet, and sub-optimal diabetes control. PMID:26693427

  10. Non-Invasive Measurement of Skin Microvascular Response during Pharmacological and Physiological Provocations

    PubMed Central

    Iredahl, Fredrik; Löfberg, Andreas; Sjöberg, Folke; Farnebo, Simon; Tesselaar, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Microvascular changes in the skin due to pharmacological and physiological provocations can be used as a marker for vascular function. While laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been used extensively for measurement of skin microvascular responses, Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) and Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) are novel imaging techniques. TiVi measures red blood cell concentration, while LDF and LSCI measure perfusion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare responses to provocations in the skin using these different techniques. Method Changes in skin microcirculation were measured in healthy subjects during (1) iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and noradrenaline (NA), (2) local heating and (3) post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) using LDF, LSCI and TiVi. Results Iontophoresis of SNP increased perfusion (LSCI: baseline 40.9±6.2 PU; 10-min 100±25 PU; p<0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 119±18; 10-min 150±41 AU; p = 0.011). No change in perfusion (LSCI) was observed after iontophoresis of NA (baseline 38.0±4.4 PU; 10-min 38.9±5.0 PU; p = 0.64), while RBC concentration decreased (TiVi: baseline 59.6±11.8 AU; 10-min 54.4±13.3 AU; p = 0.021). Local heating increased perfusion (LDF: baseline 8.8±3.6 PU; max 112±55 PU; p<0.001, LSCI: baseline 50.8±8.0 PU; max 151±22 PU; p<0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 49.2±32.9 AU; max 99.3±28.3 AU; p<0.001). After 5 minutes of forearm occlusion with prior exsanguination, a decrease was seen in perfusion (LDF: p = 0.027; LSCI: p<0.001) and in RBC concentration (p = 0.045). Only LSCI showed a significant decrease in perfusion after 5 minutes of occlusion without prior exsanguination (p<0.001). Coefficients of variation were lower for LSCI and TiVi compared to LDF for most responses. Conclusion LSCI is more sensitive than TiVi for measuring microvascular changes during SNP-induced vasodilatation and forearm occlusion. TiVi is more sensitive to noradrenaline