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Sample records for microwave anomalous emission

  1. Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Tibbs, C.; Cleary, K.; Readhead, A. C.; Scaife, A.; Keating, G.; Sieth, M.; Stevenson, M.; Perrott, Y.; Grainge, K.

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission is a form of radio emission that peaks at tens of GHz. This emission, primarily observed in Galactic sources, most likely comes from spinning dust grains with an electric dipole moment. This explanation is based on the remarkable spatial correlation between large-scale 15-GHz emission and long-wavelength infrared emission, discovered in 1997 at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and since confirmed by many subsequent observations. Anomalous emission presents a new window on the physical conditions in the interstellar medium, especially the properties of very small dust grains. It is also a foreground for studies of the cosmic microwave background. This emission mechanism has so far been studied mostly on large spatial scales - tens of arcminutes to degrees. I present arcminute-resolution 30-GHz observations of known anomalous emission regions in the Perseus molecular cloud, and combine these data with 15-GHz observations in order to understand spectral properties. I also compare the radio observations to infrared data in order to clarify the environmental conditions that lead to anomalous emission.

  2. Studies of Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) with the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, C.; Ali-Hamoud, Y.; Beswick, R. J.; Casassus, S.; Cleary, K.; Draine, B.; Genova-Santos, R.; Grainge, K.; Hoang, T. C.; Lazarian, A.; Murphy, E.; Paladini, R.; Peel, M. W.; Perrott, Y.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Scaife, A.; Tibbs, C.; Verstraete, L.; Vidal, M.; Watson, R. A.; Ysard, N.

    2015-04-01

    In this chapter, we will outline the scientific motivation for studying Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) with the SKA. AME is thought to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains, although thermal fluctuations of magnetic dust grains may also contribute. Studies of this mysterious component would shed light on the emission mechanism, which then opens up a new window onto the interstellar medium (ISM). AME is emitted mostly in the frequency range $\\sim 10$--100\\,GHz, and thus the SKA has the potential of measuring the low frequency side of the AME spectrum, particularly in band 5. Science targets include dense molecular clouds in the Milky Way, as well as extragalactic sources. We also discuss the possibility of detecting rotational line emission from Poly-cyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), which could be the main carriers of AME. Detecting PAH lines of a given spacing would allow for a definitive identification of specific PAH species.

  3. Observations and Theory of the Anomalous Microwave Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Matthew; Readhead, A. C.; Pearson, T. J.; Cleary, K.; Tibbs, C.; Villadsen, J.; Hirata, C. M.; Paladini, R.; Muchovej, S.; Grainge, K.; Perrott, Y.; Rumsey, C.; Scaife, A.; C-BASS Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The recently discovered Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) presents a potential new probe of interstellar dust. Peaking at around 30GHz, having a width of several tens of GHz, and appearing to be highly dust-correlated, this continuum emission is commonly assumed to be due very small, rapidly spinning dust grains. Directed study of the AME may therefore provide a new handle on these grains and their environments. I will present three projects aimed at advancing our understanding of this emission. The first is a new, analytical derivation of radiation from spinning dust grains, bridging the gap between the precise models and realistic observations. The second is a joint CARMA/AMI survey of Planck Early Cold Clumps, searching for predicted spinning dust emission. The third is a correlation analysis of diffuse microwave emission from the North Celestial Pole, combining a new 5GHz map from the C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS) with existing radio, WMAP, IRAS, and Hα maps. This work was supported in part by the NSF (AST-1212217).

  4. Anomalous Microwave Emission in HII regions: is it really anomalous ? The case of RCW 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Roberta; Ingallinera, Adriano; Agliozzo, Claudia; Tibbs, Christopher; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Umana, Grazia; Dickinson, Clive; Trigiglio, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The detection of an excess of emission at microwave frequencies with respect to the predicted free-free emission has been reportedfor several Galactic HII regions. Here, we investigate the case of RCW 49, for which the Cosmic Background Imager tentatively (~ 3 sigma) detected Anomalous Microwave Emission at 31 GHz on angular scales of 7'. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we carried out a multi-frequency (5 GHz, 19 GHz and 34 GHz) continuum study of the region, complemented by observations of the H109 alpha radio recombination line. The analysis shows that: 1) the spatial correlation between the microwave and IR emission persists on angular scales from 3.4' to 0.4'', although the degree of the correlation slightly decreases at higher frequencies and on smaller angular scales; 2) the spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz are globally in agreement with optically thin free-free emission, however, ~ 30 % of these are positive and much greater than -0.1, consistently with a stellar wind scenario; 3) no major evidence for inverted free-free radiation is found, indicating that this is likely not the cause of the Anomalous Emission in RCW 49. Although our results cannot rule out the spinning dust hypothesis to explain the tentative detection of Anomalous Microwave emission in RCW 49, they emphasize the complexity of astronomical sources very well known and studied such as HII regions, and suggest that, at least in these objects, the reported excess of emissionmight be ascribed to alternative mechanisms such as stellar winds and shocks.

  5. Anomalous Microwave Emission in HII Regions: Is it Really Anomalous? The Case of RCW 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Roberta; Ingallinera, Adriano; Agliozzo, Claudia; Tibbs, Christopher T.; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Umana, Grazia; Dickinson, Clive; Trigilio, Corrado

    2015-11-01

    The detection of an excess of emission at microwave frequencies with respect to the predicted free-free emission has been reported for several Galactic H ii regions. Here, we investigate the case of RCW 49, for which the Cosmic Background Imager tentatively (˜3σ) detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) at 31 GHz on angular scales of 7‧. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we carried out a multi-frequency (5, 19, and 34 GHz) continuum study of the region, complemented by observations of the H109α radio recombination line. The analysis shows that: (1) the spatial correlation between the microwave and IR emission persists on angular scales from 3.‧4 to 0.″4, although the degree of the correlation slightly decreases at higher frequencies and on smaller angular scales; (2) the spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz are globally in agreement with optically thin free-free emission, however, ˜30% of these are positive and much greater than -0.1, consistent with a stellar wind scenario; and (3) no major evidence for inverted free-free radiation is found, indicating that this is likely not the cause of the Anomalous Emission in RCW 49. Although our results cannot rule out the spinning dust hypothesis to explain the tentative detection of AME in RCW 49, they emphasize the complexity of astronomical sources that are very well known and studied, such as H ii regions, and suggest that, at least in these objects, the reported excess of emission might be ascribed to alternative mechanisms such as stellar winds and shocks.

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON FREE-FREE EMISSION FROM ANOMALOUS MICROWAVE EMISSION SOURCES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Tibbs, C. T.; Paladini, R.; Dickinson, C.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; Watson, R. A.; Mason, B. S.; Casassus, S.; Cleary, K.

    2013-06-20

    We present observations performed with the Green Bank Telescope at 1.4 and 5 GHz of three strips coincident with the anomalous microwave emission features previously identified in the Perseus molecular cloud at 33 GHz with the Very Small Array. With these observations we determine the level of the low frequency ({approx}1-5 GHz) emission. We do not detect any significant extended emission in these regions and we compute conservative 3{sigma} upper limits on the fraction of free-free emission at 33 GHz of 27%, 12%, and 18% for the three strips, indicating that the level of the emission at 1.4 and 5 GHz cannot account for the emission observed at 33 GHz. Additionally, we find that the low frequency emission is not spatially correlated with the emission observed at 33 GHz. These results indicate that the emission observed in the Perseus molecular cloud at 33 GHz, is indeed in excess over the low frequency emission, hence confirming its anomalous nature.

  7. Constraints on Free-Free Emission from Anomalous Microwave Emission Sources in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbs, C. T.; Paladini, R.; Dickinson, C.; Mason, B. S.; Casassus, S.; Cleary, K.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; Watson, R. A.

    2013-06-01

    We present observations performed with the Green Bank Telescope at 1.4 and 5 GHz of three strips coincident with the anomalous microwave emission features previously identified in the Perseus molecular cloud at 33 GHz with the Very Small Array. With these observations we determine the level of the low frequency (~1-5 GHz) emission. We do not detect any significant extended emission in these regions and we compute conservative 3σ upper limits on the fraction of free-free emission at 33 GHz of 27%, 12%, and 18% for the three strips, indicating that the level of the emission at 1.4 and 5 GHz cannot account for the emission observed at 33 GHz. Additionally, we find that the low frequency emission is not spatially correlated with the emission observed at 33 GHz. These results indicate that the emission observed in the Perseus molecular cloud at 33 GHz, is indeed in excess over the low frequency emission, hence confirming its anomalous nature.

  8. QED induced redshift and anomalous microwave emission from dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevenslik, Thomas V.

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite imaging of CMB polarizations at 353 GHz extrapolated to 160 GHz suggested the AME was caused by dust and not as a relic of gravity waves from Universe expansion. AME stands for anomalous microwave emisssion. Similarly, dust has also been implicated in questioning Universe expansion by exaggerating Hubble redshift measurements. In this regard, QED induced EM radiation in dust NPs may be the commonality by which an expanding Universe may be assessed. QED stands for quantum electrodynamics, EM for electromagnetic, and NPs for nanoparticles. QED radiation is a consequence of QM that denies the atoms in NPs under TIR confinement the heat capacity to allow increases in NP temperature upon absorbing galaxy light. QM stands for quantum mechanics and TIR for total internal reflection.In this paper, the only galaxy light considered are single Lyα photons absorbed in spherical dust NPs. Since NPs have high surface to volume ratios, an absorbed Lyα photon is induced by QED to be totally confined by TIR to the NP surface. Hence, the TIR wavelength λ of the QED photon moving at velocity c/n in the NP surface is λ = 2πa, where c is the speed of light, and n and a are the refractive index and radius of the NP. The boundary between QED induced spinning and redshift depends on the NP material. For amorphous silicate, small NPs with a < 0.040 microns conserve the Lyα photon energy by NP spinning; whereas, the larger NPs having a > 0.040 microns redshift the Lyα photon to produce VIS and near IR galaxy light.Since the TIR mode is tangential to the surface of the NP, the Lyα photon produces circularly polarized light during absorption thereby exerting a momentary torque on the NP. Conserving the Lyα photon energy hc/λ* with the rotational energy ½ Jω2 of the NP gives the spin ω = √ (2 hc/Jλ*). Here, h is Planck’s constant, λ* the Lyα wavelength, J the NP rotational moment of inertia, J = 2 ma2/5, m the NP mass, m = 4πρa3/3, and ρ the NP

  9. A Case Against Spinning PAHs as the Source of the Anomalous Microwave Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Draine, B. T.; Meisner, Aaron M.

    2016-08-01

    We employ an all-sky map of the anomalous microwave emission (AME) produced by component separation of the microwave sky to study correlations between the AME and Galactic dust properties. We find that while the AME is highly correlated with all tracers of dust emission, the best predictor of the AME strength is the dust radiance. Fluctuations in the AME intensity per dust radiance are uncorrelated with fluctuations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), casting doubt on the association between AME and PAHs. The PAH abundance is strongly correlated with the dust optical depth and dust radiance, consistent with PAH destruction in low density regions. We find that the AME intensity increases with increasing radiation field strength, at variance with predictions from the spinning dust hypothesis. Finally, the temperature dependence of the AME per dust radiance disfavors the interpretation of the AME as thermal emission. A reconsideration of other AME carriers, such as ultrasmall silicates, and other emission mechanisms, such as magnetic dipole emission, is warranted.

  10. Planck early results. XX. New light on anomalous microwave emission from spinning dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casassus, S.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Dickinson, C.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Procopio, P.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Varis, J.; Verstraete, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) has been observed by numerous experiments in the frequency range ~10-60 GHz. Using Planck maps and multi-frequency ancillary data, we have constructed spectra for two known AME regions: the Perseus and ρ Ophiuchi molecular clouds. The spectra are well fitted by a combination of free-free radiation, cosmic microwave background, thermal dust, and electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The spinning dust spectra are the most precisely measured to date, and show the high frequency side clearly for the first time. The spectra have a peak in the range 20-40 GHz and are detected at high significances of 17.1σ for Perseus and 8.4σ for ρ Ophiuchi. In Perseus, spinning dust in the dense molecular gas can account for most of the AME; the low density atomic gas appears to play a minor role. In ρ Ophiuchi, the ~30 GHz peak is dominated by dense molecular gas, but there is an indication of an extended tail at frequencies 50-100 GHz, which can be accounted for by irradiated low density atomic gas. The dust parameters are consistent with those derived from other measurements. We have also searched the Planck map at 28.5 GHz for candidate AME regions, by subtracting a simple model of the synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust. We present spectra for two of the candidates; S140 and S235 are bright Hii regions that show evidence for AME, and are well fitted by spinning dust models. Corresponding author: C. Dickinson, Clive.Dickinson@manchester.ac.uk

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Anomalous microwave emission in Galactic clouds (Planck+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casassus, S.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; De Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Desert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Dupac, X.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Genova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihaenen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Laehteenmaeki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschenes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tibbs, C. T.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Verstraete, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-07-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is believed to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The aim of this paper is a statistical study of the basic properties of AME regions and the environment in which they emit. We used WMAP and Planck maps, combined with ancillary radio and IR data, to construct a sample of 98 candidate AME sources, assembling SEDs for each source using aperture photometry on 1°-smoothed maps from 0.408GHz up to 3000GHz. Each spectrum is fitted with a simple model of free-free, synchrotron (where necessary), cosmic microwave background (CMB), thermal dust, and spinning dust components. We find that 42 of the 98 sources have significant (>5σ) excess emission at frequencies between 20 and 60GHz. An analysis of the potential contribution of optically thick free-free emission from ultra-compact HII regions, using IR colour criteria, reduces the significant AME sample to 27 regions. The spectrum of the AME is consistent with model spectra of spinning dust. Peak frequencies are in the range 20-35GHz except for the California nebula (NGC1499), which appears to have a high spinning dust peak frequency of (50+/-17)GHz. The AME regions tend to be more spatially extended than regions with little or no AME. The AME intensity is strongly correlated with the sub-millimetre/IR flux densities and comparable to previous AME detections in the literature. AME emissivity, defined as the ratio of AME to dust optical depth, varies by an order of magnitude for the AME regions. The AME regions tend to be associated with cooler dust in the range 14-20K and an average emissivity index, βd, of +1.8, while the non-AME regions are typically warmer, at 20-27K. In agreement with previous studies, the AME emissivity appears to decrease with increasing column density. This supports the idea of AME originating from small grains that are known to be depleted in dense regions, probably due to coagulation onto larger grains. We also find a

  12. Planck intermediate results. XV. A study of anomalous microwave emission in Galactic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casassus, S.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson; , C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tibbs, C. T.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Verstraete, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-05-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is believed to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The aim of this paper is a statistical study of the basic properties of AME regions and the environment in which they emit. We used WMAP and Planck maps, combined with ancillary radio and IR data, to construct a sample of 98 candidate AME sources, assembling SEDs for each source using aperture photometry on 1°-smoothed maps from 0.408 GHz up to 3000 GHz. Each spectrum is fitted with a simple model of free-free, synchrotron (where necessary), cosmic microwave background (CMB), thermal dust, and spinning dust components. We find that 42 of the 98 sources have significant (>5σ) excess emission at frequencies between 20 and 60 GHz. An analysis of the potential contribution of optically thick free-free emission from ultra-compact H ii regions, using IR colour criteria, reduces the significant AME sample to 27 regions. The spectrum of the AME is consistent with model spectra of spinning dust. Peak frequencies are in the range 20-35 GHz except for the California nebula (NGC 1499), which appears to have a high spinning dust peak frequency of (50 ± 17) GHz. The AME regions tend to be more spatially extended than regions with little or no AME. The AME intensity is strongly correlated with the sub-millimetre/IR flux densities and comparable to previous AME detections in the literature. AME emissivity, defined as the ratio of AME to dust optical depth, varies by an order of magnitude for the AME regions. The AME regions tend to be associated with cooler dust in the range 14-20 K and an average emissivity index, βd, of +1.8, while the non-AME regions are typically warmer, at 20-27 K. In agreement with previous studies, the AME emissivity appears to decrease with increasing column density. This supports the idea of AME originating from small grains that are known to be depleted in dense regions, probably due to coagulation onto larger grains. We also find a

  13. Searching for the Culprit of Anomalous Microwave Emission: An AKARI PAHrange Analysis of Probable Electric Dipole Emitting Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, A. C.; Onaka, T.; Sakon, I.; Ishihara, D.; Kaneda, H.; Lee, H. G.; Itoh, M.; Ohsawa, R.; Hammonds, M.

    In the march forward of interstellar medium inquiry, many new species of interstellar dust have been modelled and discovered. The modes by which these species interact and evolve are beginning to be understood, but in recent years a peculiar new feature has appeared in microwave surveys. Anomalous microwave emission (AME), appearing between 10 and 90Ghz, has been correlated with thermal dust emission, leading to the popular suggestion that this anomaly is electric dipole emission from spinning dust [2]. The observed frequencies suggest that spinning grains should be on the order of 10nm in size, hinting at poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. We present data from AKARI/Infrared Camera [1], due to the effective PAH/Unidentified Infrared Band (UIR) coverage of its 9um survey to investigate their role within a few regions showing strong AME in the Planck low frequency data. We include the well studied Perseus and ρOphiuchi clouds . We use the IRAS/IRIS 100µm data to account for the overall dust temperature. We present our results as abundance maps for dust emitting around 9µm, and 100µm. Part of the AME in these regions may actually be attributed to thermal dust emission, or the star forming nature of these targets is masking the vibrational modes of PAHs which should be present there, suggesting further investigation for various galactic environments.

  14. Observations of free-free and anomalous microwave emission from LDN 1622 with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Cleary, K.

    2015-11-01

    LDN 1622 has previously been identified as a possible strong source of dust-correlated anomalous microwave emission (AME). Previous observations were limited by resolution meaning that the radio emission could not be compared with current generation high-resolution infrared data from Herschel, Spitzer or Wide-field Infrared Sky Explorer. This paper presents arcminute resolution mapping observations of LDN 1622 at 4.85 and 13.7 GHz using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The 4.85 GHz map reveals a corona of free-free emission enclosing LDN 1622 that traces the photodissociation region of the cloud. The brightest peaks of the 4.85 GHz map are found to be within ≈10 per cent agreement with the expected free-free predicted by Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas H α data of LDN 1622. At 13.7 GHz, the AME flux density was found to be 7.0 ± 1.4 mJy and evidence is presented for a rising spectrum between 13.7 and 31 GHz. The spinning dust model of AME is found to naturally account for the flux seen at 13.7 GHz. Correlations between the diffuse 13.7 GHz emission and the diffuse mid-infrared emission are used to further demonstrate that the emission originating from LDN 1622 at 13.7 GHz is described by the spinning dust model.

  15. QUIJOTE scientific results - I. Measurements of the intensity and polarisation of the anomalous microwave emission in the Perseus molecular complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génova-Santos, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rebolo, R.; Peláez-Santos, A.; López-Caraballo, C. H.; Harper, S.; Watson, R. A.; Ashdown, M.; Barreiro, R. B.; Casaponsa, B.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gutiérrez, C. M.; Herranz, D.; Hoyland, R.; Lasenby, A.; López-Caniego, M.; Martínez-González, E.; McCulloch, M.; Melhuish, S.; Piccirillo, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Poidevin, F.; Razavi-Ghods, N.; Scott, P. F.; Titterington, D.; Tramonte, D.; Vielva, P.; Vignaga, R.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present Q-U-I JOint Tenerife Experiment (QUIJOTE) 10-20 GHz observations (194 h in total over ≈250 deg2) in intensity and polarisation of G159.6-18.5, one of the most widely studied regions harbouring anomalous microwave emission (AME). By combining with other publicly available intensity data, we achieve the most precise spectrum of the AME measured to date in an individual region, with 13 independent data points between 10 and 50 GHz being dominated by this emission. The four QUIJOTE data points provide the first independent confirmation of the downturn of the AME spectrum at low frequencies, initially unveiled by the COSMOlogical Structures On Medium Angular Scales experiment in this region. Our polarisation maps, which have an angular resolution of ≈1° and a sensitivity of ≈ 25 μK beam-1, are consistent with zero polarisation. We obtain upper limits on the polarisation fraction of Π < 6.3 and <2.8 per cent (95 per cent C.L.), respectively, at 12 and 18 GHz (ΠAME < 10.1 and <3.4 per cent with respect to the residual AME intensity), a frequency range where no AME polarisation observations have been reported to date. The combination of these constraints with those from other experiments confirm that all the magnetic dust models based on single-domain grains, and most of those considering randomly oriented magnetic inclusions, predict higher polarisation levels than is observed towards regions with AME. Also, neither of the two considered models of electric dipole emission seems to be compatible with all the observations together. More stringent constraints of the AME polarisation at 10-40 GHz are necessary to disentangle between different models, to which future QUIJOTE data will contribute.

  16. Diffuse Microwave Emission Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, R. A.; Mather, J.; Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Seiffert, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Levin, S. M.

    1996-12-01

    The Diffuse Microwave Emission Survey (DIMES) is a mission concept selected by NASA in 1995 to answer fundamental questions about the content and history of the universe. DIMES will use a set of absolutely calibrated cryogenic radiometers from a space platform to measure the frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at wavelengths 15--0.3 cm (frequency 2--100 GHz) to precision 0.1 mK or better. Measurements at centimeter wavelengths probe different physical processes than the COBE-FIRAS spectra at shorter wavelengths, and complement the anisotropy measurements from DMR, balloon and ground-based instruments, and the planned MAP and COBRAS/SAMBA satellites. DIMES will observe the free-free signal from early photoionization to establish the precise epoch of structure formation, and will measure or limit energy release at redshift 10(4) < z < 10(7) by measuring the chemical potential distortion of the CMB spectrum. Both are likely under current cosmological theory and allowed by current measurement limits; even an upper limit at the expected sensitivity 10(-5) MJy/sr will place important constraints on the matter content, structure, and evolution of the universe. Detecting these distortions or showing that they do not exist constitutes the last frontier of CMB observations.

  17. Characterizing the Dust-Correlated Anomalous Emission in LDN 1622

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kieran; Casassus, Simon; Dickinson, Clive; Lawrence, Charles; Sakon, Itsuki

    2008-03-01

    The search for 'dust-correlated microwave emission' was started by the surprising excess correlation of COBE-DMR maps, at 31.5, 53 and 91GHz, with DIRBE dust emission at 140 microns. It was first thought to be Galactic free-free emission from the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM). However, Leitch et al. (1997) ruled out a link with free-free by comparing with Halpha templates and first confirmed the anomalous nature of this emission. Since then, this emission has been detected by a number of experiments in the frequency range 5-60 GHz. The most popular explanation is emission from ultra-small spinning dust grains (first postulated by Erickson, 1957), which is expected to have a spectrum that is highly peaked at about 20 GHz. Spinning dust models appear to be broadly consistent with microwave data at high latitudes, but the data have not been conclusive, mainly due to the difficulty of foreground separation in CMB data. LDN 1622 is a dark cloud that lies within the Orion East molecular cloud at a distance of 120 pc. Recent cm-wave observations, in combination with WMAP data, have verified the detection of anomalous dust-correlated emission in LDN 1622. This mid-IR-cm correlation in LDN 1622 is currently the only observational evidence that very small grains VSG emit at GHz frequencies. We propose a programme of spectroscopic observations of LDN 1622 with Spitzer IRS to address the following questions: (i) Are the IRAS 12 and 25 microns bands tracing VSG emission in LDN 1622? (ii) What Mid-IR features and continuum bands best correlate with the cm-wave emission? and (iii) How do the dust properties vary with the cm-wave emission? These questions have important implications for high-sensitivity CMB experiments.

  18. The cut-sky cosmic microwave background is not anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2010-05-15

    The observed angular correlation function of the cosmic microwave background has previously been reported to be anomalous, particularly when measured in regions of the sky uncontaminated by Galactic emission. Recent work by Efstathiou et al. presents a Bayesian comparison of isotropic theories, casting doubt on the significance of the purported anomaly. We extend this analysis to all anisotropic Gaussian theories with vanishing mean (<{delta}T>=0), using the much wider class of models to confirm that the anomaly is not likely to point to new physics. On the other hand if there is any new physics to be gleaned, it results from low-l alignments which will be better quantified by a full-sky statistic. We also consider quadratic maximum likelihood power spectrum estimators that are constructed assuming isotropy. The underlying assumptions are therefore false if the ensemble is anisotropic. Nonetheless we demonstrate that, for theories compatible with the observed sky, these estimators (while no longer optimal) remain statistically superior to pseudo-C{sub l} power spectrum estimators.

  19. Microwave emissions from snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation emitted from dry and wet snowpack in the microwave region (1 to 100 GHz) is discussed and related to ground observations. Results from theoretical model calculations match the brightness temperatures obtained by truck mounted, airborne and spaceborne microwave sensor systems. Snow wetness and internal layer structure complicate the snow parameter retrieval algorithm. Further understanding of electromagnetic interaction with snowpack may eventually provide a technique to probe the internal snow properties

  20. Microwave emission and crop residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; O'Neill, Peggy E.

    1991-01-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to determine the significance of crop residues or stubble in estimating the emission of the underlying soil. Observations using truck-mounted L and C band passive microwave radiometers showed that for dry wheat and soybeans the dry residue caused negligible attenuation of the background emission. Green residues, with water contents typical of standing crops, did have a significant effect on the background emission. Results for these green residues also indicated that extremes in plant structure, as created using parallel and perpendicular stalk orientations, can cause very large differences in the degree of attenuation.

  1. Microwave emission from polar firn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave emission from a half-space medium, characterized by coordinate dependent scattering and absorbing centers, was calculated by numerically solving the radiative transfer equation by the method of invariant imbedding. Rayleigh scattering phase functions and scattering induced polarization of the radiation were included in the calculation. Using the scattering and extinction data of polar firn the brightness temperature was calculated for the 1.55 cm wavelength. This study was the first quantitative comparison of the results of numerical calculation using the actual measured information of crystal size with the observed data.

  2. Emissions from cooking microwave popcorn.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Jacky A; Krebs, Kenneth A; Liu, Xiaoyu

    2007-01-01

    This study characterized chemicals released into a chamber in the process of cooking microwave popcorn. Seventeen types of microwave popcorn from eight different brands were studied. The work proceeded in two phases: phase one investigated chemicals emitted during popping and opening, phase two investigated chemicals emitted at discrete intervals from 0-40 minutes post-pop opening. The research was performed using a microwave oven enclosed in a chamber with ports for air sampling of particulate matter (PM) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs in the air samples were identified and quantified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). PM was characterized using both an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to cover a full range of emitted sizes. The compounds measured during popping and opening included butter flavoring components such as diacetyl, butyric acid, acetoin, propylene glycol, 2-nonanone, and triacetin and bag components such as p-xylene and perfluorinated alcohol 8:2 telomer. The greatest chemical quantity is emitted when the bag is opened post-popping; more than 80% of the total chemical emissions occur at this time. PMID:17987444

  3. Anomalous microwave spectra of snow cover observed from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Simon; Grody, Norman

    2000-06-01

    Brightness temperature spectra measured by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) flown onboard F8 and F14 satellites of the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) during the 1987-1988 and 1997-1998 winter periods are analyzed concurrently with the data from snow monitoring stations over the former Soviet Union. Extensive analysis reveals the existence of two anomalies in the microwave thermal radiation spectra of snow cover. It is shown that in the beginning of winter the SSM/I measurements at 19, 37, and 85 GHz generally follow a classical pattern; that is, the brightness temperatures decrease for both increasing snow depth and increasing frequency. Dramatic departures from this behavior is observed around the middle of winter: The brightness temperatures reach a minimum and then begin to increase despite the fact that the snow depth remains constant or even continues to grow. Statistical analysis of the snow pack characteristics and SSM/I measurements is presented around the time when the brightness temperatures reach a minimum. The anomalous spectral characteristics are analyzed using a two-stream radiative transfer model and dense media theory. It is shown how metamorphic changes in the snow crystalline structure are responsible for the brightness temperature minimum. The second departure from the normal snow signature is the inversion of brightness temperature spectra; that is, the higher-frequency brightness temperature is greater than the low-frequency measurements. It is shown that this phenomenon, observed previously over Greenland and Antarctica, is much more extensive. Radiative transfer simulations were used to show that a dense layer of surface crust on top of old coarse-grained snow can produce the invented brightness temperature spectrum.

  4. Detailed study of the microwave emission of the supernova remnant 3C 396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Carretti, E.; de Bernardis, P.; Genova-Santos, R.; Masi, S.; Mason, B.; Perera, D.; Piacentini, F.; Reach, B.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    We have observed the supernova remnant 3C 396 in the microwave region using the Parkes 64-m telescope. Observations have been made at 8.4, 13.5, and 18.6 GHz and in polarization at 21.5 GHz. We have used data from several other observatories, including previously unpublished observations performed by the Green Bank Telescope at 31.2 GHz, to investigate the nature of the microwave emission of 3C 396. Results show a spectral energy distribution dominated by a single component power-law emission with α = (-0.364 ± 0.017). Data do not favour the presence of anomalous microwave emission coming from the source. Polarized emission at 21.5 GHz is consistent with synchrotron-dominated emission. We present microwave maps and correlate them with infrared (IR) maps in order to characterize the interplay between thermal dust and microwave emission. IR versus microwave TT plots reveal poor correlation between mid-IR and microwave emission from the core of the source. On the other hand, a correlation is detected in the tail emission of the outer shell of 3C 396, which could be ascribed to Galactic contamination.

  5. Detailed study of the microwave emission of the supernova remnant 3C 396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Carretti, E.; de Bernardis, P.; Genova-Santos, R.; Masi, S.; Mason, B.; Perera, D.; Piacentini, F.; Reach, B.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    We have observed the supernova remnant 3C 396 in the microwave region using the Parkes 64-m telescope. Observations have been made at 8.4 GHz, 13.5 GHz, and 18.6 GHz and in polarisation at 21.5 GHz. We have used data from several other observatories, including previously unpublished observations performed by the Green Bank Telescope at 31.2 GHz, to investigate the nature of the microwave emission of 3C 396. Results show a spectral energy distribution dominated by a single component power law emission with α = ( - 0.364 ± 0.017). Data do not favour the presence of anomalous microwave emission coming from the source. Polarised emission at 21.5 GHz is consistent with synchrotron-dominated emission. We present microwave maps and correlate them with infrared (IR) maps in order to characterise the interplay between thermal dust and microwave emission. IR vs. microwave TT plots reveal poor correlation between mid-infrared and microwave emission from the core of the source. On the other hand, a correlation is detected in the tail emission of the outer shell of 3C 396, which could be ascribed to Galactic contamination.

  6. ANOMALOUS PARITY ASYMMETRY OF THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE POWER SPECTRUM DATA AT LOW MULTIPOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel

    2010-05-10

    We have investigated non-Gaussianity of our early universe by comparing the parity asymmetry of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) power spectrum with simulations. We find that odd-parity preference of the WMAP data (2 {<=} l {<=} 18) is anomalous at 4-in-1000 level. We find it likely that low quadrupole power is part of this parity asymmetry rather than an isolated anomaly. Further investigation is required to find out whether the origin of this anomaly is a cosmological or a systematic effect. The data from Planck Surveyor, which has systematics distinct from WMAP, will help us to resolve the origin of the anomalous odd-parity preference.

  7. Surveys of Microwave Emission from Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, Kazuyuki; Ogio, Shoichi; Iijima, Takashi; Yamamoto, Tokonatsu

    2011-09-01

    A possibility of detection of microwave molecular bremsstrahlung radiation from Extensive Air Showers was reported by AMBER group [1] [2]. This method has a potential to provide a high duty cycle and a new technique for measuring longitudinal profile of EAS. To survey this microwave emission from EAS, we built prototype detectors using parabolic antenna dishes for broadcasting satellites, and we are operating detectors with a small EAS array at Osaka City Univercity. Here, we report our detector configurations and the current experimental status.

  8. Anomalous photoelectric emission from Ag on zinc-phthalocyanine film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Senku; Otani, Tomohiro; Fukuzawa, Ken; Ogawa, Koji; Azuma, Junpei; Yamamoto, Isamu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Kamada, Masao; Hiromitsu, Ichiro

    2014-05-01

    Photoelectric emission from organic and metal thin films is generally observed with irradiation of photon energy larger than 4 eV. In this paper, however, we report photoelectric emission from Ag on a zinc-phthalocyanine (ZnPc) layer at a photon energy of 3.4 eV. The threshold energy for this photoelectric emission is much smaller than the work function of Ag estimated by conventional photoelectron spectroscopy. The photoelectric emission by low-energy photons is significant for Ag thicknesses of less than 1 nm. Photoelectron spectroscopy and morphological study of the Ag/ZnPc suggest that the anomalous photoelectric emission from the Ag surface is caused by a vacuum level shift at the Ag/ZnPc interface and by surface plasmons of the Ag nanoparticles.

  9. Anomalous photoelectric emission from Ag on zinc-phthalocyanine film

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Senku; Otani, Tomohiro; Fukuzawa, Ken; Hiromitsu, Ichiro; Ogawa, Koji; Azuma, Junpei; Yamamoto, Isamu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Kamada, Masao

    2014-05-12

    Photoelectric emission from organic and metal thin films is generally observed with irradiation of photon energy larger than 4 eV. In this paper, however, we report photoelectric emission from Ag on a zinc-phthalocyanine (ZnPc) layer at a photon energy of 3.4 eV. The threshold energy for this photoelectric emission is much smaller than the work function of Ag estimated by conventional photoelectron spectroscopy. The photoelectric emission by low-energy photons is significant for Ag thicknesses of less than 1 nm. Photoelectron spectroscopy and morphological study of the Ag/ZnPc suggest that the anomalous photoelectric emission from the Ag surface is caused by a vacuum level shift at the Ag/ZnPc interface and by surface plasmons of the Ag nanoparticles.

  10. Vacuum field energy and spontaneous emission in anomalously dispersive cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.; Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2011-05-15

    Anomalously dispersive cavities, particularly white-light cavities, may have larger bandwidth to finesse ratios than their normally dispersive counterparts. Partly for this reason, they have been proposed for use in laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO)-like gravity-wave detectors and in ring-laser gyroscopes. In this paper we analyze the quantum noise associated with anomalously dispersive cavity modes. The vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode is proportional to the cavity-averaged group velocity of that mode. For anomalously dispersive cavities with group index values between 1 and 0, this means that the total vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode must exceed ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}/2. For white-light cavities in particular, the group index approaches zero and the vacuum field energy of a particular spatial mode may be significantly enhanced. We predict enhanced spontaneous emission rates into anomalously dispersive cavity modes and broadened laser linewidths when the linewidth of intracavity emitters is broader than the cavity linewidth.

  11. Anomalous radon emission as precursor of medium to strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria

    2016-03-01

    Anomalous radon (Rn222) emissions enhanced by forthcoming earthquakes is considered to be a precursory phenomenon related to an increased geotectonic activity in seismic areas. Rock microfracturing in the Earth's crust preceding a seismic rupture may cause local surface deformation fields, rock dislocations, charged particle generation and motion, electrical conductivity changes, radon and other gases emission, fluid diffusion, electrokinetic, piezomagnetic and piezoelectric effects as well as climate fluctuations. Space-time anomalies of radon gas emitted in underground water, soil and near the ground air weeks to days in the epicentral areas can be associated with the strain stress changes that occurred before the occurrence of medium and strong earthquakes. This paper aims to investigate temporal variations of radon concentration levels in air near or in the ground by the use of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) CR-39 and LR-115 in relation with some important seismic events recorded in Vrancea region, Romania.

  12. Emission characteristics of snow and ice in the microwave range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, M. F.; Edgerton, A. T.

    1971-01-01

    Some results are presented of a two year investigation on microwave emissions from snow. Included in the investigation were: theoretical studies; laboratory measurements of electrical properties of snow and similar materials; numerical modelling of hypothetical and real snowpacks; analysis of microwave data obtained on everflights; and quantative measurements of natural and artificial snowpacks made in the field. Results indicate that a fairly simple combination of microwave polarizations and frequencies can ultimately be used to monitor the water equivalent and free-water content as well as the distribution of snow. This understanding may also shed light on the physics of microwave emission from other wet, granular, layered media.

  13. Galactic Emission in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles

    2003-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has mapped the full sky in five microwave frequency bands from 23 to 94 GHz with sub-degree angular resolution. While the primary goal of the mission is to measure the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, the data also provide a wealth of information about microwave emission from the Milky Way. We present full sky maps of the synchrotron, free-free, and dust emission obtained from the first-year data and comment on how these maps inform our understanding of the interstellar medium.

  14. Anomalous conductivity and secondary electron emission in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Boniface, C.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2006-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of the effects of electron-wall interactions on cross magnetic field electron momentum and energy losses in Hall effect thrusters. By coupling a semianalytical model of the wall sheath similar to models used by several authors in this context, with a two-dimensional hybrid simulation of a Hall effect thruster, we find that the cross magnetic field conductivity enhanced by electron-wall collisions and secondary electron emission is not sufficient to explain the conductivity deduced from experiments. Calculated current-voltage curves including electron-wall collisions from a standard sheath model as the sole 'anomalous' conductivity mechanism do not reproduce the measurements, especially at high discharge voltages, and for various wall ceramics. Results also show that a one-dimensional description of electron-wall collisions with a constant radial plasma density profile as used by many authors leads to an overestimation of the contribution of electron-wall interactions to cross magnetic field conductivity.

  15. Microwave anomalous propagation (AP) measurement over Akure South-Western Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adediji, A. T.; Ajewole, M. O.

    2010-04-01

    Anomalous propagation (Anaprop) of microwave radiation is known to be caused by several meteorological conditions. In this study, radio refractive index and modified refractivity gradient were computed using the results of measurements of atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity made in Akure (7.15°N, 5.12°E), South Western Nigeria using Davis 6162 Wireless Vantage Pro2 weather stations (Integrated Sensor Suite, ISS) positioned at five different height levels beginning from the ground surface and at intervals of 50 m from the ground to a height of 200 m on a tower/mast owned by the Nigeria Television Authority (NTA) located at Iju in Akure north local government area of Ondo state but which is no longer being used. The study utilized one year of data measured between January and December 2008. From the results, the modified refractivity was calculated and found to increase with increasing altitude. The values were observed to be generally high during the rainy periods and generally low during the dry periods. The study also revealed that for microwave propagation in this geographic zone, the propagation condition is mostly super-refractive.

  16. On the Anomalous Microwave Power Dependency of both Non-Resonant and Cu2+ Resonant Microwave Absorption in a YBa2Cu3O7-δ Type Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velter-Stefanescu, M.; Duliu, O. G.

    2007-04-01

    A ceramic high temperature superconductor [HTS] of Y-Ba-Cu-O type has been investigated at 77 K by using a standard X-band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) configuration. At very low microwave power (< 1 mW) the non-resonant or zero field signal (ZFS) was in phase with DPPH signal, pleading for an unambiguous absorption process, but it commutes to a typical superconductor signal (i.e. opposite to DPPH signal phase) with increasing the microwave power. At the same time, Cu2+ signal appreciably changes its shape with increasing microwave power. These anomalous behaviors could be in part explained by a conventional SQUID response at microwave frequency by taking into account that the sample itself could be described by a collection of both Josephson and proximity junctions.

  17. Objective Characterization of Snow Microstructure for Microwave Emission Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, Michael; Kim, Edward J.; Molotch, Noah P.; Margulis, Steven A.; Courville, Zoe; Malzler, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Passive microwave (PM) measurements are sensitive to the presence and quantity of snow, a fact that has long been used to monitor snowcover from space. In order to estimate total snow water equivalent (SWE) within PM footprints (on the order of approx 100 sq km), it is prerequisite to understand snow microwave emission at the point scale and how microwave radiation integrates spatially; the former is the topic of this paper. Snow microstructure is one of the fundamental controls on the propagation of microwave radiation through snow. Our goal in this study is to evaluate the prospects for driving the Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks with objective measurements of snow specific surface area to reproduce measured brightness temperatures when forced with objective measurements of snow specific surface area (S). This eliminates the need to treat the grain size as a free-fit parameter.

  18. Extracting Microwave Emissivity Characteristics over City using AMSR-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Zhang, L.; Jiang, L.; Li, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The spectrums of different land types are very important in the application of remote sensing. Different spectrums of different land types can be used in surface classification, change detection, and so on. The microwave emissivity over land is the foundation of land parameters retrieval using passive microwave remote sensing. It depends on land type due to different objects’ structure, moisture and roughness on the earth. It has shown that the land surface microwave emissivity contributed to atmosphere temperature and moisture retrieval. Meanwhile, it depends on land type, vegetation cover, and moisture et al.. There are many researches on microwave emissivity of various land types, such as bare soil, vegetation, snow, but city was less mentioned [1]. However, with the development of society, the process of urbanization accelerated quickly. The area of city expanded fast and the fraction of city area increased in one microwave pixel, especially in The North China Plain (about 30%). The passive microwave pixel containing city has impact on satellite observation and surface parameters retrieval then. So it is essential to study the emissivity of city in order to improve the accuracy of land surface parameters retrieval from passive microwave remote sensing. To study the microwave emissivity of city, some ‘pure’ city pixels were selected according to IGBP classification data, which was defined the fraction cover of city is larger than 85%. The city emissivity was calculated using AMSR-E L2A brightness temperature and GLDAS land surface temperature data at different frequencies and polarizations over 2008 in China. Then the seasonal variation was analyzed along the year. Finally, the characteristic of city emissivity were compared with some meteorological data, seeking the relationship between city emissivity and climatic factors. The results have shown that the emissivity of city was different for different frequencies. It increased with the frequency becoming

  19. Study of the microwave emissivity characteristics over Gobi Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yubao, Qiu; Lijuan, Shi; Wenbo, Wu

    2014-03-01

    The microwave emissivity represents the capacity of the thermal radiation of the surface, and it is the significant parameter for understanding the geophysical processes such as surface energy budget and surface radiation. Different land covers have different emissivity properties, and the Gobi Desert in Central Asia seriously impact the sandstorms occur and develop in China, because of its special geographical environment and surface soil characteristics. In this study half-month averaged microwave emissivity from March 2003 to February 2004 over the Gobi Desert has been estimated. Emissivities in this area at different frequencies, polarization and their seasonal variations are discussed respectively. The results showed that emissivity polarization difference decrease as the frequency increases, and the polarization difference is large (0.03-0.127). The H polarization emissivity increases with increasing frequency, but the V-polarized microwave emissivity is reduced with increasing frequency because of the body scattering. In winter, emissivity decreases sharply in snow covered area, especially for higher frequencies (such as 89GHz). In addition, we compared emissivity with MODIS NDVI data at the same time in the Gobi Desert, and the results indicate that NDVI derived the good negative correlation with microwave emissivity polarization difference at 37GHz.

  20. Estimating microwave emissivity of sea foam by Rayleigh method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-Bo; Wei, En-Bo; Jia, Yan-Xia

    2013-01-01

    To estimate microwave emissivity of sea foam consisting of dense seawater-coated air bubbles, the effective medium approximation is applied by regarding the foam layer as an isotropic dielectric medium. The Rayleigh method is developed to calculate effective permittivity of the sea foam layer at different microwave frequencies, air volume fraction, and seawater coating thickness. With a periodic lattice model of coated bubbles and multilayered structures of effective foam media, microwave emissivities of sea foam layers with different effective permittivities obtained by the Rayleigh method are calculated. Good agreement is obtained by comparing model results with experimental data at 1.4, 10.8, and 36.5 GHz. Furthermore, sea foam microwave emissivities calculated by well-known effective permittivity formulas are investigated, such as the Silberstein, refractive model, and Maxwell-Garnett formulas. Their results are compared with those of our model. It is shown that the Rayleigh method gives more reasonable results.

  1. Microwave radiometric system for biomedical 'true temperature' and emissivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Lüdeke, K M; Köhler, J

    1983-09-01

    A novel type of radiometer is described, which solves the problem of emissivity-(mismatch)-independent noise temperature measurements by simultaneous registration of an object's apparent temperature and its reflectivity with just one microwave receiver and real-time calculation of the object's emissivity and its actual temperature. PMID:6558132

  2. Enhancement of LIBS emission using antenna-coupled microwave.

    PubMed

    Khumaeni, Ali; Motonobu, Tampo; Katsuaki, Akaoka; Masabumi, Miyabe; Ikuo, Wakaida

    2013-12-01

    Intensified microwave coupled by a loop antenna (diameter of 3 mm) has been employed to enhance the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emission. In this method, a laser plasma was induced on Gd₂O₃ sample at a reduced pressure by focusing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns, 5 mJ) at a local point, at which electromagnetic field was produced by introducing microwave radiation using loop antenna. The plasma emission was significantly enhanced by absorbing the microwave radiation, resulting in high-temperature plasma and long-lifetime plasma emission. By using this method, the enhancement of Gd lines was up to 32 times, depending upon the emission lines observed. A linear calibration curve of Ca contained in the Gd₂O₃ sample was made. The detection limit of Ca was approximately 2 mg/kg. This present method is very useful for identification of trace elements in nuclear fuel and radioactive materials. PMID:24514526

  3. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  4. Microwave measurement of thermal emission from the sea.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, K. W.; Hall, W. F.; Hardy, W. N.; Hidy, G. M.; Ho, W. W.; Love, A. W.; Van Melle, M. J.; Wang, H.

    1971-01-01

    Review of the results of some experimental and theoretical investigations of various limiting factors in microwave measurements of thermal emission from the sea, ranging from instrumentation to surface properties of the ocean. It is shown that absolute measurement of the thermal emission from the sea can be made at 2.69 GHz, with accuracies of better than plus or minus 1 K within the present state of microwave instrument development. The principal uncertainties on interpretation of such observations in terms of molecular temperature of the sea involve: (1) surface contamination such as oil slicks, (2) spray and foaming, (3) salinity variation, and (4) surface waves.

  5. Source dynamics of the microwave emission during a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum Shaik, Shaheda; Gary, Dale E.; Nita, Gelu M.

    2016-05-01

    Determining the microwave burst source characteristics is important to understand the parameters of the flare process which produce the microwave emission. Previous studies show that the microwave solar bursts do typically exhibit a single source of emission but also often show inhomogeneous sources as a function of frequency at some periods during the burst. This study focuses on the spectral and spatial dynamics of the microwave gyrosynchrotron source through the microwave spectral and imaging analysis. We report the source characteristics of few impulsive flare events observed by the newly upgraded Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) in the frequency range of 2.5 to 18 GHz and from the complimentary data of (Nobeyama Radioheliograph / Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters) NoRH / NoRP. The low frequency optically thick part of the microwave spectrum is an indicator of spatial inhomogeneity and complexity of the sources. We concentrate in the dynamics of the low frequency spectrum (intensity and spectral index) measured by EOVSA, and compare it to the corresponding spatial propoerties of the NoRH sources observed at 17 GHz and to the loop structures seen in the EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet) images with SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory).

  6. Fine and ultrafine particle emissions from microwave popcorn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Avalos, J; Zhu, Y

    2014-04-01

    This study characterized fine (PM2.5 ) and ultrafine particle (UFP, diameter < 100 nm) emissions from microwave popcorn and analyzed influential factors. Each pre-packed popcorn bag was cooked in a microwave oven enclosed in a stainless steel chamber for 3 min. The number concentration and size distribution of UFPs and PM2.5 mass concentration were measured inside the chamber repeatedly for five different flavors under four increasing power settings using either the foil-lined original package or a brown paper bag. UFPs and PM2.5 generated by microwaving popcorn were 150-560 and 350-800 times higher than the emissions from microwaving water, respectively. About 90% of the total particles emitted were in the ultrafine size range. The emitted PM concentrations varied significantly with flavor. Replacing the foil-lined original package with a brown paper bag significantly reduced the peak concentration by 24-87% for total particle number and 36-70% for PM2.5 . A positive relationship was observed between both UFP number and PM2.5 mass and power setting. The emission rates of microwave popcorn ranged from 1.9 × 10(10) to 8.0 × 10(10) No./min for total particle number and from 134 to 249 μg/min for PM2.5 . PMID:24106981

  7. SPINNING DUST EMISSION: EFFECTS OF IRREGULAR GRAIN SHAPE, TRANSIENT HEATING, AND COMPARISON WITH WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.; Draine, B. T.

    2011-11-10

    Planck is expected to answer crucial questions on the early universe, but it also provides further understanding on anomalous microwave emission. Electric dipole emission from spinning dust grains continues to be the favored interpretation of anomalous microwave emission. In this paper, we present a method to calculate the rotational emission from small grains of irregular shape with moments of inertia I{sub 1} {>=} I{sub 2} {>=} I{sub 3}. We show that a torque-free rotating irregular grain with a given angular momentum radiates at multiple frequency modes. The resulting spinning dust spectrum has peak frequency and emissivity increasing with the degree of grain shape irregularity, which is defined by I{sub 1}:I{sub 2}:I{sub 3}. We discuss how the orientation of the dipole moment {mu} in body coordinates affects the spinning dust spectrum for different regimes of internal thermal fluctuations. We show that the spinning dust emissivity for the case of strong thermal fluctuations is less sensitive to the orientation of {mu} than in the case of weak thermal fluctuations. We calculate spinning dust spectra for a range of gas density and dipole moment. The effect of compressible turbulence on spinning dust emission is investigated. We show that the emission in a turbulent medium increases by a factor from 1.2 to 1.4 relative to that in a uniform medium, as the sonic Mach number M{sub s} increases from 2 to 7. Finally, spinning dust parameters are constrained by fitting our improved model to five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cross-correlation foreground spectra, for both the H{alpha}-correlated and 100-{mu}m-correlated emission spectra.

  8. Salinity effects on the microwave emission of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; Oneill, Peggy E.

    1987-01-01

    Controlled plot experiments were conducted to collect L and C band passive microwave data concurrent with ground observations of salinity and soil moisture. Two dielectric mixing models were used with an emission model to predict the emissivity from a bare smooth uniform profile. The models produce nearly identical results when near zero salinity is involved and reproduce the observed data at L band extremely well. Discrepancies at C band are attributed to sampling depth problems. Comparisons of predicted emissivities at various salinities with observed values indicate that the dynamic range of the emissivities can be explained using either of the dielectric mixing models. Evaluation of the entire data set, which included four salinity levels, indicates that for general application the effects of soil salinity can be ignored in interpreting microwave data for estimating soil moisture under most agricultural conditions.

  9. Effects of salinity on the microwave emission of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.

    1986-01-01

    Controlled plot experiments were conducted to collect L and C band passive microwave data concurrent with ground observations of salinity and soil moisture. Two dielectric mixing models were used with an emission model to predict the emissivity from a bare smooth uniform profile. The models produce nearly identical results when near zero salinity is involved and reproduce the observed data at L band extremely well. Discrepancies at C band are attributed to sampling depth problems. Comparisons of predicted emissivities at various salinities with observed values indicate that the dynamic range of the emissivities can be explained using either of the dielectric mixing models. Evaluation of the entire data set, which included four salinity levels, indicates that for general application the effects of soil salinity can be ignored in interpreting microwave data for estimating soil moisture under most agricultural conditions.

  10. Modelling of Nonthermal Microwave Emission from Twisted Magnetic Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Microwave gyrosynchrotron radio emission generated by nonthermal electrons in twisted magnetic loops is modelled using the recently developed simulation tool GX Simulator. We consider isotropic and anisotropic pitch-angle distributions. The main scope of the work is to understand the impact of a twisted magnetic field topology on radio emission maps. We have found that nonthermal electrons inside twisted magnetic loops produce gyrosynchrotron radio emission with a particular polarisation distribution. The polarisation sign inversion line is inclined relatively to the axis of the loop. The radio emission source is more compact in the case of a less twisted loop, assuming an anisotropic pitch-angle distribution of nonthermal electrons.

  11. Modelling of Nonthermal Microwave Emission from Twisted Magnetic Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Microwave gyrosynchrotron radio emission generated by nonthermal electrons in twisted magnetic loops is modelled using the recently developed simulation tool GX Simulator. We consider isotropic and anisotropic pitch-angle distributions. The main scope of the work is to understand the impact of a twisted magnetic field topology on radio emission maps. We have found that nonthermal electrons inside twisted magnetic loops produce gyrosynchrotron radio emission with a particular polarisation distribution. The polarisation sign inversion line is inclined relatively to the axis of the loop. The radio emission source is more compact in the case of a less twisted loop, assuming an anisotropic pitch-angle distribution of nonthermal electrons.

  12. Estimations of deciduous forest biomass by analyzing vegetation microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongjun; Zhang, Lixin; Zhao, Shaojie; Wang, Huan

    2011-09-01

    Forest is important in global carbon cycle and has potential impact on global climatic change. Whether the soil moisture under forest area can be detected by microwave emission signature is unknown due to the dense forest cover. Also, the relationship between forest biomass and its microwave emissivity and transmissivity is of interest to be studied. The microwave emission contribution received by the radiometer above the forest canopy comes from both the soil surface and vegetation layer. In this study, a high-order emission model, Matrix-Doubling, was employed to simulate the emissivity of a young deciduous forest. A field experiment before and after watering the deciduous tree stand was carried in June 5, 2011 in Baoding, China to verify the model, and to measure the tree transmissivity. A tree was selected to be cut to measure the tree parameters and weighed its biomass. Assuming the forest as a non-scattering medium, the effective single-scattering albedo is obtained for 0th-order model by fitting the same emissivity from Matrix-Doubling model. For lower albedo which could be ignored, transmissivity of trees can be deduced by measured Brightness Temperatures before and after watering the underlying soil. The relationship between forest biomass and its transmissivity is presented in this paper.

  13. Microwave emission characteristics of sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, A. T.; Poe, G.

    1972-01-01

    A general classification is presented for sea ice brightness temperatures with categories of high and low emission, corresponding to young and weathered sea ice, respectively. A sea ice emission model was developed which allows variations of ice salinity and temperature in directions perpendicular to the ice surface.

  14. A search for microwave emission from cosmic ray air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christopher Lee

    At the highest energies, the sources of cosmic rays should be among the most powerful extragalactic accelerators. Large observatories have revealed a flux suppression above a few 1019 eV, similar to the expected effect of the interaction of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with the cosmic microwave background. The Pierre Auger Observatory has measured the largest sample of cosmic ray induced extensive air showers (EAS) at the highest energies leading to a precise measurement of the energy spectrum, hints of spatial anisotropy, and a surprising change in the chemical composition at the highest energies. To answer the question of the origin of UHECRs a larger sample of high quality data will be required to reach a statistically significant result. One of the possible techniques suggested to achieve this much larger data sample, in a cost effective way, is ultra-wide field of view microwave telescopes which would operate in an analogous way to the already successful fluorescence detection (FD) technique. Detecting EAS in microwaves could be done with 100% duty cycle and essentially no atmospheric effects. This presents many advantages over the FD which has a 10% duty cycle and requires extensive atmospheric monitoring for calibration. We have pursued both prototype detector designs and improved laboratory measurements, the results of which are reported herein, and published in (Alvarez-Muniz et al., 2013; Alvarez-Muniz et al., 2012a; Williams et al., 2013; Alvarez-Muniz et al., 2013). The Microwave Detection of Air Showers (MIDAS) experiment is the first ultra-wide field of view imaging telescope deployed to detect isotropic microwave emission from EAS. With 61 days of livetime data operating on the University of Chicago campus we were able to set new limits on isotropic microwave emission from extensive air showers. The new limits rule out current laboratory air plasma measurements (Gorham et al., 2008) by more than five sigma. The MIDAS experiment continues to

  15. Imaging spectroscopy of solar microwave radiation. 1: Flaring emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Lemen, James R.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of an impulsive microwave burst on the Sun with both high spatial and spectral resolution, made with the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). We used the measured brightness temperature spectrum to infer the emission process responsible for each microwave source, and to derive physical conditions in the source region. We confimed our predictions using soft X-ray measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), soft X-ray images from Yohkoh, and H-alpha flare images together with sunspots and magnetogram images from the Big Bear Solar Observatory.

  16. Quantifying Uncertainties in Land-Surface Microwave Emissivity Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Prigent, Catherine; Norouzi, Hamidreza; Aires, Filipe; Boukabara, Sid-Ahmed; Furuzawa, Fumie A.; Masunaga, Hirohiko

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties in the retrievals of microwaveland-surface emissivities are quantified over two types of land surfaces: desert and tropical rainforest. Retrievals from satellite-based microwave imagers, including the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager, and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System, are studied. Our results show that there are considerable differences between the retrievals from different sensors and from different groups over these two land-surface types. In addition, the mean emissivity values show different spectral behavior across the frequencies. With the true emissivity assumed largely constant over both of the two sites throughout the study period, the differences are largely attributed to the systematic and random errors inthe retrievals. Generally, these retrievals tend to agree better at lower frequencies than at higher ones, with systematic differences ranging 1%-4% (3-12 K) over desert and 1%-7% (3-20 K) over rainforest. The random errors within each retrieval dataset are in the range of 0.5%-2% (2-6 K). In particular, at 85.5/89.0 GHz, there are very large differences between the different retrieval datasets, and within each retrieval dataset itself. Further investigation reveals that these differences are most likely caused by rain/cloud contamination, which can lead to random errors up to 10-17 K under the most severe conditions.

  17. Flutter effect and emission in the region of anomalous and normal doppler effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nemtsov, B.E.

    1986-06-01

    This paper investigates the excitation (flutter) of a membrane in the flow of a liquid of finite depth due to the emission of long gravity waves. It is shown that loss of stability occurs due to predominance of emission of gravity waves of negative energy (anomalous Doppler effect) over waves of positive energy. Estimates of typical increments are presented; the instability develops during a period that approximately equals 1/7 sec.

  18. Aircraft measurements of microwave emission from Arctic Sea ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilheit, T.; Nordberg, W.; Blinn, J.; Campbell, W.; Edgerton, A.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of the microwave emission from Arctic Sea ice were made with aircraft at 8 wavelengths ranging from 0.510 to 2.81 cm. The expected contrast in emissivities between ice and water was observed at all wavelengths. Distributions of sea ice and open water were mapped from altitudes up to 11 km in the presence of dense cloud cover. Different forms of ice also exhibited strong contrasts in emissivity. Emissivity differences of up to 0.2 were observed between two types of ice at the 0.811-cm wavelength. The higher emissivity ice type is tentatively identified as having been formed more recently than the lower emissivity ice. ?? 1971.

  19. Observations of microwave continuum emission from air shower plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P. W.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Varner, G. S.; Hebert, C. L.; Miki, C.; Kowalski, J.; Ruckman, L.; Stokes, B. T.; Beatty, J. J.; Connolly, A.; Saltzberg, D.; Chen, P.; Hast, C.; Ng, J.; Reil, K.; Walz, D.; Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate a possible new technique for microwave detection of cosmic-ray extensive air showers which relies on detection of expected continuum radiation in the microwave range, caused by free-electron collisions with neutrals in the tenuous plasma left after the passage of the shower. We performed an initial experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator laboratory in 2003 and measured broadband microwave emission from air ionized via high-energy electrons and photons. A follow-up experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in the summer of 2004 confirmed the major features of the previous Argonne Wakefield Accelerator observations with better precision. Prompted by these results we built a prototype detector using satellite television technology and have made measurements suggestive of the detection of cosmic-ray extensive air showers. The method, if confirmed by experiments now in progress, could provide a high-duty cycle complement to current nitrogen fluorescence observations.

  20. Microwave emission from an irregular snow layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, H. J.; Lee, K. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Emission from an irregular snow layer is modeled by a layer of Mie scatterers using the radiative transfer method. Comparisons are made with measurements showing snow wetness effects and rough air-snow boundary effects. For convenience of reference, theoretical model behavior is also illustrated.

  1. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Nishizuka, N.; Oi, A.; Ohyama, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  2. Microwave emission and scattering from vegetated terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibley, T. G.

    1973-01-01

    Models are developed for the apparent temperature and backscattering coefficient of vegetated terrain to illustrate the effects of vegetation on the sensitivity of these parameters to variations of soil moisture. Three types of terrain are simulated for both the passive and the active case: a uniform canopy over a smooth surface, plant rows on a smooth surface, and plant rows on a rough surface. In each case the canopy is defined by its overall dimensions and by its electric permittivity, which is determined from Weiner model for dielectric mixture. Emission and scattering from both the soil and the canopy are considered, but atmospheric effects are neglected. Calculated data indicate that the sensitivity of the apparent temperature and backscattering coefficient to variations of soil moisture, decreases as the amount of vegetation increases. It is shown that the same effect results from increasing signal frequency or angle of incidence.

  3. Springtime microwave emissivity changes in the southern Kara Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert G.; Anderson, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    Springtime microwave brightness temperatures over first-year ice are examined for the southern Kara Sea. Snow emissivity changes are revealed by episodic drops in the 37- to 18-GHz brightness temperature gradient ratio measured by the Nimbus 7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer. We suggest that the negative gradient ratios in spring 1982 result from increased scatter at 37 GHz due to the formation of a near-surface hoar layer. This interpretation is supported by the results of a surface radiation balance model that shows the melt signature occurring at below freezing temperatures but under clear-sky conditions with increased solar input to the surface. Published observations from the Greenland ice cap show a surface hoar layer forming under similar atmospheric conditions owing to the increased penetration and absorption of solar radiation just below the surface layer. In spring/early summer 1984 similar gradient ratio signatures occur. They appear to be due to several days of freeze-thaw cycling following the movement of a low-pressure system through the region. These changes in surface emissivity represent the transition from winter to summer conditions (as defined by the microwave response) and are shown to be regional in extent and to vary with the synoptic circulations.

  4. Quantifying Uncertainties in Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Prigent, Catherine; Norouzi, Hamidreza; Aires, Filipe; Boukabara, Sid-Ahmed; Furuzawa, Fumie A.; Masunaga, Hirohiko

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainties in the retrievals of microwave land surface emissivities were quantified over two types of land surfaces: desert and tropical rainforest. Retrievals from satellite-based microwave imagers, including SSM/I, TMI and AMSR-E, were studied. Our results show that there are considerable differences between the retrievals from different sensors and from different groups over these two land surface types. In addition, the mean emissivity values show different spectral behavior across the frequencies. With the true emissivity assumed largely constant over both of the two sites throughout the study period, the differences are largely attributed to the systematic and random errors in the retrievals. Generally these retrievals tend to agree better at lower frequencies than at higher ones, with systematic differences ranging 14% (312 K) over desert and 17% (320 K) over rainforest. The random errors within each retrieval dataset are in the range of 0.52% (26 K). In particular, at 85.0/89.0 GHz, there are very large differences between the different retrieval datasets, and within each retrieval dataset itself. Further investigation reveals that these differences are mostly likely caused by rain/cloud contamination, which can lead to random errors up to 1017 K under the most severe conditions.

  5. Subsurface Emission Effects in AMSR-E Measurements: Implications for Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galantowicz, John F.; Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Lipton, Alan E.; Uymin, Gennady; Prigent, Catherine; Grassotti, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of land surface microwave emission time series shows that the characteristic diurnal signature associated with subsurface emission in sandy deserts carry over to arid and semi-arid region worldwide. Prior work found that diurnal variation of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) brightness temperatures in deserts was small relative to International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project land surface temperature (LST) variation and that the difference varied with surface type and was largest in sand sea regions. Here we find more widespread subsurface emission effects in Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) measurements. The AMSR-E orbit has equator crossing times near 01:30 and 13 :30 local time, resulting in sampling when near-surface temperature gradients are likely to be large and amplifying the influence of emission depth on effective emitting temperature relative to other factors. AMSR-E measurements are also temporally coincident with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST measurements, eliminating time lag as a source of LST uncertainty and reducing LST errors due to undetected clouds. This paper presents monthly global emissivity and emission depth index retrievals for 2003 at 11, 19, 37, and 89 GHz from AMSR-E, MODIS, and SSM/I time series data. Retrieval model fit error, stability, self-consistency, and land surface modeling results provide evidence for the validity of the subsurface emission hypothesis and the retrieval approach. An analysis of emission depth index, emissivity, precipitation, and vegetation index seasonal trends in northern and southern Africa suggests that changes in the emission depth index may be tied to changes in land surface moisture and vegetation conditions

  6. Anomalous Emissions of Sulfur Dioxide and Seismicity of San Miguel Volcano, EL Salvador in October, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmos, R.; Barahona, F.; Hernández, A.; Cartagena, R.; Henríquez, B.; López, D.; Cárdenas, C.; Galle, B.

    2007-12-01

    San Miguel (also known as Chaparrastique) volcano in eastern El Salvador is located 15 km southwest of the city of San Miguel. This volcano has erupted more than 30 times since 1699, with the last gas and ash emission on January 16, 2002. During 2006, San Miguel presented anomalous gas emissions and seismicity. In this work, the seismic parameters reported by SNET (Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales de El Salvador) and the crater gas emissions measured by researchers of the University of El Salvador are compared. For the gas efflux, two types of measurements were done using the Mini-DOAS system (Galle et al., 2002): transects around the crater perimeter (~100 m) and transects following roads located between 5 and 10 km from the crater. Several measurements between October 2005 and May 2006 indicate that the sulfur dioxide efflux during quiet periods is around 20 ton/day. From May to June 2006, a progressive increase in fumarolic activity and noise from gas emissions were observed. From May to August 2006, the sulfur dioxide emissions increased to 60 ton/day. A seismic crisis started on October 9, 2006, increasing the RSAM from 10-20 to 208 on October 10, 2006. During this time, the sulfur dioxide efflux reached a maximum of 492 ton/day. This increase in sulfur dioxide efflux represents 25 times the basic emissions during the previous quiet period and 8 times the values observed from May to August 2006. The correlation coefficient between sulfur dioxide efflux and RSAM values during this period of time was 0.81, which is statistically significant at a level higher than 99.9% . These anomalous changes in seismicity and sulfur dioxide emissions at San Miguel volcano suggest a magmatic reactivation with an increase in the exsolution of magma volatiles, long period seismic events, and volcanic tremor.

  7. Microwave snow emission modeling uncertainties in boreal and subarctic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A.; Royer, A.; St-Jean-Rondeau, O.; Montpetit, B.; Picard, G.; Mavrovic, A.; Marchand, N.; Langlois, A.

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to better understand and quantify the uncertainties in microwave snow emission models using the Dense Media Radiative Theory-Multilayer model (DMRT-ML) with in situ measurements of snow properties. We use surface-based radiometric measurements at 10.67, 19 and 37 GHz in boreal forest and subarctic environments and a new in situ dataset of measurements of snow properties (profiles of density, snow grain size and temperature, soil characterization and ice lens detection) acquired in the James Bay and Umijuaq regions of Northern Québec, Canada. A snow excavation experiment - where snow was removed from the ground to measure the microwave emission of bare frozen ground - shows that small-scale spatial variability in the emission of frozen soil is small. Hence, variability in the emission of frozen soil has a small effect on snow-covered brightness temperature (TB). Grain size and density measurement errors can explain the errors at 37 GHz, while the sensitivity of TB at 19 GHz to snow increases during the winter because of the snow grain growth that leads to scattering. Furthermore, the inclusion of observed ice lenses in DMRT-ML leads to significant improvements in the simulations at horizontal polarization (H-pol) for the three frequencies (up to 20 K of root mean square error). However, the representation of the spatial variability of TB remains poor at 10.67 and 19 GHz at H-pol given the spatial variability of ice lens characteristics and the difficulty in simulating snowpack stratigraphy related to the snow crust. The results also show that for ground-based radiometric measurements, forest emission reflected by the surface leads to TB underestimation of up to 40 K if neglected. We perform a comprehensive analysis of the components that contribute to the snow-covered microwave signal, which will help to develop DMRT-ML and to improve the required field measurements. The analysis shows that a better consideration of ice lenses and snow crusts is

  8. Microwave snow emission modeling uncertainties in boreal and subarctic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Alexandre; Royer, Alain; St-Jean-Rondeau, Olivier; Montpetit, Benoit; Picard, Ghislain; Mavrovic, Alex; Marchand, Nicolas; Langlois, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to better understand and quantify the uncertainties in microwave snow emission models using the Dense Media Radiative Theory Multi-Layer model (DMRT-ML) with in situ measurements of snow properties. We use surface-based radiometric measurements at 10.67, 19 and 37 GHz in boreal forest and subarctic environments and a new in situ data set of measurements of snow properties (profiles of density, snow grain size and temperature, soil characterization and ice lens detection) acquired in the James Bay and Umiujaq regions of Northern Québec, Canada. A snow excavation experiment - where snow was removed from the ground to measure the microwave emission of bare frozen ground - shows that small-scale spatial variability (less than 1 km) in the emission of frozen soil is small. Hence, in our case of boreal organic soil, variability in the emission of frozen soil has a small effect on snow-covered brightness temperature (TB). Grain size and density measurement errors can explain the errors at 37 GHz, while the sensitivity of TB at 19 GHz to snow increases during the winter because of the snow grain growth that leads to scattering. Furthermore, the inclusion of observed ice lenses in DMRT-ML leads to significant improvements in the simulations at horizontal polarization (H-pol) for the three frequencies (up to 20 K of root mean square error). However, representation of the spatial variability of TB remains poor at 10.67 and 19 GHz at H-pol given the spatial variability of ice lens characteristics and the difficulty in simulating snowpack stratigraphy related to the snow crust. The results also show that, in our study with the given forest characteristics, forest emission reflected by the snow-covered surface can increase the TB up to 40 K. The forest contribution varies with vegetation characteristics and a relationship between the downwelling contribution of vegetation and the proportion of pixels occupied by vegetation (trees) in fisheye pictures was found

  9. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE MICROWAVE EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K.

    2012-09-10

    Analysis of the microwave data, obtained in the 17 GHz channel of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph during the M1.6 flare on 2010 November 4, revealed the presence of 12.6 minute oscillations of the emitting plasma density. The oscillations decayed with the characteristic time of about 15 minutes. Similar oscillations with the period of about 13.8 minutes and the decay time of 25 minutes are also detected in the variation of EUV emission intensity measured in the 335 A channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed properties of the oscillations are consistent with the oscillations of hot loops observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) in the EUV spectra in the form of periodic Doppler shift. Our analysis presents the first direct observations of the slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the microwave emission of a solar flare, complementing accepted interpretations of SUMER hot loop oscillations as standing slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  10. Slow Magnetoacoustic Oscillations in the Microwave Emission of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Shibasaki, K.

    2012-09-01

    Analysis of the microwave data, obtained in the 17 GHz channel of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph during the M1.6 flare on 2010 November 4, revealed the presence of 12.6 minute oscillations of the emitting plasma density. The oscillations decayed with the characteristic time of about 15 minutes. Similar oscillations with the period of about 13.8 minutes and the decay time of 25 minutes are also detected in the variation of EUV emission intensity measured in the 335 Å channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed properties of the oscillations are consistent with the oscillations of hot loops observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) in the EUV spectra in the form of periodic Doppler shift. Our analysis presents the first direct observations of the slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the microwave emission of a solar flare, complementing accepted interpretations of SUMER hot loop oscillations as standing slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  11. Effect of soil texture on the microwave emission from soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    The intensity brightness temperature of the microwave emission from the soil is determined primarily by its dielectric properties. The large difference between the dielectric constant of water and that of dry soil produces a strong dependence of the soil's dielectric constant on its moisture content. This dependence is effected by the texture of the soil because the water molecules close to the particle surface are tightly bound and do not contribute significantly to the dielectric properties. Since this surface area is a function of the particle size distribution (soil texture), being larger for clay soils with small particles, and smaller for sandy soils with larger particles; the dielectric properties will depend on soil texture. Laboratory measurements of the dielectric constant for soils are summarized. The dependence of the microwave emission on texture is demonstrated by measurements of brightness temperature from an aircraft platform for a wide range of soil textures. It is concluded that the effect of soil texture differences on the observed values can be normalized by expressing the soil moisture values as a percent field capacity for the soil.

  12. Theory of the anomalous resonant absorption of DNA at microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Van Zandt, L L; Davis, M E

    1986-04-01

    Aqueous solutions of oligopolymer DNA have been observed by Edwards, Davis, Swicord & Saffer to show structured absorption of microwave energy in the region of several gigahertz characteristic of an ordered series of compressional normal mode vibrations propagating on the polymer chain. Hydrodynamic coupling of such vibrations to the surrounding solvent would preclude the existence of sharp resonances. The inclusion of electromagnetic interactions with surrounding counter ions yields a richer space of possibilities for complex behavior of the combined system. A well defined resonant absorption peak appears when the molecular motion and the nearby solvent motion are even slightly decoupled. The microwave electric fields in the vicinity of the molecule provide a mechanism for such a decoupling not present for the case of electrically neutral solvent. PMID:3271413

  13. On the Extended Emission of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar IE 1547.0-5408

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ng, C. -Y.; Zhu, W. W.; Gavriil, F. P.; Woods, P. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the extended emission around the anomalous X-ray pulsar IE 1547.0-5408 using four XMM-Newton observations taken with the source in varying states of outburst as well as in quiescence. We find that the extended emission flux is highly variable and strongly correlated with the flux of the magnetar. Based on this result, as well as on spectral and energetic considerations, we conclude that the extended emission is dominated by a dust-scattering halo and not a pulsar wind nebula (P-VVN), as has been previously argued. We obtain an upper limit on the 2-10 keV flux of a possible PWN of 4.7 x 10(exp -14) erg/s/sq cm, three times less than the previously claimed value, implying an efficiency for conversion of spin-down energy into nebular luminosity of <9 x 10(exp -4) .

  14. First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Foreground Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Hill, R. S.; Hinshaw, G.; Nolta, M. R.; Odegard, N.; Page, L.; Spergel, D. N.; Weiland, J. L.; Wright, E. L.; Halpern, M.

    2003-01-01

    The WMAP mission has mapped the full sky to determine the geometry, content, and evolution of the universe. Full sky maps are made in five microwave frequency bands to separate the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from foreground emission, including diffuse Galactic emission and Galactic and extragalactic point sources. We define masks that excise regions of high foreground emission, so CMB analyses can became out with minimal foreground contamination. We also present maps and spectra of the individual emission components, leading to an improved understanding of Galactic astrophysical processes. The effectiveness of template fits to remove foreground emission from the WMAP data is also examined. These efforts result in a CMB map with minimal contamination and a demonstration that the WMAP CMB power spectrum is insensitive to residual foreground emission. We use a Maximum Entropy Method to construct a model of the Galactic emission components. The observed total Galactic emission matches the model to less than 1% and the individual model components are accurate to a few percent. We find that the Milky Way resembles other normal spiral galaxies between 408 MHz and 23 GHz, with a synchrotron spectral index that is flattest (beta(sub s) approx. -2.5) near star-forming regions, especially in the plane, and steepest (beta(sub s) approx. -3) in the halo. This is consistent with a picture of relativistic cosmic ray electron generation in star-forming regions and diffusion and convection within the plane. The significant synchrotron index steepening out of the plane suggests a diffusion process in which the halo electrons are trapped in the Galactic potential long enough to suffer synchrotron and inverse Compton energy losses and hence a spectral steepening. The synchrotron index is steeper in the WMAP bands than in lower frequency radio surveys, with a spectral break near 20 GHz to beta(sub s) less than -3. The modeled thermal dust spectral

  15. The Effect of Intercepted Precipitation on the Microwave Emission of Maize at 1.4 GHz

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Terrestrial microwave emission is sensitive to soil moisture. Soil moisture is an important yet unobserved reservoir of the hydrologic cycle linked to precipitation variability. Remote sensing satellites that observe terrestrial microwave emission have the potential to map the spatial and temporal...

  16. Frequency agile microwave photonic notch filter with anomalously high stopband rejection.

    PubMed

    Marpaung, David; Morrison, Blair; Pant, Ravi; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2013-11-01

    We report a novel class microwave photonic (MWP) notch filter with a very narrow isolation bandwidth (10 MHz), an ultrahigh stopband rejection (>60 dB), a wide frequency tuning (1-30 GHz), and flexible bandwidth reconfigurability (10-65 MHz). This performance is enabled by a new concept of sideband amplitude and phase controls using an electro-optic modulator and an optical filter. This concept enables energy efficient operation in active MWP notch filters, and opens up a pathway toward enabling low-power nanophotonic devices as high-performance RF filters. PMID:24177078

  17. Optics of an individual organic molecular mesowire waveguide: directional light emission and anomalous refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ravi P. N.; Dasgupta, Arindam; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Pratim Patra, Partha; Vasista, Adarsh B.; Pavan Kumar, G. V.

    2016-06-01

    We report on experimental investigations performed on an isolated organic mesowire waveguide resting on a glass substrate. The waveguide was made of diaminoanthraquinone (DAAQ) molecular aggregates. First, we show directional emission of light from distal ends of the DAAQ waveguide. For a given mesowire geometry, operating in passive or photoluminescence regimes, we quantified the emission angles by combining multi-wavelength Fourier-plane optical microscopy and photoluminescence micro-spectroscopy. We found light emission in the photoluminescence regime to be more directional in nature compared to the passive waveguiding regime, which was supported by three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. Second, we measured the anomalous behaviour of refractive index as a function of emission wavelength using the spectra of directionally emitted light. Third, by using spatial-filtered collection optics, we observed and quantified single-excitation dual-channel directional, active emission from DAAQ mesowire. The results discussed herein has implication not only in understanding some fundamental aspects of exciton-polariton mediated directional light emission, but also in applications such as organic optical antennas and photonic couplers.

  18. Effects of soil tillage on the microwave emission of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Koopman, G. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the interactions of soil properties and microwave emission better, a series of field experiments were conducted in 1984. Small plots were measured with a truck-mounted passive microwave radiometer operating at 1.4 GHz. These data were collected concurrent with ground observations of soil moisture and bulk density. Treatment effects studied included different soil moisture contents and bulk densities. Evaluations of the data have shown that commonly used models of the dielectric properties of wet soils do not explain the observations obtained in these experiments. This conclusion was based on the fact that the roughness parameters determined through optimization were significantly larger than those observed in similar investigations. These discrepancies are most likely due to the soil structure. Commonly used models assume a homogeneous three phase mixture of soil solids, air and water. Under tilled conditions the soil is actually a two phase mixture of aggregates and voids. Appropriate dielectric models for this tilled condition were evaluated and found to explain the observations. These results indicate that previous conclusions concerning the effects of surface roughness in tilled fields may be incorrect, and they may explain some of the inconsistencies encountered in roughness modeling.

  19. Real-time calibrated microwave plasma mulitmetals emissions monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal; Thomas, Paul; Green, Karyn; Flores, Guadalupe

    1999-02-01

    Real-time calibrated atomic emission spectroscopy in stack exhaust using a continuously sustained microwave plasma is under development for trace metals monitoring. The plasma, in a shorted waveguide attached to the stack by a short sample line, is powered at 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz. An undiluted stack slipstream is isokinetically directed into the plasma at a nominal flow of 14 liters per minute. A pneumatic nebulizer attached to the sample line can momentarily, on command, inject a known concentration of metals solution providing a real-time calibration. Recent testing has been performed on the exhaust stack of an incinerator at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Risk Management Laboratory in Research Triangle Park. Three hazardous metals were monitored, lead, chromium, and beryllium. These measurements were referenced to EPA Method-29. A total of twenty spiked stack exhaust tests were carried out. Ten one-hour tests at high concentration (40 - 60 (mu) g/actual m3) and ten one and half-hour tests at low concentration (10 - 15 (mu) g/actual m3). The microwave plasma monitor achieved measurement accuracies of approximately 20% for lead and beryllium and 40% for chromium with a threshold detection capability of less than 3 (mu) g/actual m3 for a time response of approximately 1-minute. Laboratory work is continuing to add mercury, arsenic, and cadmium to the monitored metals.

  20. Anomalous Light Emission and Wide Photoluminescence Spectra in Graphene Quantum Dot: Quantum Confinement from Edge Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Shi, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Xin-He; Zhong, Hong-Xia; Ding, Yi-Min; Cao, Xiong; Wu, Meng; Lu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The physical origin of the observed anomalous photoluminescence (PL) behavior, that is, the large-size graphene quantum dots (GQDs) exhibiting higher PL energy than the small ones and the broadening PL spectra from deep ultraviolet to near-infrared, has been debated for many years. Obviously, it is in conflict with the well-accepted quantum confinement. Here we shed new light on these two notable debates by state-of-the-art first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory. We find that quantum confinement is significant in GQDs with remarkable size-dependent exciton absorption/emission. The edge environment from alkaline to acidic conditions causes a blue shift of the PL peak. Furthermore, carbon vacancies are inclined to assemble at the GQD edge and form the tiny edge microstructures. The bound excitons, localized inside these edge microstructures, determine the anomalous PL behavior (blue and UV emission) of large-size GQDs. The bound excitons confined in the whole GQD lead to the low-energy transition. PMID:27409980

  1. Can Charge Exchange Explain Anomalous Soft X-Ray Emission in the Cygnus Loop?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Henley, D. B.; Stancil, P. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Nolte, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this "anomalously" enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O8 +, O7 +, N7 +, N6 +, C6 +, and C5 + with H with an energy of 1 keV u-1 (438 km s-1). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O7 + + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model.

  2. Anomalous pulse delay in microwave propagation: A plausible connection to the tunneling time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranfagni, A.; Fabeni, P.; Pazzi, G. P.; Mugnai, D.

    1993-08-01

    Measures of pulse delay in microwave propagation, in open air and for short distances (not much greater than 1 m), were made by using launcher and receiver horns. When these are facing each other we observe a delay time corresponding to a speed equal to c while, if the receiver horn is shifted or tilted with respect to the launcher horn, the delay time decreases showing a superluminal behavior. In other words the modulation phase shift, interpreted as a propagation time, turns out to be surprisingly smaller than the one relative to the light speed. This effect, which disappears for longer distances, is here interpreted on the basis of the existence of a special kind of evanescent waves (leaky waves). Just the presence of evanescent waves allows one to make a comparison with the tunneling processes where superluminal transport properties have been theoretically predicted.

  3. Experimental study on the emission spectra of microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boya; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Guixin; Liao, Shanshan

    2014-01-28

    An experimental study on microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure was conducted by employing optical emission spectroscopy. Based on a microwave plasma generation device developed for nanoparticle synthesis, we studied the influence of input microwave power and gas flow rate on the optical emission behaviors and electron temperature of plasma using Ar, He, and N{sub 2} as working gas, respectively. The physics behind these behaviors was discussed. The results are useful in characterizing microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure and can be used for improving nanoparticle synthesis system for commercial use in the future.

  4. First Experimental Characterization of Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Smída, R; Werner, F; Engel, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K-H; Kang, D; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Krömer, O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Neunteufel, P; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pekala, J; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Stasielak, J; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Unger, M; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wilczyński, H; Will, M; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2014-11-28

    We report the first direct measurement of the overall characteristics of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers in the GHz frequency range. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above 3×10^{16}  eV. The observations presented in this Letter are consistent with a mainly forward-directed and polarized emission process in the GHz frequency range. The measurements show that microwave radiation offers a new means of studying air showers at E≥10^{17}  eV. PMID:25494064

  5. Anomalous Doppler Shift in the Storm-time Midlatitude Red-line Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, B. J.; Makela, J. J.; Bust, G.; Meriwether, J. W.; Mesquita, R.; Sanders, S.; Ridley, A. J.; Castelaz, M.; Ciocca, M.; Earle, G. D.; Frissell, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations from a midlatitude network of ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) have revealed an anomalous blueshift in the spectrum of the red-line 630.0-nm airglow emission looking to the zenith during the geomagnetic storm of 02 Oct 2013 [Makela et al., 2014]. Although the red-line emission is historically interpreted as an indicator of the thermospheric neutral wind at an altitude of 250 km, Makela et al. [2014] argue that the apparent sustained downward winds of 150 m/s are not physical and suggest that during a storm, the emission is contaminated by fast oxygen atoms created by charge exchange with precipitating oxygen ions. We extend this analysis to include every storm with adequate data quality in our FPI database and find that this anomalous blueshift is a persistent effect at midlatitudes. This complicates the interpretation of red-line data collected by FPIs during storm periods. We compare with the ionospheric response to these storms as estimated by an assmiliative model, IDA4D, in order to investigate the possible sources of contamination. References:J. J. Makela, B. J. Harding, J. W. Meriwether, R. Mesquita, S. Sanders, A. J. Ridley, M. W. Castellez, M. Ciocca, G. D. Earle, N. A. Frissell, D. L. Hampton, A. J. Gerrard, J. Noto, and C. R. Martinis, "Storm time response of the mid-latitude thermosphere: Observations from a network of Fabry-Perot interferometers," J. Geophys. Res. Sp. Phys., Jul. 2014. doi: 10.1002/2014JA019832

  6. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Echániz, T.

    2014-09-07

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ε{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ε{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, λ{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1.

  7. MICROWAVE POPCORN EMISSIONS RELEASED DURING COOKING AND BAG OPENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data are not currently available on the contaminants released when microwave popcorn, flavorings and bags are heated to microwave temperatures. Thus, the primary goal of this work is to identify and quantify contaminants emitted while popping and opening a bag of microwave popcor...

  8. Anomalous Series of Bands in the Edge Emission Spectra of CdS(О)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, N. K.; Kanakhin, A. A.; Galstyan, V. G.; Shnitnikov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    The region of the edge emission spectrum of CdS(O) single crystals with cadmium excess is examined. An anomalous series of equidistant bands with leading line at 514 nm and phonon replicas has been revealed. These bands grow in intensity with increase of the excitation density up to 1026-1027 cm-3ṡs-1 at 80 K, and the leading line of the series is observed even at 300 K. It is shown that luminescence is conditioned by the exciton spectrum in perfect bulk single-crystals of CdO. Some characteristics of this spectrum are presented, in particular, the dependence on temperature, excitation intensity, composition and size of the crystals, and the LO interaction. The results experimentally confirm the theoretically calculated magnitude of the direct band gap of CdO.

  9. A large-scale anomaly in Enceladus' microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Paul A.; Janssen, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The Cassini spacecraft flew by Enceladus on 6 November 2011, configured to acquire synthetic aperture RADAR imaging of most of the surface with the RADAR instrument. The pass also recorded microwave thermal emission from most of the surface. We report on global patterns of thermal emission at 2.17 cm based on this data set in the context of additional unresolved data both from the ground and from Cassini. The observed thermal emission is consistent with dielectric constants of pure water or methane ice, but cannot discriminate between the two. The emissivity is similar to those of other icy satellites (≈ 0.7), consistent with volume scattering. The most intriguing result, however, is an anomaly in the thermal emission of Enceladus' leading hemisphere. Evidence presented here suggests the anomaly is buried at depths on the order of a few meters. This anomaly is located in similar geographic location to anomalies previously detected with the CIRS and ISS instruments on Mimas, Tethys, and Dione (Howett, C.J.A. et al. [2011]. Icarus 216, 221-226; Howett, C.J.A. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 1084-1088; Howett, C.J.A. et al. [2014]. Icarus 241, 239-247; Schenk, P. et al. [2011]. Icarus 211, 740-757), but also corresponds with a geological feature on Enceladus' leading terrain (Crow-Willard, E., Pappalardo, R.T. [2011]. Global geological mapping of Enceladus. In: EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011. p. 635). Simple models show that the Crow-Willard and Pappalardo (Crow-Willard, E., Pappalardo, R.T. [2011]. Global geological mapping of Enceladus. In: EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011. p. 635) model is a better fit to the data. Our best-supported hypothesis is that the leading hemisphere smooth terrain is young enough (<75-200 Myr old) that the micrometeorite impact gardening depth is shallower than the electromagnetic skin depth of the observations (≈ 3-5 m), a picture consistent with ground and space radar measurements, which show no variation at 2 cm, but an increase in albedo in the

  10. Observed effects of soil organic matter content on the microwave emissivity of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P. E.; Jackson, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine the significance of organic matter content on the microwave emissivity of soils when estimating soil moisture, field experiments were conducted in which 1.4 GHz microwave emissivity data were collected over test plots of sandy loam soil with different organic matter levels (1.8, 4.0, and 6.1 percent) for a range of soil moisture values. Analyses of the observed data show only minor variation in microwave emissivity due to a change in organic matter content at a given moisture level for soils with similar texture and structure. Predictions of microwave emissivity made using a dielectric model for aggregated soils exhibit the same trends and type of response as the measured data when appropriate values for the input parameters were utilized.

  11. [Study on the Emission Spectrum of Hydrogen Production with Microwave Discharge Plasma in Ethanol Solution].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Wang, Bo; Zhu, Xiao-mei; Yan, Zhi-yu; Liu, Yong-jun; Liu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen is regarded as a kind of clean energy with high caloricity and non-pollution, which has been studied by many experts and scholars home and abroad. Microwave discharge plasma shows light future in the area of hydrogen production from ethanol solution, providing a new way to produce hydrogen. In order to further improve the technology and analyze the mechanism of hydrogen production with microwave discharge in liquid, emission spectrum of hydrogen production by microwave discharge plasma in ethanol solution was being studied. In this paper, plasma was generated on the top of electrode by 2.45 GHz microwave, and the spectral characteristics of hydrogen production from ethanol by microwave discharge in liquid were being studied using emission spectrometer. The results showed that a large number of H, O, OH, CH, C2 and other active particles could be produced in the process of hydrogen production from ethanol by microwave discharge in liquid. The emission spectrum intensity of OH, H, O radicals generated from ethanol is far more than that generated from pure water. Bond of O-H split by more high-energy particles from water molecule was more difficult than that from ethanol molecule, so in the process of hydrogen production by microwave discharge plasma in ethanol solution; the main source of hydrogen was the dehydrogenation and restructuring of ethanol molecules instead of water decomposition. Under the definite external pressure and temperature, the emission spectrum intensity of OH, H, O radicals increased with the increase of microwave power markedly, but the emission spectrum intensity of CH, C2 active particles had the tendency to decrease with the increase of microwave power. It indicated that the number of high energy electrons and active particles high energy electron energy increased as the increase of microwave power, so more CH, C2 active particles were split more thoroughly. PMID:27400531

  12. Microwave backscattering and emission model for grass canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Saatchi, S.S. ); Le Vine, D.M. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Lang, R.H. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Microwave radar and radiometer measurements of grasslands indicate a substantial reduction in sensor sensitivity to soil moisture in the presence of a thatch layer. When this layer is wet it masks changes in the underlying soil, making the canopy appear warm in the case of passive sensors (radiometer) and decreasing backscatter in the active case (scatterometer). A model for a grass canopy with thatch will be presented in this paper to explain this behavior and to compare with observations. The canopy model consists of three layers: grass, thatch, and the underlying soil. The grass blades are modeled by elongated elliptical discs and the thatch is modeled as a collection of disk shaped water droplets (i.e., the dry matter is neglected). The ground is homogeneous and flat. The distorted Born approximation is used to compute the radar cross section of this three layer canopy and the emissivity is computed from the radar cross section using the Peake formulation for the passive problem. Results are computed at L-band (1.4 GHz) and C-band (4.75 GHz) using canopy parameters (i.e., plant geometry, soil moisture, plant moisture, etc.) representative of Konza Prairie grasslands. The results are compared to C-band scatterometer measurements and L-band radiometer measurements at these grasslands.

  13. Electron-cyclotron maser and solar microwave millisecond spike emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Chun-Sheng; Fu, Qi-Jun

    1986-01-01

    An intense solar microwave millisecond spike emission (SMMSE) event was observed on May 16, 1981 by Zhao and Jin at Beijing Observatory. The peak flux density of the spikes is high to 5 x 100,000 s.f.u. and the corresponding brightness temperature (BT) reaches approx. 10 to the 15th K. In order to explain the observed properties of SMMSE, it is proposed that a beam of electrons with energy of tens KeV injected from the acceleration region downwards into an emerging magnetic arch forms so-called hollow beam distribution and causes electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) instability. The growth rate of second harmonic X-mode is calculated and its change with time is deduced. It is shown that the saturation time of ECM is t sub s approx. equals 0.42 ms and only at last short stage (delta t less than 0.2 t sub s) the growth rate decreases to zero rather rapidly. So a SMMSE with very high BT will be produced if the ratio of number density of nonthermal electrons to that of background electrons, n sub s/n sub e, is larger than 4 x .00001.

  14. Planck intermediate results. XVII. Emission of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium from the far-infrared to microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Abergel, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Joncas, G.; Jones, A.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Verstraete, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Winkel, B.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-06-01

    The dust-Hi correlation is used to characterize the emission properties of dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) from far infrared wavelengths to microwave frequencies. The field of this investigation encompasses the part of the southern sky best suited to study the cosmic infrared and microwave backgrounds. We cross-correlate sky maps from Planck, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), and the diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE), at 17 frequencies from 23 to 3000 GHz, with the Parkes survey of the 21 cm line emission of neutral atomic hydrogen, over a contiguous area of 7500 deg2 centred on the southern Galactic pole. We present a general methodology to study the dust-Hi correlation over the sky, including simulations to quantify uncertainties. Our analysis yields four specific results. (1) We map the temperature, submillimetre emissivity, and opacity of the dust per H-atom. The dust temperature is observed to be anti-correlated with the dust emissivity and opacity. We interpret this result as evidence of dust evolution within the diffuse ISM. The mean dust opacity is measured to be (7.1 ± 0.6) × 10-27 cm2 H-1 × (ν/ 353 GHz)1.53 ± 0.03 for 100 ≤ ν ≤ 353 GHz. This is a reference value to estimate hydrogen column densities from dust emission at submillimetre and millimetre wavelengths. (2) We map the spectral index βmm of dust emission at millimetre wavelengths (defined here as ν ≤ 353 GHz), and find it to be remarkably constant at βmm = 1.51 ± 0.13. We compare it with the far infrared spectral index βFIR derived from greybody fits at higher frequencies, and find a systematic difference, βmm - βFIR = - 0.15, which suggests that the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) flattens at ν ≤ 353 GHz. (3) We present spectral fits of the microwave emission correlated with Hi from 23 to 353 GHz, which separate dust and anomalous microwave emission (AME). We show that the flattening of the dust SED can be accounted for with

  15. Microwave emission from lead zirconate titanate induced by impulsive mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, A.; Majcherek, S.; Hirsch, S.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper focuses on microwave emission from Lead zirconate titanate Pb [ZrxTi1-x] O3 (PZT) induced by mechanical stressing. The mechanical stress was initiated by impact of a sharp tungsten indenter on the upper surface of PZT ceramic. The sequences of microwave and current impulses, which flew from indenter to electric ground, were detected simultaneously. The voltage between the upper and lower surface of ceramic was measured to obtain the behavior of mechanical force acting on ceramic during the impact. It was found that the amplitude, form, and frequency of measured microwave impulses were different by compression and restitution phase of impact. Two different mechanisms of electron emission, responsible for microwave impulse generation, were proposed based on the dissimilar impulse behavior. The field emission from tungsten indenter is dominant during compression, whereas ferroemission dominates during restitution phase. Indeed, it was observed that the direction of the current flow, i.e., sign of current impulses is changed by transitions from compression to restitution phase of impact. The observed dissimilar behavior of microwave impulses, caused by increasing and decreasing applied force, can be used to calculate the contact time and behavior of mechanical force during mechanical impact on ceramic surface. It is shown that the generation of microwave impulses exhibits high reproducibility, impulse intensity, a low damping factor, and high mechanical failure resistance. Based on these microwave emission properties of PZT, the development of new type of stress sensor with spatial resolution of few microns becomes possible.

  16. CAN CHARGE EXCHANGE EXPLAIN ANOMALOUS SOFT X-RAY EMISSION IN THE CYGNUS LOOP?

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbee, R. S.; Henley, D. B.; Stancil, P. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Nolte, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this ''anomalously'' enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O{sup 8} {sup +}, O{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 6} {sup +}, C{sup 6} {sup +}, and C{sup 5} {sup +} with H with an energy of 1 keV u{sup –1} (438 km s{sup –1}). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O{sup 7} {sup +} + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model.

  17. Characterization of Different Land Classes and Disaster Monitoring Using Microwave Land Emissivity for the Indian Subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Korak; Raju, Suresh; Antony, Tinu; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    Despite the ability of satellite borne microwave radiometers to measure the atmospheric pa-rameters, liquid water and the microphysical properties of clouds, they have serious limitations over the land owing its large and spatially heterogeneous emissivity compared to the relatively low and homogenous oceans. This calls for determination of the spatial maps of land-surface emissivity with accuracies better than ˜2%. In this study, the characterization of microwave emissivity of different land surface classes over the Indian region is carried out with the forth-coming Indo-French microwave satellite program Megha-Tropiques in focus. The land emissivity is retrieved using satellite microwave radiometer data from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) at 10, 19, 22, 37 and 85 GHz. After identify-ing the clear sky daily data, the microwave radiative transfer computation, is applied to the respective daily atmospheric profile for deducing the upwelling and downwelling atmospheric radiations. This, along with the skin temperature data, is used to retrieve land emission from satellites data. The emissivity maps of placecountry-regionIndia for three months representing winter (January) and post-monsoon (September-October) seasons of 2008 at V and H polar-izations of all the channels (except for 22 GHz) are generated. Though the land emissivity values in V-polarization vary between 0.5 and ˜1, some land surface classes such as the desert region, marshy land, fresh snow covered region and evergreen forest region, etc, show distinct emissivity characteristics. On this basis few typical classes having uniform physical properties over sufficient area are identified. Usually the Indian desert region is dry and shows low emis-sivity (˜0.88 in H-polarisation) and high polarization difference, V-H (˜0.1). Densely vegetated zones of tropical rain forests exhibit high emissivity values (˜0.95) and low polarization dif-ference (lt;0.01). The

  18. Application of microwave energy in the control of DPM, oxides of nitrogen and VOC emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavkar, Sameer M.

    The emissions of DPM (diesel particulate matter), NOx (oxides of nitrogen), and toxic VOCs (volatile organic compounds) from diesel engine exhaust gases and other sources such as chemical process industry and manufacturing industry have been a great environmental and health concern. Most control technologies for these emissions require elevated temperatures. The use of microwave energy as a source of heat energy, however, has not been fully explored. In this study, the microwave energy was used as the energy source in three separate emission control processes, namely, the regeneration of diesel particulate filter (DPF) for DPM control, the NOx reduction using a platinum catalyst, and the VOC destruction involving a ceramic based material. The study has demonstrated that microwave heating is an effective method in providing heat for the studied processes. The control efficiencies associated with the microwave-assisted processes have been observed to be high and acceptable. Further research, however, is required for the commercial use of these technologies.

  19. Microwave thermal emission from the zodiacal dust cloud predicted with contemporary meteoroid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikarev, Valery V.; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2015-12-01

    Predictions of the microwave thermal emission from the zodiacal dust cloud are made using several contemporary meteoroid models to construct the distributions of the cross-section area of dust in space, and by applying the Mie light-scattering theory to estimate the temperatures and emissivities of dust particles in a wide range of sizes and heliocentric distances. In particular, the Kelsall model of the zodiacal light emission based on COBE infrared observations is extrapolated to the microwaves with assistance from fits to selected IRAS and Planck data. Furthermore, the five populations of interplanetary meteoroids by Divine and the Interplanetary Meteoroid Engineering Model (IMEM) based on a variety of remote and in situ observations of dust are used in combination with the optical properties of olivine, carbonaceous, and iron spherical particles. The Kelsall model has been accepted by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) community for subtraction of the zodiacal cloud's foreground emission. We show, however, that the Kelsall model predicts microwave emission from interplanetary dust that is remarkably different from the results obtained by applying the meteoroid engineering models. We make maps and spectra of the microwave emission predicted by all three models assuming different compositions of dust particles. The predictions can be used to look for the emission from interplanetary dust in CMB experiments and to plan new observations.

  20. A new radiation balance microwave thermograph for simultaneous and independent temperature and emissivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Luedeke, K M; Koehler, J; Kanzenbach, J

    1979-06-01

    In the past, biomedical temperature measurements by microwave radiometry suffered from variable mismatch (emissivity less than 1) between the specimen under test and the receiving antenna. We have developed an improved radiometer, which simultaneously measures temperature and emissivity, independent by of a possible mismatch. Comparative measurements demonstrate the superiority of the new system as compared to conventional ones. PMID:259079

  1. Discovery of Radio Emission From Transient Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1810-197

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J P; Gotthelf, E V; Becker, R H; Helfand, D J; White, R L

    2005-10-25

    We report the first detection of radio emission from any anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP). Data from the Very Large Array (VLA) MAGPIS survey with angular resolution 6'' reveals a point-source of flux density 4.5 {+-} 0.5 mJy at 1.4 GHz at the precise location of the 5.54 s pulsar XTE J1810-197. This is greater than upper limits from all other AXPs and from quiescent states of soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs). The detection was made in 2004 January, 1 year after the discovery of XTE J1810-197 during its only known outburst. Additional VLA observations both before and after the outburst yield only upper limits that are comparable to or larger than the single detection, neither supporting nor ruling out a decaying radio afterglow related to the X-ray turn-on. Another hypothesis is that, unlike the other AXPs and SGRs, XTE J1810-197 may power a radio synchrotron nebula by the interaction of its particle wind with a moderately dense environment that was not evacuated by previous activity from this least luminous, in X-rays, of the known magnetars.

  2. Anomalous hydrogen emissions from the San Andreas fault observed at the Cienega Winery, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sato, M.; Sutton, A.J.; McGee, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    We began continuous monitoring of H2 concentration in soil along the San Andreas and Calaveras faults in central California in December 1980, using small H2/O2 fuel-cell sensors. Ten monitoring stations deployed to date have shown that anomalous H2 emissions take place occasionally in addition to diurnal changes. Among the ten sites, the Cienega Winery site has produced data that are characterized by very small diurnal changes, a stable baseline, and remarkably distinct spike-like H2 anomalies since its installation in July 1982. A major peak appeared on 1-10 November 1982, and another on 3 April 1983, and a medium peak on 1 November 1983. The occurrences of these peaks coincided with periods of very low seismicity within a radius of 50 km from the site. In order to methodically assess how these peaks are related to earthquakes, three H2 degassing models were examined. A plausible correlational pattern was obtained by using a model that (1) adopts a hemicircular spreading pattern of H2 along an incipient fracture plane from the hypocenter of an earthquake, (2) relies on the FeO-H2O reaction for H2 generation, and (3) relates the accumulated amount of H2 to the mass of serpentinization of underlying ophiolitic rocks; the mass was tentatively assumed to be proportional to the seismic energy of the earthquake. ?? 1985 Birkha??user Verlag.

  3. Simulation of Seasonal Snow Microwave TB Using Coupled Multi-Layered Snow Evolution and Microwave Emission Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Royer, Alain; Picard, Ghislain; Langlois, Alex; Fily, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The accurate quantification of SWE has important societal benefits, including improving domestic and agricultural water planning, flood forecasting and electric power generation. However, passive-microwave SWE algorithms suffer from variations in TB due to snow metamorphism, difficult to distinguish from those due to SWE variations. Coupled snow evolution-emission models are able to predict snow metamorphism, allowing us to account for emissivity changes. They can also be used to identify weaknesses in the snow evolution model. Moreover, thoroughly evaluating coupled models is a contribution toward the assimilation of TB, which leads to a significant increase in the accuracy of SWE estimates.

  4. Evaluation of modeled microwave land surface emissivities with satellite-based estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigent, C.; Liang, P.; Tian, Y.; Aires, F.; Moncet, J.-L.; Boukabara, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    An accurate estimate of the microwave surface emissivity is necessary for the retrieval of atmospheric quantities from microwave imagers or sounders. The objective of this study is to evaluate the microwave land surface emissivity modeling of the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM), providing quantitative statistic information for further model improvements. First, the model-simulated emissivity is compared to emissivity estimates derived from satellite observations (TELSEM, Tool to Estimate Land Surface Emissivities at Microwaves). The model simulations agree reasonably well with TELSEM over snow-free vegetated areas, especially at vertical polarization up to 40 GHz. For snow-free surfaces, the mean difference between CRTM and TELSEM emissivities at vertical polarization is lower than 0.01 below 40 GHz and increases to 0.02 at 89 GHz. At horizontal polarization, it increases with frequency, from 0.01 at 10.6 GHz to 0.04 at 89 GHz. Over deserts and snow, larger differences are observed, which can be due to the lack of quality inputs to the model in these complex environments. A further evaluation is provided by comparing brightness temperature (Tbs) simulations with AMSR-E observations, where CRTM emissivity and TELSEM emissivity are coupled into a comprehensive radiative transfer model to simulate the brightness temperatures, respectively. The comparison shows smaller RMS errors with the satellite-derived estimates than with the model, despite some significant bias at midday with the satellite-derived emissivities at high frequencies. This study confirms and extends to the global scale previous evaluations of land surface microwave emissivity model. It emphasizes the needs for better physical modeling in arid regions and over snow-covered surfaces.

  5. Influence of microwave frequency electromagnetic radiation on terpene emission and content in aromatic plants.

    PubMed

    Soran, Maria-Loredana; Stan, Manuela; Niinemets, Ülo; Copolovici, Lucian

    2014-09-15

    Influence of environmental stress factors on both crop and wild plants of nutritional value is an important research topic. The past research has focused on rising temperatures, drought, soil salinity and toxicity, but the potential effects of increased environmental contamination by human-generated electromagnetic radiation on plants have little been studied. Here we studied the influence of microwave irradiation at bands corresponding to wireless router (WLAN) and mobile devices (GSM) on leaf anatomy, essential oil content and volatile emissions in Petroselinum crispum, Apium graveolens and Anethum graveolens. Microwave irradiation resulted in thinner cell walls, smaller chloroplasts and mitochondria, and enhanced emissions of volatile compounds, in particular, monoterpenes and green leaf volatiles (GLV). These effects were stronger for WLAN-frequency microwaves. Essential oil content was enhanced by GSM-frequency microwaves, but the effect of WLAN-frequency microwaves was inhibitory. There was a direct relationship between microwave-induced structural and chemical modifications of the three plant species studied. These data collectively demonstrate that human-generated microwave pollution can potentially constitute a stress to the plants. PMID:25050479

  6. Influence of microwave frequency electromagnetic radiation on terpene emission and content in aromatic plants

    PubMed Central

    Soran, Maria-Loredana; Stan, Manuela; Niinemets, Ülo; Copolovici, Lucian

    2015-01-01

    Influence of environmental stress factors on both crop and wild plants of nutritional value is an important research topic. The past research has focused on rising temperatures, drought, soil salinity and toxicity, but the potential effects of increased environmental contamination by human-generated electromagnetic radiation on plants have little been studied. Here we studied the influence of microwave irradiation at bands corresponding to wireless router (WLAN) and mobile devices (GSM) on leaf anatomy, essential oil content and volatile emissions in Petroselinum crispum, Apium graveolens and Anethum graveolens. Microwave irradiation resulted in thinner cell walls, smaller chloroplasts and mitochondria, and enhanced emissions of volatile compounds, in particular, monoterpenes and green leaf volatiles. These effects were stronger for WLAN-frequency microwaves. Essential oil content was enhanced by GSM-frequency microwaves, but the effect of WLAN-frequency microwaves was inhibitory. There was a direct relationship between microwave-induced structural and chemical modifications of the three plant species studied. These data collectively demonstrate that human-generated microwave pollution can potentially constitute a stress to the plants. PMID:25050479

  7. Consideration on the Mechanism of Microwave Emission Due to Rock Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Tadashi; Sugita, Seiji; Yoshida, Shingo; Maeda, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Microwave emission due to rock fracture was found at 300 MHz, 2 GHz, and 22 GHz, and its power was calibrated in laboratory for the first time in the world. The observed waveform is impulsive, and contains correspondent frequency component inside the envelope at each frequency band. At such high frequencies, the electro-magnetic signal power can be calibrated as a radiating wave with high accuracy. Accordingly, it was verified that a substantial power is emitted. The microwave emission phenomena were also observed on occasions of hypervelocity impact, and esteemed as phenomena generally associated with material destruction. Earthquakes and volcanic activities are association with rock fractures so that the microwave is expected to be emitted. Actually, the e emission was confirmed by the data analysis of the brightness temperature obtained by a remote sensing satellite, which flew over great earthquakes of Wuenchan and Sumatra, and great volcanic eruptions of Reventador and Chanten. It is important to show the microwave emission during rock fracture in natural phenomena. Therefore, the field test to detect the microwave due to the collapse of a crater cliff was planned and persecuted at the volcano of Miyake-jima about 100 km south of Tokyo. Volcanic activity may be more convenient than an earthquake because of the known location and time. As a result, they observed the microwave emission which was strongly correlated with the cliff collapses. Despite of the above-mentioned phenomenological fruits, the reason of the microwave emission is not fixed yet. We have investigated the mechanism of the emission in consideration of the obtained data in rock fracture experiments so far and the study results on material destruction by hypervelocity impact. This paper presents the proposal of the hypothesis and resultant discussions. The microwave sensors may be useful to monitor natural hazards such as an earthquake or a volcanic eruption, because the microwave due to rock

  8. Microwave emission from lead zirconate titanate induced by impulsive mechanical load

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, A.; Majcherek, S.; Hirsch, S.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-10-28

    This paper focuses on microwave emission from Lead zirconate titanate Pb [Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}] O{sub 3} (PZT) induced by mechanical stressing. The mechanical stress was initiated by impact of a sharp tungsten indenter on the upper surface of PZT ceramic. The sequences of microwave and current impulses, which flew from indenter to electric ground, were detected simultaneously. The voltage between the upper and lower surface of ceramic was measured to obtain the behavior of mechanical force acting on ceramic during the impact. It was found that the amplitude, form, and frequency of measured microwave impulses were different by compression and restitution phase of impact. Two different mechanisms of electron emission, responsible for microwave impulse generation, were proposed based on the dissimilar impulse behavior. The field emission from tungsten indenter is dominant during compression, whereas ferroemission dominates during restitution phase. Indeed, it was observed that the direction of the current flow, i.e., sign of current impulses is changed by transitions from compression to restitution phase of impact. The observed dissimilar behavior of microwave impulses, caused by increasing and decreasing applied force, can be used to calculate the contact time and behavior of mechanical force during mechanical impact on ceramic surface. It is shown that the generation of microwave impulses exhibits high reproducibility, impulse intensity, a low damping factor, and high mechanical failure resistance. Based on these microwave emission properties of PZT, the development of new type of stress sensor with spatial resolution of few microns becomes possible.

  9. Inter-Sensor Comparison of Microwave Land Surface Emissivity Products to Improve Precipitation Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Temimi, M.; Turk, J.; Prigent, C.; Furuzawa, F.; Tian, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Microwave land surface emissivity acts as the background signal to estimate rain rate, cloud liquid water, and total precipitable water. Therefore, its accuracy can directly affect the uncertainty of such measurements. Over land, unlike over oceans, the microwave emissivity is relatively high and and varies significantly as surface conditions and land cover change. Lack of ground truth measurement of microwave emissivity especially on global scale has made the uncertainty analysis of this parameter very challenging. The present study investigates the consistency among the existing global land emissivity estimates from different microwave sensors. The products are determined from various sensors and frequencies ranging from 7 to 90 GHz. The selected emissivity products in this study are from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) by NOAA - Cooperative remote Sensing and Science and Technology Center (CREST), the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) by The Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in France, TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) by Nagoya University, Japan, and WindSat by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The emissivity estimates are based on different algorithms and ancillary data sets. This work investigates the difference among these emissivity products from 2003 to 2008 dynamically and spectrally. The similarities and discrepancies of the retrievals are studied at different land cover types. The mean relative difference (MRD) and other statistical parameters are calculated temporally for all five years of the study. Some inherent discrepancies between the selected products can be attributed to the difference in geometry in terms of incident angle, spectral response, and the foot print size which can affect the estimations. The results reveal that in lower frequencies (=<19 GHz) ancillary data especially skin temperature data set is the major source of difference in emissivity retrievals, while in higher frequencies

  10. Microwave emission from an AXIAL-Virtual Cathode Oscillator driven by a compact pulsed power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, R.; Sharma, S. K.; Banerjee, P.; Deb, P.; Prabaharan, T.; Das, R.; Kdas, B.; Adhikary, B.; Verma, R.; Shyam, A.

    2012-11-01

    For the generation of microwaves, Electron beam devices operating in vacuum are most widely used. For pulsed and high power microwave generation, Virtual cathode oscillators (VIRCATORs) are said to be simple in operation and construction. They are generally driven by a pulsed power source which gives high input powers to the Vircator connected as load. Vircator, depending upon its efficiency, converts the electrical input power to the microwave power. We are presenting the results of an axial Vircator operating in 2×10-4 mbar vacuum and is driven by a compact pulsed power source. The energy source and pulse compression is realized in very user friendly approach to run the system. The radiating system presently runs at relatively low powers but has the scope of reaching to high power by a logical improvement. A study of effect of collapsing diode impedance, of the vacuum field emission diode of the Vircator, on the microwave emission is presented in the paper. We are also presenting the microwave emission measurement conducted in the given system. Effect of vacuum is also studied to the extent of present experimental limits.

  11. Microwave Emission from Hybridized States in a Semiconductor Charge Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockklauser, A.; Maisi, V. F.; Basset, J.; Cujia, K.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Ihn, T.; Wallraff, A.; Ensslin, K.

    2015-07-01

    We explore the microwave radiation emitted from a biased double quantum dot due to the inelastic tunneling of single charges. Radiation is detected over a broad range of detuning configurations between the dot energy levels, with pronounced maxima occurring in resonance with a capacitively coupled transmission line resonator. The power emitted for forward and reverse resonant detuning is found to be in good agreement with a rate equation model, which considers the hybridization of the individual dot charge states.

  12. Microwave Emission from Hybridized States in a Semiconductor Charge Qubit.

    PubMed

    Stockklauser, A; Maisi, V F; Basset, J; Cujia, K; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Ihn, T; Wallraff, A; Ensslin, K

    2015-07-24

    We explore the microwave radiation emitted from a biased double quantum dot due to the inelastic tunneling of single charges. Radiation is detected over a broad range of detuning configurations between the dot energy levels, with pronounced maxima occurring in resonance with a capacitively coupled transmission line resonator. The power emitted for forward and reverse resonant detuning is found to be in good agreement with a rate equation model, which considers the hybridization of the individual dot charge states. PMID:26252704

  13. The AMY experiment: Microwave emission from air shower plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Blanco, M.; Boháčová, M.; Buonomo, B.; Cataldi, G.; Coluccia, M. R.; Creti, P.; De Mitri, I.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Foggetta, L.; Gaïor, R.; Garcia-Fernandez, D.; Iarlori, M.; Le Coz, S.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Louedec, K.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Monasor, M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Salamida, F.; Salina, G.; Settimo, M.; Valente, P.; Vazquez, J. R.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2016-07-01

    You The Air Microwave Yield (AMY) experiment investigate the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted in the GHz frequency range from an electron beam induced air-shower. The measurements have been performed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati INFN National Laboratories with a 510 MeV electron beam in a wide frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. We present the apparatus and the results of the tests performed.

  14. Impact of ice temperature on microwave emissivity of thin newly formed sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Byong Jun; Ehn, Jens K.; Barber, David G.

    2008-02-01

    This study examines the impact of ice temperature on microwave emissivity over thin, newly formed sea ice at 6, 19, and 37 GHz during October 2003 in the southern Beaufort Sea, where the physical properties of newly formed sea ice were coincidently measured with microwave emissions. Six ice stations with distinct properties were selected and divided according to ice surface temperature into warm (above -3°C) or cold (below -3°C) stations. The warm stations had a lower emissivity at the vertical polarization by 0.1 than the cold stations and a corresponding difference in brine volume and dielectric properties. Significant correlations were observed between brine volume and ice emissivity (R2 = 0.8, p value < 0.05). A sensitivity study showed that decreasing ice temperatures from -2.1° to -5.0°C explained the observed difference of 0.1 in ice emissivity between warm and cold stations. The results suggest that the temperature of thin bare ice could be the critical factor in determining ice emissivity near the melting point (about -2°C). Furthermore, a slight decrease in ice temperature (i.e., from -2° to -5°C) significantly reduces the brine volume, thus resulting in high ice emissivity. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of newly formed ice to cause errors in estimating sea ice concentrations using Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E data.

  15. JET-SHOCKED H{sub 2} AND CO IN THE ANOMALOUS ARMS OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION GALAXY NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Ogle, P. M.; Lanz, L.; Appleton, P. N.

    2014-06-20

    We present a Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph map of H{sub 2} emission from the nearby galaxy NGC 4258 (Messier 106). The H{sub 2} emission comes from 9.4 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} of warm molecular hydrogen heated to 240-1040 K in the inner anomalous arms, a signature of jet interaction with the galaxy disk. The spectrum is that of a molecular hydrogen emission galaxy (MOHEG), with a large ratio of H{sub 2} over 7.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission (0.37), characteristic of shocked molecular gas. We find close spatial correspondence between the H{sub 2} and CO emission from the anomalous arms. Our estimate of cold molecular gas mass based on CO emission is 10 times greater than our estimate of 1.0 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} based on dust emission. We suggest that the X {sub CO} value is 10 times lower than the Milky Way value because of high kinetic temperature and enhanced turbulence. The H{sub 2} disk has been overrun and is being shocked by the jet cocoon, and much of the gas originally in the disk has been ejected into the galaxy halo in an X-ray hot outflow. We measure a modest star formation rate of 0.08 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in the central 3.4 kpc{sup 2} that is consistent with the remaining gas surface density.

  16. The microwave emission and transmission characters of deciduous forest at L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongjun; Yuan, Yu; Zheng, Xingming; Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Xiuli

    2014-11-01

    Forest covers about 30% of earth surface, which plays an important role in global forecast and carbon cycle. Monitoring forest biomass, and retrieving soil moisture at forest area, are the main goals of most passive microwave sensors on satellite missions. L-band is the most sensitive frequency among all the frequencies due to its good penetration ability. Because of its variety of the size of scattering components, the complicated structures and species of forest, it is difficult to describe the scattering and attenuation characters of forest in modeling microwave emission at forest area. In this paper, we studied the emissivity and transmissivity of deciduous forest at L(1.4GHz) by model simulation and field experiment. The microwave emission model was based on Matrix-Doubling algorithm. The comparison between simulated emissivity and measured data collected during an experiment at Maryland, USA in 2007 was good. Since theoretical model like Matrix-Doubling is too complicated to be used in retrial application, we mapped the results of Matrix-Doubling to a simple 0th-order model, also called ω-τ model, by setting the simulated emissivity to be the emissivity of 0th-order model at the same environment, which 2 unknown variables---opacity τ and effective single scattering albedo ω need to be determined. To valited τ (transmissivity of forest) simulated by Matrix-Doubling, we took an deciduous forest experiment by an L band microwave radiometer under trees at JingYueTan area, Changchun, Jilin Province in April to June in 2014. Thus the ω of forest can be determined. The matching results are presented in this paper. The relationship between LAI and forest microwave characters are discussed.

  17. Microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor for trace-metals in furnace exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.; Rhee, D. Y.; Thomas, P.; Cohn, D. R.; Surma, J. E.; Titus, C. H.

    1996-10-01

    A microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor has been successfully demonstrated for sensitive (<1 ppb), real time measurements of trace metals in furnace exhaust. The instrument uses a robust, up to 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz microwave plasma sustained in a portion of the undiluted furnace exhaust flow for atomic emission spectroscopy. The waveguide device is constructed of refractory materials compatible with high-temperature environments (≳500 °C) and is flange mountable into the inside of the furnace exhaust duct. Fused quartz fiber optics in close proximity to the plasma flame transmit the UV through visible emission (190-690 nm) to three spectrometers for simultaneous monitoring of several metals. This instrument has been used for continuous monitoring for a 49 h period with 0.5 s time resolution on a dc graphite electrode arc furnace during a soil vitrification test. Results are presented for chromium, manganese, and iron emissions during soil loading operations.

  18. [Study of the microwave emissivity characteristics of vegetation over the Northern Hemisphere].

    PubMed

    Shi, Li-Juan; Qiu, Yu-Bao; Shi, Jian-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    The microwave emissivity is a function of structure, water content, and surface roughness, and all these factors have obvious seasonal variations. In the present study, the half-month averaged emissivities in summer and winter of 2003 over the vegetation of Northern Hemisphere were estimated using Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) combined with IGBP (International Geosphere-Biosphere Project labels) land classification data. Then the emissivities of vegetation land covers at different frequencies, the polarization and their seasonal variations were analyzed respectively. The results show that the emissivities of vegetation increase with the increase in frequencies, and decline with the frequency increasing over snow region. In summer, the vegetation emissivity at V-polarization of 89 GHz is larger than 0.944, and all emissivities are relatively stable and the RMSE of time series emissivity variation is less than 0.007 2. In winter, emissivities decrease over snow covered area, especially for higher frequencies. Furthermore, with the increase in vegetation density, the emissivities increase and emissivity polarization difference decreases. PMID:23905309

  19. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  20. [Study of the microwave emissivity characteristics over different land cover types].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Pan; Jiang, Ling-Mei; Qiu, Yu-Bao; Wu, Sheng-Li; Shi, Jian-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Xin

    2010-06-01

    The microwave emissivity over land is very important for describing the characteristics of the lands, and it is also a key factor for retrieving the parameters of land and atmosphere. Different land covers have their emission behavior as a function of structure, water content, and surface roughness. In the present study the global land surface emissivities were calculated using six month (June, 2003-August, 2003, Dec, 2003-Feb, 2004) AMSR-E L2A brightness temperature, MODIS land surface temperature and the layered atmosphere temperature, and humidity and pressure profiles data retrieved from MODIS/Aqua under clear sky conditions. With the information of IGBP land cover types, "pure" pixels were used, which are defined when the fraction cover of each land type is larger than 85%. Then, the emissivity of sixteen land covers at different frequencies, polarization and their seasonal variation were analyzed respectively. The results show that the emissivity of vegetation including forests, grasslands and croplands is higher than that over bare soil, and the polarization difference of vegetation is smaller than that of bare soil. In summer, the emissivity of vegetation is relatively stable because it is in bloom, therefore the authors can use it as its emissivity in our microwave emissivity database over different land cover types. Furthermore, snow cover can heavily impact the change in land cover emissivity, especially in winter. PMID:20707126

  1. Characterization of errors in a coupled snow hydrology-microwave emission model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andreadis, K.M.; Liang, D.; Tsang, L.; Lettenmaier, D.P.; Josberger, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional approaches to the direct estimation of snow properties from passive microwave remote sensing have been plagued by limitations such as the tendency of estimates to saturate for moderately deep snowpacks and the effects of mixed land cover within remotely sensed pixels. An alternative approach is to assimilate satellite microwave emission observations directly, which requires embedding an accurate microwave emissions model into a hydrologic prediction scheme, as well as quantitative information of model and observation errors. In this study a coupled snow hydrology [Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC)] and microwave emission [Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT)] model are evaluated using multiscale brightness temperature (TB) measurements from the Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). The ability of VIC to reproduce snowpack properties is shown with the use of snow pit measurements, while TB model predictions are evaluated through comparison with Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer (GBMR), air-craft [Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR)], and satellite [Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E)] TB measurements. Limitations of the model at the point scale were not as evident when comparing areal estimates. The coupled model was able to reproduce the TB spatial patterns observed by PSR in two of three sites. However, this was mostly due to the presence of relatively dense forest cover. An interesting result occurs when examining the spatial scaling behavior of the higher-resolution errors; the satellite-scale error is well approximated by the mode of the (spatial) histogram of errors at the smaller scale. In addition, TB prediction errors were almost invariant when aggregated to the satellite scale, while forest-cover fractions greater than 30% had a significant effect on TB predictions. ?? 2008 American Meteorological Society.

  2. Land Surface Microwave Emissivities Derived from AMSR-E and MODIS Measurements with Advanced Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Galantowicz, John F.; Lipton, Alan E.; Uymin, Gennady; Prigent, Catherine; Grassotti, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A microwave emissivity database has been developed with data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and with ancillary land surface temperature (LST) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the same Aqua spacecraft. The primary intended application of the database is to provide surface emissivity constraints in atmospheric and surface property retrieval or assimilation. An additional application is to serve as a dynamic indicator of land surface properties relevant to climate change monitoring. The precision of the emissivity data is estimated to be significantly better than in prior databases from other sensors due to the precise collocation with high-quality MODIS LST data and due to the quality control features of our data analysis system. The accuracy of the emissivities in deserts and semi-arid regions is enhanced by applying, in those regions, a version of the emissivity retrieval algorithm that accounts for the penetration of microwave radiation through dry soil with diurnally varying vertical temperature gradients. These results suggest that this penetration effect is more widespread and more significant to interpretation of passive microwave measurements than had been previously established. Emissivity coverage in areas where persistent cloudiness interferes with the availability of MODIS LST data is achieved using a classification-based method to spread emissivity data from less-cloudy areas that have similar microwave surface properties. Evaluations and analyses of the emissivity products over homogeneous snow-free areas are presented, including application to retrieval of soil temperature profiles. Spatial inhomogeneities are the largest in the vicinity of large water bodies due to the large water/land emissivity contrast and give rise to large apparent temporal variability in the retrieved emissivities when satellite footprint locations vary over time. This issue will be dealt with in the future by

  3. A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare agricultural soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Paris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare, stratified agricultural soils was developed to assist in the analysis of data gathered in the joint soil moisture experiment. The predictions of the model were compared with preliminary X band (2.8 cm) microwave and ground based observations. Measured brightness temperatures at vertical and horizontal polarizations can be used to estimate the moisture content of the top centimeter of soil with + or - 1 percent accuracy. It is also shown that the Stokes parameters can be used to distinguish between moisture and surface roughness effects.

  4. Significance of agricultural row structure on the microwave emissivity of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Promes, P. M.; Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P. E.

    1987-01-01

    A series of field experiments was carried out to extend the data base available for verifying agricultural row effect models of emissivity. The row effects model was used to simulate a data base from which an algorithm could be developed to account for row effects when the scene dielectric constant and small-scale roughness are unknown. One objective of the study was to quantify the significance of row structure and to develop a practical procedure for removing the effects of periodic row structure on the microwave emissivity of a soil in order to use the emissivity values to estimate the soil moisture. A second objective was to expand the data set available for model verification through field observations using a truck-mounted 1.4-GHz microwave radiometer.

  5. Anomalous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this composite image of spiral galaxy M106 (NGC 4258), optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey is shown as yellow, radio data from the Very Large Array appears as purple, X-ray data from Chandra is coded blue, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope appears red. Two anomalous arms, which aren't visible at optical wavelengths, appear as purple and blue emission.

  6. Field emission from carbon nanotubes produced using microwave plasma assisted CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Yoon, S.F.; Ahn, J.; Gan, B.; Rusli; Yu, M.B.; Cheah, L.K.; Shi, X.

    2000-01-30

    Electron field emission from carbon nanotubes prepared using microwave plasma assisted CVD has been investigated. The nanotubes, ranging from 50 to 120 nm in diameter and a few tens of microns in length, were formed under methane and hydrogen plasma at 720 C with the aid of iron-oxide particles. The morphology and growth direction of the nanotubes are found to be strongly influenced by the flow ratio of methane to hydrogen. However, the electron field emission from these massive nanotubes show similar characteristics, i.e., high emission current at low electric fields.

  7. The MIDAS experiment: A prototype for the microwave emission of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monasor, M.; Alekotte, I.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Berlin, A.; Bertou, X.; Bodgan, M.; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Carvalho, W.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Genat, J. F.; Facal San Luis, P.; Mills, E.; Rouille D'Orfeuil, B.; Wayne, S.; Reyes, L. C.; Santos, E. M.; Privitera, P.; Williams, C.; Zas, E.

    2011-06-01

    Recent measurements suggest that extensive air showers initiated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) emit signals in the microwave band of the electromagnetic spectrum caused by the collisions of the free-electrons with the atmospheric neutral molecules in the plasma produced by the passage of the shower. Such emission is isotropic and could allow the detection of air showers with 100% duty cycle and a calorimetric-like energy measurement, a significant improvement over current detection techniques. We have built MIDAS (MIcrowave Detection of Air Showers), a prototype of microwave detector, which consists of a 4.5 m diameter antenna with a cluster of 53 feed-horns in the 4 GHz range. The details of the prototype and first results will be presented.

  8. Rapid synthesis of white-light emissive ZnO nanorods using microwave assisted method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipour, M.; Mohammad-Sadeghipour, A.; Molaei, M.; Khanzadeh, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, firstly we have synthesized ZnO nanowires using zinc acetate, ethanol and ammonium hydroxide by a thermo-chemical method and then ZnO nanorods (NRs) have been prepared by microwave irradiation (MI) of an initial solution containing ZnO nanowires. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed the rare zinc-blende phase which grows on the surface of NRs and its crystallite size increases with the increase of microwave power. The average length and width of rods were observed several hundreds of nanometer and 80nm, respectively, from scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy indicates that a band tail forms due to MI, which has roughly 2eV energy gap. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy indicated a blue emission and a white emission for ZnO nanowires and NRs, respectively. MI quenches the UV emission from ZnO NRs and enhances the surface defects’ emission. The resultant visible PL of the samples increases with the increase of microwave power that shows the growth of zinc-blende phase which has crucial effect on the defect density of NRs.

  9. Microwave emission measurements of sea surface roughness, soil moisture, and sea ice structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the microwave radiometers to be carried aboard the Nimbus 5 and 6 satellites and proposed for one of the earth observatory satellites, remote measurements of microwave radiation at wavelengths ranging from 0.8 to 21 cm have been made of a variety of the earth's surfaces from the NASA CV-990 A/C. Brightness temperatures of sea water surfaces of varying roughness, of terrain with varying soil moisture, and of sea ice of varying structure were observed. In each case, around truth information was available for correlation with the microwave brightness temperature. The utility of passive microwave radiometry in determining ocean surface wind speeds, at least for values higher than 7 meters/second has been demonstrated. In addition, it was shown that radiometric signatures can be used to determine soil moisture in unvegetated terrain to within five percentage points by weight. Finally, it was demonstrated that first year thick, multi-year, and first year thin sea ice can be distinguished by observing their differing microwave emissivities at various wavelengths.

  10. Toward Probing Martian Ground Ice Using Microwave Emission: Data and Calculations from Antarctic Dry Valley Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winebrenner, D. P.; Sletten, R. S.; Hallet, B.

    2004-12-01

    Recent observations and modeling indicate widespread, near-surface ground ice on Mars, but leave its depth of occurrence and form (e.g., interstitial or massive) significantly uncertain. We show here that the propagation of surface temperature variations to depth, together with thermal microwave emission that originates from commensurate depths and which is observed over time, provide a basis to probe the nature and depth of ice deposits. We utilize analogs in Antarctic Dry Valley soils, where time-resolved temperature profiles reveal that surface temperature variations on daily and longer time scales propagate to depths of decimeters and greater, especially in desiccated, fine-grained (low thermal inertia) soils. For example, diurnal surface variations of 10C produce 3C variations at 20 cm depth in desiccated soil in Beacon Valley. Ice-cemented (but not saturated) soils in Victoria Valley, by contrast, show diurnal variations (with similar thermal forcing) of only a fraction of a degree at similar depths. Thus thermal microwave emission at wavelengths that probe to decimeter depths will also differ between cases. We compute expected properties of microwave brightness temperature time series using measurements of mineral dielectric properties (including observations of Martian analogs), mixing formulae to account for ice content, and recent theory from Winebrenner et al. (Annals of Glaciology, v 39, 2004). According to the latter theory, a single parameter governs the relationship between surface and brightness temperature time series. That parameter is a characteristic time-scale given by the square of the microwave emission depth-scale over the soil thermal diffusivity. Calculations show that the characteristic time-scale increases strongly with increasing ice content and with decreasing burial depth. Based on such variations, we outline a remote sensing method to estimate characteristics of ground ice based on infrared surface temperature and microwave

  11. Temperature measurements in microwave argon plasma source by using overlapped molecular emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, E.; Bazavan, M.; Shindo, H.

    2015-09-01

    The electron excitation temperature Texc, vibrational Tvib, and rotational Trot temperatures were measured in a high-pressure line-shaped microwave plasma source in argon over a wide range of gas pressure and microwave power, by using optical emission spectra. The selected ArI transition lines 5p-4s and 4p-4s were chosen to calculate electron excitation temperature using Boltzmann's plot method. Meanwhile, the emission spectra of hydroxyl OH molecular ( A 2 Σ + - X 2 Π i , Δ ν = 0 ) band and the nitrogen N2 second positive system ( C 3 Π u - B 3 Π g , Δ ν = + 1 ), both second diffraction order, were used to evaluate the vibrational Tvib and rotational Trot temperatures using the method of comparing the measured and calculated spectra with a chi-squared minimization procedure. The components of the overlapped spectrum are greatly influenced by the gas pressure; however, they are independent on microwave power. For temperatures, it was found that the Texc dramatically decreases from 2.5 to 0.75 eV, which qualitatively agrees with T e deduced from zero-global model. Both of Tvib and Trot significantly decrease with as gas pressure increase from 0.4 to 50 Torr. Yet, they behave differently with microwave power.

  12. Microwave backscattering and emission model for grass canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Lang, Roger H.; Levine, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A two-layer model is developed that treats the grass canopy as a collection of randomly oriented elliptical dielectric discs over a layer of thatch with underlying soil surface. The distorted Born approximation in conjunction with the Peake formulation is used to calculate the backscattering coefficient and the emissivity from the canopy. Two particular features of this model which are unique for grass canopies are the variation of the canopy structure and the presence of the thatch layer. The basic parameters in the model such as the size and orientation of grass blades, dielectric constant of soil and vegetation, and thickness and water content of the thatch layer have been obtained from ground truth data. To interpret the available experimental observations of grasslands, numerical results from both passive and active models at L-band (1.4 GHz) are generated and various scattering and emission properties of the grass canopies are discussed.

  13. The long-term oscillations in sunspots and related inter-sunspot sources in microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakunina, I. A.; Abramov-Maximov, V. E.; Smirnova, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents the microwave long-term oscillations with periods of a few tens of minutes obtained from Nobeyama radioheliograph (NoRH) at frequency 17 GHz. In two active regions the fluctuations of radio emission of different types of intersunspot sources (ISS) (compact and extended) were compared with the fluctuations in magnetic fields of sunspots. Common periods in variations of microwave emission of different type of sources and magnetic field of sunspots were discovered. The delay of 17 minutes was revealed for oscillations of the extended ISS with respect to variations of magnetic field of its tail sunspot. The model of the sunspot magnetic structure based on the concept of three magnetic fluxes for explanation of this fact is discussed.

  14. Optical Emission Spectroscopic Evaluation of Different Microwave Plasma Discharges and Its Potential Application for Sterilization Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, José L.; Rico, Víctor J.; Yanguas-Gil, Ángel; Cotrino, José; González-Elipe, Agustín R.

    The present work aims at studying different microwave flowing discharges containing Ar and/or NO as alternative candidates to more extended N2 containing plasma mixtures like N2-O2. Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) is used to demonstrate the potential possibilities of these plasma mixtures to provide O* and UV intermediate species demanded for sterilization purposes at low temperatures and extended discharge gaps. Additionally, some plasma sterilization experiments with Escherichia coli cultures are presented.

  15. Impact of Conifer Forest Litter on Microwave Emission at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Cosh, Michael H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the utilization of microwave modeling, together with ground truth, and L-band (1.4-GHz) brightness temperatures to investigate the passive microwave characteristics of a conifer forest floor. The microwave data were acquired over a natural Virginia Pine forest in Maryland by a ground-based microwave active/passive instrument system in 2008/2009. Ground measurements of the tree biophysical parameters and forest floor characteristics were obtained during the field campaign. The test site consisted of medium-sized evergreen conifers with an average height of 12 m and average diameters at breast height of 12.6 cm. The site is a typical pine forest site in that there is a surface layer of loose debris/needles and an organic transition layer above the mineral soil. In an effort to characterize and model the impact of the surface litter layer, an experiment was conducted on a day with wet soil conditions, which involved removal of the surface litter layer from one half of the test site while keeping the other half undisturbed. The observations showed detectable decrease in emissivity for both polarizations after the surface litter layer was removed. A first-order radiative transfer model of the forest stands including the multilayer nature of the forest floor in conjunction with the ground truth data are used to compute forest emission. The model calculations reproduced the major features of the experimental data over the entire duration, which included the effects of surface litter and ground moisture content on overall emission. Both theory and experimental results confirm that the litter layer increases the observed canopy brightness temperature and obscure the soil emission.

  16. Microwave remediation of emissions resulting from the treatment of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.L.

    2000-04-25

    The global community has become increasingly dependent on computer and other electronic technologies. As a result, society is faced with an increasing amount of obsolete equipment that is usually disposed of in landfills. While a convenient solution, this action causes a substantial loss of finite resources and poses a potential environmental threat as the various components breakdown and are exposed to the elements. Hazardous compounds such as lead, mercury, and cadmium may leach from the boards and find their way into the groundwater supply. In order to alleviate this potential problem, a microwave waste treatment system was developed that was capable of removing the organic compounds from the circuitry. Upon further heating in an industrial microwave, a glass and metal ingot were recovered. Analysis of the ingot revealed small concentrations of precious metals such as gold and silver. During treatment, gaseous organic and aromatic compounds were generated in the initial stages of processing. These emissions were successfully treated in a microwave off-gas system that reduced the concentration of the products emitted by several orders of magnitude and in some cases, completely destroyed components within the waste gas. In order to better understand the effects of processing parameters on the efficiency of the off-gas system, a parametric study was developed and undertaken. The study tested the microwave system at 3 incoming flow rates (10, 30, and 50 ft3/min) and 3 temperatures (400, 700, and 1000 degrees C). In order to determine the effects of microwave energy, some of the experiments were repeated using a conventional furnace in place of the microwave off-gas unit.

  17. Dielectric properties and emissivity of seawater at C-band microwave frequency.

    PubMed

    Murugkar, A G; Joshi, A S; Kurtadikar, M L

    2012-10-01

    Microwave remote sensing applications over ocean using radar and radiometers, a precise knowledge of emissivity and reflectivity, are required. Emissivity of ocean surface is a function of the surface configuration, frequency of radiation, temperature and its dielectric properties. The emissivity of a smooth ocean surface at a particular wavelength is determined by its complex dielectric properties. In present study, laboratory measurements of complex dielectric properties, real part epsilon', and imaginary part epsilon", of surface seawater samples collected from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea are carried out. Measurements of these seawater samples are done at 5 GHz and 30 degrees C using an automated C-band microwave bench set up. The salinity of samples is also measured using autosalinometer. The salinity values are used to determine epsilon' and epsilon" using the Debye equations. The normal incidence emissivity and brightness temperature values for smooth sea surface are reported for surface samples. The dielectric constant epsilon' decreases and dielectric loss increases with increase in salinity at 5 GHz and 30 degrees C. At normal incidence, emissivity is almost constant for varying salinities. PMID:25151713

  18. Relative influence upon microwave emissivity of fine-scale stratigraphy, internal scattering, and dielectric properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    England, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    The microwave emissivity of relatively low-loss media such as snow, ice, frozen ground, and lunar soil is strongly influenced by fine-scale layering and by internal scattering. Radiometric data, however, are commonly interpreted using a model of emission from a homogeneous, dielectric halfspace whose emissivity derives exclusively from dielectric properties. Conclusions based upon these simple interpretations can be erroneous. Examples are presented showing that the emission from fresh or hardpacked snow over either frozen or moist soil is governed dominantly by the size distribution of ice grains in the snowpack. Similarly, the thickness of seasonally frozen soil and the concentration of rock clasts in lunar soil noticeably affect, respectively, the emissivities of northern latitude soils in winter and of the lunar regolith. Petrophysical data accumulated in support of the geophysical interpretation of microwave data must include measurements of not only dielectric properties, but also of geometric factors such as finescale layering and size distributions of grains, inclusions, and voids. ?? 1976 Birkha??user Verlag.

  19. A parameterization of effective soil temperature for microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Schmugge, T. J.; Mo, T. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A parameterization of effective soil temperature is discussed, which when multiplied by the emissivity gives the brightness temperature in terms of surface (T sub o) and deep (T sub infinity) soil temperatures as T = T sub infinity + C (T sub o - T sub infinity). A coherent radiative transfer model and a large data base of observed soil moisture and temperature profiles are used to calculate the best-fit value of the parameter C. For 2.8, 6.0, 11.0, 21.0 and 49.0 cm wavelengths. The C values are respectively 0.802 + or - 0.006, 0.667 + or - 0.008, 0.480 + or - 0.010, 0.246 + or - 0.009, and 0,084 + or - 0.005. The parameterized equation gives results which are generally within one or two percent of the exact values.

  20. High brightness field emission from printed carbon nanotubes in an S-band microwave gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qilong; Li, Xiangkun; Di, Yusong; Yu, Cairu; Zhang, Xiaobing; Li, Ming; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were applied as cold cathode and placed into an S-band microwave gun operating at 2856 MHz with the pulse duration of 2.8 μs. High brightness field emission was demonstrated and the current density achieves the value more than 4.2 A/cm2. The emittance of field emission beam is calculated to be nearly 21 μm based on the beam profile of emission electrons monitored via yttrium aluminum garnet screen. The infrared image of printed CNTs confirms that the emitters in the center contributed more electrons and the heat generated during the large current density field emission. The results in the paper imply that randomly distributed printed CNTs have the potential to be applied as the high brightness electron sources for free electron lasers.

  1. Anomalous Temperature-Dependent Upconversion Luminescence of α-NaYF₄:Yb³⁺/Er³⁺ Nanocrystals Synthesized by a Microwave-Assisted Hydrothermal Method.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lili; Li, Xiangping; Hua, Ruinian; Tianxiang Peng; Wang, Yizhuo; Zhang, Xizhen; Chen, Baojiu

    2016-01-01

    Yb³⁺/Er³⁺co-doped cubic-(α-) phase NaYF₄ nanocrystals were prepared through a microwave- assisted hydrothermal method. Temperature-dependent upconversion luminescence (UCL) and sensing properties were systematically studied. It is interesting that anomalous temperature- dependent UCL behavior is observed. With increasing temperature (303-573 K), the UCL intensity of Er³⁺ does not quench monotonously but reaches a minimum around 483 K and then increases. However, it was found that the UCL spectra change in a different way with decreasing temperature (573-303 K) from the one measured with increasing temperature. The fluorescence intensity ratio of ²H₁₁/₂ --> ⁴I₁₅/₂ to ⁴S₃/₂ --> ⁴I₁₅/₂ at any measured temperature point remains almost constant in all measurement processes, indicating the consistency of temperature in each spectrum measurement at all temperature points regardless of the heating or the cooling process in our experiments. The results demonstrate that NaYF₄:Yb³⁺/Er³⁺ UC nanocrystal has good sensing stability and may have potential application in the nanoscale thermal sensor. PMID:27398529

  2. Microwave emission from high Arctic Sea ice during freeze-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Troy, B. E.; Ramseier, R. O.; Asmus, K. W.; Hartman, M. F.; Luther, C. A.

    1984-09-01

    A cooperative sea ice remote sensing experiment was conducted in the eastern Beaufort Sea and Mould Bay area during the freeze-up period in October 1981. Airborne millimeter-wave imagery at 90, 140, and 220 GHz, and nadir microwave radiometric measurements at 19, 22, and 31 GHz, were made from a U. S. Naval Research Laboratory aircraft, while the Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service conducted an extensive concurrent surface measurement program. This study demonstrates for the first time the high-resolution capability of 90 GHz to investigate detailed ice morphology and to define ice types. The 140 and 220 GHz imagery is the first ever made of sea ice at these high frequencies. Emissivities are determined for young ice, second-year ice (SY), multiyear ice (MY), new ice, old shorefast ice, and open water. The young ice exhibits the emissivity typical of first-year (FY) ice types, i.e., near unity and independent of frequency. The emissivities of new ice and open water increase with frequency, and that of MY ice decreases with frequency. Those of SY ice and old shorefast ice, measured here for the first time, also decrease with frequency but are larger in value than the MY emissivity. Ice type discrimination is optimum at 90 GHz, i.e., the spread in microwave signature between FY ice and old ice (SY and MY) is greatest at 90 GHz. The MY emissivity is lower than that of open water at both 90 and 140 GHz. The measurements presented here provide a basis for development of algorithms to exploit the potential of the Mission Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) to be launched on a Defense Meteorological Satellite in 1985 and, in particular, the 85.5-GHz SSM/I channels for ice type, concentration, and edge determination.

  3. Assessment of the consistency among global microwave land surface emissivity products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Temimi, M.; Prigent, C.; Turk, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Tian, Y.; Furuzawa, F.; Masunaga, H.

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this work is to inter-compare a number of global land surface emissivity products over various land-cover conditions to assess their consistency. Ultimately, the discrepancies between the studied emissivity products will help interpreting the divergences among numerical weather prediction models in which land emissivity is a key surface boundary parameter. The intercompared retrieved land emissivity products were generated over five-year period (2003-2007) using observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Windsat. First, all products were reprocessed in the same projection and spatial resolution as they were generated from sensors with various configurations. Then, the mean value and standard deviations of monthly emissivity values were calculated for each product to assess the spatial distribution of the consistencies/inconsistencies among the products across the globe. The emissivity values from four products were also compared to soil moisture estimates and satellite-based vegetation index to assess their sensitivities to the changes in land surface conditions. Results show that systematic differences among products exist and variation of emissivities at each product has similar frequency dependency at any land cover type. Monthly means of emissivity values from AMSR-E in the vertical and horizontal polarizations seem to be systematically lower across various land cover condition which may be attributed to the 1.30 a.m./p.m. overpass time of the sensor and possibly a residual skin temperature effect in the product. The standard deviation of the analysed products was the lowest (less than 0.01) in rain forest regions for all products and the highest in northern latitudes, above 0.04 for AMSR-E and SSM/I and around 0.03 for WindSat. Despite differences in absolute emissivity estimates

  4. Anomalous temperature dependent magneto-conductance in organic light-emitting diodes with multiple emissive states

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chen-xiao; Jia, Wei-yao; Huang, Ke-Xun; Zhang, Qiao-ming; Yang, Xiao-hui; Xiong, Zu-hong

    2015-07-13

    The temperature dependence of the magneto-conductance (MC) in organic electron donor-acceptor hybrid and layer heterojunction diodes was studied. The MC value increased with temperature in layer heterojunction and in 10 wt. % hybrid devices. An anomalous decrease of the MC with temperature was observed in 25 wt. %–50 wt. % hybrid devices. Further increasing donor concentration to 75 wt. %, the MC again increased with temperature. The endothermic exciplex-exciton energy transfer and the change in electroplex/exciton ratio caused by change in charge transport with temperature may account for these phenomena. Comparative studies of the temperature evolutions of the IV curves and the electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra back our hypothesis.

  5. Control of spontaneous emission from a microwave-field-coupled three-level{Lambda}-type atom in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X. Q.; Zhang, B.; Sun, X. D.; Lu, Z. W.

    2011-05-15

    The spontaneous emission spectrum of a three-level {Lambda}-type atom driven by a microwave field was studied. For the two transitions coupled to the same modified reservoir, we discussed the influence of photonic band gap and Rabi frequency of the microwave field on the emission spectrum. The emission spectrum is given for different locations of the upper band-edge frequency. With the transition frequencies moving from outside the band gap to inside, the number of peaks decreases in the emission spectrum and the multipeak structure of spectral line is finally replaced by a strong non-Lorentzian shape. With increase of the Rabi frequency of the microwave field, we find the spectral line changes from a multipeak structure to a two-peak structure, originating from the inhibition of spontaneous emission for the corresponding decay channel.

  6. Unique Properties of Thermally Tailored Copper: Magnetically Active Regions and Anomalous X-ray Fluorescence Emissions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    When high-purity copper (≥99.98%wt) is melted, held in its liquid state for a few hours with iterative thermal cycling, then allowed to resolidify, the ingot surface is found to have many small regions that are magnetically active. X-ray fluorescence analysis of these regions exhibit remarkably intense lines from “sensitized elements” (SE), including in part or fully the contiguous series V, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co. The XRF emissions from SE are far more intense than expected from known impurity levels. Comparison with blanks and standards show that the thermal “tailoring” also introduces strongly enhanced SE emissions in samples taken from the interior of the copper ingots. For some magnetic regions, the location as well as the SE emissions, although persistent, vary irregularly with time. Also, for some regions extraordinarily intense “sensitized iron” (SFe) emissions occur, accompanied by drastic attenuation of Cu emissions. PMID:20037657

  7. Derivation of an analytical approximation of the spectrum of spinning dust emission

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Matthew A.

    2014-02-01

    An analytical function for the spectrum of spinning dust emission is presented. It is derived through the application of careful approximations, with each step tested against numerical calculations. This approach ensures accuracy while providing an intuitive picture of the physics. The final result may be useful for fitting of anomalous microwave emission observations, as is demonstrated by a comparison with the Planck observations of the Perseus Molecular Cloud. It is hoped that this will lead to a broader consideration of the spinning dust model when interpreting microwave continuum observations, and that it will provide a standard framework for interpreting and comparing the variety of anomalous microwave emission observations.

  8. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, M.; Mätzler, C.; Wiesmann, A.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Schwank, M.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5-100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like- and cross-polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS) is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoid fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in Matlab and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  9. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, M.; Mätzler, C.; Wiesmann, A.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Schwank, M.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2015-03-01

    The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5-100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like and cross polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS) is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoids fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in MATLAB and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  10. Impact of the seasonal evolution of snow properties on microwave emission model performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.; Derksen, C.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Yackel, J.

    2010-12-01

    Snow cover exhibits great spatio-temporal variability, and is dynamically coupled with global hydrological and climatological processes. Accounting for snowpack evolution related to snow accumulation, metamorphosis, and melt are essential for both modeling and remote sensing applications. Microwave emission has frequency dependant relationships with snow water equivalent (SWE), but snow grain-size, snowpack layering, and snow liquid-water content can confuse the estimation of snow parameters with empirical stand-alone algorithms. This work presents an overview of seasonal snow and multi-frequency dual-polarization microwave emission measurements collected during the 2009-2010 winter season at a network of sites near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. These observations were used to parameterize and evaluate model simulations of microwave snow emission using the multiple-layer version of the Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) microwave emission model. The HUT model is utilized in the European Space Agency’s (ESA) GlobSnow global snow monitoring service, applied to SWE and snow depth (SD) retrievals for the Northern Hemisphere. The HUT model used for forward brightness temperature simulations in the GlobSnow retrieval scheme is currently limited to one layer which necessitates idealizing physical properties of the entire snow pack. In this study, we explore the performance of simulations with the addition of a depth hoar layer and, when appropriate, an ice lens. Simulations for forest, lake, and open environments were synthesized through a scene simulation formulation of the HUT model to produce output suitable for comparison with measured brightness temperatures from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). While the multi-layer model better represents the vertical complexities of grain size and layering, implementation of a multi-layer approach remains a challenge due to model sensitivity with regard to the method of generalization of a complex snow

  11. Topographic Effects on the Surface Emissivity of a Mountainous Area Observed by a Spaceborne Microwave Radiometer

    PubMed Central

    Pulvirenti, Luca; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Marzano, Frank S.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation study to understand the influence of topography on the surface emissivity observed by a satellite microwave radiometer is carried out. We analyze the effects due to changes in observation angle, including the rotation of the polarization plane. A mountainous area in the Alps (Northern Italy) is considered and the information on the relief extracted from a digital elevation model is exploited. The numerical simulation refers to a radiometric image, acquired by a conically-scanning radiometer similar to AMSR-E, i.e., flying at 705 km of altitude with an observation angle of 55°. To single out the impact on surface emissivity, scattering of the radiation due to the atmosphere or neighboring elevated surfaces is not considered. C and X bands, for which atmospheric effects are negligible, and Ka band are analyzed. The results indicate that the changes in the local observation angle tend to lower the apparent emissivity of a radiometric pixel with respect to the corresponding flat surface characteristics. The effect of the rotation of the polarization plane enlarges (vertical polarization), or attenuates (horizontal polarization) this decrease. By doing some simplifying assumptions for the radiometer antenna, the conclusion is that the microwave emissivity at vertical polarization is underestimated, whilst the opposite occurs for horizontal polarization, except for Ka band, for which both under- and overprediction may occur. A quantification of the differences with respect to a flat soil and an approximate evaluation of their impact on soil moisture retrieval are yielded.

  12. Observations of the microwave emission of Venus from 1.3 to 3.6 cm.

    PubMed

    Steffes, P G; Klein, M J; Jenkins, J M

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory measurements of Steffes (1986) have suggested that the intensity and shape of the microwave spectrum of Venus might be especially sensitive to the subcloud abundance of constituents such as SO2 and gaseous H2SO4. It was likewise suggested that some variations of the shape of the emission spectrum might occur between 1.5 and 3 cm (10 to 20 GHz), a wavelength range which had previously only been sparsely observed. As a result, coordinated observations of Venus emission were conducted at four wavelengths between 1.35 cm (22.2 GHz) and 3.6 cm (8.42 GHz) using the 43-m NRAO antenna at Green Bank, West Virginia, and the 64-m antenna at NASA's Deep Space Communication Complex, Goldstone, California. In this paper, we report the methodology and results of these observations, and compare the results with other observations and with calculated emission spectra. We conclude that the observed emission spectrum is consistent with an average subcloud abundance of gaseous H2SO4 in equatorial and midlatitude regions which is approximately 5 ppm. It is suggested that additional measurements of atmospheric microwave opacity be made with the Pioneer-Venus Orbiter Radio Occultation experiment to search for temporal and spatial variations in gaseous H2SO4 abundance in the Venus atmosphere. An upper limit for the subcloud abundance of SO2 is also determined. PMID:11538401

  13. Microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor for trace-metals in furnace exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, P.P.; Rhee, D.Y.; Thomas, P.; Cohn, D.R.; Surma, J.E.; Titus, C.H.

    1996-10-01

    A microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor has been successfully demonstrated for sensitive ({lt}1 ppb), real time measurements of trace metals in furnace exhaust. The instrument uses a robust, up to 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz microwave plasma sustained in a portion of the undiluted furnace exhaust flow for atomic emission spectroscopy. The waveguide device is constructed of refractory materials compatible with high-temperature environments ({approx_gt}500{degree}C) and is flange mountable into the inside of the furnace exhaust duct. Fused quartz fiber optics in close proximity to the plasma flame transmit the UV through visible emission (190{endash}690 nm) to three spectrometers for simultaneous monitoring of several metals. This instrument has been used for continuous monitoring for a 49 h period with 0.5 s time resolution on a dc graphite electrode arc furnace during a soil vitrification test. Results are presented for chromium, manganese, and iron emissions during soil loading operations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Assessment of the consistency among global microwave land surface emissivity products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Temimi, M.; Prigent, C.; Turk, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Tian, Y.; Furuzawa, F. A.; Masunaga, H.

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this work is to intercompare four global land surface emissivity products over various land-cover conditions to assess their consistency. The intercompared land emissivity products were generated over a 5-year period (2003-2007) using observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI), and WindSat. First, all products were reprocessed in the same projection and spatial resolution as they were generated from sensors with various configurations. Then, the mean value and standard deviations of monthly emissivity values were calculated for each product to assess the spatial distribution of the consistencies/inconsistencies among the products across the globe. The emissivity products were also compared to soil moisture estimates and a satellite-based vegetation index to assess their sensitivities to changes in land surface conditions. Results show the existence of systematic differences among the products. Also, it was noticed that emissivity values in each product have similar frequency dependency over different land-cover types. Monthly means of emissivity values from AMSR-E in the vertical and horizontal polarizations seem to be systematically lower than the rest of the products across various land-cover conditions which may be attributed to the 01:30/13:30 LT overpass time of the sensor and possibly a residual skin temperature effect in the product. The standard deviation of the analyzed products was lowest (less than 0.01) in rain forest regions for all products and highest at northern latitudes, above 0.04 for AMSR-E and SSM/I and around 0.03 for WindSat. Despite differences in absolute emissivity estimates, all products were similarly sensitive to changes in soil moisture and vegetation. The correlation between the emissivity polarization differences and normalized difference vegetation index

  15. THE LOCAL DUST FOREGROUNDS IN THE MICROWAVE SKY. I. THERMAL EMISSION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Dikarev, Valeri; Preuss, Oliver; Solanki, Sami; Krueger, Harald; Krivov, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    Analyses of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps made by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have revealed anomalies not predicted by the standard inflationary cosmology. In particular, the power of the quadrupole moment of the CMB fluctuations is remarkably low, and the quadrupole and octopole moments are aligned mutually and with the geometry of the solar system. It has been suggested in the literature that microwave sky pollution by an unidentified dust cloud in the vicinity of the solar system may be the cause for these anomalies. In this paper, we simulate the thermal emission by clouds of spherical homogeneous particles of several materials. Spectral constraints from the WMAP multi-wavelength data and earlier infrared observations on the hypothetical dust cloud are used to determine the dust cloud's physical characteristics. In order for its emissivity to demonstrate a flat, CMB-like wavelength dependence over the WMAP wavelengths (3 through 14 mm), and to be invisible in the infrared light, its particles must be macroscopic. Silicate spheres of several millimeters in size and carbonaceous particles an order of magnitude smaller will suffice. According to our estimates of the abundance of such particles in the zodiacal cloud and trans-Neptunian belt, yielding the optical depths of the order of 10{sup -7} for each cloud, the solar system dust can well contribute 10 muK (within an order of magnitude) in the microwaves. This is not only intriguingly close to the magnitude of the anomalies (about 30 muK), but also alarmingly above the presently believed magnitude of systematic biases of the WMAP results (below 5 muK) and, to an even greater degree, of the future missions with higher sensitivities, e.g., Planck.

  16. Modeling and measurement of microwave emission and backscattering from bare soil surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, S.; Wegmuller, U.

    1992-01-01

    A multifrequency ground-based radiometer-scatterometer system working at frequencies between 3.0 GHz and 11.0 GHz has been used to study the effect of soil moisture and roughness on microwave emission and backscattering. The freezing and thawing effect of the soil surface and the changes of the surface roughness due to rain and erosion are reported. To analyze the combined active and passive data, a scattering model based on physical optics approximation for the low frequency and geometrical optics approximation for high frequency has been developed. The model is used to calculate the bistatic scattering coefficients from the surface. By considering the conservation of energy, the result has been integrated over a hemisphere above the surface to calculate the emissivity. The backscattering and emission model has been coupled with the observed data in order to extract soil moisture and surface roughness.

  17. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION, OUTFLOWS, AND ANOMALOUS H{sub 2} EMISSION IN Mol 121 (IRAS 20188+3928)

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf-Chase, Grace; Arvidsson, Kim; Smutko, Michael; Sherman, Reid

    2013-01-10

    We have discovered 12 new molecular hydrogen emission-line objects (MHOs) in the vicinity of the candidate massive young stellar object Mol 121, in addition to five that were previously known. H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m/H{sub 2} 2.25 {mu}m flux ratios indicate another region dominated by fluorescence from a photodissociation region, and one region that displays an anomalously low H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m/H{sub 2} 2.25 {mu}m flux ratio (<1) and coincides with a previously reported deeply embedded source (DES). Continuum observations at 3 mm reveal five dense cores; the brightest core is coincident with the DES. The next brightest cores are both associated with centimeter continuum emission. One of these is coincident with the IRAS source; the other lies at the centroid of a compact outflow defined by bipolar MHOs. The brighter of these bipolar MHOs exhibits [Fe II] emission and both MHOs are associated with CH{sub 3}OH maser emission observed at 95 GHz and 44 GHz. Masses and column densities of all five cores are consistent with theoretical predictions for massive star formation. Although it is impossible to associate all MHOs with driving sources in this region, it is evident that there are several outflows along different position angles, and some unambiguous associations can be made. We discuss implications of observed H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m/H{sub 2} 2.25 {mu}m and [Fe II] 1.64 {mu}m/H{sub 2} 2.12 {mu}m flux ratios and compare the estimated total H{sub 2} luminosity with the bolometric luminosity of the region. We conclude that the outflows are driven by massive young stellar objects embedded in cores that are likely to be in different evolutionary stages.

  18. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. IV. Anomalous Behavior of the Broad Ultraviolet Emission Lines in NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goad, M. R.; Korista, K. T.; De Rosa, G.; Kriss, G. A.; Edelson, R.; Barth, A. J.; Ferland, G. J.; Kochanek, C. S.; Netzer, H.; Peterson, B. M.; Bentz, M. C.; Bisogni, S.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Denney, K. D.; Ely, J.; Fausnaugh, M. M.; Grier, C. J.; Gupta, A.; Horne, K. D.; Kaastra, J.; Pancoast, A.; Pei, L.; Pogge, R. W.; Skielboe, A.; Starkey, D.; Vestergaard, M.; Zu, Y.; Anderson, M. D.; Arévalo, P.; Bazhaw, C.; Borman, G. A.; Boroson, T. A.; Bottorff, M. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Brewer, B. J.; Cackett, E. M.; Carini, M. T.; Croxall, K. V.; Dalla Bontà, E.; De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Dietrich, M.; Efimova, N. V.; Evans, P. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Flatland, K.; Gehrels, N.; Geier, S.; Gelbord, J. M.; Gonzalez, L.; Gorjian, V.; Grupe, D.; Hall, P. B.; Hicks, S.; Horenstein, D.; Hutchison, T.; Im, M.; Jensen, J. J.; Joner, M. D.; Jones, J.; Kaspi, S.; Kelly, B. C.; Kennea, J. A.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. C.; Klimanov, S. A.; Lee, J. C.; Leonard, D. C.; Lira, P.; MacInnis, F.; Manne-Nicholas, E. R.; Mathur, S.; McHardy, I. M.; Montouri, C.; Musso, R.; Nazarov, S. V.; Norris, R. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Papadakis, I.; Parks, J. R.; Pott, J.-U.; Rafter, S. E.; Rix, H.-W.; Saylor, D. A.; Schimoia, J. S.; Schnülle, K.; Sergeev, S. G.; Siegel, M.; Spencer, M.; Sung, H.-I.; Teems, K. G.; Treu, T.; Turner, C. S.; Uttley, P.; Villforth, C.; Weiss, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Yan, H.; Young, S.; Zheng, W.-K.

    2016-06-01

    During an intensive Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) UV monitoring campaign of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 performed from 2014 February to July, the normally highly correlated far UV continuum and broad emission line variations decorrelated for ∼60–70 days, starting ∼75 days after the first HST/COS observation. Following this anomalous state, the flux and variability of the broad emission lines returned to a more normal state. This transient behavior, characterized by significant deficits in flux and equivalent width of the strong broad UV emission lines, is the first of its kind to be unambiguously identified in an active galactic nucleus reverberation mapping campaign. The largest corresponding emission line flux deficits occurred for the high ionization, collisionally excited lines C iv and Si iv(+O iv]), and also He ii(+O iii]), while the anomaly in Lyα was substantially smaller. This pattern of behavior indicates a depletion in the flux of photons with {E}{{ph}}\\gt 54 {{eV}} relative to those near 13.6 eV. We suggest two plausible mechanisms for the observed behavior: (i) temporary obscuration of the ionizing continuum incident upon broad line region (BLR) clouds by a moving veil of material lying between the inner accretion disk and inner (BLR), perhaps resulting from an episodic ejection of material from the disk, or (ii) a temporary change in the intrinsic ionizing continuum spectral energy distribution resulting in a deficit of ionizing photons with energies >54 eV, possibly due to a transient restructuring of the Comptonizing atmosphere above the disk. Current evidence appears to favor the latter explanation.

  19. Regionalization of Methane Emissions in the Amazon Basin with Multi-temporal Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Hess, L. L.; Forsberg, B. R.; Hamilton, S. K.; Novo, E. M.

    2002-12-01

    Remote sensing of the Amazon basin with passive and active microwave techniques were applied to determine the temporally varying extent of inundation and associated vegetation, and used in conjunction with field measurements to calculate regional rates of methane emission from wetlands to the atmosphere. Monthly inundation areas were derived from analysis of the 37-GHz polarization difference observed by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (1979 -87) for the mainstem Amazon floodplain in Brazil, the Llanos de Moxos (Beni and Mamore rivers) in Bolivia, the Bananal Island (Araguaia River) and Roraima savannas. Data from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1, L-band synthetic aperture radar were used to determine inundation and wetland vegetation for Amazon basin less than 500 m above sea level at high water (May-June 1996) and low water (October 1995). Although all the measurements of methane emission from aquatic habitats have been performed in the deeply inundated, central basin in open water, flooded forests or floating macrophytes, our basin-wide remote sensing has revealed large areas of seasonally flooded savannas. Therefore, improvements in basin-wide estimates of methane emission will require field studies in wetlands such as those in Bolivia, Roraima and the Bananal.

  20. A model describing the microwave emission from a multi-layer snowpack at 37 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelrazik, M.; Ulaby, F.; Stiles, H.

    1981-01-01

    A multilayer emission model is described and applied to emission measurements obtained at 37 GHz and H polarization using a microwave radiometer attached to a truck-mounted boom in Steamboat Springs, Colorado in 1977. Estimated absorption and scattering coefficients and their dependence on wetness were obtained using calculated values of the dielectric constant at 37 GHz along with the model. It was found that the scattering coefficient is comparable in value to the absorption coefficient for dry snow however, the absorption coefficient increases linearly with increasing snow wetness while the scattering coefficient decreases linearly with increasing wetness. The emission from each layer of the snowpack was also calculated using the estimated coefficients. It is shown that for dry snow, the ground underneath the snowpack contributes about 45% of all measured emission while the rest is due to emission from all the layers within the snowpack. When the wetness of the top 5 cm layer of snowpack increases to about 2% by volume, this top 5 cm snowlayer contributes more than 90% of all the measured emission.

  1. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL ANALYSES OF SPECTRAL INDICES OF NONTHERMAL EMISSIONS DERIVED FROM HARD X-RAYS AND MICROWAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Ayumi; Kiyohara, Junko; Takasaki, Hiroyuki; Narukage, Noriyuki; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Masuda, Satoshi; Shimojo, Masumi; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2013-02-15

    We studied electron spectral indices of nonthermal emissions seen in hard X-rays (HXRs) and microwaves. We analyzed 12 flares observed by the Hard X-Ray Telescope aboard Yohkoh, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), and compared the spectral indices derived from total fluxes of HXRs and microwaves. Except for four events, which have very soft HXR spectra suffering from the thermal component, these flares show a gap {Delta}{delta} between the electron spectral indices derived from HXRs {delta} {sub X} and those from microwaves {delta}{sub {mu}} ({Delta}{delta} = {delta} {sub X} - {delta}{sub {mu}}) of about 1.6. Furthermore, from the start to the peak times of the HXR bursts, the time profiles of the HXR spectral index {delta} {sub X} evolve synchronously with those of the microwave spectral index {delta}{sub {mu}}, keeping the constant gap. We also examined the spatially resolved distribution of the microwave spectral index by using NoRH data. The microwave spectral index {delta}{sub {mu}} tends to be larger, which means a softer spectrum, at HXR footpoint sources with stronger magnetic field than that at the loop tops. These results suggest that the electron spectra are bent at around several hundreds of keV, and become harder at the higher energy range that contributes the microwave gyrosynchrotron emission.

  2. Statistical Analysis of the Correlation between Microwave Emission Anomalies and Seismic Activity Based on AMSR-E Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    qin, kai; Wu, Lixin; De Santis, Angelo; Zhang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Pre-seismic thermal IR anomalies and ionosphere disturbances have been widely reported by using the Earth observation system (EOS). To investigate the possible physical mechanisms, a series of detecting experiments on rock loaded to fracturing were conducted. Some experiments studies have demonstrated that microwave radiation energy will increase under the loaded rock in specific frequency and the feature of radiation property can reflect the deformation process of rock fracture. This experimental result indicates the possibility that microwaves are emitted before earthquakes. Such microwaves signals are recently found to be detectable before some earthquake cases from the brightness temperature data obtained by the microwave-radiometer Advanced Microwave-Scanning Radiometer for the EOS (AMSR-E) aboard the satellite Aqua. This suggested that AMSR-E with vertical- and horizontal-polarization capability for six frequency bands (6.925, 10.65, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz) would be feasible to detect an earthquake which is associated with rock crash or plate slip. However, the statistical analysis of the correlation between satellite-observed microwave emission anomalies and seismic activity are firstly required. Here, we focus on the Kamchatka peninsula to carry out a statistical study, considering its high seismicity activity and the dense orbits covering of AMSR-E in high latitudes. 8-years (2003-2010) AMSR-E microwave brightness temperature data were used to reveal the spatio-temporal association between microwave emission anomalies and 17 earthquake events (M>5). Firstly, obvious spatial difference of microwave brightness temperatures between the seismic zone at the eastern side and the non-seismic zone the western side within the Kamchatka peninsula are found. Secondly, using both vertical- and horizontal-polarization to extract the temporal association, it is found that abnormal changes of microwave brightness temperatures appear generally 2 months before the

  3. Spatial Scaling of Snow Observations and Microwave Emission Modeling During CLPX and Appropriate Satellite Sensor Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimates of snow water equivalent and other properties play an important role in weather, natural hazard, and hydrological forecasting and climate modeling over a range of scales in space and time. Remote sensing-derived estimates have traditionally been of the "snapshot" type, but techniques involving models with assimilation are also being explored. In both cases, forward emission models are useful to understand the observed passive microwave signatures and developing retrieval algorithms. However, mismatches between passive microwave sensor resolutions and the scales of processes controlling subpixel heterogeneity can affect the accuracy of the estimates. Improving the spatial resolution of new passive microwave satellite sensors is a major desire in order to (literally) resolve such subpixel heterogeneity, but limited spacecraft and mission resources impose severe constraints and tradeoffs. In order to maximize science return while mitigating risk for a satellite concept, it is essential to understand the scaling behavior of snow in terms of what the sensor sees (brightness temperature) as well as in terms of the actual variability of snow. NASA's Cold Land Processes Experiment-1 (CLPX-1: Colorado, 2002 and 2003) was designed to provide data to measure these scaling behaviors for varying snow conditions in areas with forested, alpine, and meadow/pasture land cover. We will use observations from CLPX-1 ground, airborne, and satellite passive microwave sensors to examine and evaluate the scaling behavior of observed and modeled brightness temperatures and observed and retrieved snow parameters across scales from meters to 10's of kilometers. The conclusions will provide direct examples of the appropriate spatial sampling scales of new sensors for snow remote sensing. The analyses will also illustrate the effects and spatial scales of the underlying phenomena (e.g., land cover) that control subpixel heterogeneity.

  4. First detection of nonflare microwave emissions from the coronae of single late-type dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, D. E.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of a search for nonflare microwave radiation from the coronae of nearby late-type dwarf stars comparable to the sun: single stars without evidence for either a large wind or circumstellar envelope. The observing program consisted of flux measurements of six stars over a 24-h period with the VLA in the C configuration at a wavelength of 6 cm with 50 MHz bandwidth. Positive detections at 6 cm were made for Chi 1 Ori (0.6 mJy) and the flare star UV Cet (1.55 mJy), and upper limits were obtained for the stars Pi 1 UMa, Xi Boo A, 70 Oph A and Epsilon Eri. It is suggested that Chi 1 Ori, and possibly UV Cet, represent the first detected members of a new class of radio sources which are driven by gyroresonance emission, i.e. cyclotron emission from nonrelativistic Maxwellian electrons.

  5. Microwave plasma CVD-grown graphene-CNT hybrids for enhanced electron field emission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Vishakha; Shukla, A. K.; Vankar, V. D.

    2014-12-01

    The growth and electron emission characteristics were investigated from a hybrid structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and multilayer layer graphene (MLG) deposited on silicon substrate coated with iron catalyst and an interlayer of aluminium. The hybrid structures were synthesized in a two-step process by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique. The formation of MWCNTs takes place by absorption and precipitation of carbon radicals into the catalyst particles. Thereafter, ample carbon forms MLG on tip of the MWCNTs resulting in a MLG-MWCNTs hybrid nanostructure. MLG was observed to grow branching out of the tips and sidewalls of the MWCNTs and is expected to attach by Van der Walls bonds. Transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy confirmed the crystalline nature of the hybrid structures. Electron emission studies were carried out using a diode-type field emission setup. The enhancement factor was found to be ~3,500 for bare MWCNTs, ~4,070 to ~5,000 for hybrid structures and ~6,500 for N-doped MLG-MWCNTs hybrid structures. Modification in the defects structure and enhancement of emission sites are suggested to be responsible for the increase of the field emission characteristics.

  6. ANOMALOUS SILICATE DUST EMISSION IN THE TYPE 1 LINER NUCLEUS OF M81

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Marengo, M.; Wang, Z.; Willner, S.; Zezas, A.; Li, Aigen; Li, M. P.; Koehler, M.; Spinoglio, L.; Wu, Y. L. E-mail: lia@missouri.ed

    2010-06-10

    We report the detection and successful modeling of the unusual 9.7 {mu}m Si-O stretching silicate emission feature in the type 1 (i.e., face-on) LINER nucleus of M81. Using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument on Spitzer, we determine the feature in the central 230 pc of M81 to be in strong emission, with a peak at {approx}10.5 {mu}m. This feature is strikingly different in character from the absorption feature of the galactic interstellar medium, and from the silicate absorption or weak emission features typical of galaxies with active star formation. We successfully model the high signal-to-noise ratio IRS spectra with porous silicate dust using laboratory-acquired mineral spectra. We find that the most probable fit uses micron-sized, porous grains of amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon. In addition to silicate dust, there is weak polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission present (particularly at 11.3 {mu}m, arising from the C-H out-of-plane bending vibration of relatively large PAHs of {approx}500-1000 C atoms) whose character reflects the low-excitation active galactic nucleus environment, with some evidence that small PAHs of {approx}100-200 C atoms (responsible for the 7.7 {mu}m C-C stretching band) in the immediate vicinity of the nucleus have been preferentially destroyed. Analysis of the infrared fine structure lines confirms the LINER character of the M81 nucleus. Four of the infrared H{sub 2} rotational lines are detected and fit to an excitation temperature of T {approx} 800 K. Spectral maps of the central 230 pc in the [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m line, the H{sub 2} 17 {mu}m line, and the 11.3 {mu}m PAH C-H bending feature reveal arc- or spiral-like structures extending from the core. We also report on epochal photometric and spectroscopic observations of M81, whose nuclear intensity varies in time across the spectrum due to what is thought to be inefficient, sub-Eddington accretion onto its central black hole. We find that, contrary to the

  7. Microwave observations of jupiter's synchrotron emission during the galileo flyby of amalthea in 2002.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M. J.; Bolton, S. J.; Bastian, T. S.; Blanc, M.; Levin, S. M.; McLeod, R. J.; MacLaren, D.; Roller, J. P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.

    2003-04-01

    In November, 2002, the Galileo spacecraft trajectory provided a close flyby of Amalthea, one of Jupiter's inner most moons (˜2.4 RJ). During this pass, Galileo entered into a region rarely explored by spacecraft, the inner radiation belts of Jupiter. We present preliminary results from a campaign of microwave observations of Jovian synchrotron emission over a six month interval centered around the flyby. The observations were made with NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas at Goldstone, California, and the NRAO Very Large Array. We report preliminary measurements of the flux density of the synchrotron emission and the rotational beaming curves and a compare them with the long term history of Jupiter's microwave emission which varies significantly on timescales of months to years. The new data are also being examined to search for evidence of short-term variations and to compare single aperture beaming curves with the spatially resolved images obtained with the VLA. These radio astronomy data will be combined with in-situ measurements from Galileo (see companion paper by Bolton et al) to improve models of the synchrotron emission from Jupiter's radiation belts. A large percentage of the Goldstone observations were conducted by middle- and high school students from classrooms across the nation. The students and their teachers are participants in the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) science education project, which is a partnership involving NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Lewis Center for Educational Research (LCER) in Apple Valley, CA. Working with the Lewis Center over the Internet, GAVRT students conduct remotely controlled radio astronomy observations using 34-m antennas at Goldstone. The JPL contribution to this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 2756 Planetary magnetospheres (5443, 5737, 6030) 6218 Jovian

  8. On the wavelength dependence of apparent emissivity of asteroid microwave emissions - Ceres and Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, William J., Jr.; Johnston, Kenneth J.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of Ceres and Vesta demonstrate the need for modifying the physical parameters of the standard model procedure in treating single-wavelength observations. It is suggested that simultaneous IR and cm-wavelength data should be used in order to determine such properties as the surface dielectric characteristics, layer depth, and radio emissivity. If using the standard model, an emissivity of 0.8 should be adopted for wavelengths of longer than 1 cm.

  9. The role of microwaves in the enhancement of laser-induced plasma emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Akaoka, Katsuaki; Miyabe, Masabumi; Wakaida, Ikuo

    2016-08-01

    We studied experimentally the effect of microwaves (MWs) on the enhancement of plasma emission achieved by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A laser plasma was generated on a calcium oxide pellet by a Nd:YAG laser (5 mJ, 532 nm, 8 ns) in reduced-pressure argon surrounding gas. A MW radiation (400 W) was injected into the laser plasma via a loop antenna placed immediately above the laser plasma to enhance the plasma emission. The results confirmed that when the electromagnetic field was introduced into the laser plasma region by the MWs, the lifetime of the plasma was extended from 50 to 500 µs, similar to the MW duration. Furthermore, the plasma temperature and electron density increased to approximately 10900 K and 1.5×1018 cm-3, respectively and the size of the plasma emission was extended to 15 mm in diameter. As a result, the emission intensity of Ca lines obtained using LIBS with MWs was enhanced by approximately 200 times compared to the case of LIBS without MWs.

  10. A global high-resolution microwave emission model for the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, G.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Solimini, D.; de Maagt, P.; Baptista, J. P. V. Poiares

    1998-05-01

    This paper reports on a numerical model developed to simulate vertically and horizontally polarized microwave emission from the Earth in the frequency range between 5 and 50 GHz and at various angles of observation, with a 1°×1° (latitude by longitude) spatial resolution, taking into account seasonal variations. The principal motivation of the model is the evaluation of the noise antenna temperature of telecommunications satellites, which is required to calculate the uplink G/T for satellite-borne receivers. The results of the study, however, prove useful in a number of remote sensing applications. To implement the model, significant types of surface, such as bare soil, nonarboreous vegetation, forests, snow, glacier and sea ice, and ocean, have been identified, and their emissivity properties have been determined by the available theoretical and/or empirical models.The millimeter-wave propagation model of Liebe [1993] has been used to compute the atmospheric contribution. Profiles from actual radio soundings collected during a 10-year period over the globe have been used to take into account major climatic variations. The various contributions from the surface and the atmosphere have been finally combined to obtain the theoretical global brightness temperature of each 1°×1° pixel. The numerical model has been validated by comparing on a pixel-by-pixel basis the theoretical brightness temperature with those measured by the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) radiometer in the year 1992 at 19.35, 22.235, and 37.0 GHz at the available polarizations. The discrepancies between model and experimental brightness temperatures have been noted, and actions have been taken to reduce the differences. In its present configuration, the global emission model yields brightness temperature estimates which differ all over the Earth by less than 12 K rms from those measured by the SSM/I.

  11. L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; va der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T.

    2012-01-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (T(sub B))'s measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These T(sub B)'s measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly T(sub B)'s could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly T(sub B). Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, h(sub r), on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on T(sub B) simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent h(sub r) parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of T(sub B) simulations in the early growth cycle.

  12. Microwave response and photon emission of a voltage baised Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebari, Salha; Grimm, Alexander; Hazra, Dibyendu; Hofheinz, Max

    The readout of superconducting qubits requires amplifiers combining noise close to the quantum limit, high gain, large bandwidth, and sufficient dynamic range. Josephson parametric amplifiers using Josephson junctions in the 0-voltage state, driven by a large microwave signals, begin to perform sufficiently well in all 4 of these aspects to be of practical use, but remain difficult to optimize and use. Recent experiments with superconducting circuits consisting of a DC voltage-biased Josephson junction in series with a resonator, showed that a tunneling Cooper pair can emit one or several photons with a total energy of 2e times the applied voltage. We present microwave reflection measurements on this device indicating that amplification is possible with a simple DC voltage-biased Josephson junction. We compare these measurements with the noise power emitted by the junction and show that, for low Josephson energy, transmission and noise emission can be explained within the framework of P(E) theory of inelastic Cooper pair tunneling. Combined with a theoretical model, our results indicate that voltage-biased Josephson junctions might be useful for amplification near the quantum limit, offering simpler design and a different trade-off between gain, bandwidth and dynamic range.

  13. Applications of anomalous diffraction systems, generation of attosecond electron and photon pulses and Raman amplification by stimulated emission of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartak, Sameer Dinkar

    1998-10-01

    Anomalous diffraction is scattering process due to phase distortion introduced on incident phase front by scattering object. Phase mask or hologram, Christiansen filter, PDLC are examples of an anomalously diffracting systems. Phase hologram modulates an input wavefront to produce a wavefront which when Fourier transformed using a converging lens gives desired image on to a screen. We made a nonlinear optical element using phase mask made up of nonlinear material. It forms a lens because of nonlinear index of refraction when a high intensity beam is incident. This lens Fourier transforms the phase mask and images the phase mask. This nonlinear optical element can be used for various applications like image gating and 3-D memory writing and read out. Christiansen filter (CF) is a two component scattering system whose dispersion curves intersect at certain wavelength. Thus light corresponding to this wavelength traverses the filter without any scattering and light at other wavelengths gets scattered. This results in narrow wavelength dependent transmission curve centered at the index matching wavelength. When materials with an intensity dependent refractive index are used to make a CF, the index matching condition of CF becomes function of the input intensity resulting in intensity dependent beam size and transmittance through the filter. This property of nonlinear CF can be used to switch beam optically in both self and cross-modulation modes. Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal (PDLC) is dispersion of liquid crystal droplets in polymer whose index of refraction is same as ordinary refractive index of liquid crystal. PDLC shows voltage dependent scattering and are used in flat panel displays. We used this element as voltage controlled intracavity loss element in a laser cavity to make a lasing pixel projection display. Output of this pixel shows all desired properties for a projection display like narrow linewidth, high brightness, TTL switching compatibility and

  14. Correlated Cooper pair transport and microwave photon emission in the dynamical Coulomb blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppäkangas, Juha; Fogelström, Mikael; Marthaler, Michael; Johansson, Göran

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically electromagnetic radiation emitted by inelastic Cooper-pair tunneling. We consider a dc-voltage-biased superconducting transmission line terminated by a Josephson junction. We show that the generated continuous-mode electromagnetic field can be expressed as a function of the time-dependent current across the Josephson junction. The leading-order expansion in the tunneling coupling, similar to the P (E ) theory, has previously been used to investigate the photon emission statistics in the limit of sequential (independent) Cooper-pair tunneling. By explicitly evaluating the system characteristics up to the fourth order in the tunneling coupling, we account for dynamics between consecutively tunneling Cooper pairs. Within this approach we investigate how temporal correlations in the charge transport can be seen in the first- and second-order coherences of the emitted microwave radiation.

  15. Vacuum ultraviolet emission from microwave Ar-H{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Espinho, S.; Felizardo, E.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2013-03-18

    Vacuum ultraviolet emission from Ar-H{sub 2} wave driven microwave (2.45 GHz) plasmas operating at low pressures (0.1-1 mbar) has been investigated. The emitted spectra show the presence of the Ar resonance lines at 104.8 and 106.7 nm and of the Lyman-{alpha},{beta} atomic lines at 121.6 nm and 102.6 nm, respectively. The increase of the hydrogen amount in the mixture results in an abrupt increase of the Werner and Lyman molecular bands intensity. The Lyman-{beta} intensity shows little changes in the range of 5%-30% of hydrogen in the mixture while the Lyman-{alpha} intensity tends to decrease as the percentage of hydrogen increases.

  16. A comparison of radiative transfer models for predicting the microwave emission from soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two general types of numerical models for predicting microwave emission from soils are compared-coherent and noncoherent. In the former, radiation in the soil is treated coherently, and the boundary conditions on the electric fields across the layer boundaries are used to calculate the radiation intensity. In the latter, the radiation is assumed to be noncoherent, and the intensities of the radiation are considered directly. The results of the two approaches may be different because of the effects of interference, which can cause the transmitted intensity at the surface (i.e., emissivity) to be sometimes higher and sometimes lower for the coherent case than for the noncoherent case, depending on the relative phases of reflected fields from the lower layers. This coupling between soil layers in the coherent models leads to greater soil moisture sampling depths observed with this type of model, and is the major difference that is found between the two types of models. In noncoherent models, the emissivity is determined by the dielectric constraint at the air/soil interface. The subsequent differences in the results are functions of both the frequency of the radiation being considered and the steepness of the moisture gradient near the surface. The calculations were performed at frequencies of 1.4 and 19.4 GHz and for two sets of soil profiles. Little difference was observed between the models at 19.4 GHz; and only at the lower frequency were differences apparent because of the greater soil moisture sampling depth at this frequency.

  17. Passive L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; van der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E. J.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (TB's) measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These TB measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly TB's could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly TB. Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, hr, on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on TB simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent hr parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of TB simulations in the early growth cycle. A.T. Joseph, R. Van der Velde, P.E. O'Neill, R.H. Lang, and T. Gish, "Soil moisture retrieval during a corn growth cycle using L-band (1.6 GHz) radar observations", IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 46, DOI:10.1109/TGRS.2008.917214, Aug. 2008. M.C. Dobson, F.T. Ulaby, M

  18. Comparison among physical process based snow models in estimating SWE and upwelling microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Durand, M. T.; Margulis, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Snowpack serves as a critical water resource and an important climate indicator. Accurately estimating snow water equivalent (SWE) and melt timing has both civil and scientific merits. Physical process based multi-layer land surface models (LSM) characterize snowpack by tracking the energy balance and mass balance in each layer. However, in terms of the number of layers used to model the snowpack stratigraphy, as well as the complexity of the simulated mass/energy exchanges in each single layer, significant variances exist among different LSMs. Previous work has largely focused on assessing the impact of layering and stratigraphy representation on mass and energy balance, with little attention paid to the implications of these factors on predicted microwave brightness temperature (Tb). In this paper, three LSMs with varying snow layer schemes: SSiB (3-layer), CoLM (5-layer), and SNOWPACK (N-layer), are coupled to the Microwave Emission from Multi-Layer Snowpacks (MEMLS) radiative transfer model (RTM) to simulate the snowpack mass/energy budgets and microwave signature over a full season. The simulations are performed at five in-situ gage locations in the Kern River Basin, Sierra Nevada, CA where it is known that large snow events occur that can be problematic to represent using a small number of snow layers. A particular emphasis is placed on assessment of the impact of layering scheme on the results. Preliminary results show that even for SSiB which has a relative simple empirical layering scheme, the modeled annual SWE could be highly correlated with the in-situ SWE (r¬2=0.91) if the precipitation bias is corrected, also, the comparison between the Tb simulated by SSiB+MEMLS and the downscaled AMSR-E Tb measurements shows a correlation coefficient of 0.94 during the snow accumulation season (Oct to Apr) if the grain growth parameters and the soil snow reflectivity is properly calibrated. Future work includes comparing SWE and Tb from all threemodels and

  19. The DMRT-ML Model: Numerical Simulations of the Microwave Emission of Snowpacks Based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Picard, Ghislain; Roy, Alexandre; Dupont, Florent; Fily, Michel; Royer, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Microwave radiometer observations have been used to retrieve snow depth and snow water equivalent on both land and sea ice, snow accumulation on ice sheets, melt events, snow temperature, and snow grain size. Modeling the microwave emission from snow and ice physical properties is crucial to improve the quality of these retrievals. It also is crucial to improve our understanding of the radiative transfer processes within the snow cover, and the snow properties most relevant in microwave remote sensing. Our objective is to present a recent microwave emission model and its validation. The model is named DMRT-ML (DMRT Multi-Layer), and is available at http:lgge.osug.frpicarddmrtml.

  20. The DMRT-ML Model: Numerical Simulations of the Microwave Emission of Snowpacks Based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picard, Ghislain; Brucker, Ludovic; Roy, Alexandre; DuPont, FLorent; Champollion, Nicolas; Morin, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Microwave radiometer observations have been used to retrieve snow depth and snow water equivalent on both land and sea ice, snow accumulation on ice sheets, melt events, snow temperature, and snow grain size. Modeling the microwave emission from snow and ice physical properties is crucial to improve the quality of these retrievals. It also is crucial to improve our understanding of the radiative transfer processes within the snow cover, and the snow properties most relevant in microwave remote sensing. Our objective is to present a recent microwave emission model and its validation. The model is named DMRT-ML (DMRT Multi-Layer).

  1. Snow stratigraphic heterogeneity within ground-based passive microwave radiometer footprints: implications for emission modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandells, M.; Rutter, N.; Derksen, C.; Langlois, A.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Montpetit, B.; Pulliainen, J. T.; Royer, A.; Toose, P.

    2012-12-01

    quantify possible sources of error in the simulations, a number of experiments were carried out to investigate the sensitivity of the brightness temperature to: 1) uncertainties in field observations, 2) representation of ice lenses, 3) model layering structure, and 4) near-infrared derived grain size representing snow grain size at microwave wavelengths. Field measurement error made little difference to the simulated brightness temperature, nor did the representation of ice lenses as crusts of high density snow. As the number of layers in the snow was reduced to 3, 2, or 1, the simulated brightness temperature increased slightly. However, scaling of snow grain size had a dramatic effect on the simulated brightness temperatures, reducing the median bias of the simulations to within measurement error for the statistically different brightness temperature distributions. This indicated that further investigation is required to define what is meant by the microwave grain size, and how this relates to the grain size that is used in the microwave emission model.

  2. Extending lean operating limit and reducing emissions of methane spark-ignited engines using a microwave-assisted spark plug

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rapp, Vi H.; DeFilippo, Anthony; Saxena, Samveg; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Dibble, Robert W.; Nishiyama, Atsushi; Moon, Ahsa; Ikeda, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Amore » microwave-assisted spark plug was used to extend the lean operating limit (lean limit) and reduce emissions of an engine burning methane-air. In-cylinder pressure data were collected at normalized air-fuel ratios of λ = 1.46, λ = 1.51, λ = 1.57, λ = 1.68, and λ = 1.75. For each λ, microwave energy (power supplied to the magnetron per engine cycle) was varied from 0 mJ (spark discharge alone) to 1600 mJ. At lean conditions, the results showed adding microwave energy to a standard spark plug discharge increased the number of complete combustion cycles, improving engine stability as compared to spark-only operation. Addition of microwave energy also increased the indicated thermal efficiency by 4% at λ = 1.68. At λ = 1.75, the spark discharge alone was unable to consistently ignite the air-fuel mixture, resulting in frequent misfires. Although microwave energy produced more consistent ignition than spark discharge alone at λ = 1.75, 59% of the cycles only partially burned. Overall, the microwave-assisted spark plug increased engine performance under lean operating conditions (λ = 1.68) but did not affect operation at conditions closer to stoichiometric.« less

  3. Anomalous resistivity effect on multiple ion beam emission and hard x-ray generation in a Mather type plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, R. A.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2011-10-15

    Multi ion beam and hard x-ray emissions were detected in a high inductance (more than 100 nH) Mather type plasma focus (PF) device at different filling gas pressures and charging voltages. The signal analysis was performed through the current trace, as it is the fundamental signal from which all of the phenomena in a PF device can be extracted. Two different fitting processes were carried out according to Lee's computational (snow-plow) model. In the first process, only plasma dynamics and classical (Spitzer) resistances were considered as energy consumer parameters for plasma. This led to an unsuccessful fitting and did not answer the energy transfer mechanism into plasma. A second fitting process was considered through the addition of anomalous resistance, which provided the best fit. Anomalous resistance was the source of long decrease in current trace, and multi dips and multi peaks of high voltage probe. Multi-peak features were interpreted considering the second fitting process along with the mechanisms for ion beam production and hard x-ray emission. To show the important role of the anomalous resistance, the duration of the current drop was discussed.

  4. Strong localization induced anomalous temperature dependence exciton emission above 300 K from SnO{sub 2} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, S. S. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn; Li, F. D.; Liu, Q. W.; Xu, S. C.; Luo, Y. Y.; Li, G. H. E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn

    2015-05-07

    SnO{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) are potential materials for deep ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting devices. In this study, we report the temperature and excitation power-dependent exciton luminescence from SnO{sub 2} QDs. The exciton emission exhibits anomalous blue shift, accompanied with band width reduction with increasing temperature and excitation power above 300 K. The anomalous temperature dependences of the peak energy and band width are well interpreted by the strongly localized carrier thermal hopping process and Gaussian shape of band tails states, respectively. The localized wells and band tails at conduction minimum are considered to be induced by the surface oxygen defects and local potential fluctuation in SnO{sub 2} QDs.

  5. Model-estimated microwave emissions from rain systems for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Mikhail T.; Meischner, Peter F.

    1996-12-01

    A simple model for estimating the upward and downward microwave emission from rain layer types above ground is presented. The emission properties of the rain layers are estimated from physical quantities such as the optical depth, the single-scattering albedo, the physical temperature, and a given drop size distribution for Mie scattering calculations. The underlying surface is characterized by the emissivity and the physical temperature. The transparency coefficient q and the reflection coefficient r of the rain layer are expressed by these physical quantities. The brightness temperature then is given by the physical temperature T, q, and r. The radiation transfer is estimated by the method of layer addition, described by Sobolev [1956], which avoids the necessity of solving the equation of radiation transfer. The accuracy of this simple model was estimated by comparisons with three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations. The error is estimated to be less than 3 K for common situations and less than 8 K for unrealistic high optical depths. It is shown that any one of the quantities rain rate, rain layer depth, and physical temperature can be estimated with sufficient accuracy if the others are known. The basic model has been extended for application to inhomogeneous cloud layers and to include differences in brightness temperatures for horizontal and vertical polarizations for oblate raindrops. The main intended application of this model is rain rate estimation from space with low data processing efforts, especially for the Priroda mission. The model was tested for the downwelling emission during the field experiment CLEOPATRA by measurements with a polarimetric weather radar and rain gauges. The results verify the principles, and promising agreement was found at least for stratiform rain. The polarimetric extension of the model too showed promising results under quite different measurement conditions in Russia and southern Germany.

  6. Microwave and hard X-ray emissions during the impulsive phase of solar flares: Nonthermal electron spectrum and time delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Ye-Ming; Li, Chung-Sheng

    1986-01-01

    On the basis of the summing-up and analysis of the observations and theories about the impulsive microwave and hard X-ray bursts, the correlations between these two kinds of emissions were investigated. It is shown that it is only possible to explain the optically-thin microwave spectrum and its relations with the hard X-ray spectrum by means of the nonthermal source model. A simple nonthermal trap model in the mildly-relativistic case can consistently explain the main characteristics of the spectrum and the relative time delays.

  7. Spatial Variability of Barrow-Area Shore-Fast Sea Ice and Its Relationships to Passive Microwave Emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Rivas, M. Belmonte; Holmgren, J.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Heinrichs, J. F.; Stroeve, J. C.; Klein, M.; Markus, T.; Perovich, D. K.; Sonntag, J. G.; Tape, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aircraft-acquired passive microwave data, laser radar height observations, RADARSAT synthetic aperture radar imagery, and in situ measurements obtained during the AMSR-Ice03 experiment are used to investigate relationships between microwave emission and ice characteristics over several space scales. The data fusion allows delineation of the shore-fast ice and pack ice in the Barrow area, AK, into several ice classes. Results show good agreement between observed and Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR)-derived snow depths over relatively smooth ice, with larger differences over ridged and rubbled ice. The PSR results are consistent with the effects on snow depth of the spatial distribution and nature of ice roughness, ridging, and other factors such as ice age. Apparent relationships exist between ice roughness and the degree of depolarization of emission at 10,19, and 37 GHz. This depolarization .would yield overestimates of total ice concentration using polarization-based algorithms, with indications of this seen when the NT-2 algorithm is applied to the PSR data. Other characteristics of the microwave data, such as effects of grounding of sea ice and large contrast between sea ice and adjacent land, are also apparent in the PSR data. Overall, the results further demonstrate the importance of macroscale ice roughness conditions such as ridging and rubbling on snow depth and microwave emissivity.

  8. Establishing a Calibration for a Microwave Plasma Continuous Emissions Monitor For Stack Exhaust Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, G. J., III; Green, K. M.; Woskov, P. P.; Hadidi, K.; Thomas, P.

    1998-11-01

    A real-time continuous emissions monitor for hazardous metals in stack exhaust is in development to replace the regulatory standard, EPA Method 29. A microwave plasma is sustained in ambient stack exhaust flow for real-time atomic emission spectroscopy. A metals injection calibration subsystem using a pneumatic nebulizer and standard metals solution is attached to the exhaust flow for real-time span calibration of the monitored metals. A novel approach to determine the nebulizer injection efficiency during plasma operation was tested. A known metal mass on a tungsten filament attached to an alumina rod was introduced into a nitrogen plasma at different axial positions. These signals were then correlated to masses of metals aspirated into the plasma by the nebulizer. The metals injection efficiency as a function of rod insertion position was calculated by dividing the correlated mass by the total mass aspirated by the nebulizer, and extrapolated to the end of the sample line. The resulting efficiency was compared to samples collected directly by Gelman Science Type A/E glass fiber filters off line from the plasma. The results to date give the nebulizer metals injection efficiencies less than one percent.

  9. An evaluation of microwave-assisted fusion and microwave-assisted acid digestion methods for determining elemental impurities in carbon nanostructures using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Patole, Shashikant P; Simões, Filipa; Yapici, Tahir F; Warsama, Bashir H; Anjum, Dalaver H; Costa, Pedro M F J

    2016-02-01

    It is common for as-prepared carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene samples to contain remnants of the transition metals used to catalyze their growth; contamination may also leave other trace elemental impurities in the samples. Although a full quantification of impurities in as-prepared samples of carbon nanostructures is difficult, particularly when trace elements are intercalated or encapsulated within a protective layer of graphitic carbon, reliable information is essential for reasons such as quantifying the adulteration of physico-chemical properties of the materials and for evaluating environmental issues. Here, we introduce a microwave-based fusion method to degrade single- and double-walled CNTs and graphene nanoplatelets into a fusion flux thereby thoroughly leaching all metallic impurities. Subsequent dissolution of the fusion product in diluted hydrochloric and nitric acid allowed us to identify their trace elemental impurities using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Comparisons of the results from the proposed microwave-assisted fusion method against those of a more classical microwave-assisted acid digestion approach suggest complementarity between the two that ultimately could lead to a more reliable and less costly determination of trace elemental impurities in carbon nanostructured materials. PMID:26653428

  10. The ultra-rapid synthesis of 2D graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets via direct microwave heating for field emission.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongzhi; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Jigang

    2016-02-16

    The 2D g-C3N4 nanosheets were ultra-rapidly prepared via a direct microwave heating approach. The as-synthesized g-C3N4 possessed a large surface area, few stacking layers, a large aspect ratio and an enlarged bandgap. As a consequence, the excellent field emission properties of 2D g-C3N4 nanosheets were exhibited with extremely low turn-on fields. PMID:26879135

  11. MICROWAVE EMISSION FROM THE EDGEWORTH-KUIPER BELT AND THE ASTEROID BELT CONSTRAINED FROM THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Fukugita, Masataka

    2011-08-01

    Objects in the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt and the main asteroid belt should emit microwaves that may give rise to extra anisotropy signals in the multipole of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment. Constraints are derived from the absence of positive detection of such anisotropies for l {approx}< 50, meaning the total mass of Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects is smaller than 0.2 M{sub +}. This limit is consistent with the mass extrapolated from the observable population with the size of a {approx}> 15 km, assuming that the small-object population follows the power law in size dN/da {approx} a{sup -q} with the canonical index expected for collisional equilibrium, q {approx_equal} 3.5, with which 23% of the mass is ascribed to objects smaller than are observationally accessible down to grains. A similar argument applied to the main asteroid belt indicates that the grain population should not increase more quickly than q {approx_equal} 3.6 toward smaller radii, if the grain population follows the power law that continues to observed asteroids with larger radii. Both cases are at or only slightly above the limit that can be physically significant, implying the importance of further tightening the CMB anisotropy limit, which may be attained with observation at higher radio frequencies.

  12. Microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of Ca, K and Mg in various cheese varieties.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) was used to determine calcium, magnesium and potassium in various Turkish cheese samples. Cheese samples were dried at 100 °C for 2 days and then digested in a mixture of nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide (3:1). Good linearities (R(2) > 0.999) were obtained up to 10 μg mL(-1) of Ca, Mg and K at 445.478 nm, 285.213 nm and 766.491 nm, respectively. The analytes in a certified reference milk powder sample were determined within the uncertainty limits. Moreover, the analytes added to the cheese samples were recovered quantitatively (>90%). All determinations were performed using aqueous standards for calibration. The LOD values for Ca, Mg and K were 0.036 μg mL(-1), 0.012 μg mL(-1) and 0.190 μg mL(-1), respectively. Concentrations of Ca, K and Mg in various types of cheese samples produced in different regions of Turkey were found between 1.03-3.70, 0.242-0.784 and 0.081-0.303 g kg(-1), respectively. PMID:26304350

  13. Effects of varying soil moisture contents and vegetation canopies on microwave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, H.-H. K.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Results of NASA airborne passive microwave scans of bare and vegetated fields for comparison with ground truth tests are discussed and a model for atmospheric scattering of radiation by vegetation is detailed. On-board radiometers obtained data at 21, 2.8, and 1.67 cm during three passes over each of 46 fields, 28 of which were bare and the others having wheat or alfalfa. Ground-based sampling included moisture in five layers down to 15 cm in addition to soil temperature. The relationships among the brightness temperature and soil moisture, as well as the surface roughness and the vegetation canopy were examined. A model was developed for the dielectric coefficient and volume scattering for a vegetation medium. L- to C-band data were found useful for retrieving soil information directly. A surface moisture content of 5-35% yielded an emissivity of 0.9-0.7. The data agreed well with a combined multilayer radiative transfer model with simple roughness correction.

  14. A parameterization of the effect of surface roughness on microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan; Schmugge, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    A simple model is developed to represent the net effect of surface roughness on the microwave emission from soils. The reflectivity of a rough soil surface is defined in a theoretical model that includes both coherent and incoherent reflectivities in terms of the statistical properties of the rough surface, i.e., the surface height standard deviation and its horizontal correlation length. It is shown that the rough surface reflectivity obtained from this theoretical model can be presented in a form that is simply the reflectivity of a smooth surface attenuated by a 'rough thickness'. It is found that the rough thickness can be parameterized as a function of the statistical slope ratio of a rough surface by a simple power-law relationship. Since the slope of a rough surface can be determined experimentally, the rough thickness can be quantitatively estimated from the parametric representation. Model calculations show that this simple model can provide reasonably accurate results of predicted brightness temperatures that agree well with field measurements within experimental uncertainty.

  15. Ozone-stimulated emission due to atomic oxygen population inversions in an argon microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lukina, N. A.; Sergeichev, K. F.

    2008-06-15

    It is shown that, in a microwave torch discharge in an argon jet injected into an oxygen atmosphere at normal pressure, quasi-resonant energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to molecules of oxygen and ozone generated in the torch shell and, then, to oxygen atoms produced via the dissociation of molecular oxygen and ozone leads to the inverse population of metastable levels of atomic oxygen. As a result, the excited atomic oxygen with population inversions becomes a gain medium for lasing at wavelengths of 844.6 and 777.3 nm (the 3{sup 3}P-3{sup 3}S and 3{sup 5}P-3{sup 5}S transitions). It is shown that an increase in the ozone density is accompanied by an increase in both the lasing efficiency at these wavelength and the emission intensity of the plasma-forming argon at a wavelength of 811.15 nm (the {sup 2}P{sup 0}4s-{sup 2}P{sup 0}4p transition). When the torch operates unstably, the production of singlet oxygen suppresses ozone generation; as a result, the lasing effect at these wavelengths disappears.

  16. Standard dilution analysis of beverages by microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Daniel A; McSweeney, Tina; Santos, Mirian C; Jones, Bradley T; Donati, George L

    2016-02-25

    In this work, standard dilution analysis (SDA) is combined with microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP OES) to determine seven elements in coffee, green tea, energy drink, beer, whiskey and cachaça (Brazilian hard liquor). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in HNO3 1% v v(-1) is required. Due to relatively low plasma temperatures, matrix effects may compromise accuracies in MIP OES analyzes of complex samples. The method of standard additions (SA) offers enhanced accuracies, but is time-consuming and labor intensive. SDA offers a simpler, faster approach, with improved accuracies for complex matrices. In this work, SDA's efficiency is evaluated by spike experiments, and the results are compared to the traditional methods of external calibration (EC), internal standard (IS), and standard additions (SA). SDA is comparable to the traditional calibration methods, and it provides superior accuracies for applications involving ethanol-containing beverage samples. The SDA-MIP OES procedure is effective. Using only two calibration solutions, it may be easily automated for accurate and high sample throughput routine applications. PMID:26851081

  17. Modeling microwave backscatter and thermal emission from linear dune fields: Application to Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, A.; Janssen, M. A.; Kirk, R. L.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2014-02-01

    We present an electromagnetic model that relates the microwave backscatter and thermal emission from linear dune fields to their compositional, physical (roughness, subsurface porosity/heterogeneity) and geometrical (slope, orientation) properties. This model shows the value of exploring these highly directional and geometrical features in light of both their backscattering cross-section and emissivity. Compared to Cassini concurrent radar and radiometry data acquired from October 2004 to June 2011 over Titan's dune fields, it provides clues to understand variations among dune regions on the largest Saturn's moon. In particular, it brings a formal support to the idea first advanced in Le Gall et al. (Le Gall, A., Janssen, M.A., Wye, L.C., Hayes, A.G., Radebaugh, J., Savage, C., Zebker, H., Lorenz, R.D., Lunine, J.I., Kirk, R.L., Lopes, R.M.C., Wall, S., Callahan, P., Stofan, E.R., Farr, T. and the Cassini Radar Team [2011]. Icarus 213, 608-624) that the size of the interdune valleys (relative to that of the dunes) varies across Titan as well as the diffuse scattering properties of these interdune areas due to different thickness of sand cover (i.e. bedrock contribution) or degree of compaction/heterogeneity of the sand cover. The Fensal and Belet dune fields, in particular, are quite different in terms of these properties. The comparison between the model and Cassini data also reveals the potential presence of structures, possibly small-superposed dunes, oriented perpendicular to the dune crests in the Aztlan region.

  18. Frequency drifts of 3-min oscillations in microwave and EUV emission above sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, R.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Shibasaki, K.; Yan, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We analysed 3-min oscillations of microwave and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission generated at different heights of a sunspot atmosphere, studied the amplitude and frequency modulation of the oscillations, and its relationship with the variation of the spatial structure of the oscillations. Methods: High-resolution data obtained with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, TRACE and SDO/AIA were analysed with pixelised wavelet filtering (PWF) and wavelet skeleton techniques. Results: Three-minute oscillations in sunspots appear in the form of recurring trains of 8-20 min duration (13 min in average). The typical interval between the trains is 30-50 min. The oscillation trains are transient in frequency and power. The relative amplitude of 3-min oscillations was about 3-8% and sometimes reached 17%. Recurring frequency drifts of 3-min oscillations were detected during the development of individual trains, with the period varying in the range 90-240 s. A wavelet analysis showed that there are three types of oscillation trains: with positive drifts (to high frequencies), negative drifts, and without a drift. Negative drifts, i.e., when the 3-min oscillation period gradually increases, were found to occur more often. The start and end of the drifts coincides with the start time and end of the train. Sometimes two drifts co-exist, i.e. during the end of the previous drift, a new drift appears near 160 s, when the frequency is in the low-frequency part of the 3-min spectrum, near 200 s. This behaviour is seen at all levels of the sunspot atmosphere. The speed of the drift is 4-5 mHz/h in the photosphere, 5-8 mHz/h in the chromosphere, and 11-13 mHz/h in the corona. There were also low-frequency peaks in the spectrum, corresponding to the periods of 10-20 min, and 30-60 min. The comparative study of the spatial structure of 3-min oscillations in microwave and EUV shows the appearance of new sources of the sunspot oscillations during the development of the trains. Conclusions

  19. In-depth Analysis of Land Surface Emissivity using Microwave Polarization Difference Index to Improve Satellite QPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Kirstetter, P. E.; Hong, Y.; Wen, Y.; Turk, J.; Gourley, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of primary uncertainties in satellite overland quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) from passive sensors such as radiometers is the impact on the brightness temperatures by the surface land emissivity. The complexity of surface land emissivity is linked to its temporal variations (diurnal and seasonal) and spatial variations (subsurface vertical profiles of soil moisture, vegetation structure and surface temperature) translating into sub-pixel heterogeneity within the satellite field of view (FOV). To better extract the useful signal from hydrometeors, surface land emissivity needs to be determined and filtered from the satellite-measured brightness temperatures. Based on the dielectric properties of surface land cover constitutes, Microwave Polarization Differential index (MPDI) is expected to carry the composite effect of surface land properties on land surface emissivity, with a higher MPDI indicating a lower emissivity. This study analyses the dependence of MPDI to soil moisture, vegetation and surface skin temperature over 9 different land surface types. Such analysis is performed using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from MODIS, the near surface air temperature from the RAP model and ante-precedent precipitation accumulation from the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor as surrogates for the vegetation, surface skin temperature and shallow layer soil moisture, respectively. This paper provides 1) evaluations of brightness temperature-based MPDI from the TRMM and GPM Microwave Imagers in both raining and non-raining conditions to test the dependence of MPDI to precipitation; 2) comparisons of MPDI categorized into instantly before, during and immediately after selected precipitation events to examine the impact of modest-to-heavy precipitation on the spatial pattern of MPDI; 3) inspections of relationship between MPDI versus rain fraction and rain rate within the satellite sensors FOV to investigate the behaviors of MPDI in varying

  20. Microwave absorption properties and infrared emissivities of ordered mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites with crystalline framework

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao; He, Jianping; Zhou, Jianhua; Tang, Jing; Guo, Yunxia; Ding, Xiaochun; Wu, Shichao; Zhao, Jianqing

    2010-12-15

    Ordered mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites with crystalline framework were prepared by the evaporation-induced triconstituent co-assembly method. The products were characterized by XRD, TEM, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and TG. Their microwave absorption properties were investigated by mixing the product and epoxy resin. It is found that the peak with minimum reflection loss value moves to lower frequencies and the ordered mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite possesses an excellent microwave absorbing property with the maximum reflection loss of -25.4 dB and the bandwidth lower than -10 dB is 6.6 GHz. The attenuation of microwave can be attributed to dielectric loss and their absorption mechanism is discussed in detail. The mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites also exhibit a lower infrared emissivity in the wavelength from 8 to 14 {mu}m than that of TiO{sub 2}-free powder. -- Graphical abstract: Ordered mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite with crystalline framework possess excellent microwave absorbing properties with the maximum reflection loss of -25.4 dB and the bandwidth lower than -10 dB is 6.6 GHz. Display Omitted

  1. Microwave emission related to cyclotron instabilities in a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, I.; Tarvainen, O.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2015-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) have been essential in the research and applications of nuclear physics over the past 40 years. They are extensively used in a wide range of large-scale accelerator facilities for the production of highly charged heavy ion beams of stable and radioactive elements. ECRISs are susceptible to kinetic instabilities due to resonance heating mechanism leading to anisotropic electron velocity distribution function. Instabilities of cyclotron type are a proven cause of frequently observed periodic bursts of ‘hot’ electrons and bremsstrahlung, accompanied with emission of microwave radiation and followed by considerable drop of multiply charged ions current. Detailed studies of the microwave radiation associated with the instabilities have been performed with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen and argon plasmas. It is demonstrated that during the development of cyclotron instability ‘hot’ electrons emit microwaves in sub-microsecond scale bursts at temporally descending frequencies in the 8-15 GHz range with two dominant frequencies of 11.09 and 12.59 GHz regardless of ECRIS settings i.e. magnetic field strength, neutral gas pressure or species and microwave power. The experimental data suggest that the most probable excited plasma wave is a slow extraordinary Z-mode propagating quasi-longitudinally with respect to the external magnetic field.

  2. Comparison of 2.8- and 21-cm microwave radiometer observations over soils with emission model calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Schmugge, T.; Paris, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    An airborne experiment was conducted under NASA auspices to test the feasibility of detecting soil moisture by microwave remote sensing techniques over agricultural fields near Phoenix, Arizona at midday of April 5, 1974 and at dawn of the following day. Extensive ground data were obtained from 96 bare, sixteen hectare fields. Observations made using a scanning (2.8 cm) and a nonscanning (21 cm) radiometer were compared with the predictions of a radiative transfer emission model. It is shown that (1) the emitted intensity at both wavelengths correlates best with the near surface moisture, (2) surface roughness is found to more strongly affect the degree of polarization than the emitted intensity, (3) the slope of the intensity-moisture curves decreases in going from day to dawn, and (4) increased near surface moisture at dawn is characterized by increased polarization of emissions. The results of the experiment indicate that microwave techniques can be used to observe the history of the near surface moisture. The subsurface history must be inferred from soil physics models which use microwave results as boundary conditions.

  3. Emission, absorption and group delay of microwaves in the atmosphere in relation to water vapour content over the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. K.; Gupta, A. K. D.; Karmakar, P. K.; Barman, S. D.; Bhattacharya, A. B.; Purkait, N.; Gupta, M. K. D.; Sehra, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The advent of satellite communication for global coverage has apparently indicated a renewed interest in the studies of radio wave propagation through the atmosphere, in the VHF, UHF and microwave bands. The extensive measurements of atmosphere constituents, dynamics and radio meterological parameters during the Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) have opened up further the possibilities of studying tropospheric radio wave propagation parameters, relevant to Earth/space link design. The three basic parameters of significance to radio propagation are thermal emission, absorption and group delay of the atmosphere, all of which are controlled largely by the water vapor content in the atmosphere, particular at microwave bands. As good emitters are also good absorbers, the atmospheric emission as well as the absorption attains a maximum at the frequency of 22.235 GHz, which is the peak of the water vapor line. The group delay is practically independent of frequency in the VHF, UHF and microwave bands. However, all three parameters exhibit a similar seasonal dependence originating presumably from the seasonal dependence of the water vapor content. Some of the interesting results obtained from analyses of radiosonde data over the Indian subcontinent collected by the India Meteorological Department is presented.

  4. Ultralow field emission from thinned, open-ended, and defected carbon nanotubes by using microwave hydrogen plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian-Hua; Cheng, Lin; Wang, Fan-Jie; Yu, Bin; Li, Guo-Zheng; Li, De-Jun; Cheng, Guo-An

    2015-01-01

    Ultralow field emission is achieved from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by using microwave hydrogen plasma processing. After the processing, typical capped CNT tips are removed, with thinned, open-ended, and defected CNTs left. Structural analyses indicate that the processed CNTs have more SP3-hybridized defects as compared to the pristine ones. The morphology of CNTs can be readily controlled by adjusting microwave powers, which change the shape of CNTs by means of hydrogen plasma etching. Processed CNTs with optimal morphology are found to have an ultralow turn-on field of 0.566 V/μm and threshold field of 0.896 V/μm, much better than 0.948 and 1.559 V/μm of the as-grown CNTs, respectively. This improved FE performance is ascribed to the structural changes of CNTs after the processing. The thinned and open-ended shape of CNTs can facilitate electron tunneling through barriers and additionally, the increased defects at tube walls can serve as new active emission sites. Furthermore, our plasma processed CNTs exhibit excellent field emission stability at a large emission current density of 10.36 mA/cm2 after being perfectly aged, showing promising prospects in applications as high-performance vacuum electron sources.

  5. Simulating the effects of mid- to upper-tropospheric clouds on microwave emissions in EC-Earth using COSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. S.; Holl, G.; Hocking, J.; Cooper, S. J.; Chen, D.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison (CFMIP) Observation Simulation Package (COSP) is expanded to include scattering and emission effects of clouds and precipitation at passive microwave frequencies. This represents an advancement over the official version of COSP (version 1.4.0) in which only clear-sky brightness temperatures are simulated. To highlight the potential utility of this new microwave simulator, COSP results generated using the climate model EC-Earth's version 3 atmosphere as input are compared with Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) channel (190.311 GHz) observations. Specifically, simulated seasonal brightness temperatures (TB) are contrasted with MHS observations for the period December 2005 to November 2006 to identify possible biases in EC-Earth's cloud and atmosphere fields. The EC-Earth's atmosphere closely reproduces the microwave signature of many of the major large-scale and regional scale features of the atmosphere and surface. Moreover, greater than 60 % of the simulated TB are within 3 K of the NOAA-18 observations. However, COSP is unable to simulate sufficiently low TB in areas of frequent deep convection. Within the Tropics, the model's atmosphere can yield an underestimation of TB by nearly 30 K for cloudy areas in the ITCZ. Possible reasons for this discrepancy include both incorrect amount of cloud ice water in the model simulations and incorrect ice particle scattering assumptions used in the COSP microwave forward model. These multiple sources of error highlight the non-unique nature of the simulated satellite measurements, a problem exacerbated by the fact that EC-Earth lacks detailed micro-physical parameters necessary for accurate forward model calculations. Such issues limit the robustness of our evaluation and suggest a general note of caution when making COSP-satellite observation evaluations.

  6. Preliminary results of long term correlation analysis among earthquakes (M>4) occurrence and anomalous transients in Radon emission and Earth's emitted TIR radiation in Northeastern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggio, Anna; Capobianco, Stefano; Genzano, Nicola; Lisi, Mariano; Tamaro, Alberto; Santulin, Marco; Sileo, Giancanio; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Looking toward the assessment of a multi-parametric system for dynamically updating seismic hazard estimates and earthquake short term (from days to weeks) forecast, a preliminary step is to identify those parameters (chemical, physical, biological, etc.) whose anomalous variations can be, to some extent, associated to the complex process of earthquake preparation. Among the other parameters claimed as possible indicators of an impending seismic activity, the anomalous variations of radon emissions and of Earth's thermally emitted infrared radiation (TIR), have been proposed, since long time, as potential earthquake precursors. In this paper the added value of a multi-parametric approach is evaluated by applying a similar statistical analysis (based on the general RST approach) to long-term time series of Radon and TIR data collected in Northern Italy. Preliminary results of the correlation analysis performed with earthquakes (M>4) clearly show a strong reduction of false positive (up to zero) as soon as the number of considered parameter pass from one (just Radon) to two (Radon & TIR anomalies) (contemporary) considered parameters.

  7. Extremely Coherent Microwave Emission from Spin Torque Oscillator Stabilized by Phase Locked Loop

    PubMed Central

    Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Yuasa, Shinji; Fukushima, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Spin torque oscillator (STO) has been attracting a great deal of attention as a candidate for the next generation microwave signal sources for various modern electronics systems since its advent. However, the phase noise of STOs under free running oscillation is still too large to be used in practical microwave applications, thus an industrially viable means to stabilize its oscillation has been strongly sought. Here we demonstrate implementation of a phase locked loop using a STO as a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) that generates a 7.344 GHz microwave signal stabilized by a 153 MHz reference signal. Spectrum measurement showed successful phase locking of the microwave signal to the reference signal, characterized by an extremely narrow oscillation peak with a linewidth of less than the measurement limit of 1 Hz. This demonstration should be a major breakthrough toward various practical applications of STOs. PMID:26658880

  8. Extremely Coherent Microwave Emission from Spin Torque Oscillator Stabilized by Phase Locked Loop.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yakushiji, Kay; Yuasa, Shinji; Fukushima, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Spin torque oscillator (STO) has been attracting a great deal of attention as a candidate for the next generation microwave signal sources for various modern electronics systems since its advent. However, the phase noise of STOs under free running oscillation is still too large to be used in practical microwave applications, thus an industrially viable means to stabilize its oscillation has been strongly sought. Here we demonstrate implementation of a phase locked loop using a STO as a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) that generates a 7.344 GHz microwave signal stabilized by a 153 MHz reference signal. Spectrum measurement showed successful phase locking of the microwave signal to the reference signal, characterized by an extremely narrow oscillation peak with a linewidth of less than the measurement limit of 1 Hz. This demonstration should be a major breakthrough toward various practical applications of STOs. PMID:26658880

  9. Comparison between ECMWF L-band brightness temperatures and SMOS observations using the Community Microwave Emission Modelling Platform (CMEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosnay, Patricia; Muñoz Sabater, Joaquín; Dutra, Emanuel; Albergel, Clément; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boussetta, Souhail; Isaksen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture initialisation is crucial for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). New generations of satellites, such as SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) and SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) provide highly suitable data from passive and active microwave sensors for soil moisture remote sensing. In order to make it possible to combine use of satellite, in situ and proxy observations to analyse soil moisture, ECMWF implemented an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) soil moisture analysis which is used for operational NWP in the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). The use of passive microwave sensors in the EKF soil moisture data assimilation requires an accurate radiative transfer model. In this poster we present ECMWF developments in radiative transfer modelling conducted to use SMOS and SMAP brightness temperature observations in the ECMWF data assimilation system. The ECMWF Community Microwave Emission Modelling Platform (CMEM) is described. CMEM input global fields, including soil moisture, soil temperature, snow depth and vegetation cover, were obtained from H-TESSEL land surface model simulations forced by ERA-Interim atmospheric conditions. CMEM multi-year simulations were performed using a land surface model configuration which is similar to the current operational IFS. In CMEM, combinations of three soil dielectric models, three vegetation opacity models and four soil roughness parametrizations were used, allowing comparing 36 different configurations of the microwave emission model. Global scale forward simulations of dual polarization L-band (1.4 GHz) brightness temperature were conducted at 40 degrees incidence angle for each radiative transfer model and evaluated using the SMOS near real time brightness temperature data for 2010. Best microwave emission model performances were obtained with the Wang and Schmugge dielectric model combined with the Wigneron vegetation opacity model and the simple Wigneron soil roughness parametrization. The

  10. Coupling the snow thermodynamic model SNOWPACK with the microwave emission model of layered snowpacks for subarctic and arctic snow water equivalent retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, A.; Royer, A.; Derksen, C.; Montpetit, B.; Dupont, F.; GoïTa, K.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite-passive microwave remote sensing has been extensively used to estimate snow water equivalent (SWE) in northern regions. Although passive microwave sensors operate independent of solar illumination and the lower frequencies are independent of atmospheric conditions, the coarse spatial resolution introduces uncertainties to SWE retrievals due to the surface heterogeneity within individual pixels. In this article, we investigate the coupling of a thermodynamic multilayered snow model with a passive microwave emission model. Results show that the snow model itself provides poor SWE simulations when compared to field measurements from two major field campaigns. Coupling the snow and microwave emission models with successive iterations to correct the influence of snow grain size and density significantly improves SWE simulations. This method was further validated using an additional independent data set, which also showed significant improvement using the two-step iteration method compared to standalone simulations with the snow model.

  11. Optical emission spectroscopy for simultaneous measurement of plasma electron density and temperature in a low-pressure microwave induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Konjevic, N.; Jovicevic, S.; Ivkovic, M.

    2009-10-15

    The simple optical emission spectroscopy technique for diagnostics of low pressure microwave induced plasma (MIP) in hydrogen or in MIP seeded with hydrogen is described and tested. This technique uses the Boltzmann plot of relative line intensities along Balmer spectral series in conjunction with the criterion for partial local thermodynamic equilibrium for low electron density (N{sub e}) plasma diagnostics. The proposed technique is tested in a low pressure MIP discharge for simultaneous determination of electron density N{sub e} (10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and temperature T{sub e}.

  12. Microwave remediation of electronic circuitry waste and the resulting gaseous emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Rebecca L.

    The global community has become increasingly dependent on computer and electronic technology. As a result, society is faced with an increasing amount of obsolete equipment and electronic circuitry waste. Electronic waste is generally disposed of in landfills. While convenient, this action causes a substantial loss of finite resources and poses an environmental threat as the circuit board components breakdown and are exposed to the elements. Hazardous compounds such as lead, mercury and cadmium may leach from the circuitry and find their way into the groundwater supply. For this dissertation, a microwave waste remediation system was developed. The system was designed to remove the organic components from a wide variety of electronic circuitry. Upon additional heating of the resulting ash material in an industrial microwave, a glass and metal product can be recovered. Analysis of the metal reveals the presence of precious metals (gold, silver) that can be sold to provide a return on investment. a glass and metal product can be recovered. Analysis of the metal reveals the presence of precious metals (gold, silver) that can be sold to provide a return on investment. Gaseous organic compounds that were generated as a result of organic removal were treated in a microwave off gas system that effectively reduced the concentration of the products emitted by several orders of magnitude, and in some cases completely destroying the waste gas. Upon further heating in an industrial microwave, a glass and metal product were recovered. In order to better understand the effects of processing parameters on the efficiency of the off-gas system, a parametric study was developed. The study tested the microwave system at 3 flow rates (10, 30, and 50 ft 3/min) and three temperatures (400, 700 and 1000°C. In order to test the effects of microwave energy, the experiments were repeated using a conventional furnace. While microwave energy is widely used, the mechanisms of interaction with

  13. Design of a portable optical emission tomography system for microwave induced compact plasma for visible to near-infrared emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathore, Kavita; Munshi, Prabhat; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2016-03-01

    A new non-invasive diagnostic system is developed for Microwave Induced Plasma (MIP) to reconstruct tomographic images of a 2D emission profile. A compact MIP system has wide application in industry as well as research application such as thrusters for space propulsion, high current ion beams, and creation of negative ions for heating of fusion plasma. Emission profile depends on two crucial parameters, namely, the electron temperature and density (over the entire spatial extent) of the plasma system. Emission tomography provides basic understanding of plasmas and it is very useful to monitor internal structure of plasma phenomena without disturbing its actual processes. This paper presents development of a compact, modular, and versatile Optical Emission Tomography (OET) tool for a cylindrical, magnetically confined MIP system. It has eight slit-hole cameras and each consisting of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear image sensor for light detection. The optical noise is reduced by using aspheric lens and interference band-pass filters in each camera. The entire cylindrical plasma can be scanned with automated sliding ring mechanism arranged in fan-beam data collection geometry. The design of the camera includes a unique possibility to incorporate different filters to get the particular wavelength light from the plasma. This OET system includes selected band-pass filters for particular argon emission 750 nm, 772 nm, and 811 nm lines and hydrogen emission Hα (656 nm) and Hβ (486 nm) lines. Convolution back projection algorithm is used to obtain the tomographic images of plasma emission line. The paper mainly focuses on (a) design of OET system in detail and (b) study of emission profile for 750 nm argon emission lines to validate the system design.

  14. Design of a portable optical emission tomography system for microwave induced compact plasma for visible to near-infrared emission lines.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Kavita; Munshi, Prabhat; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2016-03-01

    A new non-invasive diagnostic system is developed for Microwave Induced Plasma (MIP) to reconstruct tomographic images of a 2D emission profile. A compact MIP system has wide application in industry as well as research application such as thrusters for space propulsion, high current ion beams, and creation of negative ions for heating of fusion plasma. Emission profile depends on two crucial parameters, namely, the electron temperature and density (over the entire spatial extent) of the plasma system. Emission tomography provides basic understanding of plasmas and it is very useful to monitor internal structure of plasma phenomena without disturbing its actual processes. This paper presents development of a compact, modular, and versatile Optical Emission Tomography (OET) tool for a cylindrical, magnetically confined MIP system. It has eight slit-hole cameras and each consisting of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear image sensor for light detection. The optical noise is reduced by using aspheric lens and interference band-pass filters in each camera. The entire cylindrical plasma can be scanned with automated sliding ring mechanism arranged in fan-beam data collection geometry. The design of the camera includes a unique possibility to incorporate different filters to get the particular wavelength light from the plasma. This OET system includes selected band-pass filters for particular argon emission 750 nm, 772 nm, and 811 nm lines and hydrogen emission H(α) (656 nm) and H(β) (486 nm) lines. Convolution back projection algorithm is used to obtain the tomographic images of plasma emission line. The paper mainly focuses on (a) design of OET system in detail and (b) study of emission profile for 750 nm argon emission lines to validate the system design. PMID:27036771

  15. Intervalence charge transfer luminescence: Interplay between anomalous and 5d − 4f emissions in Yb-doped fluorite-type crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Barandiarán, Zoila Seijo, Luis

    2014-12-21

    In this paper, we report the existence of intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) luminescence in Yb-doped fluorite-type crystals associated with Yb{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} mixed valence pairs. By means of embedded cluster, wave function theory ab initio calculations, we show that the widely studied, very broad band, anomalous emission of Yb{sup 2+}-doped CaF{sub 2} and SrF{sub 2}, usually associated with impurity-trapped excitons, is, rather, an IVCT luminescence associated with Yb{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} mixed valence pairs. The IVCT luminescence is very efficiently excited by a two-photon upconversion mechanism where each photon provokes the same strong 4f{sup 14}–1A{sub 1g}→ 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sub 7/2})5de{sub g}–1T{sub 1u} absorption in the Yb{sup 2+} part of the pair: the first one, from the pair ground state; the second one, from an excited state of the pair whose Yb{sup 3+} moiety is in the higher 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sub 5/2}) multiplet. The Yb{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} → Yb{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 2+} IVCT emission consists of an Yb{sup 2+} 5de{sub g} → Yb{sup 3+} 4f{sub 7/2} charge transfer accompanied by a 4f{sub 7/2} → 4f{sub 5/2} deexcitation within the Yb{sup 2+} 4f{sup 13} subshell: [{sup 2}F{sub 5/2}5de{sub g},{sup 2}F{sub 7/2}] → [{sup 2}F{sub 7/2},4f{sup 14}]. The IVCT vertical transition leaves the oxidized and reduced moieties of the pair after electron transfer very far from their equilibrium structures; this explains the unexpectedly large band width of the emission band and its low peak energy, because the large reorganization energies are subtracted from the normal emission. The IVCT energy diagrams resulting from the quantum mechanical calculations explain the different luminescent properties of Yb-doped CaF{sub 2}, SrF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, and SrCl{sub 2}: the presence of IVCT luminescence in Yb-doped CaF{sub 2} and SrF{sub 2}; its coexistence with regular 5d-4f emission in SrF{sub 2}; its absence in BaF{sub 2} and SrCl{sub 2}; the quenching of

  16. Attenuation of soil microwave emissivity by corn and soybeans at 1.4 and 5 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; O'Neill, Peggy E.

    1989-01-01

    Theory and experiments have shown that passive microwave radiometers can be used to measure soil moisture. However, the presence of a vegetative cover alters the measurement that might be obtained under bare conditions. Deterministically accounting for the effect of vegetation and developing algorithms for extracting soil moisture from observations of a vegetable-soil complex present significant obstacles to the practical use of this approach. The presence of a vegetation canopy reduces the sensitivity of passive microwave instruments to soil moisture variations. The reduction in sensitivity, as compared to a bare-soil relationship, increases as microwave frequency increases, implying that the longest wavelength sensors should provide the most information. Sensitivity also decreases as the amount of vegetative wet biomass increases for a given type of vegetation.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of varying moisture contents on microwave thermal emissions from agriculture fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, H. H. K.

    1980-01-01

    Three tasks related to soil moisture sensing at microwave wavelengths were undertaken: (1) analysis of data at L, X and K sub 21 band wavelengths over bare and vegetated fields from the 1975 NASA sponsored flight experiment over Phoenix, Arizona; (2) modeling of vegetation canopy at microwave wavelengths taking into consideration both absorption and volume scattering effects; and (3) investigation of overall atmospheric effects at microwave wavelengths that can affect soil moisture retrieval. Data for both bare and vegetated fields are found to agree well with theoretical estimates. It is observed that the retrieval of surface and near surface soil moisture information is feasible through multi-spectral and multi-temporal analysis. It is also established that at long wavelengths, which are optimal for surface sensing, atmospheric effects are generally minimal. At shorter wavelengths, which are optimal for atmosheric retrieval, the background surface properties are also established.

  18. Field emission from bias-grown diamond thin films in a microwave plasma

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Ding, Ming Q.; Auciello, Orlando

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing diamond or diamond like films in which a negative bias is established on a substrate with an electrically conductive surface in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. The atmosphere that is subjected to microwave energy includes a source of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The negative bias is maintained on the substrate through both the nucleation and growth phase of the film until the film is continuous. Biases between -100V and -200 are preferred. Carbon sources may be one or more of CH.sub.4, C.sub.2 H.sub.2 other hydrocarbons and fullerenes.

  19. Modelling the spinning dust emission from dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ysard, N.; Juvela, M.; Verstraete, L.

    2011-11-01

    Context. Electric dipole emission arising from rapidly rotating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is often invoked to explain the anomalous microwave emission. This assignation is based on i) an observed tight correlation between the mid-IR emission of PAHs and the anomalous microwave emission; and ii) a good agreement between models of spinning dust and the broadband anomalous microwave emission spectrum. So far often detected at large scale in the diffuse interstellar medium, the anomalous microwave emission has recently been studied in detail in well-known dense molecular clouds with the help of Planck data. Aims: While much attention has been given to the physics of spinning dust emission, the impact of varying local physical conditions has not yet been considered in detail. Our aim is to study the emerging spinning dust emission from interstellar clouds with realistic physical conditions and radiative transfer. Methods: We use the DustEM code to describe the extinction and IR emission of all dust populations. The spinning dust emission is obtained with SpDust, which we have coupled to DustEM. We carry out full radiative transfer simulations and carefully estimate the local gas state as a function of position within interstellar clouds. Results: We show that the spinning dust emission is sensitive to the abundances of the major ions (H ii, C ii) and we propose a simple scheme to estimate these abundances. We also investigate the effect of changing the cosmic-ray rate. In dense media, where radiative transfer is mandatory to estimate the temperature of the grains, we show that the relationship between the spinning and mid-IR emissivities of PAHs is no longer linear and that the spinning dust emission may actually be strong at the centre of clouds where the mid-IR PAH emission is weak. These results provide new ways to trace grain growth from diffuse to dense medium and will be useful for the analysis of anomalous microwave emission at the scale of

  20. Microwave emission spectrum of the moon: mean global heat flow and average depth of the regolith.

    PubMed

    Keihm, S J; Langseth, M G

    1975-01-10

    Earth-based observations of the lunar microwave brightness temperature spectrum at wavelengths between 5 and 500 centimeters, when reexamined in the light of physical property data derived from the Apollo program, tentatively support the high heat flows measured in situ and indicate that a regolith thickness between 10 and 30 meters may characterize a large portion of the lunar near side. PMID:17844211

  1. Microwave emission spectrum of the moon - Mean global heat flow and average depth of the regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keihm, S. J.; Langseth, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    Earth-based observations of the lunar microwave brightness temperature spectrum at wavelengths between 5 and 500 centimeters, when reexamined in the light of physical property data derived from the Apollo program, tentatively support the high heat flows measured in situ and indicate that a regolith thickness between 10 and 30 meters may characterize a large portion of the lunar near side.

  2. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  3. An helium microwave-induced plasma Fourier transform atomic emission spectrometer as a novel two-dimensional detector for gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    The helium microwave-induced plasma (MIP) emission excitation source is a sensitive, element selective detector for gas chromatography. Fourier transform (FT) spectrometry is a technique that allows rapid simultaneous monitoring of the full spectrum of a light source. The combination of the MIP excitation course with an FT spectrometer provides a versatile simultaneous multielement gas chromatography detector. The design and construction of a helium microwave-induced plasma/Fourier transform atomic emission detector for gas chromatography is described. Examples of the operation of this instrument are given.

  4. A large scale microwave emission model for forests. Contribution to the SMOS algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmoune, R.; Della Vecchia, A.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Guerriero, L.; Martin-Porqueras, F.

    2009-04-01

    1. INTRODUCTION It is well known that surface soil moisture plays an important role in the water cycle and the global climate. SMOS is a L-Band multi-angle dual-polarization microwave radiometer for global monitoring of this variable. In the areas covered by forests, the opacity is relatively high, and the knowledge of moisture remains problematic. A significant percentage of SMOS pixels at global scale is affected by fractional forest. Whereas the effect of the vegetation can be corrected thanks a simple radiative model, in case of dense forests the wave penetration is limited and the sensitivity to variations of soil moisture is poor. However, most of the pixels are mixed, and a reliable estimate of forest emissivity is important to retrieve the soil moisture of the areas less affected by forest cover. Moreover, there are many sparse woodlands, where the sensitivity to variations of soil moisture is still acceptable. At the scale of spaceborne radiometers, it is difficult to have a detailed knowledge of the variables which affect the overall emissivity. In order to manage effectively these problems, the electromagnetic model developed at Tor Vergata University was combined with information available from forest literature. Using allometric equations and other information, the geometrical and dielectric inputs required by the model were related to global variables available at large scale, such as the Leaf Area Index. This procedure is necessarily approximate. In a first version of the model, forest variables were assumed to be constant in time, and were simply related to the maximum yearly value of Leaf Area Index. Moreover, a unique sparse distribution of trunk diameters was assumed. Finally, the temperature distribution within the crown canopy was assumed to be uniform. The model is being refined, in order to consider seasonal variations of foliage cover, subdivided into arboreous foliage and understory contributions. Different distributions of trunk diameter

  5. Enhanced field emission characteristics of boron doped diamond films grown by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koinkar, Pankaj M.; Patil, Sandip S.; Kim, Tae-Gyu; Yonekura, Daisuke; More, Mahendra A.; Joag, Dilip S.; Murakami, Ri-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Boron doped diamond films were synthesized on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) technique. The effect of B 2O 3 concentration varied from 1000 to 5000 ppm on the field emission characteristics was examined. The surface morphology and quality of films were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology obtained by SEM showed variation from facetted microcrystal covered with nanometric grains to cauliflower of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) particles with increasing B 2O 3 concentration. The Raman spectra confirm the formation of NCD films. The field emission properties of NCD films were observed to improve upon increasing boron concentration. The values of the onset field and threshold field are observed to be as low as 0.36 and 0.08 V/μm, respectively. The field emission current stability investigated at the preset value of ˜1 μA is observed to be good, in each case. The enhanced field emission properties are attributed to the better electrical conductivity coupled with the nanometric features of the diamond films.

  6. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  7. Near-infrared digital photography to estimate snow correlation length for microwave emission modeling.

    PubMed

    Toure, Ally Mounirou; Goïta, Kalifa; Royer, Alain; Mätzler, Christian; Schneebeli, Martin

    2008-12-20

    The study is based on experimental work conducted in alpine snow. We made microwave radiometric and near-infrared reflectance measurements of snow slabs under different experimental conditions. We used an empirical relation to link near-infrared reflectance of snow to the specific surface area (SSA), and converted the SSA into the correlation length. From the measurements of snow radiances at 21 and 35 GHz, we derived the microwave scattering coefficient by inverting two coupled radiative transfer models (the sandwich and six-flux model). The correlation lengths found are in the same range as those determined in the literature using cold laboratory work. The technique shows great potential in the determination of the snow correlation length under field conditions. PMID:19104524

  8. A semiempirical model for interpreting microwave emission from semiarid land surfaces as seen from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Yann H.; Njoku, Eni G.

    1990-01-01

    A radiative-transfer model for simulating microwave brightness temperatures over land surfaces is described. The model takes into account sensor viewing conditions (spacecraft altitude, viewing angle, frequency, and polarization) and atmospheric parameters over a soil surface characterized by its moisture, roughness, and temperature and covered with a layer of vegetation characterized by its temperature, water content, single scattering albedo, structure, and percent coverage. In order to reduce the influence of atmospheric and surface temperature effects, the brightness temperatures are expressed as polarization ratios that depend primarily on the soil moisture and roughness, canopy water content, and percentage of cover. The sensitivity of the polarization ratio to these parameters is investigated. Simulation of the temporal evolution of the microwave signal over semiarid areas in the African Sahel is presented and compared to actual satellite data from the SMMR instrument on Nimbus-7.

  9. Microwave radio emissions of negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D.; Beasley, W.

    2014-01-01

    We report preliminary results of a new observational study of microwave-frequency electromagnetic radiation that is emitted by lightning discharge processes. Radiation was observed with a ceramic patch antenna and a digital radio receiver tuned to a center frequency of 1.63 GHz and a bandwidth of 2 MHz. The recorded radiation waveforms are compared with data collected by the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA) lightning mapping system and the co-located Earth Networks Total Lightning Network (ENTLN) broadband electric field antenna. Microwave radiation was observed to occur during preliminary breakdown, negative stepped leader breakdown, negative dart leader breakdown, and return strokes. Characteristic radiation signatures were observed, including trains of individually resolvable impulses during breakdown and brief but intense trains of noise-like bursts during return strokes.

  10. Anomalous Change of Diffuse CO2 Emission Rates at San Salvador volcano, El Salvador, Central America: a premonitory geochemical signature of magmatic and/or tectonic reactivation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, N.; Salazar, J.; Hernandez, P.; Soriano, T.; Barahona, F.; Cartagena, R.; Olmos, R.; Lopez, D.

    2002-12-01

    San Salvador volcano is located towards the southern part of the Central American graben. The most recent magmatic activity was mainly focused on the volcano NW flank forming monogenetic explosion craters, cinder cones, and lava flows. Flank vents continue to erupt at a rate of once every 82 yrs with the last eruption in 1917 (Sofield, 1999). The city of San Salvador, with a population 1.7 million located at the skirts of the volcano, will be at high risk if an eruption occurs. The purpose of this work is to provide a multidisciplinary approach for the volcanic surveillance by means of introducing geochemical continuous monitoring of diffuse CO2 and H2S emission rates. Soil CO2 and H2S efflux are continuously monitored at Cerro La Hoya, which is located at San Salvador volcano southern flank, by means of a soil gas efflux continuous monitoring station. Since Nov.11, 2001, until Aug.30, 2002, about 6,800 observations of soil gas efflux and meteorological measurements had been recorded. Soil H2S efflux values were negligible during this period. On the contrary, two distinct diffuse CO2 degassing periods have been observed: (1) a stationary period from Nov. 11 to Dec. 27, 2001, and (2) a clear increasing trend period from Dec. 28, 2001, up to date. From Nov.11 to Dec.27, 2001, CO2 efflux showed an average of 700 gm-2d-1 peaking values up to 1,194 gm-2d-1. From Dec.28, 2001, to Aug.30, 2002, CO2 efflux showed an average of 7,435 gm-2d-1 peaking values up to 45,285 gm-2d-1. Soil temperature showed similar average and peak values for both periods. It is quite evident that this anomalous change of CO2 efflux rate at San Salvador is not driven by meteorological fluctuations. Therefore, this anomalous change of diffuse CO2 emission should be related to an increase of CO2 pressure in the volcanic-hydrothermal system. This increase of fluid pressure could be related to subsurface strain/stress changes, which might be taking place due to either magmatic or tectonic

  11. Fast polarization changes in mm microwave emission of weak multistructured solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Strauss, F. M.; Costa, J. E. R.; Dennis, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    Circular polarization of weak multistructured solar bursts was measured at mm microwaves with unprecedented sensitivity (0.03 sfu rms) and high time resolution (1ms). It was shown that sudden changes occur in the degree of polarization with time scales of 0.04 to 0.3 s. In most cases the degree of polarization attained maximum values before the maximum flux in both mm microwaves and hard X-rays with time scales of 0.04 to 1.0 s. The timing accuracy in determining the degree of polarization was 40 ms. Physical phenomena are discussed invoking one or a combination of various possible causes for the observed effects. The bursts at mm microwaves were weak compared to the contribution of the preexisting active regions, and therefore the changes in magnetoionic propagation conditions for emerging radiation plays an important role in the observed effects. Composite effects due to more than one polarizing mechanism or more than one polarized spots within the antenna beam are discussed.

  12. The relationship between visible light emission and species fraction of the hydrogen ion beams extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharge.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions with extracted H(+), H2(+), and H3(+) ions is demonstrated for a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Ion mass spectra and optical measurements of Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions have been obtained with a Wien Filter having an optical view-port on the plasma chamber axis. The beam of approximately 1 mA is analyzed for different plasma conditions simultaneously with the measurement of light emissions both with temporal resolution. The use of visible light emissions as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring the species fraction of the extracted beams is proposed. PMID:26329183

  13. The relationship between visible light emission and species fraction of the hydrogen ion beams extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, O. D.; Megía-Macías, A.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions with extracted H+, H2 + , and H3 + ions is demonstrated for a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Ion mass spectra and optical measurements of Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions have been obtained with a Wien Filter having an optical view-port on the plasma chamber axis. The beam of approximately 1 mA is analyzed for different plasma conditions simultaneously with the measurement of light emissions both with temporal resolution. The use of visible light emissions as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring the species fraction of the extracted beams is proposed.

  14. Angular power spectrum of the FASTICA cosmic microwave background component from Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, S.; Maino, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Childers, J.; Figueiredo, N.; Lubin, P. M.; Meinhold, P. R.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Seiffert, M. D.; Villela, T.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2006-06-01

    We present the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) component extracted with FASTICA from the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) data. BEAST is a 2.2-m off-axis telescope with a focal plane comprising eight elements at Q (38-45 GHz) and Ka (26-36 GHz) bands. It operates from the UC (University of California) White Mountain Research Station at an altitude of 3800 m. The BEAST CMB angular power spectrum has already been calculated by O'Dwyer et al. using only the Q-band data. With two input channels, FASTICA returns two possible independent components. We found that one of these two has an unphysical spectral behaviour, while the other is a reasonable CMB component. After a detailed calibration procedure based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, we extracted the angular power spectrum for the identified CMB component and found a very good agreement with the already published BEAST CMB angular power spectrum and with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data.

  15. Influence of (FeO + TiO2) abundance on the thermal emission from the lunar regolith using Chang'E-2 microwave radiometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhiguo; Ping, Jinsong; Xu, Yi; Cai, Zhanchuan; Zheng, Yongchun

    Abstract:The microwave radiometer data obtained from Chang’E-2 mission (CELMS data) has provided new opportunity to study the influence of the (FeO+TiO2) abundance on the microwave thermal emission of the lunar regolith. In this paper, the radiative transfer simulation is employed to study the change of the brightness temperature with (FeO+TiO2) abundance at different frequencies and surface temperature. The (FeO+TiO2) abundance are derived from Clementine UV-VIS data and the samples from Apollo, Luna and Surveyor projects. The simulation results along the Equator indicate that the (FeO+TiO2) abundance has strong impact on the microwave thermal emission of the lunar regolith. However, the data along the Longitude 0° shows that the (FeO+TiO2) abundance is not the dominant influential factor of the microwave thermal emission of the lunar regolith. Specifically, the abnormal brightness temperature at 160°W (Unnamed crater), 138°W (Crater Vavilov), 125°W (Crater Hertzsprung), 116°E (Crater Abul Wáfa), 119°E (Crater Heron), 130°E (Crater Catena Gregory) and 140°E (Crater Catena Mendeleev) shows that the (FeO+TiO2) abundance is not the only influential factor for the observed brightness temperature. In addition, the correlations between the four-channel brightness temperature and the (FeO+TiO2) abundance in Apollo landing site and along the Equator both indicate that the (FeO+TiO2) abundance is slightly decreasing with depth. The research is essential for the inversion of the lunar regolith parameters with the microwave radiometer data from Chang’E satellites. Keywords: lunar regolith, microwave thermal emission, CELMS data, (FeO+TiO2) abundance

  16. High Galactic latitude polarized emission at 1.4 GHz and implications for cosmic microwave background observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, E.; Bernardi, G.; Sault, R. J.; Cortiglioni, S.; Poppi, S.

    2005-03-01

    We analyse the polarized emission at 1.4 GHz in a 3°× 3° area at high Galactic latitude (b~-40°). The region, centred in (α= 5h, δ=-49°), was observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) radio-interferometer, whose 3-30 arcmin angular sensitivity range allows the study of scales appropriate for cosmic microwave background polarization (CMBP) investigations. The angular behaviour of the diffuse emission is analysed through the E- and B-mode angular power spectra. These follow a power law CXl~lβX with slopes βE=-1.97 +/- 0.08 and βB=-1.98 +/- 0.07. The emission is found to be approximately a factor 25 fainter than in Galactic plane regions. The comparison of the power spectra with other surveys indicates that this area is intermediate between strong and negligible Faraday rotation effects. A similar conclusion can be reached by analysing both the frequency and Galactic latitude behaviours of the diffuse Galactic emission of the 408-1411 MHz Leiden survey data. We present an analysis of the Faraday rotation effects on the polarized power spectra and find that the observed power spectra can be enhanced by a transfer of power from large to small angular scales. The extrapolation of the spectra to 32 and 90 GHz of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) window suggests that Galactic synchrotron emission leaves the CMBP E-mode uncontaminated at 32 GHz. The level of the contamination at 90 GHz is expected to be more than 4 orders of magnitude below the CMBP spectrum. Extrapolating to the relevant angular scales, this region also appears adequate for investigation of the CMBP B-modes for models with tensor-to-scalar fluctuation power ratio T/S > 0.01. We also identify polarized point sources in the field, providing a nine object list, which is complete down to the polarized flux limit of Splim= 2 mJy.

  17. Subnanogram determination of inorganic and organic mercury by helium-microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushi, K. ); Willie, S.N.; Sturgeon, R.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Inorganic and organic mercury were determined by helium-microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry following cold vapor generation. Whereas only inorganic mercury was reduced by stannous ion in an acidic medium, both inorganic and organic mercury (total mercury) were reduced by stannous ion in the presence of cupric ion in a basic medium. Organic mercury was determined as the difference between total and inorganic mercury. Detection limits for inorganic and organic mercury were 11 and 10 pg, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was verified through the determination of inorganic, total and organic mercury in two marine biological standard reference materials, DORM-1 and TORT-1. 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Electric field-assisted metal insulator transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films: optical switching behavior and anomalous far-infrared emissivity variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crunteanu, Aurelian; Fabert, Marc; Cornette, Julie; Colas, Maggy; Orlianges, Jean-Christophe; Bessaudou, Annie; Cosset, Françoise

    2014-03-01

    We present the vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films deposition using e-beam evaporation of a vanadium target under oxygen atmosphere on different substrates (sapphire, Si, SiO2/Si…) and we focus on their electrical and optical properties variations as the material undergoes a metal-insulator transition under thermal and electrical stimuli. The phase transition induces extremely abrupt changes in the electronic and optical properties of the material: the electrical resistivity increases up to 5 orders of magnitude while the optical properties (transmission, reflection, refractive index) are drastically modified. We present the integration of these films in simple planar optical devices and we demonstrate electrical-activated optical modulators for visible-infrared signals with high discrimination between the two states. We will highlight a peculiar behavior of the VO2 material in the infrared and far infrared regions (2- 20 μm), namely its anomalous emissivity change under thermal- end electrical activation (negative differential emittance phenomenon) with potential applications in active coatings for thermal regulation, optical limiting or camouflage coatings.

  19. Plasma Upflows and Microwave Emission in Hot Supra-arcade Structure Associated with an M1.6 Limb Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K.; Bain, H.-M.; Cho, K.-S.

    2014-04-01

    We have investigated a supra-arcade structure associated with an M1.6 flare, which occurred on the south-east limb on 2010 November 4. It is observed in EUV with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, microwaves at 17 and 34 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), and soft X-rays of 8-20 keV with RHESSI. Interestingly, we found exceptional properties of the supra-arcade thermal plasma from the AIA 131 Å and the NoRH: (1) plasma upflows along large coronal loops and (2) enhancing microwave emission. RHESSI detected two soft X-ray sources, a broad one in the middle of the supra-arcade structure and a bright one just above the flare-arcade. We estimated the number density and thermal energy for these two source regions during the decay phase of the flare. In the supra-arcade source, we found that there were increases of the thermal energy and the density at the early and last stages, respectively. On the contrary, the density and thermal energy of the source on the top of the flare-arcade decreases throughout. The observed upflows imply that there is continuous energy supply into the supra-arcade structure from below during the decay phase of the flare. It is hard to explain by the standard flare model in which the energy release site is located high in the corona. Thus, we suggest that a potential candidate of the energy source for the hot supra-arcade structure is the flare-arcade, which has exhibited a predominant emission throughout.

  20. Plasma upflows and microwave emission in hot supra-arcade structure associated with AN M1.6 limb flare

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K.; Cho, K.-S.

    2014-04-20

    We have investigated a supra-arcade structure associated with an M1.6 flare, which occurred on the south-east limb on 2010 November 4. It is observed in EUV with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, microwaves at 17 and 34 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), and soft X-rays of 8-20 keV with RHESSI. Interestingly, we found exceptional properties of the supra-arcade thermal plasma from the AIA 131 Å and the NoRH: (1) plasma upflows along large coronal loops and (2) enhancing microwave emission. RHESSI detected two soft X-ray sources, a broad one in the middle of the supra-arcade structure and a bright one just above the flare-arcade. We estimated the number density and thermal energy for these two source regions during the decay phase of the flare. In the supra-arcade source, we found that there were increases of the thermal energy and the density at the early and last stages, respectively. On the contrary, the density and thermal energy of the source on the top of the flare-arcade decreases throughout. The observed upflows imply that there is continuous energy supply into the supra-arcade structure from below during the decay phase of the flare. It is hard to explain by the standard flare model in which the energy release site is located high in the corona. Thus, we suggest that a potential candidate of the energy source for the hot supra-arcade structure is the flare-arcade, which has exhibited a predominant emission throughout.

  1. Microwave emission from snow and glacier ice. [brightness temperature for snow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. C.; Gloersen, P.; Schmugge, T.; Wilheit, T. T.; Zwally, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    The microwave brightness temperature for snow fields was studied assuming that the snow cover consists of closely packed scattering spheres which do not interact coherently. The Mie scattering theory was used to compute the volume scattering albedo. It is shown that in the wavelength range from 0.8 to 2.8 cm, most of the micro-radiation emanates from a layer 10 meters or less in thickness. It is concluded that it is possible to determine snow accumulation rates as well as near-surface temperature.

  2. Modeling of the nonstationary regimes of distributed-emission M-type microwave amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsunov, A. V.

    An improved modeling procedure for the calculation of transient processes in M-type microwave amplifiers by the large-particle method is described which involves a three-dimensional mulitparticle configuration and rectangular and cylindrical geometry. The operating characteristics of the TUL'PAN applied program package based on the models developed are examined. Typical time dependences of the output parameters during the insertion process are shown for the QK-434 device, and the space-charge distribution in the interaction space under stationary conditions is presented.

  3. A planetary radio astronomy discussion of the 1.55 cm microwave emission of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, W. J., Jr.; Chang, T. C.; Darby, L. T.; Finkelstein, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Using 1.55 cm observations of the earth made by the Electrically Scanned Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) experiment on Nimbus 5, the appearance of the earth from Venus is simulated. A single antenna unable to resolve the earth's disk would give a time-averaged disk temperature of 183 K. In one rotation, the disk temperature would vary from 194 K to 172 K. During the 1973 inferior conjunction, a radio telescope with 1 arc sec resolution would resolve most of the major surface features of the earth.

  4. Detection of microwave emission due to rock fracture as a new tool for geophysics: A field test at a volcano in Miyake Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Tadashi; Maeda, Takashi; Miki, Yoji; Akatsuka, Sayo; Hattori, Katsumi; Nishihashi, Masahide; Kaida, Daishi; Hirano, Takuya

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes a field test to verify a newly discovered phenomenon of microwave emission due to rock fracture in a volcano. The field test was carried out on Miyake Island, 150 km south of Tokyo. The main objective of the test was to investigate the applicability of the phenomenon to the study of geophysics, volcanology, and seismology by extending observations of this phenomenological occurrence from the laboratory to the natural field. We installed measuring systems for 300 MHz, 2 GHz, and 18 GHz-bands on the mountain top and mountain foot in order to discriminate local events from regional and global events. The systems include deliberate data subsystems that store slowly sampled data in the long term, and fast sampled data when triggered. We successfully obtained data from January to February 2008. During this period, characteristic microwave pulses were intermittently detected at 300 MHz. Two photographs taken before and after this period revealed that a considerably large-scale collapse occurred on the crater cliff. Moreover, seismograms obtained by nearby observatories strongly suggest that the crater subsidence occurred simultaneously with microwave signals on the same day during the observation period. For confirmation of the microwave emission caused by rock fracture, these microwave signals must be clearly discriminated from noise, interferences, and other disturbances. We carefully discriminated the microwave data taken at the mountaintop and foot, checked the lightning strike data around the island, and consequently concluded that these microwave signals could not be attributed to lightning. Artificial interferences were discriminated by the nature of their waveforms. Thus, we inferred that the signals detected at 300 MHz were due to rock fractures during cliff collapses. This result may provide a useful new tool for geoscientists and for the mitigation of natural hazards.

  5. Optical emission spectroscopy of microwave-plasmas at atmospheric pressure applied to the growth of organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicaslan, A.; Levasseur, O.; Roy-Garofano, V.; Profili, J.; Moisan, M.; Côté, C.; Sarkissian, A.; Stafford, L.

    2014-03-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma sustained by an electromagnetic surface wave (SW) in the microwave regime combined with a bubbler/flash evaporator for the injection of liquid precursors was used to produce organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders. Following the addition of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapors in the nominally pure argon plasma, optical emission spectra revealed the apparition of strong C2 molecular bands along with Si and Balmer H emission lines. Such features were not observed in our atmospheric-pressure Ar/HMDSO discharges controlled by dielectric barriers, indicating that microwave plasmas are characterized by much higher fragmentation levels of the precursors due to much higher electron densities. Emission spectra from the Ar/HMDSO SW plasma further showed a high-intensity continuum, the intensity of which decreased with time as powders started to form on the discharge tube walls. In presence of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) vapors in the nominally pure Ar plasma, the emission was dominated by Ar and Ti lines, with no trace of carbon and no continuum. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the powders formed in Ar/HMDSO plasmas showed very strong Si-(CH3)x and O-Si-(CH3)x bands, which is consistent with the formation of silicon oxycarbide. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further showed tube and sheet-like nanofeatures as well as larger structures consisting of agglomerated primary clusters. On the other hand, introduction of O2 in Ar/HMDSO plasmas produced only round-like nanoparticles with strong Si-O-Si bands and no trace of carbon, consistent with the formation of SiOx. The average size of the silica nanoparticles was 50 nm. FTIR spectra of powders formed in Ar/TTIP plasmas showed strong Ti-O signals, even without the addition of O2 in the gas phase. Corresponding TEM analysis showed nano- and agglomerated features comparable to those obtained in Ar/HMDSO although the average size of the titanate nanoparticles was smaller

  6. Optical emission spectroscopy of microwave-plasmas at atmospheric pressure applied to the growth of organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Kilicaslan, A.; Levasseur, O.; Roy-Garofano, V.; Profili, J.; Moisan, M.; Stafford, L.; Côté, C.; Sarkissian, A.

    2014-03-21

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma sustained by an electromagnetic surface wave (SW) in the microwave regime combined with a bubbler/flash evaporator for the injection of liquid precursors was used to produce organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders. Following the addition of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapors in the nominally pure argon plasma, optical emission spectra revealed the apparition of strong C{sub 2} molecular bands along with Si and Balmer H emission lines. Such features were not observed in our atmospheric-pressure Ar/HMDSO discharges controlled by dielectric barriers, indicating that microwave plasmas are characterized by much higher fragmentation levels of the precursors due to much higher electron densities. Emission spectra from the Ar/HMDSO SW plasma further showed a high-intensity continuum, the intensity of which decreased with time as powders started to form on the discharge tube walls. In presence of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) vapors in the nominally pure Ar plasma, the emission was dominated by Ar and Ti lines, with no trace of carbon and no continuum. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the powders formed in Ar/HMDSO plasmas showed very strong Si-(CH{sub 3}){sub x} and O-Si-(CH{sub 3}){sub x} bands, which is consistent with the formation of silicon oxycarbide. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further showed tube and sheet-like nanofeatures as well as larger structures consisting of agglomerated primary clusters. On the other hand, introduction of O{sub 2} in Ar/HMDSO plasmas produced only round-like nanoparticles with strong Si-O-Si bands and no trace of carbon, consistent with the formation of SiO{sub x}. The average size of the silica nanoparticles was 50 nm. FTIR spectra of powders formed in Ar/TTIP plasmas showed strong Ti-O signals, even without the addition of O{sub 2} in the gas phase. Corresponding TEM analysis showed nano- and agglomerated features comparable to those obtained in Ar/HMDSO although the

  7. Research relative to angular distribution of snow reflectance/snow cover characterization and microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Davis, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Remote sensing has been applied in recent years to monitoring snow cover properties for applications in hydrologic and energy balance modeling. In addition, snow cover has been recently shown to exert a considerable local influence on weather variables. Of particular importance is the potential of sensors to provide data on the physical properties of snow with high spatial and temporal resolution. Visible and near-infrared measurements of upwelling radiance can be used to infer near-surface properties through the calculation of albedo. Microwave signals usually come from deeper within the snow pack and thus provide depth-integrated information, which can be measured through clouds and does not relay on solar illumination.Fundamental studies examining the influence of snow properties on signals from various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum continue in part because of the promise of new remote sensors with higher spectral and spatial accuracy. Information in the visible and near-infrared parts of the spectrum comprise nearly all available data with high spatial resolution. Current passive microwave sensors have poor spatial resolution and the data are problematic where the scenes consist of mixed landscape features, but they offer timely observations that are independent of cloud cover and solar illumination.

  8. Thermal microwave emission from vegetated fields - A comparison between theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Shiue, J. C.; Dombrowski, M.; Chuang, S. L.; Shin, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The radiometric measurements over bare field and fields covered with grass, soybean, corn, and alfalfa were made with 1.4- and 5-GHz microwave radiometers during August-October 1978. The measured results are compared with radiative transfer theory treating the vegetated fields as a two-layer random medium. It is found that the presence of a vegetation cover generally gives a higher brightness temperature T sub B than that expected from a bare soil. The amount of this T sub B excess increases with increase in the vegetation biomass and in the frequency of the observed radiation. The results of radiative transfer calculations, which include a parameter characterizing ground surface roughness, generally match well with the experimental data.

  9. Microwave emission by nonlinear crystals irradiated with a high-intensity, mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, A. F.; Braggio, C.; Guarise, M.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of the efficiency of some nonlinear crystals to generate microwave (RF) radiation as a result of optical rectification (OR) when irradiated with intense pulse trains delivered by a mode-locked laser at 1064 nm. We have investigated lithium triborate (LBO), lithium niobate (LiNbO3), zinc selenide (ZnSe), and also potassium titanyl orthophosphate (KTP) for comparison with previous measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the form of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor. For some crystals we investigated also the second harmonic generation (SHG) to cross check the theoretical model. We confirm the theoretical prediction that OR leads to the production of higher order RF harmonics that are overtones of the laser repetition rate.

  10. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  11. Asymmetric absorption and emission of energy by a macroscopic mechanical oscillator in a microwave circuit optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Jennifer; Palomaki, Tauno; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Teufel, John; Simmonds, Raymond; Lehnert, Konrad

    2012-02-01

    We measure the asymmetry in rates for emission and absorption of mechanical energy in an electromechanical system composed of a macroscopic suspended membrane coupled to a high-Q, superconducting microwave resonant circuit. This asymmetry is inherently quantum mechanical because it arises from the inability to annihilate the mechanical ground state. As such, it is only appreciable when the average mechanical occupancy approaches one. This measurement is now possible due to the recent achievement of ground state cooling of macroscopic mechanical oscillators [1,2]. Crucially, we measure the thermal cavity photon occupancy and account for it in our analysis. Failure to correctly account for the interference of these thermal photons with the mechanical signal can lead to a misinterpretation of the data and an overestimate of the emission/absorption asymmetry. [4pt] [1] J. D. Teufel, T. Donner, Dale Li, J. W. Harlow, M. S. Allman, K. Cicak, A. J. Sirois, J. D. Whittaker, K. W. Lehnert, R. W. Simmonds, ``Sideband Cooling Micromechanical Motion to the Quantum Ground State,'' Nature, 475, 359-363 (2011).[0pt] [2] Jasper Chan, et al, ``Laser cooling of a nanomechanical oscillator into its quantum ground state,'' Nature, 478, 89-92 (2011).

  12. Frequency and Angular Variations of Land Surface Microwave Emissivities: Can we Estimate SSM/T and AMSU Emissivities from SSM/I Emissivities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Rossow, William B.; Pardo-Carrion, Juan R.

    1999-01-01

    To retrieve temperature and humidity profiles from SSM/T and AMSU, it is important to quantify the contribution of the Earth surface emission. So far, no global estimates of the land surface emissivities are available at SSM/T and AMSU frequencies and scanning conditions. The land surface emissivities have been previously calculated for the globe from the SSM/I conical scanner between 19 and 85 GHz. To analyze the feasibility of deriving SSM/T and AMSU land surface emissivities from SSM/I emissivities, the spectral and angular variations of the emissivities are studied, with the help of ground-based measurements, models and satellite estimates. Up to 100 GHz, for snow and ice free areas, the SSM/T and AMSU emissivities can be derived with useful accuracy from the SSM/I emissivities- The emissivities can be linearly interpolated in frequency. Based on ground-based emissivity measurements of various surface types, a simple model is proposed to estimate SSM/T and AMSU emissivities for all zenith angles knowing only the emissivities for the vertical and horizontal polarizations at 53 deg zenith angle. The method is tested on the SSM/T-2 91.655 GHz channels. The mean difference between the SSM/T-2 and SSM/I-derived emissivities is less than or equal to 0.01 for all zenith angles with an r.m.s. difference of approx. = 0.02. Above 100 GHz, preliminary results are presented at 150 GHz, based on SSM/T-2 observations and are compared with the very few estimations available in the literature.

  13. Simulations of Gyrosynchrotron Microwave Emission from an Oscillating 3D Magnetic Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Reznikova, V. E.

    2015-04-01

    Radio observations of solar flares often reveal various periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations. Most likely, these oscillations are caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations of flaring loops which modulate the emission. Interpreting the observations requires comparing them with simulations. We simulated the gyrosynchrotron radio emission from a semicircular (toroidal-shaped) magnetic loop containing sausage-mode MHD oscillations. The aim was to detect the observable signatures specific to the considered MHD mode and to study their dependence on the various source parameters. The MHD waves were simulated using a linear three-dimensional model of a magnetized plasma cylinder; both standing and propagating waves were considered. The curved loop was formed by replicating the MHD solutions along the plasma cylinder and bending the cylinder; this model allowed us to study the effect of varying the viewing angle along the loop. The radio emission was simulated using a three-dimensional model, and its spatial and temporal variations were analyzed. We considered several loop orientations and different parameters of the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic electrons in the loop. In the model with low plasma density, the intensity oscillations at all frequencies are synchronous (with the exception of a narrow spectral region below the spectral peak). In the model with high plasma density, the emission at low frequencies (where the Razin effect is important) oscillates in anti-phase with the emissions at higher frequencies. The oscillations at high and low frequencies are more pronounced in different parts of the loop (depending on the loop orientation). The layers where the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field changes sign can produce additional peculiarities in the oscillation patterns.

  14. Microwave observations of Saturn's rings: anisotropy in directly transmitted and scattered saturnian thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, David E.; Molnar, Lawrence A.; Niehof, Jon T.; de Pater, Imke; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2004-09-01

    We present a new Very Large Array (VLA) image of Saturn, made from data taken in October 1998 at a wavelength of λ3.6 cm. The moderate ring opening angle ( B≈15°) allows us to explore direct transmission of microwave photons through the A and C rings. We find a strong asymmetry of photons transmitted through the A ring, but not in the C ring, a new diagnostic of wake structure in the ring particles. We also find a weak asymmetry between east and west for the far side of the ansae. To facilitate quantitative comparison between dynamic models of the A ring and radio observations, we extend our Monte Carlo radiative transfer code (described in Dunn et al., 2002, Icarus 160, 132-160) to include idealized wakes. We show the idealized model can reproduce the properties of dynamic simulations in directly transmitted light. We examine the model behavior in directly transmitted and scattered light over a range of physical and geometric wake parameters. Finally, we present a wake model with a plausible set of physical parameters that quantitatively reproduces the observed intensity and asymmetry of the A ring both across the planet and in the ansae.

  15. Connecting Surface Emissions, Convective Uplifting, and Long-Range Transport of Carbon Monoxide in the Upper Troposphere: New Observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Su, Hui; Neary, Lori; McConnell, John C.; Richards, Nigel A. D.

    2007-01-01

    Two years of observations of upper tropospheric (UT) carbon monoxide (CO) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder are analyzed; in combination with the CO surface emission climatology and data from the NCEP analyses. It is shown that spatial distribution, temporal variation and long-range transport of UT CO are closely related to the surface emissions, deep-convection and horizontal winds. Over the Asian monsoon region, surface emission of CO peaks in boreal spring due to high biomass burning in addition to anthropogenic emission. However, the UT CO peaks in summer when convection is strongest and surface emission of CO is dominated by anthropogenic source. The long-range transport of CO from Southeast Asia across the Pacific to North America, which occurs most frequently during boreal summer, is thus a clear imprint of Asian anthropogenic pollution influencing global air quality.

  16. A comparison of radiative transfer models for predicting the microwave emission from soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Noncoherent and coherent numerical models for predicting emission from soils are compared. Coherent models use the boundary conditions on the electric fields across the layer boundaries to calculate the radiation intensity, and noncoherent models consider radiation intensities directly. Interference may cause different results in the two approaches when coupling between soil layers in coherent models causes greater soil moisture sampling depths. Calculations performed at frequencies of 1.4 and 19.4 GHz show little difference between the models at 19.4 GHz, although differences are apparent at the lower frequency. A definition for an effective emissivity is also given for when a nonuniform temperature profile is present, and measurements made from a tower show good agreement with calculations from the coherent model.

  17. SURFACE FILMS TO SUPPRESS FIELD EMISSION IN HIGH-POWER MICROWAVE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay l

    2014-02-07

    Results are reported on attempts to reduce the RF breakdown probability on copper accelerator structures by applying thin surface films that could suppress field emission of electrons. Techniques for application and testing of copper samples with films of metals with work functions higher than copper are described, principally for application of platinum films, since platinum has the second highest work function of any metal. Techniques for application of insulating films are also described, since these can suppress field emission and damage on account of dielectric shielding of fields at the copper surface, and on account of the greater hardness of insulating films, as compared with copper. In particular, application of zirconium oxide films on high-field portions of a 11.424 GHz SLAC cavity structure for breakdown tests are described.

  18. Detection of microwave emission from both components of the red dwarf binary EQ Pegasi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topka, K.; Marsh, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    The detection at 4.9 GHz of the late main sequence binary EQ Pegasi (dM3.5e + dM4.5e) with the VLA is reported. Both components were detected, as flux levels of 0.69 mJy and 0.4 mJy, respectively. Thermal gyroresonance emission from the quiescent coronae of these stars appears to explain observations of the authors, as it does those of Gary and Linsky (1981) for chi Ori and UV Ceti, provided coronal magnetic fields in excess of 300 gauss exist over a region that has a length scale of at least twice the radii of these stars. Support for this model is provided by the unlikelihood of both stars flaring simultaneously, and by the fact that the emission was confined to each star within the observational uncertainty of a few AU.

  19. Emissivity measurements in thin metallized membrane reflectors used for microwave radiometer sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Cravey, Robin L.; Scherner, Michael J.; Hearn, Chase P.; Blume, Hans-Juergen C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concerned with electromagnetic losses in metallized films used for inflatable reflectors. An inflatable membrane is made of tough elastic material such as Kapton, and it is not electromagnetically reflective by design. A film of conducting metal is added to the membrane to enhance its reflective properties. Since the impetus for use of inflatables for spacecraft is the light weight and compact packaging, it is important that the metal film be as thin as possible. However, if the material is not conductive or thick enough, the radiation due to the emissivity of the reflector could be a significant part of the radiation gathered by the radiometer. The emissivity would be of little consequence to a radar or solar collector; but for a radiometer whose signal is composed of thermal radiation, this contribution could be severe. Bulk properties of the metal film cannot be used to predict its loss. For this reason, a program of analysis and measurement was undertaken to determine the emissivities of a number of candidate metallized film reflectors. This paper describes the three types of measurements which were performed on the metallized thin films: (1) a network analyzer system with an L-band waveguide; (2) an S-band radiometer; and (3) a network analyzer system with a C-band antenna free-space transmission system.

  20. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 108 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1 SIN 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  1. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, 08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A2, S/N 108, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  2. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the Engineering Test Report, Radiated Emissions and SARR, SARP, DCS Receivers, Link Frequencies EMI Sensitive Band Test Results, AMSU-A1, S/N 109, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A).

  3. Characterization of low-pressure microwave and radio frequency discharges in oxygen applying optical emission spectroscopy and multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Styrnoll, Tim; Mitschker, Felix; Bienholz, Stefan; Nikita, Bibinov; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and multipole resonance probe (MRP) are adopted to characterize low-pressure microwave (MW) and radio frequency (RF) discharges in oxygen. In this context, both discharges are usually applied for the deposition of permeation barrier SiOx films on plastic foils or the inner surface of plastic bottles. For technological reasons the MW excitation is modulated and a continuous wave (cw) RF bias is used. The RF voltage produces a stationary low-density plasma, whereas the high-density MW discharge is pulsed. For the optimization of deposition process and the quality of the deposited barrier films, plasma conditions are characterized using OES and MRP. To simplify the comparison of applied diagnostics, both MW and RF discharges are studied separately in cw mode. The OES and MRP diagnostic methods complement each other and provide reliable information about electron density and electron temperature. In the MW case, electron density amounts to ne = (1.25 ± 0.26) × 1017 m-3, and kTe to 1.93 ± 0.20 eV, in the RF case ne = (6.8 ± 1.8)×1015 m-3 and kTe = 2.6 ± 0.35 eV. The corresponding gas temperatures are 760±40 K and 440±20 K.

  4. The microwave induced plasma with optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) in 23 elements determination in geological samples.

    PubMed

    Niedzielski, P; Kozak, L; Wachelka, M; Jakubowski, K; Wybieralska, J

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the optimisation, validation and application of the microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES) dedicated for a routine determination of Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl, Zn, in the geological samples. The three procedures of sample preparation has been proposed: sample digestion with the use of hydrofluoric acid for determination of total concentration of elements, extraction by aqua regia for determination of the quasi-total element concentration and extraction by hydrochloric acid solution to determine contents of the elements in acid leachable fraction. The detection limits were on the level 0.001-0.121 mg L(-1) (from 0.010-0.10 to 1.2-12 mg kg(-1) depend on the samples preparation procedure); the precision: 0.20-1.37%; accuracy 85-115% (for recovery for certified standards materials analysis and parallel analysis by independent analytical techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS)). The conformity of the results obtained by MIP-OES analytical procedures with the results obtained by XRF and FAAS analysis allows to propose the procedures for studies of elemental composition of the fraction of the geological samples. Additionally, the MIP-OES technique is much less expensive than ICP techniques and much less time-consuming than AAS techniques. PMID:25476349

  5. Partial microwave-assisted wet digestion of animal tissue using a baby-bottle sterilizer for analyte determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Wladiana O.; Menezes, Eveline A.; Gonzalez, Mário H.; Costa, Letícia M.; Trevizan, Lilian C.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.

    2009-06-01

    A procedure for partial digestion of bovine tissue is proposed using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) micro-vessels inside a baby-bottle sterilizer under microwave radiation for multi-element determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Samples were directly weighed in laboratory-made polytetrafluoroethylene vessels. Nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide were added to the uncovered vessels, which were positioned inside the baby-bottle sterilizer, containing 500 mL of water. The hydrogen peroxide volume was fixed at 100 µL. The system was placed in a domestic microwave oven and partial digestion was carried out for the determination of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The single-vessel approach was used in the entire procedure, to minimize contamination in trace analysis. Better recoveries and lower residual carbon content (RCC) levels were obtained under the conditions established through a 2 4-1 fractional factorial design: 650 W microwave power, 7 min digestion time, 50 µL nitric acid and 50 mg sample mass. The digestion efficiency was ascertained according to the residual carbon content determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was checked against two certified reference materials.

  6. Microwave Continuum Emission and Dense Gas Tracers in NGC 3627: Combining Jansky VLA and ALMA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Eric J.; Dong, Dillon; Leroy, Adam K.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Condon, James J.; Helou, George; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Schinnerer, Eva; Turner, Jean L.

    2015-11-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array Ka band (33 GHz) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3 (94.5 GHz) continuum images covering the nucleus and two extranuclear star-forming regions within the nearby galaxy NGC 3627 (M 66), observed as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey. Both images achieve an angular resolution of ≲2″, allowing us to map radio spectral indices and estimate thermal radio fractions at a linear resolution of ≲90 pc. The thermal fraction at 33 GHz reaches unity at and around the peaks of each H ii region; the spectral index between 33 and 94.5 GHz additionally becomes both increasingly negative and positive away from the H ii region peaks, indicating an increase of non-thermal emission from diffusing cosmic-ray electrons and the possible presence of cold dust, respectively. While the ALMA observations were optimized for collecting continuum data, they also detected line emission from the J=1\\to 0 transitions of HCN and HCO+. The peaks of dense molecular gas traced by these two spectral lines are spatially offset from the peaks of the continuum emission for both extranuclear star-forming regions, indicating that our data reach an angular resolution at which one can spatially distinguish sites of recent star formation from the sites of future star formation. Finally, we find trends of decreasing dense gas fraction and velocity dispersion with increasing star formation efficiency among the regions observed, indicating that the dynamical state of the dense gas, rather than its abundance, plays a more significant role in the star formation process.

  7. Methods for correcting microwave scattering and emission measurements for atmospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komen, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Algorithms were developed to permit correction of scattering coefficient and brightness temperature for the Skylab S193 Radscat for the effects of cloud attenuation. These algorithms depend upon a measurement of the vertically polarized excess brightness temperature at 50 deg incidence angle. This excess temperature is converted to an equivalent 50 deg attenuation, which may then be used to estimate the horizontally polarized excess brightness temperature and reduced scattering coefficient at 50 deg. For angles other than 50 deg, the correction also requires use of the variation of emissivity with salinity and water temperature.

  8. Microwave scattering and emission properties of large impact craters on the surface of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, N. J. S.; Campbell, D. B.; Devries, C.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the impact craters on Venus imaged by the Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) have interior floors with oblique incidence angle backscatter cross sections 2 to 16 times (3 dB to 12 dB) greater than the average scattering properties of the planet's surface. Such high backscatter cross sections are indicative of a high degree of wavelength-scale surface roughness and/or a high intrinsic reflectivity of the material forming the crater floors. Fifty-three of these (radar) bright floored craters are associated with 93 percent of the parabolic-shaped radar-dark features found in the Magellan SAR and emissivity data, features that are thought to be among the youngest on the surface of Venus. It was suggested by Campbell et al. that either the bright floors of the parabolic feature parent craters are indicative of a young impact and the floor properties are modified with time to a lower backscatter cross section or that they result from some property of the surface or subsurface material at the point of impact or from the properties of the impacting object. As a continuation of earlier work we have examined all craters with diameters greater than 30 km (except 6 that were outside the available data) so both the backscatter cross section and emissivity of the crater floors could be estimated from the Magellan data.

  9. Anomalous Diffraction in Cold Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Z.; Gad, R.; Bar-Ad, S.; Fisher, A.

    2015-10-01

    Cold magnetized plasma possesses an anisotropic permittivity tensor with a unique dispersion relation that for adequate electron density and magnetic field results in anomalous diffraction of a right-hand circularly polarized beam. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally anomalous diffraction of a microwave beam in plasma. Additionally, decreasing the electron density enables observation of the transition of the material from a hyperbolic to a standard material. Manipulation of the control parameters will enable plasma to serve as a reconfigurable metamaterial-like medium.

  10. Anomalous Diffraction in Cold Magnetized Plasma.

    PubMed

    Abelson, Z; Gad, R; Bar-Ad, S; Fisher, A

    2015-10-01

    Cold magnetized plasma possesses an anisotropic permittivity tensor with a unique dispersion relation that for adequate electron density and magnetic field results in anomalous diffraction of a right-hand circularly polarized beam. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally anomalous diffraction of a microwave beam in plasma. Additionally, decreasing the electron density enables observation of the transition of the material from a hyperbolic to a standard material. Manipulation of the control parameters will enable plasma to serve as a reconfigurable metamaterial-like medium. PMID:26551813

  11. Anomalous conductivity in Hall thrusters: Effects of the non-linear coupling of the electron-cyclotron drift instability with secondary electron emission of the walls

    SciTech Connect

    Héron, A.; Adam, J. C.

    2013-08-15

    With the help of an implicit particle-in-cell code, we have shown in a previous paper that the electron-cyclotron drift instability was able to induce anomalous conductivity as well as anomalous heating. As such it can be a major actor among the mechanisms involved in the operation of Hall thrusters. However, experimental results show that the nature of wall material has a significant effect on the behavior of the thruster. The purpose of this paper is to study the plasma-wall interaction in the case where the plasma is heated self-consistently by electrostatic fluctuations induced by the electron-cyclotron drift instability.

  12. Lower hybrid resonance acceleration of electrons and ions in solar flares and the associated microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclements, K. G.; Bingham, R.; Su, J. J.; Dawson, J. M.; Spicer, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    The particle acceleration processes here studied are driven by the relaxation of unstable ion ring distributions; these produce strong wave activity at the lower hybrid resonance frequency which collapses, and forms energetic electron and ion tails. The results obtained are applied to the problem posed by the production of energetic particles by solar flares. The numerical simulation results thus obtained by a 2 1/2-dimensional particle-in-cell code show a simultaneous acceleration of electrons to 10-500 keV energies, and of ions to as much as the 1 MeV range; the energy of the latter is still insufficient to account for gamma-ray emission in the 4-6 MeV range, but furnish a seed population for further acceleration.

  13. Maps of Dust Infrared Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Foregrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davis, Marc

    1998-06-01

    standard reddening law and use the colors of elliptical galaxies to measure the reddening per unit flux density of 100 μm emission. We find consistent calibration using the B-R color distribution of a sample of the 106 brightest cluster ellipticals, as well as a sample of 384 ellipticals with B-V and Mg line strength measurements. For the latter sample, we use the correlation of intrinsic B-V versus Mg2 index to tighten the power of the test greatly. We demonstrate that the new maps are twice as accurate as the older Burstein-Heiles reddening estimates in regions of low and moderate reddening. The maps are expected to be significantly more accurate in regions of high reddening. These dust maps will also be useful for estimating millimeter emission that contaminates cosmic microwave background radiation experiments and for estimating soft X-ray absorption. We describe how to access our maps readily for general use.

  14. Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP1) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, B.; Bennett, C.L.; Larson, D.; Hill, R.S.; Odegard, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Hinshaw, G.; Kogut, A.; Wollack, E.; Page, L.; Dunkley, J.; Jarosik, N.; Spergel, N.; Halpern, M.; Komatsu, E.; Meyer, S.S.; Nolta, M.R.; Wright, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new estimate of foreground emission in the WMAP data, using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The new technique delivers maps of each foreground component for a variety of foreground models, error estimates of the uncertainty of each foreground component, and provides an overall goodness-of-fit measurement. The resulting foreground maps are in broad agreement with those from previous techniques used both within the collaboration and by other authors. We find that for WMAP data, a simple model with power-law synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust components fits 90% of the sky with a reduced X(sup 2) (sub v) of 1.14. However, the model does not work well inside the Galactic plane. The addition of either synchrotron steepening or a modified spinning dust model improves the fit. This component may account for up to 14% of the total flux at Ka-band (33 GHz). We find no evidence for foreground contamination of the CMB temperature map in the 85% of the sky used for cosmological analysis.

  15. Composition, seasonal change, and bathymetry of Ligeia Mare, Titan, derived from its microwave thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Lorenz, R. D.; Janssen, M. A.; Tokano, T.; Hayes, A. G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Lunine, J. I.; Veyssière, G.; Encrenaz, P.; Karatekin, O.

    2016-02-01

    For the last decade, the passive radiometer incorporated in the Cassini RADAR has recorded the 2.2 cm wavelength thermal emission from Titan's seas. In this paper, we analyze the radiometry observations collected from February 2007 to January 2015 over one of these seas, Ligeia Mare, with the goal of providing constraints on its composition, bathymetry, and dynamics. In light of the depth profile obtained by Mastrogiuseppe et al. (2014) and of a two-layer model, we find that the dielectric constant of the sea liquid is <1.8, and its loss tangent is <3.6-2.1+4.3×10-5. Both results point to a composition dominated by liquid methane rather than ethane. A high methane concentration suggests that Ligeia Mare is primarily fed by methane-rich precipitation and/or ethane has been removed from it (e.g., by crustal interaction). Our result on the dielectric constant of the seafloor is less constraining (<2.9-0.9+0.9), but we favor a scenario where the floor of Ligeia Mare is covered by a sludge of compacted and possibly nitrile-rich organic material formed by the deposition of photochemical haze or by rain washing of the nearby shores. We use these results to produce a low-resolution bathymetry map of the sea. We also estimate the temperature variation of the bulk sea between February 2007 and July 2013 to be <2 K, which provides a constraint on its net evaporative cooling currently being explored in ocean circulation models. Lastly, we suggest a lag in the summer warming of the northern polar terrains.

  16. Application of microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) for environmental monitoring of industrially contaminated sites in Hyderabad city.

    PubMed

    Kamala C T; Balaram V; Dharmendra V; Satyanarayanan M; Subramanyam K S V; Krishnaiah A

    2014-11-01

    Recently introduced microwave plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (MP-AES) represents yet another and very important addition to the existing array of modern instrumental analytical techniques. In this study, an attempt is made to summarize the performance characteristics of MP-AES and its potential as an analytical tool for environmental studies with some practical examples from Patancheru and Uppal industrial sectors of Hyderabad city. A range of soil, sediment, water reference materials, particulate matter, and real-life samples were chosen to evaluate the performance of this new analytical technique. Analytical wavelengths were selected considering the interference effects of other concomitant elements present in different sample solutions. The detection limits for several elements were found to be in the range from 0.05 to 5 ng/g. The trace metals analyzed in both the sectors followed the topography with more pollution in the low-lying sites. The metal contents were found to be more in ground waters than surface waters. Since a decade, the pollutants are transfered from Patancheru industrial area to Musi River. After polluting Nakkavagu and turning huge tracts of agricultural lands barren besides making people residing along the rivulet impotent and sick, industrialists of Patancheru are shifting the effluents to downstream of Musi River through an 18-km pipeline from Patancheru. Since the effluent undergoes primary treatment at Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) at Patanchru and travels through pipeline and mixes with sewage, the organic effluents will be diluted. But the inorganic pollutants such as heavy and toxic metals tend to accumulate in the environmental segments near and downstreams of Musi River. The data generated by MP-AES of toxic metals like Zn, Cu, and Cr in the ground and surface waters can only be attributed to pollution from Patancheru since no other sources are available to Musi River. PMID:25086712

  17. Low gas flow inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the analysis of food samples after microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Sascha; Gesell, Monika; Holtkamp, Michael; Scheffer, Andy; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the recently introduced low flow inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) with a total argon consumption below 0.7 L/min is applied for the first time to the field of food analysis. One goal is the investigation of the performance of this low flow plasma compared to a conventional ICP-OES system when non-aqueous samples with a certain matrix are introduced into the system. For this purpose, arsenic is determined in three different kinds of fish samples. In addition several nutrients (K, Na, Mg, Ca) and trace metals (Co, Cu, Mn, Cd, Pb, Zn, Fe, and Ni) are determined in honey samples (acacia) after microwave digestion. The precision of the measurements is characterized by relative standard deviations (RSD) and compared to the corresponding precision values achieved using the conventional Fassel-type torch of the ICP. To prove the accuracy of the low flow ICP-OES method, the obtained data from honey samples are validated by a conventional ICP-OES. For the measurements concerning arsenic in fish, the low flow ICP-OES values are validated by conventional Fassel-type ICP-OES. Furthermore, a certified reference material was investigated with the low gas flow setup. Limits of detection (LOD), according to the 3σ criterion, were determined to be in the low microgram per liter range for all analytes. Recovery rates in the range of 96-106% were observed for the determined trace metal elements. It was proven that the low gas flow ICP-OES leads to results that are comparable with those obtained with the Fassel-type torch for the analysis of food samples. PMID:25127635

  18. Long wavelength (>1.55 {mu}m) room temperature emission and anomalous structural properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots obtained by conversion of In nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, A.; Keizer, J. G.; Koenraad, P. M.; Noetzel, R.

    2013-02-18

    We demonstrate that molecular beam epitaxy-grown InAs quantum dots (QDs) on (100) GaAs obtained by conversion of In nanocrystals enable long wavelength emission in the InAs/GaAs material system. At room temperature they exhibit a broad photoluminescence band that extends well beyond 1.55 {mu}m. We correlate this finding with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. They reveal that the QDs are composed of pure InAs which is in agreement with their long-wavelength emission. Additionally, the measurements reveal that the QDs have an anomalously undulated top surface which is very different to that observed for Stranski-Krastanow grown QDs.

  19. A new neural network approach including first guess for retrieval of atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water path, surface temperature, and emissivities over land from satellite microwave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aires, F.; Prigent, C.; Rossow, W. B.; Rothstein, M.

    2001-07-01

    The analysis of microwave observations over land to determine atmospheric and surface parameters is still limited due to the complexity of the inverse problem. Neural network techniques have already proved successful as the basis of efficient retrieval methods for nonlinear cases; however, first guess estimates, which are used in variational assimilation methods to avoid problems of solution nonuniqueness or other forms of solution irregularity, have up to now not been used with neural network methods. In this study, a neural network approach is developed that uses a first guess. Conceptual bridges are established between the neural network and variational assimilation methods. The new neural method retrieves the surface skin temperature, the integrated water vapor content, the cloud liquid water path and the microwave surface emissivities between 19 and 85 GHz over land from Special Sensor Microwave Imager observations. The retrieval, in parallel, of all these quantities improves the results for consistancy reasons. A database to train the neural network is calculated with a radiative transfer model and a global collection of coincident surface and atmospheric parameters extracted from the National Center for Environmental Prediction reanalysis, from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data, and from microwave emissivity atlases previously calculated. The results of the neural network inversion are very encouraging. The theoretical RMS error of the surface temperature retrieval over the globe is 1.3 K in clear-sky conditions and 1.6 K in cloudy scenes. Water vapor is retrieved with a theoretical RMS error of 3.8 kg m-2 in clear conditions and 4.9 kg m-2 in cloudy situations. The theoretical RMS error in cloud liquid water path is 0.08 kg m-2. The surface emissivities are retrieved with an accuracy of better than 0.008 in clear conditions and 0.010 in cloudy conditions. Microwave land surface temperature retrieval presents a very attractive

  20. LIRAS mission for lunar exploration by microwave interferometric radiometer: Moon's subsurface characterization, emission model and numerical simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompili, Sara; Silvio Marzano, Frank; Di Carlofelice, Alessandro; Montopoli, Mario; Talone, Marco; Crapolicchio, Raffaele; L'Abbate, Michelangelo; Varchetta, Silvio; Tognolatti, Piero

    2013-04-01

    when it becomes operational providing the extrapolation of lunar brightness temperature maps in both Antenna frame (the cosine domain) and on the Moon surface and allowing an accurate analysis of the instrument performance. The Moon stratigraphy is reproduced in LEPS environment through three scenarios: a macro-layer of regolith; two subsequent macro-layers of regolith and rock; three subsequent macro-layers of regolith, ice and rock, respectively. These scenarios are studied using an incoherent approach, taking into account the interaction between the upwelling and downwelling radiation contributions from each layer to model the resulting brightness temperature at the surface level. It has been considered that the radiative behavior of the Moon varies over time, depending on solar illumination conditions, and it is also function of the material properties, layer thickness and specific position on the lunar crust; moreover it has been examined its variation with frequency, observation angle, and polarization. Using the proposed emission model it has been possible to derive a digital thermal model in the microwave frequency of the Moon, allowing in-depth analysis of the lunar soil consistency; this collected information could be related with a lunar digital elevation model in order to achieve global coverage information on topological aspects. The main results of the study will be presented at the conference.

  1. Microwave imaging diagnostics for plasma fluctuation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian

    Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) and Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) combined systems are being investigated by the UC Davis Plasma Diagnostic Group (PDG), in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) researchers, Drs. E. Mazzucato, H.K. Park and T. Munsat, as well as researchers from the FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen,the Netherlands. The goal is to develop the plasma diagnostic systems based on the imaging technology developed in the UC Davis PDG group, for the study of plasma micro-turbulence, which is extremely important for the understanding of anomalous transport behavior of magnetically confined plasmas such as in tokamaks. This dissertation work provides the design of the optical systems, the design of the electronics, the testing of the antenna array and the data analysis of TEXTOR ECEI/MIR combined systems.

  2. X-radiation /E greater than 10 keV/, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation in hard (E greater than 10 keV) X-radiation, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Analysis shows that the rise-time in the 20-30-keV X-ray spike depends on the electron hardness. The impulsive phase is also marked by an abrupt, very intense increase in H-alpha emission in one or more knots of the flare. Properties of these H-alpha kernels include: (1) a luminosity several times greater than the surrounding flare, (2) an intensity rise starting about 20-30 sec before, peaking about 20-25 sec after, and lasting about twice as long as the hard spike, (3) a location lower in the chromosphere than the remaining flare, (4) essentially no expansion prior to the hard spike, and (5) a position within 6000 km of the boundary separating polarities, usually forming on both sides of the neutral line near both feet of the same tube of force. Correspondingly, impulsive microwave events are characterized by: (1) great similarity in burst structure with 20-32 keV X-rays but only above 5000 MHz, (2) typical low frequency burst cutoff between 1400-3800 MHz, and (3) maximum emission above 7500 MHz.

  3. Resonant laser ablation of metals detected by atomic emission in a microwave plasma and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Danielle; Stchur, Peter; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Karl X; Zhou, Jack; Michel, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    It has been shown that an increase in sensitivity and selectivity of detection of an analyte can be achieved by tuning the ablation laser wavelength to match that of a resonant gas-phase transition of that analyte. This has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA). For a pulsed tunable nanosecond laser, the data presented here illustrate the resonant enhancement effect in pure copper and aluminum samples, chromium oxide thin films, and for trace molybdenum in stainless steel samples, and indicate two main characteristics of the RLA phenomenon. The first is that there is an increase in the number of atoms ablated from the surface. The second is that the bandwidth of the wavelength dependence of the ablation is on the order of 1 nm. The effect was found to be virtually identical whether the atoms were detected by use of a microwave-induced plasma with atomic emission detection, by an inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, or by observation of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate through thin films. The data indicate that a distinct ablation laser wavelength dependence exists, probably initiated via resonant radiation trapping, and accompanied by collisional broadening. Desorption contributions through radiation trapping are substantiated by changes in crater morphology as a function of wavelength and by the relatively broad linewidth of the ablation laser wavelength scans, compared to gas-phase excitation spectra. Also, other experiments with thin films demonstrate the existence of a distinct laser-material interaction and suggest that a combination of desorption induced by electronic transition (DIET) with resonant radiation trapping could assist in the enhancement of desorption yields. These results were obtained by a detailed inspection of the effect of the wavelength of the ablation laser over a narrow range of energy densities that lie between the threshold of laser-induced desorption of species and the usual analytical

  4. The emission and scattering of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces and wind speed measurements from the Aquarius sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.; Ricciardulli, Lucrezia

    2014-09-01

    In order to achieve the required accuracy in sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements from L-band radiometers such as the Aquarius/SAC-D or SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission, it is crucial to accurately correct the radiation that is emitted from the ocean surface for roughness effects. We derive a geophysical model function (GMF) for the emission and backscatter of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces. The analysis is based on radiometer brightness temperature and scatterometer backscatter observations both taken on board Aquarius. The data are temporally and spatially collocated with wind speeds from WindSat and F17 SSMIS (Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder) and wind directions from NCEP (National Center for Environmental Prediction) GDAS (Global Data Assimilation System). This GMF is the basis for retrieval of ocean surface wind speed combining L-band H-pol radiometer and HH-pol scatterometer observations. The accuracy of theses combined passive/active L-band wind speeds matches those of many other satellite microwave sensors. The L-band GMF together with the combined passive/active L-band wind speeds is utilized in the Aquarius SSS retrieval algorithm for the surface roughness correction. We demonstrate that using these L-band wind speeds instead of NCEP wind speeds leads to a significant improvement in the SSS accuracy. Further improvements in the roughness correction algorithm can be obtained by adding VV-pol scatterometer measurements and wave height (WH) data into the GMF.

  5. Green Upconversion Emissions in Er³⁺/Yb³⁺ Co-Doped CaMoO₄Prepared by Microwave-Assisted Metathetic Method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Yunzhao; Li, Changlin; Wang, Xinze; Gao, Hongjian; Liu, Zhongxin; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study Er³⁺ doped CaMoO₄ (CaMoO₄:Er³⁺), and Er³⁺/Yb³⁺-co-doped CaMoO₄ (CaMoO₄:Er³⁺Yb³⁺) nanoparticles have been synthesized by the microwave-assisted metathetic method. Er³⁺/Yb³⁺ co-doped CaMoO₄ nanoparticles sintered at 600 °C showed the strongest photoluminescence intensity, and crystallized well. At the excitation of 980 nm, the CaMoO₄ nanoparticles show the strongest green emission at the 520 nm and 550 nm emission bands. Moreover, the green light produced has a better color purity. PMID:27398526

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet emission spectrum measurement of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp in several configurations: Application to photodesorption of CO ice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Wu, C.-Y. R.; Chuang, K.-J.; Chu, C.-C.; Yih, T.-S.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Nuevo, M.; Ip, W.-H.

    2014-01-20

    We report measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectra of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp (MDHL), a common tool in astrochemistry laboratories working on ice VUV photoprocessing. The MDHL provides hydrogen Ly-α (121.6 nm) and H{sub 2} molecular emission in the 110-180 nm range. We show that the spectral characteristics of the VUV light emitted in this range, in particular the relative proportion of Ly-α to molecular emission bands, strongly depend on the pressure of H{sub 2} inside the lamp, the lamp geometry (F type versus T type), the gas used (pure H{sub 2} versus H{sub 2} seeded in He), and the optical properties of the window used (MgF{sub 2} versus CaF{sub 2}). These different configurations are used to study the VUV irradiation of CO ice at 14 K. In contrast to the majority of studies dedicated to the VUV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs, which have not taken into consideration the emission spectrum of the MDHL, our results show that the processes induced by photons in CO ice from a broad energy range are different and more complex than the sum of individual processes induced by monochromatic sources spanning the same energy range, as a result of the existence of multistate electronic transitions and discrepancy in absorption cross sections between parent molecules and products in the Ly-α and H{sub 2} molecular emission ranges.

  7. Simulation of the Microwave Emission of Multi-layered Snowpacks Using the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory: the DMRT-ML Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picard, G.; Brucker, Ludovic; Roy, A.; Dupont, F.; Fily, M.; Royer, A.; Harlow, C.

    2013-01-01

    DMRT-ML is a physically based numerical model designed to compute the thermal microwave emission of a given snowpack. Its main application is the simulation of brightness temperatures at frequencies in the range 1-200 GHz similar to those acquired routinely by spacebased microwave radiometers. The model is based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory for the computation of the snow scattering and extinction coefficients and on the Discrete Ordinate Method (DISORT) to numerically solve the radiative transfer equation. The snowpack is modeled as a stack of multiple horizontal snow layers and an optional underlying interface representing the soil or the bottom ice. The model handles both dry and wet snow conditions. Such a general design allows the model to account for a wide range of snow conditions. Hitherto, the model has been used to simulate the thermal emission of the deep firn on ice sheets, shallow snowpacks overlying soil in Arctic and Alpine regions, and overlying ice on the large icesheet margins and glaciers. DMRT-ML has thus been validated in three very different conditions: Antarctica, Barnes Ice Cap (Canada) and Canadian tundra. It has been recently used in conjunction with inverse methods to retrieve snow grain size from remote sensing data. The model is written in Fortran90 and available to the snow remote sensing community as an open-source software. A convenient user interface is provided in Python.

  8. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  9. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  10. Chlorine and sulfur determination in extra-heavy crude oil by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after microwave-induced combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Juliana S. F.; Mello, Paola A.; Moraes, Diogo P.; Duarte, Fábio A.; Dressler, Valderi L.; Knapp, Guenter; Flores, Érico M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, microwave-induced combustion (MIC) of extra-heavy crude oil is proposed for further chlorine and sulfur determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Combustion was carried out under oxygen pressure (20 bar) in quartz vessels using ammonium nitrate (50 µl of 6 mol l - 1 solution) as ignition aid. Samples were wrapped with polyethylene film and placed on a quartz holder positioned inside the quartz vessels. The need for an additional reflux step after combustion and the type and concentration of absorbing solution (water, 0.02 to 0.9 mmol l - 1 H 2O 2, 10 to 100 mmol l - 1 (NH 4) 2CO 3 or 0.1 to 14 mol l - 1 HNO 3) were studied. The influence of sample mass, O 2 pressure and maximum pressure attained during the combustion process were investigated. Recoveries from 92 to 102% were obtained for Cl and S for all absorbing solutions. For comparison, Cl and S determination was also performed by ion chromatography (IC) using 25 mmol l - 1 (NH 4) 2CO 3 as absorbing solution. Using MIC with a reflux step the agreement was better than 95% for certified reference materials of similar composition (crude oil, petroleum coke, coal and residual fuel oil). Microwave-assisted digestion and water extraction in high pressure closed vessels were also evaluated. Using these procedures the maximum recoveries were 30 and 98% for Cl and S, respectively, using microwave-assisted digestion and 70% for Cl and less than 1% for S by water extraction procedure. Limits of detection by ICP OES were 12 and 5 µg g - 1 for Cl and S, respectively, and the corresponding values by IC were 1.2 and 8 µg g - 1 . Using MIC it was possible to digest simultaneously up to eight samples resulting in a solution suitable for the determination of both analytes with a single combustion step.

  11. Simultaneous determination of macro and trace elements in biological reference materials by microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry with slurry sample introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Golik, Bartosz

    2004-05-01

    A slurry sampling technique (SST) has been utilized for simultaneous multi-element analysis by microwave-induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES). Slurry samples from a spray chamber are fed directly into the microwave cavity-torch assembly (power 300 W) with no desolvation apparatus. The performance of SST-MIP-OES was demonstrated by the determination of macro (Na, K, Ca, Mg, P) and trace (Cd, Cu, Mn, Sr, Zn) elements in three biological certified reference materials using a V-groove, clog-free Babington-type nebulizer. Slurry concentrations up to 1% m/v (particles <20 μm), prepared in 10% HNO 3 (pH 1.2) containing 0.01% of Triton X-100, were used with calibration by the standard additions method. The method offers relatively good precision (R.S.D. ranged from 7 to 11%) with measured concentrations being in satisfactory agreement with certified values for NRCC TORT-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas), NRCC LUTS-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas) and IAEA-153 (Milk powder). The concentrations of Na, K, Ca, Mg, P and Cd, Cu, Mn, Sr, Zn were determined in the range 90-22 000 μg/g and 1-420 μg/g, respectively. The method could be useful as a routine procedure.

  12. The theory of an auto-resonant field emission cathode relativistic electron accelerator for high efficiency microwave to direct current power conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A novel method of microwave power conversion to direct current is discussed that relies on a modification of well known resonant linear relativistic electron accelerator techniques. An analysis is presented that shows how, by establishing a 'slow' electromagnetic field in a waveguide, electrons liberated from an array of field emission cathodes, are resonantly accelerated to several times their rest energy, thus establishing an electric current over a large potential difference. Such an approach is not limited to the relatively low frequencies that characterize the operation of rectennas, and can, with appropriate waveguide and slow wave structure design, be employed in the 300 to 600 GHz range where much smaller transmitting and receiving antennas are needed.

  13. Attenuation statistics at 20.6, 31.65 and 52.85 GHz derived from emission measurements by ground-based microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fionda, E.; Falls, M. J.; Westwater, E. R.

    1991-01-01

    Two seasons (December 1987 to February 1988 and July 1988 to September 1988) of thermal emission measurements, taken by a multichannel ground-based microwave radiometer, are used to derive single-station zenith attenuation statistics at 20.6 and 31.65 GHz. For the summer period, statistics are also derived at 52.85 GHz. In addition, data from two radiometers located 50 km apart are used to derive two-station attenuation diversity statistics at 20.6 and 31.65 GHz. The multichannel radiometer was operated at Denver, Colorado, U.S. and the dual-channel device was operated at Platteville, Colorado. The diversity statistics are presented by cumulative distributions and by bivariate frequency distributions. The frequency distributions are analyzed when either one or both stations have liquid clouds.

  14. The DMRT-ML model: numerical simulations of the microwave emission of multilayered snowpacks based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, G.; Brucker, L.; Roy, A.; Dupont, F.; Fily, M.; Royer, A.; Champollion, N.; Morin, S.

    2012-12-01

    DMRT-ML is a physically-based model to compute the thermal microwave emission of a given snowpack for passive microwave remote sensing applications. The model is based on the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory (DMRT) for the computation of snow scattering and absorption properties. The radiative transfer equation is accurately solved using the DIscrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer Method (DISORT). The snowpack is described as a stack of horizontal snow layers and an optional underlying interface representing either the soil or the ice. The atmospheric downwelling contribution can be optionally taken into account. DMRT-ML is designed to work for most snow-covered surfaces, and can account for both dry and wet snowpack conditions over soil (e.g. Alpine or Arctic seasonal snow) and over ice (e.g. on ice sheet or lake). The model was initially validated against satellite observations at Dome C, East Antarctica, using in-situ snow grain size, density and temperature profile measurements. Recently, DMRT-ML was extended and applied to sub-Arctic seasonal snowpacks. Validation experiments were done using a set of 20 detailed snowpit measurements. Results were compared to ground-based radiometry. In addition, the model was applied to snowpacks overlying ice, as found on the Canadian Barnes ice cap and on the ablation areas of Antarctic ice sheets. Accounting for the ice properties (bubble size and density) appeared to be necessary to get the best agreement between the model simulations and the ground-based radiometer observations. This model provides accurate snow brightness temperature simulations over for a wide range of cryospheric environments, which are of particular interest for the assimilation of satellite passive microwave data in snow models and for improving simulations of snow properties. Indeed, the model can take input from a detailed snowpack model such as Crocus or SNOWPACK. It is entirely written in Fortran90 which makes its integration in numerical

  15. Continuous-flow determination of aqueous sulfur by atmospheric-pressure helium microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry with gas-phase sample introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Taketoshi; Mori, Toshio; Morimoto, Satoru; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    1995-06-01

    A simple continuous-flow generation of volatile hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide by acidification of aqueous sulfide and sulfite ions, respectively, is described for the determination of low concentrations of sulfur by atmospheric-pressure helium microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) in the normal ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions of the spectrum. For measuring spectral lines in the VUV region, the monochromator and the enclosed external optical path between the MIP source and the entrance slit of the monochromator have both been purged with nitrogen to minimize oxygen absorption below 190 nm. Sulfur atomic emission lines at 180.73, 182.04 and 217.05 nm have been selected as the analytical lines. Of the various acids examined, 1.0 M hydrochloric acid is the most favorable for both the generation of hydrogen sulfide from sulfide ions and sulfur dioxide from sulfite ions. Either generated hydrogen sulfide or sulfur dioxide is separated from the solution in a simple gas-liquid separator and swept into the helium stream of a microwave-induced plasma for analysis. The best attainable detection limits (3 σ criterion) for sulfur at 180.73 nm were 0.13 and 1.28 ng ml -1 for the generation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide, respectively, with the corresponding background equivalent concentrations of 20.9 and 62.2 ng ml -1 in sulfur concentration. The typical analytical working graphs obtained under the optimized experimental conditions were rectilinear over approximately four orders of magnitude in sulfur concentration. The present method has been successfully applied to the recovery test of the sulfide spiked to waste water samples and to the determination of sulfite in some samples of commercially available wine.

  16. Chandra ACIS-S imaging spectroscopy of anomalously faint X-ray emission from Comet 103P/Hartley 2 during the EPOXI encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, C. M.; Christian, D. J.; Wolk, S. J.; Dennerl, K.; Bodewits, D.; Combi, M. R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Li, J. Y.; Dello-Russo, N.; Belton, M. J. S.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-02-01

    We present results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory's characterization of the X-ray emission from Comet 103P/Hartley 2, in support of NASA's Deep Impact Extended close flyby of the comet on 04 November 2010. The comet was observed 4 times for a total on target time of ˜60 ks between the 17th of October and 16th of November 2010, with two of the visits occurring during the EPOXI close approach on 04 November and 05 November 2010. X-ray emission from 103P was qualitatively similar to that observed for collisionally thin Comets 2P/Encke (Lisse, C.M. et al. [2005]. Astrophys. J. 635, 1329-1347) and 9P/Tempel 1 (Lisse, C.M. et al. [2007]. Icarus 190, 391-405). Emission morphology offset sunward but asymmetrical from the nucleus and emission lines produced by charge exchange between highly stripped C, N, and O solar wind minor ions and coma neutral gas species were found. The comet was very under-luminous in the X-ray at all times, representing the 3rd faintest comet ever detected (LX = 1.1 ± 0.3 × 1014 erg s-1). The coma was collisionally thin to the solar wind at all times, allowing solar wind ions to flow into the inner coma and interact with the densest neutral coma gas. Localization of the X-ray emission in the regions of the major rotating gas jets was observed, consistent with the major source of cometary neutral gas species being icy coma dust particles. Variable spectral features due to changing solar wind flux densities and charge states were also seen. Modeling of the Chandra observations from the first three visits using observed gas production rates and ACE solar wind ion fluxes with a charge exchange mechanism for the emission is consistent with the temporal and spectral behavior expected for a slow, hot wind typical of low latitude emission from the solar corona interacting with the comet's neutral coma. The X-ray emission during the 4th visit on 16 November 2010 is similar to the unusual behavior seen for Comet 17P/Holmes in 2007 (Christian, D.J. et

  17. On Anomalous Quark Triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous quark triangles with one axial and two vector currents are studied in special kinematics when one of the vector currents carries a soft momentum. According to the Adler-Bardeen theorem the anomalous longitudinal part of the triangle is not renormalized in the chiral limit. We show that perturbative corrections the transversal part of the triangle is also absent. This nonrenormalization, in difference with the longitudinal part, holds on only perturbatively.

  18. The influence of ions and the induced secondary emission on the nanosecond high-gradient microwave breakdown at metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Liu, C. L.; Chen, C. H.; Sun, J.; Liu, Y. S.; Guo, L. T.; Cao, Y. B.; Wang, Y.; Song, Z. M.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of ultrafast breakdown at metal/vacuum interface in the high-power microwave waveguides is studied. In order to realize the nanosecond discharge, the required ambient gas pressure above the metal surface is approximately calculated as high as several Torr due to the low ionization-rate for high-energy electrons and short pulse. The local high pressure may come from the evaporated microscopic protrusions due to Joule heating and gas desorption. Besides, ions accelerated by the ambient space charge field could obtain sufficient high energy to collide and sputter the metal atoms to increase the ambient pressure. The positive feedbacks during the rapid discharge are studied by particle-in-cell simulation. The relatively high-energy ions could generate secondary electrons. It is shown that, as the positive feedback, the secondary electrons induce the gas desorption and stronger ionization, resulting in ion and electron density increasing as well as sheath field further increasing. As a result, more higher-energy ions bombard metal surface, leading to higher secondary electron yield and higher density plasma generated to cut off the microwave transmission finally. These nonlinear courses realize the ultrafast discharge in waveguides.

  19. The influence of ions and the induced secondary emission on the nanosecond high-gradient microwave breakdown at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Liu, C. L.; Chen, C. H.; Sun, J.; Liu, Y. S.; Guo, L. T.; Cao, Y. B.; Wang, Y.; Song, Z. M.

    2015-06-15

    The mechanism of ultrafast breakdown at metal/vacuum interface in the high-power microwave waveguides is studied. In order to realize the nanosecond discharge, the required ambient gas pressure above the metal surface is approximately calculated as high as several Torr due to the low ionization-rate for high-energy electrons and short pulse. The local high pressure may come from the evaporated microscopic protrusions due to Joule heating and gas desorption. Besides, ions accelerated by the ambient space charge field could obtain sufficient high energy to collide and sputter the metal atoms to increase the ambient pressure. The positive feedbacks during the rapid discharge are studied by particle-in-cell simulation. The relatively high-energy ions could generate secondary electrons. It is shown that, as the positive feedback, the secondary electrons induce the gas desorption and stronger ionization, resulting in ion and electron density increasing as well as sheath field further increasing. As a result, more higher-energy ions bombard metal surface, leading to higher secondary electron yield and higher density plasma generated to cut off the microwave transmission finally. These nonlinear courses realize the ultrafast discharge in waveguides.

  20. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  1. Spinning Dust Emission from Ultra-small Silicates: Emissivity and Polarization Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Vinh, Nguyen-Anh; Quynh Lan, Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an important Galactic foreground of cosmic microwave background radiation. It is believed that AME arises from rotational emission by spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium (ISM). In this paper, we suppose that a new population of ultra-small silicate grains perhaps exists in the ISM, and quantify the rotational emissivity from these tiny particles and its polarization spectrum. We find that spinning silicate nanoparticles can produce strong rotational emission when the tiny grains follow a log-normal size distribution. The polarization fraction of spinning dust emission from tiny silicates increases with decreasing dipole moment per atom (β) and can reach P∼ 20 % for β ∼ 0.1 {{D}} at a grain temperature of 60 K. We identify a parameter space (β ,{Y}{{Si}}), with {Y}{{Si}} being the fraction of Si abundance in nanoparticles, in which its rotational emission can adequately reproduce both the observed AME and the polarization of the AME, without violating the observational constraints of ultraviolet extinction and polarization of starlight. Our results reveal that rotational emission from spinning silicate may be an important source of AME.

  2. Thermal microwave emissions from vegetated fields: A comparison between theory and experiment. [Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, MD.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Shiue, J.; Chuang, S. L.; Dombrowski, M.

    1980-01-01

    The radiometric measurements over bare field and fields covered with grass, soybean, corn, and alfalfa were made with 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz microwave radiometers during August - October 1978. The measured results are compared with radiative transfer theory treating the vegetated fields as a two layer random medium. It is found that the presence of a vegetation cover generally gives a higher brightness temperature T(B) than that expected from a bare soil. The amount of this T(B) excess increases in the vegetation biomass and in the frequency of the observed radiation. The results of radiative transfer calculations generally match well with the experimental data, however, a detailed analysis also strongly suggests the need of incorporating soil surface roughness effect into the radiative transfer theory in order to better interpret the experimental data.

  3. Analysis of regolith electromagnetic scattering as constrained by high resolution Earth-based measurements of the lunar microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keihm, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    When high resolution measurements of the phase variation of the lunar disk center brightness temperature revealed that in situ regolith electrical losses were larger than those measured on returned samples by a factor of 1.5 to 2.0 at centimeter wavelengths, the need for a refinement of the regolith model to include realistic treatment of scattering effects was identified. Two distinct scattering regimes are considered: vertial variations in dielectric constant and volume scattering due to subsurface rock fragments. Models of lunar regolith energy transport processes are now at the state for which a maximum scientific return could be realized from a lunar orbiter microwave mapping experiment. A detailed analysis, including the effects of scattering produced a set of nominal brightness temperature spectra for lunar equatorial regions, which can be used for mapping as a calibration reference for mapping variations in mineralogy and heat flow.

  4. Validating optical emission spectroscopy as a diagnostic of microwave activated CH{sub 4}/Ar/H{sub 2} plasmas used for diamond chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jie; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2009-02-15

    Spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) has been used to investigate the gas phase chemistry and composition in a microwave activated CH{sub 4}/Ar/H{sub 2} plasma operating at moderate power densities ({approx}30 W cm{sup -3}) and pressures ({<=}175 Torr) during chemical vapor deposition of polycrystalline diamond. Several tracer species are monitored in order to gain information about the plasma. Relative concentrations of ground state H (n=1) atoms have been determined by actinometry, and the validity of this method have been demonstrated for the present experimental conditions. Electronically excited H (n=3 and 4) atoms, Ar (4p) atoms, and C{sub 2} and CH radicals have been studied also, by monitoring their emissions as functions of process parameters (Ar and CH{sub 4} flow rates, input power, and pressure) and of distance above the substrate. These various species exhibit distinctive behaviors, reflecting their different formation mechanisms. Relative trends identified by OES are found to be in very good agreement with those revealed by complementary absolute absorption measurements (using cavity ring down spectroscopy) and with the results of complementary two-dimensional modeling of the plasma chemistry prevailing within this reactor.

  5. Microwave Ovens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Required Reports for the Microwave Oven Manufacturers or Industry Exemption from Certain Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements for ... Microwave Ovens (PDF) (PDF - 2.5MB) FDA eSubmitter Industry Guidance - Documents of Interest Notifications to Industry (PDF ...

  6. Measurement of anomalously strong emission from the 1s-9p transition in the spectrum of H-like phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Leutenegger, M A; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S

    2010-08-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with ∼6  eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of 2 for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements. PMID:20867978

  7. Measurement of Anomalously Strong Emission from the 1s-9p Transition in the Spectrum of H-like Phosphorus Following Charge Exchange with Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with approx.6 eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high-end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of two for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements.

  8. High frequency thermal emission from the lunar surface and near surface temperature of the Moon from Chang’E-2 microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tuo; Fa, Wenzhe

    2014-04-01

    Near surface temperature of the Moon and thermal behaviors of the lunar regolith can provide important information for constraining thermal and magmatic evolution models of the Moon and engineering constrains for in situ lunar exploration system. In this study, China’s Chang’E-2 (CE-2) microwave radiometer (MRM) data at high frequency channels are used to investigate near surface temperature of the Moon given the penetration ability of microwave into the desiccated and porous lunar regolith. Factors that affect high frequency brightness temperature (TB), such as surface slope, solar albedo and dielectric constant, are analyzed first using a revised Racca’s temperature model. Radiative transfer theory is then used to model thermal emission from a semi-infinite regolith medium, with considering dielectric constant and temperature profiles within the regolith layer. To decouple the effect of diurnal temperature variation in the uppermost lunar surface, diurnal averaged brightness temperatures at high frequency channels are used to invert mean diurnal surface and subsurface temperatures based on their bilinear profiles within the regolith layer. Our results show that, at the scale of the spatial resolution of CE-2 MRM, surface slope of crater wall varies typically from about 20° to 30°, and this causes a variation in TB about 10-15 K. Solar albedo can give rise to a TB difference of about 5-10 K between maria and highlands, whereas a ∼2-8 K difference can be compensated by the dielectric constant on the other hand. Inversion results indicate that latitude (ϕ) variations of the mean diurnal surface and subsurface temperatures follow simple rules as cos0.30ϕ and cos0.36ϕ, respectively. The inverted mean diurnal temperature profiles at the Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites are also compared with the Apollo heat flow experiment data, showing an inversion uncertainty <4 K for surface temperature and <1 K for subsurface temperature.

  9. The high accuracy model of the 19 July 2012 solar flare: kinetic description, calculations of X-Ray and microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The limb white-light solar flare M7.7 class was observed at the 19 July 2012 at 05:58UT by RHESSI, GOES and SDO with high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. These new data make possible to test modern models of solar flares. The flare, which considered here, locates in the picture plane, so we well see two different hard X-ray sources: footpoint and above-the-loop-top. The loop was observed in whit-light and microwave wavelengths. The key part of the presented work is high accuracy kinetic model, which describe behavior of electrons in the target - solar flare loop. We interpret the footpoint source in approximation of the thick target model with reverse current and above-the-loop-top source - in the thin target approximation. The microwave spectrum in the range from 1 to 50 GHz was calculated. Our results fit well the observational data, particularly so important parameter as hard X-Ray spectral index. But intensity of emission of the coronal source was estimated incorrect, it was low than observed. This problem can be solved by taking into account effects of particles acceleration in the collapsing magnetic trap, when fast electrons receive additional energy without changing the index of their energy spectrum. In the result we have flux ~ 5 1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for electrons with energies more then 15 keV, that ~ 5 times larger then in the case classical thick target model. Accordingly , so high flux of electrons to the Chromosphere provides effective heating of the cold plasma in the target, but the reverse current electric field restrict depth of the electron penetration. Received in this work estimates may be used for interpretation of the solar flare optical source formation and evolution.

  10. Translational anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation and far-infrared emission by galactic dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    The predicted emission spectrum of galactic dust at about 10 K is compared with the spectrum of 2.8-K universal blackbody radiation and with the spectrum of the anisotropy expected in the 2.8-K radiation due to motion of earth with respect to the coordinate system in which the radiation was last scattered. The extremely anisotropic galactic-dust emission spectrum may contribute a significant background to anisotropy measurements which scan through the galactic plane. The contamination would appear in an 8-mm scan around the celestial equator, for example, as a spurious 200 km/s velocity toward declination 0 deg, right ascension 19 hr, if predictions are correct. The predicted spectrum of dust emission in the galactic plane at longitudes not exceeding about 30 deg falls below the total 2.8-K cosmic background intensity at wavelengths of at least 1 mm.

  11. Quantitative Determination of Density of Ground State Atomic Oxygen from Both TALIF and Emission Spectroscopy in Hot Air Plasma Generated by Microwave Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, F.; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.; Wattieaux, G.; Piquemal, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two experimental techniques have been used to quantify the atomic oxygen density in the case of hot air plasma generated by a microwave (MW) resonant cavity. The latter operates at a frequency of 2.45 GHz inside a cell of gas conditioning at a pressure of 600 mbar, an injected air flow of 12 L/min and an input MW power of 1 kW. The first technique is based on the standard two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) using xenon for calibration but applied for the first time in the present post discharge hot air plasma column having a temperature of about 4500 K near the axis of the nozzle. The second diagnostic technique is an actinometry method based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In this case, we compared the spectra intensities of a specific atomic oxygen line (844 nm) and the closest wavelength xenon line (823 nm). The two lines need to be collected under absolutely the same spectroscopic parameters. The xenon emission is due to the addition of a small proportion of xenon (1% Xe) of this chemically inert gas inside the air while a further small quantity of H2 (2%) is also added in the mixture in order to collect OH(A-X) and NH(A-X) spectra without noise. The latter molecular spectra are required to estimate gas and excitation temperatures. Optical emission spectroscopy measurements, at for instance the position z=12 mm on the axis plasma column that leads to a gas measured temperature equal to 3500 K, an excitation temperature of about 9500 K and an atomic oxygen density 2.09×1017±0.2×1017 cm-3. This is in very good agreement with the TALIF measurement, which is equal to 2.0×1017 cm-3.

  12. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-01-01

    SWift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18 - 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 1038 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in IE 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  13. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Göǧüş, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, James Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-10-01

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in 2010 May with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least 2011 July. Here we present Swift and Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T 90 durations of the bursts range between 18 and 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) × 1038 erg, which is on the low side of soft gamma repeater bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large-scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  14. BURST AND PERSISTENT EMISSION PROPERTIES DURING THE RECENT ACTIVE EPISODE OF THE ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSAR 1E 1841-045

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Van der Klis, Michiel; Baring, Matthew G.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Mcenery, Julie; Michael Burgess, James; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain; Preece, Robert D.; Granot, Jonathan; Tierney, David

    2011-10-10

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in 2010 May with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least 2011 July. Here we present Swift and Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T {sub 90} durations of the bursts range between 18 and 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 10{sup 38} erg, which is on the low side of soft gamma repeater bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large-scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  15. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  16. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:25770525

  17. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  18. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Barklow, T.; Baur, U. |

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is {approximately} 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than {Omicron}(10{sup {minus}2}). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed.

  19. A multi-frequency measurement of thermal microwave emission from soils: The effects of soil texture and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Oneill, P. E.; Jackson, T. J.; Engman, E. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    An experiment on remote sensing of soil moisture content was conducted over bare fields with microwave radiometers at the frequencies of 1.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 10.7 GHz during July - September of 1981. Three bare fields with different surface roughnesses and soil textures were prepared for the experiment. Ground truth acquisition of soil temperatures and moisture contents for 5 layers down to the depths of 15 cm was made concurrently with radiometric measurements. The experimental results show that the effect of surface roughness is to increase the soils' brightness temperature and to reduce the slope of regression between brightness temperature and moisture content. The slopes of regression for soils with different textures are found to be comparable, and the effect of soil texture is reflected in the difference of regression line intercepts at brightness temperature axis. The result is consistent with laboratory measurement of soils' dielectric permittivity. Measurements on wet smooth bare fields give lower brightness temperatures at 5 GHz than at 1.4 GHz.

  20. A multi-frequency measurement of thermal microwave emission from soils - The effect of soil texture and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Oneill, P. E.; Jackson, T. J.; Engman, E. T.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment on remote sensing of soil moisture content was conducted over bare fields with microwave radiometers at the frequencies of 1.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 10.7 GHz during July September of 1981. Three bare fields with different surface roughneses and soil textures were prepared for the experiment. Ground truth acquisition of soil temperatures and moisture contents for 5 layers down to the depth of 15 cm was made concurrently with radiometric measurements. The experimental results show that the effect of surface roughness is to increase the soils' brightness temperature and to reduce the slope of regression between brightness temperature and moisture content. The slopes of regression for soils with different textures are found to be comparable, and the effect of soil texture is reflected in the difference of regression line intercepts at brightness temperature axis. The result is consistent with laboratory measurement of soils' dielectric permittivity. Measurements on wet smooth bare fields give lower brightness temperatures at 5 GHz than at 1.4 GHz. Previously announced in STAR as N82-24550

  1. X-ray and microwave emissions from the July 19, 2012 solar flare: Highly accurate observations and kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyk, P. A.; Somov, B. V.

    2016-08-01

    The M7.7 solar flare of July 19, 2012, at 05:58 UT was observed with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions in the hard X-ray and optical ranges. The flare occurred at the solar limb, which allowed us to see the relative positions of the coronal and chromospheric X-ray sources and to determine their spectra. To explain the observations of the coronal source and the chromospheric one unocculted by the solar limb, we apply an accurate analytical model for the kinetic behavior of accelerated electrons in a flare. We interpret the chromospheric hard X-ray source in the thick-target approximation with a reverse current and the coronal one in the thin-target approximation. Our estimates of the slopes of the hard X-ray spectra for both sources are consistent with the observations. However, the calculated intensity of the coronal source is lower than the observed one by several times. Allowance for the acceleration of fast electrons in a collapsing magnetic trap has enabled us to remove this contradiction. As a result of our modeling, we have estimated the flux density of the energy transferred by electrons with energies above 15 keV to be ˜5 × 1010 erg cm-2 s-1, which exceeds the values typical of the thick-target model without a reverse current by a factor of ˜5. To independently test the model, we have calculated the microwave spectrum in the range 1-50 GHz that corresponds to the available radio observations.

  2. Microwave-promoted pure host phase for red emission CaS:Eu2+ phosphor from single CaSO4 precursor and the photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Lu, Qi-Fei; Wang, Yan-Ze; Lu, Zhi-Juan; Sun, Liang; Dong, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Da-Jian

    2014-08-01

    We report a novel approach to obtaining a classical blue-green excitable CaS:Eu2+ phosphor with desired red emission by microwave (MW) firing procedure in the absence of adding elemental sulphur. The disturbing effect of MW electromagnetic field on decomposition of CaSO4 into CaS activated by europium is distinctly observed to give pure host phase without adding any elemental sulphur and carbon. The host phase evolution is observed to be highly dependent on the variation of applied MW power from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and the corresponding photoluminescence (PL), and a maximum PL intensity at 1100 W of MW power is acquired for the obtained purer host phase. The non-thermal and non-equilibrium effects by MW are revealed to correlate with the interaction between polar structure of the host and applied electromagnetic field. The results demonstrate an optional procedure to prepare this red-emitting phosphor in an effective, environment-friendly and scalable approach for phosphor production in the application of bio-illumination for plant cultivation and artificial photosynthesis.

  3. Multielement determination of heavy metals in water samples by continuous powder introduction microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry after preconcentration on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Krzysztof; Yao, Jun; Kasiura, Krzysztof; Jackowska, Adrianna; Sieradzka, Anna

    2005-03-01

    A novel continuous powder introduction microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry method (CPI-MIP-AES) has been developed for trace determination of metals in ground and tap water samples after preconcentration on activated carbon. The experimental setup consisted of integrated rectangular cavity TE 101 and vertically positioned plasma torch. The technical arrangement of the sample introduction system has been designed based on the fluidized bed concept. The satisfactory signal stability required for sequential analysis was attained owing to the vertical plasma configuration, as well as the plasma gas flow rate compatibility with sample introduction flow rate. The elements of interest (Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn) were preconcentrated in a batch procedure at pH 8-8.5 after addition of activated carbon and then, after filtering and drying of the activated carbon suspension, introduced to the MIP by the CPI system. An enrichment factor of about 1000-fold for a sample volume of 1 l was obtained. The detection limit values for the proposed method were 17-250 ng l -1. The proposed method was validated by analyzing the certified reference materials: SRW "Warta" Synthetic River Water and BCR CRM 399 major elements in freshwater. The method was successfully applied to the determination of the heavy metals in tap water samples.

  4. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes. PMID:26830585

  5. Growth, microstructure, and field-emission properties of synthesized diamond film on adamantane-coated silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Rajanish N.; Chang Li

    2010-05-15

    Diamond nucleation on unscratched Si surface is great importance for its growth, and detailed understanding of this process is therefore desired for many applications. The pretreatment of the substrate surface may influence the initial growth period. In this study, diamond films have been synthesized on adamantane-coated crystalline silicon {l_brace}100{r_brace} substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gaseous mixture of methane and hydrogen gases without the application of a bias voltage to the substrates. Prior to adamantane coating, the Si substrates were not pretreated such as abraded/scratched. The substrate temperature was {approx}530 deg. C during diamond deposition. The deposited films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These measurements provide definitive evidence for high-crystalline quality diamond film, which is synthesized on a SiC rather than clean Si substrate. Characterization through atomic force microscope allows establishing fine quality criteria of the film according to the grain size of nanodiamond along with SiC. The diamond films exhibit a low-threshold (55 V/{mu}m) and high current-density (1.6 mA/cm{sup 2}) field-emission (FE) display. The possible mechanism of formation of diamond films and their FE properties have been demonstrated.

  6. Large-amplitude, narrow-linewidth microwave emission in a dual free-layer MgO spin-torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasawa, Tazumi Kudo, Kiwamu; Suto, Hirofumi; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2014-11-03

    Synchronized magnetization motion among the several magnetic layers composing a spin-torque oscillator (STO) is considered an effective way to improve spectral purity. To utilize this scheme in a MgO-based STO, we have fabricated a dual free-layer STO composed of a CoFeB free layer (FL), a MgO barrier layer, and a CoFe/Ru/CoFeB synthetic ferrimagnet free layer (SyF). Unlike conventional MgO-based STOs, this structure does not have an antiferromagnetic layer that pins the SyF, leading to a large-amplitude oscillation of magnetization in the SyF. The dual free-layer STO exhibits coherent microwave emissions with power spectrum density beyond 800 nW/GHz and narrow spectral linewidth below 5 MHz (Q-factor ≈ 2000). Macrospin simulations confirm that the stable oscillations originate from the synchronized magnetization motion of the FL and the SyF through dynamical dipolar coupling.

  7. The effects of layers in dry snow on its passive microwave emissions using dense media radiative transfer theory based on the quasicrystalline approximation (QCA/DMRT)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liang, D.; Xu, X.; Tsang, L.; Andreadis, K.M.; Josberger, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    A model for the microwave emissions of multilayer dry snowpacks, based on dense media radiative transfer (DMRT) theory with the quasicrystalline approximation (QCA), provides more accurate results when compared to emissions determined by a homogeneous snowpack and other scattering models. The DMRT model accounts for adhesive aggregate effects, which leads to dense media Mie scattering by using a sticky particle model. With the multilayer model, we examined both the frequency and polarization dependence of brightness temperatures (Tb's) from representative snowpacks and compared them to results from a single-layer model and found that the multilayer model predicts higher polarization differences, twice as much, and weaker frequency dependence. We also studied the temporal evolution of Tb from multilayer snowpacks. The difference between Tb's at 18.7 and 36.5 GHz can be S K lower than the single-layer model prediction in this paper. By using the snowpack observations from the Cold Land Processes Field Experiment as input for both multi- and single-layer models, it shows that the multilayer Tb's are in better agreement with the data than the single-layer model. With one set of physical parameters, the multilayer QCA/DMRT model matched all four channels of Tb observations simultaneously, whereas the single-layer model could only reproduce vertically polarized Tb's. Also, the polarization difference and frequency dependence were accurately matched by the multilayer model using the same set of physical parameters. Hence, algorithms for the retrieval of snowpack depth or water equivalent should be based on multilayer scattering models to achieve greater accuracy. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  8. Characterization of a low-pressure chlorine plasma column sustained by propagating surface waves using phase-sensitive microwave interferometry and trace-rare-gas optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, S.; Boudreault, O.; Stafford, L.; Khare, R.; Donnelly, V. M.

    2011-06-01

    Phase-sensitive microwave interferometry and trace-rare-gas optical emission spectroscopy were used to measure the line-integrated electron density, n{sub e}, and electron temperature, T{sub e}, in a high-density chlorine plasma sustained in a quartz discharge tube (inner diameter = 6 mm) by an electromagnetic surface wave at 2.45 GHz. For pressures in the 0.1-1 Torr range, n{sub e} decreased nearly linearly along the tube's z-axis down to the critical density for surface wave propagation, where the plasma decayed abruptly. At lower pressures (< 50 mTorr), however, the plasma extended well beyond this critical point, after which n{sub e} decreased quasiexponentially toward the end of the plasma column. The length of this expansion region increased with decreasing pressure, going from {approx}8 cm at 5 mTorr to {approx}1 cm at 50 mTorr. T{sub e} was nearly independent of the axial position in the main plasma region and strongly decreased in the expansion region at lower pressures. The Cl{sub 2} percent dissociation, {tau}{sub D}, obtained from the calibrated Cl{sub 2} (306 nm)-to-Xe (828 nm) emission ratio, displayed behavior similar to that of n{sub e} and T{sub e}. For example, at 5 mTorr, {tau}{sub D} was close to 100% near the wave launcher and {approx}70% at 0.5 cm from the end of the plasma column.

  9. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 2 - Radar remote sensing and surface scattering and emission theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental principles of radar backscattering measurements are presented, including measurement statistics, Doppler and pulse discrimination techniques, and associated ambiguity functions. The operation of real and synthetic aperture sidelooking airborne radar systems is described, along with the internal and external calibration techniques employed in scattering measurements. Attention is given to the physical mechanisms responsible for the scattering emission behavior of homogeneous and inhomogeneous media, through a discussion of surface roughness, dielectric properties and inhomogeneity, and penetration depth. Simple semiempirical models are presented. Theoretical models involving greater mathematical sophistication are also given for extended ocean and bare soil surfaces, and the more general case of a vegetation canopy over a rough surface.

  10. Colored models for anomalous nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.J.S.; Saly, R.; Romo, W.J.; Sundaresan, M.K.; Campbell, B.; Elias, V.

    1983-04-01

    There seems to be good experimental evidence that anomalous nuclei are produced in heavy-ion collisions; they are anomalous in that they have an abnormally short mean free path, for example, in nuclear emulsions. Here we consider the possibility that anomalous nuclei are combinations of a colored anomalous particle fragment (based on theories with spontaneous breakdown of color symmetry) with ordinary nucleons. Phenomenological implications of various possible models in which the anomalous particle fragment is considered to be a colored particle with the color symmetry SU(3)/sub c/ explicitly broken are given.

  11. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  12. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  13. MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: EMISSION SPECTRUM AND POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B. T.; Hensley, Brandon

    2013-03-10

    The presence of ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic nanoparticles in the interstellar medium would give rise to magnetic dipole radiation at microwave and submillimeter frequencies. Such grains may account for the strong millimeter-wavelength emission observed from a number of low-metallicity galaxies, including the Small Magellanic Cloud. We calculate the absorption and scattering cross sections for such grains, with particular attention to metallic Fe, magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and maghemite {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, all potentially present in the interstellar medium. The rate of Davis-Greenstein alignment by magnetic dissipation is also estimated. We determine the temperature of free-flying magnetic grains heated by starlight and calculate the polarization of the magnetic dipole emission from both free-fliers and inclusions. For inclusions, the magnetic dipole emission is expected to be polarized orthogonally relative to the normal electric dipole radiation. Magnetic dipole radiation will contribute significantly to the 20-40 GHz anomalous microwave emission only if a large fraction of the Fe is in metallic Fe iron nanoparticles with extreme elongations. Finally, we present self-consistent dielectric functions for metallic Fe, magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and maghemite {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, enabling calculation of absorption and scattering cross sections from microwave to X-ray wavelengths.

  14. Recent Advancements in Microwave Imaging Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; C.C. Chang; B.H. Deng; C.W. Domier; A.J.H. Donni; K. Kawahata; C. Liang; X.P. Liang; H.J. Lu; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; A. Mase; H. Matsuura; E. Mazzucato; A. Miura; K. Mizuno; T. Munsat; K. and Y. Nagayama; M.J. van de Pol; J. Wang; Z.G. Xia; W-K. Zhang

    2002-03-26

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology over the past decade have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics for current and envisioned magnetic fusion devices. Prominent among these are revolutionary microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), microwave phase imaging interferometers, imaging microwave scattering and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) systems for imaging electron temperature and electron density fluctuations (both turbulent and coherent) and profiles (including transport barriers) on toroidal devices such as tokamaks, spherical tori, and stellarators. The diagnostic technology is reviewed, and typical diagnostic systems are analyzed. Representative experimental results obtained with these novel diagnostic systems are also presented.

  15. Microwave radiometric observations of snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Stiles, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Models for the microwave emission from snowpacks were generated on the basis of radiometric observations made at 10.7 GHz, 37 HGz, and 94 GHz at a test site near Steamboat Springs, Colorado. In addition to conducting measurements on an approximately daily basis over a six week observation period, measurements were made over several diurnal cycles during which the change in snow wetness was tracked by the microwave radiometers. Also, the variation in emissivity with snow water equivalent was examined, as was the sensitivity to changes in snow surface geometry. The microwave emissivity was observed to (1) decrease exponentially with snow water equivalent and (2) increase with snow wetness. Thus, the emission behavior is the reverse of the backscattering behavior observed by the radar. By fitting the models to the measured data, the variation of the optical depth with snow wetness was estimated.

  16. Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Rebecca L.; Clark, David E.; Wicks, George G.

    2003-01-01

    The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

  17. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  18. Polarization of Magnetic Dipole Emission and Spinning Dust Emission from Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic dipole emission (MDE) from interstellar magnetic nanoparticles is potentially an important Galactic foreground in the microwave frequencies, and its polarization level may pose great challenges for achieving reliable measurements of cosmic microwave background B-mode signal. To obtain realistic predictions for the polarization of MDE, we first compute the degree of alignment of big silicate grains incorporated with magnetic inclusions. We find that thermally rotating big grains with magnetic inclusions are weakly aligned and can achieve alignment saturation when the magnetic alignment rate becomes much faster than the rotational damping rate. We then compute the degree of alignment for free-flying magnetic nanoparticles, taking into account various interaction processes of grains with the ambient gas and radiation field, including neutral collisions, ion collisions, and infrared emission. We find that the rotational damping by infrared emission can significantly decrease the degree of alignment of small particles from the saturation level, whereas the excitation by ion collisions can enhance the alignment of ultrasmall particles. Using the computed degrees of alignment, we predict the polarization level of MDE from free-flying magnetic nanoparticles to be rather low. Such a polarization level is within the upper limits measured for anomalous microwave emission (AME), which indicates that MDE from free-flying iron particles may not be ruled out as a source of AME. We also quantify rotational emission from free-flying iron nanoparticles with permanent magnetic moments and find that its emissivity is about one order of magnitude lower than that from spinning polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  19. Observation of plasma hole transition induced by microwave power modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji

    2005-10-01

    Spontaneous formation of stationary vortex structure with density depletion, or plasma hole, has been observed in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. We have so far reported the flow velocity field, the vorticity distribution and the strong electric field resulting from the breaking of quasi-neutrality condition. The detailed transitional behavior of plasma hole formation is not entirely revealed yet. Here we report the results on microwave power modulation experiments to investigate the detailed change in density, plasma potential and flow velocity field of the plasma hole. Temporal evolutions of those quantities were measured by using a Langmuir probe, an emissive probe and a directional Langmuir probe. By increasing the microwave power to a certain threshold value, the density depletion characterizing the hole structure was formed along the central axis of the cylindrical plasma. The plasma potential started building up a bell-shaped distribution simultaneously, resulting in ExB rotation of the plasma. It should be emphasized that a definite inward-directed flow, which implies an anomalous viscosity of the plasma, was observed. A general relation between radial flow and viscosity is derived through the analysis of ion fluid equation, suggesting a possible means of determination of viscosity coefficient.

  20. Beta function and anomalous dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-orders beta-function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the 2-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows us to determine the anomalous dimension of the fermion masses at the infrared fixed point, and the resulting values compare well with the lattice determinations.

  1. Flashing anomalous color contrast.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2004-01-01

    A new visual phenomenon that we call flashing anomalous color contrast is described. This phenomenon arises from the interaction between a gray central disk and a chromatic annulus surrounded by black radial lines. In an array of such figures, the central gray disk no longer appears gray, but assumes a color complementary to that of the surrounding annulus. The induced color appears: (1) vivid and saturated; (2) self-luminous, not a surface property; (3) flashing with eye or stimulus movement; (4) floating out of its confines; and (5) stronger in extrafoveal than in foveal vision. The strength of the effect depends on the number, length, width, and luminance contrast of the radial lines. The results suggest that the chromatic ring bounding the inner tips of the black radial lines induces simultaneous color contrast, whereas the radial lines elicit, in conjunction with the gray disk and the ring, the flashing, vividness, and high saturation of the effect. The stimulus properties inducing the illusion suggest that flashing anomalous color contrast may be based on asynchronous interactions among multiple visual pathways. PMID:15518215

  2. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  3. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  4. Microwave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  5. An Anomalous Force on the Map Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Wollack, Edward J.; Bay, P. Michael; Fink, Dale R.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) orbits the second Earth-Sun libration point (L2)-about 1.5 million kilometers outside Earth's orbit-mapping cosmic microwave background radiation. To achieve orbit near L2 on a small fuel budget, the MAP spacecraft needed to swing past the Moon for a gravity assist. Timing the lunar swing-by required MAP to travel in three high-eccentricity phasing loops with critical maneuvers at a minimum of two, but nominally all three, of the perigee passes. On the approach to the first perigee maneuver, MAP telemetry showed a considerable change in system angular momentum that threatened to cause on-board Failure Detection and Correction (FDC) to abort the critical maneuver. Fortunately, the system momentum did not reach the FDC limit; however, the MAP team did develop a contingency strategy should a stronger anomaly occur before or during subsequent perigee maneuvers, Simultaneously, members of the MAP team developed and tested various hypotheses for the cause of the anomalous force. The final hypothesis was that water was outgassing from the thermal blanketing and freezing to the cold side of the solar shield. As radiation from Earth warmed the cold side of the spacecraft, the uneven sublimation of frozen water created a torque on the spacecraft.

  6. Observational and theoretical advances in cosmological foreground emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Matthew A.

    Observational and theoretical work towards the separation of foreground emission from the cosmic microwave background is described. The bulk of this work is in the design, construction, and commissioning of the C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS), an experiment to produce a template of the Milky Way Galaxy's polarized synchrotron emission. Theoretical work is the derivation of an analytical approximation to the emission spectrum of spinning dust grains. The performance of the C-BASS experiment is demonstrated through a preliminary, deep survey of the North Celestial Pole region. A comparison to multiwavelength data is performed, and the thermal and systematic noise properties of the experiment are explored. The systematic noise has been minimized through careful data processing algorithms, implemented both in the experiment's Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based digital backend and in the data analysis pipeline. Detailed descriptions of these algorithms are presented. The analytical function of spinning dust emission is derived through the application of careful approximations, with each step tested against numerical calculations. This work is intended for use in the parameterized separation of cosmological foreground components and as a framework for interpreting and comparing the variety of anomalous microwave emission observations.

  7. Anomalous reflections from the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givishvili, G. V.; Leshchenko, L. N.

    2013-09-01

    The existence of anomalous ionospheric reflections was shown on the basis of vertical soundings at the Moskow station. They are observed at heights of 100-200 km. These anomalous reflections are not related to the main Ne( h) ionospheric profile. Morphological characteristics of such reflections are presented: the daily, seasonal, and cyclic dependences of their appearance.

  8. Anomalous electrodynamic explosions in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, H.

    1986-06-01

    The recently reported Graneau experiments on electrodynamic explosions in liquids, which reveal anomalous longitudinal electrodynamic forces of the order of 10/sup 4/ times greater than expected, verify the need for a term in the law of electrodynamics that corresponds to the ion/electron mass ratio. This confirms an earlier theoretical interpretation of the anomalous cathode reaction forces found in the vacuum arc.

  9. Ultrasound- and microwave-assisted extractions followed by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for lead determination in geological samples.

    PubMed

    Welna, Maja; Borkowska-Burnecka, Jolanta; Popko, Malgorzata

    2015-11-01

    Followed the current idea of simplified sample pretratmet before analysis we evaluated the procedure for the determination of Pb in calcium-rich materials such as dolomites after ultrasound- or microwave- assisted extraction with diluted acids using hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-OES). Corresponding Pb hydride was generated in the reaction of an acidified sample solution with NaBH4 after pre-oxidation of Pb(II) to Pb(IV) by K3[Fe(CN)6]. Several chemical (acidic media: HCl, HNO3 or CH3COOH, concentration of the reductant as well as type and concentration of oxidazing agents) and physical (reagents flow rates, reaction coil length) parameters affecting the efficiency of plumbane formation were optimized in order to improve the detectability of Pb using HG-ICP-OES. Limitation of the method derived from the matrix effects was pointed out. Employing Pb separation by HG technique allows the significant reduction of interferences caused by sample matrix constituents (mainly Ca and Mg), nevertheless they could not be overcame at all, hence calibration based on the standard addition method was recommended for Pb quantification in dolomites. Under the selected conditions, i.e. 0.3 mol L(-1) HCl, HNO3 or CH3COOH, 1.5% NaBH4 and 3.0% K3[Fe(CN)6] the limits of detection (LODs) between 2.3-5.6 μg L(-1) (3.4-6.8 μg L(-1) considering matrix effects) and the precision below 5% were achieved. The accuracy of the procedure was verified by analysis of certified reference materials (NCS DC70308 (Carbonate Rock) and NIST 14000 (Bone Ash)) and recovery test with satisfactory results of Pb recoveries ranging between 94-108% (CRMs analysis) and 92-114% (standard addition method). The applicability of the proposed method was demonstrated by the determination of Pb in dolomites used by different fertiliser factories. PMID:26452913

  10. Explosive Emission Cathode Based on a Carbon Fiber for Long-Term Pulsed-Periodic Mode of Operation and its Application in a High-Power Microwave Pulse Generator Without External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutenkov, O. P.; Pegel, I. V.; Totmeninov, E. M.

    2014-09-01

    Current characteristics and operating lifetime of the explosive emission cathode based on a carbon microfiber are investigated in the pulsed-periodic mode of operation with pulse duration of about 5 ns. Long-term (for up to 3.6 million pulses) tests of the cathode operating lifetime are carried out. Specific ablation of the fiber material equal to 2.4·10-4 g/C is obtained. Change in the morphology of the fiber surface during long-time operation caused by deposition of carbon from the cathode plasma is revealed. The microscopic electric field strength on the fiber surface is estimated taking into account the surface microrelief. The efficiency of microwave generation comparable with that of a velvet cathode in low (200 kV/cm) average electric field in the gap is obtained for the Cherenkov microwave generator with vacuum diode without external magnetic field of decimeter wavelength range based on the SINUS-7 pulsed-periodic high-current electron accelerator with current pulse duration of 50 ns. The operating lifetime no less than 105 pulses is demonstrated for the carbon fiber-based cathode of the microwave generator operating in the mode of pulse batch with duration of several seconds and pulse repetition frequency of 20-50 Hz.

  11. Microwave emission from granular silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental finding is that mass absorption coefficient is independent of frequency but highly dependent on moisture content; effective conductivity increases with frequency, and low tangent is independent of frequency. Computed values of electrical properties are in rough numerical agreement with extrapolated laboratory values on other silicate materials.

  12. Spectrum of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics describe an Abelian plasma where conduction and chiral currents are simultaneously present and constrained by the second law of thermodynamics. At high frequencies the magnetic currents play the leading role, and the spectrum is dominated by two-fluid effects. The system behaves instead as a single fluid in the low-frequency regime where the vortical currents induce potentially large hypermagnetic fields. After deriving the physical solutions of the generalized Appleton-Hartree equation, the corresponding dispersion relations are scrutinized and compared with the results valid for cold plasmas. Hypermagnetic knots and fluid vortices can be concurrently present at very low frequencies and suggest a qualitatively different dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities.

  13. Detection of anomalous events

    DOEpatents

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  14. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.

  15. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Janney, Mark A.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy.

  16. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Janney, M.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1992-03-24

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy. 2 figs.

  17. A New Neural Network Approach Including First-Guess for Retrieval of Atmospheric Water Vapor, Cloud Liquid Water Path, Surface Temperature and Emissivities Over Land From Satellite Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aires, F.; Prigent, C.; Rossow, W. B.; Rothstein, M.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of microwave observations over land to determine atmospheric and surface parameters is still limited due to the complexity of the inverse problem. Neural network techniques have already proved successful as the basis of efficient retrieval methods for non-linear cases, however, first-guess estimates, which are used in variational methods to avoid problems of solution non-uniqueness or other forms of solution irregularity, have up to now not been used with neural network methods. In this study, a neural network approach is developed that uses a first-guess. Conceptual bridges are established between the neural network and variational methods. The new neural method retrieves the surface skin temperature, the integrated water vapor content, the cloud liquid water path and the microwave surface emissivities between 19 and 85 GHz over land from SSM/I observations. The retrieval, in parallel, of all these quantities improves the results for consistency reasons. A data base to train the neural network is calculated with a radiative transfer model and a a global collection of coincident surface and atmospheric parameters extracted from the National Center for Environmental Prediction reanalysis, from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data and from microwave emissivity atlases previously calculated. The results of the neural network inversion are very encouraging. The r.m.s. error of the surface temperature retrieval over the globe is 1.3 K in clear sky conditions and 1.6 K in cloudy scenes. Water vapor is retrieved with a r.m.s. error of 3.8 kg/sq m in clear conditions and 4.9 kg/sq m in cloudy situations. The r.m.s. error in cloud liquid water path is 0.08 kg/sq m . The surface emissivities are retrieved with an accuracy of better than 0.008 in clear conditions and 0.010 in cloudy conditions. Microwave land surface temperature retrieval presents a very attractive complement to the infrared estimates in cloudy areas: time record of land

  18. Constraint on the polarization of electric dipole emission from spinning dust

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Martin, P. G.; Lazarian, A.

    2013-12-20

    Planck results have revealed that the electric dipole emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the most reliable explanation for the anomalous microwave emission that interferes with cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation experiments. The emerging question is to what extent this emission component contaminates the polarized CMB radiation. We present constraints on polarized dust emission for the model of grain-size distribution and grain alignment that best fits the observed extinction and polarization curves. Two stars with a prominent polarization feature at λ = 2175 Å—HD 197770 and HD 147933-4—are chosen for our study. For HD 197770, we find that the model with aligned silicate grains plus weakly aligned PAHs can successfully reproduce the 2175 Å polarization feature; in contrast, for HD 147933-4, we find that the alignment of only silicate grains can account for that feature. The alignment function of PAHs for the best-fit model to the HD 197770 data is used to constrain polarized spinning dust emission. We find that the degree of polarization of spinning dust emission is about 1.6% at frequency ν ≈ 3 GHz and declines to below 0.9% for ν > 20 GHz. We also predict the degree of polarization of thermal dust emission at 353 GHz to be P {sub em} ≈ 11% and 14% for the lines of sight to the HD 197770 and HD 147933-4 stars, respectively.

  19. Anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  20. Microwave remote sensing of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, J. C.; Wang, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Knowledge of soil moisture is important to many disciplines, such as agriculture, hydrology, and meteorology. Soil moisture distribution of vast regions can be measured efficiently only with remote sensing techniques from airborne or satellite platforms. At low microwave frequencies, water has a much larger dielectric constant than dry soil. This difference manifests itself in surface emissivity (or reflectivity) change between dry and wet soils, and can be measured by a microwave radiometer or radar. The Microwave Sensors and Data Communications Branch is developing microwave remote sensing techniques using both radar and radiometry, but primarily with microwave radiometry. The efforts in these areas range from developing algorithms for data interpretation to conducting feasibility studies for space systems, with a primary goal of developing a microwave radiometer for soil moisture measurement from satellites, such as EOS or the Space Station. These efforts are listed.

  1. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  2. Anomalous discrete symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z. )

    1992-12-01

    We examine an interesting scenario to solve the domain-wall problem recently suggested by Preskill, Trivedi, Wilczek, and Wise. The effective potential is calculated in the presence of the QCD axial anomaly. It is shown that some discrete symmetries such as {ital CP} and {ital Z}{sub 2} can be anomalous due to a so-called {ital K} term induced by instantons. We point out that the {ital Z}{sub 2} domain-wall problem in the two-doublet standard model can be resolved by two types of solutions: the {ital CP}-conserving one and the {ital CP}-breaking one. In the first case, there exist two {ital Z}{sub 2}-related local minima whose energy splitting is provided by the instanton effect. In the second case, there is only one unique vacuum so that the domain walls do not form at all. The consequences of this new source of {ital CP} violation are discussed and shown to be well within the experimental limits in weak interactions.

  3. Passive microwave remote sensing of the ocean - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of passive microwave remote sensing of the ocean. The physics of emission and instrumentation are highlighted in order to establish a relationship between the thermal emission and retrieved geophysical parameters. A discussion then follows on measurements of temperature, salinity, windspeed, etc. using passive microwave systems. These measurements are related to the accuracy and spatial resolution required by the users. The status of passive microwave remote sensing is summarized and recommendations for future research are presented.

  4. The generation of rapid solar flare hard X-ray and microwave fluctuations in current sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1986-01-01

    The generation of rapid fluctuations, or spikes, in hard X-ray and microwave bursts via the disruption of electron heating and acceleration in current sheets is studied. It is found that 20 msec hard X-ray fluctuations can be thermally generated in a current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is highly anomalous, the plasma density in the emitting region is relatively high, and the volume of the emitting region is greater than that of the current sheet. A specific mechanism for producing the fluctuations, involving heating in the presence of ion acoustic turbulence and a constant driving electric field, and interruption of the heating by a strong two-stream instability, is discussed. Variations upon this mechanism are also discussed. This mechanism also modulates electron acceleration, as required for the microwave spike emission. If the hard X-ray emission at energies less than approx. 1000 keV is nonthermal bremsstrahlung, the coherent modulation of electron acceleration in a large number of current sheets is required.

  5. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  6. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  7. Microwave PASER Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Antipov, S.; Poluektov, O.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    The PASER (Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) concept for particle acceleration entails the direct transfer of energy from an active medium to a charged particle beam. The PASER was originally formulated for optical (laser) media; we are planning a PASER demonstration experiment based on an optically pumped X-band paramagnetic medium consisting of porphyrin or fullerene (C{sub 60}) derivatives in a toluene solution or polystyrene matrix. We discuss the background of this project and report on the status of the experiment to measure the acceleration of electrons using the microwave PASER.

  8. Anomalous Doppler instability in tokamaks: first principles simulation and observations in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard; Lai, Alan; Chapman, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    The evolution in velocity space of minority suprathermal electron populations undergoing the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI) is investigated using fully nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations (W N Lai et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 102122 (2013); and submitted (2015)) that self-consistently evolve particles and fields in a magnetized plasma. Electron trajectories during different stages of the ADI are captured, and are analyzed in relation to the excited electric fields and the overall velocity distribution of electrons. The time-evolution of the moments of the perpendicular electron distribution function is studied to test the range of applicability of analytical approximations that involve a quasilinear wave-driven diffusion operator. For some electrons, trapping and mirroring are observed during the saturation phase. Recent measurements of microwave and X-ray emission during edge localized mode (ELM) activity in the MAST tokamak imply acceleration of electrons parallel to the magnetic field combined with rapid acquisition of perpendicular momentum. This suggests (S J Freethy et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 125004 (2015)) that the ADI is operating on electrons accelerated by inductive electric fields generated by the initial ELM instability. Work supported in part by the RCUK Energy Programme and EPSRC.

  9. Determination of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, phosphorus, sodium, and zinc in fortified food products by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry: single-laboratory validation and ring trial.

    PubMed

    Poitevin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation (SLV) and a ring trial (RT) were undertaken to determine nine nutritional elements in food products by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry in order to modernize AOAC Official Method 984.27. The improvements involved extension of the scope to all food matrixes (including infant formula), optimized microwave digestion, selected analytical lines, internal standardization, and ion buffering. Simultaneous determination of nine elements (calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc) was made in food products. Sample digestion was performed through wet digestion of food samples by microwave technology with either closed- or open-vessel systems. Validation was performed to characterize the method for selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, ruggedness, and uncertainty. The robustness and efficiency of this method was proven through a successful RT using experienced independent food industry laboratories. Performance characteristics are reported for 13 certified and in-house reference materials, populating the AOAC triangle food sectors, which fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations for accuracy (trueness, recovery, and z-scores) and precision (repeatability and reproducibility RSD, and HorRat values) regarding SLVs and RTs. This multielemental method is cost-efficient, time-saving, accurate, and fit-for-purpose according to ISO 17025 Norm and AOAC acceptability criteria, and is proposed as an extended updated version of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for fortified food products, including infant formula. PMID:22468357

  10. Improvement of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for the determination of nine nutritional elements in food products by Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy after microwave digestion: single-laboratory validation and ring trial.

    PubMed

    Poitevin, Eric; Nicolas, Marine; Graveleau, Laetitia; Richoz, Janique; Andrey, Daniel; Monard, Florence

    2009-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation (SLV) and a ring trial (RT) were undertaken to determine nine nutritional elements in food products by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in order to improve and update AOAC Official Method 984.27. The improvements involved optimized microwave digestion, selected analytical lines, internal standardization, and ion buffering. Simultaneous determination of nine elements (calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc) was made in food products. Sample digestion was performed through wet digestion of food samples by microwave technology with either closed or open vessel systems. Validation was performed to characterize the method for selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, ruggedness, and uncertainty. The robustness and efficiency of this method was proved through a successful internal RT using experienced food industry laboratories. Performance characteristics are reported for 13 certified and in-house reference materials, populating the AOAC triangle food sectors, which fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations for accuracy (trueness, recovery, and z-scores) and precision (repeatability and reproducibility RSD and HorRat values) regarding SLV and RT. This multielemental method is cost-efficient, time-saving, accurate, and fit-for-purpose according to ISO 17025 Norm and AOAC acceptability criteria, and is proposed as an improved version of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for fortified food products, including infant formula. PMID:19916387

  11. The study of pinch regimes based on radiation-enhanced compression and anomalous resistivity phenomena and their effects on hard x-ray emission in a Mather type dense plasma focus device (SABALAN2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piriaei, D.; Mahabadi, T. D.; Javadi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, by using argon and nitrogen as the filling gases in a Mather type dense plasma focus device at different values of pressure and charging voltage, two different kinds of pinch regimes were observed for each of the gases. The physics of the pinch regimes could be explained by using the two versions of the Lee's computational model which predicted each of the scenarios and clarified their differences between the two gases according to the radiation-enhanced compression and, additionally, predicted the pinch regimes through the anomalous resistivity effect during the pinch time. This was accomplished through the fitting process (simulation) on the current signal. Moreover, the characteristic amplitude and time scales of the anomalous resistances were obtained. The correlations between the features of the plasma current dip and the emitted hard x-ray pulses were observed. The starting time, intensity, duration, and the multiple or single feature of the emitted hard x-ray strongly correlated to the same respective features of the current dip.

  12. The study of pinch regimes based on radiation-enhanced compression and anomalous resistivity phenomena and their effects on hard x-ray emission in a Mather type dense plasma focus device (SABALAN2)

    SciTech Connect

    Piriaei, D.; Javadi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Mahabadi, T. D.; Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-15

    In this study, by using argon and nitrogen as the filling gases in a Mather type dense plasma focus device at different values of pressure and charging voltage, two different kinds of pinch regimes were observed for each of the gases. The physics of the pinch regimes could be explained by using the two versions of the Lee's computational model which predicted each of the scenarios and clarified their differences between the two gases according to the radiation-enhanced compression and, additionally, predicted the pinch regimes through the anomalous resistivity effect during the pinch time. This was accomplished through the fitting process (simulation) on the current signal. Moreover, the characteristic amplitude and time scales of the anomalous resistances were obtained. The correlations between the features of the plasma current dip and the emitted hard x-ray pulses were observed. The starting time, intensity, duration, and the multiple or single feature of the emitted hard x-ray strongly correlated to the same respective features of the current dip.

  13. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on microwave processing of ceramics: Microwave-material interactions; anticipated advantage of microwave sintering; ceramic sintering; and ceramic joining. 24 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  14. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  15. Interaction of Microwave Radiation Undergoing Stochastic Phase Jumps with Plasmas or Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Karas', V.I.; Fainberg, Ya. B.; Alisov, A.F.; Artamoshkin, A.M.; Gavrilenko, I.V.; Mirny, V.I.; Bingham, R.; Levchenko, V.D.; Potapenko, I.F.; Lontano, M.; Starostin, A.N.

    2005-09-15

    New types of beam-plasma devices generating intense stochastic microwave radiation in the interaction of electron beams with hybrid plasma waveguides were developed and put into operation at the National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine). The objective of the paper is to discuss the results of theoretical and experimental studies and numerical simulations of the normal and oblique incidence of linearly polarized electromagnetic waves on an interface between a vacuum and an overcritical plasma. The main results of the reported investigations are as follows: (i) for the parameter values under analysis, the transmission coefficient for microwaves with a stochastically jumping phase is one order of magnitude greater than that for a broadband regular electromagnetic wave with the same spectral density; (ii) the electrons are heated most efficiently by obliquely incident waves with a stochastically jumping phase and, in addition, the electron distribution function has a high-energy tail; and (iii) necessary conditions for gas breakdown and for the initiation of a microwave discharge in stochastic fields in a light source are determined. The anomalously large transmission coefficient for microwaves, the anomalous character of the breakdown conditions, the anomalous behavior of microwave gas discharges, and the anomalous nature of collisionless electron heating, are attributed to stochastic jumps in the phase of microwave radiation.

  16. Tandem microwave waste remediation and decontamination system

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Clark, David E.; Schulz, Rebecca L.

    1999-01-01

    The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

  17. Modeling of microwave heating of particulate metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Upadhyaya, A.; Sethi, G.

    2006-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that metal powder compacts can be heated to high temperatures using microwaves. While microwave heating of ceramics is well understood and modeled, there is still uncertainty about the exact mechanism and mode of microwave heating of particulate metals. The current study describes an approach for modeling the microwave heating of metal powder compacts using an electromagnetic-thermal model. The model predicts the variation in temperature with time during sintering. The effect of powder size, emissivity, and susceptor heating on the heating rate has also been assessed. These predictions have been validated by the experimental observations of the thermal profiles of Sn-, Cu-, and W-alloy compacts, using a 2.45 GHz multimode microwave furnace.

  18. Experimental study of matrix carbon field-emission cathodes and computer aided design of electron guns for microwave power devices, exploring these cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Y.A.; Petrosyan, A.I.; Penzyakov, V.V.; Pimenov, V.G.; Rogovin, V.I.; Shesterkin, V.I.; Kudryashov, V.P.; Semyonov, V.C.

    1997-03-01

    The experimental study of matrix carbon field-emission cathodes (MCFECs), which has led to the stable operation of the cathodes with current emission values up to 100 mA, is described. A method of computer aided design of TWT electron guns (EGs) with MCFEC, based on the results of the MCFEC emission experimental study, is presented. The experimental MCFEC emission characteristics are used to define the field gain coefficient K and the cathode effective emission area S{sub eff}. The EG program computes the electric field upon the MCFEC surface, multiplies it by the K value and uses the Fowler{endash}Nordheim law and the S{sub eff} value to calculate the MCFEC current; the electron trajectories are computed as well. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  19. Wideband Agile Digital Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd C.; Brown, Shannon T.; Ruf, Christopher; Gross, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to take the initial steps needed to develop a field programmable gate array (FPGA)- based wideband digital radiometer backend (>500 MHz bandwidth) that will enable passive microwave observations with minimal performance degradation in a radiofrequency-interference (RFI)-rich environment. As manmade RF emissions increase over time and fill more of the microwave spectrum, microwave radiometer science applications will be increasingly impacted in a negative way, and the current generation of spaceborne microwave radiometers that use broadband analog back ends will become severely compromised or unusable over an increasing fraction of time on orbit. There is a need to develop a digital radiometer back end that, for each observation period, uses digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms to identify the maximum amount of RFI-free spectrum across the radiometer band to preserve bandwidth to minimize radiometer noise (which is inversely related to the bandwidth). Ultimately, the objective is to incorporate all processing necessary in the back end to take contaminated input spectra and produce a single output value free of manmade signals to minimize data rates for spaceborne radiometer missions. But, to meet these objectives, several intermediate processing algorithms had to be developed, and their performance characterized relative to typical brightness temperature accuracy re quirements for current and future microwave radiometer missions, including those for measuring salinity, soil moisture, and snow pack.

  20. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  1. Electron kinetics inferred from observations of microwave bursts during edge localized modes in the mega-amp spherical tokamak.

    PubMed

    Freethy, S J; McClements, K G; Chapman, S C; Dendy, R O; Lai, W N; Pamela, S J P; Shevchenko, V F; Vann, R G L

    2015-03-27

    Recent measurements of microwave and x-ray emission during edge localized mode (ELM) activity in tokamak plasmas provide a fresh perspective on ELM physics. It is evident that electron kinetics, which are not incorporated in standard (fluid) models for the instability that drives ELMs, play a key role in the new observations. These effects should be included in future models for ELMs and the ELM cycle. The observed radiative effects paradoxically imply acceleration of electrons parallel to the magnetic field combined with rapid acquisition of perpendicular momentum. It is shown that this paradox can be resolved by the action of the anomalous Doppler instability which enables fast collective radiative relaxation, in the perpendicular direction, of electrons accelerated in the parallel direction by inductive electric fields generated by the initial ELM instability. PMID:25860751

  2. Venus Highland Anomalous Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Richard A.; Tyler, G. L.; Häusler, B.; Mattei, R.; Patzold, M.

    2009-09-01

    Maxwell Montes was one of several unusually bright areas identified from early Venus radar backscatter observations. Pioneer Venus' orbiting radar associated low emissivity with the bright areas and established a correlation between reflectivity and altitude. Magellan, using an oblique bistatic geometry, showed that the bright surface dielectric constant was not only large but also imaginary -- i.e., the material was conducting, at least near Cleopatra Patera (Pettengill et al., Science, 272, 1996). Venus Express (VEX) repeated Magellan's bistatic observations over Maxwell, using the more conventional circular polarization carried by most spacecraft. Although VEX signal-to-noise ratio was lower than Magellan's, echoes were sufficiently strong to verify the Magellan conclusions near Cleopatra (see J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B41, doi:10.1029/2008JE003156). Only about 40% of the surface at Cleopatra scatters specularly, opening the Fresnel (specular) interpretation model to question. Elsewhere in Maxwell, the specular percentage may be even lower. Nonetheless, the echo polarization is reversed throughout Maxwell, a result that is consistent with large dielectric constants and difficult to explain without resorting qualitatively (if not quantitatively) to specular models. VEX was scheduled to explore other high altitude regions when its S-Band (13-cm wavelength) radio system failed in late 2006, so further probing of high altitude targets awaits arrival of a new spacecraft.

  3. GIANT RINGS IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Kovetz, Ely D.; Ben-David, Assaf; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: bd.assaf@gmail.co

    2010-11-20

    We find a unique direction in the cosmic microwave background sky around which giant rings have an anomalous mean temperature profile. This direction is in very close alignment with the afore measured anomalously large bulk flow direction. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate the significance of the giant rings at the 3{sigma} level and the alignment with the bulk flow at 2.5{sigma}. We argue that a cosmic defect seeded by a pre-inflationary particle could explain the giant rings, the large bulk flow, and their alignment.

  4. Creating a full-sky map of PAH emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkeley, Matthew; Kogut, Alan J.; Chuss, David T.; WISE

    2016-06-01

    Accurate characterization of foreground components has been a pressing issue in the CMB community for some time. In particular, the Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME), first detected in 1995 and confirmed by WMAP and Planck, has remained mysterious, though the leading hypothesis proposes that this excess emission is due to electric dipole emission from spinning dust grains. The leading candidate for such ‘spinning dust’ is Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs have characteristic emission lines in the mid-IR and can be analyzed using archived data from the WISE satellite. We have been working using publicly available data from WISE to create a full-sky map across the four WISE frequency bands: 3.4um, 4.6um, 12um and 22um. PAH emission is brightest in the 12um band; however it is possible to localize this population more accurately by linearly combining the maps across all four frequencies to create a full-sky map tracing the small-grain population of PAHs.We present preliminary results from this work.

  5. Magnetic effects in anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, M.

    1992-12-31

    Spectacular enhancements of magnetic x-ray scattering have been predicted and observed experimentally. These effects are the result of resonant phenomena closely related to anomalous dispersion, and they are strongest at near-edge resonances. The theory of these resonances will be developed with particular attention to the symmetry properties of the scatterer. While the phenomena to be discussed concern magnetic properties the transitions are electric dipole or electric quadrupole in character and represent a subset of the usual anomalous dispersion phenomena. The polarization dependence of the scattering is also considered, and the polarization dependence for magnetic effects is related to that for charge scattering and to Templeton type anisotropic polarization phenomena. It has been found that the strongest effects occur in rare-earths and in actinides for M shell edges. In addition to the scattering properties the theory is applicable to ``forward scattering`` properties such as the Faraday effect and circular dichroism.

  6. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB

  7. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1σ and 2σ were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal

  8. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO

  9. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1σ and 2σ were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code

  10. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO

  11. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1σ and 2σ were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO

  12. Microwave Imaging Reflectometry for the Visualization of Turbulence in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    E. Mazzucato

    1999-12-16

    Understanding the mechanism of anomalous transport in magnetically confined plasmas requires the use of sophisticated diagnostic tools for the measurement of short-scale turbulent fluctuations. This paper describes the conceptual design of an experimental technique for the global visualization of density fluctuations in tokamaks. The proposed method is based on microwave reflectometry and consists in using a large diameter probing beam, collecting the reflected waves with a large aperture antenna, and forming an image of the reflecting plasma layer onto a 2D array of microwave receivers. Based on results from a series of numerical simulations, the theoretical feasibility conditions of the proposed method are discussed.

  13. Tracking Jupiter at microwave frequencies after the 2009 impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; García-Miró, Cristina; Rizzo, Ricardo; Forster, James; Hofstadter, Mark; Dorcey, Ryan; Jauncey, David; de Pater, Imke; Baines, Graham; Sotuela, Ioanna

    2010-05-01

    On 19 July 2009, amateur astronomer Anthony Wesley located near Canberra, Australia, discovered an anomalous dark feature near Jupiter's south pole. It was soon confirmed with additional observations that the new feature was an impact site created by an unknown object. The only other observed collision with Jupiter occurred 15 years earlier with the catastrophic impact of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 Comet (SL9). Unlike the well-predicted SL9 event, the biggest question to answer this time is whether the impact body was a comet or an asteroid. We started a campaign to track Jupiter at microwave frequencies with NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), in Canberra, Goldstone (California), and Madrid, and the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) in California. A 34m DSN radio telescope at Goldstone was operated by students through GAVRT program. Our primary goal was first to detect molecular radio emissions possibly originating from cometary core components, such as OH, H2O, and NH3, and second to detect radio burst in non-thermal continuum emissions, as observed after the SL-9 impact 15 years ago. We used a 70m radio telescope in Canberra and another 70m in Madrid to search for molecular emissions at 1.6 GHz for OH, 22 GHz for water vapors, 23 GHz for ammonia. Several radio spectroscopy observing sessions have been successfully conducted from 23 July to 1 August. We also started continuum emission monitoring, mainly at 2.3 GHz and 8.4 GHz using 34m and 70m DSN telescopes and the ATA. At early stage of this still on-going monitoring, joint observations were conducted with two 34m telescopes in Canberra and the ATA on 30 July and 9 August in order to have long continuous time coverage and to check flux density scales using a common calibrator source. To highlight this campaign, on 22 November we undertook the Jupiter: Project 24 for the International Year of Astronomy. This campaign was over 24 hours of continuous observation of Jupiter using all three DSN complexes around the world. A couple

  14. Laboratory measurement of the millimeter wave properties of liquid sulfuric acid (H2SO4). [study of microwave emission from Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahd, Antoine K.; Steffes, Paul G.

    1991-01-01

    The methodology and the results of laboratory measurements of the millimeter wave properties of liquid sulfuric acid are presented. Measurements conducted at 30-40 and 90-100 GHz are reported, using different concentrations of liquid H2SO4. The measured data are used to compute the expected opacity of H2SO4 condensates and their effects on the millimeter wave emission from Venus. The cloud condensate is found to have an effect on the emission from Venus. The calculated decrease in brightness temperature is well below the observed decrease in brightness temperature found by de Pater et al. (1991). It is suggested that other constituents such as gaseous H2SO4 also affect the observed variation in the brightness temperature.

  15. Dynamic Land Surface Classifcations using Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H.; Tian, Y.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Harrison, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface emissivity in microwave frequencies is critical to the remote sensing of soil moisture, precipitation, and vegetation. Different land surfaces have different spectral signatures in the microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Their spatial and temporal behaviors are also highly variable. These properties are yet not well understood in microwave frequencies, despite their capability in detecting water-related variables in the atmosphere and land surface. A classification scheme was developed to stratify the Earth's land surfaces based on their seasonally dynamic microwave signatures. An unsupervised clustering approach was used identify and distinguish data groupings along two microwave based indicies. Land surface data clusters were mapped to determine their spatial relationships to known land cover groupings. Differences in land surface clusters were analyzed in their spatial consistency and their direction and magnitude of land surface change. It was found that vegetation and topography were the predominant contributors to change between seasons. Land surface extremes of sandy desert and closed canopy tropical forest displayed minimal intra-annual variability while transitional zones, such as the Sahel and North American temperate forests, exhibited the most variability. Distinct microwave signatures varied between seasons along a latittudinal gradient. Overall variability in land surface types increased at high lattitudes. This classification will help inform research studies maniputlating the microwave frequencies of the electromagnetic spectrum to better characterize land surface dynamics, and will be very useful in the validation of radiative transfer models and quantification of uncertainty in global precipitation monitoring.

  16. Anomalous absorption in a-type asymmetric top molecules in cosmic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    Since the detection of the first molecule OH in cosmic objects in 1963, scientists got interested in identification of molecules in the cosmic objects. By now more than 170 molecules have been identified. In order to know about the physical conditions prevailing in the cool cosmic objects and about the chemical reactions going on there, scientists are interested in identification of as many molecules as possible. In some molecular clouds, the kinetic temperature is very low, 10 - 20 K. For such objects, anomalous absorption, i.e., the absorption against the cosmic microwave background, may play an important role for identification of molecules. The transition 111 - 110 at 4.829 GHz of H_2CO was the first one showing the anomalous absorption in the cosmic objects. The molecule H_2CS also has been identified in the cosmic objects. We have discussed about the anomalous absorption of 111 - 110 transition in a-type asymmetric top molecules. For the investigation, the required parameters are the radiative and collisional transition probabilities. We can calculate radiative transition probabilities between the rotational levels. Calculation of collisional rates is a tedious job. In absence of accurate collisional rates, we can investigated the anomalous absorption in a qualitative manner by using the scaled values for collisional rates. We find that anomalous absorption of 111 - 110 transition is possible, provided collisional rates satisfy the required condition.

  17. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 1 - Microwave remote sensing fundamentals and radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The three components of microwave remote sensing (sensor-scene interaction, sensor design, and measurement techniques), and the applications to geoscience are examined. The history of active and passive microwave sensing is reviewed, along with fundamental principles of electromagnetic wave propagation, antennas, and microwave interaction with atmospheric constituents. Radiometric concepts are reviewed, particularly for measurement problems for atmospheric and terrestrial sources of natural radiation. Particular attention is given to the emission by atmospheric gases, clouds, and rain as described by the radiative transfer function. Finally, the operation and performance characteristics of radiometer receivers are discussed, particularly for measurement precision, calibration techniques, and imaging considerations.

  18. Anomalous transport induced by sheath instability in Hall effect thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Schneider, Ralf

    2009-06-22

    It is well recognized to ascribe the anomalous cross-field conductivity inside Hall-effect thrusters to fluctuation-induced transport due to gradient-driven instabilities (Rayleigh or electron drift) and to electron-wall interaction (near-wall conductivity). In this letter, we have performed numerical experiments showing the possibility of another mechanism inducing azimuthal fluctuations: the lateral sheath instability. It is created by a negative differential resistance of the current-voltage I-V characteristic of the floating wall as a consequence of high secondary electron emission. The contribution from this effect to the anomalous axial current is calculated and it accounts of more than 80% of the experimental value.

  19. Anomalous sounds from the entry of meteor fireballs.

    PubMed

    Keay, C S

    1980-10-01

    A very bright fireball observed over New South Wales in 1978 produced anomalous sounds clearly audible to some of the observers. An investigation of the phenomenon indicates that bright fireballs radiate considerable electromagnetic energy in the very-low-frequency (VLF) region of the spectrum. A mechanism for the production of VLF emissions from the highly energetic wake turbulence of the fireball is proposed. Trials with human subjects revealed a very extended range of thresholds for the perception of electrically excited sounds among a sample population, particularly when the VLF electric field excites surface acoustic waves in surrounding objects. This fact, together with variable propagation effects and local conditions, can account for the sporadic distribution of reports of anomalous sounds from fireballs and auroras. PMID:17751127

  20. No evidence for anomalously low variance circles on the sky

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Adam; Scott, Douglas; Zibin, James P. E-mail: dscott@phas.ubc.ca

    2011-04-01

    In a recent paper, Gurzadyan and Penrose claim to have found directions on the sky centred on which are circles of anomalously low variance in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These features are presented as evidence for a particular picture of the very early Universe. We attempted to repeat the analysis of these authors, and we can indeed confirm that such variations do exist in the temperature variance for annuli around points in the data. However, we find that this variation is entirely expected in a sky which contains the usual CMB anisotropies. In other words, properly simulated Gaussian CMB data contain just the sorts of variations claimed. Gurzadyan and Penrose have not found evidence for pre-Big Bang phenomena, but have simply re-discovered that the CMB contains structure.

  1. Determination of soluble toxic arsenic species in alga samples by microwave-assisted extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    García Salgado, S; Quijano Nieto, M A; Bonilla Simón, M M

    2006-09-29

    A microwave-based procedure for arsenic species extraction in alga samples (Sargassum fulvellum, Chlorella vulgaris, Hizikia fusiformis and Laminaria digitata) is described. Extraction time and temperature were tested in order to evaluate the extraction efficiency of the process. Arsenic compounds were extracted in 8 ml of deionised water at 90 degrees C for 5 min. The process was repeated three times. Soluble arsenic compounds extracted accounted for about 78-98% of total arsenic. The results were compared with those obtained in a previous work, where the extraction process was carried out by ultrasonic focussed probe for 30 s. Speciation studies were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-AES). The chromatographic method allowed us to separate As(III), As(V), monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in less than 13 min. The chromatographic analysis of the samples allowed us to identify and quantify As(V) in Hizikia sample and Sargasso material, while the four arsenic species studied were found in Chlorella sample. In the case of Laminaria sample, none of these species was identified by HPLC-HG-ICP-AES. However, in the chromatographic analysis of this alga by HPLC-ICP-AES, an unknown arsenic species was detected. PMID:16876177

  2. A novel methodology for rapid digestion of rare earth element ores and determination by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and dynamic reaction cell-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Helmeczi, Erick; Wang, Yong; Brindle, Ian D

    2016-11-01

    Short-wavelength infrared radiation has been successfully applied to accelerate the acid digestion of refractory rare-earth ore samples. Determinations were achieved with microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) and dynamic reaction cell - inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS). The digestion method developed was able to tackle high iron-oxide and silicate matrices using only phosphoric acid in a time frame of only 8min, and did not require perchloric or hydrofluoric acid. Additionally, excellent recoveries and reproducibilities of the rare earth elements, as well as uranium and thorium, were achieved. Digestions of the certified reference materials OREAS-465 and REE-1, with radically different mineralogies, delivered results that mirror those obtained by fusion processes. For the rare-earth CRM OKA-2, whose REE data are provisional, experimental data for the rare-earth elements were generally higher than the provisional values, often exceeding z-values of +2. Determined values for Th and U in this reference material, for which certified values are available, were in excellent agreement. PMID:27591646

  3. Anomalous phosphenes in ocular protontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, E.; Maréchal, F.; Dendale, R.; Mabit, C.; Calugaru, V.; Desjardin, L.; Narici, L.

    2010-04-01

    We have undertaken a clinical ground study of proton-induced light flashes (phosphenes). Patients treated at the Institut Curie - Centre de Protonthérapie in Orsay, France, received radiation therapy to cure ocular and skull-base cancers. Sixty percent of the patients treated for choroidal melanomas using 73 MeV protons report anomalous phosphenes. Delivering a radiation dose on the retina only is not sufficient to trigger the light flash. The present study may be the first indication of phosphenes triggered by protons of few tens of MeV.

  4. Khinchin Theorem and Anomalous Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Morgado, Rafael; Vainstein, Mendeli H.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2008-12-01

    A recent Letter [M. H. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 190601 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.190601] has called attention to the fact that irreversibility is a broader concept than ergodicity, and that therefore the Khinchin theorem [A. I. Khinchin, Mathematical Foundations of Statistical Mechanics (Dover, New York, 1949)] may fail in some systems. In this Letter we show that for all ranges of normal and anomalous diffusion described by a generalized Langevin equation the Khinchin theorem holds.

  5. Anomalous Hall effect in localization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Kai; Yue, Di; Tian, Yuan; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous Hall effect in the ultrathin film regime is investigated in Fe(001)(1-3 nm) films epitaxial on MgO(001). The logarithmic localization correction to longitudinal resistivity and anomalous Hall resistivity are observed at low temperature. We identify that the coefficient of skew scattering has a reduction from metallic to localized regime, while the contribution of side jump has inconspicuous change except for a small drop below 10 K. Furthermore, we discover that the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity decreases with the reduction of thickness below 2 nm. Our results provide unambiguous experimental evidence to clarify the problem of localization correction to the anomalous Hall effect.

  6. Microwave Radiometric Signatures of Different Surface Types in Deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Rossow, William B.; Matthews, Elaine; Marticorena, Beatrice

    1999-01-01

    In arid environments, specific microwave signatures have been observed with the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). For a given diurnal change in surface skin temperature, the corresponding change in the microwave brightness temperature is smaller than expected. With the help of a 1D, time-dependent heat conduction model, this behavior is explained by microwave radiation coming from different depths in the soil, depending on the soil type and on the microwave radiation frequency. Using the eight-times daily estimates of the surface skin temperature by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and a simple Fresnel model, collocated month-long time series of the SSM/I brightness temperatures and the surface skin temperatures give a consistent estimate of the effective microwave emissivity and penetration depth parameters. Results are presented and analyzed for the Sahara and the Arabian Peninsula, for July and November 1992. The case of the Australian desert is also briefly mentioned. Assuming a reasonable thermal diffusivity for the soil in desert areas, the microwave radiation is estimated to come from soil layers down to depths of at least five wavelengths in some locations. Regions where the microwave radiation comes from deeper soil layers also have large microwave emissivity polarization differences and large visible reflectances, suggesting that these areas correspond to sand dune fields.

  7. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third is a more…

  8. Hard x ray/microwave spectroscopy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Dale E.

    1992-01-01

    The joint study of hard x ray and microwave observations of solar flares is extremely important because the two complementary ways of viewing the accelerated electrons yield information that cannot be obtained using hard x rays or microwaves alone. The microwaves can provide spatial information lacking in the hard x rays, and the x ray data can give information on the energy distribution of electrons that remove ambiguities in the radio data. A prerequisite for combining the two data-sets, however, is to first understand which range of microwave frequencies correlate best with the hard x rays. This SMM Guest Investigator grant enabled us to combine multi-frequency OVRO data with calibrated hard x ray data to shed light on the relationship between the two emissions. In particular, the questions of which microwave frequencies correspond to which hard x ray energies, and what is the corresponding energy of the electrons that produce both types of emission are investigated.

  9. ERTS-1 anomalous dark patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Through combined use of imagery from ERTS-1 and NOAA-2 satellites was found that when the sun elevation exceeds 55 degrees, the ERTS-1 imagery is subject to considerable contamination by sunlight even though the actual specular point is nearly 300 nautical miles from nadir. Based on sea surface wave slope information, a wind speed of 10 knots will theoretically provide approximately 0.5 percent incident solar reflectance under observed ERTS multispectral scanner detectors. This reflectance nearly doubles under the influence of a 20 knot wind. The most pronounced effect occurs in areas of calm water where anomalous dark patches are observed. Calm water at distances from the specular point found in ERTS scenes will reflect no solar energy to the multispectral scanner, making these regions stand out as dark areas in all bands in an ocean scene otherwise comprosed by a general diffuse sunlight from rougher ocean surfaces. Anomalous dark patches in the outer parts of the glitter zones may explain the unusual appearance of some scenes.

  10. Mercury speciation by HPLC--cold-vapour radiofrequency glow-discharge optical-emission spectrometry with on-line microwave oxidation.

    PubMed

    Martínez, R; Pereiro, R; Sanz-Medel, A; Bordel, N

    2001-11-01

    Hollow-cathode (HC) radiofrequency glow-discharge (rf-GD) optical-emission spectrometry (OES) has been used as detector for the determination of inorganic mercury by cold-vapour (CV) generation in a flow-injection (FI) system. Both NaBH4 and SnCl2 were evaluated as reducing reagents for production of mercury CV. The conditions governing the discharge (pressure, He flow rate, and delivered power) and Hg CV generation (NaBH4 or SnCl2 concentration and reagent flow rate) were optimized using both reducing agents. The analytical performance characteristics of FI-CV-rf-GD-OES for mercury detection were evaluated at the 253.6 nm emission mercury line. Detection limits (DL) of 0.2 ng mL(-1) using SnCl2 and 1.8 ng mL(-1) using NaBH4 were obtained (100 microliter sample injections were used). When the optimized experimental conditions using SnCl2 had been determined, the analytical potential of this CV-rf-GD-OES method was investigated as on-line detector for high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) speciation of mercury (Hg(II) and methylmercury). The HPLC-CV-rf-GD-OES detection limits for 100 microliter sample injections were found to be 1.2 and 1.8 ng mL(-1) (as mercury) of inorganic mercury and methylmercury, respectively. The reproducibility observed was below +/- 8% for both species. Finally, the HPLC-CV-rf-GD-OES system developed was successfully applied to the determination of methylmercury (speciation) in two certified reference materials, Dorm-2 and Dolt-2. PMID:11768461

  11. Microwave radiometry and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polívka, Jiří

    1995-09-01

    The radiometry in general is a method of detecting the radiation of matter. All material bodies and substances radiate energy in the form of electromagnetic waves according to Planck s Law. The frequency spectrum of such thermal radiation is determined, beyond the properties of a blackbody, by the emissivity of surfaces and by the temperature of a particular body. Also, its reflectivity and dispersion take part. Investigating the intensity of radiation and its spectral distribution, one may determine the temperature and characterize the radiating body as well as the ambient medium, all independently of distance. With the above possibilities, the radiometry represents a base of scientific method called remote sensing. Utilizing various models, temperature of distant bodies and images of observed scenes can be determined from the spatial distribution of radiation. In this method, two parameters are of paramount importance: the temperature resolution, which flows out from the detected energy, and the spatial resolution (or, angular resolution), which depends upon antenna size with respect to wavelength. An instrument usable to conduct radiometric observations thus consists of two basic elements: a detector or radiometer, which determines the temperature resolution, and an antenna which determines the angular or spatial resolution. For example, a photographic camera consists of an objective lens (antenna) and of a sensitive element (a film or a CCD). In remote sensing, different lenses and reflectors and different sensors are employed, both adjusted to a particular spectrum region in which certain important features of observed bodies and scenes are present: frequently, UV and IR bands are used. The microwave radiometry utilizes various types of antennas and detectors and provides some advantages in observing various scenes: the temperature resolution is recently being given in milikelvins, while the range extends from zero to millions of Kelvins. Microwaves also offer

  12. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  13. Medical applications of microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Jan; Lapes, M.

    2004-04-01

    Medical applications of microwaves (i.e. a possibility to use microwave energy and/or microwave technique and technology for therapeutical purposes) are a quite new and a very rapidly developing field. Microwave thermotherapy is being used in medicine for the cancer treatment and treatment of some other diseases since early eighties. In this contribution we would like to offer general overview of present activities in the Czech Republic, i.e. clinical applications and results, technical aspects of thermo therapeutic equipment and last but not least, prospective diagnostics based on microwave principals ant technology and instrumentation.

  14. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  15. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  16. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  17. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  18. Wanted: A Positive Control for Anomalous Subdiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous subdiffusion in cells and model systems is an active area of research. The main questions are whether diffusion is anomalous or normal, and if it is anomalous, its mechanism. The subject is controversial, especially the hypothesis that crowding causes anomalous subdiffusion. Anomalous subdiffusion measurements would be strengthened by an experimental standard, particularly one able to cross-calibrate the different types of measurements. Criteria for a calibration standard are proposed. First, diffusion must be anomalous over the length and timescales of the different measurements. The length-scale is fundamental; the time scale can be adjusted through the viscosity of the medium. Second, the standard must be theoretically well understood, with a known anomalous subdiffusion exponent, ideally readily tunable. Third, the standard must be simple, reproducible, and independently characterizable (by, for example, electron microscopy for nanostructures). Candidate experimental standards are evaluated, including obstructed lipid bilayers; aqueous systems obstructed by nanopillars; a continuum percolation system in which a prescribed fraction of randomly chosen obstacles in a regular array is ablated; single-file diffusion in pores; transient anomalous subdiffusion due to binding of particles in arrays such as transcription factors in randomized DNA arrays; and computer-generated physical trajectories. PMID:23260043

  19. Predicting clutter during anomalous propagation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Susan C.; Maurer, Donald E.; Musser, Keith L.

    1988-06-01

    Excessive clutter caused by anomalous propagation conditions severely degrades radar performance in many regions of the world. This article describes methods that can be used to predict anomalous clutter amplitude for site-specific radar parameters, terrain features, and atmospheric conditions and to predict the effects of radar Doppler processing on evaporation-ducted sea clutter.

  20. Wave-particle interaction and peculiarities of propagation and emission of accelerated particles in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. V.; Tsap, Yu. T.

    2006-08-01

    Consequences of wave-particle interaction in the propagation and emission of accelerated particles in solar flares are considered. i. Strong diffusion energetic particles on small-scale waves (Trakhtengerts 1984) gives time delays of gamma ray line emission vs hard X-ray emission when electron and protons are accelerated simultaneously. ii. Anomalous propagation of relativistic electrons along the flare loop with velocity of 30 times less compared with light velocity (Yokoyama et al 2002) is explained in terms of the collective effects of interaction of electrons with plasma turbulence. A cloud of high-energetic electrons responsible for microwave emission generates whistler waves and a turbulent "wall" in the loop is formed. The electrons undergo strong resonant scattering and the emission front propagates with the wave phase velocity, which is much lower than particle velocity. iii. Absence of linear polarization (≤ 0.07%) in Hα emission of some flares (Bianda et al 2005) is interpreted in terms of pitch-angle scattering of proton beams on small-scale Alfven waves. References Bianda M., Benz F.O., Stenflo J.O. et al 2005, A&A, 434, 1183 Trakhtengerts V.Yu. 1984, Relaxation of Plasma with Anisotropic Velocity Distribution, in A.A.Galeev and R.N.Sudan (eds.) Basic Plasma Physics II, North-Holland Physics Publishing Yokoyama T., Nakajima H., Shibasaki K, et al. 2002, ApJ, 576, L87

  1. Emergent primary PCI of anomalous LAD.

    PubMed

    Hershey, Jeffrey; Isada, Loretta; Fenster, Michael S

    2006-05-01

    Approximately 0.3% to 2% of patients may have anomalous origins of the coronary arteries. Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery (LCA) or left anterior descending (LAD) artery from the right sinus has been well described. In persons in whom the course involves an interarterial track between the aorta (Ao) and pulmonary artery (PA), an increased incidence of sudden death has been reported, particularly during or shortly after exercise. This has been felt to be due to transient occlusion of the anomalous LAD from increased blood flow through the Ao and PA as the anomalous LAD courses between them, possibly causing myocardial ischemia. In an elective setting, further anatomic delineation with other methodologies such as cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is recommended. In this case report we present an emergent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of an anomalous LAD arising from the right sinus of Valsalva and coursing between the Ao and PA in a nonsurgical candidate. PMID:16670456

  2. Microwave response of anisotropic high-temperature-superconductor crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, C. E.; Exon, N. J.

    1994-07-01

    Microwave penetration and losses are derived for the anisotropic normal and superconducting states of single crystals in the shape of thin platelets oriented parallel and perpendicular to the oscillating electromagnetic field. For platelet crystals with the microwave field parallel to the major flat faces, the large anisotropy in the normal state can result in dissipation dominated by microwave field penetration through the thin edges rather than across the main faces. The influence of the extreme anisotropy is also considered for the superconducting state and can account for an anomalous peak in microwave loss below Tc sometimes observed in Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O crystals. When crystals are mounted with their flat faces perpendicular to the microwave field, the losses in both the normal and superconducting states are shown to be strongly peaked towards the outer perimeter of the crystals. This makes critical demands on the degree of perfection of such regions, if the microwave measurements are not to be complicated by nonintrinsic effects associated with local imperfections.

  3. Anomalous Growth of Aging Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a discrete-time population dynamics with age-dependent structure. At every time step, one of the alive individuals from the population is chosen randomly and removed with probability q_k depending on its age, whereas a new individual of age 1 is born with probability r. The model can also describe a single queue in which the service order is random while the service efficiency depends on a customer's "age" in the queue. We propose a mean field approximation to investigate the long-time asymptotic behavior of the mean population size. The age dependence is shown to lead to anomalous power-law growth of the population at the critical regime. The scaling exponent is determined by the asymptotic behavior of the probabilities q_k at large k. The mean field approximation is validated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  5. Microwave sintering of nanopowder ZnNb2O6: Densification, microstructure and microwave dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafrooei, H. Barzegar; Nassaj, E. Taheri; Hu, C. F.; Huang, Q.; Ebadzadeh, T.

    2014-12-01

    High density ZnNb2O6 ceramics were successfully fabricated by microwave sintering of ZnO-Nb2O5 and ZnNb2O6 nanopowders. Phase formation, microstructure and microwave electrical properties of the microwave sintered (MS) and microwave reaction sintered (MRS) specimens were examined using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and microwave dielectric properties measurement. Specimens were sintered in a temperature range from 950 to 1075 °C for 30 min at an interval of 25 °C using a microwave furnace operated at 2.45 GHz frequency, 3 kW power. XRD pattern revealed the formation of pure columbite phase of ZnNb2O6. The SEM micrographs show grain growth and reduction in porosity of specimens with the increase in sintering temperature. Good combination of microwave dielectric properties (εr~23.6, Qf~64,300 GHz and τf~-66 ppm/°C and εr~24, Qf~75,800 GHz and τf~-64 ppm/°C) was obtained for MS- and MRS-prepared samples at 1000 °C and 1050 °C for 30 min, respectively.

  6. Effect of different glycation agents on Cu(II) binding to human serum albumin, studied by liquid chromatography, nitrogen microwave-plasma atomic-emission spectrometry, inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry, and high-resolution molecular-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Corrales Escobosa, Alma Rosa; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Yanez Barrientos, Eunice; Jaramillo Ortiz, Sarahi; Ramirez Segovia, Alejandra Sarahi; Wrobel, Kazimierz

    2015-02-01

    The ability of human serum albumin to capture unbound copper under different clinical conditions is an important variable potentially affecting homeostasis of this element. Here, we propose a simple procedure based on size-exclusion chromatography with on-line UV and nitrogen microwave-plasma atomic-emission spectrometry (MP-AES) for quantitative evaluation of Cu(II) binding to HSA upon its glycation in vitro. The Cu-to-protein molar ratio for non-glycated albumin was 0.98 ± 0.09; for HSA modified with glyoxal (GO), methylglyoxal (MGO), oxoacetic acid (GA), and glucose (Glc), the ratios were 1.30 ± 0.22, 0.72 ± 0.14, 0.50 ± 0.06, and 0.95 ± 0.12, respectively. The results were confirmed by using ICP-MS as an alternative detection system. A reduced ability of glycated protein to coordinate Cu(II) was associated with alteration of the N-terminal metal-binding site during incubation with MGO and GA. In contrast, glycation with GO seemed to generate new binding sites as a result of tertiary structural changes in HSA. Capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography with electrospray-ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry enabled detection and identification of Cu(II) coordinated to the N-terminal metal-binding site (Cu(II)-DAHK) in all tryptic digests analyzed. This is the first report confirming Cu(II)-DAHK species in HSA by means of high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, and the first report on the use of MP-AES in combination with chromatographic separation. PMID:25428457

  7. Microwave remote sensing of snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiles, W. H.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction mechanisms responsible for the microwave backscattering and emission behavior of snow were investigated, and models were developed relating the backscattering coefficient (sigma) and apparent temperature (T) to the physical parameters of the snowpack. The microwave responses to snow wetness, snow water equivalent, snow surface roughness, and to diurnal variations were investigated. Snow wetness was shown to have an increasing effect with increasing frequency and angle of incidence for both active and passive cases. Increasing snow wetness was observed to decrease the magnitude sigma and increase T. Snow water equivalent was also observed to exhibit a significant influence sigma and T. Snow surface configuration (roughness) was observed to be significant only for wet snow surface conditions. Diurnal variations were as large as 15 dB for sigma at 35 GHz and 120 K for T at 37 GHz. Simple models for sigma and T of a snowpack scene were developed in terms of the most significant ground-truth parameters. The coefficients for these models were then evaluated; the fits to the sigma and T measurements were generally good. Finally, areas of needed additional observations were outlined and experiments were specified to further the understanding of the microwave-snowpack interaction mechanisms.

  8. Microwave power generation by magnetic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlejohn, S.; Nogaret, A.; Davies, S. R.; Henini, M.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    We report on microwave power emission by ballistic electrons as they cross a region of spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field. Magnetic finger gates were fabricated at the surface of high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs Hall bars embedded in a coplanar waveguide. By modulating the current injected through the Hall bar and measuring the second harmonic of the signal rectified by a Schottky detector, we obtain the microwave power emitted by the superlattice. This power (˜6 W m-2) is compared to the fluorescence of electron spins that undergo spin resonance as they cross domains of opposite magnetic field.

  9. Receivers for the Microwave Radiometer on Juno

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiwald, F.; Russell, D.; Dawson, D.; Hatch, W.; Brown, S.; Oswald, J.; Janssen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Six receivers for the MicroWave Radiometer (MWR) are currently under development at JPL. These receivers cover a frequency range of 0.6 to 22 GHz in approximately octave steps, with 4 % bandwidth. For calibration and diagnosis three noise diodes and a Dicke switch are integrated into each receiver. Each receiver is connected to its own antenna which is mounted with its bore sights perpendicular to the spin axis of the spacecraft. As the spacecraft spins at 2 RPM, the antenna field of view scans Jupiter's atmosphere from limb to nadir to limb, measuring microwave emission down to 1000-bar.

  10. Lossless anomalous dispersion and an inversionless gain doublet via dressed interacting ground states

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherall, James Owen; Search, Christopher P.

    2010-02-15

    Transparent media exhibiting anomalous dispersion have been of considerable interest since Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu [Nature 406, 277 (2000)] first observed light propagate with superluminal and negative group velocities without absorption. Here, we propose an atomic model exhibiting these properties, based on a generalization of amplification without inversion in a five-level dressed interacting ground-state system. The system consists of a {Lambda} atom prepared as in standard electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), with two additional metastable ground states coupled to the {Lambda} atom ground states by two rf-microwave fields. We consider two configurations by which population is incoherently pumped into the ground states of the atom. Under appropriate circumstances, we predict a pair of new gain lines with tunable width, separation, and height. Between these lines, absorption vanishes but dispersion is large and anomalous. The system described here is a significant improvement over other proposals in the anomalous dispersion literature in that it permits additional coherent control over the spectral properties of the anomalous region, including a possible 10{sup 4}-fold increase over the group delay observed by Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu.

  11. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain.

  12. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain. PMID:26565270

  13. Predicting molecular scale skin-effect in electrochemical impedance due to anomalous subdiffusion mediated adsorption phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushagra, Arindam

    2016-02-01

    Anomalous subdiffusion governs the processes which are not energetically driven, on a molecular scale. This paper proposes a model to predict the response of electrochemical impedance due to such diffusion process. Previous works considered the use of fractional calculus to predict the impedance behaviour in response to the anomalous diffusion. Here, we have developed an expression which predicts the skin-effect, marked by an increase in the impedance with increasing frequency, in this regime. Negative inductances have also been predicted as a consequence of the inertial response of adsorbed species upon application of frequency-mediated perturbations. It might help the researchers in the fields of impedimetric sensors to choose the working frequency and those working in the field of batteries to choose the parameters, likewise. This work would shed some light into the molecular mechanisms governing the impedance when exposed to frequency-based perturbations like electromagnetic waves (microwaves to ionizing radiations) and in charge storage devices like batteries etc.

  14. Microwave Lightcraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Looking like an alien space ship or a flying saucer the Microwave Lightcraft is an unconventional launch vehicle approach for delivering payload to orbit using power transmitted via microwaves. Microwaves re beamed from either a ground station or an orbiting solar power satellite to the lightcraft. The energy received breaks air molecules into a plasma and a magnetohydrodynamic fanjet provides the lifting force. Only a small amount of propellant is required for circulation, attitude control and deorbit.

  15. Cosmological origin of anomalous radio background

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, James M.; Vincent, Aaron C. E-mail: vincent@ific.uv.es

    2013-02-01

    The ARCADE 2 collaboration has reported a significant excess in the isotropic radio background, whose homogeneity cannot be reconciled with clustered sources. This suggests a cosmological origin prior to structure formation. We investigate several potential mechanisms and show that injection of relativistic electrons through late decays of a metastable particle can give rise to the observed excess radio spectrum through synchrotron emission. However, constraints from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy, on injection of charged particles and on the primordial magnetic field, present a challenge. The simplest scenario is with a ∼>9 GeV particle decaying into e{sup +}e{sup −} at a redshift of z ∼ 5, in a magnetic field of ∼ 5μG, which exceeds the CMB B-field constraints, unless the field was generated after decoupling. Decays into exotic millicharged particles can alleviate this tension, if they emit synchroton radiation in conjunction with a sufficiently large background magnetic field of a dark U(1)' gauge field.

  16. Experimental phasing using zinc anomalous scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sun-Shin; An, Young Jun; Jeong, Chang-Sook; Kim, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2012-09-01

    The surface of proteins can be charged with zinc ions and the anomalous signals from these zinc ions can be used for structure determination of proteins. Zinc is a suitable metal for anomalous dispersion phasing methods in protein crystallography. Structure determination using zinc anomalous scattering has been almost exclusively limited to proteins with intrinsically bound zinc(s). Here, it is reported that multiple zinc ions can easily be charged onto the surface of proteins with no intrinsic zinc-binding site by using zinc-containing solutions. Zn derivatization of protein surfaces appears to be a largely unnoticed but promising method of protein structure determination.

  17. Ultraviolet atomic emission detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W.; Peterson, N. C.; Bass, A. M.; Kurylo, M. J., III (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A device and method are provided for performing qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis through the utilization of a vacuum UV chromatographic detector. The method involves the use of a carrier gas at low pressure. The gas carries a sample to a gas chromatograph column; the column output is directed to a microwave cavity. In this cavity, a low pressure microwave discharge produces fragmentation of the compounds present and generates intense atomic emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet. These emissions are isolated by a monochromator and measured by photometer to establish absolute concentration for the elements.

  18. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymeric materials. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIM Materials Program, allows the authors, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of various thermoset resins will be studied because it holds the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components or in-situ curing of adhesives, including metal-to-metal. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  19. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIC Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of thermoset resins will be studied because it hold the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  20. COBE DMR results and implications. [Differential Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This lecture presents early results obtained from the first six months of measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) by Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) aboard COBE and discusses significant cosmological implications. The DMR maps show the dipole anisotropy and some galactic emission but otherwise a spatially smooth early universe. The measurements are sufficiently precise that we must pay careful attention to potential systematic errors. Maps of galactic and local emission such as those produced by the FIRAS and DIRBE instruments will be needed to identify foregrounds from extragalactic emission and thus to interpret the results in terms of events in the early universe. The current DMR results are significant for Cosmology.

  1. Evidence for anomalous nuclei among relativistic projectile fragments at Bevalac energies

    SciTech Connect

    Heckman, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    Two independent emulsion experiments using beams of /sup 16/O and /sup 56/Fe at approximately 2 GeV/nucleon find that the reaction mean free paths of projectile fragments (PF) with Z between 3 and 26 are shorter for a few centimeters after their emission than at larger distances, or than predicted from experiments on beam nuclei. Under the assumption that there are two populations of PF, a best fit to the data is obtained when approximately 6% of the PF have an anomalously short mean free path. The anomalous property of PF persists in subsequent fragmentation reactions. 6 figures. (RWR)

  2. Observation of anomalous ion heating by broadband drift-wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Enge, S; Birkenmeier, G; Manz, P; Ramisch, M; Stroth, U

    2010-10-22

    Using laser induced fluorescence and passive spectroscopy on a magnetically confined low-temperature plasma, anomalous ion heating is observed which exceeds collisional heating from the electrons by a factor of up to five. Direct wave heating due to the 2.45 GHz microwave as well as stochastic heating by large-amplitude fluctuations could be ruled out as explanations. Good quantitative agreement is found when comparing the missing power in the ion species with heating power due to the dissipation of drift-wave turbulence. This turbulent energy transfer into the ion channel could have important consequences for the interpretation of transport in fusion plasmas. PMID:21231054

  3. Modelling anomalous extinction using nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rakesh K.; Rastogi, Shantanu

    2012-07-01

    The modelling of extinction along anomalous/non-Cardelli, Clayton & Mathis sightlines, which are characterized by a broad 217.5-nm bump and steep far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise, is reported. The extinction along these sightlines, namely HD 210121, HD 204827, HD 29647 and HD 62542, is difficult to reproduce using standard silicate and graphite grains. A very good match with the observed extinction is obtained by considering a nanodiamond component as part of the carbonaceous matter. Most of these sightlines are rich in carbon and are invariably backed by a young hot stellar object. Nanodiamond is taken as a core within amorphous carbon and graphite. These core-mantle particles, taken as additional components along with graphite and silicates, lead to a reduction in the silicate requirement. The abundance of carbonaceous matter is not affected, as a very small fraction of nanodiamond is required. Extinction along sightlines that show steep FUV is also reported, demonstrating the importance of the nanodiamond component in all such regions.

  4. On the mechanism of electromagnetic microwave absorption in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Pashitskii, E. A. Pentegov, V. I.

    2012-08-15

    In experiments on electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption in the microwave range in superfluid (SF) helium [1-3], a narrow EM field absorption line with a width on the order of (20-200) kHz was observed against the background of a wide absorption band with a width of 30-40 GHz at frequencies f{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 110-180 GHz corresponding to the roton gap energy {Delta}{sub r}(T) in the temperature range 1.4-2.2 K. Using the so-called flexoelectric mechanism of polarization of helium atoms ({sup 4}He) in the presence of density gradients in SF helium (HeII), we show that nonresonance microwave absorption in the frequency range 170-200 GHz can be due to the existence of time-varying local density gradients produced by roton excitations in the bulk HeII. The absorption bandwidth is determined by the roton-roton scattering time in an equilibrium Boltzmann gas of rotons, which is t{sub r-r} Almost-Equal-To 3.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} s at T = 1.4 K and decreases upon heating. We propose that the anomalously narrow microwave resonance absorption line in HeII at the roton frequency f{sub 0}(T) = {Delta}r(T)/2{pi}h appears due to the following two factors: (i) the discrete structure of the spectrum of the surface EM resonator modes in the form of a periodic sequence of narrow peaks and (ii) the presence of a stationary dipole layer in HeII near the resonator surface, which forms due to polarization of {sup 4}He atoms under the action of the density gradient associated with the vanishing of the density of the SF component at the solid wall. For this reason, the relaxation of nonequilibrium rotons generated in such a surface dipole layer is strongly suppressed, and the shape and width of the microwave resonance absorption line are determined by the roton density of states, which has a sharp peak at the edge of the roton gap in the case of weak dissipation. The effective dipole moments of rotons in the dipole layer can be directed either along or across the normal to

  5. Anomalous right upper lobe venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, M; Mayooran, N; Philip, B; Anjum, M N; O'Regan, K; Doddakula, K

    2016-01-01

    Lung resections are usually not associated with significant bleeding, but can be fatal, especially in cases of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Anomalous vascular structures could be a major reason for unexpected bleeding in such surgeries. We present a case of an aberrant upper lobe pulmonary vein that was encountered posterior to the right upper lobe bronchus during a right upper lobectomy via thoracotomy. The anomalous pulmonary vein was identified preoperatively on a computed tomography (CT) scan and hence was looked for before dividing the bronchus. Many centres are adopting the VATS approach for performing lung resections. If an anomalous vein is present posterior to the bronchus, it might be in a blind spot and could be damaged inadvertently, leading to profuse and potentially fatal bleeding. We conclude that the identification of anomalous vascular structures prior to surgery with the help of CT helps in avoiding adverse outcomes. PMID:27016516

  6. Anomalous right upper lobe venous drainage

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, M.; Mayooran, N.; Philip, B.; Anjum, M.N.; O'Regan, K.; Doddakula, K.

    2016-01-01

    Lung resections are usually not associated with significant bleeding, but can be fatal, especially in cases of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Anomalous vascular structures could be a major reason for unexpected bleeding in such surgeries. We present a case of an aberrant upper lobe pulmonary vein that was encountered posterior to the right upper lobe bronchus during a right upper lobectomy via thoracotomy. The anomalous pulmonary vein was identified preoperatively on a computed tomography (CT) scan and hence was looked for before dividing the bronchus. Many centres are adopting the VATS approach for performing lung resections. If an anomalous vein is present posterior to the bronchus, it might be in a blind spot and could be damaged inadvertently, leading to profuse and potentially fatal bleeding. We conclude that the identification of anomalous vascular structures prior to surgery with the help of CT helps in avoiding adverse outcomes. PMID:27016516

  7. Anomalous Diffraction in Crystallographic Phase Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from crystals of biological macromolecules contain sufficient information to define atomic structures, but atomic positions are inextricable without having electron-density images. Diffraction measurements provide amplitudes, but the computation of electron density also requires phases for the diffracted waves. The resonance phenomenon known as anomalous scattering offers a powerful solution to this phase problem. Exploiting scattering resonances from diverse elements, the methods of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) now predominate for de novo determinations of atomic-level biological structures. This review describes the physical underpinnings of anomalous diffraction methods, the evolution of these methods to their current maturity, the elements, procedures and instrumentation used for effective implementation, and the realm of applications. PMID:24726017

  8. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  9. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. Anomalous shutdowns can occur as a result of bright object violations which trigger the Bright Scene Detection or Software Global Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur as a result of SBC hardware problems. The recovery from anomalous shutdown procedure consists of four tests: 1} a signal processing electronics check, 2} a slow high voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, 3} a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the full operating voltage, and 4} a Fold Test. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on Proposal 12738 from Cycle 19.

  10. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    This proposal is designed to permit recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. Anomalous shutdowns can occur as a result of bright object violations which trigger the Bright Scene Detection or Software Global Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur as a result of SBC hardware problems. The recovery from anomalous shutdown procedure consists of four tests: a signal processing electronics check, a slow high voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the full operating voltage, and lastly, a Fold Test. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on proposal 11884, visits 1 to 4.

  11. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    PubMed

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems. PMID:26274432

  12. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  13. Anomalous inverse bremsstrahlung heating of laser-driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Mrityunjay

    2016-05-01

    Absorption of laser light in plasma via electron-ion collision (inverse bremsstrahlung) is known to decrease with the laser intensity as I 0 -3/2 or with the electron temperature as T e -3/2 where Coulomb logarithm ln Λ = 0.5ln(1 + k 2 min/k 2 max) in the expression of electron-ion collision frequency v ei is assumed to be independent of ponderomotive velocity v 0 = E0/ω which is unjustified. Here k -1 min = v th/max(ω, ω p), and k -1 max = Z/v 2 th are maximum and minimum cut-off distances of the colliding electron from the ion, v th = √T e is its thermal velocity, ω, ω p are laser and plasma frequency. Earlier with a total velocity v = (v 2 0 + v 2 th)1/2 dependent ln Λ(v) it was reported that v ei and corresponding fractional laser absorption (α) initially increases with increasing intensity, reaches a maximum value, and then fall according to the conventional I 0 -3/2 scaling. This anomalous increase in v ei and α may be objected due to an artifact introduced in ln Λ(v) through k-1 min ∝ v. Here we show similar anomalous increase of v ei and α versus I 0 (in the low temperature and under-dense density regime) with quantum and classical kinetic models of v ei without using ln Λ, but a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cut-off length kmax -1 ∝ v 2 (in classical case) or kmax ∝ v (in quantum case). For a given I 0 < 5 × 1014Wcm-2, v ei versus T e also exhibits so far unnoticed identical anomalous increase as v ei versus Io, even if the conventional k max ∝ v2 th, or k max ∝ v th is chosen. However, for higher T e > 15 eV, anomalous growth of vei and a disappear. The total velocity dependent k max in kinetic models, as proposed here, may explain anomalous increase of a with I 0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments. This work may be important to understand collisional absorption in the under-dense pre-plasma region due to low intensity pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal in the

  14. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdollah

    2011-12-01

    A variety of oil recovery methods have been developed and applied to mature and depleted reservoirs in order to improve the efficiency. Microwave radiation oil recovery method is a relatively new method and has been of great interest in the recent years. Crude oil is typically co-mingled with suspended solids and water. To increase oil recovery, it is necessary to remove these components. The separation of oil from water and solids using gravitational settling methods is typically incomplete. Oil-in-water and oil-water-solid emulsions can be demulsified and separated into their individual layers by microwave radiation. The data also show that microwave separation is faster than gravity separation and can be faster than conventional heating at many conditions. After separation of emulsion into water and oil layers, water can be discharged and oil is collected. High-frequency microwave recycling process can recover oil and gases from oil shale, residual oil, drill cuttings, tar sands oil, contaminated dredge/sediments, tires and plastics with significantly greater yields and lower costs than are available utilizing existing known technologies. This process is environmentally friendly, fuel-generating recycler to reduce waste, cut emissions, and save energy. This paper presents a critical review of Microwave radiation method for oil recovery.

  15. Compact 2.45 GHz microwave ion/atom source

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.; Maeno, S.

    2008-02-15

    Characteristics of a microwave driven 3.4 cm diameter compact ion/atom source equipped with permanent magnets were tested. The source can be mounted to a standard copper gasket flange, and microwave power is supplied through an N-type microwave connector. The ion source plasma was observed through an ion extraction hole with an optical emission spectrometer. Peak height of an optical line spectrum emission corresponding to atomic nitrogen increased in proportion to the microwave input power. Quadrupole mass spectrometer showed that N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +} were the dominant species in the extracted ion beam. Nitrogen ion current density of 0.23 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained with only 10 W discharge power and 6x10{sup -3} Pa source surrounding pressure.

  16. MICROWAVES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of microwaves, a non-ionizing radiation, on organic reactions is described both in polar solvents and under solvent-free conditions. The special applications are highlighted in the context of solventless organic synthesis which involve microwave (MW) exposure of neat r...

  17. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  18. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  19. Television Microwave--1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Roger E.

    Since it became a reality just before World War II, terrestrial microwave has improved in systems and equipments, but with the improvements have come higher costs. Television microwave costs are so high because users are demanding more capability, land prices have increased, operating costs are higher, and there is frequency congestion along many…

  20. Satellite microwave observations of soil moisture variations. [by the microwave radiometer on the Nimbus 5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Rango, A.; Neff, R.

    1975-01-01

    The electrically scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR) on the Nimbus 5 satellite was used to observe microwave emissions from vegetated and soil surfaces over an Illinois-Indiana study area, the Mississippi Valley, and the Great Salt Lake Desert in Utah. Analysis of microwave brightness temperatures (T sub B) and antecedent rainfall over these areas provided a way to monitor variations of near-surface soil moisture. Because vegetation absorbs microwave emission from the soil at the 1.55 cm wavelength of ESMR, relative soil moisture measurements can only be obtained over bare or sparsely vegetated soil. In general T sub B increased during rainfree periods as evaporation of water and drying of the surface soil occurs, and drops in T sub B are experienced after significant rainfall events wet the soil. Microwave observations from space are limited to coarse resolutions (10-25 km), but it may be possible in regions with sparse vegetation cover to estimate soil moisture conditions on a watershed or agricultural district basis, particularly since daily observations can be obtained.

  1. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Thigpen, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  2. Soil moisture sensing with microwave techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.

    1980-01-01

    Microwave approaches for the remote sensing of soil moisture are discussed, with the advantages described as follows: (1) the all-weather capability, (2) the greater penetration depth into the soil and through vegetation than with optical or infrared sensors, and (3) the large changes in the dielectric properties of soil produced by changes in water content. Both active and passive microwave approaches are discussed. The dependence of the relationship between microwave response and soil moisture on such things as soil texture, surface roughness, vegetative cover and nonuniform moisture and temperature profiles is analyzed from both the experimental and theoretical viewpoints. The dielectric properties of the soil are analyzed quantitatively, as these control the reflective and emissive properties of the soil surface, and a model for estimating a soil's dielectric properties from its texture and moisture content is also presented. Emissivity is calculated using the Fresnel equation of electromagnetic theory, and reflectivity is shown to be decreased by surface roughness, while the backscatter coefficient increases. It is demonstrated, that microwave radiometers are sensitive to soil moisture for a wide range of surface conditions, and that the longer wavelengths are best for soil moisture sensing.

  3. HARMONIC IN-PAINTING OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND SKY BY CONSTRAINED GAUSSIAN REALIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel; Mandolesi, Nazzareno

    2012-05-01

    The presence of astrophysical emissions between the last scattering surface and our vantage point requires us to apply a foreground mask on cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky maps, leading to large cuts around the Galactic equator and numerous holes. Since many CMB analysis, in particular on the largest angular scales, may be performed on a whole-sky map in a more straightforward and reliable manner, it is of utmost importance to develop an efficient method to fill in the masked pixels in a way compliant with the expected statistical properties and the unmasked pixels. In this Letter, we consider the Monte Carlo simulation of a constrained Gaussian field and derive it CMB anisotropy in harmonic space, where a feasible implementation is possible with good approximation. We applied our method to simulated data, which shows that our method produces a plausible whole-sky map, given the unmasked pixels, and a theoretical expectation. Subsequently, we applied our method to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe foreground-reduced maps and investigated the anomalous alignment between quadrupole and octupole components. From our investigation, we find that the alignment in the foreground-reduced maps is even higher than the Internal Linear Combination map. We also find that the V-band map has higher alignment than other bands, despite the expectation that the V-band map has less foreground contamination than other bands. Therefore, we find it hard to attribute the alignment to residual foregrounds. Our method will be complementary to other efforts on in-painting or reconstructing the masked CMB data, and of great use to Planck surveyor and future missions.

  4. Microwave hydrology: A trilogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.; Johnston, E. J.; Girard, M. A.; Regusters, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave hydrology, as the term in construed in this trilogy, deals with the investigation of important hydrological features on the Earth's surface as they are remotely, and passively, sensed by orbiting microwave receivers. Microwave wavelengths penetrate clouds, foliage, ground cover, and soil, in varying degrees, and reveal the occurrence of standing liquid water on and beneath the surface. The manifestation of liquid water appearing on or near the surface is reported by a microwave receiver as a signal with a low flux level, or, equivalently, a cold temperature. Actually, the surface of the liquid water reflects the low flux level from the cosmic background into the input terminals of the receiver. This trilogy describes and shows by microwave flux images: the hydrological features that sustain Lake Baykal as an extraordinary freshwater resource; manifestations of subsurface water in Iran; and the major water features of the Congo Basin, a rain forest.

  5. Microwave ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  6. Anomalous cross-B field transport and spokes in HiPIMS plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecimovic, A.

    2016-05-01

    Localized light emission patterns observed during on time of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge on a planar magnetron, known as spokes or ionization zones, have been identified as a potential source of anomalous cross-B field diffusion. In this paper experimental evidence is presented that anomalous diffusion is triggered by the appearance of spokes. The Hall parameter {ω\\text{ce}}{τ\\text{c}} , product of the electron cyclotron frequency and the classical collision time, reduces from Bohm diffusion values (∼ 16 and higher) down to the value of 3 as spokes appear, indicating anomalous cross-B field transport. A combination of intensified charge coupled device imaging and electric probe measurements reveals that the ions from the spokes are instantaneously diffusing away from the target. The ion diffusion coefficients calculated from a sideways image of the spoke are six times higher than Bohm diffusion coefficients, which is consistent with the reduction of the Hall parameter.

  7. Microwave radiation hazards around large microwave antenna.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klascius, A.

    1973-01-01

    The microwave radiation hazards associated with the use of large antennas become increasingly more dangerous to personnel as the transmitters go to ever higher powers. The near-field area is of the greatest concern. It has spill over from subreflector and reflections from nearby objects. Centimeter waves meeting in phase will reinforce each other and create hot spots of microwave energy. This has been measured in front of and around several 26-meter antennas. Hot spots have been found and are going to be the determining factor in delineating safe areas for personnel to work. Better techniques and instruments to measure these fields are needed for the evaluation of hazard areas.

  8. Microwave detection of air showers with the MIDAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privitera, Paolo; Alekotte, I.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Berlin, A.; Bertou, X.; Bogdan, M.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Carvalho, W. R.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Facal San Luis, P.; Genat, J. F.; Hollon, N.; Mills, E.; Monasor, M.; Reyes, L. C.; Rouille d'Orfeuil, B.; Santos, E. M.; Wayne, S.; Williams, C.; Zas, E.

    2011-03-01

    Microwave emission from Extensive Air Showers could provide a novel technique for ultra-high energy cosmic rays detection over large area and with 100% duty cycle. We describe the design, performance and first results of the MIDAS (MIcrowave Detection of Air Showers) detector, a 4.5 m parabolic dish with 53 feeds in its focal plane, currently installed at the University of Chicago.

  9. Joint microwave and infrared studies for soil moisture determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Schieldge, J. P.; Kahle, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using a combined microwave-thermal infrared system to determine soil moisture content is addressed. Of particular concern are bare soils. The theoretical basis for microwave emission from soils and the transport of heat and moisture in soils is presented. Also, a description is given of the results of two field experiments held during vernal months in the San Joaquin Valley of California.

  10. Satellite microwave observations of the Utah Great Salt Lake Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dellwig, L. F.; Schmugge, T.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave data acquired over the Great Salt Lake Desert area by sensors aboard Skylab and Nimbus 5 indicate that the microwave emission and backscatter were strongly influenced by contributions from subsurface layers of sediment saturated with brine. This phenomenon was observed by Skylab's S-194 radiometer operating at 1.4 GHz, S-193 RADSCAT (Radiometer-Scatterometer) operating at 13.9 GHz, and the Nimbus 5 ESMR (Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer) operating at 19.35 GHz. The availability of ESMR data over an 18-month period allowed an investigation of temporal variations.

  11. Correlation between galactic HI and the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Kate; Slosar, Anze

    2007-10-15

    We revisit the issue of a correlation between the atomic hydrogen gas in our local galaxy and the cosmic microwave background, a detection of which has been claimed in some literature. We cross correlate the 21-cm emission of galactic atomic hydrogen as traced by the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Galactic Hi survey with the 3-year cosmic microwave background data from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe. We consider a number of angular scales, masks, and Hi velocity slices and find no statistically significant correlation.

  12. Anomalous Centrifugal Distortion in HDO and Spectroscopic Data Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, L. H.

    2015-06-01

    The HDO molecule is important from the atmospheric point of view as it can be used to study the water cycle in the earth atmosphere. It is also interesting from the spectroscopic point of view as it displays an anomalous centrifugal distortion similar to that of the normal species H_2O. A model developed to treat the anomalous distortion in HDO should account for the fact that it lacks a two-fold axis of symmetry. A new treatment aimed at the calculation of the rovibrational energy of the HDO molecule and allowing for anomalous centrifugal distortion effects has been developed. It is based on an effective Hamiltonian in which the large amplitude bending ν_2 mode and the overall rotation of the molecule are treated simultaneously. Due to the lack of a two-fold axis of symmetry, this effective Hamiltonian contains terms arising from the non-diagonal component of the inertia tensor and from the Coriolis-coupling between the large amplitude bending ν_2 mode and the overall rotation of the molecule. This new treatment has been used to perform a line position analysis of a large body of infrared, microwave, and hot water vapor data involving the ground and (010) states up to J=22. For these 4413 data, a unitless standard deviation of 1.1 was achieved. A line intensity analysis was also carried out and allowed us to reproduce the strength of 1316 transitions^c with a unitless standard deviation of 1.1. In the talk, the new theoretical approach will be presented. The results of both analyses will be discussed and compared with those of a previous investigation. The new spectroscopic data base built will be compared with HITRAN 2012. Herbin et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys.~9 (2009) 9433; and Schneider and Hase, Atmos. Chem. Phys.~ 11 (2011) 11207. Coudert, Wagner, Birk, Baranov, Lafferty, and Flaud, J. Molec. Spectrosc.~251 (2008) 339. Johns, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B~2 (1985) 1340 Toth, J. Molec. Spectrosc.~162 (1993) 20 Paso and Horneman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B~12 (1995) 1813 Toth, J

  13. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, Nancy K.; Durbin, Philip F.; Dolan, Kenneth W.; Perkins, Dwight E.

    1995-01-01

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features.

  14. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.

    1995-08-22

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation is disclosed. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features. 1 fig.

  15. Variation of the microwave brightness temperature of sea surfaces covered with mineral and monomolecular oil films

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, H.J.; Alpers, W.; Huehnerfuss, H.

    1983-07-01

    Airborne microwave radiometer measurements over mineral and monomolecular oil films and adjacent clean sea surfaces are reported. An artificial crude-oil spill experiment in the New York Bight area showed a brightness temperature increase of the sea surface at 1.43 GHz as expected from a multilayered system with different dielectric constants. However, a monomolecular surface-film experiment with oleyl alcohol conducted in the North Sea during MARSEN in 1979 showed a strong brightness temperature depression at 1.43 GHz and no change in brightness temperature at 2.65 GHz. It is postulated that the monomolecular layer, because of its physical and chemical properties, polarized the underlying water molecules so strongly that the emissivity decreased from 0.31 to 0.016. It is estimated that the effective dielectric constant changed from 90 to 5.2 x 10/sup 4/. Because these phenomena occurred at 1.43 GHz it may be concluded that this frequency is very close to the center of a new anomalous dispersion region resulting from a restructuring of the water layer below the surface film.

  16. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Magalhães, A. M.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-04-01

    Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them with the Planck and WMAP data at 12 frequencies from 23 to 353 GHz, over circular patches with 10° radius. The cross-correlation analysis is performed for both intensity and polarization data in a consistent manner. The results are corrected for the chance correlation between the templates and the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background. We use a mask that focuses our analysis on the diffuse interstellar medium at intermediate Galactic latitudes. We determine the spectral indices of dust emission in intensity and polarization between 100 and 353 GHz, for each sky patch. Both indices are found to be remarkably constant over the sky. The mean values, 1.59 ± 0.02 for polarization and 1.51 ± 0.01 for intensity, for a mean dust temperature of 19.6 K, are close, but significantly different (3.6σ). We determine the mean spectral energy distribution (SED) of the microwave emission, correlated with the 353 GHz dust templates, by averaging the results of the correlation over all sky patches. We find that the mean SED increases for decreasing frequencies at ν< 60 GHz for both intensity and polarization. The rise of the polarization SED towards low frequencies may be accounted for by a synchrotron component correlated with dust, with no need for any polarization of the anomalous microwave emission. We use a spectral model to separate the synchrotron and dust polarization and to characterize the spectral dependence of the dust polarization fraction. The polarization fraction (p) of the dust emission decreases by (21 ± 6)% from 353 to 70 GHz. We discuss this result within the context of existing dust models. The decrease in p could indicate differences in polarization

  17. Microwave bonding of MEMS component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bonding of MEMs materials is carried out using microwave. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin of the material. This causes heating in one place more than another. Thereby minimizing the effects of the bonding microwave energy.

  18. Graphene oxide reduction by microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Angela; Carotenuto, Gianfranco

    2016-05-01

    The possibility to prepare thermal reduced graphene oxide (Tr-GO) colloidal suspensions by microwave heating of graphene oxide (GO) suspensions in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) has been investigated. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and absorption and emission spectroscopy characterization, such a type of thermal reduction does not lead to graphene quantum dots formation because only mono-functional oxygen-containing groups are removed.

  19. The small scale power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Flender, Samuel; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the hemispherical power asymmetry in the cosmic microwave background on small angular scales. We find an anomalously high asymmetry in the multipole range l = 601−2048, with a naive statistical significance of 6.5σ. However, we show that this extreme anomaly is simply a coincidence of three other effects, relativistic power modulation, edge effects from the mask applied, and inter-scale correlations. After correcting for all of these effects, the significance level drops to ∼ 1σ, i.e., there is no anomalous intrinsic asymmetry in the small angular scales. Using this null result, we derive a constraint on a potential dipolar modulation amplitude, A(k) < 0.0045 on the ∼ 10 Mpc-scale, at 95% C.L. This new constraint must be satisfied by any theoretical model attempting to explain the hemispherical asymmetry at large angular scales.

  20. Microwave vision for robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Leon; Struckman, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Microwave Vision (MV), a concept originally developed in 1985, could play a significant role in the solution to robotic vision problems. Originally our Microwave Vision concept was based on a pattern matching approach employing computer based stored replica correlation processing. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) processor technology offers an attractive alternative to the correlation processing approach, namely the ability to learn and to adapt to changing environments. This paper describes the Microwave Vision concept, some initial ANN-MV experiments, and the design of an ANN-MV system that has led to a second patent disclosure in the robotic vision field.

  1. Microwave Comb Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    Stable reference tones aid testing and calibration of microwave receivers. Signal generator puts out stable tones in frequency range of 2 to 10 GHz at all multiples of reference input frequency, at any frequency up to 1 MHz. Called "comb generator" because spectral plot resembles comb. DC reverse-bias current switched on and off at 1 MHz to generate sharp pulses in step-recovery diode. Microwave components mounted on back of special connector containing built-in attenuator. Used in testing microwave and spread-spectrum wide-band receivers.

  2. Microwave coupler and method

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.

  3. Microwave coupler and method

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.

  4. Microwave plasma torches used for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F. M.; Bundaleska, N.; Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    A microwave plasma torch operating at 2.45 GHz and atmospheric pressure has been used as a medium and a tool for decomposition of alcohol in order to produce molecular hydrogen. Plasma in a gas mixture of argon and ethanol/methanol, with or without water, has been created using a waveguide surfatron launcher and a microwave generator delivering a power in the range 0.2-2.0 kW. Mass, Fourier Transform Infrared, and optical emission spectrometry have been applied as diagnostic tools. The decomposition yield of methanol was nearly 100 % with H2, CO, CO2, H2O, and solid carbon as the main reaction products. The influence of the fraction of Ar flow through the liquid ethanol/methanol on H2, CO, and CO2 partial pressures has been investigated, as well as the dependence of the produced H2 flow on the total flow and power. The optical emission spectrum in the range 250-700 nm has also been detected. There is a decrease of the OH(A-X) band intensity with the increase of methanol in the mixture. The emission of carbon atoms in the near UV range (240-300 nm) exhibits a significant increase as the amount of alcohol in the mixture grows. The obtained results clearly show that this microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure provides an efficient plasma environment for hydrogen production.

  5. Analytical solutions for anomalous dispersion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, D.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2014-06-01

    Groundwater flow and transport often occur in a highly heterogeneous environment (potentially heterogeneous at multiple spatial scales) and is impacted by geochemical reactions, advection, diffusion, and other pore scale processes. All these factors can give rise to large-scale anomalous dispersive behavior that can make complex model representation and prediction of plume concentrations challenging due to difficulties unraveling all the complexities associated with the governing processes, flow medium, and their parameters. An alternative is to use upscaled stochastic models of anomalous dispersion, and this is the approach used here. Within a probabilistic framework, we derive a number of analytical solutions for several anomalous dispersion models. The anomalous dispersion models are allowed to be either non-Gaussian (α-stable Lévy), correlated, or nonstationary from the Lagrangian perspective. A global sensitivity analysis is performed to gain a greater understanding of the extent to which uncertainty in the parameters associated with the anomalous behavior can be narrowed by examining concentration measurements from a network of monitoring wells and to demonstrate the computational speed of the solutions. The developed analytical solutions are encoded and available for use in the open source computational framework MADS (http://mads.lanl.gov).

  6. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  7. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  8. On the sources of astrometric anomalous refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne

    2009-06-01

    Over a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, now known as "anomalous refraction," is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low frequency, large angular scale motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by previous astrometric catalogs. These motions of typically several tenths of an arcsecond with timescales on the order often minutes are ubiquitous to drift-scan ground-based astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but never confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter scale slowly evolving coherent dynamical structures in the boundary-layer below 60 meters.

  9. Microwave thawing apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Fathi, Zakaryae; Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for thawing a frozen material includes: a microwave energy source; a microwave applicator which defines a cavity for applying microwave energy from the microwave source to a material to be thawed; and a shielded region which is shielded from the microwave source, the shielded region in fluid communication with the cavity so that thawed material may flow from the cavity into the shielded region.

  10. Noise characteristics of a plasma relativistic microwave amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelkov, P. S.; Ivanov, I. E.; Shumeiko, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Reasons for the occurrence of microwave noise at the output of a plasma relativistic amplifier have been analyzed. It is found that, in the absence of an input signal, the emission spectrum of the plasma relativistic microwave amplifier is similar to that of an electron beam in vacuum. It is concluded that microwave noise at the output of the amplifier appears as a result of amplification of the intrinsic noise of the electron beam. The emission characteristics of a relativistic electron beam formed in a magnetically insulated diode with an explosive emission cathode in vacuum have been studied experimentally for the first time. An important point is that, in this case, there is no virtual cathode in the drift space.

  11. Photometric Properties of Thermally Anomalous Terrain on Icy Saturnian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annex, Andrew; Verbiscer, A. J.; Helfenstein, P.; Howett, C.; Schenk, P.

    2013-10-01

    Spectral maps of thermal emission from Mimas obtained by Cassini’s Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) show that a V-shaped boundary, centered at 0° N and 180° W, divides relatively warm daytime temperatures from an anomalously cooler region at low to mid-latitudes on the leading hemisphere (Howett et al. 2011 Icarus 216, 211). This cooler region is also warmer at night, indicating that it has high thermal inertia, and also coincides in shape and location with that of high-energy electron deposition from Saturn’s magnetosphere (Roussos et al. 2007 JGR 112, A06214; Schenk et al. 2011 Icarus 211, 740). Global IR/UV color ratio maps assembled from Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images revealed a lens-shaped region of relatively blue terrain centered on the leading hemisphere (Schenk et al. 2011, Icarus). The area with low IR/UV ratio also coincides in shape and location with the region of high thermal inertia. A preliminary photometric analysis of Cassini ISS CL1 CL2 filter (centered at 611 nm) images using the Hapke (2008) model suggests that the high thermal inertia region on Mimas is rougher and more strongly backscattering than terrain with lower thermal inertia. Particles on the surface of the thermally anomalous terrain may have a more complex microtexture due to the high-energy electron bombardment. This work is supported by the NASA Cassini Data Analysis Program.

  12. Drag suppression in anomalous chiral media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We study a heavy impurity moving longitudinal with the direction of an external magnetic field in an anomalous chiral medium. Such system would carry a nondissipative current of chiral magnetic effect associated with the anomaly. We show, by generalizing Landau's criterion for superfluidity, that the "anomalous component" which gives rise to the anomalous transport will not contribute to the drag experienced by an impurity. We argue on a very general basis that those systems with a strong magnetic field would exhibit an interesting transport phenomenon—the motion of the heavy impurity is frictionless, in analogy to the case of a superfluid. We demonstrate and confirm our general results with two complementary examples: weakly coupled chiral fermion gases and strongly interacting chiral liquids.

  13. Experimental realization of quantized anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qi-Kun

    2014-03-01

    Anomalous Hall effect was discovered by Edwin Hall in 1880. In this talk, we report the experimental observation of the quantized version of AHE, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 magnetic topological insulator. At zero magnetic field, the gate-tuned anomalous Hall resistance exhibits a quantized value of h /e2 accompanied by a significant drop of the longitudinal resistance. The longitudinal resistance vanishes under a strong magnetic field whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value. The realization of QAHE paves a way for developing low-power-consumption electronics. Implications on observing Majorana fermions and other exotic phenomena in magnetic topological insulators will also be discussed. The work was collaborated with Ke He, Yayu Wang, Xucun Ma, Xi Chen, Li Lv, Dai Xi, Zhong Fang and Shoucheng Zhang.

  14. Anomalous fluorescence line intensity in megavoltage bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Nino; Litz, Marc; Merkel, George; Schumer, Joseph; Seely, John; Carroll, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission crystal spectrometer intended for laser plasma diagnostics has measured an anomalous ratio between the fluorescence lines in megavoltage bremsstrahlung. When observed in reflection, Kα1 fluorescence is twice as strong as the Kβ line, as is usual. However, in forward-directed bremsstrahlung from a 2 MV end point linear accelerator with a tungsten converter, the Kα1 and Kβ fluorescence are approximately equal. The anomalous fluorescence line ratio, unity, reflects the large amount of fluorescence generated on the side of the converter where the electrons enter, and the differential attenuation of the fluorescence photons as they pass through the converter to opposite side. Understanding of fluorescence in megavoltage bremsstrahlung is relevant to the explanation of anomalous line ratios in spectra produced by high-energy electrons generated by intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

  15. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Samik; Patel, Vipul R

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint. PMID:25593361

  16. Microwave sensing from orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritikos, H. N.; Shiue, J.

    1979-01-01

    Microwave sensors, used in conjunction with the traditional sensors of visible and infrared light to extend present capabilities of global weather forecasts and local storm watches, are discussed. The great advantage of these sensors is that they can penetrate or 'see' through cloud formations to monitor temperature, humidity and wind fields below the clouds. Other uses are that they can penetrate the earth deeper than optical and IR systems; they can control their own angle of incidence; they can detect oil spills; and they can enhance the studies of the upper atmosphere through measurement of temperature, water vapor and other gaseous species. Two types of microwave sensors, active and passive, are examined. Special attention is given to the study of the microwave radiometer and the corresponding temperature resolution as detected by the antenna. It is determined that not only will the microwave remote sensors save lives by allowing close monitoring of developing storms, but also save approximately $172 million/year.

  17. Microwave Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  18. Emitron: microwave diode

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Pettibone, J.S.; Drobot, A.T.

    1982-05-06

    The invention comprises a new class of device, driven by electron or other charged particle flow, for producing coherent microwaves by utilizing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron flow in diodes not requiring an external magnetic field. Anode and cathode surfaces are electrically charged with respect to one another by electron flow, for example caused by a Marx bank voltage source or by other charged particle flow, for example by a high energy charged particle beam. This produces an electric field which stimulates an emitted electron beam to flow in the anode-cathode region. The emitted electrons are accelerated by the electric field and coherent microwaves are produced by the three dimensional spatial and temporal interaction of the accelerated electrons with geometrically allowed microwave modes which results in the bunching of the electrons and the pumping of at least one dominant microwave mode.

  19. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  20. Microwave Oven Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.; Richardson, Denise; Yan, Yuan

    1998-01-01

    Explains a series of laboratory activities which employ a microwave oven to help students understand word problems that relate to states of matter, collect data, and calculate and compare electrical costs to heat energy costs. (DDR)