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Sample records for microwave imaging plasma

  1. Microwave imaging diagnostics for plasma fluctuation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian

    Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) and Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) combined systems are being investigated by the UC Davis Plasma Diagnostic Group (PDG), in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) researchers, Drs. E. Mazzucato, H.K. Park and T. Munsat, as well as researchers from the FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen,the Netherlands. The goal is to develop the plasma diagnostic systems based on the imaging technology developed in the UC Davis PDG group, for the study of plasma micro-turbulence, which is extremely important for the understanding of anomalous transport behavior of magnetically confined plasmas such as in tokamaks. This dissertation work provides the design of the optical systems, the design of the electronics, the testing of the antenna array and the data analysis of TEXTOR ECEI/MIR combined systems.

  2. Recent Advancements in Microwave Imaging Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; C.C. Chang; B.H. Deng; C.W. Domier; A.J.H. Donni; K. Kawahata; C. Liang; X.P. Liang; H.J. Lu; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; A. Mase; H. Matsuura; E. Mazzucato; A. Miura; K. Mizuno; T. Munsat; K. and Y. Nagayama; M.J. van de Pol; J. Wang; Z.G. Xia; W-K. Zhang

    2002-03-26

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology over the past decade have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics for current and envisioned magnetic fusion devices. Prominent among these are revolutionary microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), microwave phase imaging interferometers, imaging microwave scattering and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) systems for imaging electron temperature and electron density fluctuations (both turbulent and coherent) and profiles (including transport barriers) on toroidal devices such as tokamaks, spherical tori, and stellarators. The diagnostic technology is reviewed, and typical diagnostic systems are analyzed. Representative experimental results obtained with these novel diagnostic systems are also presented.

  3. Using indium tin oxide material to implement the imaging of microwave plasma ignition process

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Hou, Lingyun; Zhang, Guixin Zhang, Boya; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Zhi; Huang, Jian

    2014-02-17

    In this paper, a method is introduced to get global observation of microwave plasma ignition process at high pressure. A microwave resonator was designed with an indium tin oxide coated glass at bottom. Microwave plasma ignition was implemented in methane and air mixture at 10 bars by a 2 ms-3 kW-2.45 GHz microwave pulse, and the high speed images of the ignition process were obtained. The images visually proved that microwave plasma ignition could lead to a multi-point ignition. The system may also be applied to obtain Schlieren images, which is commonly used to observe the development of flame kernel in an ignition process.

  4. Compact microwave imaging system to measure spatial distribution of plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Oba, R.; Yugami, N.; Nishida, Y.

    2004-10-01

    We have developed an advanced microwave interferometric system operating in the K band (18-27 GHz) with the use of a fan-shaped microwave based on a heterodyne detection system for measuring the spatial distribution of the plasma density. In order to make a simple, low-cost, and compact microwave interferometer with better spatial resolution, a microwave scattering technique by a microstrip antenna array is employed. Experimental results show that the imaging system with the microstrip antenna array can have finer spatial resolution than one with the diode antenna array and reconstruct a good spatially resolved image of the finite size dielectric phantoms placed between the horn antenna and the micro strip antenna array. The precise two-dimensional electron density distribution of the cylindrical plasma produced by an electron cyclotron resonance has been observed. As a result, the present imaging system is more suitable for a two- or three-dimensional display of the objects or stationary plasmas and it is possible to realize a compact microwave imaging system.

  5. Investigation of turbulence in reversed field pinch plasma by using microwave imaging reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Z. B.; Nagayama, Y.; Hamada, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Michael, C. A.; Yambe, K.

    2011-10-15

    Turbulence in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma has been investigated by using the microwave imaging reflectometry in the toroidal pinch experiment RX (TPE-RX). In conventional RFP plasma, the fluctuations are dominated by the intermittent blob-like structures. These structures are accompanied with the generation of magnetic field, the strong turbulence, and high nonlinear coupling among the high and low k modes. The pulsed poloidal current drive operation, which improves the plasma confinement significantly, suppresses the dynamo, the turbulence, and the blob-like structures.

  6. Synthetic aperture microwave imaging with active probing for fusion plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir F.; Freethy, Simon J.; Huang, Billy K.; Vann, Roddy G. L.

    2014-08-01

    A Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system has been designed and built to obtain 2-D images at several frequencies from fusion plasmas. SAMI uses a phased array of linearly polarised antennas. The array configuration has been optimised to achieve maximum synthetic aperture beam efficiency. The signals received by antennas are down-converted to the intermediate frequency range and then recorded in a full vector form. Full vector signals allow beam focusing and image reconstruction in both real time and a post-processing mode. SAMI can scan over 16 pre-programmed frequencies in the range of 10-35GHz with a switching time of 300ns. The system operates in 2 different modes simultaneously: both a 'passive' imaging of plasma emission and also an 'active' imaging of the back-scattered signal of the radiation launched by one of the antennas from the same array. This second mode is similar to so-called Doppler backscattering (DBS) reflectometry with 2-D resolution of the propagation velocity of turbulent structures. Both modes of operation show good performance in fusion plasma experiments on Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). We have obtained the first ever 2-D images of BXO mode conversion windows. With active probing, first ever turbulence velocity maps have been obtained. We present an overview of the diagnostic and discuss recent results. In contrast to quasi-optical microwave imaging systems SAMI requires neither big aperture viewing ports nor large 2-D detector arrays to achieve the desired imaging resolution. The number of effective 'pixels' of the synthesized image is proportional to the number of receiving antennas squared. Thus only a small number of optimised antennas is sufficient for the majority of applications. Possible implementation of SAMI on ITERand DEMO is discussed.

  7. Synthetic aperture microwave imaging with active probing for fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir F.; Freethy, Simon J.; Huang, Billy K.

    2014-08-21

    A Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system has been designed and built to obtain 2-D images at several frequencies from fusion plasmas. SAMI uses a phased array of linearly polarised antennas. The array configuration has been optimised to achieve maximum synthetic aperture beam efficiency. The signals received by antennas are down-converted to the intermediate frequency range and then recorded in a full vector form. Full vector signals allow beam focusing and image reconstruction in both real time and a post-processing mode. SAMI can scan over 16 pre-programmed frequencies in the range of 10-35GHz with a switching time of 300ns. The system operates in 2 different modes simultaneously: both a 'passive' imaging of plasma emission and also an 'active' imaging of the back-scattered signal of the radiation launched by one of the antennas from the same array. This second mode is similar to so-called Doppler backscattering (DBS) reflectometry with 2-D resolution of the propagation velocity of turbulent structures. Both modes of operation show good performance in fusion plasma experiments on Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). We have obtained the first ever 2-D images of BXO mode conversion windows. With active probing, first ever turbulence velocity maps have been obtained. We present an overview of the diagnostic and discuss recent results. In contrast to quasi-optical microwave imaging systems SAMI requires neither big aperture viewing ports nor large 2-D detector arrays to achieve the desired imaging resolution. The number of effective 'pixels' of the synthesized image is proportional to the number of receiving antennas squared. Thus only a small number of optimised antennas is sufficient for the majority of applications. Possible implementation of SAMI on ITERand DEMO is discussed.

  8. 2D Doppler backscattering using synthetic aperture microwave imaging of MAST edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. A.; Brunner, K. J.; Freethy, S. J.; Huang, B. K.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is already established as a powerful diagnostic; its extension to 2D enables imaging of turbulence characteristics from an extended region of the cut-off surface. The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D DBS experiments of MAST edge plasma. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (±40° vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-34.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24° FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial observations of phenomena previously measured by conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch angle to be made; preliminary results are presented. Capabilities gained through steering a beam using a phased array and the limitations of this technique are discussed.

  9. Spatially-resolved spectral image of a microwave-induced plasma with Okamoto-cavity for nitridation of steel substrate.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shigeo; Arai, Yuuki; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    When a nitrogen microwave-induced plasma produced with an Okamoto-cavity was employed as a source for the nitridation of steel samples, the characteristics of the plasma were investigated by analyzing a spatially-resolved emission image of nitrogen excited species obtained with a two-dimensionally imaging spectrograph. Our previous study had reported on an excellent performance of the Okamoto-cavity microwave-induced plasma (MIP), enabling a nitrided layer having a several-micrometer-thickness to form on an iron substrate, even if the treatment is completed within 1 min, which is superior to a conventional plasma nitriding using low-pressure glow discharges requiring a prolonged treatment time. In this paper, the reason for this is discussed based on a spectrometric investigation. The emission images of band heads of nitrogen molecule and nitrogen molecule ion extended toward the axial/radial directions of the plasma at larger microwave powers supplied to the MIP, thus elevating the number density of the excited species of nitrogen, which would activate any chemical reaction on the iron substrate. However, a drastic increase in the growth rate of the nitrided layer when increasing the microwave power from 600 to 700 W, which had been observed in our previous study, could not be explained only from such a variation in the excited species of nitrogen. This result is probably because the growth process is dominantly controlled by thermal diffusion of nitrogen atom after it enters into the iron substrate, where the substrate temperature is the most important parameter concerning the mobility in the iron lattice. Therefore, the Okamoto-cavity MIP could contribute to a thermal source through radiative heating as well as a source of nitrogen excited species, especially in the growth process of the nitrided layer. PMID:24521910

  10. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, Edgar; Pencheva, Mariana; Benova, Evgenia; Dias, Fransisco; Tatarova, Elena

    2009-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of a microwave (2.45 GHz) Argon plasma torch driven by a surface wave is presented. The theoretical model couples in a self-consistent way the wave electrodynamics and the electron and heavy particle kinetics. The set of coupled equations includes: Maxwell's equations, the electron Boltzmann equation, including electron-electron collisions, and the particle balance equations for electrons, excited atoms (4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, 6s), and atomic (Ar^+) and molecular ions (Ar2^+). The input parameters of the model are: gas pressure (760 Torr), plasma radius (R = 0.75 cm), dielectric permittivity (ɛd = 4.0) and tube thickness (d = 0.15 cm) as well as the measured axial profile of the gas temperature (3500 K - 1500 K). The latter was determined from measurements of the rotational temperature of the OH molecular band in the range 306 - 315 nm. Phase and amplitude sensitive recording provides the data for the axial wavenumber and wave attenuation coefficient. The wavenumber decreases along the generated plasma torch. The electron density (Ne) axial profile as determined from measurements of Hβ Stark broadening is in agreement with the theoretical one.

  11. Controlled zone microwave plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B; Seals, Roland D; Morrell, Jonathan S

    2009-10-20

    An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

  12. Volumetric Near-Field Microwave Plasma Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2003-01-01

    A periodic series of microwave-induced plasmoids is generated using the outgoing wave from a microwave horn and the reflected wave from a nearby on-axis concave reflector. The plasmoids are spaced at half-wavelength separations according to a standing-wave pattern. The plasmoids are enhanced by an effective focusing in the near field of the horn (Fresnel region) as a result of a diffractive narrowing. Optical imaging, electron density, and rotational temperature measurements characterize the near field plasma region. Volumetric microwave discharges may have application to combustion ignition in scramjet engines.

  13. A microwave plasma cleaning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, C. C.; Nelson, W. D.; Schechter, D. E.; Thompson, L. M.; Glover, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    In a microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source, reactive plasmas of oxygen and its mixtures of argon have been used for evaluating plasma cleaning technologies. Small aluminum samples (0.95 x 1.9 cm) were coated with thin films (less than or equal to 20 micrometers in thickness) of Shell Vitrea oil and cleaned with reactive plasmas. The discharge parameters, such as gas pressure, magnetic field, substrate biasing, and microwave power, were varied to change cleaning conditions. A mass spectroscopy (or residual gas analyzer) was used to monitor the status of plasma cleaning. Mass loss of the samples after plasma cleaning was measured to estimate cleaning rates. Measured cleaning rates of low-pressure (0.5-m torr) argon/oxygen plasmas were as high as 2.7 micrometers/min. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine cleanliness of the sample surfaces. In this paper, significant results of the plasma cleaning are reported and discussed.

  14. Microwave diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, David

    Plasma treatment of biological tissues has tremendous potential due to the wide range of applications. Most plasmas have gas temperatures which greatly exceed room temperature. These are often utilized in electro-surgery for cutting and coagulating tissue. Another type of plasma, referred to as cold atmospheric plasma, or CAP, is characterized by heavy particle temperatures which are at or near room temperature. Due to this lack of thermal effect, CAP may provide less invasive medical procedures. Additionally, CAP have been demonstrated to be effective at targeting cancer cells while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissue. A recently fabricated Microwave Electron Density Device (MEDD) utilizes microwave scattering on small atmospheric plasmas to determine the electron plasma density. The MEDD can be utilized on plasmas which range from a fraction of a millimeter to several centimeters at atmospheric pressure when traditional methods cannot be applied. Microwave interferometry fails due to the small size of the plasma relative to the microwave wavelength which leads to diffraction and negligible phase change; electrostatic probes introduce very strong perturbation and are associated with difficulties of application in strongly-collisional atmospheric conditions; and laser Thomson scattering is not sensitive enough to measure plasma densities less than 1012 cm-3. The first part of this dissertation provides an overview of two types of small atmospheric plasma objects namely CAPs and plasmas utilized in the electro-surgery. It then goes on to describe the fabrication, testing and calibration of the MEDD facility. The second part of this dissertation is focused on the application of the MEDD and other diagnostic techniques to both plasma objects. A series of plasma images that illustrate the temporal evolution of a discharge created by an argon electrosurgical device operating in the coagulation mode and its behavior was analyzed. The discharge of the argon

  15. Microwave imaging of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1988-12-01

    Three methods of imaging aircraft from the ground with microwave radar with quality suitable for aircraft target recognition are described. The imaging methods are based on a self-calibration procedure called adaptive beamforming that compensates for the severe geometric distortion inherent in any imaging system that is large enough to achieve the high angular resolution necessary for two-dimensional target imaging. The signal processing algorithm is described and X-band (3-cm)-wavelength experiments demonstrate its success on commercial aircraft flying into Philadelphia International Airport.

  16. Plasma-assisted microwave processing of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin (Inventor); Ylin, Tzu-yuan (Inventor); Jackson, Henry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A microwave plasma assisted method and system for heating and joining materials. The invention uses a microwave induced plasma to controllably preheat workpiece materials that are poorly microwave absorbing. The plasma preheats the workpiece to a temperature that improves the materials' ability to absorb microwave energy. The plasma is extinguished and microwave energy is able to volumetrically heat the workpiece. Localized heating of good microwave absorbing materials is done by shielding certain parts of the workpiece and igniting the plasma in the areas not shielded. Microwave induced plasma is also used to induce self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) process for the joining of materials. Preferably, a microwave induced plasma preheats the material and then microwave energy ignites the center of the material, thereby causing a high temperature spherical wave front from the center outward.

  17. X-ray imaging studies of electron cyclotron microwave-heated plasmas in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Failor, B.H.

    1986-02-01

    An x-ray pinhole camera designed to efficiently detect photons with energies between 5 and 250 keV was built to image bremsstrahlung emission from a microwave-heated hot electron plasma. This plasma is formed at one of the thermal barrier locations in the Tandem Experiment-Upgrade at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The instrument consists of a lead aperture, an x-ray converter in the form of a sodium-activated cesium iodide scintillator, light intensifier electronics, and a recording medium that may either be high speed film or a CCD array. The nominal spatial and temporal resolutions are one part in 40 and 17 msec, respectively. The component requirements for optimum performance were determined both analytically and by computer simulation, and were verified experimentally. The details of these results are presented. The instrument has been used to measure x-ray emission from the TMX-U west end cell. Data acquired with the x-ray camera has allowed us to infer the temporal evolution of the mirror-trapped electron radial profile.

  18. Variable frequency microwave excited plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gathi, Z.; Wei, J.; Garard, S.; Lauf, R.J.; Clausing, R.; McMillan, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on the use of an agile frequency source in generating plasma. A Traveling Wave Tube (TWT) provides approximately one octave bandwidth and variable power level up to 2 KW. By controlling the frequency, efficient coupling to the load (materials and/or plasma) can be maintained even as the load is changing in properties or position. Furthermore, the variable frequency power source allows the localization of the plasma discharge in precise areas of interest to specific processes. The excitation frequencies can be continuously swept to scan the plasma across an arbitrary-shaped target surface. Plasma generation and position control is reviewed and experimental results on variable frequency microwave excited plasma are presented.

  19. Image recorder with microwave fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, N.; Isaka, K.

    1984-11-13

    The present invention is directed to improvement in an image recorder for recording developed images or toner images by microwave fixation. According to the invention there is used a novel thermoplastic developer comprising of two components. The first component contains a dielectric material which is able to absorb microwave and generate heat by dielectric loss. The second component contains magnetic loss exothermic material. The microwave absorbing power of the first component is improved by heating the first component with heat generated from the second component.

  20. Microwave Plasma Hydrogen Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James; Wheeler, Richard, Jr.; Dahl, Roger; Hadley, Neal

    2010-01-01

    A microwave plasma reactor was developed for the recovery of hydrogen contained within waste methane produced by Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA), which reclaims oxygen from CO2. Since half of the H2 reductant used by the CRA is lost as CH4, the ability to reclaim this valuable resource will simplify supply logistics for longterm manned missions. Microwave plasmas provide an extreme thermal environment within a very small and precisely controlled region of space, resulting in very high energy densities at low overall power, and thus can drive high-temperature reactions using equipment that is smaller, lighter, and less power-consuming than traditional fixed-bed and fluidized-bed catalytic reactors. The high energy density provides an economical means to conduct endothermic reactions that become thermodynamically favorable only at very high temperatures. Microwave plasma methods were developed for the effective recovery of H2 using two primary reaction schemes: (1) methane pyrolysis to H2 and solid-phase carbon, and (2) methane oligomerization to H2 and acetylene. While the carbon problem is substantially reduced using plasma methods, it is not completely eliminated. For this reason, advanced methods were developed to promote CH4 oligomerization, which recovers a maximum of 75 percent of the H2 content of methane in a single reactor pass, and virtually eliminates the carbon problem. These methods were embodied in a prototype H2 recovery system capable of sustained high-efficiency operation. NASA can incorporate the innovation into flight hardware systems for deployment in support of future long-duration exploration objectives such as a Space Station retrofit, Lunar outpost, Mars transit, or Mars base. The primary application will be for the recovery of hydrogen lost in the Sabatier process for CO2 reduction to produce water in Exploration Life Support systems. Secondarily, this process may also be used in conjunction with a Sabatier reactor employed to

  1. Microwave Plasma Excitation Using Cylindrical Cavity with Dual Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yuichi; Nakamura, Keiji; Park, Soonam; Kobayashi, Satoru; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; Applied Materials Team; Nagoya Industrial Science Research Institute Team

    2015-09-01

    Large high-density plasmas have been generated by injecting magnetron-based microwaves radiated from slots cut on a wall of a rectangular or coaxial waveguide. However, a standing structural microwave in the waveguide often causes non-uniformity of plasma density. To minimize such inhomogeneity excited by the conventional waveguide, we adopt a resonant cylindrical cavity combined with a solid-state microwave amplifier. Microwave is injected into the cavity from two ports azimuthally apart by 90 degrees to each other (dual injection). FDTD simulations are performed for a TE111 mode resonant cavity excited by single or dual microwave injection. In the case of the dual injection with a phase difference of π/2, the wave field azimuthally rotates in the cavity, and hence the slots cut on a cavity bottom wall launch travelling waves, thus minimizing the azimuthal inhomogeneity of the resultant plasma. 40-cm-diameter plasmas are experimentally generated in argon at 0.1 ~ 5 Torr with microwaves of 2.4-2.5GHz and 400W. Threshold powers for plasma ignition are much less in dual injection than those in single injection. Optical emission images of the cylindrical plasmas show that the plasma uniformity is considerably improved in dual injection, particularly at high-pressure and low-power.

  2. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W. Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Tobias, B. J.

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  3. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W.; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Tobias, B. J.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  4. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    PubMed

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  5. Microwave Reflectometry for Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is about microwave reflectometry -- a radar technique for plasma density measurements using the reflection of electromagnetic waves by a plasma cutoff. Both the theoretical foundations of reflectometry and its practical application to the study of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper. In particular, the role of short-scale density fluctuations is discussed at length, both as a unique diagnostic tool for turbulence studies in thermonuclear plasmas and for the deleterious effects that fluctuations may have on the measurement of the average plasma density with microwave reflectometry.

  6. Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.

    2012-02-20

    Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

  7. Planar controlled zone microwave plasma system

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.; Seals, Roland D.; Morrell, Jonathan S.

    2011-10-04

    An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

  8. Coating Solar Cells By Microwave Plasma Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minaee, Behrooz; Chitre, Sanjeev R.; Zahedi, Narges

    1991-01-01

    Antireflection films deposited on silicon solar cells at high production rates with microwave-enhanced plasma deposition. Microwave energy at frequency of 2.45 GHz generates plasma in mixture of gases, from which thin film of silicon nitride deposits on silicon substrates. Reaction temperature relatively low (only 250 degrees C), and film deposition rate more than 500 Angstrom/minute - 2 to 5 times faster. Quality of antireflection film similar to that produced by chemical-vapor deposition. Uses less power and consumes smaller quantities of gas. Species formed in plasma longer lived and dissociate reactants in region of chamber well away from plasma-generation region.

  9. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  10. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Smatlak, Donna L.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Wittle, J. Kenneth; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  11. Medical Applications of Microwave Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Lim, Eng Gee; Tang, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    Ultrawide band (UWB) microwave imaging is a promising method for the detection of early stage breast cancer, based on the large contrast in electrical parameters between malignant tumour tissue and the surrounding normal breast-tissue. In this paper, the detection and imaging of a malignant tumour are performed through a tomographic based microwave system and signal processing. Simulations of the proposed system are performed and postimage processing is presented. Signal processing involves the extraction of tumour information from background information and then image reconstruction through the confocal method delay-and-sum algorithms. Ultimately, the revision of time-delay and the superposition of more tumour signals are applied to improve accuracy. PMID:25379515

  12. Microwave plasma synthesis of lanthanide zirconates from microwave transparent oxides.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Hsin; Hondow, Nicole; Thomas, Chris I; Mitchell, Robert; Brydson, Rik; Douthwaite, Richard E

    2012-02-28

    Lanthanide zirconate phases Ln(2)Zr(2)O(7) and Ln(4)Zr(3)O(12) (Ln = Y, La, Gd, Dy, Ho, Yb) have been prepared using a microwave induced plasma methodology, which allows rapid synthesis using materials which do not couple directly with microwaves at room temperature. We describe the measurement of heating profiles of the precursor binary metal oxides which can be used to identify conditions conducive to the synthesis of more complex oxides. Uncontrolled heating which can be a feature of microwave synthesis of ceramics is not observed, allowing reproducible synthesis. Conventionally these phases are prepared at >1400 °C over hours or days and are being investigated for applications including the immobilisation of nuclear waste where rapid processing is important. Using the microwave plasma method, phase-pure materials have been prepared in minutes. Furthermore, it is clear that Ln(2)Zr(2)O(7) and Ln(4)Zr(3)O(12) also exhibit significant plasma-promoted dielectric heating (e.g. >2200 °C for Dy(4)Zr(3)O(12)) which is typically greater than either of the respective precursors, thus providing a driving force to rapidly complete the reaction. PMID:22215067

  13. Antenna development for high field plasma imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.

    2010-10-15

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are two microwave nonperturbing plasma visualization techniques that employ millimeter-wave imaging arrays with lens-coupled planar antennas, yielding time-resolved images of temperature (via ECEI) and electron density (via MIR) fluctuations within high temperature magnetic fusion plasmas. A series of new planar antennas have been developed that extend this technology to frequencies as high as 220 GHz for use on high field plasma devices with toroidal fields in excess of 3 T. Antenna designs are presented together with theoretical calculations, simulations, and experimental measurements.

  14. Advances in Plasma-Filled Microwave Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    1998-11-01

    Significant improvements in the performance of high power microwave tubes have been achieved in recent years by the introduction of plasma into the beam- coupling structures of the devices. Plasma has been credited with increasing the maximum electron beam current, frequency bandwidth, electrical efficiency and reducing or eliminating the need for guiding magnetic fields in microwave sources. These advances are critically important for the development of high power, frequency agile microwave systems where size and weight are important. Conversely, plasma has been blamed for causing noise, instabilities, power variations and pulse-length limitations in microwave tubes for many years. Recent experimental and theoretical studies have demonstrated that introducing the right amount of plasma in a controlled manner can be beneficial in the areas described above. Enhanced beam propagation at lower magnetic fields and higher beam current levels due to the space-charge neutralization by plasma can be realized provided that the neutralization fraction is fairly stable and maintained near a value of one for the duration of the desired pulse length. The generation of hybrid waves in plasma-filled slow-wave structures (SWS) operating near cutoff has resulted in an increased electric field on axis and improved coupling to solid beams in both helix and coupled-cavity SWS, and wider coupling-aperture pass-bands and frequency bandwidth in coupled-cavity devices. In the event of excess plasma generation in these TWTs or BWOs, the device structures rapidly approach cutoff or breakdown and the beam forms instabilities, which degrades the output power level and pulse length. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in this field including plasma implementation techniques in the gun and circuit will be presented, and the benefits and limitations of plasma filling of microwave sources will be shown and discussed.

  15. Microwave Imaging under Oblique Illumination.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyang; Xu, Kuiwen; Shen, Fazhong; Zhang, Bin; Ye, Dexin; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Li, Changzhi; Ran, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Microwave imaging based on inverse scattering problem has been attracting many interests in the microwave society. Among some major technical challenges, the ill-posed, multi-dimensional inversion algorithm and the complicated measurement setup are critical ones that prevent it from practical applications. In this paper, we experimentally investigate the performance of the subspace-based optimization method (SOM) for two-dimensional objects when it was applied to a setup designed for oblique incidence. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results show that, for 2D objects, neglecting the cross-polarization scattering will not cause a notable loss of information. Our method can be potentially used in practical imaging applications for 2D-like objects, such as human limbs. PMID:27399706

  16. Microwave Imaging under Oblique Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingyang; Xu, Kuiwen; Shen, Fazhong; Zhang, Bin; Ye, Dexin; Huangfu, Jiangtao; Li, Changzhi; Ran, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Microwave imaging based on inverse scattering problem has been attracting many interests in the microwave society. Among some major technical challenges, the ill-posed, multi-dimensional inversion algorithm and the complicated measurement setup are critical ones that prevent it from practical applications. In this paper, we experimentally investigate the performance of the subspace-based optimization method (SOM) for two-dimensional objects when it was applied to a setup designed for oblique incidence. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results show that, for 2D objects, neglecting the cross-polarization scattering will not cause a notable loss of information. Our method can be potentially used in practical imaging applications for 2D-like objects, such as human limbs. PMID:27399706

  17. Electromagnetic plasma models for microwave plasma cavity reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasch, L.; Asmussen, J.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure used to design cavity applicators that efficiently produce cylindrical and disk microwave discharges is reviewed. In contrast to most microwave applicators these cavities utilize single mode excitation of the plasma. This method of excitation has the advantage of providing efficient coupling (zero reflected power) to the plasma over a wide range of discharge loading conditions while also allowing, if desired, electric feedback control of the heating process. The design procedure is generalized to any lossy dielectric. Experimental and theoretical research required to further understand microwave discharges is also discussed.

  18. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  19. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  20. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  1. Microwave cavity diagnostics of microwave breakdown plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckstrom, D.J.; Williams, M.S.

    1989-08-01

    We have performed microwave cavity perturbation measurements in the LLNL AIM facility using a 329-MHz cavity that allow us to examine in detail the plasma formation and decay processes for electron densities between approximately 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7}/cm{sup 3}. We believe these to be the lowest density plasmas ever studied in microwave breakdown experiments, and as such they allow us to determine the power and energy required to produce plasmas suitable for HF radar reflection as well as the effective lifetimes of these plasmas before re-ionization is required. Analyses of these results leads to the following conclusions. (1) For microwave breakdown pulses varying from 0.6 to 2.4 {mu}s, the threshold power required to produce measurable plasmas is 30 to 12 MW/m{sup 2} at 0.01 torr, decreasing to 3.5 to 1.8 MW/m{sup 2} at 1 to 3 torr, and then increasing to 5 to 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} at 30 torr. The threshold power in each case decreases with increasing pulse length, but the required pulse energy increases with decreasing power or increasing pulse length. (2) The effective electron density decay rates are approximately 100/s for 0.1 to 1 torr, after which they increase linearly with pressure. Thus, the useful plasma lifetimes are in the range of 20 to 40 ms at the lower pressures and decrease to about 1 ms at 30 torr. These decay rates and lifetimes are comparable to those that would exist for artificially ionized regions in the upper atmosphere. (3) The collision frequencies measured at pressures of 1 torr and above correspond to electron temperatures of 800 K or less. In fact, the inferred temperatures for p > 3 torr are below room temperature. This may be due to a contribution to the measured conductivity by negative ions.

  2. Chromatic monitoring of downstream microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serý, M.; Špatenka, P.; Pavlík, J.; Messelhäuser, J.

    2000-03-01

    The application of the chromatic sensing for monitoring of a microwave plasma source is described. The emitted radiation from the plasma excited in the argon, oxygen and CF4 mixture was measured with three PIN-diodes with integrated optical filters. The response of the chromatic signals on variation of power and gas composition was investigated. Whereas a good sensitivity of the integrated optical signal to the power was confirmed, only a limited sensitivity to the working gas mixture was found.

  3. Plasma Properties of Microwave Produced Plasma in a Toroidal Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajay; Edwards, W. F.; Held, Eric

    2011-10-01

    We have modified a small tokamak, STOR-1M, on loan from University of Saskatchewan, to operate as a low-temperature (~5 eV) toroidal plasma machine with externally induced toroidal magnetic fields ranging from zero to ~50 G. The plasma is produced using microwave discharges at relatively high pressures. Microwaves are produced by a kitchen microwave-oven magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz in continuous operating mode, resulting in pulses ~0.5 s in duration. Initial measurements of plasma formation in this device with and without applied magnetic fields are presented. Plasma density and temperature profiles have been measured using Langmuir probes and the magnetic field profile inside the plasma has been obtained using Hall probes. When the discharge is created with no applied toroidal magnetic field, the plasma does not fill the entire torus due to high background pressure. However, when a toroidal magnetic field is applied, the plasma flows along the applied field, filling the torus. Increasing the applied magnetic field seems to aid plasma formation - the peak density increases and the density gradient becomes steeper. Above a threshold magnetic field, the plasma develops low-frequency density oscillations due to probable excitation of flute modes in the plasma.

  4. Optimized ECR plasma apparatus with varied microwave window thickness

    DOEpatents

    Berry, L.A.

    1995-11-14

    The present invention describes a technique to control the radial profile of microwave power in an ECR plasma discharge. In order to provide for a uniform plasma density to a specimen, uniform energy absorption by the plasma is desired. By controlling the radial profile of the microwave power transmitted through the microwave window of a reactor, the profile of the transmitted energy to the plasma can be controlled in order to have uniform energy absorption by the plasma. An advantage of controlling the profile using the window transmission characteristics is that variations to the radial profile of microwave power can be made without changing the microwave coupler or reactor design. 9 figs.

  5. Optimized ECR plasma apparatus with varied microwave window thickness

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Lee A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention describes a technique to control the radial profile of microwave power in an ECR plasma discharge. In order to provide for a uniform plasma density to a specimen, uniform energy absorption by the plasma is desired. By controlling the radial profile of the microwave power transmitted through the microwave window of a reactor, the profile of the transmitted energy to the plasma can be controlled in order to have uniform energy absorption by the plasma. An advantage of controlling the profile using the window transmission characteristics is that variations to the radial profile of microwave power can be made without changing the microwave coupler or reactor design.

  6. Numerical modeling of waveguide heated microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, S.; Schwer, D.A.; Merkle, C.L.

    1993-12-01

    Waveguide-heated microwave plasmas for space propulsion applications are analyzed by a two-dimensional numerical solution of the combined Navier-Stokes and Maxwell equations. Two waveguide configurations -- one purely transmitting and the other with a reflecting end wall -- are considered. Plasma stability and absorption characteristics are studied and contrasted with the characteristic of resonant cavity heated plasmas. In addition, preliminary estimates of the overall efficiency and the thrust and specific impulse of the propulsion system are also made. The computational results are used to explain experimental trends and to better understand the working of these devices.

  7. Microwave plasma torches used for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F. M.; Bundaleska, N.; Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    A microwave plasma torch operating at 2.45 GHz and atmospheric pressure has been used as a medium and a tool for decomposition of alcohol in order to produce molecular hydrogen. Plasma in a gas mixture of argon and ethanol/methanol, with or without water, has been created using a waveguide surfatron launcher and a microwave generator delivering a power in the range 0.2-2.0 kW. Mass, Fourier Transform Infrared, and optical emission spectrometry have been applied as diagnostic tools. The decomposition yield of methanol was nearly 100 % with H2, CO, CO2, H2O, and solid carbon as the main reaction products. The influence of the fraction of Ar flow through the liquid ethanol/methanol on H2, CO, and CO2 partial pressures has been investigated, as well as the dependence of the produced H2 flow on the total flow and power. The optical emission spectrum in the range 250-700 nm has also been detected. There is a decrease of the OH(A-X) band intensity with the increase of methanol in the mixture. The emission of carbon atoms in the near UV range (240-300 nm) exhibits a significant increase as the amount of alcohol in the mixture grows. The obtained results clearly show that this microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure provides an efficient plasma environment for hydrogen production.

  8. Microwave Imaging Reflectometry for the Visualization of Turbulence in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    E. Mazzucato

    1999-12-16

    Understanding the mechanism of anomalous transport in magnetically confined plasmas requires the use of sophisticated diagnostic tools for the measurement of short-scale turbulent fluctuations. This paper describes the conceptual design of an experimental technique for the global visualization of density fluctuations in tokamaks. The proposed method is based on microwave reflectometry and consists in using a large diameter probing beam, collecting the reflected waves with a large aperture antenna, and forming an image of the reflecting plasma layer onto a 2D array of microwave receivers. Based on results from a series of numerical simulations, the theoretical feasibility conditions of the proposed method are discussed.

  9. Polycrystal diamond growth in a microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Lukina, N. A.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Arutyunyan, N. R.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2010-12-15

    Diamond films of different structures were deposited on quartz, WC-Co, and molybdenum substrates in a microwave plasma torch discharge in an argon-hydrogen-methane gas mixture in a sealed chamber at pressures close to atmospheric by using the chemical vapor deposition technique. Images of diamond polycrystal films and separate crystals, as well as results of Raman spectroscopy, are presented. The spectra of optical plasma radiation recorded during film deposition demonstrate the presence of intense H{sub {alpha}} hydrogen and C{sub 2} radical bands known as Swan bands.

  10. Optimal spectral windows for microwave diversity imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Nabil H.; Bai, Baocheng

    1991-01-01

    Tomographic microwave diversity imaging is analyzed using linear system theory concepts, and optimal spectral windows for data acquisition are obtained either by considering window position in the spectral domain or by using simulated annealing to find an optimal phase weighting of the object frequency response samples collected over the specified spectral window. This study provides a means of microwave image formation that is applicable under general assumptions. Results of numerical simulations and representative images reconstructed from realistic experimental microwave scattering data are given, demonstrating that the proposed approach is superior to previous image reconstruction methods.

  11. Microwave plasma removal of sulphur hexafluoride.

    PubMed

    Radoiu, Marilena; Hussain, Shahid

    2009-05-15

    Sulphur hexafluoride (SF(6)) gas is a common pollutant emitted during the plasma etching of thin films and plasma cleaning chemical vapor deposition (CVD) production processes used in the semiconductor industry. In this paper a method using microwave (2.45GHz frequency) plasmas sustained at atmospheric pressure for the abatement of SF(6) is investigated experimentally for various gas mixture constituents and operating conditions, with respect to its ability to decompose SF(6) to less harmful molecules. The destruction and removal efficiencies (DRE) of plasma abatement of SF(6) at concentrations between 1.7 and 5% in nitrogen in the presence of water vapor were studied as a function of the total gas flow rate and microwave power. Water vapor proved to be an effective source of free radical species that reacts with the radicals and ions resulting from SF(6) fragmentation in the plasma and also, it proved to reduce the process by-products. It was measured that approximately 25% of the initial SF(6) is converted to SO(2). Destruction and removal efficiencies of SF(6) up to 99.9% have been achieved. PMID:18774642

  12. Development of microwave imaging reflectometry in large helical device.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Nagayama, Y; Kuwahara, D; Yoshinaga, T; Shi, Z B; Kogi, Y; Mase, A

    2008-10-01

    Three key devices of the microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are under development in large helical device (LHD). The 2-D mixer array is developed by stacking the one-dimensional array of the planar Yagi-Uda antenna. The new type of the bandpass filter bank is modified to match the requirement of the MIR. The low-cost quadrature demodulator is also developed for the phase detection system. By using the low-price commercial wireless devices, the development cost becomes much lower than the expensive waveguide system. These devices enable the development of 2-D/3-D microwave imaging system for the plasma diagnostics and industrial applications. PMID:19044595

  13. Simulation of Optical and Synthetic Imaging using Microwave Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Kramer; R. Nazikian; E. Valeo

    2004-01-16

    Two-dimensional full-wave time-dependent simulations in full plasma geometry are presented which show that conventional reflectometry (without a lens) can be used to synthetically image density fluctuations in fusion plasmas under conditions where the parallel correlation length greatly exceeds the poloidal correlation length of the turbulence. The advantage of synthetic imaging is that the image can be produced without the need for a large lens of high optical quality, and each frequency that is launched can be independently imaged. A particularly simple arrangement, consisting of a single receiver located at the midpoint of a microwave beam propagating along the plasma midplane is shown to suffice for imaging purposes. However, as the ratio of the parallel to poloidal correlation length decreases, a poloidal array of receivers needs to be used to synthesize the image with high accuracy. Simulations using DIII-D relevant parameters show the similarity of synthetic and optical imaging in present-day experiments.

  14. Microwaves Scattering by Underdense Inhomogeneous Plasma Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-03-01

    The scattering characteristics of microwaves (MWs) by an underdense inhomogeneous plasma column have been investigated. The plasma column is generated by hollow cathode discharge (HCD) in a glass tube filled with low pressure argon. The plasma density in the column can be varied by adjusting the discharge current. The scattering power of X-band MWs by the column is measured at different discharge currents and receiving angles. The results show that the column can affect the properties of scattering wave significantly regardless of its plasma frequency much lower than the incident wave frequency. The power peak of the scattering wave shifts away from 0° to about ±15° direction. The finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method is employed to analyze the wave scattering by plasma column with different electron density distributions. The reflected MW power from a metal plate located behind the column is also measured to investigate the scattering effect on reducing MW reflectivity of a metal target. This study is expected to deepen the understanding of plasma-electromagnetic wave interaction and expand the applications concerning plasma antenna and plasma stealth.

  15. Downstream microwave ammonia plasma treatment of polydimethylsiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Pruden, K.G.; Beaudoin, S.P.

    2005-01-01

    To control the interactions between surfaces and biological systems, it is common to attach polymers, proteins, and other species to the surfaces of interest. In this case, surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was performed by exposing PDMS films to the effluent from a microwave ammonia plasma, with a goal of creating primary amine groups on the PDMS. These amine sites were to be used as binding sites for polymer attachment. Chemical changes to the surface of the PDMS were investigated as a function of treatment time, microwave power, and PDMS temperature during plasma treatment. Functional groups resulting from this treatment were characterized using attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy. Plasma treatment resulted in the incorporation of oxygen- and nitrogen-containing groups, including primary amine groups. In general, increasing the treatment time, plasma power and substrate temperature increased the level of oxidation of the films, and led to the formation of imines and nitriles. PDMS samples treated at 100 W and 23 deg. C for 120 s were chosen for proof-of-concept dextran coating. Samples treated at this condition contained primary amine groups and few oxygen-containing groups. To test the viability of the primary amines for attachment of biopolymers, functionalized dextran was successfully attached to primary amine sites on the PDMS films.

  16. Computational comparative study of microwave probes for plasma density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.; Oh, W. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A microwave probe is known to be a suitable method to measure plasma density, even in the processing condition and is widely used in various environments of low-temperature processing plasmas. Various types of microwave probes have been researched and developed to measure the precise plasma density. Extensive research has been conducted to investigate each probes characteristic responding to the plasma parameters (plasma density, electron temperature, pressure, sheath width, and so forth) based on both experiments and simulations. However, a comparative study elucidating the relative characteristics of each probe has not been completed yet, despite the wide applications of the probes in processing plasma. We conduct a comparative study among the microwave probes using the numerical method of three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. In this study, the microwave probes are compared by investigating the precision of plasma density measurement under a comprehensive range of plasma parameters (plasma density, pressure, and sheath width).

  17. Microwave Plasma Window Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, Andrew; Zheng, Peng; Franzi, Matthew; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Plasma, Pulsed Power,; Microwave Laboratory Team

    2011-10-01

    The microwave plasma window is an experiment designed to promote RF breakdown in a controlled vacuum-gas environment using a DC bias. Experimental data has shown that this DC bias will significantly reduce the RF power required to yield breakdown, a feature also shown in recent simulation. The cross-polarized conducting array is biased at (100's V) DC on the surface of a Lucite vacuum window. Microwave power is supplied to the window's surface by a single 1-kW magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz CW. The goal of this project is to establish controllable characteristics relating vacuum pressure, DC bias, RF power required for surface breakdown, as well as RF transmission after the formation of plasma. Experimental data will be compared with multipactor susceptibility curves generated using a Monte Carlo simulation which incorporates an applied DC bias and finite pressures of air and argon. Research supported by an AFOSR grant on the Basic Physics of Distributed Plasma Discharge, AFRL, L-3 Communications, and Northrop Grumman.

  18. Localized microwave pulsed plasmas for ignition and flame front enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, James Bennett

    Modern combustor technologies require the ability to match operational parameters to rapidly changing demands. Challenges include variable power output requirements, variations in air and fuel streams, the requirement for rapid and well-controlled ignition, and the need for reliability at low fuel mixture fractions. Work on subcritical microwave coupling to flames and to weakly ionized laser-generated plasmas has been undertaken to investigate the potential for pulsed microwaves to allow rapid combustion control, volumetric ignition, and leaner combustion. Two strategies are investigated. First, subcritical microwaves are coupled to femtosecond laser-generated ionization to ignite methane/air mixtures in a quasi-volumetric fashion. Total energy levels are comparable to the total minimum ignition energies for laser and spark discharges, but the combined strategy allows a 90 percent reduction in the required laser energy. In addition, well-defined multi-dimensional ignition patterns are designated with multiple laser passes. Second, microwave pulse coupling to laminar flame fronts is achieved through interaction with chemiionization-produced electrons in the reaction zone. This energy deposition remains well-localized for a single microwave pulse, resulting in rapid temperature rises of greater than 200 K and maintaining flame propagation in extremely lean methane/air mixtures. The lean flammability limit in methane/air mixtures with microwave coupling has been decreased from an equivalence ratio 0.6 to 0.3. Additionally, a diagnostic technique for laser tagging of nitrogen for velocity measurements is presented. The femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) technique utilizes a 120 fs laser to dissociate nitrogen along a laser line. The relatively long-lived emission from recombining nitrogen atoms is imaged with a delayed and fast-gated camera to measure instantaneous velocities. The emission strength and lifetime in air and pure nitrogen allow

  19. Plasma uniformity of microwave ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tokiguichi, K.; Sakudo, N.; Suzuki, K.; Kanomata, I.

    1980-09-01

    The ion saturation current uniformities of two different type plasma sources, a coaxial and a Lisitano coil type, are investigated using a moveable Langmuir probe. They both operate under off-resonance microwave discharge. H/sub 2/ or Ar is used as the discharge gas. The coaxial source provides better uniformities for ion saturation current, electron temperature, and electon density than the Lisitano coil, independent of the discharge gas species. The ion saturation current with the coaxial source is uniform within approx.15% inside a 40-mm-diam circle for a 0.17 Pa H/sub 2/ discharge. However, with the Lisitano coil, uniformity is limited to a 20-mm-diam circle. Furthermore, the Lisitano coil easily suffers from heat distortion because of difficulties in realizing a cooled system. It is also experimentally confirmed that the coaxial-type source is more appropriate for obtaining high density plasma under continuous operation.

  20. Properties of microwave plasma torch operating at a low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Soon C.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Kim, Jae H.

    2008-10-15

    A microwave plasma torch system is attached to a low-pressure chamber in this study. The electric field induced in a quartz discharge tube by microwave radiation breaks down the gas at a sufficiently low pressure, igniting the plasma, which is continuously sustained by the microwave radiation. The plasma profile at a very low pressure is shown to be asymmetric with higher density on the incoming side of the microwaves. The gas temperature at the bright spot of the torch plasma measured via the optical emission from hydroxide radicals is shown to increase drastically upon high-pressure operation as the microwave power increases. The electron density at the torch flame is measured by recording the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line. The plasma density increases as the microwave power increases. The typical argon plasma density of a plasma torch powered at 500 W under a pressure of 150 Torr is on the order of 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 3}. The electron temperature in the argon torch plasma was estimated to be 1.5 eV, thereby effectively exciting the molecules in the torch gas. Disintegration of nitrogen fluoride (NF{sub 3}) indicates that a microwave plasma torch operating at a low pressure can efficiently generate an abundant amount of chemical radicals.

  1. Investigations of microwave plasmas - Applications in electrothermal thruster systems

    SciTech Connect

    Haraburda, S.S.; Hawley, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental studies which have been conducted to develop understanding of plasma processes used for spacecraft propulsion are reviewed. The techniques discussed are calorimetry and volume measurements using the TM 011 and TM 012 modes in the microwave cavity system. The use of plasmas in electrical propulsion and microwave induction is reviewed. Plasma containment, microwave power production, energy distribution, and the pressure and flow dependence of the energy distribution are addressed. The plasma dimensions and their dependence on pressure, flow, and power are considered. 10 refs.

  2. Image understanding and interpretation in microwave diversity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hsueh-Jyh; Farhat, Nabil H.; Shen, Yuhsyen; Werner, Charles L.

    1989-08-01

    The authors investigate microwave imaging of metallic objects using a diversity method and interpret and predict the reconstructed image from an approach based on analysis of the scattering mechanism and a back-projection algorithm used in image retrieval. The connection between the various scattering mechanisms and the reconstructed images is discussed, what the images represent is interpreted, and a prediction is made as to what the image will look like over given spectral and angular windows. A brief description is given of the microwave diversity imaging system and the formulation of the microwave diversity imaging based on the physical optics approximation. The scattering mechanism of a complex shaped metallic object is then briefly reviewed and an alternate approach to interpreting the reconstructed image based on the understanding of the scattering mechanism and the reconstruction algorithm is given. Several numerical and experimental examples are included to support this interpretation approach.

  3. Image understanding and interpretation in microwave diversity imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsueh-Jyh; Farhat, Nabil H.; Shen, Yuhsyen; Werner, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    The authors investigate microwave imaging of metallic objects using a diversity method and interpret and predict the reconstructed image from an approach based on analysis of the scattering mechanism and a back-projection algorithm used in image retrieval. The connection between the various scattering mechanisms and the reconstructed images is discussed, what the images represent is interpreted, and a prediction is made as to what the image will look like over given spectral and angular windows. A brief description is given of the microwave diversity imaging system and the formulation of the microwave diversity imaging based on the physical optics approximation. The scattering mechanism of a complex shaped metallic object is then briefly reviewed and an alternate approach to interpreting the reconstructed image based on the understanding of the scattering mechanism and the reconstruction algorithm is given. Several numerical and experimental examples are included to support this interpretation approach.

  4. Characteristics of plasma sterilizer using microwave torch plasma with AC high-voltage discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itarashiki, Tomomasa; Hayashi, Nobuya; Yonesu, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Microwave plasma sterilization has recently been attracting attention for medical applications. However, it is difficult to perform low-temperature sterilization in short time periods. Increasing the output power shortens the time required for sterilization but causes the temperature to increase. To overcome this issue, we have developed a hybrid plasma system that combines a microwave torch plasma and a high-voltage mesh plasma, which allows radicals to be produced at low temperatures. Using this system, successful sterilization was shown to be possible in a period of 45 min at a temperature of 41 °C.

  5. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  6. Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate by plasma flame made of microwave plasma and burning hydrocarbon fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S. C.; Uhm, H. S.; Hong, Y. C.; Park, Y. G.; Park, J. S.

    2008-06-15

    Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) in liquid phase was studied by making use of a microwave plasma burner, exhibiting a safe removal capability of stockpiled chemical weapons. The microwave plasma burner consisted of a fuel injector and a plasma flame exit connected in series to a microwave plasma torch. The burner flames were sustained by injecting hydrocarbon fuels into the microwave plasma torch in air discharge. The Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated near perfect elimination of DMMP in the microwave plasma burner. This was confirmed by gas chromatography spectra as supporting data, revealing the disappearance of even intermediary compounds in the process of DMMP destruction. The experimental results and the physical configuration of the microwave plasma burner may provide an effective means of on-site removal of chemical warfare agents found on a battlefield.

  7. Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate by plasma flame made of microwave plasma and burning hydrocarbon fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S. C.; Uhm, H. S.; Hong, Y. C.; Park, Y. G.; Park, J. S.

    2008-06-01

    Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) in liquid phase was studied by making use of a microwave plasma burner, exhibiting a safe removal capability of stockpiled chemical weapons. The microwave plasma burner consisted of a fuel injector and a plasma flame exit connected in series to a microwave plasma torch. The burner flames were sustained by injecting hydrocarbon fuels into the microwave plasma torch in air discharge. The Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated near perfect elimination of DMMP in the microwave plasma burner. This was confirmed by gas chromatography spectra as supporting data, revealing the disappearance of even intermediary compounds in the process of DMMP destruction. The experimental results and the physical configuration of the microwave plasma burner may provide an effective means of on-site removal of chemical warfare agents found on a battlefield.

  8. Microwave plasma burner and temperature measurements in its flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Cheon; Bang, Chan Uk; Shin, Dong Hun; Kim, Jong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup; Yi, Won Ju

    2006-05-15

    An apparatus for generating flames and more particularly the microwave plasma burner for generating high-temperature large-volume plasma flame was presented. The plasma burner is operated by injecting liquid hydrocarbon fuels into a microwave plasma torch in air discharge and by mixing the resultant gaseous hydrogen and carbon compounds with air or oxygen gas. The microwave plasma torch can instantaneously vaporize and decompose the hydrogen and carbon containing fuels. It was observed that the flame volume of the burner was more than 50 times that of the torch plasma. While the temperature of the torch plasma flame was only 550 K at a measurement point, that of the plasma-burner flame with the addition of 0.025 lpm (liters per minute) kerosene and 20 lpm oxygen drastically increased to about 1850 K. A preliminary experiment was carried out, measuring the temperature profiles of flames along the radial and axial directions.

  9. Plasma uniformity of microwave ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokiguichi, K.; Sakudo, N.; Suzuki, K.; Kanomata, I.

    1980-10-01

    The ion saturation current uniformities of two different type plasma sources, a coaxial and a Lisitano coil type, are investigated using a moveable Langmuir probe. They both operate under off-resonance microwave discharge; H2 or Ar is used as the discharge gas. The coaxial source provides better uniformities for ion saturation current, electron temperature, and electron density than the Lisitano coil, independent of the discharge gas species. The ion saturation current with the coaxial source is uniform within about 15% inside a 40-mm-diam circle for a 0.17 Pa H2 discharge. However, with the Lisitano coil uniformity is limited to a 20-mm-diam circle and the coil is subject to heat distortion because of difficulties in realizing a cooled system

  10. Image interpretation and prediction in microwave diversity imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsueh-Jyh; Farhat, Nabil H.; Shen, Yuhsyen

    1989-01-01

    The microwave image of a metallic object is interpreted from a point of view based on the understanding of the interconnection between the scattering mechanisms, the data acquisition system, and the image reconstruction algorithm. From this understanding it is possible to interpret and predict microwave images reconstructed from data collected over specified and angular windows. The connection between a special scattering mechanism, edge diffraction, and its reconstructed image is established. The microwave image of an edge is two bright points whose locations correspond to the end points of the edge if the normal aspect angle is not included in the angular windows; otherwise a line joining the two end points and representing the edge will appear in the image. Experimental images of a trihedral reflector constructed from data collected over different angular windows support this approach to image interpretation and prediction.

  11. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Haselton, Halsey H.

    1994-01-01

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm.sup.2 at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance.

  12. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.

    1994-03-08

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm[sup 2] at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance. 4 figures.

  13. Hydrogen Generation from the Dissociation of Water Using Microwave Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Ho Jung; Soo Ouk, Jang; Hyun Jong, You

    2013-06-01

    Hydrogen is produced by direct dissociation of water vapor, i.e., splitting water molecules by the electrons in water plasma at low pressure (<10-50 Torr) using microwave plasma discharge. This condition generates a high electron temperature, which facilitates the direct dissociation of water molecules. A microwave plasma source is developed, utilizing the magnetron of a microwave oven and a TE10 rectangular waveguide. The quantity of the generated hydrogen is measured using a residual gas analyzer. The electron density and temperature are measured by a Langmuir probe, and the neutral temperature is calculated from the OH line intensity.

  14. Geostationary microwave imagers detection criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Geostationary orbit is investigated as a vantage point from which to sense remotely the surface features of the planet and its atmosphere, with microwave sensors. The geometrical relationships associated with geostationary altitude are developed to produce an efficient search pattern for the detection of emitting media and metal objects. Power transfer equations are derived from the roots of first principles and explain the expected values of the signal-to-clutter ratios for the detection of aircraft, ships, and buoys and for the detection of natural features where they are manifested as cold and warm eddies. The transport of microwave power is described for modeled detection where the direction of power flow is explained by the Zeroth and Second Laws of Thermodynamics. Mathematical expressions are derived that elucidate the detectability of natural emitting media and metal objects. Signal-to-clutter ratio comparisons are drawn among detectable objects that show relative detectability with a thermodynamic sensor and with a short-pulse radar.

  15. Generation of microwave-induced plasmas in automotive exhaust gas mixtures using pulsed microwave energy.

    PubMed

    Destefani, Carlos A; Siores, Elias; Murphy, Anthony B

    2003-01-01

    Microwave energy at 2.45 GHz was applied to a mixture of exhaust gases from a petrol engine at atmospheric pressure. It was found that by pulsing the microwave energy with a 50% duty cycle, the average power required to sustain a microwave-induced plasma discharge was decreased by about 40%. The ratio of absorbed to incident power was unaffected. These findings were confirmed for pulse frequencies from 10 to 300 Hz. PMID:15007864

  16. GPM Microwave Imager Engineering Model Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, David; Krimchansky, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) Instrument is being developed by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation (BATC) for the GPM program at NASA Goddard. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological predictions through more accurate and more frequent precipitation measurements. The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) will be used to make calibrated, radiometric measurements from space at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. GMI will be placed on the GPM Core Spacecraft together with the Dualfrequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The DPR is two-frequency precipitation measurement radar, which will operate in the Ku-band and Ka-band of the microwave spectrum. The Core Spacecraft will make radiometric and radar measurements of clouds and precipitation and will be the central element ofGPM's space segment. The data products from GPM will provide information concerning global precipitation on a frequent, near-global basis to meteorologists and scientists making weather forecasts and performing research on the global energy and water cycle, precipitation, hydrology, and related disciplines. In addition, radiometric measurements from GMI and radar measurements from the DPR will be used together to develop a retrieval transfer standard for the purpose of calibrating precipitation retrieval algorithms. This calibration standard will establish a reference against which other retrieval algorithms using only microwave radiometers (and without the benefit of the DPR) on other satellites in the GPM constellation will be compared.

  17. Development of a long-slot microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Miyamoto, N.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    A 20 cm long 10 cm wide microwave plasma source was realized by inserting two 20 cm long 1.5 mm diameter rod antennas into the plasma. Plasma luminous distributions around the antennas were changed by magnetic field arrangement created by permanent magnets attached to the source. The distributions appeared homogeneous in one direction along the antenna when the spacing between the antenna and the source wall was 7.5 mm for the input microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz. Plasma density and temperature at a plane 20 cm downstream from the microwave shield were measured by a Langmuir probe array at 150 W microwave power input. The measured electron density and temperature varied over space from 3.0 × 109 cm-3 to 5.8 × 109 cm-3, and from 1.1 eV to 2.1 eV, respectively.

  18. Development of a long-slot microwave plasma source.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Y; Kasuya, T; Miyamoto, N; Wada, M

    2016-02-01

    A 20 cm long 10 cm wide microwave plasma source was realized by inserting two 20 cm long 1.5 mm diameter rod antennas into the plasma. Plasma luminous distributions around the antennas were changed by magnetic field arrangement created by permanent magnets attached to the source. The distributions appeared homogeneous in one direction along the antenna when the spacing between the antenna and the source wall was 7.5 mm for the input microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz. Plasma density and temperature at a plane 20 cm downstream from the microwave shield were measured by a Langmuir probe array at 150 W microwave power input. The measured electron density and temperature varied over space from 3.0 × 10(9) cm(-3) to 5.8 × 10(9) cm(-3), and from 1.1 eV to 2.1 eV, respectively. PMID:26932114

  19. Microwave Imaging of Human Forearms: Pilot Study and Image Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Colin; Zakaria, Amer; Pistorius, Stephen; LoVetri, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We present a pilot study using a microwave tomography system in which we image the forearms of 5 adult male and female volunteers between the ages of 30 and 48. Microwave scattering data were collected at 0.8 to 1.2 GHz with 24 transmitting and receiving antennas located in a matching fluid of deionized water and table salt. Inversion of the microwave data was performed with a balanced version of the multiplicative-regularized contrast source inversion algorithm formulated using the finite-element method (FEM-CSI). T1-weighted MRI images of each volunteer's forearm were also collected in the same plane as the microwave scattering experiment. Initial “blind” imaging results from the utilized inversion algorithm show that the image quality is dependent on the thickness of the arm's peripheral adipose tissue layer; thicker layers of adipose tissue lead to poorer overall image quality. Due to the exible nature of the FEM-CSI algorithm used, prior information can be readily incorporated into the microwave imaging inversion process. We show that by introducing prior information into the FEM-CSI algorithm the internal anatomical features of all the arms are resolved, significantly improving the images. The prior information was estimated manually from the blind inversions using an ad hoc procedure. PMID:24023539

  20. Development and research of a coaxial microwave plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Juan; Xu Yingqiao; Tang Jinlan; Mao Genwang; Yang Tielian; Tan Xiaoquen

    2008-08-15

    An overview of the research on a coaxial microwave plasma thruster at Northwestern Polytechnic University is presented. Emphasis is put on the development and research on key components of the thruster system, a microthrust balance, plasma plume diagnostics, and a numerical simulation of the plasma flow field inside the thruster cavity. The developed thruster cavity is chosen from a coaxial resonant cavity with concentrated capacitance, which can operate well in atmosphere and vacuum conditions. The development of a microwave source shows that a magnetron powered by a switch power supply has advantages in the power level and efficiency, but a solid state microwave source synthesized from the arsenide field effect transistor is superior in weight and volume. Through elimination of the effect of large gravity and resistance force induced by a gas pipe line and a microwave transmitting line on the microthrust, 15 mN and 340 s in the performance of the microwave plasma thruster at 70 W and with helium gas are measured. Diagnosing experiment shows that the plasma plume density is in the range of (1-7.2)x10{sup 16}/m{sup 3}. Numerical simulation of the plasma flow field inside the coaxial thruster cavity shows that there is a good match between the microwave power and gas flow rate.

  1. Development and research of a coaxial microwave plasma thruster.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Xu, Yingqiao; Tang, Jinlan; Mao, Genwang; Yang, Tielian; Tan, Xiaoquen

    2008-08-01

    An overview of the research on a coaxial microwave plasma thruster at Northwestern Polytechnic University is presented. Emphasis is put on the development and research on key components of the thruster system, a microthrust balance, plasma plume diagnostics, and a numerical simulation of the plasma flow field inside the thruster cavity. The developed thruster cavity is chosen from a coaxial resonant cavity with concentrated capacitance, which can operate well in atmosphere and vacuum conditions. The development of a microwave source shows that a magnetron powered by a switch power supply has advantages in the power level and efficiency, but a solid state microwave source synthesized from the arsenide field effect transistor is superior in weight and volume. Through elimination of the effect of large gravity and resistance force induced by a gas pipe line and a microwave transmitting line on the microthrust, 15 mN and 340 s in the performance of the microwave plasma thruster at 70 W and with helium gas are measured. Diagnosing experiment shows that the plasma plume density is in the range of (1-7.2)x10(16)m(3). Numerical simulation of the plasma flow field inside the coaxial thruster cavity shows that there is a good match between the microwave power and gas flow rate. PMID:19044345

  2. Reflectometric measurement of plasma imaging and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, A.; Ito, N.; Oda, M.; Komada, Y.; Nagae, D.; Zhang, D.; Kogi, Y.; Tobimatsu, S.; Maruyama, T.; Shimazu, H.; Sakata, E.; Sakai, F.; Kuwahara, D.; Yoshinaga, T.; Tokuzawa, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Yamaguchi, S.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G.; Lee, W.; Padhi, S.; Kim, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in microwave and millimeter-wave technologies has made possible advanced diagnostics for application to various fields, such as, plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, alien substance detection, airborne and spaceborne imaging radars called as synthetic aperture radars, living body measurements. Transmission, reflection, scattering, and radiation processes of electromagnetic waves are utilized as diagnostic tools. In this report we focus on the reflectometric measurements and applications to biological signals (vital signal detection and breast cancer detection) as well as plasma diagnostics, specifically by use of imaging technique and ultra-wideband radar technique.

  3. Development of 3D microwave imaging reflectometry in LHD (invited).

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Y; Kuwahara, D; Yoshinaga, T; Hamada, Y; Kogi, Y; Mase, A; Tsuchiya, H; Tsuji-Iio, S; Yamaguchi, S

    2012-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) microwave imaging reflectometry has been developed in the large helical device to visualize fluctuating reflection surface which is caused by the density fluctuations. The plasma is illuminated by the probe wave with four frequencies, which correspond to four radial positions. The imaging optics makes the image of cut-off surface onto the 2D (7 × 7 channels) horn antenna mixer arrays. Multi-channel receivers have been also developed using micro-strip-line technology to handle many channels at reasonable cost. This system is first applied to observe the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO), which is an MHD mode with many harmonics that appears in the edge plasma. A narrow structure along field lines is observed during EHO. PMID:23126965

  4. Destruction of dimethyl methylphosphonate using a microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Cho, Soon C.; Hong, Yong C.; Park, Yang G.; Park, Ju S.

    2008-02-01

    A microwave plasma torch with a microwave power of 1.2kW destroys dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) with a destruction rate of 1.14l/h, demonstrating a safe removal capability of stockpiled chemical weapons. The FTIR spectra of the discharge gas from DMMP destruction indicates near perfect elimination of DMMP when the proper amount of oxygen gas is added. This can be confirmed by the gas chromatography spectra, which show the disappearance of even intermediary compounds. The compactness and light weight of the microwave plasma torch provide an effective means of on-site removal of the chemical warfare agents found on a battlefield.

  5. Effect of applied magnetic field on a microwave plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Juan; Xu Yingqiao; Meng Zhiqiang; Yang Tielian

    2008-02-15

    Theoretical analysis and calculation show that applying a magnetic field in a microwave plasma thruster operating at 2.45 GHz can improve the thruster performance, whereby an electron cyclotron resonant layer at thruster startup state contributes to the increase of microwave energy dissipated in plasma, and a strong magnetic field up to 0.5 T can increase the peak temperature of inside plasma when the thruster operates in steady state. Experimental measurements of the thruster with applied field and operating on argon gas show high coupling efficiency. Plasma plume diagnostics deduce a high degree of gas ionization in the thruster cavity. This shows the feasibility of operating a microwave plasma thruster with an applied magnetic field.

  6. Microwave Reflectometry Measurements of Mode Transitions in Helicon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Robert; Boivin, Robert; Balkey, Matthew; Scime, Earl

    1999-10-01

    Considerable research effort has been devoted to developing probe techniques for measurements of electron temperatures and densities in rf plasmas. However, the densities (n > 10E13 cm-3) and electron temperatures (T > 3 eV) found in steady-state helicon plasmas make probe measurements problematic, particularly in helium plasmas as they have significantly higher electron temperatures. We have designed and built a microwave density diagnostic for a steady-state helicon plasma. The cornerstone of the diagnostic is a 20 - 40 GHz variable frequency microwave source. The microwave horns located inside the vacuum chamber are configured so that the system operates in the far-field diffraction regime. The diagnostic can be operated in two different configurations: 1) Simple interferometry, where at a fixed microwave frequency the average electron density is obtained by measuring either the phase shift of the attenuation of the microwave beam; 2) Differential interferometery where the Fourier transform of the plasma phase shift response to a slightly non-linear frequency ramp yields the average density. The change in peak plasma density is reported for transitions into the helicon mode for both helium and argon plasmas. The transitions occur as a function of rf power, magnetic field, and rf frequency.

  7. Simple microwave preionization source for ohmic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, W.; Kwon, Gi-Chung; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Jayhyun; Jeon, Sang-Jean; Huh, Songwhe

    2000-07-01

    A simple economical 2.45 GHz microwave system has been developed and utilized for preionization on the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)-TOKAMAK. The magnetron microwave source was obtained from a widely used, household microwave oven. Since ac operation of the magnetron is not suitable for tokamak application, the magnetron cathode bias circuit was modified to obtain continuous and stable operation of the magnetron for several hundred milliseconds. Application of the developed microwave system to KAIST-TOKAMAK resulted in a reduction of ohmic flux consumption.

  8. Restoration of multichannel microwave radiometric images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, R. T.; Yeh, C. L.; Olson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    A constrained iterative image restoration method is applied to multichannel diffraction-limited imagery. This method is based on the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm utilizing incomplete information and partial constraints. The procedure is described using the orthogonal projection operators which project onto two prescribed subspaces iteratively. Some of its properties and limitations are also presented. The selection of appropriate constraints was emphasized in a practical application. Multichannel microwave images, each having different spatial resolution, were restored to a common highest resolution to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. Both noise-free and noisy images were used in this investigation.

  9. Medical imaging with a microwave tomographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Jofre, L; Hawley, M S; Broquetas, A; de los Reyes, E; Ferrando, M; Elias-Fusté, A R

    1990-03-01

    A microwave tomographic scanner for biomedical applications is presented. The scanner consists of a 64 element circular array with a useful diameter of 20 cm. Electronically scanning the transmitting and receiving antennas allows multiview measurements with no mechanical movement. Imaging parameters are appropriate for medical use: a spatial resolution of 7 mm and a contrast resolution of 1% for a measurement time of 3 s. Measurements on tissue-simulating phantoms and volunteers, together with numerical simulations, are presented to assess the system for absolute imaging of tissue distribution and for differential imaging of physiological, pathological, and induced changes in tissues. PMID:2329003

  10. AESMIR: A New NASA Airborne Microwave Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Hood, Robbie; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR) is a versatile new airborne imaging radiometer under development by NASA. The AESMIR design is unique in that it will perform dual-polarized imaging at all AMSR frequency bands (6.9 through 89 GHz) using only one sensor head/scanner package, providing an efficient solution for AMSR-type science applications (snow, soil moisture/land parameters, precip, ocean winds, SST, water vapor, sea ice, etc.). The microwave radiometers themselves will incorporate state-of-the-art receivers, with particular attention given to instrument calibration for the best possible accuracy and sensitivity. The single-package design of AESMIR makes it compatible with high-altitude aircraft platforms such as the NASA ER-2s and the Proteus. The arbitrary 2-axis gimbal can perform conical and cross-track scanning, as well as fixed-beam staring. This compatibility with high-altitude platforms coupled with the flexible scanning configuration, opens up previously unavailable science opportunities for convection/precip/cloud science and co-flying with complementary instruments, as well as providing wider swath coverage for all science applications. By designing AESMIR to be compatible with these high-altitude platforms, we are also compatible with the NASA P-3, the NASA DC-8, and ground-based deployments. Thus AESMIR can provide low-, mid-, and high altitude microwave imaging.

  11. Microwave imaging of tissue blood content changes.

    PubMed

    Hawley, M S; Broquetas, A; Jofre, L; Bolomey, J C; Gaboriaud, G

    1991-05-01

    Active microwave imaging gives information on the dielectric properties of of the body, allowing the collection of data that are distinct from, but complementary to, those available from other imaging methods based on different radiations. Two types of microwave imaging systems have been developed. The first is a planar system that irradiates the object with a plane wave and collects scattered phase and amplitude data at 1024 points on a parallel plane. The data can be reconstructed using a back propagation technique to give an image of the object. The second type of system is a tomographic scanner, consisting of a multiplexed 64-element circular array of waveguides. The waveguides are electronically scanned, alternately as sources and receivers, to give a complete scan of the object with no mechanical movement. A tomographic 'slice' of the object is reconstructed using spectral domain interpolation. Both systems work at 2.45 GHz with an incident power less than 1 mW cm-2 at the object and require a coupling medium (usually water) between the object and the source/receiver. Imaging parameters are appropriate for clinical use: a spatial resolution of 1 cm, measurement time of a few seconds and contrast resolution of around 1%. The effects of changes in perfusion on images of isolated animal organs are presented. Images have also been obtained, with both systems, of the internal dielectric structure of the forearm and of variations in dielectric properties due to changes of tissue blood content effected by application and release of tourniquets to the upper arm. Results show that these changes are well demonstrated by microwave imaging, and possible clinical applications are discussed. PMID:1870328

  12. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  13. Recent trends in atomic spectrometry with microwave-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekaert, José A. C.; Siemens, Volker

    2004-12-01

    The state-of-the-art and trends of development in atomic spectrometry with microwave-induced plasmas (MIPs) since the 1998s are presented and discussed. This includes developments in devices for producing microwave plasma discharges, with reference also to miniaturized systems as well as to progress in sample introduction for microwave-induced plasmas, such as pneumatic and ultrasonic nebulization using membrane desolvation, to the further development of gaseous analyte species generation systems and to both spark and laser ablation (LA). The features of microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) as an alternative to inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-MS are discussed. Recent work on the use of microwave-induced plasma atomic spectrometry for trace element determinations and monitoring, their use as tandem sources and for particle sizing are discussed. Recent applications of the coupling of gas chromatography and MIP atomic spectrometry for the determination of organometallic compounds of heavy metals such as Pb, Hg, Se and Sn are reviewed and the possibilities of trapping for sensitivity enhancement, as required for many applications especially in environmental work, are showed at the hand of citations from the recent literature.

  14. Fan-shaped microwave plasma for mail decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.; Popovic, S.; Tarasenko, Olga; Rubinraut, M.; Raskovic, M.

    2007-08-01

    A microwave torch is designed to produce fan-shaped plasma, which extends about 140 mm laterally. This torch produces an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen in the plasma effluent as evidenced by its emission spectroscopy. The results of the spectral intensity measurements show that the produced atomic oxygen outside the microwave cavity distributes quite uniformly over a width of about 80 mm and reaches out more than 10 mm. An experiment applying this plasma to kill Bacillus cereus contained in an envelope has been performed. The kill rate is presented.

  15. Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, Toshiki; Hidaka, Hiroki; Muguruma, Hitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is presented. A system with a re-entrant microwave cavity realizes simple matching, stable plasma, and free space under the orifice of plasma steam. Hexamethyldisiloxane is employed as a monomer, while argon is used as a carrier gas. The effective area of the hydrophobic coating film used corresponds to a circle of 20 mm diameter and the deposition rate considered is 5 nm/min. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy shows that the coating film has a large molecular weight (>200 kDa), suggesting that a high-crosslinking and three-dimensional polymer matrix is formed and microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is fulfilled.

  16. Analysis of a microwave-heated planar propagating hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, J.P.; Micci, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    The heating of a gas to high temperatures by absorption of microwave radiation has been proposed as a potential electrothermal rocket propulsion system. One possible mode of microwave energy absorption is by means of a planar plasma region propagating toward the source of the microwave radiation. Such a planar propagating plasma can be spatially stabilized by a gas stream flowing in the same direction as the microwave radiation with a velocity equal to the plasma propagation velocity. A one-dimensional analysis of the microwave-heated planar propagating plasma for hydrogen gas was developed to predict maximum gas temperatures and propagation velocities. The governing electromagnetic and energy equations were numerically integrated with temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of equilibrium hydrogen. The propagation velocity eigenvalue was solved by means of an iterative technique. Temperature distribution in the gas, propagation velocities, and percent power absorbed, reflected and transmitted, were obtained as a function of incident microwave power at a frequency of 2.45 GHza for hydrogen gas pressures of 1 and 10 atm. 19 references.

  17. Implementation of a Microwave Imaging Reflectometer on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriete, D. M.; Tobias, B. J.

    2013-10-01

    The microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) is a new plasma diagnostic system on DIII-D that will make localized measurements of density fluctuations on a poloidal cross section of the tokamak. The data from these measurements will provide a quantitative picture of plasma turbulence and MHD instabilities. This project's focus is to install the MIR system on DIII-D, perform calibration tests on it, and develop data analysis tools to process MIR data, with a focus on estimating measurement error. Tests include taking dark shots to subtract out passive noise from the measurements and taking plasma shots to better quantify active noise. Synthetic diagnostics based on numerical codes will also be used to evaluate the MIR system. The MIR uses the same optics as the existing electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system so, after completion, physicists will have access to a 2D image of both density and temperature fluctuations within the plasma. The MIR thus has broad utility across experiments seeking to understand turbulent transport. Supported by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R.

    2015-11-16

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  19. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleasman, Timothy; F. Imani, Mohammadreza; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R.

    2015-11-01

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  20. Numerical Study on Microwave Scattering by Various Plasma Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guibin; Zhang, Lin; He, Feng; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-08-01

    The scattering features of microwave (MW) by planar plasma layer, plasma column and plasma-column array under different parameters have been numerically studied by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The effects of the plasma frequency and electron collision rate on MW's reflectance, transmittance and absorptance are examined. The results show that for the planar plasma layer, the electron collision plays an important role in MW absorption and the reduction of wave reflection. In the plasma column condition, strong scattering occurs in certain directions. The scattering pattern depends on the plasma frequency, electron collision rate and column radius. A collisional, non-planar shaped plasma object like the plasma-column array can reduce significantly the wave reflection comparing with the planar plasma layer.

  1. Coherent microwave radiation from a laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.

    2012-12-24

    We propose a method for generation of coherent monochromatic microwave/terahertz radiation from a laser-induced plasma. It is shown that small-scale plasma, located in the interaction region of two co-propagating plane-polarized laser beams, can be a source of the dipole radiation at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the lasers. This radiation is coherent and appears as a result of the so-called optical mixing in plasma.

  2. Shallow depth subsurface imaging with microwave holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, Andrei; Ivashov, Sergey; Razevig, Vladimir; Vasiliev, Igor; Bechtel, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, microwave holography is considered as a tool to obtain high resolution images of shallowly buried objects. Signal acquisition is performed at multiple frequencies on a grid using a two-dimensional mechanical scanner moving a single transceiver over an area of interest in close proximity to the surface. The described FFT-based reconstruction technique is used to obtain a stack of plan view images each using only one selected frequency from the operating waveband of the radar. The extent of a synthetically-formed aperture and the signal wavelength define the plan view resolution, which at sounding frequencies near 7 GHz amounts to 2 cm. The system has a short depth of focus which allows easy selection of proper focusing plane. The small distance from the buried objects to the antenna does not prevent recording of clean images due to multiple reflections (as happens with impulse radars). The description of the system hardware and signal processing technique is illustrated using experiments conducted in dry sand. The microwave images of inert anti-personnel mines are demonstrated as examples. The images allow target discrimination based on the same visually-discernible small features that a human observer would employ. The demonstrated technology shows promise for modification to meet the specific practical needs required for humanitarian demining or in multi-sensor survey systems.

  3. Analysis of the tuning characteristics of microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotk, Robert; Jasiński, Mariusz; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the tuning characteristics of waveguide-supplied metal-cylinder-based nozzleless microwave plasma source. This analysis has enabled to estimate the electron concentration ne and electron frequency collisions ν in the plasma generated in nitrogen and in a mixture of nitrogen and ethanol vapour. The parameters ne and ν are the basic quantities that characterize the plasma. The presented new plasma diagnostic method is particularly useful, when spectroscopic methods are useless. The presented plasma source is currently used in research of a hydrogen production from liquids.

  4. Electric probe investigations of microwave generated, atmospheric pressure, plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Porteanu, H. E.; Kuehn, S.; Gesche, R.

    2010-07-15

    We examine the applicability of the Langmuir-type of characterization for atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated in a millimeter-size cavity microwave resonator at 2.45 GHz. Wide range I-V characteristics of helium, argon, nitrogen, air and oxygen are presented for different gas fluxes, distances probe-resonator, and microwave powers. A detailed analysis is performed for the fine variation in the current around the floating potential. A simplified theory specially developed for this case is presented, considering the ionic and electronic saturation currents and the floating potential. Based on this theory, we conclude that, while the charge carrier density depends on gas flow, distance to plasma source, and microwave absorbed power, the electron temperature is quite independent of these parameters. The resulting plasma parameters for helium, argon, and nitrogen are presented.

  5. Microwave plasma torch abatement of NF3 and SF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup; Chun, Byung Jun; Lee, Sun Ku; Hwang, Sang Kyu; Kim, Dong Su

    2006-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch as a tool for fluorinated compounds (FCs) abatement was presented. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF3 and SF6 in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Swirl gas, compressed air for stable plasma, was tangentially injected into the microwave plasma torch and a mixture of N2, NF3, or SF6, and C2H4 was axially injected. The DRE of 99.1% for NF3 was achieved without an additive gas at the total flow rate of 50.1 liters per minute (lpm) by applying a microwave power of 1.4kW. Also, a DRE of SF6 up to 90.1% was obtained at the total flow rate of 40.6lpm using an applied microwave power of 1.4kW. Experimental results indicate that the microwave plasma abatement device can successfully eliminate FCs in the semiconductor industry.

  6. Extreme ultraviolet radiation emitted by helium microwave driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinho, S.; Felizardo, E.; Tatarova, E.; Alves, L. L.

    2016-06-01

    The extreme ultraviolet radiation emitted by helium microwave-driven (2.45 GHz) plasmas operating at low-pressure conditions was investigated. Novel data regarding emitted spectral lines of excited helium atoms and ions in the 20-33 nm wavelength range and their intensity behavior with variation of discharge operational conditions are presented. The intensity of all the spectral emissions was found to strongly increase with the microwave power delivered to the plasma. Furthermore, the intensity of the ionic spectral emissions decreases by nearly one order of magnitude as the pressure was raised from 0.2 to 0.5 mbar.

  7. Plasmas generated in bubbles immersed in liquids: direct current streamers versus microwave plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Sharma, Ashish; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-07-01

    Two approaches to generate non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma in bubbles immersed in liquids are compared using high-fidelity 2D fluid simulations. In the first approach, corona/streamer like plasma is generated using high-voltage negative and positive pulses applied between two electrodes (pin-to-plane geometry) immersed in liquid. In the second, the plasma is generated using a remote microwave source (frequency 2.45 GHz). We find that the microwave approach requires less energy, while generating a denser, more chemically reactive and more uniform plasma within the bubble volume, as compared to the plasma generated using high-voltage pulsing.

  8. Development of Microwave Imaging Reflectometry for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Hong, I.; Nam, Y.; Kim, M.; Leem, J.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Kim, Y. G.; Kim, K. W.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2011-10-01

    A microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) system for KSTAR is being developed to measure 2-D (poloidal × radial) image of the electron density fluctuations for turbulence based transport study. Prior to the full system, two-frequency prototype system will be tested for the 2012 KSTAR campaign. The system is capable to measure poloidal wave numbers from 0.5 to 2 cm-1 with a 16 channel array of detectors that can image ~ 13 cm length of the poloidal plane. Due to the standing wave problem of lens based system (sharing optics with 2nd ECEI system), a new system based on reflective optics is being designed. The RF electronics, capable of simultaneous measurement of the reflected beams from two cut-off layers, has been developed and the laboratory test results with a corrugated reflecting target will be presented. Work supported by NRF Korea and US DOE.

  9. Restoration of multichannel microwave radiometric images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, R. T.; Yeh, C.-L.; Olson, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A constrained iterative image restoration method is applied to multichannel diffraction-limited imagery. This method is based on the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm utilizing incomplete information and partial constraints. The procedure is described using the orthogonal projection operators which project onto two prescribed subspaces iteratively. Its properties and limitations are presented. The effect of noise was investigated and a better understanding of the performance of the algorithm with noisy data has been achieved. The restoration scheme with the selection of appropriate constraints was applied to a practical problem. The 6.6, 10.7, 18, and 21 GHz satellite images obtained by the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), each having different spatial resolution, were restored to a common, high resolution (that of the 37 GHz channels) to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. Both simulated data and real data were used in this study. The restored multichannel images may be utilized to retrieve rainfall distributions.

  10. Coupling modes in a dipolar microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, Ana; Baele, Pierre; Maurau, Remy; Bechu, Stephane; Bes, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    The multi-dipolar microwave plasma is a suitable technology for the scaling-up of high density plasma processing in the very low pressure range. Effectively, a large area or volume of plasma can be achieved by a mere distribution, over 2 or 3 dimensions, of a number of elementary plasma sources. To enhance the microwave coupling efficiency and optimize the spatial repartition of the elementary plasma sources, it could be helpful to localize the production regions and coupling modes that govern the energy transfer from the wave to the electrons. The main objective of this work is to identify the possible coupling modes as a function of operating parameters. Accordingly, the plasma parameters (electron temperature, density) were correlated together with the electromagnetic radiation, as well as with different coupling modes observed as a function of microwave power. High plasma densities, up to 10 times the critical density (for one source), can be achieved through an efficient transfer of the electrostatic wave energy to the electrons.

  11. Deposition of diamond-like films by ECR microwave plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor); Pool, Frederick S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Hard amorphous hydrogenated carbon, diamond-like films are deposited using an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma with a separate radio frequency power bias applied to a substrate stage. The electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma yields low deposition pressure and creates ion species otherwise unavailable. A magnetic mirror configuration extracts special ion species from a plasma chamber. Different levels of the radio frequency power bias accelerate the ion species of the ECR plasma impinging on a substrate to form different diamond-like films. During the deposition process, a sample stage is maintained at an ambient temperature of less than 100.degree. C. No external heating is applied to the sample stage. The deposition process enables diamond-like films to be deposited on heat-sensitive substrates.

  12. Noise characteristics of a plasma relativistic microwave amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelkov, P. S.; Ivanov, I. E.; Shumeiko, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Reasons for the occurrence of microwave noise at the output of a plasma relativistic amplifier have been analyzed. It is found that, in the absence of an input signal, the emission spectrum of the plasma relativistic microwave amplifier is similar to that of an electron beam in vacuum. It is concluded that microwave noise at the output of the amplifier appears as a result of amplification of the intrinsic noise of the electron beam. The emission characteristics of a relativistic electron beam formed in a magnetically insulated diode with an explosive emission cathode in vacuum have been studied experimentally for the first time. An important point is that, in this case, there is no virtual cathode in the drift space.

  13. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Marcinek, Marek; Kostecki, Robert

    2012-07-17

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  14. DETOXIFICATION OF NAVY RED DYE BY MICROWAVE PLASMA. SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The process of microwave plasma detoxification has been applied successfully to the destruction/disposal of a U.S. Navy red dye pyrotechnic smoke mixture. The mixture was added as a powder, a solvent solution, and a water slurry. Material balance for detoxification of the slurry ...

  15. Observation of plasma hole transition induced by microwave power modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji

    2005-10-01

    Spontaneous formation of stationary vortex structure with density depletion, or plasma hole, has been observed in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. We have so far reported the flow velocity field, the vorticity distribution and the strong electric field resulting from the breaking of quasi-neutrality condition. The detailed transitional behavior of plasma hole formation is not entirely revealed yet. Here we report the results on microwave power modulation experiments to investigate the detailed change in density, plasma potential and flow velocity field of the plasma hole. Temporal evolutions of those quantities were measured by using a Langmuir probe, an emissive probe and a directional Langmuir probe. By increasing the microwave power to a certain threshold value, the density depletion characterizing the hole structure was formed along the central axis of the cylindrical plasma. The plasma potential started building up a bell-shaped distribution simultaneously, resulting in ExB rotation of the plasma. It should be emphasized that a definite inward-directed flow, which implies an anomalous viscosity of the plasma, was observed. A general relation between radial flow and viscosity is derived through the analysis of ion fluid equation, suggesting a possible means of determination of viscosity coefficient.

  16. Rapid Formation of Distributed Plasma Discharges using X-Band Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xun; Booske, John; Scharer, John

    2015-11-01

    Observations of rapidly formed (<50-300 ns) distributed plasma discharges using X-band microwaves are presented. A cylindrical stainless steel chamber enclosed with polycarbonate windows is used to observe microwave breakdown in Ar and Ne gas mixtures from 10 to 760 torr. The chamber is illuminated by the output of 25 kW, 0.8 μs pulse-width, 9.382 GHz magnetron through an X-band waveguide pressed against the polycarbonate window. Measured incident and reflected microwave power is used to detect the discharge and absorption and transmission characteristics as the pressure is varied. Measurements show 70% reflected power once plasma is formed and a small amount of Argon in Neon shortens the breakdown time. An E-plane tapered waveguide is designed to enhance the electric field at the breakdown surface so that breakdown condition is improved. Additionally, an ICCD provides fast (<50 ns) time-scale optical images of the plasma, revealing the plasma formation and decay processes. Optical emission spectroscopy branching ratio measurements provide plasma breakdown characteristics including electron temperatures and the electron energy distribution functions for different Ne/Ar gas mixture plasmas formed at 10-200 torr. Experiments show that inclusion of both red and blue argon lines significantly enhances the effective electron temperature and the distribution function solutions, compared with using only red lines.

  17. Properties of linear microwave plasma sustained by coaxial TEM waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Moon-Ki; Seo, Kwon-Sang; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Ho-Jun

    2013-09-01

    A linear 2.45GHz microwave plasma sustained by coaxial circular TEM waveguide has been developed for the low temperature large area plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition application. TE-TEM microwave power coupling was achieved by copper rod located at λg/4 from short-end of TE10 waveguide. TEM waveguide consists of quartz tube surrounded by plasma and copper rod electrode. TEM waveguide is 60 cm in length and 3 cm in diameter, which is terminated with shorted metal cap. For the operation condition of 300 W input power and Ar pressure of 200 mTorr, a clear standing wave pattern with wavelength of 10 cm was observed. Measured plasma density and temperature at 5 cm from quartz wall was 1.2 × 1017/cm3 and 1.7 eV respectively. Density non-uniformity was less than 6% along quartz tube in spite of standing wave set-up. In addition, properties of the microwave source are also investigated through electromagnetic field simulation coupled with drift-diffusion approximation of plasma. Calculated and measured standing wave pattern was almost identical. Electron density and temperature distribution show similar behavior with experimental results. S11 value of input port of TE10 waveguide was calculated as 17dB.

  18. Liquid fuel reforming using microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotk, Robert; Hrycak, Bartosz; Czylkowski, Dariusz; Dors, Miroslaw; Jasinski, Mariusz; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most promising energy carriers. Due to the growing interest in hydrogen production technologies, in this paper we present the results of experimental investigations of thermal decomposition and dry reforming of two alcohols (ethanol and isopropanol) in the waveguide-supplied metal-cylinder-based nozzleless microwave (915 MHz) plasma source (MPS). The hydrogen production experiments were preceded by electrodynamics properties investigations of the used MPS and plasma spectroscopic diagnostics. All experimental tests were performed with the working gas (nitrogen or carbon dioxide) flow rate ranging from 1200 to 3900 normal litres per hour and an absorbed microwave power up to 5 kW. The alcohols were introduced into the plasma using an induction heating vaporizer. The ethanol thermal decomposition resulted in hydrogen selectivity up to 100%. The hydrogen production rate was up to 1150 NL(H2) h‑1 and the energy yield was 267 NL(H2) kWh‑1 of absorbed microwave energy. Due to intense soot production, the thermal decomposition process was not appropriate for isopropanol conversion. Considering the dry reforming process, using isopropanol was more efficient in hydrogen production than ethanol. The rate and energy yield of hydrogen production were up to 1116 NL(H2) h‑1 and 223 NL(H2) kWh‑1 of microwave energy used, respectively. However, the hydrogen selectivity was no greater than 37%. Selected results given by the experiment were compared with the results of numerical modeling.

  19. Thermal imaging of subsurface microwave absorbers in dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiander, Robert; Maclachlan Spicer, Jane W.; Murphy, John C.

    1994-03-01

    The use of microwaves as a heating source in time-resolved IR radiometry provides the ability to heat surface and subsurface microwave-absorbing regions of a specimen directly. This can improve the contrast and spatial resolution of such regions and enhance their detectibility when compared with conventional laser or flashlamp sources. The experiments reported here use microwave heating with IR detection. Results on plexiglass-water-Teflon test specimens with absorbers at different depths in the sample are described by a 1D analytical model. Measurements using microwave and optical heating on epoxy-coated steel pipes are compared and demonstrate the ability of microwave heating to detect subsurface water voids very efficiently. Other applications of the method to microwave imaging, field mapping and imaging of defects in composite materials are discussed.

  20. Observations of microwave continuum emission from air shower plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P. W.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Varner, G. S.; Hebert, C. L.; Miki, C.; Kowalski, J.; Ruckman, L.; Stokes, B. T.; Beatty, J. J.; Connolly, A.; Saltzberg, D.; Chen, P.; Hast, C.; Ng, J.; Reil, K.; Walz, D.; Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate a possible new technique for microwave detection of cosmic-ray extensive air showers which relies on detection of expected continuum radiation in the microwave range, caused by free-electron collisions with neutrals in the tenuous plasma left after the passage of the shower. We performed an initial experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator laboratory in 2003 and measured broadband microwave emission from air ionized via high-energy electrons and photons. A follow-up experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in the summer of 2004 confirmed the major features of the previous Argonne Wakefield Accelerator observations with better precision. Prompted by these results we built a prototype detector using satellite television technology and have made measurements suggestive of the detection of cosmic-ray extensive air showers. The method, if confirmed by experiments now in progress, could provide a high-duty cycle complement to current nitrogen fluorescence observations.

  1. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2013-09-15

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N{sub 2}, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  2. Advanced Microwave/Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zuowei; Yang, Lu; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Domier, C. W.; Ito, N.; Kogi, Y.; Liang, Y.; Mase, A.; Park, H.; Sakata, E.; Tsai, W.; Xia, Z. G.; Zhang, P.

    Millimeter wave technology advances have made possible active and passive millimeter wave imaging for a variety of applications including advanced plasma diagnostics, radio astronomy, atmospheric radiometry, concealed weapon detection, all-weather aircraft landing, contraband goods detection, harbor navigation/surveillance in fog, highway traffic monitoring in fog, helicopter and automotive collision avoidance in fog, and environmental remote sensing data associated with weather, pollution, soil moisture, oil spill detection, and monitoring of forest fires, to name but a few. The primary focus of this paper is on technology advances which have made possible advanced imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations and microturbulence in fusion plasmas. Topics of particular emphasis include frequency selective surfaces, planar Schottky diode mixer arrays, electronically controlled beam shaping/steering arrays, and high power millimeter wave local oscillator and probe sources.

  3. Resonant and Ground Experimental Study on the Microwave Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; He, Hongqing; Mao, Genwang; Qu, Kun; Tang, Jinlan; Han, Xianwei

    2002-01-01

    chemistry. Therefore, the application of EP for the attitude control and station keeping of satellite, the propulsion of deep space exploration craft allows to reduce substantially the mass of on-board propellant and the launching cost. The EP research is now receiving high interest everywhere. microwave generating subsystem, the propellant supplying subsystem and the resonator (the thruster). Its principle is that the magnetron of the microwave generating subsystem transfers electric energy into microwave energy at given frequency which is introduced into a resonant cavity. Microwave will resonate within the cavity when it is adjusted. When the propellant gas (N2, Ar, He, NH3 or H2) is put into the cavity and coupled with microwave energy at the maximal electric intensity place, it will be broken down to form free-floating plasma, which flows from nozzle with high speed to produce thrust. Its characteristic is high efficiency, simple power supply and without electrode ablation, its specific impulse is greater than arcjet. 2450MHz, have been developed. The microwave generating subsystem and resonator of lower power MPT, 70-200W, are coaxial. The resonator with TEM resonating mode is section of coaxial wave-guide, of which one end is shorted, another is semi-opened. The maximal electric intensity field is in the lumped capacity formed between the end surface of inner conductor, retracting in the cavity, and the semi-opened surface of outer conductor. It provides favorable condition for gas breakdown. The microwave generating system and resonator of middle power MPT, 500-1,000W, are wave-guide cavity. The resonator with TM011 resonating mode is cylinder wave-guide cavity, of which two end surface are shorted. The distribution of electromagnetic field is axial symmetry, its maximal electric intensity field locates on the axis and closes to the exit of nozzle, where the propellant gas is breakdown to form free floating plasma. The plasma is free from the wall of

  4. Miniature microwave plasma antenna at 2.45 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachkov, Vasil; Kiss'ovski, Zhivko

    2015-12-01

    New unique miniature plasma antenna driven by a one microwave signal at frequency of 2.45 GHz is constructed and tested. The length of the antenna (l = 16 mm) is much shorter than the free space wavelength of the signal. The parameters of the plasma column (n = 2.6±0.4×1018 m-3, Te = 3.1±0.2 eV) are obtained from argon emission spectrum by applying the line ratio method. The simulations of this monopole antenna reveal that in the standing wave regime the plasma antenna is effective transmitter at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. The results we obtained show that the shape of the radiation pattern of the plasma antenna depends on the plasma density, the exciter and the distance above the grounded plane.

  5. Microwave plasma generation of hydrogen atoms for rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Morin, T.; Snellenberger, R.; Asmussen, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.

    1981-01-01

    A flow microwave plasma reaction system is used to study the conversion of hydrogen to hydrogen atoms as a function of pressure, power density, cavity tuning, cavity mode, and time in the plasma zone. Hydrogen atom concentration is measured down-stream from the plasma by NOCl titration. Extensive modeling of the plasma and recombination zones is performed with the plasma zone treated as a backmix reaction system and the recombination zone treated as a plug flow. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the recombination process are examined in detail to provide an understanding of the conversion of recombination energy to gas kinetic energy. It is found that cavity tuning, discharge stability, and optimum power coupling are critically dependent on the system pressure, but nearly independent of the flow rate.

  6. Novel Microwave Cavity for Resonant Cooling of a Lepton Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evetts, Nathan; Martens, Issac; Povilus, Alex; Hunter, Eric; Shanman, Sabrina; Belmore, Nathan; Lewis, Nicole; So, Chukman; Fajans, Joel; Hardy, Walter

    2015-11-01

    A novel microwave cavity is described which can be used to cool lepton plasmas for potential use in creation of mono-energetic beams, and synthesis of antihydrogen. The cooling scheme represents an incarnation of the Purcell Effect; When plasmas are coupled to a microwave cavity, the plasma cooling rate is resonantly enhanced through increased spontaneous emission of cyclotron radiation. Geometric design considerations for a cavity with strong cooling power and low equilibrium plasma temperatures are discussed. A three electrode cavity forms a section of a Penning-Malmberg trap. It has a bulged cylindrical geometry with open ends aligned with the magnetic trapping axis. This allows plasmas to be injected and removed from the cavity without the need for moving parts while maintaining high quality factors for resonant modes. The cavity includes unique surface preparations for tuning the cavity quality factor and achieving anti-static shielding using thin layers of nichrome and colloidal graphite respectively. Preliminary data suggests that temperatures and cooling rates for these plasmas can be improved by at least a factor of 10 as described in an adjacent poster. This work is supported by DoE, Grant DE-FG02-06ER54904, and NSERC.

  7. Microwave Produced Plasma Study in a Cylindrical System

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, V. K.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Bora, D.

    2008-03-19

    Hydrogen plasma using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is produced and is studied in a small linear system for breakdown parameters. Microwave power in the experimental system is delivered by a magnetron at 2.45 GHz for 30 ms during which the breakdown of neutral gas occurs. The axial magnetic field required for ECR in the system is such that the fundamental ECR surface (B = 875 G) resides at the geometrical centre of the plasma system. ECR breakdown parameters such as plasma delay and plasma decay time are observed from plasma density measurements, carried out at the centre of plasma system using a specially designed Langmuir probe. The operating parameters such as working gas pressure (10{sup -5}-10{sup -2} mbar) and input microwave power (160-800 W) are varied and the corresponding effect on the breakdown parameters is observed and the parameter space for operating the pulsed experimental system has been identified. All the relevant experimental results obtained are presented.

  8. A 3D Level Set Method for Microwave Breast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Timothy J.; Hagness, Susan C.; Van Veen, Barry D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conventional inverse-scattering algorithms for microwave breast imaging result in moderate resolution images with blurred boundaries between tissues. Recent 2D numerical microwave imaging studies demonstrate that the use of a level set method preserves dielectric boundaries, resulting in a more accurate, higher resolution reconstruction of the dielectric properties distribution. Previously proposed level set algorithms are computationally expensive and thus impractical in 3D. In this paper we present a computationally tractable 3D microwave imaging algorithm based on level sets. Methods We reduce the computational cost of the level set method using a Jacobian matrix, rather than an adjoint method, to calculate Frechet derivatives. We demonstrate the feasibility of 3D imaging using simulated array measurements from 3D numerical breast phantoms. We evaluate performance by comparing full 3D reconstructions to those from a conventional microwave imaging technique. We also quantitatively assess the efficacy of our algorithm in evaluating breast density. Results Our reconstructions of 3D numerical breast phantoms improve upon those of a conventional microwave imaging technique. The density estimates from our level set algorithm are more accurate than those of conventional microwave imaging, and the accuracy is greater than that reported for mammographic density estimation. Conclusion Our level set method leads to a feasible level of computational complexity for full 3D imaging, and reconstructs the heterogeneous dielectric properties distribution of the breast more accurately than conventional microwave imaging methods. Significance 3D microwave breast imaging using a level set method is a promising low-cost, non-ionizing alternative to current breast imaging techniques. PMID:26011863

  9. Microwave radiation measurements near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallavarpu, R.; Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave emission near the electron plasma frequency was observed, and its relation to the average electron density and the dc toroidal magnetic field was examined. The emission was detected using a spectrum analyzer and a 50 omega miniature coaxial probe. The radiation appeared as a broad amplitude peak that shifted in frequency as the plasma parameters were varied. The observed radiation scanned an average plasma density ranging from 10 million/cu cm to 8 hundred million/cu cm. A linear relation was observed betweeen the density calculated from the emission frequency and the average plasma density measured with a microwave interferometer. With the aid of a relative density profile measurement of the plasma, it was determined that the emissions occurred from the outer periphery of the plasma.

  10. Deposition Of Diamondlike Films By ECR Microwave Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Frederick S.; Shing, Yuh-Han

    1991-01-01

    Hard, amorphous hydrogenated carbon films of diamondlike quality deposited at room temperature on silicon, optical glass, and quartz through decomposition of CH4 in electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) microwave plasma of CH4 diluted with H2. Technique provides hard, abrasion-resistant coatings for lenses and other optical components. Films chemically inert and posses high electrical resistivity and breakdown fields, valuable properties in microelectronics applications.

  11. Characteristics of microwave plasma induced by lasers and sparks.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuji; Tsuruoka, Ryoji

    2012-03-01

    Characteristics of the plasma light source of microwave (MW) plus laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) or spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy (SIBS) were studied. The plasma was initially generated by laser- or spark-induced breakdown as a plasma seed. A plasma volume was then grown and sustained by MWs in air. This MW plasma had a long lifetime, large volume, strong emission intensity, and high stability with time. These characteristics are suitable for applications in the molecular analysis of gases such as OH or N(2). Because the plasma properties did not depend on laser or spark plasma seeds, the resulting plasma was easily controllable by the input power and duration of the MWs. Therefore, a significant improvement was achieved in the spectral intensity and signal-to-noise ratio. For example, the peak intensity of the Pb spectra of LIBS increased 15 times, and that of SIBS increased 880 times without increases in their background noise. A MW-enhanced plasma light source could be used to make the total system smaller and cheaper than a conventional LIBS system, which would be useful for real-time and in situ analysis of gas molecules in, for example, food processing, medical applications, chemical exposure, and gas turbine or automobile air-to-fuel ratio and exhaust gas measurement. PMID:22410918

  12. Nanoparticle plasma ejected directly from solid copper by localized microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Jerby, E.; Golts, A.; Shamir, Y.; Wonde, S.; Ashkenazi, D.; Eliaz, N.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; LeGarrec, J. L.; Narayanan, T.; Sztucki, M.; Barkay, Z.

    2009-11-09

    A plasma column ejected directly from solid copper by localized microwaves is studied. The effect stems from an induced hotspot that melts and emits ionized copper vapors as a confined fire column. Nanoparticles of {approx}20-120 nm size were revealed in the ejected column by in situ small-angle x-ray scattering. Optical spectroscopy confirmed the dominance of copper particles in the plasma column originating directly from the copper substrate. Nano- and macroparticles of copper were verified also by ex situ scanning electron microscopy. The direct conversion of solid metals to nanoparticles is demonstrated and various applications are proposed.

  13. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit "coral" and "cauliflower-like" morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  14. The Interaction of C-Band Microwaves with Large Plasma Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liang; Huo, Wenqing; Yang, Xinjie; Xu, Yuemin

    2012-01-01

    A large plasma sheet 60 cm×60 cm×2 cm in size was generated using a hollow cathode, and measurements were conducted for interactions including transmission, reflection and absorption. With different discharge parameters, plasma sheets can vary and influence microwave strength. Microwave reflection decreases when the discharge current rises, and the opposite occurs in transmission. The C-band microwave is absorbed when it is propagated through large plasma sheets at higher pressure. When plasma density and collision frequency are fitted with incident microwave frequency, a large amount of microwave energy is consumed. Reflection, transmission and absorption all exist simultaneously. Plasma sheets are an attractive alternative to microwave steering at low pressure, and the microwave reflection used in receiving radar can be altered by changing the discharge parameters.

  15. Calibration of Langmuir probes against microwaves and plasma oscillation probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.; Evans, John D.; Zawalski, Wade

    2012-10-01

    The use of Langmuir probes for measuring plasma density is subject to uncertainty because the theories commonly used to interpret the data give widely differing results. This is especially troublesome in partially ionized plasmas used, for instance, in the semiconductor industry, since no existing theory adequately treats the case when there are a few collisions between ions and neutral atoms. In this work, plasma densities measured by microwave interferometry and plasma-oscillation probes are compared with those from probe data analyzed with Langmuir's orbital motion limited (OML) theory, the Allen-Boyd-Reynolds (ABR) theory and the Bernstein-Rabinowitz-Laframboise (BRL) theory. It is found that ABR underestimates and BRL overestimates the density, the problems being the neglect of ion orbiting in ABR and the effect of ion-neutral collisions in BRL. The best theory is either OML or the geometric mean between the ABR and BRL results. For thicker probes, other methods are suggested.

  16. Low-pressure sustainment of surface-wave microwave plasma with modified microwave coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Kensuke; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Sustainment of long-scale surface-wave plasma (SWP) at pressures below 1 Pa is investigated for the application of the SWP as an assisting plasma source for roll-to-roll sputter deposition. A modified microwave coupler (MMC) for easier surface-wave propagation is proposed, on the basis of the concept of the power direction alignment of the slot antenna and surface-wave propagation. The superiority of the MMC-SWP over conventional SWPs is shown at a sustainment pressure as low as 0.6 Pa and an electron density as high as 3 × 1017 m-3. A polymer film is treated with the MMC-SWP at a low pressure of 0.6 Pa, and surface modification at a low pressure is proved using Ar plasma. These results show the availability of the MMC-SWP as the surface treatment plasma source that is compatible with sputter deposition in the same processing chamber.

  17. Properties of plasma flames sustained by microwaves and burning hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-15

    Plasma flames made of atmospheric microwave plasma and a fuel-burning flame were presented and their properties were investigated experimentally. The plasma flame generator consists of a fuel injector and a plasma flame exit connected in series to a microwave plasma torch. The plasma flames are sustained by injecting hydrocarbon fuels into a microwave plasma torch in air discharge. The microwave plasma torch in the plasma flame system can burn a hydrocarbon fuel by high-temperature plasma and high atomic oxygen density, decomposing the hydrogen and carbon containing fuel. We present the visual observations of the sustained plasma flames and measure the gas temperature using a thermocouple device in terms of the gas-fuel mixture and flow rate. The plasma flame volume of the hydrocarbon fuel burners was more than approximately 30-50 times that of the torch plasma. While the temperature of the torch plasma flame was only 868 K at a measurement point, that of the diesel microwave plasma flame with the addition of 0.019 lpm diesel and 30 lpm oxygen increased drastically to about 2280 K. Preliminary experiments for methane plasma flame were also carried out, measuring the temperature profiles of flames along the radial and axial directions. Finally, we investigated the influence of the microwave plasma on combustion flame by observing and comparing OH molecular spectra for the methane plasma flame and methane flame only.

  18. Development of compact high voltage switched mode power supply for microwave plasma sources supply for low pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdtongmee, P.; Srinoum, D.; Nisoa, M.

    2011-08-01

    Although microwave induced plasmas are well known as high efficiency plasma sources, their uses in laboratories are limited since the microwave power systems are complicated and expensive. The output power of commercially available low-cost microwave ovens is fixed and discontinuous resulting from the high voltage doubler topology of the magnetron tube power supply. In this paper, a high voltage switched mode power supply of forward topology has been developed for continuous microwave power radiation. The forward converter can generate a no-load high voltage output maximum of 7 kV. When driving the magnetron tube, the microwave output power could be varied from 0 to 35 W while the high voltage output level was constantly regulated at -3.4 kV. A microwave induced plasma system was setup to investigate the plasma produced. A low pressure argon plasma was produced with only 2 W over a wide range of pressures.

  19. Three-dimensional microwave imaging with incorporated prior structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golnabi, Amir H.; Meaney, Paul M.; Epstein, Neil R.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-03-01

    Microwave imaging for biomedical applications, especially for early detection of breast cancer and effective treatment monitoring, has attracted increasing interest in last several decades. This fact is due to the high contrast between the dielectric properties of the normal and malignant breast tissues at microwave frequencies. The available range of dielectric properties for different soft tissue can provide important functional information about tissue health. Nonetheless, one of the limiting weaknesses of microwave imaging is that unlike conventional modalities, such as X-ray CT or MRI, it inherently cannot provide high-resolution images. The conventional modalities can produce highly resolved anatomical information but often cannot provide the functional information required for diagnoses. Previously, we have developed a regularization strategy that can incorporate prior anatomical information from MR or other sources and use it in a way to refine the resolution of the microwave images, while also retaining the functional nature of the reconstructed property values. In the present work, we extend the use of prior structural information in microwave imaging from 2D to 3D. This extra dimension adds a significant layer of complexity to the entire image reconstruction procedure. In this paper, several challenges with respect to the 3D microwave imaging will be discussed and the results of a series of 3D simulation and phantom experiments with prior structural information will be studied.

  20. Dielectric properties in microwave remote plasma sustained in argon: Expanding plasma conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jauberteau, J. L.; Jauberteau, I.

    2012-11-15

    This work is devoted to the study of the relative permittivity in argon expanding plasma produced below a microwave discharge sustained in a quartz tube and working at 2.45 GHz. We discuss results and explain the microwave propagation within the reactor, outside the quartz tube. It is shown that at low pressures (133 Pa) and at powers ranging from 100 W to 400 W, the wave frequency remains lower than the plasma frequency anywhere in the expanding plasma. Under these conditions, the real part of the relative permittivity is negative and the wave is reflected. Surprisingly, in these conditions, the plasma is produced inside and outside the quartz tube, below the wave launcher. This effect can be explained considering a surface wave propagating at the surface of the quartz tube then into the reactor, on the external surface of the expanding plasma below the quartz tube.

  1. Imaging the cosmic microwave background: The BEAST experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natoli, P.; Bersanelli, M.; Childers, J.; Figueiredo, N.; Halevi, D.; Kangas, M.; Levy, A.; Lubin, P.; Mandolesi, N.; Meinhold, P.; Parendo, S.; Staren, J.; Villela, T.; Wuensche, C.

    2001-02-01

    We describe the Santa Barbara BEAST experiment, a balloon borne telescope to image the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation anisotropy pattern. Some aspects of the map making pipeline are also discussed. .

  2. Development of a ridged microstrip microwave interferometer for plasma electron density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, C. H.; Liang, Y. W.; Jeng, J. Y.; Chiou, J. S.; Leou, K. C.; Lin, C.

    2015-06-01

    Here we report the development of a microwave interferometer based on a ridged microstrip transmission line structure for the monitoring of plasma density in plasma processing tools. A special ridged shaped microstrip structure with a quartz dielectric is adopted for yielding a large phase shift of the microwave, and thus a higher sensitivity of the interferometer. During operation, the plasma density sensor is installed on the chamber wall where the microstrip transmission line is immersed in plasma and a microwave is launched from one end of the line and exits through the other end. As in conventional microwave interferometers, the plasma density is determined by the phase shift of the microwave propagating through the transmission line. 3D electromagnetic numerical simulations, where plasma is treated as a dielectric medium having a plasma permittivity determined by plasma density and microwave frequency, were employed to determine the phase shift/plasma density relation of this sensor. The sensor is designed to operate at 2.4 GHz microwave frequency, with a compact size and materials that are compatible with most plasma processing tools. Measurement results show that plasma density measured by the sensor, although placed at the chamber wall, does reflect the variations of the plasma density near the chamber center. In the real-time plasma etch process, the dependence of plasma densities on source powers and pressures measured by the sensor is also consistent with the results of ion current on the wafer electrode obtained from an impedance meter.

  3. A Tutorial on Basic Principles of Microwave Reflectometry Applied to Fluctuation Measurements in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Kramer, G.J.; Valeo, E.

    2001-02-16

    Microwave reflectometry is now routinely used for probing the structure of magnetohydrodynamic and turbulent fluctuations in fusion plasmas. Conditions specific to the core of tokamak plasmas, such as small amplitude of density irregularities and the uniformity of the background plasma, have enabled progress in the quantitative interpretation of reflectometer signals. In particular, the extent of applicability of the 1-D [one-dimensional] geometric optics description of the reflected field is investigated by direct comparison to 1-D full wave analysis. Significant advances in laboratory experiments are discussed which are paving the way towards a thorough understanding of this important measurement technique. Data is presented from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 33 (1991) 1509] identifying the validity of the geometric optics description of the scattered field and demonstrating the feasibility of imaging turbulent fluctuations in fusion scale devices.

  4. Real-time calibrated microwave plasma mulitmetals emissions monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal; Thomas, Paul; Green, Karyn; Flores, Guadalupe

    1999-02-01

    Real-time calibrated atomic emission spectroscopy in stack exhaust using a continuously sustained microwave plasma is under development for trace metals monitoring. The plasma, in a shorted waveguide attached to the stack by a short sample line, is powered at 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz. An undiluted stack slipstream is isokinetically directed into the plasma at a nominal flow of 14 liters per minute. A pneumatic nebulizer attached to the sample line can momentarily, on command, inject a known concentration of metals solution providing a real-time calibration. Recent testing has been performed on the exhaust stack of an incinerator at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Risk Management Laboratory in Research Triangle Park. Three hazardous metals were monitored, lead, chromium, and beryllium. These measurements were referenced to EPA Method-29. A total of twenty spiked stack exhaust tests were carried out. Ten one-hour tests at high concentration (40 - 60 (mu) g/actual m3) and ten one and half-hour tests at low concentration (10 - 15 (mu) g/actual m3). The microwave plasma monitor achieved measurement accuracies of approximately 20% for lead and beryllium and 40% for chromium with a threshold detection capability of less than 3 (mu) g/actual m3 for a time response of approximately 1-minute. Laboratory work is continuing to add mercury, arsenic, and cadmium to the monitored metals.

  5. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  6. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  7. High-resolution microwave images of saturn.

    PubMed

    Grossman, A W; Muhleman, D O; Berge, G L

    1989-09-15

    An analysis of high-resolution microwave images of Saturn and Saturn's individual rings is presented. Radio interferometric observations of Saturn taken at the Very Large Array in New Mexico at wavelengths of 2 and 6 centimeters reveal interesting new features in both the atmosphere and rings. The resulting maps show an increase in brightness temperature of about 3 K from equator to pole at both wavelengths, while the 6-centimeter map shows a bright band at northern mid-latitudes. The data are consistent with a radiative transfer model of the atmosphere that constrains the well-mixed, fully saturated, NH(3) mixing ratio to be 1.2 x 10(-4) in a region just below the NH(3) clouds, while the observed bright band indicates a 25 percent relative decrease of NH(3) in northern mid-latitudes. Brightness temperatures for the classical rings are presented. Ring brightness shows a variation with azimuth and is linearly polarized at an average value of about 5 percent. The variations in ring polarization suggest that at least 20 percent of the ring brightness is the result of a single scattering process. PMID:17747882

  8. Passive Microwave Spectral Imaging of Amospheric Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, David H.; Rosenkranz, Philip W.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to improve the scientific foundation necessary to full realization of the meteorological potential of the NOAA Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) recently first launched on the NOAA-15 satellite in May, 1998. These advances were made in four main areas: (1) improvements, based on aircraft observations, in the atmospheric transmittance expressions used for interpreting AMSU and similar data; (2) development of neural network retrieval methods for cloud top altitude estimates of approximately 1-km accuracy under cirrus shields--the altitude is that of the larger ice particles aloft, which is related to precipitation rate; (3) analysis of early AMSU flight data with respect to its precipitation sensitivity and fine-scale thermal structure; and (4) improvements to the 54-GHz and 118-GHz MTS aircraft imaging spectrometer now operating on the NASA ER-2 aircraft. More specifically, the oxygen transmittance expressions near 118 GHz were in better agreement with aircraft data when the temperature dependence exponent of the 118.75-GHz linewidth was increased from the MPM92 value (Liebe et al., 1992) of 0.8 to 0.97+/-0.03. In contrast, the observations 52.5-55.8 GHz were consistent with the MPM92 model. Neural networks trained on comparisons of 118-GHz spectral data and coincident stereoscopic video images of convective cells observed from 20-km altitude yielded agreement in their peak altitudes within as little as 1.36 km rms, much of which is stereoscopic error. Imagery using these methods produced useful characterizations for Cyclone Oliver in 1993 and other storms (Schwartz et al., 1996; Spina et al., 1998). Similar neural network techniques yielded simulated rms errors in relative humidity retrievals of 6-14 percent over ocean and 6-15 percent over land at pressure levels from 1013 to 131 mbar (Cabrera-Mercader and Staelin, 1995).

  9. Multispectral microwave imaging radar for remote sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Rawson, R.; Ausherman, D.; Bryan, L.; Porcello, L.

    1974-01-01

    A multispectral airborne microwave radar imaging system, capable of obtaining four images simultaneously is described. The system has been successfully demonstrated in several experiments and one example of results obtained, fresh water ice, is given. Consideration of the digitization of the imagery is given and an image digitizing system described briefly. Preliminary results of digitization experiments are included.

  10. Microwave plasmas generated in bubbles immersed in liquids for hydrocarbons reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Sharma, Ashish; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-06-01

    We present a computational modeling study of microwave plasma generated in cluster of atmospheric-pressure argon bubbles immersed in a liquid. We demonstrate that the use of microwaves allows the generation of a dense chemically active non-equilibrium plasma along the gas–liquid interface. Also, microwaves allow generation of overdense plasma in all the bubbles considered in the cluster which is possible because the collisional skin depth of the wave exceeds the bubble dimension. These features of microwave plasma generation in bubbles immersed in liquids are highly desirable for the large-scale liquid hydrocarbon reforming technologies.

  11. Experimental study on the emission spectra of microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boya; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Guixin; Liao, Shanshan

    2014-01-28

    An experimental study on microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure was conducted by employing optical emission spectroscopy. Based on a microwave plasma generation device developed for nanoparticle synthesis, we studied the influence of input microwave power and gas flow rate on the optical emission behaviors and electron temperature of plasma using Ar, He, and N{sub 2} as working gas, respectively. The physics behind these behaviors was discussed. The results are useful in characterizing microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure and can be used for improving nanoparticle synthesis system for commercial use in the future.

  12. Diagnosis of femtosecond plasma filament by channeling microwaves along the filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Ren, Yu; Qin, Jiang; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a simple, fast, and non-intrusive experimental method to obtain the basic parameters of femtosecond laser-generated plasma filament. The method is based on the channeling of microwaves along both a plasma filament and a well-defined conducting wire. By comparing the detected microwaves that propagate along the plasma filament and a copper wire with known conductivity and spatial dimension, the basic parameters of the plasma filament can be easily obtained. As a result of the possibility of channeling microwave radiation along the plasma filament, we were then able to obtain the plasma density distribution along the filament length.

  13. Diagnosis of femtosecond plasma filament by channeling microwaves along the filament

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Ren, Yu; Qin, Jiang; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-05-20

    We introduce a simple, fast, and non-intrusive experimental method to obtain the basic parameters of femtosecond laser-generated plasma filament. The method is based on the channeling of microwaves along both a plasma filament and a well-defined conducting wire. By comparing the detected microwaves that propagate along the plasma filament and a copper wire with known conductivity and spatial dimension, the basic parameters of the plasma filament can be easily obtained. As a result of the possibility of channeling microwave radiation along the plasma filament, we were then able to obtain the plasma density distribution along the filament length.

  14. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, O; Lucca Fabris, A; Falcetta, C; Accatino, L; De Angelis, R; Manente, M; Ferri, F; Florean, M; Neri, C; Mazzotta, C; Pavarin, D; Pollastrone, F; Rocchi, G; Selmo, A; Tasinato, L; Trezzolani, F; Tuccillo, A A

    2013-03-01

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10(16) m(-3) and 10(19) m(-3)) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small (λ = 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02° has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 × 10(16) m(-3). PMID:23556819

  15. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudisco, O.; Lucca Fabris, A.; Falcetta, C.; Accatino, L.; De Angelis, R.; Manente, M.; Ferri, F.; Florean, M.; Neri, C.; Mazzotta, C.; Pavarin, D.; Pollastrone, F.; Rocchi, G.; Selmo, A.; Tasinato, L.; Trezzolani, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 1016 m-3 and 1019 m-3) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small (λ = 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02° has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 × 1016 m-3.

  16. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tudisco, O.; Falcetta, C.; De Angelis, R.; Florean, M.; Neri, C.; Mazzotta, C.; Pollastrone, F.; Rocchi, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Lucca Fabris, A.; Manente, M.; Ferri, F.; Tasinato, L.; Trezzolani, F.; Accatino, L.; Selmo, A.

    2013-03-15

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small ({lambda}= 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02 Degree-Sign has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}.

  17. Plasma heating and current drive using intense, pulsed microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1988-01-01

    The use of powerful new microwave sources, e.g., free-electron lasers and relativistic gyrotrons, provide unique opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes in the electron-cyclotron and lower-hybrid ranges of frequencies. These high-power, pulsed sources have a number of technical advantages over conventional, low-intensity sources; and their use can lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and better penetration into a reactor-grade plasma in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. This paper reports theoretical progress both in modeling absorption and current drive for intense pulses and in analyzing some of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities and nonlinear self-focusing. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness in polystyrene modified by microwave plasma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Heidari, Majid; Asefnezhad, Azadeh; Montazeri, Naser

    2011-01-01

    Background: Surface modification of medical polymers can improve biocompatibility. Pure polystyrene is hydrophobic and cannot provide a suitable environment for cell cultures. The conventional method for surface modification of polystyrene is treatment with plasma. In this study, conventional polystyrene was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30, 60, and 180 seconds. Methods and results: Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated clearly the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscopic images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated nanometric surface topography. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed more roughness (31 nm) compared with those irradiated with inert plasma (16 nm) at 180 seconds. Surface roughness increased with increasing duration of exposure, which could be due to reduction of the contact angle of samples irradiated with oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis showed reduction in samples irradiated with inert plasma. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed a lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma. Conclusion: Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation for samples radiated by oxygen plasma with increasing duration of exposure than those of normal samples. PMID:21698084

  19. Improved microwave shielding behavior of carbon nanotube-coated PET fabric using plasma technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji, Aminoddin; Semnani Rahbar, Ruhollah; Mousavi Shoushtari, Ahmad

    2014-08-01

    Four different procedures were conducted to load amine functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (NH2-MWCNT) onto poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric surface to obtain a microwave shielding sample. Plasma treated fabric which was subsequently coated with NH2-MWCNT in the presence of acrylic acid was chosen as the best sample. Surface changes in the PET fabrics were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study the crystalline structure of the PET fabric. The microwave shielding performance of the PET fabrics in term of reflection loss was determined using a network analyzer at X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). The XPS results revealed that the carbon atomic percentage decreased while the oxygen atomic percentage increased when the fabric was plasma treated and coated with NH2-MWCNT. The SEM images showed that the NH2-MWCNTs were homogenously dispersed and individually separated in the surface of fabric. Moreover, the structural studies showed that the crystalline region of the fabrics was not affected by NH2-MWCNT and plasma treatment. The best microwave absorbing properties were obtained from the plasma treated fabric which was then coated with 10% NH2-MWCNT in the presence of acrylic acid. It showed a minimum reflection loss of ∼-18.2 dB about 11 GHz. Proper attachments of NH2-MWCNT on the PET fabric surface was explained in the suggested mechanism in which hydrogen bonding and amide linkage are responsible for the achievement of microwave shielding properties with high durability.

  20. Nitrogen Dissociation in N_2-Ar Microwave Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2002-10-01

    Microwave N_2-Ar discharges driven by a traveling surface wave (SW) attract attention due to their advantageous properties for plasma processing technologies, in particular for nitriding surfaces. Nitrogen atoms are the most important precursors in gas discharge nitriding and the study of their production and loss mechanisms is of fundamental importance. The kinetics of dissociation of N2 in N_2-Ar microwave plasmas was investigated as a function of the spatial position, mixture composition and pressure. A theoretical model(J. Henriques, E. Tatarova, V. Guerra and C.M. Ferreira, J. Appl. Phys. 91 5622 (2002).) was developed for the following situation: an azimuthally symmetric SW (TM_00, ω/2π=2.45 GHz) propagates and sustains an N_2-Ar plasma column in a dielectric tube (a=0.75 cm, \\varepsilon_d=3.78) surrounded by a metal screen (R=2.5 cm). The model account in a self-consistent way for the electron and heavy particle kinetics, gas thermal balance and wave electrodynamics. It is demonstrated that charge transfer Ar^+ + N2 arrow N_2^+ + Ar followed by dissociative recombination e + N_2^+ arrow N(^4S) + N(^4S) increases the dissociation degree of nitrogen at high Ar fractional percentage in the mixture. The predictions are validated by optical emission spectroscopy(J. Henriques, E. Tatarova, F.M. Dias and C.M. Ferreira, J. Appl. Phys. 91 5632 (2002).).

  1. Portable microwave air plasma device for wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S. K.; Kim, H. Y.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. K.

    2015-06-01

    A portable microwave air plasma has been developed for safe and effective wound healing. The device is operated by a fixed microwave power and two different air gas flows (main and cooling air flow). It was found that the speeds of the two air flows determine the stability of the plasma jet and gas temperature and thereby regulate the concentrations of the individual reactive species. Two different regimes, i.e. the NO abundant (0.1 slm main air flow) and ozone abundant regimes (4 slm main air flow), were identified as suitable for wound healing without thermal damage and toxicity. These regimes show similar plasma characteristics (e.g. less than 40 °C at the treatment point, less than 4 ppm of NO2) except for different NO and ozone amounts. Both regimes show more than twice as fast wound healing speed compared with the untreated case without any histological damages. Faster healing speed with intrinsic ozone safety make the NO abundant regime the best operation regime for wound healing. Finally, the stability of the developed device was demonstrated by a one-hour continuous operation test with a 24 V battery.

  2. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2015-01-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10−3, nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10−7, nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10−5, where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. PMID:26674957

  3. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyoung S; Uhm, Han S; Hong, Yong C; Choi, Eun H

    2015-01-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10(-3), nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10(-7), nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10(-5), where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. PMID:26674957

  4. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2015-12-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10-3, nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10-7, nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10-5, where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch.

  5. Laser/plasma theory for microwave modeling experiments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, J J; Divergilio, W F

    1980-01-01

    During the last year, we have carried out theoretical investigations of microwave-plasma interactions in support of both the UCLA program, and the TRW program. The UCLA program concentrated on experimental studies of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). We derived a theory which successfully explained the basic features of their experiment. The TRW program was originally conceived of as an investigation of electron heating and thermal transport; however, the subject was later changed to the interaction of SBS and self focusing. The experimental program has not yet started; however, we have developed a theoretical description of the expected interaction.

  6. Deposition of diamondlike films by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, F. S.; Shing, Y. H.

    1990-01-01

    Hard a-C:H films have been deposited through electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma decomposition of CH4 diluted with H2 gas. It has been found that hard diamondlike films could only be produced under a RF-induced negative self-bias of the substrate stage. Raman spectra indicate the deposition of two distinct film types: one film type exhibiting well-defined bands at 1360 and 1580/cm and another displaying a broad Raman peak centered at approximately 1500/cm. Variation of the mirror magnetic-field profile of the ECR system was examined, demonstrating the manipulation of film morphology through the extraction of different ion energies.

  7. Plasma generation for controlled microwave-reflecting surfaces in plasma antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, Yury P.; Felsteiner, Joshua; Slutsker, Yakov Z.

    2014-04-28

    The idea of replacing metal antenna elements with equivalent plasma objects has long been of interest because of the possibility of switching the antenna on and off. In general, two kinds of designs have so far been reported: (a) Separate plasma “wires” which are thin glass tubes filled with gas, where plasma appears due to discharge inside. (b) Reflecting surfaces, consisting of tightly held plasma wires or specially designed large discharge devices with magnetic confinement. The main disadvantages of these antennas are either large weight and size or too irregular surfaces for proper reflection. To design a microwave plasma antenna in the most common radar wavelength range of 1–3 cm with a typical gain of 30 dB, a smooth plasma mirror having a 10–30 cm diameter and a proper curvature is required. The plasma density must be 10{sup 12}–10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} in order to exceed the critical density for the frequency of the electromagnetic wave. To achieve this we have used a ferromagnetic inductively coupled plasma (FICP) source, where a thin magnetic core of a large diameter is fully immersed in the plasma. In the present paper, we show a way to adapt the FICP source for creating a flat switchable microwave plasma mirror with an effective diameter of 30 cm. This mirror was tested as a microwave reflector and there was found no significant difference when compared with a copper plate having the same diameter.

  8. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness for polyurethane modified by microwave plasma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Azhdadi, S Neda Kh; Asefnezhad, Azadeh; Sadraeian, Mohammad; Montazeri, Mohamad; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    Surface modification of medical polymers is carried out to improve biocompatibility. In this study, conventional polyurethane was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30 seconds and 60 seconds. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscope images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated the nanometric topography of the sample surfaces. Samples irradiated by oxygen plasma indicated high roughness compared with those irradiated by inert plasma for the different lengths of time. In addition, surface roughness increased with time, which can be due to a reduction of contact angle of samples irradiated by oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis indicated a reduction in samples irradiated with both types of plasma. However, samples irradiated with oxygen plasma indicated lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma. Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation among samples radiated by oxygen plasma for longer than for normal samples. PMID:21556340

  9. Comparative study between the reflective optics and lens based system for microwave imaging system on KSTAR.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Yun, G S; Nam, Y; Hong, I; Kim, J B; Park, H K; Tobias, B; Liang, T; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2010-10-01

    Recently, two-dimensional microwave imaging diagnostics such as the electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) have been developed to study magnetohydrodynamics instabilities and turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. These imaging systems utilize large optics to collect passive emission or reflected radiation. The design of this optics can be classified into two different types: reflective or refractive optical systems. For instance, an ECEI/MIR system on the TEXTOR tokamak [Park et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3787 (2004)] employed the reflective optics which consisted of two large mirrors, while the TEXTOR ECEI upgrade [B. Tobias et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 093502 (2009)] and systems on DIII-D, ASDEX-U, and KSTAR adopted refractive systems. Each system has advantages and disadvantages in the standing wave problem and optical aberrations. In this paper, a comparative study between the two optical systems has been performed in order to design a MIR system for KSTAR. PMID:21033960

  10. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotubes by Slot-Excited Microwave Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Gyu Il; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Kono, Satoshi; Ohno, Yutaka; Ishijima, Tatsuo

    2008-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fabricated by adopting plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with a planar microwave plasma source. Plasma is produced by a slot antenna at 2.45-GHz microwave injection in CH4/H2 mixture. In this study, it is shown that avoiding the exposure of the substrate to the plasma drastically improves the CNT growth. Furthermore, it is found that the CNT quality can be controlled with the optimization of one of the steps in the catalyst treatment, such as the preheating procedure; the treated catalyst is considered to be unaffected by the heating in the high-density microwave plasma treatment during the CNT growth.

  11. Development of local oscillator integrated antenna array for microwave imaging diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, D.; Ito, N.; Nagayama, Y.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Yoshinaga, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A.; Shinohara, S.

    2015-12-01

    Microwave imaging diagnostics are powerful tools that are used to obtain details of complex structures and behaviors of such systems as magnetically confined plasmas. For example, microwave imaging reflectometry and microwave imaging interferometers are suitable for observing phenomena that are involved with electron density fluctuations; moreover, electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostics enable us to accomplish the significant task of observing MHD instabilities in large tokamaks. However, microwave imaging systems include difficulties in terms of multi-channelization and cost. Recently, we solved these problems by developing a Horn-antenna Mixer Array (HMA), a 50 - 110 GHz 1-D heterodyne- type antenna array, which can be easily stacked as a 2-D receiving array, because it uses an end-fire element. However, the HMA still evidenced problems owing to the requirement for local oscillation (LO) optics and an expensive high-power LO source. To solve this problem, we have developed an upgraded HMA, named the Local Integrated Antenna array (LIA), in which each channel has an internal LO supply using a frequency multiplier integrated circuit. Therefore, the proposed antenna array eliminates the need for both the LO optics and the high-power LO source. This paper describes the principle of the LIA, and provides details about an 8 channel prototype LIA.

  12. Microwave Imaging with Infrared 2-D Lock-in Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiyo, Noritaka; Arai, Mizuki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nishikata, Atsuhiro; Maeno, Takashi

    We have developed a 3-D electromagnetic field measurement system using 2-D lock-in amplifier. This system uses an amplitude modulated electromagnetic wave source to heat a resistive screen. A very small change of temperature on a screen illuminated with the modulated electromagnetic wave is measured using an infrared thermograph camera. In this paper, we attempted to apply our system to microwave imaging. By placing conductor patches in front of the resistive screen and illuminating with microwave, the shape of each conductor was clearly observed as the temperature difference image of the screen. In this way, the conductor pattern inside the non-contact type IC card could be visualized. Moreover, we could observe the temperature difference image reflecting the shape of a Konnyaku (a gelatinous food made from devil's-tonge starch) or a dried fishbone, both as non-conducting material resembling human body. These results proved that our method is applicable to microwave see-through imaging.

  13. Imaging spectroscopy of solar microwave radiation. 1: Flaring emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Lemen, James R.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of an impulsive microwave burst on the Sun with both high spatial and spectral resolution, made with the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). We used the measured brightness temperature spectrum to infer the emission process responsible for each microwave source, and to derive physical conditions in the source region. We confimed our predictions using soft X-ray measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), soft X-ray images from Yohkoh, and H-alpha flare images together with sunspots and magnetogram images from the Big Bear Solar Observatory.

  14. Microwave interferometer for plasma-density measurement on TMX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, F.E.; Stever, R.D.; Lund, N.P.

    1981-09-25

    A four-channel microwave interferometer operating at 140 GHz has been designed for installation on the upgrade to the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX Upgrade). The instrument can be used to measure plasma density simultaneously at four locations: by reconnecting the waveguide runs, density can be measured at other locations of interest. The design is an outgrowth of a system used on TMX, but includes some newly developed hardware. An over-mode circular waveguide system is used to transport the signals over long distances with only moderate losses. Several precautions have been taken to limit the effect of possible interference from the electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) system used to heat the plasma. A high-resolution linear phase comparator has been designed that will operate over the wide range of signals expected. A CAMAC-based data-acquisition system provides for automatic data sampling and archival after each shot.

  15. Decontamination of biological warfare agents by a microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Wilson; Lai, Henry; Kuo, Spencer P.; Tarasenko, Olga; Levon, Kalle

    2005-02-01

    A portable arc-seeded microwave plasma torch running stably with airflow is described and applied for the decontamination of biological warfare agents. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma torch indicated that this torch produced an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen that could effectively oxidize biological agents. Bacillus cereus was chosen as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis spores for biological agent in the decontamination experiments. Decontamination was performed with the airflow rate of 0.393 l/s, corresponding to a maximum concentration of atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The experimental results showed that all spores were killed in less than 8 s at 3 cm distance, 12 s at 4 cm distance, and 16 s at 5 cm distance away from the nozzle of the torch.

  16. Microwave processing of epoxy resins and synthesis of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Liming

    Microwave processing of advanced materials has been studied as an attractive alternative to conventional thermal processing. In this dissertation, work was preformed in four sections. The first section is a review on research status of microwave processing of polymer materials. The second section is investigation of the microwave curing kinetics of epoxy resins. The curing of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 3, 3'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) system under microwave radiation at 145 °C was governed by an autocatalyzed reaction mechanism. A kinetic model was used to describe the curing progress. The third section is a study on dielectric properties of four reacting epoxy resins over a temperature range at 2.45 GHz. The epoxy resin was DGEBA. The four curing agents were DDS, Jeffamine D-230, m-phenylenediamine, and diethyltoluenediamine. The mixtures of DGEBA and the four curing agents were stoichiometric. The four reacting systems were heated under microwave irradiation to certain cure temperatures. Measurements of temperature and dielectric properties were made during free convective cooling of the samples. The cooled samples were analyzed with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter to determine the extents of cure. The Davidson-Cole model can be used to describe the dielectric data. A simplified Davidson-Cole expression was proposed to calculate the parameters in the Davidson-Cole model and describe the dielectric properties of the DGEBA/DDS system and part of the dielectric data of the other three systems. A single relaxation model was used with the Arrhenius expression for temperature dependence to model the results. The evolution of all parameters in the models during cure was related to the decreasing number of the epoxy and amine groups in the reactants and the increasing viscosity of the reacting systems. The last section is synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of a gas mixture of

  17. Spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure microwave induced nitrogen plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microwave induced N2 plasma is diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy with respect to the plasma gas temperature. The spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature is discussed with respect to the spectral line broadening of Ar I and the various emission rotational-vibrational band systems of N2(B-A), N2(C-B) and \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}). It is found that the Boltzmann plot of the selective spectral lines from \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}) at 391.4 nm is preferable to others with an accuracy better than 5% for an atmospheric-pressure plasma of high gas temperature. On the basis of the thermal balance equation, the dependences of the plasma gas temperature on the absorbed power, the gas flow rate, and the gas composition are investigated experimentally with photographs recording the plasma morphology.

  18. Gas mixing enhanced by power modulations in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voráč, J.; Potočňáková, L.; Synek, P.; Hnilica, J.; Kudrle, V.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave plasma jet operating in atmospheric pressure argon was power modulated by audio frequency sine envelope in the 102 W power range. Its effluent was imaged using interference filters and ICCD camera for several different phases of the modulating signal. The combination of this fast imaging with spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy provides useful insights into the plasmachemical processes involved. Phase-resolved schlieren photography was performed to visualize the gas dynamics. The results show that for higher modulation frequencies the plasma chemistry is strongly influenced by formation of transient flow perturbation resembling a vortex during each period. The perturbation formation and speed are strongly influenced by the frequency and power variations while they depend only weakly on the working gas flow rate. From application point of view, the perturbation presence significantly broadened lateral distribution of active species, effectively increasing cross-sectional area suitable for applications.

  19. Analysis of microwave leaky modes propagating through laser plasma filaments column waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2012-12-15

    A plasma column waveguide formed by a bundle of closely spaced plasma filaments induced by the propagation of ultrafast laser pulses in air and revived by a longer infrared laser pulse is shown to support microwave radiation. We consider values of both the plasma electron density and microwave frequency for which the refractive index of plasma is lower than the refractive index of air; therefore, a leaky plasma waveguide can be realized in extremely high frequency band. The guiding mechanism does not require high conductance of the plasma and can be easily excited by using commercial femtosecond laser sources. A theoretical study of leaky mode characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous plasma column waveguides is investigated with several values of plasma and waveguide structure parameters. The microwave transmission loss was found to be mainly caused by the microwave leakage through the air-plasma interface and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In spite of losses of microwaves caused by leakage and plasma absorption, it is shown to be much lower than both that accompanying to surface waves attaching to single conducting plasma wire and the free space propagation over distances in the order of the filament length, which opens exciting perspectives for short distance point to point wireless transmission of pulsed-modulated microwaves.

  20. Analysis of microwave leaky modes propagating through laser plasma filaments column waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2012-12-01

    A plasma column waveguide formed by a bundle of closely spaced plasma filaments induced by the propagation of ultrafast laser pulses in air and revived by a longer infrared laser pulse is shown to support microwave radiation. We consider values of both the plasma electron density and microwave frequency for which the refractive index of plasma is lower than the refractive index of air; therefore, a leaky plasma waveguide can be realized in extremely high frequency band. The guiding mechanism does not require high conductance of the plasma and can be easily excited by using commercial femtosecond laser sources. A theoretical study of leaky mode characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous plasma column waveguides is investigated with several values of plasma and waveguide structure parameters. The microwave transmission loss was found to be mainly caused by the microwave leakage through the air-plasma interface and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In spite of losses of microwaves caused by leakage and plasma absorption, it is shown to be much lower than both that accompanying to surface waves attaching to single conducting plasma wire and the free space propagation over distances in the order of the filament length, which opens exciting perspectives for short distance point to point wireless transmission of pulsed-modulated microwaves.

  1. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  2. Plasma filamentation and shock wave enhancement in microwave rockets by combining low-frequency microwaves with external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    A filamentary plasma is reproduced based on a fully kinetic model of electron and ion transports coupled with electromagnetic wave propagation. The discharge plasma transits from discrete to diffusive patterns at a 110-GHz breakdown, with decrease in the ambient pressure, because of the rapid electron diffusion that occurs during an increase in the propagation speed of the ionization front. A discrete plasma is obtained at low pressures when a low-frequency microwave is irradiated because the ionization process becomes more dominant than the electron diffusion, when the electrons are effectively heated by the low-frequency microwave. The propagation speed of the plasma increases with decrease in the incident microwave frequency because of the higher ionization frequency and faster plasma diffusion resulting from the increase in the energy-absorption rate. An external magnetic field is applied to the breakdown volume, which induces plasma filamentation at lower pressures because the electron diffusion is suppressed by the magnetic field. The thrust performance of a microwave rocket is improved by the magnetic fields corresponding to the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and its higher-harmonic heating, because slower propagation of the ionization front and larger energy-absorption rates are obtained at lower pressures. It would be advantageous if the fundamental mode of ECR heating is coupled with a lower frequency microwave instead of combining the higher-harmonic ECR heating with the higher frequency microwave. This can improve the thrust performance with smaller magnetic fields even if the propagation speed increases because of the decrease in the incident microwave frequency.

  3. CO2 dissociation in vortex-stabilised microwave plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welzel, S.; Bongers, W. A.; Graswinckel, M. F.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Plasma-assisted gas conversion techniques are widely considered as efficient building blocks in a future energy infrastructure which will be based on intermittent, renewable electricity sources. CO2 dissociation in high-frequency plasmas is of particular interest in carbon capture and utilisation process chains for the production of CO2-neutral fuels. In order to achieve efficient plasma processes of high throughput specifically designed gas flow and power injection regimes are required. In this contribution vortex-stabilised microwave plasmas in undiluted CO2 were studied in a pressure range from 170 to 1000 mbar at up to 1 kW (forward) injected power, respectively. The CO2 depletion was measured downstream, e.g. by means of mass spectrometry. Although the system configuration was entirely not optimised, energy efficiencies of nearly 40%, i.e. close to the thermal dissociation limit, and conversion efficiencies of up to 23% were achieved. Additionally, spatially-resolved emission spectroscopy was applied to map the axial and radial distribution of excited atomic (C, O) and molecular (CO, C2) species along with their rotational temperatures. Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbox 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven.

  4. Modelling of microwave-driven micro-plasmas in HCPCF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. L.; Leroy, O.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Debord, B.; Gerome, F.; Jamier, R.; Benabid, F.

    2012-10-01

    New UV sources based on microwave-driven micro-plasmas filling a Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibre (HCPCF) [1], exhibit an unprecedented compactness, flexibility, low-cost and high conversion efficiency. The micro-plasma (>10^14 cm-3 electron density, estimated by electromagnetic calculations) is produced by a surface-wave discharge (2.45 GHz frequency) in argon, at 1000-1400 K gas temperatures (measured by OES diagnostics). Our first approach to simulate this system replaces the cladding structure of the fibre (air-holes region) by a capillary cylindrical quartz tube. Simulations use a one-dimensional (radial) stationary model that solves the fluid transport equations for electrons and positive ions, the electron mean energy transport equations, Poisson's and Maxwell's equations for the fields and the gas energy balance equation, coupled to the electron Boltzmann equation for the calculation of the relevant electron parameters [2,3]. We analyze the modification of the plasma with changes in the work conditions, presenting simulations for various HCPCF core radii (50--500 μm) and electron densities (1--5x10^14 cm-3), at 1mbar pressure. [1] B. Debord et al, ECOC conference Mo.2.LeCervin.5. (2011) [2] L.L. Alves et al, Phys. Rev. E 79, 016403 (2009) [3] J. Greg'orio et al, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 015013 (2012)

  5. Breast cancer imaging by microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghua; Ku, Geng; Jin, Xing; Wang, Lihong V.; Fornage, Bruno D.; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2005-04-01

    We report a preliminary study of breast cancer imaging by microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography. In this study, we built a prototype of breast cancer imager based on a circular scan mode. A 3-GHz 0.3~0.5-μs microwave is used as the excitation energy source. A 2.25-MHz ultrasound transducer scans the thermoacoustic signals. All the measured data is transferred to a personal computer for imaging based on our proposed back-projection reconstruction algorithms. We quantified the line spread function of the imaging system. It shows the spatial resolution of our experimental system reaches 0.5 mm. After phantom experiments demonstrated the principle of this technique, we moved the imaging system to the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center to image the excised breast cancer specimens. After the surgery performed by the physicians at the Cancer Center, the excised breast specimen was placed in a plastic cylindrical container with a diameter of 10 cm; and it was then imaged by three imaging modalities: radiograph, ultrasound and thermoacoustic imaging. Four excised breast specimens have been tested. The tumor regions have been clearly located. This preliminary study demonstrated the potential of microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography for applications in breast cancer imaging.

  6. Electron Spin Resonance Imaging Utilizing Localized Microwave Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Masahiro; Ikeya, Motoji

    1990-02-01

    A method for two-dimensional electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging utilizing a localized microwave field is presented with an application of the image processing technique. Microwaves are localized at the surface of a sample by placing a sample in contact with a pinholed cavity wall. A two-dimensional ESR image can be obtained by scanning the sample in contact with the cavity. Some ESR images which correspond to distribution of natural radiation damages and paramagnetic impurities in carbonate fossils of a crinoid and an ammonite are presented as applications in earth science. Resolution of a raw ESR image is restricted by the diameter of the hole (1 mm). Higher resolution of 0.2 mm is obtained by using a deconvolution algorithm and instrument function for the hole. Restored images of a test sample of DPPH and of a fossil crinoid are presented.

  7. Near Field Imaging at Microwave and Millemeter Wave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2007-06-03

    Near field imaging at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies is useful for a wide variety of applications including concealed weapon detection, through-wall and inner-wall imaging, ground penetrating radar imaging, radar cross section analysis, and non-destructive evaluation of materials. A variety of novel imaging techniques have been developed for many of these applications at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) . These techniques make use of wideband holographic wavefront reconstruction methods, and have been developed to optimize the image quality and resolution. This paper will summarize several of these techniques and show imaging results for several interesting application areas.

  8. Broadband microwave characteristics of a novel coaxial gridded hollow cathode argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruilin; Yuan, Chengxun; Li, Hui; Jia, Jieshu; Zhou, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoou; Wu, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between microwave and large area plasma is crucially important for space communication. Gas pressure, input power, and plasma volume are critical to both the microwave electromagnetic wave phase shift and electron density. This paper presents a novel type of large coaxial gridded hollow cathode plasma having a 50 cm diameter and a 40 cm thickness. Microwave characteristics are studied using a microwave measurement system that includes two broadband antennae in the range from 2 GHz to 18 GHz. The phase shift under varying gas pressure and input power is shown. In addition, the electron density ne, which varies from 1.2 × 1016 m-3 to 8.7 × 1016 m-3 under different discharge conditions, is diagnosed by the microwave system. The measured results accord well with those acquired by Langmuir Probe measurement and show that the microwave properties in the large volume hollow cathode discharge significantly depend on the input power and gas pressure.

  9. Optical diagnostics of a low power—low gas flow rates atmospheric-pressure argon plasma created by a microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuji; Srivastava, Nimisha; Scherrer, Susan; Jang, Ping-Rey; Dibble, Theodore S.; Duan, Yixiang

    2009-05-01

    We employ a suite of optical techniques, namely, visual imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), to characterize a low power, low gas flow rates, atmospheric-pressure argon microwave induced plasma. The plasma is created by a microwave plasma torch, which is excited by a 2.45 GHz microwave with powers ranging from 60 to 120 W. A series of plasma images captured in a time-resolution range of as fine as 10 µs shows that the converging point is actually a time-averaged visual effect and the converging point does not exist when the plasma is visualized under high time resolution, e.g. <2 ms. Simulations of the emission spectra of OH, N2 and N_{2}^{+} in the range 200-450 nm enable the plasma electronic excitation temperature (Texc) to be determined at 8000-9000 K, while the vibrational temperature (Tv), the rotational temperature (Tr) and the gas temperature (Tg) at different locations along the axis of the plasma column are all determined to be in the range 1800-2200 K. Thermal equilibrium properties of the plasma are discussed. OH radical concentrations along the plasma column axis are measured by CRDS and the concentrations are in the range 1.6 × 1013-3.0 × 1014 cm-3 with the highest density at the tail of the plasma column. The upper limit of electron density ne is estimated to be 5.0 × 1014 cm-3 from the Lorentzian component of the broadened lineshape obtained by ringdown spectral scans of the rovibrational line S21 of the OH A-X (0-0) band.

  10. Microwave plasma-assisted ignition and flameholding in premixed ethylene/air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Che A.; Wu, Wei; Wang, Chuji

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a 2.45 GHz microwave source and a surfatron were used, coupled with a T-shaped quartz combustor, to investigate the role of a nonthermal microwave argon plasma jet on the plasma-assisted ignition and flameholding of a premixed ethylene/air mixture. A modified U-shaped plot of the minimum plasma power required for ignition versus fuel equivalence ratio was obtained, whereby the plasma power required for plasma-assisted ignition decreased with increase in fuel equivalence ratios in the range 0.2–0.6, but for fuel equivalence ratios of 0.7 and above, the plasma power required for ignition remained fairly constant throughout. It was observed that leaner fuel/air mixtures were more sensitive to heat losses to the surrounding and this sensitivity decreased with increase in the fuel equivalence ratio. Comparison with results obtained from previous studies suggested that the mixing scheme between the plasma and the premixed fuel/air mixture and the energy density of the fuel used played an important role in influencing the minimum plasma power required for ignition with the effect being more pronounced for near stoichiometric to rich fuel equivalence ratios (0.7–1.4). Flame images obtained showed a dual layered flame with an inner white core and a bluish outer layer. The images also showed an increased degree of flameholding (tethering of the flame to the combustor orifice) with increase in plasma power. The concurrency of the dual peaks in the emission intensity profiles for OH(A), CH(A), C2(d), and the rotational temperature profiles obtained via optical emission spectroscopy along with the ground state OH(X) number density profiles in the flame using cavity ringdown spectroscopy led to the proposal that the mechanism of plasma-assisted flameholding in ethylene/air flames is predominantly radical dependent with the formation of an inner radical rich flame core which enhances the ignition and stabilization of the surrounding coflow.

  11. Airborne Microwave Imaging of River Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine whether airborne microwave remote sensing systems can measure river surface currents with sufficient accuracy to make them prospective instruments with which to monitor river flow from space. The approach was to fly a coherent airborne microwave Doppler radar, developed by APL/UW, on a light airplane along several rivers in western Washington state over an extended period of time. The fundamental quantity obtained by this system to measure river currents is the mean offset of the Doppler spectrum. Since this scatter can be obtained from interferometric synthetic aperture radars (INSARs), which can be flown in space, this project provided a cost effective means for determining the suitability of spaceborne INSAR for measuring river flow.

  12. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  13. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

  14. Microwave plasma assisted pyrolysis of refuse derived fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khongkrapan, Parin; Thanompongchart, Patipat; Tippayawong, Nakorn; Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat

    2014-03-01

    This work combined plasma reactivity and pyrolysis for conversion of solid wastes. Decomposition of refuse derived fuel (RDF) and its combustible components (paper, biomass, and plastic) in an 800 W microwave plasma reactor was investigated at varying argon flow rates of 0.50 to 1.25 lpm for 3 minutes. The characteristic bright light emission of plasma was observed with calculated maximum power density of about 35 W/cm3. The RDF and its components were successfully converted into char and combustible gas. The average char yield was found to be 12-21% of the original mass, with a gross calorific value of around 39 MJ/kg. The yield of the product gas was in the range 1.0-1.7 m3/kg. The combustible gas generated from the pyrolysis of the RDF contained about 14% H2, 66% CO, and 4% CH4 of the detected gas mass, with a heating value of 11 MJ/m3. These products are potentially marketable forms of clean energy.

  15. A microwave plasma cathode electron gun for ion beam neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusellier, C.; Wartski, L.; Aubert, J.; Schwebel, C.; Coste, Ph.; Chabrier, A.

    1998-02-01

    It is well known that there exist two distinct types of ion beam neutralization, viz., charge and current neutralization. We have designed and studied a versatile and compact microwave plasma (MP) cathode electron gun dedicated to charge as well as current neutralization. Unlike the conventional hot cathode neutralizer, this MP cathode allows operation of the electron gun in a reactive gaseous environment when it is eventually associated with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion gun. Charge neutralization can be easily carried out by extracting from the MP cathode through a 1 mm diameter hole, a 35 mA electron beam under a 20 V voltage; the MP cathode being fed with a 75 W microwave power at 2.45 GHz. Higher beam intensities could be obtained using a multiaperture thin plate. Electron beam intensities as high as 300 mA and energies of 2 keV needed for current neutralization, e.g., when an ion beam impinges onto a thick dielectric surface, are obtained via a two-stage arrangement including an anodic chamber associated with a set of three monoaperture plates for the electron beam extraction. Transport of 200-2000 eV electron beams is ensured using focusing optics composed of three aligned tubes 6 cm in diameter and unsymmetrically polarized.

  16. New diagnostic methods for laser plasma- and microwave-enhanced combustion.

    PubMed

    Miles, Richard B; Michael, James B; Limbach, Christopher M; McGuire, Sean D; Chng, Tat Loon; Edwards, Matthew R; DeLuca, Nicholas J; Shneider, Mikhail N; Dogariu, Arthur

    2015-08-13

    The study of pulsed laser- and microwave-induced plasma interactions with atmospheric and higher pressure combusting gases requires rapid diagnostic methods that are capable of determining the mechanisms by which these interactions are taking place. New rapid diagnostics are presented here extending the capabilities of Rayleigh and Thomson scattering and resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) detection and introducing femtosecond laser-induced velocity and temperature profile imaging. Spectrally filtered Rayleigh scattering provides a method for the planar imaging of temperature fields for constant pressure interactions and line imaging of velocity, temperature and density profiles. Depolarization of Rayleigh scattering provides a measure of the dissociation fraction, and multi-wavelength line imaging enables the separation of Thomson scattering from Rayleigh scattering. Radar REMPI takes advantage of high-frequency microwave scattering from the region of laser-selected species ionization to extend REMPI to atmospheric pressures and implement it as a stand-off detection method for atomic and molecular species in combusting environments. Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) generates highly excited molecular species and dissociation through the focal zone of the laser. The prompt fluorescence from excited molecular species yields temperature profiles, and the delayed fluorescence from recombining atomic fragments yields velocity profiles. PMID:26170432

  17. New diagnostic methods for laser plasma- and microwave-enhanced combustion

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Richard B; Michael, James B; Limbach, Christopher M; McGuire, Sean D; Chng, Tat Loon; Edwards, Matthew R; DeLuca, Nicholas J; Shneider, Mikhail N; Dogariu, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The study of pulsed laser- and microwave-induced plasma interactions with atmospheric and higher pressure combusting gases requires rapid diagnostic methods that are capable of determining the mechanisms by which these interactions are taking place. New rapid diagnostics are presented here extending the capabilities of Rayleigh and Thomson scattering and resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) detection and introducing femtosecond laser-induced velocity and temperature profile imaging. Spectrally filtered Rayleigh scattering provides a method for the planar imaging of temperature fields for constant pressure interactions and line imaging of velocity, temperature and density profiles. Depolarization of Rayleigh scattering provides a measure of the dissociation fraction, and multi-wavelength line imaging enables the separation of Thomson scattering from Rayleigh scattering. Radar REMPI takes advantage of high-frequency microwave scattering from the region of laser-selected species ionization to extend REMPI to atmospheric pressures and implement it as a stand-off detection method for atomic and molecular species in combusting environments. Femtosecond laser electronic excitation tagging (FLEET) generates highly excited molecular species and dissociation through the focal zone of the laser. The prompt fluorescence from excited molecular species yields temperature profiles, and the delayed fluorescence from recombining atomic fragments yields velocity profiles. PMID:26170432

  18. Synthesis of Titanium Dioxide by Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ta-Chin; Chen, Hua-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Kai

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized from titanium tetraisopropanol (TTIP) using a microwave plasma torch (MPT) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The visible light photocatalysis was studied by the decomposition of methylene blue. MB present in the aqueous solution could be almost completely (> 70%) decomposed within about 720 min of reaction time under visible light irradiation. This is due to the carbon-compounds on the surface of TiO2 (TiOC) corresponding to the results of FTIR. Furthermore, a decrease in recombination between the electron and hole was induced by the existence of TiOC. PMID:26353500

  19. Experimental study of microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Ryan T.

    Microwave-Induced Thermoacoustic Imaging (TAI) is a noninvasive hybrid modality which improves contrast by using thermoelastic wave generation induced by microwave absorption. Ultrasonography is widely used in medical practice as a low-cost alternative and supplement to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although ultrasonography has relatively high image resolution (depending on the ultrasonic wavelength at diagnostic frequencies), it suffers from low image contrast of soft tissues. In this work samples are irradiated with sub-microsecond electromagnetic pulses inducing acoustic waves in the sample that are then detected with an unfocused transducer. The advantage of this hybrid modality is the ability to take advantage of the microwave absorption coefficients which provide high contrast in tissue samples. This in combination with the superior spatial resolution of ultrasound waves is important to providing a low-cost alternative to MRI and early breast cancer detection methods. This work describes the implementation of a thermoacoustic experiment using a 5 kW peak power microwave source.

  20. Microwave Sky image from the WMAP Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A detailed full-sky map of the oldest light in the universe. It is a 'baby picture' of the universe. Colors indicate 'warmer' (red) and 'cooler' (blue) spots. The oval shape is a projection to display the whole sky; similar to the way the globe of the earth can be projected as an oval. The microwave light captured in this picture is from 379,000 years after the Big Bang, over 13 billion years ago. For more information, see http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/m_mm/mr_whatsthat.html

  1. Characterization of microwave discharge plasmas for surface processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, Milka

    We have developed several diagnostic techniques to characterize two types of microwave (MW) discharge plasmas: a supersonic flowing argon MW discharge maintained in a cylindrical quartz cavity at frequency ƒ = 2.45 GHz and a pulse repetitive MW discharge in air at ƒ = 9.5 GHz. Low temperature MW discharges have been proven to posses attractive properties for plasma cleaning and etching of niobium surfaces of superconductive radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Plasma based surface modification technologies offer a promising alternative for etching and cleaning of SRF cavities. These technologies are low cost, environmentally friendly and easily controllable, and present a possible alternative to currently used acid based wet technologies, such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP), or electrochemical polishing (EP). In fact, weakly ionized. non-equilibrium, and low temperature gas discharges represent a powerful tool for surface processing due to the strong chemical reactivity of plasma radicals. Therefore, characterizing these discharges by applying non-perturbing, in situ measurement techniques is of vital importance. Optical emission spectroscopy has been employed to analyze the molecular structure and evaluate rotational and vibrational temperatures in these discharges. The internal plasma structure was studied by applying a tomographic numerical method based on the two-dimensional Radon formula. An automated optical measurement system has been developed for reconstruction of local plasma parameters. It was found that excited argon states are concentrated near the tube walls, thus confirming the assumption that the post discharge plasma is dominantly sustained by a travelling surface wave. Employing a laser induced fluorescence technique in combination with the time synchronization device allowed us to obtain time-resolved population densities of some excited atomic levels in argon. We have developed a technique for absolute measurements of electron density based

  2. Commissioning of the Microwave Imaging Reflectometer (MIR) on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscatello, C. M.; Domier, C. W.; Gamzina, D.; Hu, X.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Ren, X.; Riemenschneider, P.; Spear, A.; Yu, L.; Munsat, T.; Zemedkun, S. E.; Tobias, B. J.

    2013-10-01

    A microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR), capable of simultaneously measuring the poloidal and radial structure of density fluctuations, has been developed for DIII-D and installed in May 2013. The MIR diagnostic concept has undergone numerous technological and system-level upgrades since earlier microwave imaging systems, thereby permitting a higher level of robustness and flexibility. Synthetic diagnostic simulations permit determination of the resolvable wavenumbers and density fluctuations levels. Laboratory qualification tests are performed to characterize the system performance compared to the designed parameters. First plasma results are presented in the form of a brief survey of MIR results collected during several select experiments from the 2013 DIII-D experimental campaign. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-00ER54531, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-SC0003913 DE0FC02-05ER54816, and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection: Advances in Three–Dimensional Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Golnabi, Amir H.; Meaney, Paul M.; Epstein, Neil R.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave imaging is based on the electrical property (permittivity and conductivity) differences in materials. Microwave imaging for biomedical applications is particularly interesting, mainly due to the fact that available range of dielectric properties for different tissues can provide important functional information about their health. Under the assumption that a 3D scattering problem can be reasonably represented as a simplified 2D model, one can take advantage of the simplicity and lower computational cost of 2D models to characterize such 3D phenomenon. Nonetheless, by eliminating excessive model simplifications, 3D microwave imaging provides potentially more valuable information over 2Dtechniques, and as a result, more accurate dielectric property maps may be obtained. In this paper, we present some advances we have made in three–dimensional image reconstruction, and show the results from a 3D breast phantom experiment using our clinical microwave imaging system at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC), NH. PMID:22255641

  4. Applications of the NPOESS Visible/Infrared and Microwave Imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. F.; Hawkins, J. D.; Turk, F. J.; Kuciauskas, A.; Richardson, K.; Miller, S.

    2008-12-01

    Satellites from the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) will contain two key imagers responsible for a large number of operational products. These are the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and the Microwave Imager Sounder (MIS). VIIRS will fly on all NPOESS satellites, initial launch expected in 2013, and the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite to be launched in 2010. Three of the four planned NPOESS satellites will carry MIS, starting in 2016. This presentation will discuss each sensor and show prototype products from existing sensors. The VIIRS instrument will contain 22 channels, ranging from the visible to infrared. It will have a swath of 3000 km. Data from all of the VIIRS channels will be produced using scan geometry which allows only slow pixel expansion toward the edge of scan. This feature enables imagery which is as sharp at the edge of scan as near nadir, enabling many more high-resolution zooms per overpass. We will also discuss in some detail the Day/Night Band (DNB), a channel for low-light imaging at night. The DNB will be considerably improved compared to the nighttime visible channel aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites with many more display levels, decreased noise and artifacts, higher spatial resolution, and full integration into the VIIRS radiometer suite. The MIS design is still being completed. However, with a larger number of channels than predecessor sensors, it will have the capability to improve upon the products from the DMSP Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS). It will also create products previewed by WindSat, the first spaceborne polarametric microwave imager built by the Naval Research Laboratory and flown aboard the DoD Space Test Program's Coriolis satellite. Products include sea surface temperature, soil moisture, sea surface wind vectors, total precipitable water, and

  5. Multistatic adaptive microwave imaging for early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yao; Guo, Bin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian; Stoica, Petre

    2006-08-01

    We propose a new multistatic adaptive microwave imaging (MAMI) method for early breast cancer detection. MAMI is a two-stage robust Capon beamforming (RCB) based image formation algorithm. MAMI exhibits higher resolution, lower sidelobes, and better noise and interference rejection capabilities than the existing approaches. The effectiveness of using MAMI for breast cancer detection is demonstrated via a simulated 3-D breast model and several numerical examples. PMID:16916099

  6. Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging method for breast tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Top, Can Barıs; Tafreshi, Azadeh Kamali; Gençer, Nevzat G

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging (HMMDI) method is recently proposed as a non-invasive hybrid breast imaging technique for tumor detection. The acquired data depend on acoustic, elastic and electromagnetic properties of the tissue. The potential of the method is analyzed with simulation studies and phantom experiments. In this paper, the results of these studies are summarized. It is shown that HMMDI method has a potential to detect malignancies inside fibro-glandular tissue. PMID:25571382

  7. Microwave guiding and intense plasma generation at subcutoff dimensions for focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Dey, Indranuj; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2007-07-23

    The mechanism of microwave guiding and plasma generation is investigated in a circular waveguide with a subcutoff dimension using pulsed microwaves of 3 GHz. During the initial phase, gaseous breakdown is induced by the exponentially decaying wave. Upon breakdown, the refractive index of the plasma medium varies radially, with the plasma density reaching close to cutoff values in the central region. At lower pressures, the waves can propagate through the peripheral plasma with a reduced wavelength, due to the collisionally broadened upper hybrid resonance region. The intense narrow cross sectional plasma bears promise for multielemental focused ion beams.

  8. Reconstruction Techniques for Sparse Multistatic Linear Array Microwave Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2014-06-09

    Sequentially-switched linear arrays are an enabling technology for a number of near-field microwave imaging applications. Electronically sequencing along the array axis followed by mechanical scanning along an orthogonal axis allows dense sampling of a two-dimensional aperture in near real-time. In this paper, a sparse multi-static array technique will be described along with associated Fourier-Transform-based and back-projection-based image reconstruction algorithms. Simulated and measured imaging results are presented that show the effectiveness of the sparse array technique along with the merits and weaknesses of each image reconstruction approach.

  9. Analysis of hydrogen plasma in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivkumar, G.; Tholeti, S. S.; Alrefae, M. A.; Fisher, T. S.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to build a numerical model of hydrogen plasma inside a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. This model will help in understanding and optimizing the conditions for the growth of carbon nanostructures. A 2D axisymmetric model of the system is implemented using the finite element high frequency Maxwell solver and the heat transfer solver in COMSOL Multiphysics. The system is modeled to study variation in parameters with reactor geometry, microwave power, and gas pressure. The results are compared with experimental measurements from the Q-branch of the H2 Fulcher band of hydrogen using an optical emission spectroscopy technique. The parameter γ in Füner's model is calibrated to match experimental observations at a power of 500 W and 30 Torr. Good agreement is found between the modeling and experimental results for a wide range of powers and pressures. The gas temperature exhibits a weak dependence on power and a strong dependence on gas pressure. The inclusion of a vertical dielectric pillar that concentrates the plasma increases the maximum electron temperature by 70%, the maximum gas temperature by 50%, and the maximum electron number density by 70% when compared to conditions without the pillar at 500 W and 30 Torr. Experimental observations also indicate intensified plasma with the inclusion of a pillar.

  10. Microwave plasma treated carbon nanotubes and their electrochemical biosensing application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaoyang; Xu, Yinyu; Zhang, Xiaolei; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2007-06-15

    A convenient microwave plasma treatment method with ammonia precursor was proposed to enhance the solubility of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The SEM, XRD and FTIR spectra clearly demonstrated that the carbon skeleton structure of the resultant ammonia plasma-treated CNTs (ammonia PT-CNTs) was not destroyed and amine groups of different forms were successfully coupled to CNTs in the MWP treatment process. The ammonia PT-CNTs have excellent solubility in water and are insoluble in nonpolar tetrahydrofuran, and the cyclic voltammograms suggest that the enhanced wetting properties clearly favor faster electron transfer kinetics on the ammonia PT-CNT electrodes. By choosing glucose oxidase as a model enzyme, the application of the ammonia PT-CNTs in construction of biosensors was further investigated. Due to the biocompatibility and electron transfer capability of the ammonia PT-CNTs, the resultant GOD biosensor displayed a good sensing performance. The biosensor has a fast response of less than 10s, and the response current linearly increases with the glucose concentration in the range of 1.2x10(-4) to 7.5x10(-3)M with a detection limit of 1.0x10(-5)M. PMID:19071766

  11. Microwave N{sub 2}-Ar plasma torch. I. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-01-15

    The spatial structure of a microwave plasma torch driven by an azimuthally symmetric surface wave operating in a N{sub 2}-Ar mixture at atmospheric pressure is investigated. A two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent theoretical model is developed to investigate the entire spatial structure of the source, including the discharge zone, sustained by the field of the surface TM{sub 00} mode, and the postdischarge plasma. Maxwell's equations, the rate balance equations for the most important excited species - vibrationally and electronically excited states, ions and nitrogen atoms N({sup 4}S) - and the Boltzmann equation for electrons are consistently solved. Model calculations of the 2D spatial distributions of species of interest such as charged particles (electrons and positive ions), N{sub 2}({Chi} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +},v) vibrationally excited molecules, N{sub 2}(A {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}) metastable molecules, and N({sup 4}S) ground state atoms are presented and discussed.

  12. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    White, Terry L; Paulauskas, Felix L; Bigelow, Timothy S

    2014-03-25

    A method for continuously processing carbon fiber including establishing a microwave plasma in a selected atmosphere contained in an elongated chamber having a microwave power gradient along its length defined by a lower microwave power at one end and a higher microwave power at the opposite end of the elongated chamber. The elongated chamber having an opening in each of the ends of the chamber that are adapted to allow the passage of the fiber tow while limiting incidental gas flow into or out of said chamber. A continuous fiber tow is introduced into the end of the chamber having the lower microwave power. The fiber tow is withdrawn from the opposite end of the chamber having the higher microwave power. The fiber to is subjected to progressively higher microwave energy as the fiber is being traversed through the elongated chamber.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROWAVE PLASMA DETOXIFICATION PROCESS FOR HAZARDOUS WASTES. PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microwave process described in this report is a relatively new application of what has been termed the 'fourth state of matter', or the 'plasma state'. It is the first practical application of a microwave discharge to the decomposition of chemical compounds in significant qua...

  14. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  15. Microwave imaging of the breast with incorporated structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golnabi, Amir H.; Meaney, Paul M.; Geimer, Shireen D.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-03-01

    Microwave imaging for biomedical applications, especially for early detection of breast cancer and effective treatment monitoring, has attracted increasing interest in last several decades. This fact is due to the high contrast between the dielectric properties of the normal and malignant breast tissues at microwave frequencies ranging from high megahertz to low gigahertz. The available range of dielectric properties for different soft tissue can provide considerable functional information about tissue health. Nonetheless, one of the limiting weaknesses of microwave imaging is, unlike that for conventional modalities such as X-ray CT or MRI, it cannot inherently provide high-resolution images. The conventional modalities can produce highly resolved anatomical information but often cannot provide the functional information required for diagnoses. We have developed a soft prior regularization strategy that can incorporate the prior anatomical information from X-ray CT, MR or other sources, and use it in a way to exploit the resolution of these images while also retaining the functional nature of the microwave images. The anatomical information is first used to create an imaging zone mesh, which segments separate internal substructures, and an associated weighting matrix that numerically groups the values of closely related nodes within the mesh. This information is subsequently used as a regularizing term for the Gauss-Newton reconstruction algorithm. This approach exploits existing technology in a systematic way without making potentially biased assumptions about the properties of visible structures. In this paper we continue our initial investigation on this matter with a series of breast-shaped simulation and phantom experiments.

  16. Towards universal ambient ionization: direct elemental analysis of solid substrates using microwave plasma ionization.

    PubMed

    Evans-Nguyen, K M; Gerling, J; Brown, H; Miranda, M; Windom, A; Speer, J

    2016-06-21

    A microwave plasma was used for direct ambient ionization mass spectrometry of solid substrates, rapidly yielding atomic spectra without sample digestion or pre-treatment. Further, molecular spectra for the organic components of the substrate were obtained simultaneously, in an ambient ionization format. Initial characterization of the microwave plasma coupling to an ion trap mass spectrometer was carried out using solution standards and a microwave plasma torch (MPT) configuration. The configuration of the microwave plasma was then optimized for ambient ionization. The atomic and organic composition for samples applicable to nuclear and conventional forensic screening, including explosive/radionuclide mixtures and inorganic/organic gunshot residue component mixtures were successfully determined. The technologies employed are readily fieldable; the feasibility of a multimode ion source that could be coupled with a portable ion trap mass spectrometer for rapid, on-site, elemental, isotopic, and molecular screening of samples is demonstrated. PMID:26979768

  17. Experimental study of microwave transmission through a decaying plasma. Final report, January 1986-February 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, K.J.

    1989-05-01

    The physics of pulsed-microwave, or radio-frequency (r-f), transmission through a decaying plasma column, is studied experimentally. A plasma column is formed in argon or nitrogen gases, to represent the neutral-gas breakdown due to an rf pulse. Initially, the electron frequency is greater than the microwave frequency. An r-f pulse capable of plasma reionization is applied across the plasma column at varying times in the plasma's decay phase (the plasma afterglow). Variation of the transmitted rf pulse characteristics, pulse width, and amplitude was studied as a function of the time into the afterglow. The ionization frequency of argon by a microwave pulse is found experimentally to be within 20% of the theoretical value. The comparison of ionization frequency is useful in establishing the applicability of earlier cavity measurements to present-day open-geometry systems used in transmission/propagation experiments.

  18. Characteristics and potential applications of an ORNL microwave ECR multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source that has two ECR plasma production regions and uses multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasma over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2} and could be scaled up to produce uniform plasma over 700 cm{sup 2} or larger. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The working gases used were argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of the discharge parameters. The discharge characteristics and a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source are described and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam sources for manufacturing advanced microelectronics, for space electric propulsion, and for fusion research, are discussed. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  19. CS based confocal microwave imaging algorithm for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y P; Zhang, S; Cui, Z; Qu, L L

    2016-04-29

    Based on compressive sensing (CS) technology, a high resolution confocal microwave imaging algorithm is proposed for breast cancer detection. With the exploitation of the spatial sparsity of the target space, the proposed image reconstruction problem is cast within the framework of CS and solved by the sparse constraint optimization. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed CS imaging method is verified by the full wave synthetic data from numerical breast phantom using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The imaging results have shown that the proposed imaging scheme can improve the imaging quality while significantly reducing the amount of data measurements and collection time when compared to the traditional delay-and-sum imaging algorithm. PMID:27177106

  20. Real-time and Portable Microwave Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghasr, Mohammed Tayeb

    2009-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter wave imaging has shown tremendous utility in a wide variety of applications. These techniques are primarily based on measuring coherent electric field distribution on the target being imaged. Mechanically scanned systems are the simple and low cost solution in microwave imaging. However, these systems are typically bulky and slow. This dissertation presents a design for a 2D switched imaging array that utilizes modulated scattering techniques for spatial multiplexing of the signal. The system was designed to be compact, coherent, possessing high dynamic range, and capable of video frame rate imaging. Various aspects of the system design were optimized to achieve the design objectives. The 2D imaging system as designed and described in this dissertation utilized PIN diode loaded resonant elliptical slot antennas as array elements. The slot antennas allow for incorporating the switching into the antennas thus reducing the cost and size of the array. Furthermore, these slots are integrated in a simple low loss waveguide network. Moreover, the sensitivity and dynamic range of this system is improved by utilizing a custom designed heterodyne receiver and matched filter. This dissertation also presents an analysis on the properties of this system. The performance of the multiplexing scheme, the noise floor and the dynamic range of the receivers are investigated. Furthermore, sources of errors such as mutual coupling and array response dispersion are also investigated. Finally, utilizing this imaging system for various applications such as 2D electric field mapping, scatterer localization, and nondestructive imaging is demonstrated.

  1. Solar Activity Studies using Microwave Imaging Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status of solar cycle 24 based on polar prominence eruptions (PEs) and microwave brightness enhancement (MBE) information obtained by the Nobeyama radioheliograph. The north polar region of the Sun had near-zero field strength for more than three years (2012-2015) and ended only in September 2015 as indicated by the presence of polar PEs and the lack of MBE. The zero-polar-field condition in the south started only around 2013, but it ended by June 2014. Thus the asymmetry in the times of polarity reversal switched between cycle 23 and 24. The polar MBE is a good proxy for the polar magnetic field strength as indicated by the high degree of correlation between the two. The cross-correlation between the high- and low-latitude MBEs is significant for a lag of approximately 5.5 to 7.3 years, suggesting that the polar field of one cycle indicates the sunspot number of the next cycle in agreement with the Babcock-Leighton mechanism of solar cycles. The extended period of near-zero field in the north-polar region should result in a weak and delayed sunspot activity in the northern hemisphere in cycle 25.

  2. Electron cyclotron resonant multicusp magnetic field microwave plasma source for electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dahimene, M.; Mahoney, L.; Asmussen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The development of electrodeless microwave ion and plasma sources has been a recent, very active research project at Michigan State University. The results are efficient, compact microwave discharge configurations that operate at low pressures (0.5 mtorr to 100 mtorr) and efficiently produce low energy ions and free radicals and broad ion beams for oxidation, deposition, and etching experiments. The microwave discharge technology developed for these applications may be useful for application in electric propulsion. This paper reviews this microwave applicator technology and indicates how it may be extended to higher power levels and applied to electric propulsion systems. 12 references.

  3. Shock Formation by Plasma Filaments of Microwave Discharge under Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-03-01

    A one-dimensional compressible fluid calculation was coupled with a finite- difference time-domain code and a particle-in-cell code with collision to reproduce propagation of electromagnetic wave, ionization process of plasma, and shock wave formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at 1 atm, and the distance between each filament is one-fifth of the wavelength of the incident microwave. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high plasma density at the atmospheric pressure. A simple analysis of the microwave propagation into the plasma shows that cut-off density of the microwave becomes smaller with the pressure decrease in a collisional plasma. At the lower pressure, the smaller density plasma is obtained with a diffusive pattern because of the smaller cut-off density and the larger diffusion effect. In contrast with the 1-atm case, the weak shock wave is generated at a rarefied condition, which lowers performance of microwave thruster.

  4. Measurements of energy distribution and wall temperature in flowing hydrogen microwave plasma systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into translational energy of the flowing gas is being investigated. A calorimetric experimental system has been designed and built enclosing the microwave plasma system to accurately determine the net energy transferred to the flowing gas. For a flow rate of 8900 micromoles/sec, a pressure of 7.4 torr, and an absorbed power level of 80 W, an energy transfer efficiency of 50 percent has been measured. A heat transfer model that characterizes the energy transfer processes in the plasma is developed. A wall temperature for the plasma system is calculated.

  5. Effects of Mass Flow Rate on the Thermal-Flow Characteristics of Microwave CO2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Na, Young-Ho; Uhm, Han-Sup; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the thermal-flow characteristics of atmospheric pressure microwave CO2 plasma were numerically investigated by simulation. The electric and gas flow fields in the reaction chamber with a microwave axial injection torch operated at 2.45 GHz were simulated. The microwave launcher had the standard rectangular waveguide WR340 geometry. The simulation was performed by using the COMSOL Multiphysics plasma model with various mass flow rates of CO2. The electric fields, temperature profiles and the density of electrons were graphically depicted for different CO2 inlet mass flow rates. PMID:26413663

  6. A TSVD Analysis of Microwave Inverse Scattering for Breast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Jacob D.; Van Veen, Barry D.; Hagness, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of methods have been applied to the inverse scattering problem for breast imaging at microwave frequencies. While many techniques have been leveraged toward a microwave imaging solution, they are all fundamentally dependent on the quality of the scattering data. Evaluating and optimizing the information contained in the data are, therefore, instrumental in understanding and achieving optimal performance from any particular imaging method. In this paper, a method of analysis is employed for the evaluation of the information contained in simulated scattering data from a known dielectric profile. The method estimates optimal imaging performance by mapping the data through the inverse of the scattering system. The inverse is computed by truncated singular-value decomposition of a system of scattering equations. The equations are made linear by use of the exact total fields in the imaging volume, which are available in the computational domain. The analysis is applied to anatomically realistic numerical breast phantoms. The utility of the method is demonstrated for a given imaging system through the analysis of various considerations in system design and problem formulation. The method offers an avenue for decoupling the problem of data selection from the problem of image formation from that data. PMID:22113770

  7. AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Slob, Evert; Turk, Ahmet Serdar; Crocco, Lorenzo; Catapano, Ilaria; Di Matteo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-IRSES project AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging is based on a well-combined network among research institutions of EU, Associate and Third Countries (National Research Council of Italy - Italy, Technische Universiteit Delft - The Netherlands, Yildiz Technical University - Turkey, Bauman Moscow State Technical University - Russia, Usikov Institute for Radio-physics and Electronics and State Research Centre of Superconductive Radioelectronics "Iceberg" - Ukraine and University of Sao Paulo - Brazil) with the aims of achieving scientific advances in the framework of microwave and millimeter imaging systems and techniques for security and safety social issues. In particular, the involved partners are leaders in the scientific areas of passive and active imaging and are sharing their complementary knowledge to address two main research lines. The first one regards the design, characterization and performance evaluation of new passive and active microwave devices, sensors and measurement set-ups able to mitigate clutter and increase information content. The second line faces the requirements to make State-of-the-Art processing tools compliant with the instrumentations developed in the first line, suitable to work in electromagnetically complex scenarios and able to exploit the unexplored possibilities offered by new instrumentations. The main goals of the project are: 1) Development/improvement and characterization of new sensors and systems for active and passive microwave imaging; 2) Set up, analysis and validation of state of art/novel data processing approach for GPR in critical infrastructure and subsurface imaging; 3) Integration of state of art and novel imaging hardware and characterization approaches to tackle realistic situations in security, safety and subsurface prospecting applications; 4) Development and feasibility study of bio-radar technology (system and data processing) for vital signs detection and

  8. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Lai, J; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2014-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T(e) and n(e) fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ~60,000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50-75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60,000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained. PMID:24689579

  10. H/sup -/ production in a multicusp microwave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Trow, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    An experiment was undertaken to examine H/sup -/ production by volume processes in a multicusp microwave discharge, part of the cusp field being enhanced to produce an ECR (electron cyclotron resonance), that would also isolate the hotter plasma formed there. This arrangement is analogous to the ''magnetic filters'' used in some other negative ion sources. This work describes the experiment set up and the results obtained, which are a survey of the behavior of this type of device. Also included is a discussion of the volume processes associated with H/sup -/ production including numerical estimates, based on the experimental measurements, which indicate H/sup -/ production is by dissociative attachment of cold electrons to vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules, and loss is by mutual neutralization with positive ions. The experimental observations are consistent with this model. These are also the same mechanisms used in the models of Bacal and Hiskes. Since magnetic fields generated by samarium cobalt permanent magnets were an important part of this experiment a set of field calculations was undertaken and is included.

  11. Buckyball microwave plasmas: Fragmentation and diamond-film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Liu, Shengzhong; Krauss, A.R.; Pan, Xianzheng

    1993-08-01

    Microwave discharges (2.45 GHz) have been generated in C{sub 60}-containing Ar produced by flowing Ar over fullerene-containing soot. Optical spectroscopy shows that the spectrum is dominated by the d{sup 3}{Pi}g-a{sup 3}{Pi}u Swan bands of C{sub 2} and particularly the {Delta}v = {minus}2, {minus}1, 0, +1, and +2 sequences. These results give direct evidence that C{sub 2} is one of the products of C{sub 60} fragmentation brought about, at least in part, by collisionally induced dissociation (CID). C{sub 60} has been used as a precursor in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) experiment to grow diamond-thin films. The films, grown in an Ar/H{sub 2} gas mixture (0.14% carbon content, 100 Torr, 20 sccm Ar, 4 sccm H{sub 2}, 1500 W, 850{degree}C substrate temperature), were characterized with SEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. Growth rate was found to be {approx} 0.6 {mu}/hr. Assuming a linear dependence on carbon concentration, a growth rate at least six times higher than commonly observed using methane as a precursor, would be predicted at a carbon content of 1% based on C{sub 60}. Energetic and mechanistic arguments are advanced to rationalize this result based on C{sub 2} as the growth species.

  12. Influence of ponderomotive force on the microwave and plasma interaction in an elliptical waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Abdoli-Arani, A.

    2014-02-15

    The interaction effect of a high-power microwave with the plasma in an elliptical waveguide taking into account the ponderomotive force is presented. Here, we assume the fundamental mode that propagates in an evacuated elliptical waveguide and encounters a plasma, which is filled in another elliptical waveguide of the same size. Here, we consider a balance between the effects of ponderomotive force and the electron pressure and consider the plasma effect through its dielectric permittivity because the electron density distribution of the plasma is modified. The propagation of the mode is described by two nonlinear coupled differential equations obtained using the Maxwell's equations. These equations are solved numerically using fourth order Runge-Kutta method for the field amplitude of the microwave in the waveguide considering the waveguide to be made up of a perfect conductor and filled with homogeneous plasma density distribution. The effects of the electron temperature, the microwave filed, and the frequency on the perturbed density profile are studied.

  13. Destruction of molecular compounds in gaseous and liquid medium in microwave discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherlitsyn, A. G.; Shiyan, V. P.; Shiyan, L. N.; Magomadova, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies of molecular destruction in gaseous and liquid medium using microwave discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure. As the gas medium hydrocarbon gas is used, the liquid medium were aqueous solutions of methylene blue and more complex organic compound in the form of humic substances. As a result of the destruction of hydrocarbon gas molecules in microwave discharge plasma new products such as hydrogen, ethylene, acetylene and carbon nanostructured material have been formed. In experiments on destruction of molecular compounds in aqueous organic solutions we used air, nitrogen and argon for plasma gases. It is shown that the process of molecular destruction in aqueous organic solutions in the microwave discharge plasma is based on oxidation-reduction reactions. It is found that the maximum efficiency of removal of organic compounds from the solution occurs when using air as the plasma gas.

  14. Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Rich, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    Low-pressure microwave plasma nucleation and deposition of diamond films were investigated in the pressure range 10-mtorr to 10 torr, at substrate temperatures 400-750 C and with CH4 and O2 concentrations in H2 plasma of 2-15 percent and 2-10 percent, respectively. The experiments were performed in a microwave plasma system consisting of a microwave plasma chamber, a downstream deposition chamber, and an RF induction heated sample stage. Scanning electron microscopy of diamond films deposited at 600 C with 5 percent CH4 and 5 percent O2 in H2 plasmas showed high-quality well faceted crystallites of 1/2 micron size. Cathodoluminescence measurements of these films showed very few nitrogen impurities and no detectable silicon impurities.

  15. Simulated experiment for elimination of air contaminated with odorous chemical agents by microwave plasma burner

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Shin, Dong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-10-15

    An experimental study on elimination of odorous chemical agent was carried out by making use of a microwave plasma burner, which consists of a microwave plasma torch and a reaction chamber with a fuel injector. Injection of hydrocarbon fuels into a high-temperature microwave torch plasma generates a plasma flame. The plasma flame can eliminate the odorous chemical agent diluted in air or purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces. The specially designed reaction chamber eliminated H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} diluted in airflow rate of 5000 lpm (liters per minute), showing {beta} values of 46.52 and 39.69 J/l, respectively.

  16. [Study on the Emission Spectrum of Hydrogen Production with Microwave Discharge Plasma in Ethanol Solution].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Wang, Bo; Zhu, Xiao-mei; Yan, Zhi-yu; Liu, Yong-jun; Liu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen is regarded as a kind of clean energy with high caloricity and non-pollution, which has been studied by many experts and scholars home and abroad. Microwave discharge plasma shows light future in the area of hydrogen production from ethanol solution, providing a new way to produce hydrogen. In order to further improve the technology and analyze the mechanism of hydrogen production with microwave discharge in liquid, emission spectrum of hydrogen production by microwave discharge plasma in ethanol solution was being studied. In this paper, plasma was generated on the top of electrode by 2.45 GHz microwave, and the spectral characteristics of hydrogen production from ethanol by microwave discharge in liquid were being studied using emission spectrometer. The results showed that a large number of H, O, OH, CH, C2 and other active particles could be produced in the process of hydrogen production from ethanol by microwave discharge in liquid. The emission spectrum intensity of OH, H, O radicals generated from ethanol is far more than that generated from pure water. Bond of O-H split by more high-energy particles from water molecule was more difficult than that from ethanol molecule, so in the process of hydrogen production by microwave discharge plasma in ethanol solution; the main source of hydrogen was the dehydrogenation and restructuring of ethanol molecules instead of water decomposition. Under the definite external pressure and temperature, the emission spectrum intensity of OH, H, O radicals increased with the increase of microwave power markedly, but the emission spectrum intensity of CH, C2 active particles had the tendency to decrease with the increase of microwave power. It indicated that the number of high energy electrons and active particles high energy electron energy increased as the increase of microwave power, so more CH, C2 active particles were split more thoroughly. PMID:27400531

  17. Properties of atmospheric pressure plasmas with microwave excitations for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Mikio; Hori, Masaru; Goto, Toshio

    2005-03-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas with microwave excitations were successfully produced in dielectric barrier micro plasmas employing N{sub 2}, Ar, or He gas. N{sub 2} optical emissions of the second positive system were measured for evaluating the gas temperature. The gas temperatures of the plasmas could be much less than 1000 K. Blackbody emissions were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for evaluating the electrode temperature. Temperatures of both the gas and electrode were evaluated by fitting the experimental results with calculations. The gas temperature in the N{sub 2} plasma was notably increased with the discharge time as compared with those in Ar and He plasmas. It was found that the pulsed discharge and the water-cooled electrode were effective for reducing the gas temperature. The pulsed discharge decreased the gas temperature from 900 to 600 K, and the water-cooled electrode decreased the gas temperature by more than 200 K. Controlling the temperature of the electrodes was the most effective technique to reduce the gas temperature, because the gas temperature was in equilibrium with the electrode temperature.

  18. A large-volume microwave plasma source based on parallel rectangular waveguides at low pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Guixin; Wang, Shumin; Wang, Liming

    2011-02-01

    A large-volume microwave plasma with good stability, uniformity and high density is directly generated and sustained. A microwave cavity is assembled by upper and lower metal plates and two adjacently parallel rectangular waveguides with axial slots regularly positioned on their inner wide side. Microwave energy is coupled into the plasma chamber shaped by quartz glass to enclose the space of working gas at low pressures. The geometrical properties of the source and the existing modes of the electric field are determined and optimized by a numerical simulation without a plasma. The calculated field patterns are in agreement with the observed experimental results. Argon, helium, nitrogen and air are used to produce a plasma for pressures ranging from 1000 to 2000 Pa and microwave powers above 800 W. The electron density is measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to be on the order of 1014 cm-3 and the electron temperature is obtained using atomic emission spectrometry to be in the range 2222-2264 K at a pressure of 2000 Pa at different microwave powers. It can be seen from the interferograms at different microwave powers that the distribution of the plasma electron density is stable and uniform.

  19. Self-consistent evolution of plasma discharge and electromagnetic fields in a microwave pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, A. S.; Beilin, L.; Hadas, Y.; Schamiloglu, E.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2015-07-01

    Nanosecond-scale evolution of plasma and RF electromagnetic fields during the release of energy from a microwave pulse compressor with a plasma interference switch was investigated numerically using the code MAGIC. The plasma was simulated in the scope of the gas conductivity model in MAGIC. The compressor embodied an S-band cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm filled with pressurized gas. In a simplified approach, the gas discharge was initiated by setting an external ionization rate in a layer crossing the side arm waveguide in the location of the electric field antinode. It was found that with increasing ionization rate, the microwave energy absorbed by the plasma in the first few nanoseconds increases, but the absorption for the whole duration of energy release, on the contrary, decreases. In a hybrid approach modeling laser ignition of the discharge, seed electrons were set around the electric field antinode. In this case, the plasma extends along the field forming a filament and the plasma density increases up to the level at which the electric field within the plasma decreases due to the skin effect. Then, the avalanche rate decreases but the density still rises until the microwave energy release begins and the electric field becomes insufficient to support the avalanche process. The extraction of the microwave pulse limits its own power by terminating the rise of the plasma density and filament length. For efficient extraction, a sufficiently long filament of dense plasma must have sufficient time to be formed.

  20. Self-consistent evolution of plasma discharge and electromagnetic fields in a microwave pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, A. S.; Beilin, L.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Hadas, Y.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2015-07-15

    Nanosecond-scale evolution of plasma and RF electromagnetic fields during the release of energy from a microwave pulse compressor with a plasma interference switch was investigated numerically using the code MAGIC. The plasma was simulated in the scope of the gas conductivity model in MAGIC. The compressor embodied an S-band cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm filled with pressurized gas. In a simplified approach, the gas discharge was initiated by setting an external ionization rate in a layer crossing the side arm waveguide in the location of the electric field antinode. It was found that with increasing ionization rate, the microwave energy absorbed by the plasma in the first few nanoseconds increases, but the absorption for the whole duration of energy release, on the contrary, decreases. In a hybrid approach modeling laser ignition of the discharge, seed electrons were set around the electric field antinode. In this case, the plasma extends along the field forming a filament and the plasma density increases up to the level at which the electric field within the plasma decreases due to the skin effect. Then, the avalanche rate decreases but the density still rises until the microwave energy release begins and the electric field becomes insufficient to support the avalanche process. The extraction of the microwave pulse limits its own power by terminating the rise of the plasma density and filament length. For efficient extraction, a sufficiently long filament of dense plasma must have sufficient time to be formed.

  1. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  2. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-06-27

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 deg. C down to 450 deg. C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 {Omega}/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  3. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Song, W; Lee, S Y; Jeon, C; Jung, W; Kim, M; Park, C-Y

    2011-06-27

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 °C down to 450 °C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 Ω∕sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film. PMID:21799537

  4. Low-temperature synthesis of graphene on nickel foil by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Song, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Jeon, C.; Jung, W.; Kim, M.; Park, C.-Y.

    2011-06-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) was employed to synthesize high quality centimeter scale graphene film at low temperatures. Monolayer graphene was obtained by varying the gas mixing ratio of hydrogen and methane to 80:1. Using advantages of MPCVD, the synthesis temperature was decreased from 750 °C down to 450 °C. Optical microscopy and Raman mapping images exhibited that a large area monolayer graphene was synthesized regardless of the temperatures. Since the overall transparency of 89% and low sheet resistances ranging from 590 to 1855 Ω/sq of graphene films were achieved at considerably low synthesis temperatures, MPCVD can be adopted in manufacturing future large-area electronic devices based on graphene film.

  5. Numerical Study of Microwave Reflectometry in Plasmas with 2D Turbulent Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    E. Mazzucato

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of the role played by 2D turbulent fluctuations in microwave reflectometry -- a radar technique for density measurements using the reflection of electromagnetic waves from a plasma cutoff. The results indicate that, if the amplitude of fluctuations is below a threshold which is set by the spectrum of poloidal wavenumbers, the measured backward field appears to originate from a virtual location behind the reflecting layer, and to arise from the phase modulation of the probing wave, with an amplitude given by 1D geometric optics. These results suggest a possible scheme for turbulence measurements in tokamaks, where the backward field is collected with a wide aperture antenna, and the virtual reflecting layer is imaged onto the plane of an array of detectors. Such a scheme should be capable of providing additional information on the nature of the short-scale turbulence observed in tokamaks, which still remains one of the unresolved issues in fusion research.

  6. How to Ignite an Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Plasma Torch without Any Additional Igniters.

    PubMed

    Leins, Martina; Gaiser, Sandra; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Matthias; Schumacher, Uwe; Hirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This movie shows how an atmospheric pressure plasma torch can be ignited by microwave power with no additional igniters. After ignition of the plasma, a stable and continuous operation of the plasma is possible and the plasma torch can be used for many different applications. On one hand, the hot (3,600 K gas temperature) plasma can be used for chemical processes and on the other hand the cold afterglow (temperatures down to almost RT) can be applied for surface processes. For example chemical syntheses are interesting volume processes. Here the microwave plasma torch can be used for the decomposition of waste gases which are harmful and contribute to the global warming but are needed as etching gases in growing industry sectors like the semiconductor branch. Another application is the dissociation of CO2. Surplus electrical energy from renewable energy sources can be used to dissociate CO2 to CO and O2. The CO can be further processed to gaseous or liquid higher hydrocarbons thereby providing chemical storage of the energy, synthetic fuels or platform chemicals for the chemical industry. Applications of the afterglow of the plasma torch are the treatment of surfaces to increase the adhesion of lacquer, glue or paint, and the sterilization or decontamination of different kind of surfaces. The movie will explain how to ignite the plasma solely by microwave power without any additional igniters, e.g., electric sparks. The microwave plasma torch is based on a combination of two resonators - a coaxial one which provides the ignition of the plasma and a cylindrical one which guarantees a continuous and stable operation of the plasma after ignition. The plasma can be operated in a long microwave transparent tube for volume processes or shaped by orifices for surface treatment purposes. PMID:25938699

  7. Microwave-heating-coupled photoacoustic radar for tissue diagnostic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    An investigation of microwave (MW) heating effects on biotissue for enhancing photoacoustic radar (PAR) signals was conducted. Localized tissue heating generated by MWs was used to improve PAR imaging depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Elevated temperatures were measured with thermocouples in ex vivo bovine muscle. The measured temperature rise on the heated spot surface by MWs was in agreement with theoretical predictions. The study showed localized MW heating can increase the photoacoustic imaging depth by 11%, and the SNR by 5% in ex vivo bovine muscle.

  8. Spatio-temporal behavior of microwave sheath-voltage combination plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyananda; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave sheath-Voltage combination Plasma (MVP) is a high density plasma source and can be used as a suitable plasma processing device (e.g., ionized physical vapor deposition). In the present report, the spatio-temporal behavior of an argon MVP sustained along a direct-current biased Ti rod is investigated. Two plasma modes are observed, one is an "oxidized state" (OS) at the early time of the microwave plasma and the other is "ionized sputter state" (ISS) at the later times. Transition of the plasma from OS to ISS results a prominent change in the visible color of the plasma, resulting from a significant increase in the plasma density, as measured by a Langmuir probe. In the OS, plasma is dominated by Ar ions, and the density is in amplitude order of 1011 cm-3. In the ISS, metal ions from the Ti rod contribute significantly to the ion composition, and higher density plasma (1012 cm-3) is produced. Nearly uniform high density plasma along the length of the Ti rod is produced at very low input microwave powers (around 30 W). Optical emission spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of sputtered Ti ions and Ti neutrals in the ISS.

  9. Apparatus for generating quasi-free-space microwave-driven plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Brad W; French, David M; Reid, Remington R; Lawrance, Julie E; Lepell, P David; Maestas, Sabrina S

    2016-03-01

    An apparatus for generating quasi-free-space microwave-driven plasmas has been designed, constructed, and tested. The plasma is driven by a multi-kW, ∼5 GHz microwave beam focused at the center of a vacuum chamber using a Koch-type metal plate lens. Sustained plasma discharges have been generated in argon at pressures ranging from 150 to 200 mTorr, at beam power levels ranging from 5 to 10 kW, and at gas flow rates of approximately 200 SCCM. PMID:27036777

  10. Apparatus for generating quasi-free-space microwave-driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Brad W.; French, David M.; Reid, Remington R.; Lawrance, Julie E.; Lepell, P. David; Maestas, Sabrina S.

    2016-03-01

    An apparatus for generating quasi-free-space microwave-driven plasmas has been designed, constructed, and tested. The plasma is driven by a multi-kW, ˜5 GHz microwave beam focused at the center of a vacuum chamber using a Koch-type metal plate lens. Sustained plasma discharges have been generated in argon at pressures ranging from 150 to 200 mTorr, at beam power levels ranging from 5 to 10 kW, and at gas flow rates of approximately 200 SCCM.